WorldWideScience

Sample records for human amnion type

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

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    Jinsil Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3 gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  3. Type I and II Diabetic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Respond In Vitro to Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Treatment by Increasing Proliferation, Migration, and Altering Cytokine Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lim, Jeremy J; Godwin, Lisa; Young, Conan S.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human amniotic membranes have been shown to be effective for healing diabetic foot ulcers clinically and to regulate stem cell activity in vitro and in vivo; however, diabetic stem cells may be impaired as a sequela of the disease. In this study, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) allografts (EpiFix®; MiMedx Group) were evaluated for their ability to regulate diabetic stem cells in vitro. Approach: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from normal, type I diabetic,...

  4. Labor and inflammation increase the expression of oxytocin receptor in human amnion.

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    Terzidou, Vasso; Blanks, Andrew M; Kim, Sung Hye; Thornton, Steven; Bennett, Phillip R

    2011-03-01

    The oxytocin/oxytocin receptor (OXT/OXTR) system plays an important role in the regulation of parturition. The amnion is a major source of prostaglandins and inflammatory cytokine synthesis, which increase both before and during labor. Amnion is a noncontractile tissue; therefore, the role played by OXT/OXTR in this tissue will be fundamentally different from the role played in myometrial contractions. In the present study, we demonstrate increased OXTR mRNA and protein concentrations in human amnion epithelial cells associated with the onset of labor. We show that incubation of primary human amnion epithelial cells with IL1B results in a rapid, transient up-regulation of OXTR mRNA expression, which peaks in prelabor samples after 6 h. Incubation of prelabor amnion epithelial cells with OXT results in a marked increase of prostaglandin E(2) synthesis, and we demonstrate that OXT activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signal transduction pathway to stimulate up-regulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 in human amnion epithelial cells. The increased ability of human amnion to produce prostaglandins in response to OXT treatment suggests a complementary role for the OXT/OXTR system in the activation of human amnion and the onset of labor.

  5. Antibacterial Effect of Human Amnion Membrane

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    Kashani, L. (MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Along with antibiotics, the use of biological methods to combat bacteria is notably considered. A natural barrier such as amniotic membrane is one of the ways of dealing with bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to determine the antibacterial effect of human amniotic membrane. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed in Dezyani teaching Hospital of Gorgan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. To evaluate the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli bacteria, 20 amniotic membranes were obtained from postpartum mothers and examined by repeated dilution, diffusion and extraction techniques. Data were collected by observation method and described by mean and standard deviation. Results: The antibacterial activity was found in 15% of the samples against Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while no antibacterial activity was found against E. coli. Given the 15% positive responses, "Diffusion" and "repeated dilution" techniques were more effective in investigating the antibacterial effect of amniotic membrane. Conclusion: The results show the probability of antimicrobial effect of amniotic membrane tissue and it seems that this property can be affected by many factors.

  6. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field.

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    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues.

  7. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field

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    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues. PMID:28316944

  8. Validation and substantiation of 25 kGy as sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane.

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    Djefal, A; Tahtat, D; Khodja, A Nacer; Bouzid, S Saad; Remane, N

    2007-01-01

    The validation and substantiation of sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane by gamma irradiation delivered by Co60 source were investigated. The validation experiments were conducted according to ISO 13409 method B. A total of 120 human amnion membranes were collected. Of these, 10 membranes were used for estimation of bioburden and 20 membranes were used for the individual sterility test at verification dose. The average bioburden per product unit with sample item portion (SIP = 1) for lyophilized human amnion membrane was 572 cfu. The verification dose experiments were done at dose of 8.1 kGy and the results of sterility tests showed that human amnion membrane got one positive. Consequently, the sterilization dose of 25 kGy was confirmed and substantiated.

  9. Human Amnion Membrane Serves as a Substratum for Growing Axons in vitro and in vivo

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    Davis, George E.; Blaker, Scott N.; Engvall, Eva; Varon, Silvio; Manthorpe, Marston; Gage, Fred H.

    1987-05-01

    The epithelial cell layer of human amnion membrane can be removed while the basement membrane and stromal surfaces remain morphologically intact. Such a preparation has been used as a substratum for the in vitro culture of dissociated neurons. Embryonic motor neurons from chick ciliary ganglion attached to both surfaces but grew extensive neurites only on the basement membrane. On cross sections of rolled amnion membranes, regenerating axons of cultured neurons were guided along pathways of basement membrane that were immunoreactive with an antibody to laminin. In addition, when rolled amnion membranes were implanted into a lesion cavity between the rat septum and hippocampus, cholinergic neurons extended axons through the longitudinally oriented implant into the hippocampus. Thus, this amnion preparation can serve as a bridge to promote axonal regeneration in vivo in damaged adult brain.

  10. Syndecan expressions in the human amnion and chorionic plate

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    T. Lorenzi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The syndecan family consists of four distinct membrane glycoproteins in mammals. Syndecans control cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration through participation in cell-cell interactions, anchorage of cells to the extracellular environment, and modulation of multiple growth factors. Therefore, syndecans may play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell behaviour depending on the cellular microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 are expressed in fetal membrane tissue with different immunolocalizations. Syndecan-1 is expressed in the amniotic epithelium, localizing at basolateral cell surfaces. Syndecan-2 and syndecan-4, in contrast, are mostly localized in intracellular compartments, in the extravillous cytotrophoblastic cells and in some fibroblasts of the chorionic plate as well as in the amniotic epithelial cells. In the latter, syndecan-4 is mainly localized in the apical part of the cells. Our results strongly suggest a key role of syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 in the determination of structural and functional characteristics of human amnion and chorionic plate. Since the solute exchanges between fetus and mother take place in fetal membranes, our data suggest that syndecans are important players in the placenta for the establishment of the fetal-maternal inter-communication.

  11. Syndecan expressions in the human amnion and chorionic plate.

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    Lorenzi, T; Turi, A; Crescimanno, C; Morroni, M; Castellucci, M; David, G; Tranquilli, A L; Marzioni, D

    2010-10-27

    The syndecan family consists of four distinct membrane glycoproteins in mammals. Syndecans control cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration through participation in cell-cell interactions, anchorage of cells to the extracellular environment, and modulation of multiple growth factors. Therefore, syndecans may play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell behaviour depending on the cellular microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 are expressed in fetal membrane tissue with different immunolocalizations. Syndecan-1 is expressed in the amniotic epithelium, localizing at basolateral cell surfaces. Syndecan-2 and syndecan-4, in contrast, are mostly localized in intracellular compartments, in the extravillous cytotrophoblastic cells and in some fibroblasts of the chorionic plate as well as in the amniotic epithelial cells. In the latter, syndecan-4 is mainly localized in the apical part of the cells. Our results strongly suggest a key role of syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 in the determination of structural and functional characteristics of human amnion and chorionic plate. Since the solute exchanges between fetus and mother take place in fetal membranes, our data suggest that syndecans are important players in the placenta for the establishment of the fetal-maternal inter-communication.

  12. Isolation of Human Amnion Epithelial Cells According to Current Good Manufacturing Procedures.

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    Gramignoli, Roberto; Srinivasan, Raghuraman C; Kannisto, Kristina; Strom, Stephen C

    2016-05-12

    Different cell types can be isolated from human placental tissues, and some have been reported to retain phenotypic plasticity and characteristics that make them a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Among these are human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs). Adoption of current good manufacturing practices (cGMP) and enhanced quality control is essential when isolating hAECs in order to deliver a safe and effective cellular product for clinical purposes. This unit describes a detailed protocol for selective isolation of hAECs from human term placenta with little to no contamination by other cell types. A method for characterizing the heterogeneity of the hAEC suspension is also provided. The resulting cell product will be useful for clinical as well as basic research applications. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Type I and II Diabetic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Respond In Vitro to Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Treatment by Increasing Proliferation, Migration, and Altering Cytokine Secretion.

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    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lim, Jeremy J; Godwin, Lisa; Young, Conan S; Koob, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Objective: Human amniotic membranes have been shown to be effective for healing diabetic foot ulcers clinically and to regulate stem cell activity in vitro and in vivo; however, diabetic stem cells may be impaired as a sequela of the disease. In this study, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) allografts (EpiFix(®); MiMedx Group) were evaluated for their ability to regulate diabetic stem cells in vitro. Approach: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from normal, type I diabetic, and type II diabetic donors were treated with soluble extracts of dHACM and evaluated for proliferation after 3 days by DNA assay, chemotactic migration after 1 day by transwell assay, cytokine secretion after 3 days by multiplex ELISA, and gene expression after 5 days by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Although diabetic ADSCs demonstrated decreased responses compared to normal ADSCs, dHACM treatment stimulated diabetic ADSCs to proliferate after 3 days and enhanced migration over 24 h, similar to normal ADSCs. dHACM-treated diabetic ADSCs modulated secretion of soluble signals, including regulators of inflammation, angiogenesis, and healing. All ADSCs evaluated also responded to dHACM treatment with altered expression of immunomodulatory genes, including interleukins (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1RA. Innovation: This is the first reported case demonstrating that diabetic ADSCs respond to novel amniotic membrane therapies, specifically treatment with dHACM. Conclusion: dHACM stimulated diabetic ADSCs to migrate, proliferate, and alter cytokine expression suggesting that, despite their diabetic origin, ADSCs may respond to dHACM to accelerate diabetic wound healing.

  14. Time-dependent mechanical behavior of human amnion: macroscopic and microscopic characterization.

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    Mauri, Arabella; Perrini, Michela; Ehret, Alexander E; De Focatiis, Davide S A; Mazza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanical response of the human amnion is essential to understand and to eventually prevent premature rupture of fetal membranes. In this study, a large set of macroscopic and microscopic mechanical tests have been carried out on fresh unfixed amnion to gain insight into the time-dependent material response and the underlying mechanisms. Creep and relaxation responses of amnion were characterized in macroscopic uniaxial tension, biaxial tension and inflation configurations. For the first time, these experiments were complemented by microstructural information from nonlinear laser scanning microscopy performed during in situ uniaxial relaxation tests. The amnion showed large tension reduction during relaxation and small inelastic strain accumulation in creep. The short-term relaxation response was related to a concomitant in-plane and out-of-plane contraction, and was dependent on the testing configuration. The microscopic investigation revealed a large volume reduction at the beginning, but no change of volume was measured long-term during relaxation. Tension-strain curves normalized with respect to the maximum strain were highly repeatable in all configurations and allowed the quantification of corresponding characteristic parameters. The present data indicate that dissipative behavior of human amnion is related to two mechanisms: (i) volume reduction due to water outflow (up to ∼20 s) and (ii) long-term dissipative behavior without macroscopic deformation and no systematic global reorientation of collagen fibers.

  15. Human amnion epithelial cells can be induced to differentiate into functional insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanan Hou; Qin Huang; Tianjin Liu; Lihe Guo

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has demonstrated that long-term insulin independence may be achieved in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1. However, limited availability of islet tissue means that new sources of insulinproducing cells that are responsive to glucose are required. Here, we show that human amnion epithelial cells (HAEC) can be induced to differentiate into functional insulinproducing cells in vitro. After induction of differentiation, HAEC expressed multiple pancreatic --cell genes, including insulin, pancreas duodenum homeobox-1, paired box gene 6,NK2 transcription factor-related locus 2, Islet 1, glucokinase,and glucose transporter-2, and released C-peptide in a glucose-regulated manner in response to other extracellular stimulations. The transplantation of induced HAEC into streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57 mice reversed hyperglycemia, restored body weight, and maintained euglycemia for 30 d. These findings indicated that HAEC may be a new source for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Derivation and characterization of human embryonic stem cells on human amnion epithelial cells.

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    Lai, Dongmei; Wang, Yongwei; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yifei; Li, Ting; Wu, Yi; Guo, Lihe; Wei, Chunsheng

    2015-05-07

    Culture conditions that support the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have already been established using primary human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as an alternative to traditional mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In the present work, inner cell masses (ICM) were isolated from frozen embryos obtained as donations from couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and four new hESC lines were derived using hAECs as feeder cells. This feeder system was able to support continuous growth of what were, according to their domed shape and markers, undifferentiated naïve-like hESCs. Their pluripotent potential were also demonstrated by embryoid bodies developing to the expected three germ layers in vitro and the productions of teratoma in vivo. The cell lines retained their karyotypic integrity for over 35 passages. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that these newly derived hESCs consisted mostly of undifferentiated cells with large nuclei and scanty cytoplasm. The new hESCs cultured on hAECs showed distinct undifferentiated characteristics in comparison to hESCs of the same passage maintained on MEFs. This type of optimized culture system may provide a useful platform for establishing clinical-grade hESCs and assessing the undifferentiated potential of hESCs.

  17. Comparison of angiogenic, cytoprotective, and immunosuppressive properties of human amnion- and chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Kenichi Yamahara

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be obtained from the fetal membrane (FM, little information is available regarding biological differences in MSCs derived from different layers of the FM or their therapeutic potential. Isolated MSCs from both amnion and chorion layers of FM showed similar morphological appearance, multipotency, and cell-surface antigen expression. Conditioned media obtained from amnion- and chorion-derived MSCs inhibited cell death caused by serum starvation or hypoxia in endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Amnion and chorion MSCs secreted significant amounts of angiogenic factors including HGF, IGF-1, VEGF, and bFGF, although differences in the cellular expression profile of these soluble factors were observed. Transplantation of human amnion or chorion MSCs significantly increased blood flow and capillary density in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. In addition, compared to human chorion MSCs, human amnion MSCs markedly reduced T-lymphocyte proliferation with the enhanced secretion of PGE2, and improved the pathological situation of a mouse model of acute graft-versus-host disease. Our results highlight that human amnion- and chorion-derived MSCs, which showed differences in their soluble factor secretion and angiogenic/immuno-suppressive function, could be ideal cell sources for regenerative medicine.

  18. Clinical Experience: Using Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allografts for Acute and Reconstructive Burn Care.

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    Reilly, Debra Ann; Hickey, Sean; Glat, Paul; Lineaweaver, William C; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    Amniotic membrane is immunologically privileged and is a reservoir of growth factors and cytokines known to modulate inflammation and enhance the healing process, while also possessing antimicrobial, antifibrosis, and antiscarring properties. These properties establish a strong argument for using amniotic membrane derived products as a treatment for burns. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of commercially available dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allografts in patients with partial-thickness and full-thickness burns.

  19. Evidence for a spatial and temporal regulation of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression in human amnion in term and preterm parturition.

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    Lee, Deug-Chan; Romero, Roberto; Kim, Jung-Sun; Yoo, Wonsuk; Lee, JoonHo; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Hassan, Sonia S; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2010-09-01

    Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) is a key enzyme involved in parturition. PTGS2 mRNA was found to be differentially expressed between placental amnion (amnion overlying the placental disc) and reflected amnion (amnion of the extraplacental chorioamniotic membranes) in term placentas. The aim was to evaluate the spatial and temporal regulation of PTGS2 expression in the amnion and the chorion-decidua. PTGS2 expression was analyzed in the amnion and chorion-decidua obtained from 32 women: term not in labor (n = 12), term in labor (n = 12), and preterm labor (n = 8), by immunoblotting and densitometry. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the amnion and chorion-decidua was measured by a specific immunoassay. Compared to preterm labor cases, PTGS2 expression increased at term before the onset of labor far more prominently in placental amnion (4.5-fold; P = 0.002) than in reflected amnion (1.4-fold; P = 0.007). There was a significant increase in PTGS2 expression in reflected amnion (2.9-fold; P human parturition.

  20. Phosphorylation of STAT3 mediates the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by cortisol in the human amnion at parturition.

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    Wang, Wangsheng; Guo, Chunming; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Jiangwen; Li, Wenjiao; Liu, Chao; Xie, Huiliang; Myatt, Leslie; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Sun, Kang

    2015-10-27

    The induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and subsequent production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by cortisol in the amnion contrast with the effect of cortisol on most other tissues, but this proinflammatory effect of cortisol may be a key event in human parturition (labor). We evaluated the underlying mechanism activated by cortisol in primary human amnion fibroblasts. Exposure of the amnion fibroblasts to cortisol led to the activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, which induced the phosphorylation of the kinase SRC and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). STAT3 interacted with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the transcription factor CREB-1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1) at the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2, which promoted the production of the secreted prostaglandin PGE2. PGE2 activates the prostaglandin receptors EP2 and EP4, which stimulate cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, cortisol reinforced the activation of cAMP-PKA signaling through an SRC-STAT3-COX-2-PGE2-mediated feedback loop. Inhibiting STAT3, SRC, or the cAMP-PKA pathway attenuated the cortisol-stimulated induction of COX-2 and PGE2 production in amnion fibroblasts. In human amnion tissue, the amount of phosphorylated STAT3 correlated positively with that of cortisol, COX-2, and PGE2, and all were more abundant in tissue obtained after active labor than in tissue obtained from cesarean surgeries in the absence of labor. These results indicated that the coordinated recruitment of STAT3, CREB-1, and GR to the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2 contributes to the feed-forward induction of COX-2 activity and prostaglandin synthesis in the amnion during parturition.

  1. Isolation, cryopreservation and culture of human amnion epithelial cells for clinical applications.

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    Murphy, Sean V; Kidyoor, Amritha; Reid, Tanya; Atala, Anthony; Wallace, Euan M; Lim, Rebecca

    2014-12-21

    Human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) derived from term or pre-term amnion membranes have attracted attention from researchers and clinicians as a potential source of cells for regenerative medicine. The reason for this interest is evidence that these cells have highly multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory functions. These properties have prompted researchers to investigate the potential of hAECs to be used to treat a variety of diseases and disorders in pre-clinical animal studies with much success. hAECs have found widespread application for the treatment of a range of diseases and disorders. Potential clinical applications of hAECs include the treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, liver disease, diabetes and chronic and acute lung diseases. Progressing from pre-clinical animal studies into clinical trials requires a higher standard of quality control and safety for cell therapy products. For safety and quality control considerations, it is preferred that cell isolation protocols use animal product-free reagents. We have developed protocols to allow researchers to isolate, cryopreserve and culture hAECs using animal product-free reagents. The advantage of this method is that these cells can be isolated, characterized, cryopreserved and cultured without the risk of delivering potentially harmful animal pathogens to humans, while maintaining suitable cell yields, viabilities and growth potential. For researchers moving from pre-clinical animal studies to clinical trials, these methodologies will greatly accelerate regulatory approval, decrease risks and improve the quality of their therapeutic cell population.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M; Christine, Paul J; Schaefer, Amanda R; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2013-01-01

    ... (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth...

  3. Nuclear microanalysis of the human amnion: A study of ionic cellular exchanges

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    Razafindrabe, L.; Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1995-09-01

    The epithelial cells of the human amniotic membrane have been extensively studied by electrophysiologists with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of transmembrane ionic transfers. In order to provide complementary information about this model, nuclear microanalysis was performed using the CENBG ion microbeam. Quantitative mapping of the human amnion was carried out and the distributions of most mono- and divalent ions involved in cellular pathways (Na +, Mg 2+, Cl -, Ca 2+) were determined. The ionic cellular content was also compared, before and after incubation in a Hanks' physiological fluid and the resultant ions transfers were determined. The aim of this paper is to expose the advances of this experimental model, more particularly after the development of simulation programs which improved the accuracy of PIXE analysis in the measurement of low energy X-rays emitters. Statistically significant results can now be extracted and can be explained taking into account the results of previous electrophysiological experiments.

  4. [Effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts].

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    Wu, Qi'er; Lyu, Lu; Xin, Haiming; Luo, Liang; Tong, Yalin; Mo, Yongliang; Yue, Yigang

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs-CS) on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts. (1) hAMSCs were isolated from deprecated human fresh amnion tissue of placenta and then sub-cultured. The morphology of hAMSCs on culture day 3 and hAMSCs of the third passage were observed with inverted phase contrast microscope. (2) Two batches of hAMSCs of the third passage were obtained, then the expression of vimentin of cells was observed with immunofluorescence method, and the expression of cell surface marker CD90, CD73, CD105, and CD45 was detected by flow cytometer. (3) hAMSCs-CS of the third passage at culture hour 72 were collected, and the content of insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (4) Human fibroblasts were isolated from deprecated human fresh prepuce tissue of circumcision and then sub-cultured. Human fibroblasts of the third passage were used in the following experiments. Cells were divided into blank control group and 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% hAMSCs-CS groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), with 48 wells in each group. Cells in blank control group were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while cells in the latter 4 groups were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS and 2% FBS. The proliferation activity of cells was detected by cell counting kit 8 and microplate reader at culture hour 12, 24, 48, and 72, respectively, and corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS which causing the best proliferation activity of human fibroblasts was used in the following experiments. (5) Human fibroblasts were divided into blank control group and 50% hAMSCs-CS group and treated as in (4), with 4 wells in each group, at post

  5. Biological properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion composite graft: implications for chronic wound healing.

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    Koob, Thomas J; Rennert, Robert; Zabek, Nicole; Massee, Michelle; Lim, Jeremy J; Temenoff, Johnna S; Li, William W; Gurtner, Geoffrey

    2013-10-01

    Human amnion/chorion tissue derived from the placenta is rich in cytokines and growth factors known to promote wound healing; however, preservation of the biological activities of therapeutic allografts during processing remains a challenge. In this study, PURION® (MiMedx, Marietta, GA) processed dehydrated human amnion/chorion tissue allografts (dHACM, EpiFix®, MiMedx) were evaluated for the presence of growth factors, interleukins (ILs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were performed on samples of dHACM and showed quantifiable levels of the following growth factors: platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), PDGF-BB, transforming growth factor α (TGFα), TGFβ1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), placental growth factor (PLGF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF). The ELISA assays also confirmed the presence of IL-4, 6, 8 and 10, and TIMP 1, 2 and 4. Moreover, the relative elution of growth factors into saline from the allograft ranged from 4% to 62%, indicating that there are bound and unbound fractions of these compounds within the allograft. dHACM retained biological activities that cause human dermal fibroblast proliferation and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro. An in vivo mouse model showed that dHACM when tested in a skin flap model caused mesenchymal progenitor cell recruitment to the site of implantation. The results from both the in vitro and in vivo experiments clearly established that dHACM contains one or more soluble factors capable of stimulating MSC migration and recruitment. In summary, PURION® processed dHACM retains its biological activities related to wound healing, including the potential to positively affect four distinct and pivotal physiological processes intimately involved in wound healing: cell proliferation, inflammation, metalloproteinase activity and recruitment of progenitor cells. This suggests

  6. A model for the compressible, viscoelastic behavior of human amnion addressing tissue variability through a single parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Arabella; Ehret, Alexander E; De Focatiis, Davide S A; Mazza, Edoardo

    2016-08-01

    A viscoelastic, compressible model is proposed to rationalize the recently reported response of human amnion in multiaxial relaxation and creep experiments. The theory includes two viscoelastic contributions responsible for the short- and long-term time-dependent response of the material. These two contributions can be related to physical processes: water flow through the tissue and dissipative characteristics of the collagen fibers, respectively. An accurate agreement of the model with the mean tension and kinematic response of amnion in uniaxial relaxation tests was achieved. By variation of a single linear factor that accounts for the variability among tissue samples, the model provides very sound predictions not only of the uniaxial relaxation but also of the uniaxial creep and strip-biaxial relaxation behavior of individual samples. This suggests that a wide range of viscoelastic behaviors due to patient-specific variations in tissue composition can be represented by the model without the need of recalibration and parameter identification.

  7. Characterization of Side Cell Populations Obtained from Human Amnion Mesenchymal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; PIAO Zhengfu; Mamoru Kobayashi; Koji Sasaki; DING Shu-qin; Aiko Kikuchi; Isao Kamo; Norio Sakuragawa

    2009-01-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal cells (AMCs) contain multipotent cells. To enrich such multipotent stem cells, we applied to AMCs the new method for the isolation of side population (SP) cells used for the enrichment of multipotent stem cells from many tissues. We succeeded in obtaining SP cells from AMCs (AMC-SP cells). AMC-SP cells were found in 0.2% of AMCs, irrespective of the length of pregnant period, ranging from 37 to 40 weeks. Cell cycle analyses uggested that AMC-SP cells belonged to a cell population that proliferated very slowly and/or was in a quiescent state in the amniotic membrane. Upon culturing, they proliferated with 40 to 80 cell doublings. However, they did not form colonies in a soft agarose culture, whereas HepG2 cells, representative human hepatoma cells formed many large colonies. These results suggest that AMC-SP cells that have considerable value for the use of regenerative medicine can be managed safely in vitro.

  8. Human amnion epithelial cells induced to express functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean V Murphy

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, remains a leading cause of childhood respiratory morbidity and mortality. The respiratory consequences of cystic fibrosis include the generation of thick, tenacious mucus that impairs lung clearance, predisposing the individual to repeated and persistent infections, progressive lung damage and shortened lifespan. Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs to express functional CFTR. We found that hAECs formed 3-dimensional structures and expressed the CFTR gene and protein after culture in Small Airway Growth Medium (SAGM. We also observed a polarized CFTR distribution on the membrane of hAECs cultured in SAGM, similar to that observed in polarized airway cells in vivo. Further, hAECs induced to express CFTR possessed functional iodide/chloride (I(-/Cl(- ion channels that were inhibited by the CFTR-inhibitor CFTR-172, indicating the presence of functional CFTR ion channels. These data suggest that hAECs may be a promising source for the development of a cellular therapy for cystic fibrosis.

  9. Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Yin, Ying; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) can be obtained from human amniotic membrane, a highly abundant and readily available tissue. HAMSC sources present fewer ethical issues, have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties, considerable advantageous characteristics, and are considered an attractive potential treatment material in the field of regenerative medicine. We used a co-culture system to determine whether HAMSCs could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). We isolated HAMSCs from discarded amnion samples and collected them using pancreatin/collagenase digestion. We cultured HAMSCs and HBMSCSs in basal medium. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an early osteogenesis marker, was increased in the co-culture system compared to the control single cultures, which we also confirmed by ALP staining. We used immunofluorescence testing to investigate the effects of co-culturing with HAMSCs on HBMSC proliferation, which revealed that the co-culturing enhanced EdU expression in HBMSCs. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that co-culturing promoted osteogenesis in HBMSCs. Furthermore, Alizarin red S staining revealed that extracellular matrix calcium levels in mineralized nodule formation produced by the co-cultures were higher than that in the controls. Using the same co-culture system, we further observed the effects of HAMSCs on osteogenic differentiation in primary osteoblasts by Western blotting, which better addressed the mechanism for HAMSCs in bone regeneration. The results showed HAMSCs are osteogenic and not only play a role in promoting HBMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but also in osteoblasts, laying the foundation for new regenerative medicine methods.

  10. Identification of Extracellular Matrix Components and Biological Factors in Micronized Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jennifer; Priddy, Lauren B.; Lim, Jeremy J.; Massee, Michelle; Koob, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The use of bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts such as amniotic membranes is an attractive treatment option for enhancing wound repair. In this study, the concentrations, activity, and distribution of matrix components, growth factors, proteases, and inhibitors were evaluated in PURION® Processed, micronized, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM; MiMedx Group, Inc.). Approach: ECM components in dHACM tissue were assessed by using immunohistochemical staining, and growth factors, cytokines, proteases, and inhibitors were quantified by using single and multiplex ELISAs. The activities of proteases that were native to the tissue were determined via gelatin zymography and EnzChek® activity assay. Results: dHACM tissue contained the ECM components collagens I and IV, hyaluronic acid, heparin sulfate proteoglycans, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, numerous growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, proteases, and protease inhibitors that are known to play a role in the wound-healing process were quantified in dHACM. Though matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were present in dHACM tissues, inhibitors of MMPs overwhelmingly outnumbered the MMP enzymes by an overall molar ratio of 28:1. Protease activity assays revealed that the MMPs in the tissue existed primarily either in their latent form or complexed with inhibitors. Innovation: This is the first study to characterize components that function in wound healing, including inhibitor and protease content and activity, in micronized dHACM. Conclusion: A variety of matrix components and growth factors, as well as proteases and their inhibitors, were identified in micronized dHACM, providing a better understanding of how micronized dHACM tissue can be used to effectively promote wound repair. PMID:28224047

  11. Proteome analysis of human amnion and amniotic fluid by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Won-Gap; Song, Jin-Su; Jung, Hyun Sook; Kim, Chong Jai; Oh, Soo Young; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Jung, Guhung; Kim, Hie-Joon; Nirasawa, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Proteome analysis by 2-DE and PMF by MALDI-TOF MS was performed on human amnion and amniotic fluid at term. Ninety-two soluble and nineteen membrane proteins were identified from amnion. Thirty-five proteins were identified from amniotic fluid. Calgranulin A and B were found in all patients infected with Ureaplasma urealyticum, but not in any of the patients without infection, indicating that they are potential markers of intrauterine infection. Identity of calgranulin A and B was confirmed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. This study represents the first extensive analysis of the human amnion and amniotic fluid proteome at term and demonstrates that 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS is a useful tool for identifying clinically significant biomarkers of problematic pregnancies.

  12. Molecular and cellular characteristics of human and non-human primate multipotent stromal cells from the amnion and bone marrow during long term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogozhykh, Olena; Pogozhykh, Denys; Neehus, Anna-Lena; Hoffmann, Andrea; Blasczyk, Rainer; Müller, Thomas

    2015-08-22

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are among the key candidates in regenerative medicine. However variety of MSC sources and general heterogeneity lead to controversial data in functional characterization. Furthermore, despite intensive usage as preclinical animal model, little is known about MSCs of the common marmoset monkey. MSCs derived from placental amnion and bone marrow samples from human and common marmoset were characterized in parallel over 12 passages to monitor similarities and significant differences (p ≤ 0.05, Student's t-test) in MSC markers and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, metabolic activity test, with special focus on pluripotency associated genes. Human and non-human primate MSCs were characterized for expression of MSC markers and capability of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages. MSCs could be cultured more than 100 days (26 passages), but metabolic activity was significantly enhanced in amnion vs. bone marrow MSCs. Interestingly, MHC class I expression is significantly reduced in amnion MSCs until passage 6 in human and marmoset, but not in bone marrow cells. For MSC markers, CD73 and CD105 levels remain unchanged in amnion MSCs and slightly decline in bone marrow at late passages; CD166 is significantly higher expressed in human MSCs, CD106 significantly lower vs. marmoset. All cultured MSCs showed pluripotency marker expression like Oct-4A at passage 3 significantly decreasing over time (passages 6-12) while Nanog expression was highest in human bone marrow MSCs. Furthermore, human MSCs demonstrated the highest Sox2 levels vs. marmoset, whereas the marmoset exhibited significantly higher Lin28A values. Bisulfite sequencing of the Oct-4 promoter region displayed fewer methylations of CpG islands in the marmoset vs. human. Little is known about MSC characteristics from the preclinical animal model common marmoset vs. human during long term culture

  13. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in amniotic fluid modulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human amnion-derived WISH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Im; Jo, Eun Jin; Lee, Ha-Young; Cha, Moon Seok; Min, Jung Kee; Choi, Chang Hwan; Lee, Yong Moon; Choi, Young-Ae; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Kwak, Jong-Young; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2003-08-22

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid, in particular the generation of prostaglandins (PGs), has been proposed to play a key role in the regulation of labor. Moreover, several extracellular proteins have been reported to modulate PG synthesis in amnion cells. In this study, we found that lipid components dissolved in the amniotic fluid modulate PG synthesis in WISH human amnion cells and identified one of these components as a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). WISH cells express several S1P receptors including S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3. When WISH cells were stimulated with S1P, PGE2 synthesis increased in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximal activity at around 100 nM. S1P treatment also caused the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein, which was apparent within 3-12 h of stimulation. In terms of the intracellular signaling pathway of S1P-induced WISH cell activation, we found that S1P stimulated two kinds of MAPK, ERK, and p38 kinase. We examined the roles of these two MAPKs in S1P-induced COX-2 expression. S1P-induced COX-2 expression was blocked completely by PD-98059 but not by SB-203580, suggesting that ERK has a critical role in the process. Transfection of S1P1 or S1P3 but not of S1P2 antisense oligonucleotide inhibited S1P-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in WISH cells, indicating the involvements of S1P1 and S1P3 in the processes. This study demonstrates the physiological role of S1P in amniotic fluid and its effect on the modulation of COX-2 expression and PGs synthesis in WISH cells.

  14. Induction of progesterone receptor A form attenuates the induction of cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha expression by cortisol in human amnion fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunming; Ni, Xiaotian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Wenjiao; Zhu, Xiaoou; Sun, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha (cPLA(2alpha), now known as PLA2G4A) is the enzyme catalyzing the formation of the rate-limiting substrate, arachidonic acid, for prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. The increasing expression of PLA2G4A toward term gestation in human amnion fibroblasts is believed to be the crucial event in parturition. Human amnion fibroblasts produce cortisol, progesterone and express glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor A (PGRA) form at term. The roles of progesterone and PGRA in the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol via GR in the amnion fibroblasts remain largely unknown. Using cultured human term amnion fibroblasts, we found that cortisol induced the expression of PGRA, which was attenuated by inhibiting PG synthesis with indomethacin. Knockdown of PGRA expression or inhibition of endogenous progesterone production with trilostane significantly enhanced the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol, whereas overexpression of PGRA attenuated the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. Although exogenous progesterone did not alter PLA2G4A expression under basal conditions, it attenuated cortisol-induced PLA2G4A expression at concentrations about tenfold higher, which might be achieved by competition with cortisol for GR. In conclusion, PGRA in the presence of endogenous progesterone is a transdominant repressor of the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. High level of progesterone may compete with cortisol for GR, thus further inhibiting the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. Moreover, increased PG synthesis by cortisol may feed back on the expression of PGRA leading to attenuation of cortisol-induced PLA2G4A expression. The above findings may be pertinent to the inconsistent effects of glucocorticoids on parturition in humans.

  15. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Edward P.; Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conse...

  16. Effectiveness of human amnion as a graft material in lower anterior ridge vestibuloplasty: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Maria, Anisha; Kaur, Preeti

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical use of amnion as a biodegradable graft material for lower anterior ridge vestibuloplasty. Ten patients who had been referred for preprosthetic surgery underwent mandibular anterior ridge vestibuloplasty using Clark's technique and amniotic membrane as a graft material. Preoperative vestibular depth was measured. Fresh amniotic membrane was placed in the surgical site and sutured with 4-0 vicryl. In all ten cases suction catheter stent was used and was secured in the depth of the vestibule by using 1-0 mersilk percutaneous sutures. Vestibular depths were measured using a divider and a scale. Post operative measurements were taken at the end of 10th day, 1st month and 3rd month. And an average gain of 4-6 mm in the depth of the labial vestibule was noted. Amniotic membrane can be a favorable graft material for vestibuloplasty, promoting healing and preventing relapse. It is easily available and preserved and a cost effective material.

  17. Regenerative and Antibacterial Properties of Acellular Fish Skin Grafts and Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane: Implications for Tissue Preservation in Combat Casualty Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Skuli; Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Rolfsson, Ottar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur Fertram

    2017-03-01

    Improvised explosive devices and new directed energy weapons are changing warfare injuries from penetrating wounds to large surface area thermal and blast injuries. Acellular fish skin is used for tissue repair and during manufacturing subjected to gentle processing compared to biologic materials derived from mammals. This is due to the absence of viral and prion disease transmission risk, preserving natural structure and composition of the fish skin graft. The aim of this study was to assess properties of acellular fish skin relevant for severe battlefield injuries and to compare those properties with those of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane. We evaluated cell ingrowth capabilities of the biological materials with microscopy techniques. Bacterial barrier properties were tested with a 2-chamber model. The microstructure of the acellular fish skin is highly porous, whereas the microstructure of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane is mostly nonporous. The fish skin grafts show superior ability to support 3-dimensional ingrowth of cells compared to dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (p < 0.0001) and the fish skin is a bacterial barrier for 24 to 48 hours. The unique biomechanical properties of the acellular fish skin graft make it ideal to be used as a conformal cover for severe trauma and burn wounds in the battlefield. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Serelaxin improves the therapeutic efficacy of RXFP1-expressing human amnion epithelial cells in experimental allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Simon G; Tominaga, Anna M; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Lim, Rebecca; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2016-12-01

    Current asthma therapies primarily target airway inflammation (AI) and suppress episodes of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) but fail to treat airway remodelling (AWR), which can develop independently of AI and contribute to irreversible airway obstruction. The present study compared the anti-remodelling and therapeutic efficacy of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to that of human amnion epithelial stem cells (AECs) in the setting of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD), in the absence or presence of an anti-fibrotic (serelaxin; RLX). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD, were either vehicle-treated (OVA alone) or treated with MSCs or AECs alone [intranasally (i.n.)-administered with 1×10(6) cells once weekly], RLX alone (i.n.-administered with 0.8 mg/ml daily) or a combination of MSCs or AECs and RLX from weeks 9-11 (n=6/group). Measures of AI, AWR and AHR were then assessed. OVA alone exacerbated AI, epithelial damage/thickness, sub-epithelial extracellular matrix (ECM) and total collagen deposition, markers of collagen turnover and AHR compared with that in saline-treated counterparts (all P<0.01 compared with saline-treated controls). RLX or AECs (but not MSCs) alone normalized epithelial thickness and partially diminished the OVA-induced fibrosis and AHR by ∼40-50% (all P<0.05 compared with OVA alone). Furthermore, the combination treatments normalized epithelial thickness, measures of fibrosis and AHR to that in normal mice, and significantly decreased AI. Although AECs alone demonstrated greater protection against the AAD-induced AI, AWR and AHR, compared with that of MSCs alone, combining RLX with MSCs or AECs reversed airway fibrosis and AHR to an even greater extent. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Therapeutic effects of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conditioned medium enema in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Onishi, Reizo; Tsuchiya, Ikuki; Hosono, Hidetaka; Katsurada, Takehiko; Yamahara, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is expected to provide a new strategy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Large amounts of MSCs can be obtained from human amnion. Therefore, we investigated the effect of transplantation of human amnion-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) or enema of conditioned medium (CM) from hAMSCs into rats with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. In the first experiment, 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected with hAMSCs (1 × 106 cells) 3 h after rectal administration of TNBS (45 mg/kg). In the second experiment, rats with TNBS-induced colitis received CM by enema into the colon for 3 days. Colitis was investigated by endoscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and by measuring mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators. Administration of hAMSCs or CM enema significantly improved the endoscopic score. In addition, these two interventions resulted in significantly decreased infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages and decreased expression levels of TNF-α, CXCL1, and CCL2. In conclusion, transplantation of hAMSCs and CM enema provided significant improvement in rats with TNBS-induced colitis. CM from hAMSCs and hAMSCs may be new strategies for the treatment of IBD.

  20. Induction of apoptosis, stimulation of cell-cycle arrest and inhibition of angiogenesis make human amnion-derived cells promising sources for cell therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, Hassan; Yazdanpanah, Ghasem; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2016-03-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM), the nearest layer of fetal membranes to the fetus, contains two types of cells with unique characteristics that make them excellent candidates for clinical applications. Amniotic epithelial and mesenchymal cells have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammation, anti-fibrosis and anti-bacterial properties and no ethical issues. Although amniotic cells have stem cell properties and express transcription factors specific for pluripotent stem cells, they are not tumorigenic after transplantation. In the last decade, a new line of research has been initiated with a focus on the anti-proliferative effects of amniotic epithelial and mesenchymal cells on tumor growth. Amnion-derived epithelial and mesenchymal cells inhibit tumor growth and invasion through three pathways: the induction of apoptosis, the stimulation of cell-cycle arrest and the inhibition of angiogenesis. In this review, the various aspects of the anti-cancer properties of amnion-derived cells and the underlying mechanisms are discussed with emphasis on the translation of the cell therapy of cancer from experimental into clinical practice.

  1. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Influencing the ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs are considered to be an important resource in the field of tissue engineering because of their anti-inflammatory properties and fewer ethical issues associated with their use compared with other sources of stem cells. HAMSCs can be obtained from human amniotic membranes, a readily available and abundant tissue. However, the potential of HAMSCs as seed cells for treating bone deficiency is unknown. In this study, HAMSCs were used to promote proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs in a Transwell coculture system. Proliferation levels were investigated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU. Osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were evaluated in chromogenic alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity substrate assays, Alizarin red S staining, and RT-PCR analysis of early HBMSCs osteogenic marker expression. We demonstrated that HAMSCs stimulated increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes, and mineralized matrix deposition. Moreover, the effect of HAMSCs was significantly inhibited by U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling. We demonstrate that HAMSCs promote osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs by influencing the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. These observations confirm the potential of HAMSCs as a seed cell for the treatment of bone deficiency.

  2. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Yuta [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yuan, Bo, E-mail: yuanbo@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Kaise, Toshikazu [Laboratory of Environmental Chemodynamics, School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Takeichi, Makoto [Yoneyama Maternity Hospital, 2-12 Shin-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0065 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kroetz, Deanna L. [Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 1550 4th St, RH584E Box 2911 San Francisco, CA 94158-2911 (United States); Toyoda, Hiroo [Department of Clinical Molecular Genetics, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  3. PTGS2 (Prostaglandin Endoperoxide Synthase-2) Expression in Term Human Amnion in Vivo Involves Rapid mRNA Turnover, Polymerase-II 5′-Pausing, and Glucocorticoid Transrepression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Carolyn; Johnson, Renee; Bisits, Andrew; Hirst, Jonathan; Zakar, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    ...) binding, pol-II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, histone acetylation, and histone methylation at the PTGS2 gene in fresh amnion and in amnion explants incubated with dexamethasone for 24 h after delivery, when adaptation...

  4. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As(III) on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As(III) on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As(III) were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As(III) than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As(III) in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As(III) cytotoxicity between these cells.

  5. Endothelin-1 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor are co-localized in human amnion membrane cells and secreted into amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Gabriel; Sand, Anna; Ostlund, Eva; Andersson, Eva; Byström, Birgitta; Ståbi, Berit

    2003-11-01

    We have examined the cellular localization and human amniotic fluid content of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The study material consisted of amniotic fluid from 20 patients referred for amniocentesis, and placental samples from normal deliveries. ET-1 and M-CSF were analysed by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively. The cellular localization of ET-1 and M-CSF in the amnion membranes was analysed by double-labelling immunocytochemistry using fluorescein isothiocyanate- and Cy3-labelled secondary antibodies. Release of ET-1 and M-CSF was studied in cultured amniocytes. We found that the mean +/- SD concentrations of ET-1 and M-CSF in fetal amniotic fluid were 45.6 +/- 17.3 pmol/l (range 16.8-85.5) and 7323 +/- 3415 ng/l (range 2640-12 110) respectively. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry showed that both M-CSF and ET-1 were co-localized in the same cells to a high extent. Further analysis revealed that levels of M-CSF, but not ET-1, were significantly correlated with pregnancy length. Both M-CSF and ET-1 were released from cultured amniocytes in response to interleukin-1. These findings show that ET-1 and M-CSF are partly co-localized to specific cells in the human amniotic membrane. As both M-CSF and ET-1 were released from cultured amniocytes in vitro, this suggests that they both may be secreted into fetal amniotic fluid in vivo as well.

  6. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  7. [Comparison of the effects of taurine and magnesium on electrical characteristics of artificial and natural membranes. V. Study on the human amnion of the antagonism between magnesium, taurine and polluting metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, M; Guiet-Bara, A; Durlach, J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of metal pollutants (Pb, Cd, Hg, As) were studied on strips of human amnion isolated from the placental zone put in between two Ussing chambers with Hanks' solution at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. The total conductance Gt through the human isolated amnion was decreased on the fetal side by Pb and As; on the maternal side by Cd, Hg and As. When Gt was decreased by metal pollutants, Mg or taurine (TA) were added in the external medium to induce an antagonism between Mg or TA and metal pollutants. The addition of Mg increased significantly the Gt reduced by Pb, Cd and Hg, but had no effect on the Gt reduced by As. The addition of taurine increased significantly the Gt reduced by Cd and Hg, but had no effect on the Gt reduced by Pb and As. Dixon's kinetics (Gt as a function of the Mg or TA concentration when the metal pollutant concentration increased) indicate that there is a competitive inhibition between Mg-Pb and Mg-Cd (the inhibition constant Ki is lower with Pb (= 2.5) than with Cd (= 11.4) and suggests a greater antagonism between Mg-Pb than between Mg-Cd). Moreover, there appears to be a noncompetitive inhibition between Mg-Hg, TA-Cd and TA-Hg. These results indicate that Mg and TA, on the fetal side, exert an action on the same sites and that, on the maternal side, their action takes place on the same sites and also on different ones. Also, TA can be considered as a partial magnesium agonist, at least in the human amnion.

  8. Neuronal-like differentiation of single versus multiple treatments with human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced by basic fibroblast growth factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Jiao; Fangxia Guan; Xiang Hu; Jianbin Li; Hong Shan; Wei Li; Jun Li; Ying Du; Bo Yang; Yunfan Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cultures from multiple portions of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to undergo more rapid proliferation and attachment than single portions. OBJECTIVE: To observe growth of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced cultures of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) and differentiation into neuronal-like cells. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Comparative observation. The study was performed at the Laboratory of Microbiology and Immunology, Basic Medical School of Zhengzhou University from January to May 2008.METHODS: Amnia from full-term, uterine-incision delivery were donated by 12 healthy women. AMSCs were obtained by cell separation and culture techniques, and were passaged and induced by bFGF. From the third passage, a total of 1 mL AMSCs, at a density of 1.0 ×10 4/mL, was separately harvested from six samples, which served as group A. A total of 1 mL AMSCs, at a density of 1.0×10 4 /mL, was harvested separately from the remaining six samples, which served as group B. A total of 0.5 mL from the six samples of group A and 0.5 mL from the six samples of group B were combined to form group C. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences in cell quantity among the three groups were compared by cell quantification and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)analysis. Expression of a glial cell marker, neuron-specific enolase, and nestin was detected in the three groups by immunocytochemistry. RESULTS: Cell quantification and MTT analysis of live cells, as well as AMSC absorbance, were significantly greater in group C compared with groups A and B at 18 days of culture (P<0.05), and no significant difference was observed between groups A and B. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron-specific enolase, and nestin were expressed in all groups following bFGF induction. CONCLUSION: Mixed AMSC cultures promoted proliferation, and bFGF-induced AMSCs differentiated into neuronal-like cells.

  9. Amnion s and radio-sterilized porcine skin use as potential matrices for the development of human skin substitutes; Uso de amnios y piel porcina radioesterilizados como matrices potenciales para el desarrollo de sustitutos de piel humana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez P, M. E.; Reyes F, M. L.; Reboyo B, D. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Velasquillo M, M. C.; Sanchez S, R.; Brena M, A. M.; Ibarra P, J. C., E-mail: esther.martinez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, Calz. Mexico-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The injuries by burns constitute a primordial problem of public health; they cause a high mortality index, severe physical and psychological disability, etc. The autologous skin transplant is the replacement therapy recommended for its treatment, but in patients that present a high percentage of burnt skin; this is not possible to carry out. Another strategy is the transplant of donated skin; however, due to the little donation that exists in our country is not very feasible to apply this treatment. A challenge of the tissues engineering is to develop biological skin substitutes, based on cells and amnion s, favoring the cutaneous regeneration and quick repair of injuries, diminishing this way the hospitalization expenses. At present skin substitutes that can equal to the same skin do not exist. On the other hand, the mesenchymal stromal cells (Msc) represent an alternative to achieve this objective; since has been demonstrated that the Msc participate in the tissue repair by means of inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and differentiation to dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. To apply the Msc in cutaneous injuries a support material is required that to allow transplanting these cells to a lesion or burn. The radio-sterilized human amnion and the radio-sterilized porcine skin, processed by the Radio-Sterilized Tissues Bank of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), are biomaterials that are used as temporary cutaneous coverings. We suppose that these two matrices will be appropriate for the growth and maintenance in cultivation of the Msc, to generate two biological skin substitutes, in collaboration with the Biotechnology Laboratory of the Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion. (Author)

  10. Telomere Fragment Induced Amnion Cell Senescence: A Contributor to Parturition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polettini, Jossimara; Behnia, Faranak; Taylor, Brandie D.; Saade, George R.; Taylor, Robert N.; Menon, Ramkumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS)-induced senescence of the amniochorion has been associated with parturition at term. We investigated whether telomere fragments shed into the amniotic fluid (AF) correlated with labor status and tested if exogenous telomere fragments (T-oligos) could induce human and murine amnion cell senescence. In a cross-sectional clinical study, AF telomere fragment concentrations quantitated by a validated real-time PCR assay were higher in women in labor at term compared to those not in labor. In vitro treatment of primary human amnion epithelial cells with 40 μM T-oligos ([TTAGGG]2) that mimic telomere fragments, activated p38MAPK, produced senescence-associated (SA) β-gal staining and increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production compared to cells treated with complementary DNA sequences (Cont-oligos, [AATCCC]2). T-oligos injected into the uteri of pregnant CD1 mice on day 14 of gestation, led to increased p38MAPK, SA-β-gal (SA β-gal) staining in murine amniotic sacs and higher AF IL-8 levels on day 18, compared to saline treated controls. In summary, term labor AF samples had higher telomere fragments than term not in labor AF. In vitro and in situ telomere fragments increased human and murine amnion p38MAPK, senescence and inflammatory cytokines. We propose that telomere fragments released from senescent fetal cells are indicative of fetal cell aging. Based on our data, these telomere fragments cause oxidative stress associated damages to the term amniotic sac and force them to release other DAMPS, which, in turn, provide a sterile immune response that may be one of the many inflammatory signals required to initiate parturition at term. PMID:26397719

  11. Nuclear factor kappa B activation occurs in the amnion prior to labour onset and modulates the expression of numerous labour associated genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior to the onset of human labour there is an increase in the synthesis of prostaglandins, cytokines and chemokines in the fetal membranes, particular the amnion. This is associated with activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB. In this study we characterised the level of NFκB activity in amnion epithelial cells as a measure of amnion activation in samples collected from women undergoing caesarean section at 39 weeks gestation prior to the onset of labour. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that a proportion of women exhibit low or moderate NFκB activity while other women exhibit high levels of NFκB activity (n = 12. This activation process does not appear to involve classical pathways of NFκB activation but rather is correlated with an increase in nuclear p65-Rel-B dimers. To identify the full range of genes upregulated in association with amnion activation, microarray analysis was performed on carefully characterised non-activated amnion (n = 3 samples and compared to activated samples (n = 3. A total of 919 genes were upregulated in response to amnion activation including numerous inflammatory genes such cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, 44-fold, interleukin 8 (IL-8, 6-fold, IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAP, 4.5-fold, thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1, 3-fold and, unexpectedly, oxytocin receptor (OTR, 24-fold. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the microarray data reveal the two main gene networks activated concurrently with amnion activation are i cell death, cancer and morphology and ii cell cycle, embryonic development and tissue development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that assessment of amnion NFκB activation is critical for accurate sample classification and subsequent interpretation of data. Collectively, our data suggest amnion activation is largely an inflammatory event that occurs in the amnion epithelial layer as a prelude to the onset of labour.

  12. Nuclear factor kappa B activation occurs in the amnion prior to labour onset and modulates the expression of numerous labour associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sheri; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun S; Khanjani, Shirin; Terzidou, Vasso; Teoh, T G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the onset of human labour there is an increase in the synthesis of prostaglandins, cytokines and chemokines in the fetal membranes, particular the amnion. This is associated with activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In this study we characterised the level of NFκB activity in amnion epithelial cells as a measure of amnion activation in samples collected from women undergoing caesarean section at 39 weeks gestation prior to the onset of labour. We found that a proportion of women exhibit low or moderate NFκB activity while other women exhibit high levels of NFκB activity (n = 12). This activation process does not appear to involve classical pathways of NFκB activation but rather is correlated with an increase in nuclear p65-Rel-B dimers. To identify the full range of genes upregulated in association with amnion activation, microarray analysis was performed on carefully characterised non-activated amnion (n = 3) samples and compared to activated samples (n = 3). A total of 919 genes were upregulated in response to amnion activation including numerous inflammatory genes such cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, 44-fold), interleukin 8 (IL-8, 6-fold), IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAP, 4.5-fold), thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1, 3-fold) and, unexpectedly, oxytocin receptor (OTR, 24-fold). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the microarray data reveal the two main gene networks activated concurrently with amnion activation are i) cell death, cancer and morphology and ii) cell cycle, embryonic development and tissue development. Our results indicate that assessment of amnion NFκB activation is critical for accurate sample classification and subsequent interpretation of data. Collectively, our data suggest amnion activation is largely an inflammatory event that occurs in the amnion epithelial layer as a prelude to the onset of labour.

  13. Increased axonal regeneration through a biodegradable amnionic tube nerve conduit: effect of local delivery and incorporation of nerve growth factor/hyaluronic acid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, J A; Warnke, P H; Pan, Y C; Shenaq, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors emphasize the possible pharmacological enhancement of axonal regeneration using a specific growth factor/ extracellular media incorporated in a biodegradable nonneural nerve conduit material. They investigated the early effects on nerve regeneration of continuous local delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and the local incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) inside a newly manufactured nerve conduit material from fresh human amnionic membrane. Human amnionic membrane contains important biochemical factors that play a major neurotrophic role in the nerve regeneration process. The process of manufacturing a nerve conduit from fresh human amnionic membrane is described. This nerve conduit system was used in rabbits to bridge a 25-mm nerve gap over 3 months. NGF was released locally, over 28 days, at the distal end of the tube via a system of slow release, and HA was incorporated inside the lumen of the tube at the time of surgery. NGF/HA treatment promoted axonal regeneration across the amnionic tube nerve conduit (8,962 +/- 383 myelinated axons) 45% better than the nontreated amnionic tube group (6,180 +/- 353 myelinated axons). The authors demonstrate that NGF/HA media enhances additional axonal regeneration in the amnionic tube nerve conduit. This result is secondary to the effect of the amnion promoting biochemical factors, in combination with the NGF/HA effect on facilitating early events in the nerve regeneration process.

  14. Gamma radiation sterilized amnion: use in ophthalmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez P, M. E. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Leon T, Y. [Hospital General Regional 220, IMSS, Paseo Tollocan No. 620, Col. Vertice, Toluca 50150, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Vazquez M, L., E-mail: esther.martinez@inin.gob.m [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis 148, Col. Doctores, 06720 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Amnion processed at the Radio sterilized Tissue Bank at the National Institute of Nuclear Research, sterilized with {sup 60}Co gamma radiation, have been used in Mexico since 2005 either as a graft to replace the damaged ocular surface, or as a patch to prevent unwanted inflammatory reactions. Patients from the Hospital General de Mexico (HGM) and Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), suffering diverse pathologies such as keratoconjunctivitis; recurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon; corneal neuro trophic ulcers, chemical and thermal burns, and corneal thinning s, had been successfully treated with irradiated amnion. In the HGM, a clinical prospective study on lesions of the ocular surface of 17 eyes from 15 patients, affected with the above mentioned pathologies, was successful in 88.2%. The results have proven to be excellent as much for cosmetic purposes as for functional ones. Without the treatment, the patients could have suffered a healing after-effect or loss of sight. At IMSS, a controlled clinical randomized trial with 108 eyes from 100 patients, affected with primary nasal pterygium, was performed in 2009. These eyes were treated with radio sterilized amnion and intraoperative mitomycin C to prevent recurrence after excision of the primary pterygium. The preliminary results do not shown adverse reaction, inflammation and pain were significantly reduced radio sterilized amnion also offer security because they do no express antigens HLA-A, B or Dr and the sterile irradiated tissue do not provoke rejection or transmit an infective disease. (Author)

  15. Prostaglandin pathway gene expression in human placenta, amnion and choriodecidua is differentially affected by preterm and term labour and by uterine inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, Robert J; Fortier, Michel A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the biochemical pathways involved in activation of preterm and term human labour would facilitate the development of effective management and inform judgements regarding the necessity...

  16. Comparative study of effects of magnesium and taurine on electrical parameters of natural and artificial membranes. VII. Effects on cellular and paracellular ionic transfer through isolated human amnion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, M; Guiet-Bara, A; Durlach, J

    1990-12-01

    The comparative effects of 2 mM magnesium and taurine on various components of the human transamniotic conductance, Gt, were observed. The use of both microelectrodes and metabolic inhibitors enables 10 components of Gt to be distinguished: six cellular components (Na-K ATPase, Na-H antiport, Na-K-2Cl cotransport and Na, K, Cl channels), one coupling component, and three paracellular components (Na, K, Cl). Mg increased all components of Gt while taurine only increased five of them (Na and K channels, coupling, Na and K paracellular conductance). A potentiometric effect of taurine on Mg2+ modified membrane, obtained on paracellular components, was not measured on cellular components. There was only a vicarious effect between Mg and taurine on the non-enzymatic cellular and paracellular transfer of Na and K.

  17. Evaluation of amnion in creation of neovagina in women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsa, Richa; Bharti, Juhi; Roy, Kallol Kumar; Kumar, Sunesh; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Singh, Neeta; Singhal, Seema; Meena, Jyoti

    2017-08-01

    To assess the outcome of amnion vaginoplasty in cases of vaginal agenesis due to Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome managed at the authors' institution. Retrospective study. Tertiary care hospital. Fifty women with MRKH who underwent neovaginoplasty. Modified McIndoe's vaginoplasty was done in all the patients, using human amnion graft. Functional status assessed by Female Sexual Function Index, anatomic status (length and width of neovagina), and epithelialization of vagina. Mean (±SD) vaginal length after surgery was 8.2 ± 1 cm. Mean vaginal length at 6-month follow-up in sexually active patients was significantly longer as compared with the patients who were not sexually active after surgery (8.4 ± 1.04 cm vs. 6.6 ± 2.4 cm). Mean Female Sexual Function Index score was 30.8 ± 2.1. Vaginal biopsy showed complete epithelialization of vaginal mucosa. In a developing nation like India, McIndoe's method with amnion graft seems to be a promising option owing to its low cost, easy availability, and safety, ease of the procedure not requiring any special instrument, physiologic outcome with respect to epithelialization of the vagina without hair growth, and satisfying functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the Potential of Amnion-Based Scaffolds as a Barrier Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuwei; Ma, Guowu; Brazile, Bryn; Li, Nan; Dai, Wei; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew A; Wertheim, Jason A; Liao, Jun; Wang, Bo

    2015-08-11

    Guided bone regeneration is a new concept of large bone defect therapy, which employs a barrier membrane to afford a protected room for osteogenesis and prevent the invasion of fibroblasts. In this study, we developed a novel barrier membrane made from lyophilized multilayered acellular human amnion membranes (AHAM). After decellularization, the AHAM preserved the structural and biomechanical integrity of the amnion extracellular matrix (ECM). The AHAM also showed minimal toxic effects when cocultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), as evidenced by high cell density, good cell viability, and efficient osteogenic differentiation after 21-day culturing. The effectiveness of the multilayered AHAM in guiding bone regeneration was evaluated using an in vivo rat tibia defect model. After 6 weeks of surgery, the multilayered AHAM showed great efficiency in acting as a shield to avoid the invasion of the fibrous tissues, stabilizing the bone grafts and inducing the massive bone growth. We hence concluded that the advantages of the lyophilized multilayered AHAM barrier membrane are as follows: preservation of the structural and mechanical properties of the amnion ECM, easiness for preparation and handling, flexibility in adjusting the thickness and mechanical properties to suit the application, and efficiency in inducing bone growth and avoiding fibrous tissues invasion.

  19. Vesicular uptake of macromolecules by human placental amniotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharshiner, Rita; Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2017-09-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that unidirectional vesicular transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion plays a primary role in regulating amniotic fluid volume. Our objective was to explore vesicle type, vesicular uptake and intracellular distribution of vesicles in human amnion cells using high- and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Placental amnion was obtained at cesarean section and amnion cells were prepared and cultured. At 20%-50% confluence, the cells were incubated with fluorophore conjugated macromolecules for 1-30 min at 22 °C or 37 °C. Fluorophore labeled macromolecules were selected as markers of receptor-mediated caveolar and clathrin-coated vesicular uptake as well as non-specific endocytosis. After fluorophore treatment, the cells were fixed, imaged and vesicles counted using Imaris(®) software. Vesicular uptake displayed first order saturation kinetics with half saturation times averaging 1.3 min at 37 °C compared to 4.9 min at 22 °C, with non-specific endocytotic uptake being more rapid at both temperatures. There was extensive cell-to-cell variability in uptake rate. Under super-resolution microscopy, the pattern of intracellular spatial distribution was distinct for each macromolecule. Co-localization of fluorescently labeled macromolecules was very low at vesicular dimensions. In human placental amnion cells, 1) vesicular uptake of macromolecules is rapid, consistent with the concept that vesicular transcytosis across the amnion plays a role in the regulation of amniotic fluid volume; 2) uptake is temperature dependent and variable among individual cells; 3) the unique intracellular distributions suggest distinct functions for each vesicle type; 4) non-receptor mediated vesicular uptake may be a primary vesicular uptake mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Timing of Histologic Progression from Chorio-Deciduitis to Chorio-Deciduo-Amnionitis in the Setting of Preterm Labor and Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes with Sterile Amniotic Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Wook Park

    Full Text Available Histologic chorio-deciduitis and chorio-deciduo-amnionitis (amnionitis in extra-placental membranes are known to represent the early and advanced stages of ascending intra-uterine infection. However, there are no data in humans about the time required for chorio-deciduitis to develop and for chorio-deciduitis without amnionitis to progress to chorio-deciduitis with amnionitis, and the effect of prolongation of pregnancy on the development of chorio-deciduitis and amnionitis in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes (PTL and preterm premature rupture of membranes (preterm-PROM. We examined these issues in this study.The study population consisted of 289 women who delivered preterm (133 cases with PTL, and 156 cases with preterm-PROM and who had sterile amniotic fluid (AF defined as a negative AF culture and the absence of inflammation as evidenced by a matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8 level <23 ng/ml. We examined the association between amniocentesis-to-delivery interval and inflammatory status in the extra-placental membranes (i.e., inflammation-free extra-placental membranes, choroi-deciduitis only, and chorio-deciduitis with amnionitis in patients with PTL and preterm-PROM.Amniocentesis-to-delivery interval was longer in cases of chorio-deciduitis with amnionitis than in cases of chorio-deciduitis only in both PTL (median [interquartile-range (IQR]; 645.4 [319.5] vs. 113.9 [526.9] hours; P = 0.005 and preterm-PROM (131.3 [135.4] vs. 95.2 [140.5] hours; P<0.05. Amniocentesis-to-delivery interval was an independent predictor of the development of both chorio-deciduitis and amnionitis after correction for confounding variables such as gestational age at delivery in the setting of PTL, but not preterm-PROM.These data confirm for the first time that, in cases of both PTL and preterm-PROM with sterile AF, more time is required to develop chorio-deciduitis with amnionitis than chorio-deciduitis alone in extra-placental membranes. Moreover

  1. Amnion-derived mesenchymal stromal cells show a mesenchymal-epithelial phenotype in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Julia; Lang, Ingrid; Siwetz, Monika; Fröhlich, Julia; Huppertz, Berthold

    2014-06-01

    The amnionic membrane is a rich source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), which are readily available and show a potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Before these cells can be applied clinically, careful characterization is necessary, especially as primary cells are known to change their phenotype in culture. We analyzed the mesenchymal phenotype of hAMSC at different stages after isolation using immunohistochemistry. Shortly after isolation (1 day), 92 % (± 7 %) of the hAMSC expressed the mesenchymal marker vimentin, 2 % (± 1 %) stained for the epithelial marker cytokeratin-7 and 5 % (± 4 %) co-expressed these markers. After 5 days, the double positive cells slightly increased to 7 % (± 3 %), while exclusive expression of cytokeratin-7 or vimentin remained unchanged (1 % ± 2 % and 92 % ± 1 %, respectively). After the first passage, all attached cells were vimentin-positive, while 54 % (± 9 %) co-expressed cytokeratin-7 and vimentin. Thus, we conclude that under culture, hAMSC adopt a hybrid mesenchymal-epithelial phenotype. It is also essential to perform microscopical examination during the first days after isolation to detect contaminations with human amnion-derived epithelial cells in cultures of hAMSC.

  2. Double trouble: the importance of reporting chorionicity and amnionicity in twin pregnancy ultrasound reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Sarah; Wilkinson, Chris

    2015-02-01

    An obstetric ultrasound report in a twin pregnancy that does not unambiguously determine chorionicity and amnionicity in the first trimester is substandard. This article will assist radiologists to understand the importance of reporting the chorionicity and amnionicity in all twin obstetric scans.

  3. 体外共培养诱导人羊膜间充质干细胞分化为眼表上皮细胞的研究%A pilot study on differentiation of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells into ocular surface epithelial cells by co-culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文晔; 沙翔垠; 宋莉; 刘志平; 彭娟; 谢莉菲

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicated that human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) can be induced to differentiate into multiple types of cells in vitro,but whether the hAMSCs can differentiate into ocular surface cells has not been reported yet.Objective This study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing differentiation of hAMSCs into ocular surface cells by co-culturing with human bulbar conjunctiva fibroblasts (hBCFs).Methods This study was approved by Ethic Committee of Affiliated Second Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University.HAMSCs were isolated from placenta under the informed consent of healthy delivery women.hAMSCs were cultured,passaged and identified by detecting the expressions of CD44,CD45,CD73,CD90 in the cells with flow cytometer,osteogenesis and adipogenic differentiation experiments.Human conjunctival tissue was obtained during the eye operation under the informed consent of patients and hBCFs were isolated and cultured with explant culture.The cells were divided into the hAMSCs culture group and the hAMSCs and hBCFs co-culture group and cultivated in Transwell chambers for 7 days.The expressions of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the cells were assayed by immnofluorescence technique.Results Cultured hAMSCs showed the slender shape and cell body enlarged with passage.CD44,CD73 and CD90 were expressed in the cells,and the expression of CD45 was absent.After 3-4 weeks of osteogenesis and adipogenic induce,the cells showed red staining for alizarin and oil red O.In the co-culture group of hAMSCs and hBCFs,hAMSCs presented the epithelioid cell-like in shape and showed the positive response for CK19 and weaker response for α-SMA.However,in the hAMSCs culture group,the cells showed the positive response for α-SMA and absent response for CK19.Conclusions The hAMSCs can differentiate into ocular surface cells after being induced by hBCFs.And the differentiation mechanism is possibly relevant to mesenchymal cells

  4. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  5. Post-Stroke Inflammation and the Potential Efficacy of Novel Stem Cell Therapies: Focus on Amnion Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad RS Broughton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a debilitating disease for which there are currently no effective treatments besides the clot-buster, tissue plasminogen activator, which is administered to less than 10 % of patients due to a limited (4.5 h time window of efficacy. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel therapies that can prevent or reverse the effects of stroke-induced brain injury. Recent encouraging reports have revealed that stem cells derived from human tissue, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, neural, and mesenchymal cells, can rescue injured brain tissue and improve functional recovery in experimental models of stroke. However, there are potentially major limitations to each of these types of stem cells that may ultimately prevent or restrict their use as viable mainstream treatment options for stroke patients. Conversely, stem cells derived from the placenta, such as human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs, appear to have several important advantages over other stem cell lineages, in particular their non-tumorigenic and non-immunogenic characteristics. Surprisingly, so far hAECs have received little attention as a potential stroke therapy. This brief review will firstly describe the inflammatory response and immune cell involvement following stroke, and then consider the potential for hAECs to improve stroke outcome given their unique characteristics. These actions of hAECs may involve a reduction of local inflammation and modulation of the immune response, promotion of neural recovery, differentiation into neural tissue, re-innervation of lost connections, and secretion of necessary cytokines, growth factors, hormones and/or neurotransmitters to restore cellular function.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells from amnion and amniotic fluid in the bovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradetti, B; Meucci, A; Bizzaro, D; Cremonesi, F; Lange Consiglio, A

    2013-04-01

    Amnion and amniotic fluid (AF) are noncontroversial and inexhaustible sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be harvested noninvasively at low cost. As in humans, also in veterinary field, presumptive stem cells derived from these tissues reveal as promising candidates for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity, and high anti-inflammatory potential. The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize, for the first time in bovine species, presumptive MSCs from the epithelial portion of the amnion (AECs) and from the AF (AF-MSCs) to be used for clinical applications. AECs display a polygonal morphology, whereas AF-MSCs exhibit a fibroblastic-like morphology only starting from the second passage, being heterogeneous during the primary culture. For both lines, the proliferative ability has been found constant over the ten passages studied and AECs show a statistically lower (P<0.05) doubling time with respect to AF-MSCs. AECs express MSC-specific markers (ITGB1 (CD29), CD44, ALCAM (CD166), ENG (CD105), and NT5E (CD73)) from P1 to P3; in AF-MSCs, only ITGB1, CD44, and ALCAM mRNAs are detected; NT5E is expressed from P2 and ENG has not been found at any passage. AF-MSCs and AECs are positive for the pluripotent markers (POU5F1 (OCT4) and MYC (c-Myc)) and lack of the hematopoietic markers. When appropriately induced, both cell lines are capable of differentiating into ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. This study contributes to reinforce the emerging importance of these cells as ideal tools in veterinary medicine. A deeper evaluation of the immunological properties needs to be performed in order to better understand their role in cellular therapy.

  7. 人羊膜间充质干细胞培养上清液对人成纤维细胞生物学功能的影响%Effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴骐而; 吕璐; 辛海明; 罗亮; 童亚林; 莫永亮; 岳毅刚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs-CS) on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts.Methods (1) hAMSCs were isolated from deprecated human fresh amnion tissue of placenta and then sub-cultured.The morphology of hAMSCs on culture day 3 and hAMSCs of the third passage were observed with inverted phase contrast microscope.(2) Two batches of hAMSCs of the third passage were obtained,then the expression of vimentin of cells was observed with immunofluorescence method,and the expression of cell surface marker CD90,CD73,CD105,and CD45 was detected by flow cytometer.(3) hAMSCs-CS of the third passage at culture hour 72 were collected,and the content of insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ),vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),epidermal growth factor (EGF),and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.(4) Hunan fibroblasts were isolated from deprecated human fresh prepuce tissue of circumcision and then sub-cultured.Human fibroblasts of the third passage were used in the following experiments.Cells were divided into blank control group and 10%,30%,50%,and 70% hAMSCs-CS groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method below),with 48 wells in each group.Cells in blank control group were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS),while cells in the latter 4 groups were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS and 2% FBS.The proliferation activity of cells was detected by cell counting kit 8 and microplate reader at culture hour 12,24,48,and 72,respectively,and corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS which causing the best proliferation activity of human fibroblasts was used in the following experiments.(5) Human fibroblasts were divided into blank control group and 50% hAMSCs-CS group and treated as in (4),with 4 wells in each group,at post

  8. Amnion formation in the mouse embryo: the single amniochorionic fold model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo N G; Dobreva, Mariya P; Graham, Liz; Huylebroeck, Danny; Lawson, Kirstie A; Zwijsen, A N

    2011-08-01

    Despite the detailed knowledge obtained over the last decade on the molecular regulation of gastrulation in amniotes, the process of amnion development has been poorly described and illustrated in mice, and conflicting descriptions exist. Understanding the morphogenesis and development not only of the early mouse embryo, but also of its extraembryonic tissues, is crucial for correctly interpreting fate-mapping data and mouse mutants with gastrulation defects. Moreover, the recent isolation from amnion of cells with stem cell features further argues for a better understanding of the process of amnion formation. Here, we revisit the highly dynamic process of amnion formation in the mouse. Amnion development starts early during gastrulation and is intimately related to the formation of the exocoelom and the expansion of the amniotic fold. The authoritative description involves the fusion of two amniotic folds, a big posterior and a smaller anterior fold. We challenged this 'two amniotic folds' model by performing detailed histomorphological analyses of dissected, staged embryos and 3D reconstructions using historical sections. A posterior fold of extraembryonic ectoderm and associated epiblast is formed early during gastrulation by accumulation of extraembryonic mesoderm posterior to the primitive streak. Previously called the "posterior amniotic fold", we rename it the "amniochorionic fold" (ACF) because it forms both amnion and chorion. Exocoelom formation within the ACF seems not to involve apoptosis within the mesoderm. The ACF and exocoelom expand without disrupting the anterior junction of epiblast, extraembryonic ectoderm and visceral endoderm. No separate anterior fold is formed; its absence was confirmed in 3D reconstructions. Amnion and chorion closure is eccentric, close to the anterior margin of the egg cylinder: we name it the "anterior separation point". Here, we reconcile previous descriptions of amnion formation and provide new nomenclature, as well as

  9. Amnion formation in the mouse embryo: the single amniochorionic fold model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huylebroeck Danny

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the detailed knowledge obtained over the last decade on the molecular regulation of gastrulation in amniotes, the process of amnion development has been poorly described and illustrated in mice, and conflicting descriptions exist. Understanding the morphogenesis and development not only of the early mouse embryo, but also of its extraembryonic tissues, is crucial for correctly interpreting fate-mapping data and mouse mutants with gastrulation defects. Moreover, the recent isolation from amnion of cells with stem cell features further argues for a better understanding of the process of amnion formation. Here, we revisit the highly dynamic process of amnion formation in the mouse. Amnion development starts early during gastrulation and is intimately related to the formation of the exocoelom and the expansion of the amniotic fold. The authoritative description involves the fusion of two amniotic folds, a big posterior and a smaller anterior fold. We challenged this 'two amniotic folds' model by performing detailed histomorphological analyses of dissected, staged embryos and 3D reconstructions using historical sections. Results A posterior fold of extraembryonic ectoderm and associated epiblast is formed early during gastrulation by accumulation of extraembryonic mesoderm posterior to the primitive streak. Previously called the "posterior amniotic fold", we rename it the "amniochorionic fold" (ACF because it forms both amnion and chorion. Exocoelom formation within the ACF seems not to involve apoptosis within the mesoderm. The ACF and exocoelom expand without disrupting the anterior junction of epiblast, extraembryonic ectoderm and visceral endoderm. No separate anterior fold is formed; its absence was confirmed in 3D reconstructions. Amnion and chorion closure is eccentric, close to the anterior margin of the egg cylinder: we name it the "anterior separation point". Conclusions Here, we reconcile previous descriptions

  10. miR-144 and targets, c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), modulate synthesis of PGE2 in the amnion during pregnancy and labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Zhou, Jiawei; Wei, Xiajie; Chen, Ran; Geng, Junnan; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Li, Fenge; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-06-14

    Labor is initiated as a result of hormonal changes that are induced by the activation of the inflammatory response and a series of biochemical events. The amnion, which is the primary source of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), plays an important role in the process of labor. In the present study, we uncovered a pathway in which c-fos, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and miR-144 function as hormonal modulators in the amnions of pregnant mice and humans. miR-144 down-regulated the synthesis of PGE2 during pregnancy by directly and indirectly inhibiting COX2 expression and by directly inhibiting the expression of c-fos, a transcriptional activator of COX2 and miR-144. Estrogen (E2) activated c-fos, thus promoting the expression of miR-144 and COX2 during labor. However, the increase in COX2 resulted in the partial inhibition of COX2 expression by miR-144, thereby slightly reducing the secretion of PGE2. These observations suggest that miR-144 inhibits PGE2 secretion by section to prevent the initiation of premature labor. Up-regulated expression of miR-144, c-fos and COX2 was also observed both in preterm mice and in mice undergoing normal labor. In summary, miR-144, c-fos and COX2 play important roles in regulating PGE2 secretion in the amnion during pregnancy and labor.

  11. Fetal fibronectin signaling induces matrix metalloproteases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in amnion cells and preterm birth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogami, Haruta; Kishore, Annavarapu Hari; Shi, Haolin; Keller, Patrick W; Akgul, Yucel; Word, R Ann

    2013-01-18

    Fetal fibronectin (fFN) in cervical and vaginal secretions has been used as a predictor of preterm delivery. Here, we clarified the pathological function of fFN on cell type-specific matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and prostaglandin synthesis in fetal membranes. Treatment of amnion mesenchymal cells with fFN resulted in dramatic increases in MMP-1 and MMP-9 mRNA and enzymatic activity as well as COX-2 mRNA and prostaglandin E(2) synthesis, activating both NFκB and ERK1/2 signaling. Fetal FN-induced increases in MMPs and COX-2 were mediated through its extra domain A and Toll-like receptor 4 expressed in mesenchymal cells. Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α increased the release of free FN in medium of amnion epithelial cells in culture. Finally, injection of fFN in pregnant mice resulted in preterm birth. Collectively, these results indicate that fFN is not only a marker of preterm delivery but also plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of preterm labor and premature rupture of fetal membranes.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem or Stromal Cells from Amnion and Umbilical Cord Tissue and Their Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Redl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC have proven to offer great promise for cell-based therapies and tissue engineering applications, as these cells are capable of extensive self-renewal and display a multilineage differentiation potential. Furthermore, MSC were shown to exhibit immunomodulatory properties and display supportive functions through parakrine effects. Besides bone marrow (BM, still today the most common source of MSC, these cells were found to be present in a variety of postnatal and extraembryonic tissues and organs as well as in a large variety of fetal tissues. Over the last decade, the human umbilical cord and human amnion have been found to be a rich and valuable source of MSC that is bio-equivalent to BM-MSC. Since these tissues are discarded after birth, the cells are easily accessible without ethical concerns.

  13. 人羊膜间充质干细胞在微载体动态培养体系中的扩增和成骨诱导分化%Expansion and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Amnion Mesenchymal Stem Cell in a Microcarrier-Based Dynamic Culture System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周倩; 周燕; 叶朝阳; 谭文松

    2011-01-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) are an attractive cell source for bone tissue engineering. However, their utility is restrained by low expansion rate and poor osteogenic differentiation under static culture conditions. In the present study, hAMSCs were seeded and cultured in 12-wells plates as static culture system or Cytodex3 microcarrier-based dynamic culture system. Both proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs in spinner flasks were investigated and compared with those in static plates. Total cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium deposition were determined. The effects of fluid flow stimulation and collagen coating on osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs were further analyzed in static plates. The results show that higher cell density and stronger osteogenic differentiation in microcarrier-based dynamic culture were achieved than those in static plates. It was further found that fluid flow stimulation and collagen coating could promote osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs, and there exists additive effects when fluid flow stimulation and collagen coating were combined. Therefore, Cytodex 3 microcarrier-based dynamic culture system represents a promising strategy for expansion and osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs in an integrated manner.%人羊膜间充质干细胞(hAMSCs)作为一种多潜能干细胞有望应用于骨组织工程.但是,传统的静态培养和诱导方法并不利于间充质干细胞的体外扩增和成骨分化.实验通过考察和比较在孔板中静态及微载体动态培养条件下hAMSCs的扩增与成骨诱导,以建立集间充质干细胞增殖和成骨分化诱导为一体的动态培养体系.将hAMSCs接种到Cytodex 3微载体上,计细胞数,检测成骨诱导分化后细胞的碱性磷酸酶活性与钙基质含量,与二维静态培养系统比较;另外,基于二维培养体系进一步考察了流体刺激和胶原基质修饰对hAMSCs成骨分化的影响.结果表明:

  14. Transplantation of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviates ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury after cardiopulmonary bypass%人羊膜间充质干细胞移植减轻体外循环再灌注肺损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强勇; 梁贵友; 余丽梅; 齐斌; 高振宇

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:In recent years, mesenchymal stem cels exhibit a good prospect in organ or tissue repair and therefore, and therefore, cel transplantation based on mesenchymal stem cel plasticity can promote cel regeneration and functional recovery from lung injury after cardiopulmonary bypass. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effects of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cels (hAMSCs) transplantation on ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute lung injury in dogs after cardiopulmonary bypassand its mechanism for regulating inflammatory cytokines. METHODS:Eighteen adult healthy mongrel dogs were randomly divided into three groups (n=6 per group): black group (cardiopulmonary bypass with 1 mL physiological saline injectionvia the femoral vein without blocking the aorta), control group (cardiopulmonary bypass with blocking the aorta for 1 hour and then opening the aorta for 15 minutes plus 1 mL physiological saline injectionvia the femoral vein), experiment group (cardiopulmonary bypass with blocking the aorta for 1 hour and then opening the aorta for 15 minutes plus femoral vein injection of 1 mL physiological saline containing 2×107 hAMSCs). Arterial blood samples of 2 mL were taken to calculate oxygenation index and respiratory index before cardiopulmonary bypass (T1), 15 minutes (T2), 1 hour (T3), 2 hours (T4), 3 hours (T5) after opening the aorta. 8 mL intravenous blood samples were taken to detect the serum tumor necrosis factor α, matrix metaloproteinase-9, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 by ELISA. Meanwhile, western blot assay was used to detect the expression of nuclear factor-κB in lung tissues, and histopathological changes of lung tissues observed under optical microscope. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Compared with the control group, the oxygenation index was significantly increased in the experimental group at 2 and 3 hours after transplantation, and the respiratory index was remarkably decreased at 1, 2, 3 hours after transplantation. Compared with the control group

  15. Penggunaan Tetes Telinga Serum Autologous dengan Amnion untuk Penutupan Perforasi Membran Timpani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayatul Fitria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Latar Belakang: Gangguan pendengaran atau ketulian mempunyai dampak yang merugikan bagi penderita , keluarga, masyarakat maupun negara. Salah satu penyebab ketulian yang sering dijumpai adalah radang telinga tengah, terutama yang disertai perforasi membran timpani yang menetap. Penutupan perforasi membran timpani dapat dilakukan dengan operatif dan konservatif. Secara konservatif sudah banyak cara yang dilakukan. Salah satunya dengan mengkaustik tepi perforasi dengan menggunakan silver nitrat untuk membuat luka baru, kemudian digunakan amnion sebagai jembatan (bridge dan faktor regulasi yang terdapat pada tetes telinga serum autologous. Tujuan: Untuk menjelaskan gambaran penggunaan amnion sebagai jembatan dan tetes telinga serum autologous sebagai faktor regulasi. Tinjauan pustaka: Penutupan perforasi membran timpani dapat dilakukan secara konservatif salah satunya dengan menggunakan tetes telinga serum autologous sebagai faktor regulator, amnion sebagai jembatan dan penggunaan silver nitrat pada tepi perforasi untuk membuat luka baru. Serum autologous memiliki asselerator pertumbuhan yaitu epidermal growth factor (EGF , transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1 dan fibronektin. Asselerator pertumbuhan ini dapat kita temukan pada penyembuhan membran timpani normal. Sedangkan membran amnion adalah jaringan semi transparan tipis yang membentuk lapisan terdalam membran fetus dengan susunan membran basalis yang tebal dan jaringan stroma avaskuler. Membran amnion mempercepat pembentukan epitel normal dengan menekan pembentukan jaringan fibrosis. Sel epitel amnion memproduksi faktor pertumbuhan seperti fibroblast growth factor dan transforming growth factor beta. Faktor pertumbuhan akan membantu komunikasi antara epitel dan sel fibroblast stroma untuk menekan proliferasi dan diferensiasi jaringan fibrosis. Kesimpulan: Diperlukan tiga elemen pada penutupan perforasi membran timpani yaitu faktor regulasi, jembatan (bridge dan membuat luka baru

  16. Modelling the influence of amnionicity on the severity of twin-twin transfusion syndrome in monochorionic twin pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Umur, Asli [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ross, Michael G [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502 (United States); Gemert, Martin J C van [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-03-21

    Clinical treatment for diamniotic-monochorionic twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) may include conversion of diamniotic pregnancies to a monoamniotic-monochorionic state by disrupting the amnion septum. We sought to test the underlying hypothesis, i.e. that a monoamniotic state reduces the severity of TTTS. With use of our previously developed mathematical model of two equal fetoplacental circulatory units connected by various sizes and types of placental anastomoses, we compared the haemodynamic and amniotic fluid dynamics of monoamniotic and diamniotic twins that develop TTTS. We used three anastomotic patterns that produce severe, moderate or mild forms of TTTS, respectively, in our diamniotic-monochorionic twin model. Monoamnionicity was modelled by adding the two amniotic fluid volumes and using the volume-averaged amniotic fluid osmolality. The results were as follows: for severe TTTS, small differences develop between diamniotic and monoamniotic donor twins in fetal urine production, swallowed volume, blood volume, blood pressures, net fetofetal transfusion, and blood and amniotic fluid osmolality. However, the circulatory imbalance between the monoamniotic twins deteriorates similar to that of diamniotic twins. The pathophysiological differences tend to disappear for milder TTTS. In conclusion, our model suggests that the uncommon finding of TTTS in monoamniotic twins is not due to the presence of a single amniotic sac. Rather, clinically significant differences in anastomotic patterns and the delayed or lack of identification of manifestations in monoamniotic twins account for the reduced rate of TTTS diagnosis. Based on these results we expect the clinical disruption of the amnion septum in diamniotic-monochorionic TTTS pregnancies to have only minimal benefits. (note)

  17. Combination of hydroxyapatite, platelet rich fibrin and amnion membrane as a novel therapeutic option in regenerative periapical endodontic surgery: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppada, Uday Kiran; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Koppolu, Pradeep; Varma, Narendra; Palakurthy, Kiran; Manchikanti, Venkatesh; Prasad, Shilpa; Samar, Shereen; Swapna, Lingam Amara

    2017-01-01

    Periapical surgery is the last resort in the arsenal of an endodontist to effectively deal with periapical lesions that result from necrosis of the pulp. Bone grafts, growth factors and membranes form an array of regenerative materials that influence the healing outcome of periapical surgery. The main purpose of the two cases reported here was to assess the potential benefits of a combination of bone graft, platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and amnion membrane in terms of reduced post-operative discomfort, radiographic evidence of accelerated periapical bone healing and present a novel therapeutic option in the management of large periapical lesions. Two cases of radicular cysts were treated through a combined regenerative approachof Bio-Gen mix(®), PRF and amnion membrane. The patients were assessed for discomfort immediate post-operatively and after a week. The patients were recalled every month for the next 6 months for radiographic assessment of the periapical healing. Literature is replete with articles that have substantiated the role of demineralized bone matrix comprising a mixture of cancellous and cortical bone graft particles in enhancing regeneration. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no evidence related to the application of a human placental membrane in periapical surgery. Hence, the rationale of using a combined approach of Bio-Gen mix(®), PRF and amnion membrane was to combine the individual advantages of these materials to enhance clinical and radiographic healing outcomes. Our present case reports provide an insight into this novel therapeutic option. The results of this case seriessubstantiatesthe credibility of using a combination ofamnion membrane with a bone graft and PRF to enhance radiographic healing outcome with decreased post-operative discomfort and present a viable regenerative treatment modality in periapical surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of amnion as a graft material in vestibuloplasty: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samandari, Mohammad Hassan; Yaghmaei, Masoud; Ejlali, Masoud; Moshref, Mohammad; Saffar, Arash Shoja

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of amnion as a biodegradable graft material for vestibuloplasty. Seven subjects who had been referred for preprosthetic surgery underwent mandibular vestibuloplasty using Clark's technique and amnion as graft material. Fresh amniotic membrane was placed in the area and an acrylic splint was used with soft liner and 0.4-mm wires to cover the surgical site. The area was reexamined after 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. A white necrotic soft tissue layer could be seen with underlying hyperemic tissue and an average reduction of 1 to 3 mm in the depth of the labial vestibule after a week. By the end of the second week, the necrotic layer had disappeared, leaving slightly hyperemic mucosal tissue under. By the third week, the graft area could be noticed but the amnion had completely degenerated and disappeared. After 4 weeks, the subjects could be referred for their prosthodontic treatment. The reduction in the depth of the buccal vestibule ranged from 17% to 40% after 6 months' follow-up. Amnion might be used as a potential graft material for vestibuloplasty.

  19. Human labour is associated with nuclear factor-kappaB activity which mediates cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression and is involved with the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allport, V C; Pieber, D; Slater, D M; Newton, R; White, J O; Bennett, P R

    2001-06-01

    Human labour is associated with the up-regulation of prostaglandins within the uterus, synthesized via the type-2 cyclo-oxygenase enzyme (COX-2). These lead to remodelling of the fetal membranes and cervix and to stimulation of myometrial contractions. In the human, the principal source of prostaglandins is the amnion. Progesterone acts to promote myometrial quiescence, and in many species the onset of labour is preceded by withdrawal of progesterone. Humans show no systemic progesterone withdrawal, although biochemical changes within the uterus are similar to those in other species. A mutual negative interaction between the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and the progesterone receptor (PR) has been reported. Using transient transfections and assays for transcriptional activation and promoter binding, we have shown that there is constitutive activity of NF-kappaB in amnion cells at the time of labour, and that COX-2 expression depends upon NF-kappaB. In cells obtained before labour, in which NF-kappaB activity is low, increasing the concentration of PR represses NF-kappaB dependent transcription, while stimulation with IL-1beta both increases NF-kappaB activity and represses PR activity. Our data suggest that human labour is associated with constitutive NF-kappaB activity within the amnion, which functions to increase the expression of COX-2 and appears to contribute to the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

  20. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV.

  1. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  2. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Gupta; Kedige, Suresh D.; Kanu Jain

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have ...

  3. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Sheller

    Full Text Available At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC. We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H 3, heat shock protein (HSP 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK (P-p38 MAPK co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (p<0.05. Finally, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined

  4. S100B protein expression in the amnion and amniotic fluid in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tskitishvili, E; Komoto, Y; Temma-Asano, K; Hayashi, S; Kinugasa, Y; Tsubouchi, H; Song, M; Kanagawa, T; Shimoya, K; Murata, Y

    2006-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the expression of S100B protein in the amnion and to assess the amniotic fluid concentration in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia. Samples were obtained from women who developed pre-eclampsia (n = 7), pre-eclampsia with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) (n = 4), normotensive IUGR (n = 7) and gestational hypertension (n = 4) during pregnancy and healthy controls who delivered at term (n = 35). To determine the difference in the expression of S100B in the amnion, we performed immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we assessed the S100B concentration in amniotic fluid. The S100B mRNA expression in the amnion of pre-eclamptic patients and patients with pre-eclampsia with IUGR was significantly higher than that in the control. The amniotic fluid S100B protein concentration of the pre-eclampsia and normotensive IUGR cases was significantly higher than that of the control. This study shows that amnion could be a source responsible for the increased concentration of S100B in amniotic fluid. In pre-eclampsia, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by oxidative stress. Some pathological conditions that develop during pregnancy and are related to hypoxic stress can affect the elevation of S100B concentration in the amnion.

  5. Prostaglandin E2 regulation of amnion cell vascular endothelial growth factor expression: relationship with intramembranous absorption rate in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Beardall, Michael K; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates amniotic fluid transport across the amnion by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in amnion cells and that amniotic PGE2 concentration correlates positively with intramembranous (IM) absorption rate in fetal sheep. The effects of PGE2 at a range of concentrations on VEGF 164 and caveolin-1 gene expressions were analyzed in cultured ovine amnion cells. IM absorption rate, amniotic fluid (AF) volume, and PGE2 concentration in AF were determined in late-gestation fetal sheep during control conditions, isovolumic fetal urine replacement (low IM absorption rate), or intra-amniotic fluid infusion (high IM absorption rate). In ovine amnion cells, PGE2 induced dose- and time-dependent increases in VEGF 164 mRNA levels and reduced caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. VEGF receptor blockade abolished the caveolin-1 response, while minimally affecting the VEGF response to PGE2. In sheep fetuses, urine replacement reduced amniotic PGE2 concentration by 58%, decreased IM absorption rate by half, and doubled AF volume (P amniotic fluid infusion increased IM absorption rate and AF volume (P amniotic PGE2 concentration was unchanged. Neither IM absorption rate nor AF volume correlated with amniotic PGE2 concentration under each experimental condition. Although PGE2 at micromolar concentrations induced dose-dependent responses in VEGF and caveolin-1 gene expression in cultured amnion cells consistent with a role of PGE2 in activating VEGF to mediate AF transport across the amnion, amniotic PGE2 at physiological nanomolar concentrations does not appear to regulate IM absorption rate or AF volume.

  6. K-type human endogenous retroviral elements in human melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincon L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Liliana Rincon,1 Michael P Sedrak,1 Huijian Sun,2 Gregorio Garza,3 Brent Kelly,4 Jianli Dong11Department of Pathology, 2School of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, TX, USA; 3Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; 4Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Medical Branch, TX, USAAbstract: Human endogenous retroviral elements (HERVs are thought to be germline-integrated genetic remnants of exogenous retroviral infections. HERVs comprise approximately 5%–8% of the human genome. Although all HERV genomes are highly defective, some, especially the K type (HERV-K, have the potential to be expressed and have biological activities. HERV-K expression has been detected in human melanomas. There are also reports on the regulation and potential activities of HERV-K in melanoma cells. Although a causal link between the activation of HERV-K and melanoma development has yet to be determined, existing data support the further research efforts in this area. In this review, we summarize the published studies on the expression, regulation, and activity of HERV-K in human melanoma.Keywords: HERV, HERV-K, melanoma development

  7. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Kedige, Suresh D; Jain, Kanu

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  8. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining and chorion (a layer next to it, have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  9. Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIB and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA tested the hypothesis that human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein E6 (HPV16 E6 is present in human focal cortical dysplasia type IIB (FCDIIB specimens.

  10. Oxytocin receptor expression in human term and preterm gestational tissues prior to and following the onset of labour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DC Wathes; SC Borwick; PM Timmons; ST Leung; S Thornton

    1999-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) mRNA expression has previously been demonstrated in human myometrium, decidua, chorion and amnion but the effect of gestational age and the onset of labour has not been determined in these individual tissues...

  11. Blood type biochemistry and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, D Rose; Sumner, Susan C J

    2016-11-01

    Associations between blood type and disease have been studied since the early 1900s when researchers determined that antibodies and antigens are inherited. In the 1950s, the chemical identification of the carbohydrate structure of surface antigens led to the understanding of biosynthetic pathways. The blood type is defined by oligosaccharide structures, which are specific to the antigens, thus, blood group antigens are secondary gene products, while the primary gene products are various glycosyltransferase enzymes that attach the sugar molecules to the oligosaccharide chain. Blood group antigens are found on red blood cells, platelets, leukocytes, plasma proteins, certain tissues, and various cell surface enzymes, and also exist in soluble form in body secretions such as breast milk, seminal fluid, saliva, sweat, gastric secretions, urine, and amniotic fluid. Recent advances in technology, biochemistry, and genetics have clarified the functional classifications of human blood group antigens, the structure of the A, B, H, and Lewis determinants and the enzymes that produce them, and the association of blood group antigens with disease risks. Further research to identify differences in the biochemical composition of blood group antigens, and the relationship to risks for disease, can be important for the identification of targets for the development of nutritional intervention strategies, or the identification of druggable targets. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:517-535. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  12. Comparison of vestibular sulcus depth in vestibuloplasty using standard Clark's technique with and without amnion as graft material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkerimath, Basavaraj C; Dandagi, Satyajit; Gudi, Santosh S; Jayapalan, Deeptha

    2012-01-01

    A number of materials are used as grafts in vestibuloplasty like mucosal and skin grafts with several advantages and disadvantages. To circumvent the disadvantages of these grafts, biological membranes such as amnion membranes are often recommended. The objective of this study was to clinically assess the vestibular sulcus depth in vestibuloplasty using Clark's technique with and without amnion as graft material. Twenty edentulous patients underwent mandibular labial vestibuloplasty using Clark's technique. Amnion was used as graft material in 10 patients (group I) and no grafts used in remaining 10 patients (group II). The vestibular depth was evaluated at time intervals of 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months, postoperatively. Mean postoperative vestibular depth after 3 months in group I and II were 10.0 ± 3.13 mm and 7.8±0.63 mm, respectively. Mean of 2.2 ± 2.50 mm increase in depth was achieved after 3 months in Group I. Amnion graft is a viable and reliable option that promotes early healing and maintains postoperative vestibular depth.

  13. Isolation, proliferation, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization and in vitro differentiation potency of canine stem cells from foetal adnexa: a comparative study of amniotic fluid, amnion, and umbilical cord matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filioli Uranio, M; Valentini, L; Lange-Consiglio, A; Caira, M; Guaricci, A C; L'Abbate, A; Catacchio, C R; Ventura, M; Cremonesi, F; Dell'Aquila, M E

    2011-05-01

    The possibility to isolate canine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from foetal adnexa is interesting since several canine genetic disorders are reported to resemble similar dysfunctions in humans. In this study, we successfully isolated, cytogenetically and molecularly characterized, and followed the differentiation potency of canine MSCs from foetal adnexa, such as amniotic fluid (AF), amniotic membrane (AM), and umbilical cord matrix (UCM). In the three types of cell lines, the morphology of proliferating cells typically appeared fibroblast-like, and the population doubling time (DT) significantly increased with passage number. For AF- and AM-MSCs, cell viability did not change with passages. In UCM-MSCs, cell viability remained at approximately constant levels up to P6 and significantly decreased from P7 (P < 0.05). Amnion and UCM-MSCs expressed embryonic and MSC markers, such as Oct-4 CD44, CD184, and CD29, whereas AF-MSCs expressed Oct-4, CD44. Expression of the hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 was not found. Dog leucocyte antigens (DLA-DRA1 and DLA-79) were expressed only in AF-MSCs at P1. Isolated cells of the three cell lines at P3 showed multipotent capacity, and differentiated in vitro into neurocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte, as demonstrated by specific stains and expression of molecular markers. Cells at P4 showed normal chromosomal number, structure, and telomerase activity. These results demonstrate that, in dog, MSCs can be successfully isolated from foetal adnexa and grown in vitro. Their proven stemness and chromosomal stability indicated that MSCs could be used as a model to study stem cell biology and have an application in therapeutic programs.

  14. Comparison of the therapeutic effects of extracts from Spirulina platensis and amnion membrane on inflammation-associated corneal neovascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Wang, Yao; Gao, Yan; Wang, Yi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    AIM To compare the therapeutic effects of polysaccharide extract from Spirulina platensis (PSP) and extract from amnion membrane (AME) on alkali burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CorNV). METHODS PSP and AME were extracted from dry powder of Spirulina platensis and human aminion membrane respectively. Murine CorNV was induced by applying 1N sodiumhydroxide (NaOH) solution directly on the mice corneas. PSP and AME extracts were administered topically on the corneas 4 times daily for 7 days. The therapy effects of PSP and AME extracts were evaluated daily using slit-lamp. At the end of the therapy, corneas were harvested for H&E staining, masson trichrome staining, immunohistochemical study, and semi-quantification reverse transcriptive PCR (RT-PCR) was utilized for measurement of inflammation-related molecules. RESULTS Topical application of PSP extract had significant therapeutic effects on CorNV that could be shown in various assays of the corneas. Compared with AME extract, PSP extract treatment was more effective in suppressing CorNV in terms of vessel length and levels of cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) proteins or the angiogenesis related genes like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). PSP also inhibited inflammation more markedly by more effectively inhibiting mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells infiltration into the corneal stroma and reducing levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and macrophage inflammatory protein-3 (MIP3a). In additon, corneas of PSP group had a more regular and compact architecture of collagen with thinner corneal thickness than in the AME group. CONCLUSION Polysaccharide extract from Spirulina platensis inhibited alkali burn-induced inflammation and CorNV more effectively than AME extract at the studied doses, thus may be used for the therapy of corneal diseases involving neovascularization and

  15. Clinically silent polymicrobial amnionitis and intrauterine fetal death associated with a Cu-7 intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waites, K B; Bobo, R A; Davis, R O; Brookings, E S; Cassell, G H

    1984-12-15

    This article presents a case of silent polymicrobial amnionitis with subsequent intrauterine fetal death in a 34-year old woman who conceived with a Cu-7 IUD in place. There were no apparent pregnancy complications or symptoms of uterine infection during early pregnancy. At 16 weeks gestation, the patient underwent amniocentesis for cytogenetic studies. 5 different microorganisms--Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus warneri, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum--were isolated from the amniotic fluid. 2 week later, intrauterine fetal death was detected. U. urealyticum was at this point isolated from the cervix and placental and fetal tissues. This organism, which has been associated with chorioamnionitis, spontaneous abortion, and neonatal death, is suspected to have contributed to the fetal death in this case. U. urealyticum can invade the amniotic sac with fetal membranes intact and persist for 8 weeks without overt effects. This case illustrates the risks associated with nonremoval of an IUD after contraceptive failure.

  16. Studies on the Relationship between the Embryonic Heart Development and the Amnion Folding in Chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqing Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As a model animal for developmental biology, chick embryo is easy to control and observe during embryo development period and therefore it is widely used in the study of cardiac development. The application of proteomics has opened the door for large-scale studies to dissect both protein expression, regulation and function during chick heart developing stages. The proteomics study requires to quickly separate a large number of chick heart samples with the same developing stage. However, the traditional morphological standards based on Hamburger-Hamilton and Witschi stages are difficult to fulfill this requirement. Herein, we suppose a new standard for distinguishing chick heart morphology in different developing stages based on the relationship between the embryonic heart development and the amnion folding in chick. Based on this standard, we can accelerate the speed of embryonic heart sample separation and guarantee the quantity and quality of the sample more reliably.

  17. Use of amnion as a graft material in vestibuloplasty: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Chaitanya R; Goudar, Gayathri; Hallur, Neelakamal; Sikkerimath, Basavraj; Gudi, Santosh; Kothari, Meenakshi C

    2012-09-01

    The need to cover the exposed periostium has meant that a number of materials including mucosal and skin grafts are regarded as suitable for grafting in oral and maxillofacial surgery. To circumvent the disadvantages of other materials such as skin, biological membranes have been suggested as options, including fetal membrane. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of amnion as a graft material for vestibuloplasty, to increase the depth of the sulcus for complete rehabilitation with dentures in 10 patients with a follow up period of 3 months. Ten patients with deficient depth of the mandibular vestibular sulcus who were referred from the Department of Prosthodontics were listed for mandibular labial vestibuloplasty using Clark's technique followed by grafting with amnion over the denuded periostium. The vestibular depth was evaluated at the end of the 1st week, 2nd week, 4th week, and 3rd month postoperatively, and compared with the preoperative vestibular depth. We had no cases of graft necrosis either complete or partial. However, the reduction in the depth of the labial vestibule ranged from 17% to 50% after 3 months' follow up. A mean (SD) labial vestibular depth of 13.3 (1.8)mm was achieved immediately postoperatively, and 10.0 (3.1)mm at 3 months' follow up. We conclude that grafts of amniotic membrane are viable and reliable for covering of the raw surface, prevent secondary contraction after vestibuloplasty, and maintain the postoperative vestibular depth. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The dynamic expression of extraembryonic marker genes in the beetle Tribolium castaneum reveals the complexity of serosa and amnion formation in a short germ insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Beermann, Anke; Schröder, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    Most insect embryos develop with two distinct extraembryonic membranes, the serosa and the amnion. In the insect beetle Tribolium the early origin of the serosa within the anterior blastoderm is well established but the origin of the amnion is still debated. It is not known whether this tissue develops from a blastodermal precursor or originates de novo later from embryonic tissue during embryogenesis. We undertook an in-depth analysis of the spatio-temporal expression pattern profile of important extraembryonic membrane marker genes with emphasis on early blastoderm development in Tribolium. The amnion marker iroquois (Tc-iro) was found co-expressed with the serosa marker zerknüllt1 (Tc-zen1) during early blastoderm formation in an anterior cap domain. This domain later resolved into two adjacent domains that likely represent the precursors of the serosa and the amnion. In addition, we found the hindsight ortholog in Tribolium (Tc-hnt) to be a serosa-specific marker. Surprisingly, decapentaplegic (Tc-dpp) expression was not seen as a symmetric cap domain but detected asymmetrically first along the DV- and later also along the AP-axis. Moreover, we found a previously undescribed domain of phosphorylated MAD (pMAD) protein in anterior ventral serosal cells. This is the first study showing that the anterior-lateral part of the amnion originates from the anterior blastoderm while the precursor of the dorsal amnion develops later de novo from a dorsal-posterior region within the differentiated blastoderm.

  19. Human intestinal microbiota and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2013-10-01

    The role of intestinal microbiota in immune-mediated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, has deservedly received a lot of attention. Evidently, changes in the intestinal microbiota are associated with type 1 diabetes as demonstrated by recent studies. Children with beta-cell autoimmunity have shown low abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and increase in the abundance of members of the Bacteroidetes phylum in fecal microbiota. These alterations could explain increased gut permeability, subclinical small intestinal inflammation, and dysregulation of oral tolerance in type 1 diabetes. However, these studies do not provide evidence of the causative role of the gut microbiota in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity, yet. In animal models, the composition of gut microbiota modulates the function of both innate and adaptive immunity, and intestinal bacteria are regulators of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, prevention of type 1 diabetes could, in the future, be based on the interventions targeted to the gut microbiota.

  20. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto,Noriaki

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful for estimating the degradation of type IV collagen.

  1. Class I to III histone deacetylases differentially regulate inflammation-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression in primary amnion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Marin; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2014-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 plays an important role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix in fetal membranes, and pathological activation of MMP-9 can lead to preterm birth. In nongestational tissues, modulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulates MMP-9 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether class I to III HDACs regulate MMP-9 expression and activity in primary amnion cells. Class I and II HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the general class I and II HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I HDACi MS-275, and the class II HDACi MC1568. Class III HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRT1720 as well as SIRT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Primary amnion epithelial cells were incubated with 1 ng/mL interleukin (IL) 1β in the absence or presence of 0.3 μmol/L TSA, 5 μmol/L SAHA, 2.5 μmol/L MS-275, 2.5 μmol/L MC1568, 50 μmol/L resveratrol, or 10 μmol/L SRT1720 for 20 hours. We found that the class I and II HDACi TSA and SAHA and the class II HDACi MC1568 significantly decreased IL-β-induced MMP-9 gene and pro-MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells. There was, however, no effect of the class I HDACi MS-275 on IL-β-induced MMP-9 expression. On the other hand, inhibition of class III HDAC SIRT1 using siRNA significantly augmented IL-1β-induced MMP-9, and SIRT1 activation using resveratrol and SRT1720 inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP-9 expression. In summary, class I to III HDACs differentially regulate inflammation-induced MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells.

  2. The three types of human viral hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Infections with hepatitis A and B viruses are common in all parts of the world and constitute a major public health problem. The identification of specific antigenic markers of these viruses has led to the development of sensitive laboratory tests. These, in turn, have resulted in a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunology, and the nature of these common infections. In the case of hepatitis type B, laboratory tests revealed a persistent carrier state of the surface antigen in some 120-175 million people and established the significance of hepatitis B virus in the pathogenesis of serious chronic liver disease, including a strong association with primary hepatocellular carcinoma in tropical and some subtropical regions. In addition, the specific diagnosis of hepatitis types A and B has revealed a previously unrecognized form of hepatitis which is clearly unrelated to either type. This new form of infection of the liver is now the most common type of hepatitis after the transfusion of blood and blood products in some areas of the world and it also appears to be an important cause of sporadic hepatitis, particularly among adults. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:78770

  3. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: Impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2015-01-01

    /or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared to type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4......-responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared to lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I...

  4. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Michio; Watanabe,Akiharu; Higashi, Toshiro; Tsuji, Takao

    1988-01-01

    Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful...

  5. Self-organized amniogenesis by human pluripotent stem cells in a biomimetic implantation-like niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yue; Taniguchi, Kenichiro; Gurdziel, Katherine; Townshend, Ryan F.; Xue, Xufeng; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Sang, Jianming; Spence, Jason R.; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Fu, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Amniogenesis--the development of amnion--is a critical developmental milestone for early human embryogenesis and successful pregnancy. However, human amniogenesis is poorly understood due to limited accessibility to peri-implantation embryos and a lack of in vitro models. Here we report an efficient biomaterial system to generate human amnion-like tissue in vitro through self-organized development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in a bioengineered niche mimicking the in vivo implantation environment. We show that biophysical niche factors act as a switch to toggle hPSC self-renewal versus amniogenesis under self-renewal-permissive biochemical conditions. We identify a unique molecular signature of hPSC-derived amnion-like cells and show that endogenously activated BMP-SMAD signalling is required for the amnion-like tissue development by hPSCs. This study unveils the self-organizing and mechanosensitive nature of human amniogenesis and establishes the first hPSC-based model for investigating peri-implantation human amnion development, thereby helping advance human embryology and reproductive medicine.

  6. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  7. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in th

  8. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter H; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper B; Kristensen, Dorte E; Vind, Birgitte F; Baba, Otto; Nøhr, Jane; Højlund, Kurt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber type-specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and/or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared with type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1 domain family member 4 (TBC1D4), and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared with type II fibers, the phosphorylation response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1, and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS, and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I muscle fibers compared with type II fibers have a higher glucose-handling capacity but a similar sensitivity for phosphoregulation by insulin.

  9. Deformation mechanisms of human amnion: Quantitative studies based on second harmonic generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Arabella; Ehret, Alexander E; Perrini, Michela; Maake, Caroline; Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole; Ehrbar, Martin; Oyen, Michelle L; Mazza, Edoardo

    2015-06-25

    Multiphoton microscopy has proven to be a versatile tool to analyze the three-dimensional microstructure of the fetal membrane and the mechanisms of deformation on the length scale of cells and the collagen network. In the present contribution, dedicated microscopic tools for in situ mechanical characterization of tissue under applied mechanical loads and the related methods for data interpretation are presented with emphasis on new stepwise monotonic uniaxial experiments. The resulting microscopic parameters are consistent with previous ones quantified for cyclic and relaxation tests, underlining the reliability of these techniques. The thickness reduction and the substantial alignment of collagen fiber bundles in the compact and fibroblast layer starting at very small loads are highlighted, which challenges the definition of a reference configuration in terms of a force threshold. The findings presented in this paper intend to inform the development of models towards a better understanding of fetal membrane deformation and failure, and thus of related problems in obstetrics and other clinical conditions.

  10. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  11. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 in wild nonhuman primates, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Ishii, Akihiro; Orba, Yasuko; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Moonga, Ladslav; Mweene, Aaron S; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) genome was detected in 4 baboons in Zambia. Antibody for HPIV3 was detected in 13 baboons and 6 vervet monkeys in 2 distinct areas in Zambia. Our findings suggest that wild nonhuman primates are susceptible to HPIV3 infection.

  12. Selecting Human Error Types for Cognitive Modelling and Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mioch, T.; Osterloh, J.P.; Javaux, D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method that has enabled us to make a selection of error types and error production mechanisms relevant to the HUMAN European project, and discusses the reasons underlying those choices. We claim that this method has the advantage that it is very exhaustive in determining the re

  13. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  14. Evidence for two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Heglind, Mikael; Elander, Louise; Slawik, Marc; Mussack, Thomas; Nilsson, Daniel; Romu, Thobias; Nuutila, Pirjo; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Beuschlein, Felix; Persson, Anders; Borga, Magnus; Enerbäck, Sven

    2013-05-01

    The previously observed supraclavicular depot of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans was commonly believed to be the equivalent of the interscapular thermogenic organ of small mammals. This view was recently disputed on the basis of the demonstration that this depot consists of beige (also called brite) brown adipocytes, a newly identified type of brown adipocyte that is distinct from the classical brown adipocytes that make up the interscapular thermogenic organs of other mammals. A combination of high-resolution imaging techniques and histological and biochemical analyses showed evidence for an anatomically distinguishable interscapular BAT (iBAT) depot in human infants that consists of classical brown adipocytes, a cell type that has so far not been shown to exist in humans. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that infants, similarly to rodents, have the bona fide iBAT thermogenic organ consisting of classical brown adipocytes that is essential for the survival of small mammals in a cold environment.

  15. Intranasal Delivery of A Novel Amnion Cell Secretome Prevents Neuronal Damage and Preserves Function In A Mouse Multiple Sclerosis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Reas S.; Dine, Kimberly; Bauman, Bailey; Lorentsen, Michael; Lin, Lisa; Brown, Helayna; Hanson, Leah R.; Svitak, Aleta L.; Wessel, Howard; Brown, Larry; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of a novel intranasally delivered amnion cell derived biologic to suppress inflammation, prevent neuronal damage and preserve neurologic function in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model of multiple sclerosis was assessed. Currently, there are no existing optic nerve treatment methods for disease or trauma that result in permanent vision loss. Demyelinating optic nerve inflammation, termed optic neuritis, induces permanent visual dysfunction due to retinal ganglion cell damage in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. ST266, the biological secretome of Amnion-derived Multipotent Progenitor cells, contains multiple anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Intranasally administered ST266 accumulated in rodent eyes and optic nerves, attenuated visual dysfunction, and prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis, with reduced inflammation and demyelination. Additionally, ST266 reduced retinal ganglion cell death in vitro. Neuroprotective effects involved oxidative stress reduction, SIRT1-mediated mitochondrial function promotion, and pAKT signaling. Intranasal delivery of neuroprotective ST266 is a potential novel, noninvasive therapeutic modality for the eyes, optic nerves and brain. The unique combination of biologic molecules in ST266 provides an innovative approach with broad implications for suppressing inflammation in autoimmune diseases, and for preventing neuronal damage in acute neuronal injury and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:28139754

  16. Cases of limb-body wall complex: Early amnion rupture, vascular disruption, or abnormal splitting of the embryo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Frank; Pinar, Halit; Kostadinov, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    We report two cases of limb-body wall complex (LBWC), also known as body stalk anomaly, a rare form of body wall defect incompatible with life. The first case was identified during a level II ultrasound examination performed at 7 wk gestational age. The delivery was by breech extraction at 39 wk and 4 days. The second case was delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 35 wk and 5 days. Karyotype analysis was normal in both fetuses. The phenotype of LBWC is variable, but commonly identified features include: exencephaly, limb defects, and either facial clefts or thoraco-abdominoschisis. The exact etiology remains uncertain, as the disorder has been regarded as sporadic with low recurrence. Vascular disruption during early embryogenesis, early amnion rupture, abnormal splitting of the embryo, and failure of amnion fusion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of LBWC. A role for possible gene mutation and maternal use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs has also been suggested. Detailed ultrasonography along with biochemical screening may allow for early detection.

  17. A four-fold humanity: Margaret Mead and psychological types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in 1933, while working in New Guinea, Margaret Mead developed her so-called squares hypothesis. Mead never published its terms, though she made a brief comment on it in her autobiography, Blackberry Winter (1972), and the arguments found in Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies (1935) and the research leading to Balinese Character (Bateson & Mead, 1942) bore its imprint. Beginning with William McDougall's distinction between temperament (innate predispositions) and character (learned organization of habit), Mead articulated a morphological approach to the interplay between biology and culture that yielded four primary and four intermediary personality types. Under specified but not inevitable circumstances, the conscious choices of a given people could render one or another of these types characteristic or predominantly stable within their population, giving each of the other types a definite relation to the dominant type and thereby the cultural ethos of its society. Persons of each type followed a developmental path specific to their type different both from that of other types and in its manifestations given the various relations of the individual's type to the dominant type. Mead's hypothesis was, therefore, a vision of the unity and diversity of a single human species as well as an approach to the differing psychological positioning of individuals in cultures. In examining Mead's hypothesis, this essay also takes up Mead's debts to several leading psychologists (McDougall, C. G. Jung, and Erik Erikson), and (provisionally) how her vision differed from that of Ruth Benedict.

  18. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Yawno, Tamara; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2013-10-24

    In the research, clinical, and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however, this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical, and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form teratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  19. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie eCastillo-Melendez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research, clinical and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form terratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs, or umbilical cord blood (UCB stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  20. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  1. Citation Type Analysis on Humanity Literature of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using informetrics and citation analysis, the present study explores and compares characteristics and types of citations in the humanity journal articles that published in Taiwan. Research articles published in 2011, from top humanity journals, assessed by the Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Science Council in Taiwan, were collected and analyzed. The analysis was done by structure of journal article and location of citations. In addition to citations appearing in the text, the phenomena of citation type will be compared and discussed in the latter part. The results of this study revealed articles of literature, history, philosophy and arts were mostly argumentative, while linguistic articles tended to comply with IMRAD (Introduction, Methods and Materials, Results,And Discussion formats. Introducing primary materials from original works, humanity scholars tended to cite for factual descriptions or to support authors’ perspectives. Secondary materials, such as later studies on the original works by other scholars, were seen the most in the disciplines of linguistics while the least in that of history. In general, the distribution of citation types is similar between articles in domestic and foreign journals; merely minor differences occurred among disciplines. While citing characteristics and information needs of humanities scholars revealed in this study may contribute to collection development of libraries or refinement of information services to researchers, suggestions based on analysis of research results may also serve as reference for standardization of writing and publication of journal articles in Taiwan. Aiming at further exploration of citations, this study is expected to provide a better understanding of the nature of citations and to serve as a foundation for future empirical studies.

  2. Induction of Human Squamous Cell-Type Carcinomas by Arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a potent human carcinogen. Around one hundred million people worldwide have potentially been exposed to this metalloid at concentrations considered unsafe. Exposure occurs generally through drinking water from natural geological sources, making it difficult to control this contamination. Arsenic biotransformation is suspected to have a role in arsenic-related health effects ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies associated with chronic exposure. It has been demonstrated that arsenic exhibits preference for induction of squamous cell carcinomas in the human, especially skin and lung cancer. Interestingly, keratins emerge as a relevant factor in this arsenic-related squamous cell-type preference. Additionally, both genomic and epigenomic alterations have been associated with arsenic-driven neoplastic process. Some of these aberrations, as well as changes in other factors such as keratins, could explain the association between arsenic and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  3. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  4. Human papillomavirus typing of warts and response to cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, N; Sterling, J; Ahmed, I; Hague, J; Berth-Jones, J

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous warts are common and caused by a number of different types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the HPV types causing common warts and to determine any association between the HPV type and the duration of warts and response to cryotherapy. Eighty wart samples from 76 immunocompetent patients were taken from warts by paring prior to cryotherapy and analysed by in situ hybridization (ISH) with HPV probes specific to HPV 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 57 and PCR analysis using degenerate cutaneous HPV primers with subsequent DNA sequencing. Each patient's details, including site, duration and response of the wart to cryotherapy were recorded. Cryotherapy was performed at 2 week intervals for a maximum of 12 weeks. An HPV type was identified in 65 samples. The majority of warts (58 samples) were typed as HPV 2/27/57 by ISH and/or PCR. Three of the 18 samples that were HPV negative with ISH were HPV positive by PCR. Response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type, duration or location. In the 21 wart parings taken from patients aged 16 and under, response to treatment did not correlate with HPV type but warts of shorter duration were more likely to resolve with cryotherapy treatment than longer standing lesions. This study demonstrates that HPV type can be determined from wart parings. HPV-2 related viruses are the prevalent HPV types causing common warts on the hands and feet in this population. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Molecular epidemiology and pathogenic potential of underdiagnosed human papillomavirus types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisti Stefano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV tests are crucial diagnostic tools for the prevention of neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix. However most commercial methods are designed to detect high-risk (HR HPV types and a limited selection of low-risk ones, thus missing a fair number of intermediate/low-risk types. As a result, many HPV infections remain undiagnosed, generating distrust in virological diagnosis among gynaecologists, who continue to rely preferentially on cytological and colposcopic findings. Results In this study, we tested 6,335 consecutive clinical samples, most of them from Italian patients with cytological abnormalities. The samples, collected in 2000–2007, were analyzed using PCR amplification of a 173–206 bp (depending on HPV type conserved region in the L1 open reading frame, restriction endonuclease analysis and, where required, sequence analysis for type determination. Analysis of a smaller male sample and long term follow-up of a few female subjects was also performed. A total of 2,161 samples tested positive for HPV DNA (32.1%; 21.3% of them were mixed infections. Overall, 59 known and 2 unknown HPV types were detected. Their relative prevalence was calculated; notably, types not clearly identifiable using the most common commercial method accounted for 36% of infections. Clinical findings associated with the underdiagnosed types ranged from H-SIL to low-grade abnormalities, although none of these infections resulted in invasive cancer. Conclusion Given the high prevalence of some underdiagnosed HPV types in the population (principally HPV53, HPV66, HPV84, and HPV87 and their frequent association with cytological abnormalities, techniques capable of detecting and typing them would prove extremely useful.

  6. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells.

  7. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  8. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...... do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins...

  9. Human papillomavirus type 29 (HPV-29), an HPV type cross-hybridizing with HPV-2 and with HPV-3-related types.

    OpenAIRE

    Favre, M.; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning and partial characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 29 is presented. By hybridization analyses, this virus appears to be related to HPV types associated with common warts and HPV types associated with flat warts.

  10. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Selby, Katja; Miethe, Sebastian; Frenzel, André; Liu, Yvonne; Rasetti-Escargueil, Christine; Avril, Arnaud; Pelat, Thibaut; Urbain, Remi; Fontayne, Alexandre; Thullier, Philippe; Sesardic, Dorothea; Lindström, Miia; Hust, Michael; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis)-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18) by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD) in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans. PMID:27626446

  11. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type E by a Humanized Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yağmur Derman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs cause botulism and are the deadliest naturally-occurring substances known to humans. BoNTs have been classified as one of the category A agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, indicating their potential use as bioweapons. To counter bio-threat and naturally-occurring botulism cases, well-tolerated antibodies by humans that neutralize BoNTs are relevant. In our previous work, we showed the neutralizing potential of macaque (Macaca fascicularis-derived scFv-Fc (scFv-Fc ELC18 by in vitro endopeptidase immunoassay and ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm assay by targeting the light chain of the botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E. In the present study, we germline-humanized scFv-Fc ELC18 into a full IgG hu8ELC18 to increase its immunotolerance by humans. We demonstrated the protection and prophylaxis capacity of hu8ELC18 against BoNT/E in a mouse model. A concentration of 2.5 ng/mouse of hu8ELC18 protected against 5 mouse lethal dose (MLD in a mouse protection assay and complete neutralization of 1 LD50 of pure BoNT/E toxin was achieved with 8 ng of hu8ELC18 in mouse paralysis assay. Furthermore, hu8ELC18 protected mice from 5 MLD if injected up to 14 days prior to intraperitoneal BoNT/E administration. This newly-developed humanized IgG is expected to have high tolerance in humans.

  12. Human skeletal muscle fibre types and force: velocity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, B R; Herzog, W; Suter, E; Wiley, J P; Sokolosky, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that there is a relationship between power output and fibre type distribution in mixed muscle. The strength of this relationship is greater in the range of 3-8 rad.s-1 during knee extension compared to slower or faster angular knee extensor speeds. A mathematical model of the force: velocity properties of muscle with various combinations of fast- and slow-twitch fibres may provide insight into why specific velocities may give better predictions of fibre type distribution. In this paper, a mathematical model of the force:velocity relationship for mixed muscle is presented. This model demonstrates that peak power and optimal velocity should be predictive of fibre distribution and that the greatest fibre type discrimination in human knee extensor muscles should occur with measurement of power output at an angular velocity just greater than 7 rad.s-1. Measurements of torque:angular velocity relationships for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer and fibre type distribution in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscles were made on 31 subjects. Peak power and optimal velocity were determined in three ways: (1) direct measurement, (2) linear regression, and (3) fitting to the Hill equation. Estimation of peak power and optimal velocity using the Hill equation gave the best correlation with fibre type distribution (r < 0.5 for peak power or optimal velocity and percentage of fast-twitch fibres). The results of this study confirm that prediction of fibre type distribution is facilitated by measurement of peak power at optimal velocity and that fitting of the data to the Hill equation is a suitable method for evaluation of these parameters.

  13. Polymorphism of the human vitronectin gene causes vitronectin blood type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, K; Hayashi, M; Oishi, N; Sakaki, Y

    1990-03-30

    Human blood plasma/sera are classified into three distinct vitronectin types based on the relative amount of the 75 kDa polypeptide to its cleavage product of 65 kDa. We asked whether the vitronectin blood types correlated with the polymorphism of the vitronectin gene. A portion of the vitronectin gene was amplified by using polymerase chain reaction and digested with a restriction enzyme PmaC I which may distinguish the base sequence causing the polymorphic change at the amino acid position 381. Amplified DNAs of the blood type I (75 kDa-rich), II (75/65 kDa-even), and III (65 kDa-rich) were shown to be resistant, moderately sensitive and completely sensitive to PmaC I, respectively. These results suggest that Thr at position 381 is essential for the cleavage of the vitronectin 75 kDa polypeptide and that three possible combinations of two codominant alleles of vitronectin determine three vitronectin blood types.

  14. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  15. Human bile sorption by cancrinite-type zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Carlos F. [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Metales de Transicion, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: clinares@uc.edu.ve; Colmenares, Maryi; Ocanto, Freddy [Laboratorio de Catalisis y Metales de Transicion, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valbuena, Oscar [Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Departamento de Biologia, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia. Edo. Carabobo, Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: ovalbuena@uc.edu.ve

    2009-01-01

    A nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite was synthesized from zeolite X, NaOH and NaNO{sub 3} solutions under autogeneous pressure at 80 deg. C for 48 h. This zeolite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR-spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET surface area. XRD, SEM and FT-IR confirmed the presence of nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite without other collateral phases as sodalite. Then, this sodium zeolite was exchanged with potassium and calcium cations and finally, these modified zeolites were reacted with biliar solutions from human gallbladder. Several factors such as: mass of used cancrinite, nature of the exchanged cation and reaction time of the cancrinite-bile solution interactions were studied. The composition of bile solutions (bile acids, phospholipids and bilirubin) was analyzed before and after the cancrinite-bile solution reaction. Results showed that the components of the bile were notably reduced after the contact with solids. Ca-cancrinite, 120 min of reaction time and 500 mg of solids were the best conditions determined for the bile acid reduction in human bile. When the modified zeolites were compared with the commercial cholestyramine, it was found that zeolites were more active than the latter. These zeolites may be an alternative choice to diminish cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic patients.

  16. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  17. Multiplexed serologic assay for nine anogenital human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalka, David; Matys, Katie; Bojczuk, Paul; Green, Tina; Gesser, Richard; Saah, Alfred; Haupt, Richard; Dutko, Frank; Esser, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    A multiplexed human papillomavirus (HPV) immunoassay has been developed for the detection of human IgG antibodies to HPV type 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 virus-like particle (VLP) types in serum following natural infection or immunization with VLP-based vaccines. The VLP antigens were covalently conjugated to carboxyl Luminex microspheres (MS) using a carbodiimide chemistry. Antibody (Ab) titers were determined in a direct binding format, in which an IgG1- to -4-specific, phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) (HP6043) binds to human serum IgG antibodies. Pooled serum samples from rhesus macaques immunized with a 9-valent VLP-based vaccine served as the reference standard. The overall specificity of the assay was >99%, and the linearity (parallelism) of the assay was <7% per 10-fold dilution. Total assay precision was <19% across 3 different VLP-microsphere lots, 2 secondary antibody lots, and 2 different operators over a period of 3 weeks. Three different methods were used to evaluate serostatus cutoffs (SCO): (i) a clinical sensitivity/specificity analysis based on "likely negative" and "likely positive" samples from nonvaccinees, (ii) stringent upper tolerance limits on samples from "likely negatives," and (iii) stringent upper tolerance limits from the same "likely negative" sample set after VLP adsorption. Depending on the method to set the serostatus cutoff, the percentage of seropositive samples at the month 48 time point following vaccination with the HPV 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent vaccine ranged from 70% to 100%. This assay has proven useful for measuring the levels of serum antibody to the nine HPV VLPs following natural infection or administration of VLP-based vaccines.

  18. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  19. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-03-07

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  20. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insulitis in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgwood, Kyle C. A.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Morgan, Noel G.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an auto-immune disease characterized by the selective destruction of the insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas during an inflammatory phase known as insulitis. Patients with T1D are typically dependent on the administration of externally provided insulin in order to manage blood glucose levels. Whilst technological developments have significantly improved both the life expectancy and quality of life of these patients, an understanding of the mechanisms of the disease remains elusive. Animal models, such as the NOD mouse model, have been widely used to probe the process of insulitis, but there exist very few data from humans studied at disease onset. In this manuscript, we employ data from human pancreases collected close to the onset of T1D and propose a spatio-temporal computational model for the progression of insulitis in human T1D, with particular focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of insulitis in pancreatic islets. This framework allows us to investigate how the time-course of insulitis progression is affected by altering key parameters, such as the number of the CD20+ B cells present in the inflammatory infiltrate, which has recently been proposed to influence the aggressiveness of the disease. Through the analysis of repeated simulations of our stochastic model, which track the number of beta cells within an islet, we find that increased numbers of B cells in the peri-islet space lead to faster destruction of the beta cells. We also find that the balance between the degradation and repair of the basement membrane surrounding the islet is a critical component in governing the overall destruction rate of the beta cells and their remaining number. Our model provides a framework for continued and improved spatio-temporal modeling of human T1D. PMID:28082906

  1. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Insulitis in Human Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgwood, Kyle C A; Richardson, Sarah J; Morgan, Noel G; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an auto-immune disease characterized by the selective destruction of the insulin secreting beta cells in the pancreas during an inflammatory phase known as insulitis. Patients with T1D are typically dependent on the administration of externally provided insulin in order to manage blood glucose levels. Whilst technological developments have significantly improved both the life expectancy and quality of life of these patients, an understanding of the mechanisms of the disease remains elusive. Animal models, such as the NOD mouse model, have been widely used to probe the process of insulitis, but there exist very few data from humans studied at disease onset. In this manuscript, we employ data from human pancreases collected close to the onset of T1D and propose a spatio-temporal computational model for the progression of insulitis in human T1D, with particular focus on the mechanisms underlying the development of insulitis in pancreatic islets. This framework allows us to investigate how the time-course of insulitis progression is affected by altering key parameters, such as the number of the CD20+ B cells present in the inflammatory infiltrate, which has recently been proposed to influence the aggressiveness of the disease. Through the analysis of repeated simulations of our stochastic model, which track the number of beta cells within an islet, we find that increased numbers of B cells in the peri-islet space lead to faster destruction of the beta cells. We also find that the balance between the degradation and repair of the basement membrane surrounding the islet is a critical component in governing the overall destruction rate of the beta cells and their remaining number. Our model provides a framework for continued and improved spatio-temporal modeling of human T1D.

  2. A roentgenographic assessment of regenerative efficacy of bioactive Gengigel® in conjunction with amnion membrane in grade II furcation defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Harveen Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, techniques are being developed to guide and instruct the specialized cellular components of the periodontium to participate in the regenerative process. This approach of reconstruction makes use of understanding of the development of the periodontium and the cellular processes that are involved. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring non-sulfated high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that forms a critical component of the extracellular matrix and contributes significantly to tissue hydrodynamics, cell migration, and proliferation. Hence, its administration to periodontal wound sites could achieve comparable beneficial effects in periodontal tissue regeneration. Hence, the purpose of the present case report was to assess roentgenographically, the regenerative capacity of Gengigel® in conjunction with bioactive amnion guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane in a patient with Grade II furcation defect. Case Presentation: A patient complained of bleeding gums from the lower back tooth region, reportedly found Grade II furcation in the lower right mandibular first molar. After Phase, I therapy, Gengigel® along with bioactive amnion membrane was placed in the furcation area during the surgical phase. Roentgenographic assessment was done at 4 months and 6 months postoperatively. It resulted in complete defect-fill and loss of radiolucency at 6 months. Conclusion: Surgical placement of Gengigel® along with amnion membrane in the furcation defect can significantly improve the periodontal defect morphology.

  3. Scanning electron microscopic assessment on surface morphology of preserved human amniotic membrane after gamma sterilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Hamid, Suzina Sheikh; Zahari, Nor Kamalia; Yusof, Norimah; Hassan, Asnah

    2014-03-01

    Human amniotic membrane that has been processed and sterilised by gamma irradiation is widely used as a biological dressing in surgical applications. The morphological structure of human amniotic membrane was studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess effects of gamma radiation on human amniotic membrane following different preservation methods. The amniotic membrane was preserved by either air drying or submerged in glycerol before gamma irradiated at 15, 25 and 35 kGy. Fresh human amniotic membrane, neither preserved nor irradiated was used as the control. The surface morphology of glycerol preserved amnion was found comparable to the fresh amniotic membrane. The cells of the glycerol preserved was beautifully arranged, homogonous in size and tended to round up. The cell structure in the air dried preserved amnion seemed to be flattened and dehydrated. The effects of dehydration on intercellular channels and the microvilli on the cell surface were clearly seen at higher magnifications (10,000×). SEM revealed that the changes of the cell morphology of the glycerol preserved amnion were visible at 35 kGy while the air dried already changed at 25 kGy. Glycerol preservation method is recommended for human amniotic membrane as the cell morphological structure is maintained and radiation doses lower than 25 kGy for sterilization did not affect the appearance of the preserved amnion.

  4. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of human and animal Clostridium difficile isolates of various toxigenic types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemee, Ludovic; Dhalluin, Anne; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Lemeland, Jean-François; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2004-06-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 72 Clostridium difficile isolates from various hosts, geographic sources, PCR ribotypes, and toxigenic types (determined by PCR targeting tcdA and tcdB genes). MLST was performed by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, ddl, dutA, tpi, recA, gmk, and sodA). The number of alleles ranged from five (dutA and ddl) to eleven (recA). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 34 different sequence types (STs). These STs lacked correlation with geographic source but were well correlated to toxigenic type. The dendrogram generated from a matrix of pairwise genetic distances showed that animal isolates did not constitute a distinct lineage from human isolates and that there was no hypervirulent lineage within the population of toxigenic human isolates (isolates recovered from pseudomembranous colitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea did not cluster in distinct lineages). However, A(-) B(+) variant isolates shared the same ST that appeared as a divergent lineage in the population studied, indicating a single evolutionary origin. The population structure was further examined by analysis of allelic polymorphism. The dendrogram generated from composite sequence-based analysis revealed a homogeneous population associated with three divergent lineages, one of which was restricted to A(-) B(+) variant isolates. C. difficile exhibited a clonal population structure, as revealed by the estimation of linkage disequilibrium (Ia) between loci. The analysis of alleles within clonal complexes estimated that point mutation generated new alleles at a frequency eightfold higher than recombinational exchange, and the congruence of the dendrograms generated from separate housekeeping loci confirmed the mutational evolution of this species.

  5. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A;

    2011-01-01

    that specifically recognize stem-loop motifs in the viral genomes, an assay termed single virion analysis. These studies revealed that >90% of the HIV-2 particles contained viral RNAs and that RNAs derived from different viruses were copackaged frequently. Furthermore, the frequencies of heterozygous particles...... two monomeric RNAs. Additionally, single virion analyses demonstrated a similar RNA distribution in viral particles regardless of whether both viruses had a functional gag or one of the viruses had a nonfunctional gag, providing further support for the trans-packaging hypothesis. Together......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...

  6. Inverted Pendulum-type Personal Mobility Considering Human Vibration Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misaki Masuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An inverted pendulum-type PM (personal mobility has been attracting attention as a low-carbon vehicle. For many people who like to use the PM, ride comfort is important. However, ride comfort of PM has not been focused on in previous studies. The vibration is one of causes that make riders feel uncomfortable. The PM is unstable system and horizontal vibration may be caused by a stabilizing control. Additionally, vertical vibration may also be caused by road disturbances. This study analyzes the vibration of the rider’s head in these two directions when the PM runs on a road with disturbances in numerical simulations, and evaluates ride comfort with the frequency characteristics of the vibration. To consider human vibration sensitivity, the frequency weighting proposed in ISO 2631-1 is used as an evaluation standard. The improvement methods are proposed from both software and hardware, and it is confirmed that the proposed method can improve ride comfort.

  7. Cytotoxicity of dietary flavonoids on different human cancer types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature. They are also in food, providing an essential link between diet and prevention of chronic diseases including cancer. Anticancer effects of these polyphenols depend on several factors: Their chemical structure and concentration, and also on the type of cancer. Malignant cells from different tissues reveal somewhat different sensitivity toward flavonoids and, therefore, the preferences of the most common dietary flavonoids to various human cancer types are analyzed in this review. While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities. Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors. Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

  8. Human cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Smith, Charles D; Abner, Erin A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Scheff, Stephen W; Davis, Gregory J; Keller, Jeffrey N; Jicha, Gregory A; Davis, Daron; Wang-Xia, Wang; Hartman, Adria; Katz, Douglas G; Markesbery, William R

    2009-05-01

    The cerebral neuropathology of Type 2 diabetes (CNDM2) has not been positively defined. This review includes a description of CNDM2 research from before the 'Pubmed Era'. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on cerebrovascular and white matter pathology. These and prior studies about cerebrovascular histopathology in diabetes are reviewed. Evidence is also described for and against the link between CNDM2 and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. To study this matter directly, we evaluated data from University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center (UK ADC) patients recruited while non-demented and followed longitudinally. Of patients who had come to autopsy (N = 234), 139 met inclusion criteria. These patients provided the basis for comparing the prevalence of pathological and clinical indices between well-characterized cases with (N = 50) or without (N = 89) the premortem diagnosis of diabetes. In diabetics, cerebrovascular pathology was more frequent and Alzheimer-type pathology was less frequent than in non-diabetics. Finally, a series of photomicrographs demonstrates histopathological features (including clinical-radiographical correlation) observed in brains of persons that died after a history of diabetes. These preliminary, correlative, and descriptive studies may help develop new hypotheses about CNDM2. We conclude that more work should be performed on human material in the context of CNDM2.

  9. Expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase-1 and -2 in ovine amnion and placenta following glucocorticoid-induced labour onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, W J; Young, I R; Wong, M H; Rice, G E

    1996-10-01

    Parturition in the sheep is preceded by an increase in the synthesis of prostaglandins by intrauterine tissues. Prostaglandin G/H synthase (PGHS) is the central enzyme involved in prostanoid production. Its expression is enhanced during late gestation in the ewe. Recent studies have identified two PGHS isozymes, termed PGHS-1 and PGHS-2. The labour-associated expression of the two isozymes of PGHS in the sheep has not been characterized. This study investigated the changes in expression of immunoreactive PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 in ovine amnion and placenta following glucocorticoid-induced labour. Ewes underwent surgery to implant fetal and maternal vascular cannulae and uterine electromyogram electrodes between 118 and 125 days of gestation. Fetal sheep were administered either the glucocorticoid betamethasone (n = 5) or saline (control n = 6) by direct transabdominal intrafetal injection. Ewes from the betamethasone-injected group were killed in the first stage of labour as indicated by uterine electromyographic activity. Ewes from the saline-injected group were killed at the same time to obtain age-matched control tissue. The time taken to euthanasia following induced-labour onset in the glucocorticoid-injected animals was 56.6 +/- 0.8 h post-injection. Plasma endocrine profiles in the maternal and fetal circulation following glucocorticoid injection were comparable to those observed following normal spontaneous delivery. At post-mortem, amnion and cotyledons were collected in liquid N2 and stored at -70 degrees C. Solubilized tissue extracts were prepared and analysed by Western blots using polyclonal antibodies to PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 isozymes. Fetal amnion contained PGHS-1 isozyme at day 133 of gestation, as demonstrated in the saline-injected animals. Slightly higher PGHS-1 immunoreactivity was observed following induced-labour onset, although this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). PGHS-2 enzyme was not detectable in amnion. PGHS-2 expression was also

  10. Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 among individuals participating in a case–control study in Havana City, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, L; Serraino, D; Rezza, G; Lence, J; Ortiz, R M; Cruz, T; Vaccarella, S; Sarmati, L; Andreoni, M; Franceschi, S

    2002-01-01

    Infection with human herpesvirus type 8 and with human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 shows strong geographic variations. We conducted this study to assess prevalence and risk factors for human herpesvirus type 8 infection in Havana City, Cuba. Information and residual serum samples already collected for a hospital based case–control study were used. A total of 379 individuals (267 males and 112 females; median age=63 years) were evaluated. Antibodies to the lytic antigen of human herpesvirus type 8 were detected by using an immunofluorescence assay, while human T-cell leukaemia virus type-1 serology was performed by means of an ELISA test (alpha Biotech). Overall, 64 subjects (16.9%, 95% confidence interval: 13.1–20.0) were positive for human herpesvirus type 8 antibodies. Human herpesvirus type 8 seroprevalence significantly increased with age (odds ratio=1.9 for ⩾65 vs Havana City, Cuba, suggesting that Cuba may represent an intermediate endemical area. Sexual transmission does not seem to play a major role in the spread human herpesvirus type 8 infection. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1253–1256. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600613 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12439714

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human protein interaction database at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, William; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Katz, Kenneth S; Maglott, Donna R; Pruitt, Kim D; Ptak, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Protein Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/HIVInteractions, was created to catalog all interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins published in the peer-reviewed literature. The database serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. To facilitate this discovery approach, the following information for each HIV-1 human protein interaction is provided and can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, Entrez Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. Currently, 2589 unique HIV-1 to human protein interactions and 5135 brief descriptions of the interactions, with a total of 14,312 PMID references to the original articles reporting the interactions, are stored in this growing database. In addition, all protein-protein interactions documented in the database are integrated into Entrez Gene records and listed in the 'HIV-1 protein interactions' section of Entrez Gene reports. The database is also tightly linked to other databases through Entrez Gene, enabling users to search for an abundance of information related to HIV pathogenesis and replication.

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms in human adenovirus type 12 oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Walter

    2009-06-01

    For the past 30 years, my laboratory has concentrated its work on demonstrating that the epigenetic consequences of foreign DNA insertion into established mammalian genomes -de novo DNA methylation of the integrate and alterations of methylation patterns across the recipient genome - are essential elements in setting the stage towards oncogenic transformation. We have primarily studied human adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) which induces undifferentiated tumors in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) either at the site of subcutaneous Ad12 injection or intraperitoneally upon intramuscular injection. Up to 90% of the hamsters injected with Ad12 develop tumors within 3-6 weeks. Integration of foreign DNA, its de novo methylation, and the consequences of insertion on the cellular methylation and transcription profiles have been studied in detail. While viral infections are a frequent source of foreign genomes entering mammalian and other hosts and often their genomes, we have also pursued the fate of food-ingested foreign DNA in the mouse organism. The persistence of this DNA in the animals is transient and there is no evidence for the expression or germ line fixation of foreign DNA. Nevertheless, the occasional cell that carries integrated genomes from that foreign source deserves the oncologist's sustained interest.

  13. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  14. The role of prostaglandins in human parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, W

    1998-06-01

    Parturition is the process of giving birth, and the molecular mechanisms involved are still to be elucidated. Among the various factors involved prostaglandins appear to have an important role. They are synthesized within the human fetal membranes (amnion and chorion) and decidua and act to ripen the cervix, change membrane structure and contract the myometrium. Prostaglandin concentrations increase in amniotic fluid prior to myometrial contractions, and the activity of prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) increases in the chorion laeve and amnion at labour. This increase is due to increased expression of the PGHS-2 isoenzyme rather than the PGHS-1 isoenzyme. In animal pregnancy, there is also an increase in the expression of the PGHS-2 isoenzyme, and in both human and animal pregnancies this increase appears to occur in the fetal tissues rather than in the maternal tissues. Prostaglandin metabolism also plays an important role in altering prostaglandin output by the human fetal membranes. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH) activity decreases in certain cases of preterm labour, and at term it decreases in the area of the chorion laeve covering the cervix. This may allow active prostaglandins produced by the amnion and chorion to access the cervix and myometrium. Recent studies have indicated that glucocorticoids may be important in regulating prostaglandin formation within the human fetal membranes by increasing expression of PGHS-2 in the amnion and decreasing PGDH activity in the chorion. Prostaglandin formation is also important in infection-induced preterm labour and both phospholipase and PGHS-2 activities can be increased by various cytokines. Prostaglandins are important for the onset of both term and preterm parturition and their effects may result from changes in prostaglandin synthesis, prostaglandin metabolism and expression of various prostaglandin receptors.

  15. The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Nakai, M; Ikuta, K

    1998-01-01

    The life-cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been studied using several techniques including immunoelectron microscopy and cryomicroscopy. The HIV-1 particle consists of an envelope, a core and the region between the core and the envelope (matrix). Virus particles in the extracellular space are observed as having various profiles: a central or an eccentric round electron-dense core, a bar-shaped electron-dense core, and immature doughnut-shaped particle. HIV-1 particles in the hydrated state were observed by high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy to be spherical and the lipid membrane was clearly resolved as a bilayer. Projections around the circumference were seen to be knob-like. The shapes and sizes of the projections, especially the head parts, were found to vary with each projection. HIV-1 cores were isolated with a mixture of Nonidet P40 and glutaraldehyde, and were confirmed to consist of HIV-1 Gag p24 protein by immunogold labelling. On infection, the HIV-1 virus was found to enter the cell in two ways: membrane fusion and endocytosis. After viral entry, no structures resembling virus particles could be seen in the cytoplasm. In the infected cells, positive reactions by immunolabelling suggest that HIV-1 Gag is produced in membrane-bound structures and transported to the cell surface by the cytoskeletons. A crescent electron-dense layer is then formed underneath the cell membrane. Finally, the virus particle is released from the cell surface and found extracellularly to be a complete virus particle with an electron-dense core. However, several cell clones producing defective mature, doughnut-shaped (immature) or teardrop-shaped particles were found to be produced in the extracellular space. In the doughnut-shaped particles, Gag p17 and p24 proteins exist facing each other against an inner electron-dense ring, suggesting that the inner ring consists of a precursor Gag protein showing a defect at the viral proteinase.

  16. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  17. The correlation between histologic placentitis and amnionitis and the amnioniotic fluid's inflammatory cytokines in case of spontaneous pre-term labor with intact membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Abadi

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Pre-term labor is presumed to result from spreading of lower genital infection to upper part, subsequently to decidual and choioamniotic tissues. Host response to this injury include the expression of protein which is responsible to the inflammatory reactions. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α increase in case of infection.These cytokines may play an essential role in the pathophysiology of spontaneous pretem labor with intact membrane.An observational analytic cohort study was caried out on cases of spontaneous pre-tefln labor with intact membrane. The objectives of this study are to examine the relationship between l the histologic amnionitis and placentitis and the incidence of preterm delivery,2 the expression of amniotic fluid's IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and the incidence of preterm delivery, 3 the level of amniotic fluid's IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and the grade of histologic amnionitis and placentitis in case of pre-term labor with intact membrane. Cases of spontaneous Pre'teftn labor with intact membrane which underwent transabdominal amniocentesis at admission and managed as standard procedure for pre-term labor with intact membrane. Atl of the cases were observed until the delivery of the baby, eithir preterm or term. The membrane and the placentawere cut postnatally and then the histologic acute inflammation eyaluated based on the criteria of Salafia.The level of amniotic fluid IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were analyzed quantitatively by Elisa method. This study showed thet the degree of histologic amnionitis and placentitis, and the level of amniotic fluid's IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were significantly higher in pre-term compared to terrn deliveries (p<0.05 and lhere were a positive correlation between the grade of histoLogic inflammation and the level of amniotic fluid's cytokines (Spearmann Rank Conelation test; p<0,05 in cases of preterm labor with intact membrane. The

  18. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 16 pseudovirus containing histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kwag, Hye-Lim; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-08-27

    Pseudoviruses (PsVs) that encapsidate a reporter plasmid DNA have been used as surrogates for native human papillomavirus (HPV), whose continuous production is technically difficult. HPV PsVs have been designed to form capsids made up of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid proteins L2. HPV PsVs have been produced in 293TT cells transfected with plasmid expressing L1 and L2 protein and plasmid containing the reporter gene. Several studies have suggested that naturally occurring HPV virions contain cellular histones, and histones have also been identified in mature HPV PsVs. However, the effect of the histones on the properties of the PsVs has not been investigated. Using heparin chromatography, we separated mature HPV type 16 PsVs into three fractions (I, II, and III) according to their heparin-binding affinities. The amounts of cellular histone and cellular nucleotides per PsV were found to increase in the order fraction I, II and III. It appeared that PsVs in fraction I contains just small amount of cellular histone in Western blot analysis. The proportions of the three fractions in PsV preparations were 83.4, 7.5, and 9.1 % for fraction I, II, and III PsVs, respectively. In the electron microscope PsVs in fraction I appeared to have a more condensed structure than those in fractions II and III. Under the electron microscope fraction II and III PsVs appeared to be covered by substantial amounts of cellular histone while there was no visible histone covering PsVs of fraction I. Also the levels of reporter gene expression in infections of fraction II and III PsVs to 293TT cells were significantly lower than those in infections of fraction I PsV, and fraction II and III particles had significantly reduced immunogenicity. Our findings suggest that the involvement of large amounts of cellular histones during PsV formation interferes with the structural integrity of the PsVs and affects their immunogenicity. The fraction I particle therefore has the most

  19. Ultracytochemical study on the permeability of the human amniotic epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, S; Tamada, T

    1991-06-01

    In order to elucidate and characterize the transport pathway of the substances in the amniotic fluid, the permeability of the term human amnion was studied ultracytochemically, with lanthanum or horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer. Pieces of the term human amnion were exposed to the solutions containing lanthanum or HRP, and processed for electronmicroscopy. Precipitates indicating lanthanum or HRP were observed in the lateral intercellular spaces of the amniotic epithelial cells through the entire depth of the spaces. Generally, pinocytosis of HPR was not observed. In rare cases, however, diffuse uptake of HRP was noticed in the cells of the electron-lucent cytoplasm. These facts indicated that the human amniotic epithelium is quite permeable and that this particular intercellular pathway is important in the mechanism of the transfer of substances between the mother and the fetus.

  20. Is ageing associated with a shift in the balance between Type 1 and Type 2 cytokines in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandmand, M; Bruunsgaard, H; Kemp, K

    2002-01-01

    The balance between Type 1 and Type 2 cytokines is important for the outcome of several infectious diseases. As elderly humans show increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases, this study tests if ageing is associated with a change towards Type 2 dominance in T cells. Expression...... adjusting for decreased lymphocyte counts in the elderly, the concentration in the blood of IFN-gamma+ and IL-4+ CD8+ T cells was still increased in the 81-year-olds. In centenarians, a shift towards a relative dominance of Type 2 cytokine expression was found within CD8+ T cells. Furthermore...

  1. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  2. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  3. Salmonella-Typhimurium phage types from human salmonellosis in denmark 1988 to 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Gaarslev, K.

    1994-01-01

    and 194. It is concluded that phage typing, although here performed retrospectively, produces valuable epidemiological information regarding changes in the relative importance of different sources of infection in humans. It is suggested that phage typing be performed prospectively on both human and animal......A total of 989 isolates of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium from cases of human salmonellosis were investigated by phage typing, The isolates comprised all isolates recovered during the month of August in each of the years from 1988 to 1993. Phage typing assigned 82.......6% of the strains to 36 different definitive types, 11.9% of the strains belonged to types of unknown lysis pattern (RDNC), and 5.5% could not be typed by the phages used (NT). Three phage types (12, 66 and 110) made up approximately 50% of the isolates in each of the years investigated. During the period...

  4. Methylation of Promoter Regions of Genes of the Human Intrauterine Renin Angiotensin System and Their Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D. Sykes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrauterine renin angiotensin system (RAS is implicated in placentation and labour onset. Here we investigate whether promoter methylation of RAS genes changes with gestation or labour and if it affects gene expression. Early gestation amnion and placenta were studied, as were term amnion, decidua, and placenta collected before labour (at elective caesarean section or after spontaneous labour and delivery. The expression and degree of methylation of the prorenin receptor (ATP6AP2, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1, and two proteases that can activate prorenin (kallikrein, KLK1, and cathepsin D, CTSD were measured by qPCR and a DNA methylation array. There was no effect of gestation or labour on the methylation of RAS genes and CTSD. Amnion and decidua displayed strong correlations between the percent hypermethylation of RAS genes and CTSD, suggestive of global methylation. There were no correlations between the degree of methylation and mRNA abundance of any genes studied. KLK1 was the most methylated gene and the proportion of hypermethylated KLK1 alleles was lower in placenta than decidua. The presence of intermediate methylated alleles of KLK1 in early gestation placenta and in amnion after labour suggests that KLK1 methylation is uniquely dynamic in these tissues.

  5. Selective exposure of the fetal lung and skin/amnion (but not gastro-intestinal tract) to LPS elicits acute systemic inflammation in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Matthew W; Kannan, Paranthaman Senthamarai; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P; Cox, Tom; Jobe, Alan H; Kramer, Boris W; Kallapur, Suhas G

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the uterine environment (commonly as a result of microbial colonisation of the fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and fetus) is strongly associated with preterm labour and birth. Both preterm birth and fetal inflammation are independently associated with elevated risks of subsequent short- and long-term respiratory, gastro-intestinal and neurological complications. Despite numerous clinical and experimental studies to investigate localised and systemic fetal inflammation following exposure to microbial agonists, there is minimal data to describe which fetal organ(s) drive systemic fetal inflammation. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E.coli in an instrumented ovine model of fetal inflammation and conducted a series of experiments to assess the systemic pro-inflammatory capacity of the three major fetal surfaces exposed to inflammatory mediators in pregnancy (the lung, gastro-intestinal tract and skin/amnion). Exposure of the fetal lung and fetal skin/amnion (but not gastro-intestinal tract) caused a significant acute systemic inflammatory response characterised by altered leucocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated plasma MCP-1 levels and inflammation of the fetal liver and spleen. These novel findings reveal differential fetal organ responses to pro-inflammatory stimulation and shed light on the pathogenesis of fetal systemic inflammation after exposure to chorioamnionitis.

  6. Human Rights Education in Israel: Four Types of Good Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbaria, Ayman K.; Katz-Pade, Revital

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the involvement of civil society organizations in human rights education (HRE) in Israel. Focussing on the educational programs of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), as a qualitative instrumental case study, this article examines the conceptions of good citizenship embedded in these programs. Specifically, the…

  7. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  8. Transitions between the Arabidopsis-type and the human-type telomere sequence in green algae (clade Caudivolvoxa, Chlamydomonadales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulnečková, Jana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Lukešová, Alena; Sýkorová, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures that distinguish native chromosomal ends from double-stranded breaks. They are maintained by telomerase that adds short G-rich telomeric repeats at chromosomal ends in most eukaryotes and determines the TnAmGo sequence of canonical telomeres. We employed an experimental approach that was based on detection of repeats added by telomerase to identify the telomere sequence type forming the very ends of chromosomes. Our previous studies that focused on the algal order Chlamydomonadales revealed several changes in telomere motifs that were consistent with the phylogeny and supported the concept of the Arabidopsis-type sequence being the ancestral telomeric motif for green algae. In addition to previously described independent transitions to the Chlamydomonas-type sequence, we report that the ancestral telomeric motif was replaced by the human-type sequence in the majority of algal species grouped within a higher order clade, Caudivolvoxa. The Arabidopsis-type sequence was apparently retained in the Polytominia clade. Regarding the telomere sequence, the Chlorogonia clade within Caudivolvoxa bifurcates into two groups, one with the human-type sequence and the other group with the Arabidopsis-type sequence that is solely formed by the Chlorogonium species. This suggests that reversion to the Arabidopsis-type telomeric motif occurred in the common ancestral Chlorogonium species. The human-type sequence is also synthesized by telomerases of algal strains from Arenicolinia, Dunaliellinia and Stephanosphaerinia, except a distinct subclade within Stephanosphaerinia, where telomerase activity was not detected and a change to an unidentified telomeric motif might arise. We discuss plausible reasons why changes in telomeric motifs were tolerated during evolution of green algae.

  9. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  10. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at recapitulating...... the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  11. Characterization of Enteroviruses from non-human primates in cameroon revealed virus types widespread in humans along with candidate new types and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Alain Sadeuh-Mba

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses (EVs infecting African Non-Human Primates (NHP are still poorly documented. This study was designed to characterize the genetic diversity of EVs among captive and wild NHP in Cameroon and to compare this diversity with that found in humans. Stool specimens were collected in April 2008 in NHP housed in sanctuaries in Yaounde and neighborhoods. Moreover, stool specimens collected from wild NHP from June 2006 to October 2008 in the southern rain forest of Cameroon were considered. RNAs purified directly from stool samples were screened for EVs using a sensitive RT-nested PCR targeting the VP1 capsid coding gene whose nucleotide sequence was used for molecular typing. Captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla were primarily infected by EV types already reported in humans in Cameroon and elsewhere: Coxsackievirus A13 and A24, Echovirus 15 and 29, and EV-B82. Moreover EV-A119, a novel virus type recently described in humans in central and west Africa, was also found in a captive Chimpanzee. EV-A76, which is a widespread virus in humans, was identified in wild chimpanzees, thus suggesting its adaptation and parallel circulation in human and NHP populations in Cameroon. Interestingly, some EVs harbored by wild NHP were genetically distinct from all existing types and were thus assigned as new types. One chimpanzee-derived virus was tentatively assigned as EV-J121 in the EV-J species. In addition, two EVs from wild monkeys provisionally registered as EV-122 and EV-123 were found to belong to a candidate new species. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic diversity of EVs among NHP is more important than previously known and could be the source of future new emerging human viral diseases.

  12. DNA typing of Calliphorids collected from human corpses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, R; Tan, T C; Lee, H L; Nazni, W A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of post-mortem interval (PMI) is crucial for time of death determination. The advent of DNA-based identification techniques forensic entomology saw the beginning of a proliferation of molecular studies into forensically important Calliphoridae (Diptera). The use of DNA to characterise morphologically indistinguishable immature calliphorids was recognised as a valuable molecular tool with enormous practical utility. The local entomofauna in most cases is important for the examination of entomological evidences. The survey of the local entomofauna has become a fundamental first step in forensic entomological studies, because different geographical distributions, seasonal and environmental factors may influence the decomposition process and the occurrence of different insect species on corpses. In this study, calliphorids were collected from 13 human corpses recovered from indoors, outdoors and aquatic conditions during the post-mortem examination by pathologists from the government hospitals in Malaysia. Only two species, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies were recovered from human corpses. DNA sequencing was performed to study the mitochondrial encoded COI gene and to evaluate the suitability of the 1300 base pairs of COI fragments for identification of blow fly species collected from real crime scene. The COI gene from blow fly specimens were sequenced and deposited in GenBank to expand local databases. The sequenced COI gene was useful in identifying calliphorids retrieved from human corpses.

  13. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting human T lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Rodrigues Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1, n = 1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; G2, n = 1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 screening; Western blotting (WB, INNO-LIA (LIA, real-time PCR pol (qPCR, and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and human T lymphotropic virus infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline: 56 human T lymphotropic virus type 1 [G1 (27 + G2 (29]; 45 human T lymphotropic virus type 2 [G1 (21 + G2 (24]; one human T lymphotropic virus type 1 + human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (G2; six human T lymphotropic virus [G1 (2 + G2 (4]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1 and 4.2% (G2, p = 0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of human T lymphotropic virus infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the human T

  14. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  15. Recombinant human Fab fragments neutralize human type 1 immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, C F; Björling, E; Chiodi, F; Dunlop, N; Cababa, D; Jones, T M; Zebedee, S L; Persson, M A; Nara, P L; Norrby, E

    1992-01-01

    A panel of 20 recombinant Fab fragments reactive with the surface glycoprotein gp120 of human type 1 immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were examined for their ability to neutralize MN and IIIB strains of the virus. Neutralization was determined as the ability of the Fab fragments to inhibit infection as measured in both a p24 ELISA and a syncytium-formation assay. One group of closely sequence-related Fab fragments was found to neutralize virus in both assays with a 50% neutralization titer at approximately 1 micrograms/ml. Another Fab neutralized in the p24 ELISA but not in the syncytium assay. The other Fab fragments showed weak or no neutralizing ability. The results imply that virion aggregation or crosslinking of gp120 molecules on the virion surface is not an absolute requirement for HIV-1 neutralization. Further, all of the Fab fragments were shown to be competitive with soluble CD4 for binding to gp120 and yet few neutralized the virus effectively, implying that the mechanism of neutralization in this case may not involve receptor blocking. The observation of a preponderance of high-affinity Fab fragments with poor or no neutralizing ability could have implications for vaccine strategies. PMID:1384050

  16. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  17. Morphological method for the diagnosis of human adult type hypolactasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Maiuri, L; M. Rossi; V. Raia; Paparo, F; Coletta, S; Mazzeo, F; Breglia, A; Auricchio, S

    1994-01-01

    The primary adult type hypolactasia is the most common form of genetically determined disaccharidase deficiency. This study examined a large and homogeneous population of the south of Italy: surgical biopsy specimens of proximal jejunum from 178 adult subjects have been assayed for disaccharidase activities; the expression of lactase protein and lactase activity has also been investigated on tissue sections by immunomorphological and enzymohistochemical techniques. Histograms of lactase to su...

  18. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility.

  19. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  20. Transformation of human fetal thymus and spleen lymphocytes by human t-cell leukemia virus type Ι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-cultivation of human thymus and spleen lymphocytes, which were obtained from 26-week and 27-week fetuses, with a lethally-irradiated human cord T-cell line harboring human T-cell leukemia virus type Ι(HTLV-Ι resultes in the establishment of T-cell lines positive for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens and producing HTLV-Ι. These cell lines had the phenotype of a helper/inducer subset of peripheral T-cells as evidenced by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to human T-cells.

  1. Fibre type-specific change in FXYD1 phosphorylation during acute intense exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Martin; Murphy, Robyn M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine fibre type-specific Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit expression and exercise-induced alterations in phospholemman (FXYD1) phosphorylation in humans. Segments of human skeletal muscle fibres were dissected and fibre typed, and protein expression was determined...... by Western blotting. The protein expression of the Na(+)-K(+) pump a2 isoform was lower in type I than in type II fibres (0.63 ± 0.04 a.u. vs. 1.00 ± 0.07 a.u., P ... channel Kir6.2 was higher in type I compared with type II fibres. In both type I (P type II fibres (P

  2. Developing Educational Computer Animation Based on Human Personality Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Musa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation in the past decade has become one of the most noticeable features of technology-based learning environments. By its definition, it refers to simulated motion pictures showing movement of drawn objects, and is often defined as the art in movement. Its educational application known as educational computer animation is considered to be one of the most elegant ways for preparing materials for teaching, and its importance in assisting learners to process, understand and remember information efficiently has vastly grown since the advent of powerful graphics-oriented computers era. Based on theories and facts of psychology, colour science, computer animation, geometric modelling and technical aesthetics, this study intends to establish an inter-disciplinary area of research towards a greater educational effectiveness. With today’s high educational demands as well as the lack of time provided for certain courses, classical educational methods have shown deficiencies in keeping up with the drastic changes observed in the digital era. Generally speaking, without taking into account various significant factors as, for instance, gender, age, level of interest and memory level, educational animations may turn out to be insufficient for learners or fail to meet their needs. Though, we have noticed that the applications of animation for education have been given only inadequate attention, and students’ personality types of temperaments (sanguine, choleric, melancholic, phlegmatic, etc. have never been taken into account. We suggest there is an interesting relationship here, and propose essential factors in creating educational animations based on students’ personality types. Particularly, we study how information in computer animation may be presented in a more preferable way based on font types and their families, colours and colour schemes, emphasizing texts, shapes of characters designed by planar quadratic Bernstein-Bézier curves

  3. Morphological analysis of amnion stored in glycerol sterilized with different doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fernando Augusto N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Martino Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci Diva B.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: fernandonevessoares@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CTR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes

    2013-07-01

    The amniotic membrane (AM) is the innermost layer of the fetal membranes (placenta), widely used in transplantation being a tissue that combines anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifibrotic, and limited immunogenicity. The tissue can be used a bandage biological for treatment of burns and skin wounds, chronic ulcers, reconstructions from different body areas, including ophthalmic repairs. In the last decades the amniotic membrane has been used widely also as a carrier substrate to transfer tissues cultured 'in vitro'. The use of fresh membrane has some limitations, the main ones are being necessary your quick use and the inability to obtain full security for certain infections. Other types of preservation require a processing thereof. The radiosterilization is an alternative for ensuring quality and safety of tissues used in transplants, and other clinical applications in order to minimize the risk of contamination of the receptor tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test various doses of radiation using two sources of ionizing radiation: the cobalt-60 irradiator Gamma and Electron Beam Accelerator (E.B.). A tissue analysis was done by visual and tactile qualitative analysis, semi-quantitative (solid colorimetry) and light microscopy to observe morphological and physic-chemical changes after the irradiation of AM preserved in glycerol, comparing the results obtained with the sample not irradiated. It was noted that at higher doses, for both radiation sources, irradiated membranes suffered greater color change, becoming yellowish and thereby reducing their initial malleability. (author)

  4. Increased oxidative stress in human fetal membranes overlying the cervix from term non-labouring and post labour deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, M; Barker, G; Menon, R; Lappas, M

    2012-08-01

    Enzymatic breakdown of the collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) that connects the amnion and chorion layers of the fetal membranes is one of the key events leading to rupture of membranes. Oxidant stress caused by increased formation of reactive oxygen species and/or reduced antioxidant capacity may predispose to membrane rupture, a major cause of preterm birth. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human labour and supracervical (SC) apposition on antioxidant enzymes and 8-isoprostane (a marker of lipid peroxidation). To determine the effect of human labour on oxidative stress status, fetal membranes from the SC site (SCS) were collected from women at term Caesarean section (no labour), and from the site of membrane rupture (SOR) after spontaneous labour onset and delivery (post labour). To determine the effect of SC apposition on oxidative stress status, amnion was collected from the SCS and a distal site (DS) in women at term Caesarean section in the absence of labour. The release of 8-isoprostane was significantly higher in amnion from the SCS compared to DS, and in fetal membranes from the SOR compared to the SCS. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were lower in amnion from the SC compared to DS. SOD gene expression and enzyme activity were lower in fetal membranes after labour. There was no difference in expression or activity in catalase, GPx and glutathione reductase (GSR) between no labour and post labour fetal membranes. In primary amnion cells, SOD supplementation significantly augmented IL-1β induced MMP-9 expression and activity. In summary, non-labouring SC fetal membranes are characterised by reduced antioxidant enzyme activity when compared to distal membranes, and, as such, may be more susceptible to oxidative damage and thus membrane rupture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  6. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  7. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  8. Life table analysis of Cimex hemipterus F. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) reared on different types of human blood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abd Rahim, Abd Hafis; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the development time of each immature stage and total development time of Cimex hemipterus reared on human blood type A, B, O and AB, and to compare survivorship and fecundity of Cimex...

  9. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  10. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  11. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  12. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by cdk inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehn-Hall Kylene

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection relies primarily on the administration of anti-retroviral nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with HIV-protease inhibitors. Although these drugs have a clinical benefit, continuous therapy with the drugs leads to drug-resistant strains of the virus. Recently, significant progress has been made towards the development of natural and synthetic agents that can directly inhibit HIV-1 replication or its essential enzymes. We previously reported on the pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (PCI r-roscovitine as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. PCIs are among the most promising novel antiviral agents to emerge over the past few years. Potent activity on viral replication combined with proliferation inhibition without the emergence of resistant viruses, which are normally observed in HAART patients; make PCIs ideal candidates for HIV-1 inhibition. To this end we evaluated twenty four cdk inhibitors for their effect on HIV-1 replication in vitro. Screening of these compounds identified alsterpaullone as the most potent inhibitor of HIV-1 with activity at 150 nM. We found that alsterpaullone effectively inhibits cdk2 activity in HIV-1 infected cells with a low IC50 compared to control uninfected cells. The effects of alsterpaullone were associated with suppression of cdk2 and cyclin expression. Combining both alsterpaullone and r-roscovitine (cyc202 in treatment exhibited even stronger inhibitory activities in HIV-1 infected PBMCs.

  13. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  14. Enhanced human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 expression and neuropathogenesis in knockout mice lacking Type I interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongxia; Sharer, Leroy R; Chao, Wei; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Borjabad, Alejandra; Hadas, Eran; Kelschenbach, Jennifer; Ichiyama, Koji; Do, Meilan; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Type I interferon (IFN) in human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) neuropathogenesis are poorly understood; both protective and deleterious effects of IFN signaling have been described. We used genetically modified mice deficient in the Type I IFN receptor (IFNRKO) to analyze the progress of HIV-1 brain infection and neuropathogenesis in the absence of IFN signaling. IFNRKO and wild-type (WT) mice on the 129xSv/Ev or C57BL/6 strain backgrounds were infected systemically with EcoHIV, a chimeric HIV-1 that productively infects mice. IFNRKO mice showed higher HIV-1 expression in spleen and peritoneal macrophages and greater virus infiltration into the brain compared to WT mice. Neuropathogenesis was studied by histopathological, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissues after the virus was inoculated into the brain by stereotaxic intracerebral injection. Both IFNRKO and WT mice showed readily detectable HIV-1 and brain lesions, including microglial activation, astrocytosis, and increased expression of genes coding for inflammatory cytokines and chemokines typical of human HIV-1 brain disease. Parameters of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, including HIV-1 expression in microglia/macrophages, were significantly greater in IFNRKO than in WT mice. Our results show unequivocally that Type I IFN signaling and responses limit HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis in the brains of mice.

  15. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. EXPRESSION AND SWITCHING OF TH 1/TH2 TYPE CYTOKINES GENE IN HUMAN GLIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-sheng Hu; Xin-gang Li; Qing-lin Zhang; Dong-hai Wang; Song-feng Gong

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the expression and switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene in hman gliomas and its effects on occurring and developing of human gliomas.Methods Interleukin(IL)-2 and intefferon-γ represent Th1 type cytokines. IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13 represent Th2 type cytokines. The gene expressions of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human glioma cells, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes,and glioma cell lines were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The biological activity of cytokines in the supematant of glioma cell lines was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)method.Results The total positive rates of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines gene in human glioma cells were 14.77% and 75%. The total positive rates of Thl and Th2 type cytokines gene in glioma infiltrating lymphocytes were 22.73% and 68.17%. There was obviously predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma tissues, glioma infiltrating lymphocytes, and glioma cell lines. There was no unbalanced expression of Th1/Th2 cytokines in normal brain tissues.Conclusion There is a predominant expression of Th2 type cytokines in human glioma cells. The switching of Th1/Th2 cytokines gene may play an important role in the occurring and developing of human gliomas.

  17. Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels and blood pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Baumunk, Daniel; Krause, Hans;

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but this has not been studied using human renal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of TRPC3 in human renal tissue is associated with blood...

  18. Cultivating New-type Farmers Based on the Theory of Human Resources Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Under the direction of theory of human resources development, this thesis analyzes the impact of rural human resources development on cultivating new-type farmers. Firstly, it increases the input of rural basic education; secondly, it reinforces the vocational education and technology training; thirdly, it promotes the rural medical and public health services; fourthly, it quickens the rural labor transfer. The status quo of China’s rural human resources has been analyzed as follows: in ter...

  19. Worldwide Genomic Diversity of the High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Types 31, 35, 52, and 58, Four Close Relatives of Human Papillomavirus Type 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Villa, Luisa L.; Prado, Jose C.; Kalantari, Mina; Allan, Bruce; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Chung, Lap-Ping; Collins, Robert J.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Dunn, S. Terence; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Cubie, Heather A.; Cuschieri, Kate; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Martins, Claudia R.; Sanchez, Gloria I.; Bosch, F. Xavier; Munoz, Nubia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Among the more than one hundred formally described human papillomavirus (HPV) types, 18 are referred to as high-risk HPV types due to their association with anogenital cancer. Despite pathogenic similarities, these types form three remotely related taxonomic groups. One of these groups is called HPV species 9 and is formed by HPV-16, the most common and best-studied type, together with HPV-31, -33, -35, -52, -58, and -67. Previous worldwide comparisons of HPV-16 samples showed about 2% nucleotide diversity between isolates, which were subsequently termed variants. The distribution of divergent variants has been found to correlate frequently with the geographic origin and the ethnicity of the infected patients and led to the concept of unique African, European, Asian, and Native American HPV-16 variants. In the current study, we address the question of whether geography and ethnicity also correlate with sequence variations found for HPV-31, -35, -52, and -58. This was done by sequencing the long control region in samples derived from Europe, Asia, and Africa, and from immigrant populations in North and South America. We observed maximal divergence between any two variants within each of these four HPV types ranging from 1.8 to 3.6% based on nucleotide exchanges and, occasionally, on insertions and deletions. Similar to the case with HPV-16, these mutations are not random but indicate a relationship between the variants in form of phylogenetic trees. An interesting example is presented by a 16-bp insert in select variants of HPV-35, which appears to have given rise to additional variants by nucleotide exchanges within the insert. All trees showed distinct phylogenetic topologies, ranging from dichotomic branching in the case of HPV-31 to star phylogenies of the other three types. No clear similarities between these types or between these types and HPV-16 exist. While variant branches in some types were specific for Europe, Africa, or East Asia, none of the four trees

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  1. Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in human tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Qing; Vicki L Clifton; CUI Ying; HUI Ning; ZHOU Xiao-ning; HE Qian; HAN Qing-feng; SHA Jin-yan; Roger Smith

    2001-01-01

    To localize where urocortin is expressed in human tissue in an attempt to study its physiological functions. Methods: Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in different human tissue was examined using a specific urocortin antibody and the immunoperoxidase staining method. Results: Immunoreactive urocortin was observed in the anterior pituitary cells, decidual stromal cells, syncytiotrophoblasts, amnion epithelium, the vascular smooth muscles of myometrium, fallopian tube and small intestine. Conclusion: The study indicates that urocortin is expressed in some specific areas of human tissue. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that urocortin is produced locally as an endocrine factor, which may act as a neural regulator and a regulator of local blood flow.

  2. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in

  3. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  4. Identification of intermediate cell types by keratin expression in the developing human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y; Smedts, F; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH; Schalken, JA

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The secretory acini of the adult human prostate contain basal, luminal, and intermediate types of exocrine cells. Intermediate cells are thought to play an important role in normal growth and neoplastic transformation. In this study we investigated whether this cell type is present in ea

  5. Human autologous and allogeneic rosettes with erythrocytes of the Bombay type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J M; Bigel, P; Mayer, S

    1977-06-01

    Human red blood cells of the Bombay type which lack ABH group substances can bind to allogeneic lymphocytes just as well as erythrocytes of any other type. A much lower percentage of auto-rosettes between erythrocytes and lymphocytes from the Bombay donor was observed, a result which may be due at least partially to some T lymphocyte defect in the Bombay donor.

  6. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

  7. The Role of Amnion Membrane-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Differentiation and Expansion of Natural Killer Cell Progenitors Originated From Umbilical Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Natural killer (NK cells are members of the innate immune system. Their unique properties, including recognition of viral infected and tumor cells without major histocompatibility complex (MHC restriction or prior sensitization, make them a suitable choice for immunotherapy. Low numbers of NK cells in circulating blood is the most important obstacle for this goal. Objectives The aim of this study was to make an optimum in vitro condition to proliferate and differentiate cord blood (CB-NK cell progenitors to mature NK cells, which can be used for cell therapy. Materials and Methods In our study, CB-Mononuclear Cells’ (MNCs CD3+ lymphocytes were positive depleted using immunomagnetic microbeads. This CD3-depleted (CD3-dep CB - MNCs compartment was used for in vitro expansion with or without a layer of amnion membrane mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in combination with cytokines that are essential for NK cells expansion (IL-2, IL-3, IL-15, and FLT3 ligand. The expansion period lasted for one week. On day seven, immunophenotype and fold expansion of differentiated cells were measured. Results Combination of cytokines and MSC layer yielded significant fold expansion in comparison with cytokines without feeder conditions (day 7: 5.2 ± 1.12 and 2 ± 0.78, respectively, P < 0.05. CD3-/CD56+ cells percentage increased during the culture period in MSCs/with cytokine and cytokine/without feeder, respectively (day 0: 4.4 ± 0.42% and day 7: 22.9 ± 3.6% and 13.9 ± 1.92 % for MSC/with cytokine and cytokine without feeder, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggested that CB-NK cells progenitors could proliferate and differentiate on feeder layer of amnion membrane MSCs in combination with specific cytokines to produce NK cells for immunotherapy.

  8. C-type natriuretic-derived peptides as biomarkers in human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The natriuretic peptide system comprises three structurally related peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide. In circulation, they play an important endocrine role in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis by maintaining blood pressure...... and extracellular fluid volume. Atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide have gained considerable diagnostic interest as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. By contrast, C-type natriuretic peptide has not yet been ascribed a role in human diagnostics. This perspective aims at recapitulating...... the present biochemical and clinical issues concerning C-type natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma as a potential biomarker....

  9. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 13 from focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfister, H.; Hettich, I; Runne, U.; Gissmann, L; Chilf, G N

    1983-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions of a Turkish patient were shown to contain papillomavirus-specific DNA, which was molecularly cloned into bacteriophage lambda. It proved to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6 DNA and HPV type 11 DNA. Reassociation kinetics revealed a cross-hybridization of 4 and 3%, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with HPV type 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, or 10. This papillomavirus type will be referred to as HPV type 13. The DNA was characterized by c...

  10. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis...

  11. DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Nishino

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic reprogramming is a critical event in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. Here, we determined the DNA methylation profiles of 22 human iPSC lines derived from five different cell types (human endometrium, placental artery endothelium, amnion, fetal lung fibroblast, and menstrual blood cell and five human embryonic stem cell (ESC lines, and we followed the aberrant methylation sites in iPSCs for up to 42 weeks. The iPSCs exhibited distinct epigenetic differences from ESCs, which were caused by aberrant methylation at early passages. Multiple appearances and then disappearances of random aberrant methylation were detected throughout iPSC reprogramming. Continuous passaging of the iPSCs diminished the differences between iPSCs and ESCs, implying that iPSCs lose the characteristics inherited from the parent cells and adapt to very closely resemble ESCs over time. Human iPSCs were gradually reprogrammed through the "convergence" of aberrant hyper-methylation events that continuously appeared in a de novo manner. This iPS reprogramming consisted of stochastic de novo methylation and selection/fixation of methylation in an environment suitable for ESCs. Taken together, random methylation and convergence are driving forces for long-term reprogramming of iPSCs to ESCs.

  12. Comparison of virulence factors and capsular types of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from human and bovine infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaneini, Mohammad; Khoramian, Babak; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Abani, Samira; Dabiri, Hossein; Beigverdi, Reza

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a leading cause of human and bovine infections. A total of 194 S. agalactiae isolates, 55 isolates from bovines and 139 from humans, were analyzed for capsular types, virulence genes (scpB, hly, rib, bca and bac) and mobile genetic elements (IS1548 and GBSi1) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex PCR. Capsular type III was predominant (61%), followed by types V, II, Ib, and IV. The scpB, hly, bca and bac virulence genes were only found among human isolates. Twelve and 2 distinct virulence gene profiles were identified among human and bovine isolates respectively. The virulence gene profiles scpB- hly- IS1548- rib-bca (51%) and scpB- hly- IS1548- bca (19%) were only predominant among human isolates. The rib gene was the most common virulence gene in both human and bovine isolates. The study showed a high prevalence of virulence genes in S. agalactiae strains isolated from human infections, these result can support the idea that S. agalactiae isolated from humans and bovines are generally unrelated and probably belonged to separate populations.

  13. Cultivating New-type Farmers Based on the Theory of Human Resources Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Under the direction of theory of human resources development,this thesis analyzes the impact of rural human resources development oncultivating new-type farmers.Firstly,it increases the input of rural basic education;secondly,it reinforces the vocational education and technologytraining;thirdly,it promotes the rural medical and public health services;fourthly,it quickens the rural labor transfer.The status quo of China’s ruralhuman resources has been analyzed as follows:in terms of the quantity of rural human resources,the status quo is large and quick-developed baseof rural human resources,high labor participatory rate,and constitution of low age;in terms of the quality of rural human resources,the status quois the ubiquitous low quality of rural human resources,low technological level of rural human resources,and overall low physical quality of farmers;in terms of the structure of rural human resources,the status quo is the irrational industrial structure distribution and imbalanced regional structuredistribution.The thesis also discusses the edification of theory of human resources development in cultivating new-type farmers.First,in terms ofthe control over quantity of rural human resources,it is to keep the stability of family planning policy,and expedite the transfer of rural surplus la-bor;second,in terms of promoting the quality of rural human resources,it is to bolster the development of reserve rural labor force resources,toconstruct the adult educational training system with Chinese characteristics,and to build rural primary health care system;third,in terms of adjus-ting the structure of rural human resources,it is to perfect rural human resources market,and adjust rural economical structure and talents struc-ture.

  14. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian; Heinz, Andrea; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    Collagens of either soft connective or mineralized tissues are subject to continuous remodeling and turnover. Undesired cleavage can be the result of an imbalance between proteases and their inhibitors. Owing to their superhelical structure, collagens are resistant to many proteases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated. The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around these typical sites contains comparatively less prolines, of which some have been proven to be only partially hydroxylated. This is of relevance since partial hydroxylation in the vicinity of a potential scissile bond may have a local effect on the conformational thermodynamics with probable consequences on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Herpes Virus Type 2 (HSV2), Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the Male Genital Tract and Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtot Anne Marie; Pallier Coralie; Testart Jacques

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of infection of the human male genital tract by human herpes virus type 2 (HSV2) or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is well established and their sexual transmission has been the object of many studies. Moreover, medically assisted procreation, which helps in numerous fertility problems, raises the question of new viral risks linked to the application of these new technologies. In this review, we shall consider current knowledge in terms of the presence of HSV2 and HCMV in the different parts of the genital tract of immunocompetent or immunodepressed men. We shall also consider the possibility of viral transmission by the sexual act or by the various techniques used in medically assisted procreation. We shall describe studies in human beings and in animals.

  16. DENV inhibits type I IFN production in infected cells by cleaving human STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aguirre

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a pathogen with a high impact on human health. It replicates in a wide range of cells involved in the immune response. To efficiently infect humans, DENV must evade or inhibit fundamental elements of the innate immune system, namely the type I interferon response. DENV circumvents the host immune response by expressing proteins that antagonize the cellular innate immunity. We have recently documented the inhibition of type I IFN production by the proteolytic activity of DENV NS2B3 protease complex in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. In the present report we identify the human adaptor molecule STING as a target of the NS2B3 protease complex. We characterize the mechanism of inhibition of type I IFN production in primary human MDDCs by this viral factor. Using different human and mouse primary cells lacking STING, we show enhanced DENV replication. Conversely, mutated versions of STING that cannot be cleaved by the DENV NS2B3 protease induced higher levels of type I IFN after infection with DENV. Additionally, we show that DENV NS2B3 is not able to degrade the mouse version of STING, a phenomenon that severely restricts the replication of DENV in mouse cells, suggesting that STING plays a key role in the inhibition of DENV infection and spread in mice.

  17. Types I and III procollagen extension peptides in serum respond to fracture in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Jensen, L T; Andersen, G R

    1992-01-01

    Markers of types I and III collagen turnover were measured in serial blood samples in 16 patients with a Colles' fracture. The collagen markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP......). Significant increases were found of PIIINP within 1 week and of PICP within 2 weeks. This sequential appearance of PIIINP and PICP was found to be in agreement with the appearance of types III and I collagen during early fracture healing as demonstrated in previous animal experimental studies. PICP had...... prove relevant as non-invasive markers of normal and pathological fracture healing in humans....

  18. Millicurrent stimulation of human articular chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen type-I gel and of human osteochondral explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silny Jiri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we investigate the effect of millicurrent treatment on human chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen gel matrix and on human osteochondral explants. Methods Human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic knee joints were enzymatically released and transferred into a collagen type-I gel. Osteochondral explants and cell-seeded gel samples were cultivated in-vitro for three weeks. Samples of the verum groups were stimulated every two days by millicurrent treatment (3 mA, sinusoidal signal of 312 Hz amplitude modulated by two super-imposed signals of 0.28 Hz, while control samples remained unaffected. After recovery, collagen type-I, type-II, aggrecan, interleukin-1β, IL-6, TNFα and MMP13 were examined by immunohistochemistry and by real time PCR. Results With regard to the immunostainings 3 D gel samples and osteochondral explants did not show any differences between treatment and control group. The expression of all investigated genes of the 3 D gel samples was elevated following millicurrent treatment. While osteochondral explant gene expression of col-I, col-II and Il-1β was nearly unaffected, aggrecan gene expression was elevated. Following millicurrent treatment, IL-6, TNFα, and MMP13 gene expression decreased. In general, the standard deviations of the gene expression data were high, resulting in rarely significant results. Conclusions We conclude that millicurrent stimulation of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes cultivated in a 3 D collagen gel and of osteochondral explants directly influences cell metabolism.

  19. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapparel, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Tapparel@hcuge.ch [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Sobo, Komla [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song [Epithelix sárl, 14 Chemin des Aulx, 1228 Plan les Ouates, Geneva (Switzerland); Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent. - Highlights: • A 3D human upper airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro supports HRV-C growth. • HRV-Cs enter and exit preferentially at the apical side of this ALI culture system. • HRV-Cs are acid sensitive. • Temperature sensitivity may be type-dependent for HRV-Cs.

  20. Dynamics and associations of microbial community types across the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-05-15

    A primary goal of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) was to provide a reference collection of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences collected from sites across the human body that would allow microbiologists to better associate changes in the microbiome with changes in health. The HMP Consortium has reported the structure and function of the human microbiome in 300 healthy adults at 18 body sites from a single time point. Using additional data collected over the course of 12-18 months, we used Dirichlet multinomial mixture models to partition the data into community types for each body site and made three important observations. First, there were strong associations between whether individuals had been breastfed as an infant, their gender, and their level of education with their community types at several body sites. Second, although the specific taxonomic compositions of the oral and gut microbiomes were different, the community types observed at these sites were predictive of each other. Finally, over the course of the sampling period, the community types from sites within the oral cavity were the least stable, whereas those in the vagina and gut were the most stable. Our results demonstrate that even with the considerable intra- and interpersonal variation in the human microbiome, this variation can be partitioned into community types that are predictive of each other and are probably the result of life-history characteristics. Understanding the diversity of community types and the mechanisms that result in an individual having a particular type or changing types, will allow us to use their community types to assess disease risk and to personalize therapies.

  1. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. High seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in French human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections.

  3. Natural variation of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 infections in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pádua, E.; Jenkins, A.; S. Brown; Bootman, J.; Paixão, M T; Almond, N; Berry, N

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infections cause severe immunodeficiency in humans, although HIV-2 is associated frequently with reduced virulence and pathogenicity compared to HIV-1. Genetic determinants that play a role in HIV pathogenesis are relatively poorly understood but nef has been implicated in inducing a more pathogenic phenotype in vivo. However, relatively little is known about the role of nef in HIV-2 pathogenesis. To address this, the genetic composition of 44 nef a...

  4. Interaction of human dipeptidyl peptidase IV and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 transcription transactivator in Sf9 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reutter Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV also known as the T cell activation marker CD26 is a multifunctional protein which is involved in various biological processes. The association of human-DPPIV with components of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV1 is well documented and raised some discussions. Several reports implicated the interaction of human-DPPIV with the HIV1 transcription transactivator protein (HIV1-Tat and the inhibition of the dipeptidyl peptidase activity of DPPIV by the HIV1-Tat protein. Furthermore, enzyme kinetic data implied another binding site for the HIV1-Tat other than the active centre of DPPIV. However, the biological significance of this interaction of the HIV1-Tat protein and human-DPPIV has not been studied, yet. Therefore, we focused on the interaction of HIV1-Tat protein with DPPIV and investigated the subsequent biological consequences of this interaction in Spodoptera frugiperda cells, using the BAC-TO-BAC baculovirus system. Results The HIV1-Tat protein (Tat-BRU co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with human-DPPIV protein, following co-expression in the baculovirus-driven Sf9 cell expression system. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of DPPIV protein was up-regulated in Tat/DPPIV-co-expressing cells after 72 h culturing and also in DPPIV-expressing Sf9 cells after application of purified recombinant Tat protein. As opposed to the expression of Tat alone, serine phosphorylation of the Tat protein was decreased when co-expressed with human-DPPIV protein. Conclusions We show for the first time that human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat co-immunoprecipitate. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the interaction of HIV1-Tat and human-DPPIV may be involved in signalling platforms that regulate the biological function of both human-DPPIV and HIV1-Tat.

  5. Efficient induction of cross-presentating human B cell by transduction with human adenovirus type 7 vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Lai, Meimei; Lou, Yunyan; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Huiyan; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Although human autologous B cells represent a promising alternative to dendritic cells (DCs) for easy large-scale preparation, the naive human B cells are always poor at antigen presentation. The safe and effective usage record of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdV7) live vaccines makes it attractive as a promising vaccine vector candidate. To investigate whether HAdV7 vector could be used to induce the human B cells cross-presentation, in the present study, we constructed the E3-defective recombinant HAdV7 vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We demonstrated that naive human B cells can efficiently be transduced, and that the MAPKs/NF-κB pathway can be activated by recombinant HAdV7. We proved that cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, surface molecule MHC class I and the CD86, antigen-processing machinery (APM) compounds ERp57, TAP-1, and TAP-2. were upregulated in HAdV7 transduced human B cells. We also found that CEA-specific IFNγ expression, degranulation, and in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxicities are induced in autologous CD8(+) T cells presensitized by HAd7CEA modified human B cells. Meanwhile, our evidences clearly show that Toll-like receptors 9 (TLR9) antagonist IRS 869 significantly eliminated most of the HAdV7 initiated B cell activation and CD8(+) T cells response, supporting the role and contribution of TLR9 signaling in HAdV7 induced human B cell cross-presentation. Besides a better understanding of the interactions between recombinant HAdV7 and human naive B cells, to our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence to support the use of HAdV7-modified B cells as a vehicle for vaccines and immunotherapy.

  6. Fiber type and metabolic characteristics of lion (Panthera leo), caracal (Caracal caracal) and human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Tertius Abraham; Burroughs, Richard; Hartman, Marthinus Jacobus; Noakes, Timothy David

    2011-06-01

    Lion (Panthera leo) and caracal (Caracal caracal) skeletal muscle samples from Vastus lateralis, Longissimus dorsi and Gluteus medius were analyzed for fiber type and citrate synthase (CS; EC 2.3.3.1), 3-hydroxyacyl Co A dehydrogenase (3HAD; EC 1.1.1.35), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK; EC 2.7.1.11), creatine kinase (CK; EC 2.7.3.2), phosphorylase (PHOS; EC 2.4.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) activities and compared to human runners, the latter also serving as validation of methodology. Both felids had predominantly type IIx fibers (range 50-80%), whereas human muscle had more types I and IIa. Oxidative capacity of both felids (CS: 5-9 μmol/min/g ww and 3HAD: 1.4-2.6 μmol/min/g ww) was lower than humans, whereas the glycolytic capacity was elevated. LDH activity of caracal (346 ± 81) was higher than lion (227 ± 62 μmol/min/g ww), with human being the lowest (55 ± 17). CK and PHOS activities were also higher in caracal and lion compared to human, but PFK was lower in both felid species. The current data and past research are illustrated graphically showing a strong relationship between type II fibers and sprinting ability in various species. These data on caracal and lion muscles confirm their sprinting behavior.

  7. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J;

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control...... to control metabolic diseases by modifying the gut microbiota....... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies...

  8. Multilocus sequence types of Finnish bovine Campylobacter jejuni isolates and their attribution to human infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corander Jukka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the sporadic nature of infection, sources often remain unknown. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST has been successfully applied to population genetics of Campylobacter jejuni and mathematical modelling can be applied to the sequence data. Here, we analysed the population structure of a total of 250 Finnish C. jejuni isolates from bovines, poultry meat and humans collected in 2003 using a combination of Bayesian clustering (BAPS software and phylogenetic analysis. Results In the first phase we analysed sequence types (STs of 102 Finnish bovine C. jejuni isolates by MLST and found a high diversity totalling 50 STs of which nearly half were novel. In the second phase we included MLST data from domestic human isolates as well as poultry C. jejuni isolates from the same time period. Between the human and bovine isolates we found an overlap of 72.2%, while 69% of the human isolates were overlapping with the chicken isolates. In the BAPS analysis 44.3% of the human isolates were found in bovine-associated BAPS clusters and 45.4% of the human isolates were found in the poultry-associated BAPS cluster. BAPS reflected the phylogeny of our data very well. Conclusions These findings suggest that bovines and poultry were equally important as reservoirs for human C. jejuni infections in Finland in 2003. Our results differ from those obtained in other countries where poultry has been identified as the most important source for human infections. The low prevalence of C. jejuni in poultry flocks in Finland could explain the lower attribution of human infection to poultry. Of the human isolates 10.3% were found in clusters not associated with any host which warrants further investigation, with particular focus on waterborne transmission routes and companion animals.

  9. Functional analysis of the Tat trans activator of human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fenrick, R; Malim, M H; Hauber, J; Le, S.Y.; Maizel, J; Cullen, B R

    1989-01-01

    The trans-activator (Tat) proteins of the related but distinct type 1 and type 2 human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) display incomplete functional reciprocity. One possible explanation of this observation, suggested by computer analysis of potential RNA secondary structures within the viral trans-activation response (TAR) elements, is that HIV-2 Tat requires the presentation of two viral RNA stem-loop sequences for full activity whereas HIV-1 Tat is maximally active upon presenta...

  10. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Linda R.; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R.; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-hum...

  11. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M.; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type.

  12. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  13. Detection of human papillomavirus types in balanitis xerotica obliterans and other penile conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16 and 18 in foreskin biopsies from patients with balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and other penile conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS--Foreskin biopsy specimens from 24 patients with penile lesions and 5 control patients were analysed by type-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS--HPV6 or HPV16 were not detected in patients with BXO. HPV6 was detected in 2 controls. CONCLUSIONS--Genital papilloma...

  14. Simultaneous detection, typing and quantitation of oncogenic human papillomavirus by multiplex consensus real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew; Allum, Anne-Gry; Strand, Linda; Aakre, Randi Kersten

    2013-02-01

    A consensus multiplex real-time PCR test (PT13-RT) for the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and 66 is described. The test targets the L1 gene. Analytical sensitivity is between 4 and 400 GU (genomic units) in the presence of 500 ng of human DNA, corresponding to 75,000 human cells. HPV types are grouped into multiplex groups of 3 or 4 resulting in the use of 4 wells per sample and permitting up to 24 samples per run (including controls) in a standard 96-well real-time PCR instrument. False negative results are avoided by (a) measuring sample DNA concentration to control that sufficient cellular material is present and (b) including HPV type 6 as a homologous internal control in order to detect PCR inhibition or competition from other (non-oncogenic) HPV types. Analysis time from refrigerator to report is 8 h, including 2.5 h hands-on time. Relative to the HC2 test, the sensitivity and specificity were respectively 98% and 83%, the lower specificity being attributable to the higher analytical sensitivity of PT13-RT. To assess type determination comparison was made with a reversed line-blot test. Type concordance was high (κ=0.79) with discrepancies occurring mostly in multiple-positive samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  16. Effects of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 oncoproteins on the expression of involucrin in human keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyösi Eszter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human papillomavirus (HPV life cycle is closely linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Oncogenic HPV infection has been shown to hamper the normal differentiation of keratinocytes; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are yet to be clarified. Here, we aimed to study the effects of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes on the expression of involucrin (IVL, an established marker of keratinocyte differentiation, in human foreskin keratinocyte (HFK cells. Results The differentiation of HFK cells by serum and high calcium significantly increased both the mRNA and the protein levels of IVL. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV16 together caused strong down-regulation of IVL mRNA and protein both in proliferating and in differentiating HFK cells. To study the effects of HPV oncogenes on the IVL promoter, we made transient transfection assays and luciferase tests and found that HPV 16 E6 but not E7 repressed IVL promoter activity in proliferating HFK cells. The inhibitory effect of HPV 16 E6 on the human IVL promoter could be localised to the proximal regulatory region (PRR of the gene. Conclusions These results suggest that the down-regulation of IVL promoter activity by HPV 16 E6 significantly contribute to the inhibition of endogenous IVL expression by the HPV 16 oncoproteins. In contrast, the down-regulation of endogenous IVL expression by HPV16 E7 is probably not caused by a direct and specific effect of E7 on the IVL promoter.

  17. Bone formation induced in mouse thigh by cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H C; Coulter, P R

    1967-04-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. (35)S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible (35)S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-(3)H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts.

  18. Role of PUFAs, the precursors of endocannabinoids, in human obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Alejandro; Repossi, Gaston; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo Renato

    2010-06-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) serve as precursors of the endocannabinoids (ECs) that are bioactive lipids molecules. Recent studies revealed that ECs participate in several physiological and pathological processes including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we review the experimental and clinical aspects of the role of endocannabinoids in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus and the modification of the endocannabinoids by exogenously administered PUFAs. Based on these evidences, we propose that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) can be modulated by exogenous manipulation of PUFAs that could help in the prevention and management of human diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  20. Two amino acid residues confer type specificity to a neutralizing, conformationally dependent epitope on human papillomavirus type 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludmerer, S W; Benincasa, D; Mark, G E

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of virus binding by neutralizing antibodies is important both in understanding early events in viral infectivity and in development of vaccines. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) have been described, but mapping the binding site has been difficult because of the conformational nature of key type-specific neutralization epitopes on the L1 coat protein. We have determined those residues of the L1 protein of HPV11 which confer type specificity to the binding of HPV11-neutralizing MAbs. Binding of three HPV11-specific neutralizing MAbs could be redirected to HPV6 L1 virus-like particles in which as few as two substitutions of corresponding amino acid residues from HPV11 L1 have been made, thus demonstrating the importance of these residues to MAb binding through the transfer of a conformationally dependent epitope. In addition, a fourth neutralizing MAb could be distinguished from the other neutralizing MAbs in terms of the amino acid residues which affect binding, suggesting the possibility that it neutralizes HPV11 through a different mechanism. PMID:8676509

  1. A new method for high yield purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets. This method is a three-step procedure including gel filtration, weak cation exchange HPLC and reverse phase HPLC. All steps are carried out at low pH using exclusively volatile acidic buffer

  2. GENOTYPING HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 ISOLATES FROM PERSISTENTLY INFECTED PROMISCUOUS INDIVIDUALS AND CERVICAL NEOPLASIA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBELKUM, A; JUFFERMANS, L; SCHRAUWEN, L; VANDOORNUM, G; BURGER, M; QUINT, W

    1995-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sexual promiscuity and/or cervicopathology we

  3. Genotyping human papillomavirus type 16 isolates from persistently infected promiscuous individuals and cervical neoplasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); L. Juffermans (Leon); L. Schrauwen (Lianne); M. Burger; G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); W.G.V. Quint (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sex

  4. Patterns of cervical coinfection with multiple human papilloma virus types in a screening population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Bryan; Rebolj, Matejka; Rygaard, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection suggest that HPV genotypes are not independent of each other. This may be explained by risk factors common to all HPV infections, but type-specific biological factors may also play a role. This raises the question of whether widespread use...

  5. Determination of markers for collagen type I turnover in peritendinous human tissue by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J L; Langberg, Henning; Heinemeier, K M

    2006-01-01

    Previous results from our group have shown that loading of human tendon elevates tendinous type I collagen production measured by microdialysis. However, exclusion of the observed elevation as a response to trauma from inserting the microdialysis catheters or a possible influence from the collagen...

  6. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  7. The early noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 16 is regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Kristiansen, Karen; Durand, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    All human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) early mRNAs are polyadenylated at the poly(A) signal within the early 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The 3'end of the early E5 open reading frame and the 3'UTR of HPV-16 is very AU-rich, with five regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (...

  8. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  9. Simple mucin-type carbohydrates in normal and malignant human endometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Mandel, U; Svenstrup, B

    1995-01-01

    The simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, Tn, sialosyl-Tn, and T, are tumor-associated antigens of adenocarcinomas. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the expression of Tn, sialosyl-Tn (s-Tn), T, and sialosyl-T (s-T) antigens in normal nonsecretory, early gestational, and malignant human end...

  10. Identification and characterization of the human type II collagen gene (COL2A1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S.E. Cheah (Kathryn); N.G. Stoker; J.R. Griffin; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe gene contained in the human cosmid clone CosHcol1, previously designated an alpha 1(I) collagen-like gene, has now been identified. CosHcol1 hybridizes strongly to a single 5.9-kilobase mRNA species present only in tissue in which type II collagen is expressed. DNA sequence analysis

  11. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned

    2015-01-01

    : 0%). The most common HPV types were restricted to HPV16/18/45, accounting for 98.3% of all HPV-positive ADC. There were variations in HPV prevalence and ADC type-distribution by country. Age at diagnosis differed by ADC subtype, with usual-type diagnosed in younger women (median: 43 years) compared...... to rarer subtypes (medians between 57 and 66 years). Moreover, HPV-positive ADC cases were younger than HPV-negative ADC. The six years difference in median age for women with AIS compared to those with usual-type ADC suggests that cytological screening for AIS may be suboptimal. Since the great majority......Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providing...

  12. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV...... contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men....... according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive...

  13. Expression of 5α-Reductase Type 2 Gene in Human Testis, Epididymis and Vas Deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德瑜; 吴燕婉; 罗宏志; 张桂元

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression pattern of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human malereproductive organsMethods The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene inhuman testis, epididymisand vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using Digoxin labeled5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm ofSertoli and Leydig cells of the testis, the principle cells of epididymis and the epithe-lial cells of vas deferens, but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of above-men-tioned cells. No positive signal was observed in germ cells, basement of the testis,interstium of epididymis and basement, as well as smooth muscle of vas deferens.Conclusion This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in Ser-toli, Leydig cells of the testis, and the principle cells of epididymis. The expressionpattern of the gene in these cells in human was similar to that of rat and monkey. Thepresence of 5a-reductase type 2 gene in epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggested itmight possess an important physiological role in human reproduction.

  14. Type I collagen synthesis and degradation in peritendinous tissue after exercise determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Petersen, L J;

    1999-01-01

    1. Physical activity is known to increase type I collagen synthesis measured as the concentration of biomarkers in plasma. By the use of microdialysis catheters with a very high molecular mass cut-off value (3000 kDa) we aimed to determine local type I collagen synthesis and degradation...... in the peritendinous region by measuring interstitial concentrations of a collagen propeptide (PICP; 100 kDa) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP; 9 kDa) as well as an inflammatory mediator (PGE2). 2. Seven trained human runners were studied before and after (2 and 72 h) 3 h of running (36 km). Two microdialysis...... catheters were placed in the peritendinous space ventral to the Achilles' tendon under ultrasound guidance and perfused with a Ringer-acetate solution containing 3H-labelled human type IV collagen and [15-3H(N)]PGE2 for in vivo recovery determination. Relative recovery was 37-59 % (range of the s...

  15. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control....... Methods and Findings The study included 36 male adults with a broad range of age and body-mass indices (BMIs), among which 18 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes type 2. The fecal bacterial composition was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and in a subgroup of subjects (N = 20) by tag...... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies...

  16. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Human Surfaceome Reveals New Targets for a Variety of Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 10 to 20% of all genes in the human genome encode cell surface proteins and due to their subcellular localization these proteins represent excellent targets for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Therefore, a precise characterization of the surfaceome set in different types of tumor is needed. Using TCGA data from 15 different tumor types and a new method to identify cancer genes, the S-score, we identified several potential therapeutic targets within the surfaceome set. This allowed us to expand a previous analysis from us and provided a clear characterization of the human surfaceome in the tumor landscape. Moreover, we present evidence that a three-gene set—WNT5A, CNGA2, and IGSF9B—can be used as a signature associated with shorter survival in breast cancer patients. The data made available here will help the community to develop more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic tools for a variety of tumor types.

  17. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Brinkley, Garrett J; Khalil, Hassan A; Sears, Connie M; Lei, Nan Ye; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  18. Type I Collagen as an Extracellular Matrix for the In Vitro Growth of Human Small Intestinal Epithelium: e107814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziyad Jabaji; Garrett J Brinkley; Hassan A Khalil; Connie M Sears; Nan Ye Lei; Michael Lewis; Matthias Stelzner; Martín G Martín; James C Y Dunn

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  19. Type-dependent association between risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus types other than types 16 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu Xi, Long; Schiffman, Mark; Ke, Yang; Hughes, James P; Galloway, Denise A; He, Zhonghu; Hulbert, Ayaka; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-04-15

    Studies of the clinical relevance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load have focused mainly on HPV16 and HPV18. Data on other oncogenic types are rare. Study subjects were women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study who had ≥1 of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types detected during a 2-year follow-up at 6-month intervals. Viral load measurements were performed on the first type-specific HPV-positive specimens. The association of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) with type-specific HPV DNA load was assessed with discrete-time Cox regression. Overall, the increase in the cumulative risk of CIN2/3 per 1 unit increase in log10 -transformed viral load was statistically significant for four types within species 9 including HPV31 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adjusted ] = 1.32: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.52), HPV35 (HR adjusted  = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76), HPV52 (HR adjusted  = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.30) and HPV58 (HR adjusted  = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.82). The association was marginally significant for HPV33 (species 9) and HPV45 (species 7) and was not appreciable for other types. The per 1 log10 -unit increase in viral load of a group of species 9 non-HPV16 oncogenic types was statistically significantly associated with risk of CIN2/3 for women with a cytologic diagnosis of within normal limits, ASC-US, or LSIL at the first HPV-positive visit but not for those with high-grade SIL. Findings suggest that the viral load-associated risk of CIN2/3 is type-dependent, and mainly restricted to the species of HPV types related to HPV16, which shares this association. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Limited transmission of bla(CTX-M-9)-type-positive Escherichia coli between humans and poultry in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Huong, Bui Thi Mai; Hirai, Itaru; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the bla(CTX-M-9)-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited.

  1. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapparel, Caroline; Sobo, Komla; Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song; Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent.

  2. Fiber type composition and maximum shortening velocity of muscles crossing the human shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R C; Lungren, M P; Langenderfer, J E; Hughes, R E

    2007-03-01

    A study of the fiber type composition of fourteen muscles spanning the human glenohumeral joint was carried out with the purpose of determining the contribution of fiber types to overall muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and to estimate the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) of those muscles. Muscle biopsies were procured from 4 male cadavers (mean age 50) within 24 hr of death, snap frozen, mounted, and transversely sectioned (10 microm). Slides were stained for myofibrillar ATPase after alkaline preincubation. Photoimages were taken of defined areas (100 fibers) using the Bioquant system, and fiber type and CSA were measured from these images. Staining for mATPase produced three different fiber types: slow-oxidative (SO), fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-glycolytic (FG). On average, the muscle fiber type composition ranged from 22 to 40% of FG, from 17 to 51% of FOG, and from 23 to 56% of SO. Twelve out of the 14 muscles had average SO proportions ranging from 35 to 50%. V(max) was calculated from the fiber type contribution relative to CSA and shortening velocity values taken from the literature. The maximum velocities of shortening presented here provide a physiological basis for the development of human shoulder musculoskeletal models suitable for predicting muscle forces for functionally relevant tasks encompassing conditions of muscle shortening and lengthening.

  3. The nasal mucosa contains a large spectrum of human papillomavirus types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Ola; Johansson, Hanna; Madsen, Klaus Gregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....

  4. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Sérgio V

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Methods Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Results After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. Conclusion There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations.

  5. Seven Types of Ambiguity in Evaluating the Impact of Humanities Provision in Undergraduate Medicine Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion of the humanities in undergraduate medicine curricula remains controversial. Skeptics have placed the burden of proof of effectiveness upon the shoulders of advocates, but this may lead to pursuing measurement of the immeasurable, deflecting attention away from the more pressing task of defining what we mean by the humanities in medicine. While humanities input can offer a fundamental critical counterweight to a potentially reductive biomedical science education, a new wave of thinking suggests that the kinds of arts and humanities currently used in medical education are neither radical nor critical enough to have a deep effect on students' learning and may need to be reformulated. The humanities can certainly educate for tolerance of ambiguity as a basis to learning democratic habits for contemporary team-based clinical work. William Empson's 'seven types of ambiguity' model for analyzing poetry is transposed to medical education to: (a) formulate seven values proffered by the humanities for improving medical education; (b) offer seven ways of measuring impact of medical humanities provision, thereby reducing ambiguity; and

  6. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  7. Training-induced changes in peritendinous type I collagen turnover determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Rosendal, L; Kjaer, M

    2001-01-01

    1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use of microdialy...... in local connective tissue of the peritendinous Achilles' region. Early in the process both synthesis and degradation are elevated, whereas later, the anabolic processes are dominating causing a net synthesis of type I collagen in tendon-related tissue in humans.......1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use...... of microdialysis catheters. However, the local collagen type I turnover response to training is unknown. 2. Nineteen young males were studied before and after 4 and 11 weeks of physical training. Microdialysis catheters with a high molecular mass cut-off value (3000 kDa), allowing the determination of PICP...

  8. The human P-glycoprotein transporter enhances the type I interferon response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-06-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps.

  9. Identification of human nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease by antibodies obtained against a synthetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M I; Cuchillo, C M; Nogués, M V

    1995-09-01

    An antibody that recognizes human nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease was obtained by immunizing a rabbit with a 14-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal sequence of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin which is identical to human liver ribonuclease. This amino acid sequence is unique to this protein. The anti N-peptide antibody was purified by protein A-Sepharose and by using ELISA and SDS-PAGE immunoblot techniques, the antibody reactivity against EDN and partially purified nonpancreatic-type ribonucleases from human plasma and urine was observed. Cross-reactivity with bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and other proteins was not detected. In addition, the activity of the nonpancreatic-type ribonuclease was not affected by the antibody. The immune response was elicited without the need for a carrier protein showing that the N-terminal sequence of nonpancreatic ribonuclease contains a specific epitope. This antibody can be used for the immunological identification of both the native and denatured forms of this type of enzyme.

  10. Differential decomposition of bacterial and viral fecal indicators in common human pollution types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjugi, Pauline; Sivaganesan, Mano; Korajkic, Asja; Kelty, Catherine A; McMinn, Brian; Ulrich, Robert; Harwood, Valerie J; Shanks, Orin C

    2016-11-15

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decomposition of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fecal pollution originating from fresh human feces, septage, and primary effluent sewage in a subtropical marine environment was assessed over a six day period with an emphasis on the influence of ambient sunlight and indigenous microbiota. Ambient water mixed with each fecal pollution type was placed in dialysis bags and incubated in situ in a submersible aquatic mesocosm. Genetic and cultivated fecal indicators including fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci, E. coli, and Bacteroidales), coliphage (somatic and F+), Bacteroides fragilis phage (GB-124), and human-associated genetic indicators (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2) were measured in each sample. Simple linear regression assessing treatment trends in each pollution type over time showed significant decay (p ≤ 0.05) in most treatments for feces and sewage (27/28 and 32/40, respectively), compared to septage (6/26). A two-way analysis of variance of log10 reduction values for sewage and feces experiments indicated that treatments differentially impact survival of cultivated bacteria, cultivated phage, and genetic indicators. Findings suggest that sunlight is critical for phage decay, and indigenous microbiota play a lesser role. For bacterial cultivated and genetic indicators, the influence of indigenous microbiota varied by pollution type. This study offers new insights on the decomposition of common human fecal pollution types in a subtropical marine environment with important implications for water quality management applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Human type II pneumocyte chemotactic responses to CXCR3 activation are mediated by splice variant A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rong; Lee, Clement M; Gonzales, Linda W; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae; Hurford, Matthew T; Kelsen, Steven G

    2008-06-01

    Chemokine receptors control several fundamental cellular processes in both hematopoietic and structural cells, including directed cell movement, i.e., chemotaxis, cell differentiation, and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that CXCR3, the chemokine receptor expressed by Th1/Tc1 inflammatory cells present in the lung, is also expressed by human airway epithelial cells. In airway epithelial cells, activation of CXCR3 induces airway epithelial cell movement and proliferation, processes that underlie lung repair. The present study examined the expression and function of CXCR3 in human alveolar type II pneumocytes, whose destruction causes emphysema. CXCR3 was present in human fetal and adult type II pneumocytes as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. CXCR3-A and -B splice variant mRNA was present constitutively in cultured type II cells, but levels of CXCR3-B greatly exceeded CXCR3-A mRNA. In cultured type II cells, I-TAC, IP-10, and Mig induced chemotaxis. Overexpression of CXCR3-A in the A549 pneumocyte cell line produced robust chemotactic responses to I-TAC and IP-10. In contrast, I-TAC did not induce chemotactic responses in CXCR3-B and mock-transfected cells. Finally, I-TAC increased cytosolic Ca(2+) and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B kinases only in CXCR3-A-transfected cells. These data indicate that the CXCR3 receptor is expressed by human type II pneumocytes, and the CXCR3-A splice variant mediates chemotactic responses possibly through Ca(2+) activation of both mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Expression of CXCR3 in alveolar epithelial cells may be important in pneumocyte repair from injury.

  12. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results. PMID:25827511

  13. Metabolism of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in cultures of human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Blaehr, H; Andersen, C B;

    1992-01-01

    Degradation of the intact form of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) has been established in the liver, whereas the col 1 domain of PIIINP is extracted by the kidneys. We used native human PIIINP and col 1 domain of PIIINP to investigate the degradation of PIIINP...... in cultures of human proximal tubular cells. Normal renal tissue was obtained from the healthy part of kidneys surgically removed and from biopsies from a total of 10 patients. The degradation was characterized by incubation of [125I]-PIIINP followed by gel filtration. We found that in physiological...

  14. Influence of different types of trams on human perception of vibrations in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly urbanized areas transport vibration source are closer and closer to the receiver which is a building. At the same time residents requirements for comfort in rooms are higher. In this paper influence of transport vibrations from various types of trams on human perception was tested and analysed. Measurements were made in Cracow on 11 buildings located near tramway. Human perception were investigated according to ISO and Polish standard. Basic RMS method and additional VDV method were applied because of high crest factor of recorded signal. Results of both methods were compared.

  15. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  16. Bridging the species divide: transgenic mice humanized for type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Harari

    Full Text Available We have generated transgenic mice that harbor humanized type I interferon receptors (IFNARs enabling the study of type I human interferons (Hu-IFN-Is in mice. These "HyBNAR" (Hybrid IFNAR mice encode transgenic variants of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 with the human extracellular domains being fused to transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of mouse sequence. B16F1 mouse melanoma cells harboring the HyBNAR construct specifically bound Hu-IFN-Is and were rendered sensitive to Hu-IFN-I stimulated anti-proliferation, STAT1 activation and activation of a prototypical IFN-I response gene (MX2. HyBNAR mice were crossed with a transgenic strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the IFN-responsive MX2 promoter (MX2-Luciferase. Both the HyBNAR and HyBNAR/MX2-Luciferase mice were responsive to all Hu-IFN-Is tested, inclusive of IFNα2A, IFNβ, and a human superagonist termed YNSα8. The mice displayed dose-dependent pharmacodynamic responses to Hu-IFN-I injection, as assessed by measuring the expression of IFN-responsive genes. Our studies also demonstrated a weak activation of endogenous mouse interferon response, especially after high dose administration of Hu-IFNs. In sharp contrast to data published for humans, our pharmacodynamic readouts demonstrate a very short-lived IFN-I response in mice, which is not enhanced by sub-cutaneous (SC injections in comparison to other administration routes. With algometric differences between humans and mice taken into account, the HyBNAR mice provides a convenient non-primate pre-clinical model to advance the study of human IFN-Is.

  17. User Interface Design, Standards & Guidelines for Web Applications Based on Human Personality Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasthuri Subaramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the standards and guidelines of user interface features in web-based applications for the different personality types of people. An overview of human computer interaction and human  personality types is described. LEONARD, Let’s Explore our personality type based on Openness (O, Neutral (N, Analytical (A, Relational (R and Decisive (D is the model used to determine the different personality types for this study. The purpose is to define user personality profiles and to establish guidelines for the graphical user interface. The personality inventory and a user interface questionnaire were administered to university students. Interview sessions were also conducted and parts of the interviews with the university students were used to validate the results obtained from the questionnaires. The analysis of the students' personality types identified five main groups. The results suggest that users do have definable expectations concerning the features of web applications. This profile served as basis for the guidelines of web features for the graphical user interface design for the particular user groups.

  18. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  19. Quantification of Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus load in a rural West African population: no enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 pathogenesis, but HTLV-I provirus load relates to mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariyoshi, K; Berry, N; Cham, F;

    2003-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus load was examined in a cohort of a population in Guinea-Bissau among whom human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 2 is endemic. Geometric mean of HIV-2 RNA load among HTLV-I-coinfected subjects was significantly lower than that in subjects infec...

  20. Molecular diversity of L-type Ca2+ channel transcripts in human fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Soldatov, N M

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the human fibroblast Ca2+ channel of L type (HFCC) has been determined. It is highly homologous to L-type channels previously cloned from rabbit lung and heart as well as from rat brain. At least four sites of molecular diversity were identified in the nucleotide sequence of HFCC. Three of these include regions encoding the transmembrane segments IIS6, IIIS2, and IVS3, which are known to be important for channel gating properties. The positions of thes...

  1. A New Chemical Approach to Human ABO Histo-Blood Group Type 2 Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Hara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical approach to synthesizing human ABO histo-blood type 2 antigenic determinants was developed. N-Phthaloyl-protected lactosaminyl thioglycoside derived from lactulose via the Heyns rearrangement was employed to obtain a type 2 core disaccharide. Use of this scheme lowered the overall number of reaction steps. Stereoselective construction of the α-galactosaminide/galactoside found in A- and B-antigens, respectively, was achieved by using a unique di-tert-butylsilylene-directed α-glycosylation method. The proposed synthetic scheme provides an alternative to existing procedures for preparing ABO blood group antigens.

  2. [The use of achievements in human molecular immunogenetics in the management of type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, I I; Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P; Boldyreva, M N; Shestakova, M V; Trofimov, D Iu; Kuraeva, T L; Peterkova, V A

    2008-01-01

    New original data are presented on the use of achievements in human molecular immunogenetics in the management of type 1 diabetes mellitus. They include materials allowing for the prediction of the development of the disease at the population, family, and individual levels along with novel approaches to its radical treatment by the reconstitution of the lost glucose tolerance. The reported data may find wide application in current clinical practice. They open up new prospects for the enhancement of efficacy of prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and other autoimmune diseases.

  3. [Exploration on human blood type case in teaching practice of genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Yan; Li, Xiao-Ying; Huai, Cong; Wang, Shi-Ming; Qiao, Shou-Yi; Lu, Da-Ru

    2013-08-01

    Blood type, which harbors abundant genetics meaning, is one of the most common phenotypes in human life. With the development of science and technology, its significance is unceasingly updated and new finding is increasingly emerging, which constantly attracts people to decipher the heredity mechanism of blood type. In addition to four main associated contents, i.e., Mendelian inheritance, genetic linkage, gene mutations, and chromosome abnormalities, the blood type case also covers many other aspects of the genetics knowledge. Based on the genetic knowledge context, we can interest the students and improve the teaching output in genetic teaching practice by combining with explaining ABO blood type case and heredity mechanism, expanding leucocyte groups, and introducing infrequent blood type such as Bombay blood, Rh and MN. By carrying out the related experimental teaching, we could drive the student to integrate theory with practice. In genetic experimental teaching, 80% of the students chose this optional experiment, molecular identification of ABO blood type, and it greatly interested them. Using appropriate blood type case in teaching related knowledge, organizing PPT exhi-bition and the debating discussion activities, it could provide opportunities for student to propose their own opinions, guide the student to thinking deeply, and develop their abilities to analyze and solve problem. Afterwards, students will gain in-depth comprehension about the fundamental knowledge of genetics.

  4. The earth as a living planet: Human-type diseases in the earthquake preparation process

    CERN Document Server

    Contoyiannis, Y F; Eftaxias, K

    2013-01-01

    The new field of complex systems supports the view that a number of systems arising from disciplines as diverse as physics, biology, engineering, and economics may have certain quantitative features that are intriguingly similar. The earth is a living planet where many complex systems run perfectly without stopping at all. The earthquake generation is a fundamental sign that the earth is a living planet. Recently, analyses have shown that human-brain-type disease appears during the earthquake generation process. Herein, we show that human-heart-type disease appears during the earthquake preparation of the earthquake process. The investigation is mainly attempted by means of critical phenomena, which have been proposed as the likely paradigm to explain the origins of both heart electric fluctuations and fracture induced electromagnetic fluctuations. We show that a time window of the damage evolution within the heterogeneous Earth's crust and the healthy heart's electrical action present the characteristic feat...

  5. A predictive computational framework for direct reprogramming between human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Owen J L; Firas, Jaber; Fang, Hai; Oates, Matt E; Holmes, Melissa L; Knaupp, Anja S; Suzuki, Harukazu; Nefzger, Christian M; Daub, Carsten O; Shin, Jay W; Petretto, Enrico; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Polo, Jose M; Gough, Julian

    2016-03-01

    Transdifferentiation, the process of converting from one cell type to another without going through a pluripotent state, has great promise for regenerative medicine. The identification of key transcription factors for reprogramming is currently limited by the cost of exhaustive experimental testing of plausible sets of factors, an approach that is inefficient and unscalable. Here we present a predictive system (Mogrify) that combines gene expression data with regulatory network information to predict the reprogramming factors necessary to induce cell conversion. We have applied Mogrify to 173 human cell types and 134 tissues, defining an atlas of cellular reprogramming. Mogrify correctly predicts the transcription factors used in known transdifferentiations. Furthermore, we validated two new transdifferentiations predicted by Mogrify. We provide a practical and efficient mechanism for systematically implementing novel cell conversions, facilitating the generalization of reprogramming of human cells. Predictions are made available to help rapidly further the field of cell conversion.

  6. D-type cyclins in adult human testis and testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Rajpert-de Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1999-01-01

    on immunohistochemical and immunochemical analysis of human adult testis and 32 testicular tumours to examine the differential expression and abundance of cyclins D1, D2, and D3 in relation to cell type, proliferation, differentiation, and malignancy. In normal testis, the cell type-restricted expression patterns were...... D2 but not D1 or D3, while the invasive testicular tumours showed variable positivity for cyclins D2 and D3, but rarely D1. An unexpected correlation with differentiation rather than proliferation was found particularly for cyclin D3 in teratomas, a conceptually significant observation confirmed...... by massive up-regulation of cyclin D3 in the human teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2/D1 induced to differentiate along the neuronal lineage. These results suggest a possible involvement of cyclin D2 in the early stages of testicular oncogenesis and the striking examples of proliferation-independent expression...

  7. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  8. Preliminary study on Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of human oral epithelial cell in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao; Weibin Sun; Juan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the functions and mechanisms of herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) while infecting human oral epithelial cells in vitro(being similar to the infection in vivo). Methods:An abundance of HSV-1 strains amplified in Vero cells were used to infect human oral epithelial cells. The culture supernatant was collected to infect Veto cells again. Morphology of HSV-1 was identified by inverted microscope and transmission electron microscope. Nucleic acid of the virus was detected by PCR. Results:The infected human oral epithelial cells didn't display an obvious cytopathic effect(CPE) under inverted microscope(while Veto cells which were infected by the culture supematant showed typical(CPE). The virus particles were not observed in the cytoplasm nor in nucleus of human oral epithelial cells, however under transmission electron microscope in the cytoplasm of Vero cells, the nucleic acid of HSV-1 could be detected in infected human oral epithelial cells, by PCR. Conclusion:HSV-1 can successfully infect human oral epithelial cells. This model may provide a useful approach for studying the pathogenesis of herpes virus-associated periodontal disease.

  9. Species- and cell type-specific interactions between CD47 and human SIRPalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Sen, Shamik; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2006-03-15

    CD47 on red blood cells (RBCs) reportedly signals "self" by binding SIRPalpha on phagocytes, at least in mice. Such interactions across and within species, from mouse to human, are not yet clear and neither is the relation to cell adhesion. Using human SIRPalpha1 as a probe, antibody-inhibitable binding to CD47 was found only with human and pig RBCs (not mouse, rat, or cow). In addition, CD47-mediated adhesion of human and pig RBCs to SIRPalpha1 surfaces resists sustained forces in centrifugation (as confirmed by atomic force microscopy) but only at SIRPalpha-coating densities far above those measurable on human neutrophils, monocytes, and THP-1 macrophages. While interactions strengthen with deglycosylation of SIRPalpha1, low copy numbers explain the absence of RBC adhesion to phagocytes under physiologic conditions and imply that the interaction being studied is not responsible for red cell clearance in humans. Evidence of clustering nonetheless suggests mechanisms of avidity enhancement. Finally, using the same CD47 antibodies and soluble SIRPalpha1, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were assayed and found to display CD47 but not bind SIRPalpha1 significantly. The results thus demonstrate that SIRPalpha-CD47 interactions, which reportedly define self, exhibit cell type specificity and limited cross-species reactivity.

  10. Action of uracil analogs on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and its reverse transcriptase.

    OpenAIRE

    Piras, G; Dutschman, G E; Im, G J; B.C. Pan; Chu, S H; Cheng, Y C

    1995-01-01

    Three structural analogs of 5-ethyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil (E-BPU) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication without cytotoxicity in vitro and were more potent than azidothymidine and were as potent as E-BPU. The target of these compounds is HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Reverse transcriptases resistant to nevirapine (tyrosine at position 181 to cysteine) and TIBO R82150 (leucine at position 100 to isoleucine) are cross resistant to E-BPU analogs. Nevira...

  11. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 long terminal repeat: analysis of regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, S. K.; Gallo, R C

    1988-01-01

    The long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and a related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) contain cis-acting positive regulatory elements upstream and the major transactivator gene (tat) response element and a possible negative regulatory element downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The tat response element of HIV-2 and of SIVmac was more complex than that of HIV-1. Two structurally similar subelements within the HIV-2 tat response ...

  13. Subcellular localization of the Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, J.; Jallepalli, P; Gabuzda, D H

    1994-01-01

    The Vif (viral infectivity factor) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been shown to dramatically enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virus particles during virus production. The subcellular localization of Vif was examined to elucidate cellular pathways which may be important for Vif function. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Vif demonstrated a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution and showed that most Vif was not associated with the Golgi complex, a proposed site of lo...

  14. Multilocus sequence typing supports the hypothesis that Ochrobactrum anthropi displays a human-associated subpopulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchandin Hélène

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ochrobactrum anthropi is a versatile bacterial species with strains living in very diverse habitats. It is increasingly recognized as opportunistic pathogen in hospitalized patients. The population biology of the species particularly with regard to the characteristics of the human isolates is being investigated. To address this issue, we proposed a polyphasic approach consisting in Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST, multi-locus phylogeny, genomic-based fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and antibiotyping. Results We tested a population of 70 O. anthropi clinical (n = 43 and environmental (n = 24 isolates as well as the type strain O. anthropi ATCC49188T and 2 strains of Ochrobactrum lupini and Ochrobactrum cytisi isolated from plant nodules. A Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST scheme for O. anthropi is proposed here for the first time. It was based on 7 genes (3490 nucleotides evolving mostly by neutral mutations. The MLST approach suggested an epidemic population structure. A major clonal complex corresponded to a human-associated lineage since it exclusively contained clinical isolates. Genomic fingerprinting separated isolates displaying the same sequence type but it did not detect a population structure that could be related to the origin of the strains. None of the molecular method allowed the definition of particular lineages associated to the host-bacteria relationship (carriage, colonisation or infection. Antibiotyping was the least discriminative method. Conclusion The results reveal a human-associated subpopulation in our collection of strains. The emergence of this clonal complex was probably not driven by the antibiotic selective pressure. Therefore, we hypothesise that the versatile species O. anthropi could be considered as a human-specialized opportunistic pathogen.

  15. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex...

  16. PseudoGeneQuest – Service for identification of different pseudogene types in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Vihinen Mauno; Ortutay Csaba

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudogenes, nonfunctional copies of genes, evolve fast due the lack of evolutionary pressures and thus appear in several different forms. PseudoGeneQuest is an online tool to search the human genome for a given query sequence and to identify different types of pseudogenes as well as novel genes and gene fragments. Description The service can detect pseudogenes, that have arisen either by retrotransposition or segmental genome duplication, many of which are not listed in t...

  17. Impact of dietary resistant starch type 4 on human gut microbiota and immunometabolic functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bijaya Upadhyaya; Lacey McCormack; Ali Reza Fardin-Kia; Robert Juenemann; Sailendra Nichenametla; Jeffrey Clapper; Bonny Specker; Moul Dey

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the gut microbiota impacts human health. Here we investigated the hitherto unknown effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4) enriched diet on gut microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in parallel with host immunometabolic functions in twenty individuals with signs of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Cholesterols, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and proinflammatory markers in the blood as well as waist circumference and % body fat wer...

  18. The Remarkable Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genetic Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) results from a combination of point mutations and genetic recombination, and rates of both processes are unusually high. This review focuses on the mechanisms and outcomes of HIV-1 genetic recombination and on the parameters that make recombination so remarkably frequent. Experimental work has demonstrated that the process that leads to recombination—a copy choice mechanism involving the migration of reverse transcr...

  19. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease...... exposure to proinflammatory cytokines highlighting that these genes may be involved in the response of β cells to immune attack. In this review, the compiling evidence that many of the candidate genes are expressed in islets and β cells will be presented. Further, we perform the first systematic human...... islet expression analysis of all genes located in 50 T1D-associated GWAS loci using a published RNA sequencing dataset. We find that 336 out of 857 genes are expressed in human islets and that many of these interact in protein networks. Finally, the potential pathogenetic roles of some candidate genes...

  20. Analysis of Task Types and Error Types of the Human Actions Involved in the Human-related Unplanned Reactor Trip Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2008-02-15

    This report provides the task types and error types involved in the unplanned reactor trip events that have occurred during 1986 - 2006. The events that were caused by the secondary system of the nuclear power plants amount to 67 %, and the remaining 33 % was by the primary system. The contribution of the activities of the plant personnel was identified as the following order: corrective maintenance (25.7 %), planned maintenance (22.8 %), planned operation (19.8 %), periodic preventive maintenance (14.9 %), response to a transient (9.9 %), and design/manufacturing/installation (9.9%). According to the analysis of error modes, the error modes such as control failure (22.2 %), wrong object (18.5 %), omission (14.8 %), wrong action (11.1 %), and inadequate (8.3 %) take up about 75 % of all the unplanned trip events. The analysis of the cognitive functions involved showed that the planning function makes the highest contribution to the human actions leading to unplanned reactor trips, and it is followed by the observation function (23.4%), the execution function (17.8 %), and the interpretation function (10.3 %). The results of this report are to be used as important bases for development of the error reduction measures or development of the error mode prediction system for the test and maintenance tasks in nuclear power plants.

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Typing of Salmonella Stanley Isolated from Humans, Foods, and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaowei; Kuang, Dai; Meng, Jianghong; Pan, Haijian; Shen, Junqing; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Weimin; Chen, Qi; Shi, Xianming; Xu, Xuebin; Zhang, Jianmin

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley is an important serovar that has been increasingly identified in human salmonellosis. The present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of 88 Salmonella Stanley strains isolated from humans (diarrhea patients, n = 64; and healthy carrier, n = 1), foods (aquatic products, n = 16; vegetable, n = 1; and pork, n = 1), and environment (waste water, n = 2; and river water, n = 3) in Shanghai, China from 2006 to 2012. Nearly half of the strains were resistant to sulfafurazole (43/88, 48.9%), and many were resistant to streptomycin (35/88, 39.8%), tetracycline (22/88, 25%), and nalidixic acid (19/88, 21.6%). Approximately a quarter of the strains (24/88, 27.3%) were resistant to more than three antimicrobials, and five had ACSSuT resistance type. Six clusters (A-F) were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with 80% similarity. Interestingly, strains in the same cluster identified by PFGE possessed similar antibiotic resistance patterns. PFGE typing also indicated that aquatic products might serve as a transmission reservoir for Salmonella Stanley infections in humans.

  2. Identification of multiple HPV types on spermatozoa from human sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspersen, Maja D; Larsen, Peter B; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Fedder, Jens; Petersen, Gert Bruun; Bonde, Jesper; Höllsberg, Per

    2011-03-29

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may cause sexually transmitted disease. High-risk types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cell dysplasia, whereas low-risk types may cause genital condyloma. Despite the association between HPV and cancer, donor sperm need not be tested for HPV according to European regulations. Consequently, the potential health risk of HPV transmission by donor bank sperm has not been elucidated, nor is it known how HPV is associated with sperm. The presence of 35 types of HPV was examined on DNA from semen samples of 188 Danish sperm donors using a sensitive HPV array. To examine whether HPV was associated with the sperm, in situ hybridization were performed with HPV-6, HPV-16 and -18, and HPV-31-specific probes. The prevalence of HPV-positive sperm donors was 16.0% and in 66.7% of these individuals high-risk types of HPV were detected. In 5.3% of sperm donors, two or more HPV types were detected. Among all identified HPV types, 61.9% were high-risk types. In situ hybridization experiments identified HPV genomes particularly protruding from the equatorial segment and the tail of the sperm. Semen samples from more than one in seven healthy Danish donors contain HPV, most of them of high-risk types binding to the equatorial segment of the sperm cell. Most HPV-positive sperm showed decreased staining with DAPI, indicative of reduced content of DNA. Our data demonstrate that oncogenic HPV types are frequent in men.

  3. Cell-type specific DNA methylation patterns define human breast cellular identity.

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    Petr Novak

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a role in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and stem cell differentiation. Tissue specific differential methylation has also been well characterized. We sought to extend these studies to create a map of differential DNA methylation between different cell types derived from a single tissue. Using three pairs of isogenic human mammary epithelial and fibroblast cells, promoter region DNA methylation was characterized using MeDIP coupled to microarray analysis. Comparison of DNA methylation between these cell types revealed nearly three thousand cell-type specific differentially methylated regions (ctDMRs. MassARRAY was performed upon 87 ctDMRs to confirm and quantify differential DNA methylation. Each of the examined regions exhibited statistically significant differences ranging from 10-70%. Gene ontology analysis revealed the overrepresentation of many transcription factors involved in developmental processes. Additionally, we have shown that ctDMRs are associated with histone related epigenetic marks and are often aberrantly methylated in breast cancer. Overall, our data suggest that there are thousands of ctDMRs which consistently exhibit differential DNA methylation and may underlie cell type specificity in human breast tissue. In addition, we describe the pathways affected by these differences and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms and physiological overlap between normal cellular differentiation and breast carcinogenesis.

  4. Novel non-steroidal inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Nigel; Su, Xiangdong; Ganeshapillai, Dharshini; Smith, Andrew; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2007-05-01

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) regulates glucocorticoid action at the pre-receptor stage by converting cortisone to cortisol. 11beta-HSD1 is selectively expressed in many tissues including the liver and adipose tissue where metabolic events are important. Metabolic syndrome relates to a number of metabolic abnormalities and currently has a prevalence of >20% in adult Americans. 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors are being investigated by many major pharmaceutical companies for type 2 diabetes and other abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome. In this area of intense interest a number of structural types of 11beta-HSD1 inhibitor have been identified. It is important to have an array of structural types as the physicochemical properties of the compounds will determine tissue distribution, HPA effects, and ultimately clinical utility. Here we report the discovery and synthesis of three structurally different series of novel 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors that inhibit human 11beta-HSD1 in the low micromolar range. Docking studies with 1-3 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 reveal how the molecules may interact with the enzyme and cofactor and give further scope for structure based drug design in the optimisation of these series.

  5. Type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus in women screened for cervical cancer in Labrador, Canada

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    Alberto Severini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. A higher incidence of cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV infection has been reported in northern Canada and in First Nation, Métis and Inuit women, with some evidence to suggest that the HPV type distribution in these populations may be different from the rest of Canada. Objective. The objective of this study was to measure the HPV type prevalence in Labrador women to determine if significant differences in HPV types could reduce the effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Design. The prevalence of HPV types was determined in 1,370 women presenting for routine pap screening in Labrador between February and November 2010. Cervical cytology and HPV genotyping were performed on the same liquid-based cytology specimens. Results. The overall prevalence of HPV was 21.4%; cytological abnormalities were found in 8.8% of the participants. HPV 16 and 18 were the most common high-risk HPV types. These two types were found in 52.4% of high-grade lesions. The prevalence in HPV infections was comparable across the Labrador regions. Conclusions. The present results support the potential effectiveness of the HPV immunization program in Labrador.

  6. Human Papillomavirus types distribution among women with cervical preneoplastic, lesions and cancer in Luanda, Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damião, Paciência de Almeida; Oliveira-Silva, Michelle; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo; Poliakova, Natalia; de Lima, Maria Emilia RT; Chiovo, José; Nicol, Alcina Frederica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among females in Angola and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for the development of pre-cancerous squamous intraepithelial lesions. The diversity and frequency of HPV types in Angola has yet to be reported. Aim To determine the frequency of HPV among women with squamous intraepithelial lesions from women in Luanda, Angola. Methods Study participants included women diagnosed with cytological abnormalities that voluntarily provided Pap smears (n = 64). Genomic DNA was extracted from the samples for use as templates in the PCR amplification of HPV sequences. PCR products were sequenced to determine HPV type. Results HPV DNA was detected in 71.9% (46/64) in the samples. A higher diversity of HPV types was found in the cytological lesions, such as ASCUS and LSIL (HPV16, 6, 18, 31, 58, 66, 70 and 82, in order of frequency) than that detected for HSIL and SSC (HPV16, 18, 6 and 33). The most prevalent HPV type were: HPV16, HPV6 and HPV18. Conclusion This is the first report on HPV type diversity and frequency in woman of Angola. The results suggest that large-scale studies across Africa would improve our understanding of interrelationship between HPV infections and cervical cancer. More directly, the identification of the HPV types most prevalent suggests that women in Angola would benefit from currently available HPV vaccines. PMID:28154623

  7. Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines Against Multiple Types of Human Papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sumanta; De, Antara; Nandy, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) occurs in many types, some of which cause cervical, genital, and other cancers. While vaccination is available against the major cancer-causing HPV types, many others are not covered by these preventive measures. Herein, we present a bioinformatics study for the designing of multivalent peptide vaccines against multiple HPV types as an alternative strategy to the virus-like particle vaccines being used now. Our technique of rational design of peptide vaccines is expected to ensure stability of the vaccine against many cycles of mutational changes, elicit immune response, and negate autoimmune possibilities. Using the L1 capsid protein sequences, we identified several peptides for potential vaccine design for HPV 16, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 11 types. Although there are concerns about the epitope-binding affinities for the peptides identified in this process, the technique indicates possibilities of multivalent, adjuvanted, peptide vaccines against a wider range of HPV types, and tailor-made different combinations of the peptides to address frequency variations of types over different population groups as required for prophylaxis and at lower cost than are in use at the present time.

  8. The tiers and dimensions of evasion of the type I interferon response by human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Lisi; Verweij, Marieke C; DeFilippis, Victor R

    2013-12-13

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the β-herpesvirus family that invariably occupies hosts for life despite a consistent multi-pronged antiviral immune response that targets the infection. This persistence is enabled by the large viral genome that encodes factors conferring a wide assortment of sophisticated, often redundant phenotypes that disable or otherwise manipulate impactful immune effector processes. The type I interferon system represents a first line of host defense against infecting viruses. The physiological reactions induced by secreted interferon act to effectively block replication of a broad spectrum of virus types, including HCMV. As such, the virus must exhibit counteractive mechanisms to these responses that involve their inhibition, tolerance, or re-purposing. The goal of this review is to describe the impact of the type I interferon system on HCMV replication and to showcase the number and diversity of strategies employed by the virus that allow infection of hosts in the presence of interferon-dependent activity.

  9. Linkage of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene to type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, J; Pie, A; Pociot, F; Kristiansen, O P; Karlsen, A E; Nerup, J

    2001-06-01

    Exposure of human pancreatic islets to a mixture of cytokines induces expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), impairs beta-cell function, and induces apoptosis. We performed a mutational scanning of all 27 exons of the human NOS2 gene and linkage transmission disequilibrium testing of identified NOS2 polymorphisms in a Danish nationwide type 1 diabetes mellitus (IDDM) family collection. Mutational screening was performed using PCR-amplified exons, followed by single stranded conformation polymorphism and verification of potential polymorphisms by sequencing. The transmission disequilibrium test was performed in an IDDM family material comprising 257 Danish families; 154 families were affected sibling pair families, and 103 families were simplex families. In total, 10 polymorphisms were identified in 8 exons, of which 4 were tested in the family material. A C/T single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 16 resulting in an amino acid substitution, Ser(608)Leu, showed linkage to IDDM in human leukocyte antigen DR3/4-positive affected offspring (P = 0.008; corrected P = 0.024). No other distorted transmission patterns were found for any other tested single nucleotide polymorphism or constructed haplotypes with the exception of those including data from exon 16. In conclusion, linkage of the human NOS2 gene to IDDM in a subset of patients supports a pathogenic role of nitric oxide in human IDDM.

  10. Active glass-type human augmented cognition system considering attention and intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ojha, Amitash; Lee, Minho

    2015-10-01

    Human cognition is the result of an interaction of several complex cognitive processes with limited capabilities. Therefore, the primary objective of human cognitive augmentation is to assist and expand these limited human cognitive capabilities independently or together. In this study, we propose a glass-type human augmented cognition system, which attempts to actively assist human memory functions by providing relevant, necessary and intended information by constantly assessing intention of the user. To achieve this, we exploit selective attention and intention processes. Although the system can be used in various real-life scenarios, we test the performance of the system in a person identity scenario. To detect the intended face, the system analyses the gaze points and change in pupil size to determine the intention of the user. An assessment of the gaze points and change in pupil size together indicates that the user intends to know the identity and information about the person in question. Then, the system retrieves several clues through speech recognition system and retrieves relevant information about the face, which is finally displayed through head-mounted display. We present the performance of several components of the system. Our results show that the active and relevant assistance based on users' intention significantly helps the enhancement of memory functions.

  11. Disruption of the ugt1 locus in mice resembles human Crigler-Najjar type I disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nghia; Bonzo, Jessica A; Chen, Shujuan; Chouinard, Sarah; Kelner, Michael J; Hardiman, Gary; Bélanger, Alain; Tukey, Robert H

    2008-03-21

    The 9 UDP-glucuronosyltranferases (UGTs) encoded by the UGT1 locus in humans are key enzymes in the metabolism of most drugs as well as endogenous substances such as bile acids, fatty acids, steroids, hormones, neurotransmitters, and bilirubin. Severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in humans that suffer from Crigler-Najjar type I disease results from lesions in the UGT1A1 gene and is often fatal. To examine the physiological importance of the Ugt1 locus in mice, this locus was rendered non-functional by interrupting exon 4 to create Ugt1(-/-) mice. Because UGT1A1 in humans is responsible for 100% of the conjugated bilirubin, it followed that newborn Ugt1(-/-) mice developed serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin that were 40-60 times higher than Ugt1(+/-) or wild-type mice. The result of extreme unconjugated bilirubin in Ugt1(-/-) mice, comparable to the induced levels noted in patients with Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease, is fatal in neonatal Ugt1(-/-) mice within 2 weeks following birth. The extreme jaundice is present as a phenotype in skin color after 8 h. Neonatal Ugt1(-/-) mice exhibit no detectable UGT1A-specific RNA, which corresponds to a complete absence of UGT1A proteins in liver microsomes. Conserved glucuronidation activity attributed to the Ugt1 locus can be defined in Ugt1(-/-) mice, because UGT2-dependent glucuronidation activity is unaffected. Remarkably, the loss of UGT1A functionality in liver results in significant alterations in cellular metabolism as investigated through changes in gene expression. Thus, the loss of UGT1A function in Ugt1(-/-) mice leads to a metabolic syndrome that can serve as a model to further investigate the toxicities associated with unconjugated bilirubin and the impact of this disease in humans.

  12. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, J L

    1996-10-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the autocomplementary loop sequences. This hairpin motif with the palindromic loop sequence is referred to as the dimer initiation site (DIS), and the type of interaction is termed loop-loop kissing. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the DIS motifs in different human and simian immunodeficiency viruses revealed conservation of the hairpin structure with a 6-mer palindrome in the loop, despite considerable sequence divergence. This finding supports the loop-loop kissing mechanism. To test this possibility, proviral genomes with mutations in the DIS palindrome were constructed. The appearance of infectious virus upon transfection into SupT1 T cells was delayed for the DIS mutants compared with that obtained by transfection of the wild-type provirus (pLAI), confirming that this RNA motif plays an important role in virus replication. Surprisingly, the RNA genome extracted from mutant virions was found to be fully dimeric and to have a normal thermal stability. These results indicate that the DIS motif is not essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA dimerization and suggest that DIS base pairing does not contribute to the stability of the mature RNA dimer. Instead, we measured a reduction in the amount of viral RNA encapsidated in the mutant virions, suggesting a role of the DIS motif in RNA packaging. This result correlates with the idea that the processes of RNA dimerization and packaging are intrinsically linked, and we propose that DIS pairing is a prerequisite for RNA packaging.

  13. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

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    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  14. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A), erm(B), or mef(A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  15. Momordica charantia and type 2 diabetes: from in vitro to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, Sandra D; Ludwig, Christine; Yang, Ray-yu; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a growing health problem worldwide that is particularly severe in India and China. In these areas, bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a popular vegetable which is traditionally known to have health beneficial effects not only, but mainly, on diabetes. Bitter gourd could be a cheap possibility to help the poor in these and other countries to control their blood glucose levels. This review describes anti-diabetic effects of bitter gourd reported in the literature and discusses what still needs to be clarified for developing an evidence-based and safe use of the bitter gourd for diabetes. Analyses of bioactive compounds have shown that bitter gourd is rich in nutrients and phytochemicals of which some have anti-diabetic effects. Juices, powders, extracts, and isolated compounds have been tested in vitro and in vivo. Bitter gourd increases insulin secretion of the pancreas, decreases intestinal glucose uptake, and increases uptake and utilization of glucose in peripheral tissues. Although human studies with type 2 diabetics are weak in their design and/or results, some of the studies do indicate anti-diabetic effects in patients and safety for bitter gourd treatment in humans. In the future, well designed studies with rodents will help to understand what kind of bitter gourd variety, dosage, preparation, and duration of administration is optimal. Such results will help to design human studies which are necessary to prove the effectiveness of bitter gourd in patients.

  16. A quantitative infection assay for human type I, II, and III interferon antiviral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon virus infection, cells secrete a diverse group of antiviral molecules that signal proximal cells to enter into an antiviral state, slowing or preventing viral spread. These paracrine signaling molecules can work synergistically, so measurement of any one antiviral molecule does not reflect the total antiviral activity of the system. Results We have developed an antiviral assay based on replication inhibition of an engineered fluorescent vesicular stomatitis virus reporter strain on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Our assay provides a quantitative functional readout of human type I, II, and III interferon activities, and it provides better sensitivity, intra-, and inter-assay reproducibility than the traditional crystal violet based assay. Further, it eliminates cell fixation, rinsing, and staining steps, and is inexpensive to implement. Conclusions A dsRed2-strain of vesicular stomatitis virus that is sensitive to type I, II, and III interferons was used to develop a convenient and sensitive assay for interferon antiviral activity. We demonstrate use of the assay to quantify the kinetics of paracrine antiviral signaling from human prostate cancer (PC3) cells in response to viral infection. The assay is applicable to high-throughput screening for anti-viral compounds as well as basic studies of cellular antiviral signaling. PMID:23829314

  17. Role of C-type natriuretic peptide in the function of normal human sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP is a newly discovered type of local regulatory factor that mediates its biological effects through the specific, membrane-bound natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B. Recent studies have established that CNP is closely related to male reproductive function. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of CNP/NPR-B in human ejaculated spermatozoa through different methods (such as immunolocalization, real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot, and then to evaluate the influence of CNP on sperm function i n vitro, such as motility and acrosome reaction. Human semen samples were collected from consenting donors who met the criteria of the World Health Organization for normozoospermia. Our results show that the specific receptor NPR-B of CNP is localized in the acrosomal region of the head and the membrane of the front-end tail of the sperm, and there is no signal of CNP in human sperm. Compared with the control, CNP can induce a significant dose-dependent increase in spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. In summary, CNP/NPR-B can affect sperm motility and acrosome reaction, thus regulating the reproductive function of males. CNP may be a new key factor in regulating sperm function.

  18. PseudoGeneQuest – Service for identification of different pseudogene types in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihinen Mauno

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudogenes, nonfunctional copies of genes, evolve fast due the lack of evolutionary pressures and thus appear in several different forms. PseudoGeneQuest is an online tool to search the human genome for a given query sequence and to identify different types of pseudogenes as well as novel genes and gene fragments. Description The service can detect pseudogenes, that have arisen either by retrotransposition or segmental genome duplication, many of which are not listed in the public pseudogene databases. The service has a user-friendly web interface and uses a powerful computer cluster in order to perform parallel searches and provide relatively fast runtimes despite exhaustive database searches and analyses. Conclusion PseudoGeneQuest is a versatile tool for detecting novel pseudogene candidates from the human genome. The service searches human genome sequences for five types of pseudogenes and provides an output that allows easy further analysis of observations. In addition to the result file the system provides visualization of the results linked to Ensembl Genome Browser. PseudoGeneQuest service is freely available.

  19. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients.

  20. Performance Characteristics and Validation of Next-Generation Sequencing for Human Leucocyte Antigen Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Eric T; Montgomery, Maureen; Petraroia, Rosanne; Crawford, John; Schmitz, John L

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching reduces graft-versus-host disease and improves overall patient survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Sanger sequencing has been the gold standard for HLA typing since 1996. However, given the increasing number of new HLA alleles identified and the complexity of the HLA genes, clinical HLA typing by Sanger sequencing requires several rounds of additional testing to provide allele-level resolution. Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is routinely used in molecular genetics, few clinical HLA laboratories use the technology. The performance characteristics of NGS HLA typing using TruSight HLA were determined using Sanger sequencing as the reference method. In total, 211 samples were analyzed with an overall accuracy of 99.8% (2954/2961) and 46 samples were analyzed for precision with 100% (368/368) reproducibility. Most discordant alleles were because of technical error rather than assay performance. More important, the ambiguity rate was 3.5% (103/2961). Seventy-four percentage of the ambiguities were within the DRB1 and DRB4 loci. HLA typing by NGS saves approximately $6000 per run when compared to Sanger sequencing. Thus, TruSight HLA assay enables high-throughput HLA typing with an accuracy, precision, ambiguity rate, and cost savings that should facilitate adoption of NGS technology in clinical HLA laboratories.

  1. T-type calcium channel expression in cultured human neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjie Wen; Shiyuan Xu; Lingling Wang; Hua Liang; Chengxiang Yang; Hanbing Wang; Hongzhen Liu

    2011-01-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) have similar structures and functions as neural cells and have been frequently used for cell culture studies of neural cell functions. Previous studies have revealed Land N-type calcium channels in SH-SY5Y cells. However, the distribution of the low -voltage activated calcium channel (namely called T-type calcium channel, including Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3) in SH-SY5Y cells remains poorly understood. The present study detected mRNA and protein expression of the T-type calcium channel (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3) in cultured SH-SY5Y cells using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Results revealed mRNA and protein expression from all three T-type calcium channel subtypes in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover,Cav3.1 was the predominant T-type calcium channel subtype in SH-SY5Y cells.

  2. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  3. Time trends of human papillomavirus types in invasive cervical cancer, from 1940 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, Laia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Tous, Sara; Quint, Wim; Vallejos, Carlos; Shin, Hai-Rim; Bravo, Luis E; Alonso, Patricia; Lima, Marcus A; Guimerà, Núria; Klaustermeier, Joellen; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Kasamatsu, Elena; Tatti, Silvio A; Felix, Ana; Molina, Carla; Velasco, Julio; Lloveras, Belen; Clavero, Omar; Lerma, Enrique; Laco, Jan; Bravo, Ignacio G; Guarch, Rosa; Pelayo, Adela; Ordi, Jaume; Andújar, Miguel; Sanchez, Gloria I; Castellsagué, Xavier; Muñoz, Nubia; Bosch, F Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Contribution over time of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in human cancers has been poorly documented. Such data is fundamental to measure current HPV vaccines impact in the years to come. We estimated the HPV type-specific distribution in a large international series of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) over 70 years prior to vaccination. Paraffin embedded ICC cases diagnosed between 1940 and 2007 were retrieved from eleven countries in Central-South America, Asia and Europe. Included countries reported to have low-medium cervical cancer screening uptake. Information on age at and year of diagnosis was collected from medical records. After histological confirmation, HPV DNA detection was performed by SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 (version1). Logistic regression models were used for estimating the adjusted relative contributions (RC) of HPV16 and of HPV18 over time. Among 4,771 HPV DNA positive ICC cases, HPV16 and HPV18 were the two most common HPVs in all the decades with no statistically significant variations of their adjusted-RC from 1940-59 to 2000-07 (HPV16-from 61.5 to 62.1%, and HPV18-from 6.9 to 7.2%). As well, the RC of other HPV types did not varied over time. In the stratified analysis by histology, HPV16 adjusted-RC significantly increased across decades in adenocarcinomas. Regarding age, cases associated to either HPV16, 18 or 45 were younger than those with other HPV types in all the evaluated decades. The observed stability on the HPV type distribution predicts a high and stable impact of HPV vaccination in reducing the cervical cancer burden in future vaccinated generations.

  4. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomes of two strains of human adenovirus type 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG ZHOU; XIAO Bo SU; QI WEI ZIIANG; QI YI ZENG; BING ZHU; CHU Yu ZHANG; Hou Bo WU; ZAO HE WU; SI TANG GONG

    2007-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 3 (HAdV-3) is widely prevalent all over the world, especially in Asia. The objective of this study is to carry out complete genomic DNA sequencing and the phylogenetic analysis for two strains (Guangzhou01 and Guangzhou02) of HAdV-3 wild virus isolated from South China. Nasopharyngeal secretion aspirate specimens of sick children were inoculated into HEp-2 and HeLa culture tubes, and the cultures were identified by neutralization assay with type-specific reference rabbit antisermn. Type-specific primers were also utilized to confirm the serotype. The restriction fragments of HAdV genome DNA were cloned into pBlueScript SK ( + ) vectors and sequenced, and the 5' and 3'ends of the linear HAdV-3 genome were directly sequenced with double purified genomic DNA as templates. General features of the HAdV-3 genome sequences were explored by using several bio-software.Phylogenetic analysis was done with MEGA 3.0 software. The genomic sequences of Guangzhou01 and Guangzhou02 possess the same 4 early regions and 5 late regions and have 39 ceding sequences and two RNA coding sequences. Other non-ceding regions are conservative. Inverted repeats and palindromes were identified in the genome sequences. The genomes of group B human adenovirus as well as HAdV-3have close phylogenetic relationship with that of chimpanzee adenovirus type 21. The genomie lengths of these two isolated strains are 35 273 bp and 35 269 bp, respectively. The phylogenetie analysis showed that HAdV-B species has some relationship with eertain types of chimpanzee adenovirus.

  6. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  7. Establishment of a canine model of human type 2 diabetes mellitus by overexpressing phosphoenolypyruvate carboxykinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Woo; Lee, Geun-Shik; Kim, Joung Joo; Park, Sun Woo; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Kang, Mina; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jung, Eui-Man; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2012-08-01

    Dogs are useful models for studying human metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus due to similarities in physiology, anatomy and life styles with humans. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) facilitates the production of transgenic dogs. In this study, we generated transgenic dogs expressing the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, which is closely involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, we assessed the cloning efficiency associated with adult or fetal (cloned or natural mating) fibroblasts as a nuclear source. Cloning efficiency was determined by the fusion, pregnancy and cloning rates. The fusion rates were significantly high for fibroblasts from cloned fetuses, but the pregnancy and cloning rates were relatively high for cells from normal fetuses. Based on these data, fetal fibroblasts were selected as the nuclear donor for SCNT and genetically engineered to overexpress the PEPCK gene and dual selection marker genes controlled by the PEPCK promoter. The transgenic cells were introduced into oocytes and transferred into five recipient dogs, resulting in two pregnancies. Finally, three puppies were born and confirmed by microsatellite analysis to be genetically identical to the donor. One puppy successfully overexpressed PEPCK mRNA and protein in the liver. This canine disease model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis and/or therapeutic targets of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Local origins impart conserved bone type-related differences in human osteoblast behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M; Gburcik, V; Reilly, P; Sankey, R A; Emery, R J; Clarkin, C E; Pitsillides, A A

    2015-03-04

    Osteogenic behaviour of osteoblasts from trabecular, cortical and subchondral bone were examined to determine any bone type-selective differences in samples from both osteoarthritic (OA) and osteoporotic (OP) patients. Cell growth, differentiation; alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) mRNA and activity, Runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2), SP7-transcription factor (SP7), bone sialoprotein-II (BSP-II), osteocalcin/bone gamma-carboxyglutamate (BGLAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG, TNFRSF11B), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κβ ligand (RANKL, TNFSF11) mRNA levels and proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) mRNA and protein release were assessed in osteoblasts from paired humeral head samples from age-matched, human OA/OP (n = 5/4) patients. Initial outgrowth and increase in cell number were significantly faster (p origins in OA and trabecular origins in OP. We found virtually identical bone type-related differences, however, in TNFRSF11B:TNFSF11 in OA and OP, consistent with greater potential for paracrine effects on osteoclasts in trabecular osteoblasts. Subchondral osteoblasts (OA) exhibited highest VEGF-A mRNA levels and release. Our data indicate that human osteoblasts in trabecular, subchondral and cortical bone have inherent, programmed diversity, with specific bone type-related differences in growth, differentiation and pro-angiogenic potential in vitro.

  9. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  10. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Guardabassi, Luca

    2014-06-24

    The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully characterized with respect to genetic background and cell wall-anchored protein (CWAP) gene content. Seventy-seven strain-corneocyte combinations were tested using both exponential- and stationary-phase cultures. Negative binomial regression analysis of counts of bacterial cells adhering to corneocytes revealed that adherence was significantly influenced by host and strain genotype regardless of bacterial growth phase. The two MRSP ST71 strains showed greater adherence than MRSP non-ST71 (p pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p < 0.0001), but the MRSP ST71 strain of human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced in vitro adherence of ST71 needs to be elucidated as this phenotypic trait may be associated to the epidemiological success and zoonotic potential of this epidemic MRSP clone.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of mutant and wild-type human. beta. -actin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, J.; Gunning, P.; Porreca, P.; Ng, S.Y.; Lin, C.H.; Kedes, L.

    1984-10-01

    There are more than 20 ..beta..-actin-specific sequences in the human genome, many of which are pseudogenes. To facilitate the isolation of potentially functional ..beta..-actin genes, they used the new method of B. Seed for selecting genomic clones by homologous recombination. A derivative of the ..pi..VX miniplasmid, ..pi..AN7..beta..1, was constructed by insertion of the 600-base-pair 3' untranslated region of the ..beta..-actin mRNA expressed in human fibroblasts. Five clones containing ..beta..-actin sequences were selected from an amplified human fetal gene library by homologous recombination between library phage and the miniplasmid. One of these clones contained a complete ..beta..-actin gene with a coding sequence identical to that determined for the mRNA of human fibroblasts. A DNA fragment consisting of mostly intervening sequences from this gene was then use to identify 13 independent recombinant copies of the analogous gene from two specially constructed gene libraries, each containing one of the two types of mutant ..beta..-actin genes found in a line of neoplastic human fibroblasts. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences encoded by the unmutated gene predict that a guanine-to-adenine transition is responsible for the glycine-to-aspartic acid mutation at codon 244 and would also result in the loss of a HaeIII site. Detection of this HaeIII polymorphism among the fibroblast-derived closed verified the identity of the ..beta..-actin gene expressed in human fibroblasts.

  12. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  13. Type I (CD64) and type II (CD32) Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis by human blood dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Wardwell, K; Shen, L; Tedder, T F; Guyre, P M

    1996-07-15

    Three classes of Fc receptors for IgG, Fc gamma RI (CD64), Fc gamma RII (CD32), and Fc gamma RIII (CD16), are expressed on blood leukocytes. Although Fc gamma R are important phagocytic receptors on phagocytes, most reports suggest that dendritic cells lack Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis and express significant levels of only CD32. We now report that phagocytically active forms of both CD64 and CD32 are expressed significantly on at least one subset of human blood dendritic cells. Countercurrent elutriation and magnetic bead selection were used to rapidly enrich subsets of blood dendritic cells (CD33brightCD14-HLA-DRbrightCD83-) and monocytes (CD33brightCD14brightHLA-DRdimCD83-). Upon culture for 2 days, dendritic cells became CD83-positive and markedly increased HLA-DR expression, whereas monocytes did not express CD83 and exhibited reduced levels of HLA-DR. Constitutive CD64 expression was identified on this circulating dendritic cell population, but at a lower level than on monocytes. CD64 expression by dendritic cells and monocytes did not decrease during 2 days in culture, and was up-regulated on both cell types following incubation with IFN-gamma. Freshly isolated blood dendritic cells performed CD64- and CD32-mediated phagocytosis, although at a lower level than monocytes. Dendritic cells generated by culture of adherent mononuclear cells in granulocyte-macrophage CSF and IL-4 also up-regulated CD64 following IFN-gamma stimulation, and mediated CD64-dependent phagocytosis. These results indicate that both CD64 and CD32 expressed on blood dendritic cells may play a role in uptake of foreign particles and macromolecules through a phagocytic mechanism before trafficking to T cell-reactive areas.

  14. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of opponent type on human performance in a three-alternative choice task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Celia; Baxter, Jennifer; Alsop, Brent

    2013-10-01

    Adult participants played computerised games of "Paper Scissors Rock". Participants in one group were told that they were playing against the computer, and those in the other group were told that they were playing against another participant in the adjacent room. The participant who won the most games would receive a $50 prize. For both groups however, the opponent's responses (paper, scissors, or rock) were generated by the computer, and the distribution of these responses was varied across four blocks of 126 trials. Results were analysed using the generalised matching law for the three possible pairs of alternatives (paper vs. scissors, paper vs. rock, and scissors vs. rock) across all participants in each group. Overall, significantly higher estimates of sensitivity to the distribution of opponent's responses were obtained from participants who were told their opponent was a computer compared to participants who were told their opponent was another participant. While adding to the existing literature showing that the generalised matching law is an adequate descriptor of human three-alternative choice behaviour, these findings show that external factors such as perceived opponent type can affect the efficacy of reinforcer contingencies on human behaviour. This suggests that generalising the results from tasks performed against a computer to real-life human-to-human interactions warrants some caution.

  16. Disentangling type 2 diabetes and metformin treatment signatures in the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Nielsen, Trine; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Prifti, Edi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Krogh Pedersen, Helle; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Voigt, Anita Yvonne; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hercog, Rajna; Igor Costea, Paul; Kultima, Jens Roat; Li, Junhua; Jørgensen, Torben; Levenez, Florence; Dore, Joël; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Brunak, Søren; Raes, Jeroen; Hansen, Torben; Wang, Jun; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Bork, Peer; Pedersen, Oluf

    2015-12-10

    In recent years, several associations between common chronic human disorders and altered gut microbiome composition and function have been reported. In most of these reports, treatment regimens were not controlled for and conclusions could thus be confounded by the effects of various drugs on the microbiota, which may obscure microbial causes, protective factors or diagnostically relevant signals. Our study addresses disease and drug signatures in the human gut microbiome of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Two previous quantitative gut metagenomics studies of T2D patients that were unstratified for treatment yielded divergent conclusions regarding its associated gut microbial dysbiosis. Here we show, using 784 available human gut metagenomes, how antidiabetic medication confounds these results, and analyse in detail the effects of the most widely used antidiabetic drug metformin. We provide support for microbial mediation of the therapeutic effects of metformin through short-chain fatty acid production, as well as for potential microbiota-mediated mechanisms behind known intestinal adverse effects in the form of a relative increase in abundance of Escherichia species. Controlling for metformin treatment, we report a unified signature of gut microbiome shifts in T2D with a depletion of butyrate-producing taxa. These in turn cause functional microbiome shifts, in part alleviated by metformin-induced changes. Overall, the present study emphasizes the need to disentangle gut microbiota signatures of specific human diseases from those of medication.

  17. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2011-01-01

    , we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2......The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis......, and 6. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy according to a Papanicolaou triage algorithm. All tissue specimens were tested for 14 HPV types and were adjudicated by a pathology panel. During the trials, 22 women were diagnosed with AIS (six vaccine and 16 placebo). There were 25 AIS lesions in total...

  18. Disentangling type 2 diabetes and metformin treatment signatures in the human gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk ; Nielsen, Trine N.

    2015-01-01

    on the microbiota, which may obscure microbial causes, protective factors or diagnostically relevant signals. Our study addresses disease and drug signatures in the human gut microbiome of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Two previous quantitative gut metagenomics studies of T2D patients that were unstratified......In recent years, several associations between common chronic human disorders and altered gut microbiome composition and function have been reported1,2. In most of these reports, treatment regimens were not controlled for and conclusions could thus be confounded by the effects of various drugs...... for microbial mediation of the therapeutic effects of metformin through short-chain fatty acid production, as well as for potential microbiota-mediated mechanisms behind known intestinal adverse effects in the form of a relative increase in abundance of Escherichia species. Controlling for metformin treatment...

  19. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  20. [Association between types of need, human development index, and infant mortality in Mexico, 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gómez, Oswaldo Sinoe; López-Arellano, Oliva

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between different types of economic and social deprivation and infant mortality rates reported in 2008 in Mexico. We conducted an ecological study analyzing the correlation and relative risk between the human development index and levels of social and economic differences in State and national infant mortality rates. There was a strong correlation between higher human development and lower infant mortality. Low schooling and poor housing and crowding were associated with higher infant mortality. Although infant mortality has declined dramatically in Mexico over the last 28 years, the decrease has not been homogeneous, and there are persistent inequalities that determine mortality rates in relation to different poverty levels. Programs with a multidisciplinary approach are needed to decrease infant mortality rates through comprehensive individual and family development.

  1. Prognostic implication of human papillomavirus types and species in cervical cancer patients undergoing primary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yat Ming; Cheung, Tak Hong; Yeo, Winnie; Mo, Frankie; Yu, Mei Yung; Lee, Kun Min; Ho, Wendy C S; Yeung, Apple C M; Law, Priscilla T Y; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types are associated with cervical cancer. It is well established that individual HPV types vary in oncogenicity, but current data on their prognostic implication remain controversial. We examined the association between HPV types/species and the survival of 236 Chinese women aged 26-87 (mean 54.4) years after receiving primary treatment for cervical cancer. Overall, 45.8% were of FIGO stage I, 41.9% stage II, and 12.3% stage III. The four most prevalent types found were HPV-16 (60.2%), HPV-18 (21.6%), HPV-52 (11.9%), and HPV-58 (9.3%). Overall, 19.5% of patients had multiple-type infections, 78.4% harboured one or more alpha-9 species, and 28.8% harboured one or more alpha-7 species. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, 156 (66.1%) patients survived. The 3-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. Factors independently associated with a poorer 3-year overall survival were age >60 years, tumour size >4 cm, lymph node involvement and treatment with radiotherapy+/-chemotherapy. Univariate analysis showed HPV-16 single-type infection was associated with a marginally poorer disease-specific survival (71.6% vs. 87.0%, HR: 1.71, 95% CI = 1.01-2.90), whereas non-HPV-16 alpha-9 species was associated with a better disease-specific survival (90.0% vs. 76.2%, HR: 0.36, 95% CI = 0.16-0.79). However, on multivariate analysis, HPV infection status irrespective of different grouping methods, including individual types, species, single-type or co-infection, did not carry any significant prognostic significance. In conclusion, we did not observe any association between infection with a particular HPV type/species and survival. An HPV type-based stratification in treatment and follow-up plan could not be recommended.

  2. Prognostic implication of human papillomavirus types and species in cervical cancer patients undergoing primary treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yat Ming Lau

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV types are associated with cervical cancer. It is well established that individual HPV types vary in oncogenicity, but current data on their prognostic implication remain controversial. We examined the association between HPV types/species and the survival of 236 Chinese women aged 26-87 (mean 54.4 years after receiving primary treatment for cervical cancer. Overall, 45.8% were of FIGO stage I, 41.9% stage II, and 12.3% stage III. The four most prevalent types found were HPV-16 (60.2%, HPV-18 (21.6%, HPV-52 (11.9%, and HPV-58 (9.3%. Overall, 19.5% of patients had multiple-type infections, 78.4% harboured one or more alpha-9 species, and 28.8% harboured one or more alpha-7 species. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, 156 (66.1% patients survived. The 3-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. Factors independently associated with a poorer 3-year overall survival were age >60 years, tumour size >4 cm, lymph node involvement and treatment with radiotherapy+/-chemotherapy. Univariate analysis showed HPV-16 single-type infection was associated with a marginally poorer disease-specific survival (71.6% vs. 87.0%, HR: 1.71, 95% CI = 1.01-2.90, whereas non-HPV-16 alpha-9 species was associated with a better disease-specific survival (90.0% vs. 76.2%, HR: 0.36, 95% CI = 0.16-0.79. However, on multivariate analysis, HPV infection status irrespective of different grouping methods, including individual types, species, single-type or co-infection, did not carry any significant prognostic significance. In conclusion, we did not observe any association between infection with a particular HPV type/species and survival. An HPV type-based stratification in treatment and follow-up plan could not be recommended.

  3. The influence of surface type on the absorbed radiation by a human under hot, dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, A. W.; Vanos, J. K.

    2017-05-01

    Given the predominant use of heat-retaining materials in urban areas, numerous studies have addressed the urban heat island mitigation potential of various "cool" options, such as vegetation and high-albedo surfaces. The influence of altered radiational properties of such surfaces affects not only the air temperature within a microclimate, but more importantly the interactions of long- and short-wave radiation fluxes with the human body. Minimal studies have assessed how cool surfaces affect thermal comfort via changes in absorbed radiation by a human (R abs) using real-world, rather than modeled, urban field data. The purpose of the current study is to assess the changes in the absorbed radiation by a human—a critical component of human energy budget models—based on surface type on hot summer days (air temperatures > 38.5∘C). Field tests were conducted using a high-end microclimate station under predominantly clear sky conditions over ten surfaces with higher sky view factors in Lubbock, Texas. Three methods were used to measure and estimate R abs: a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT), a net radiometer, and a theoretical estimation model. Results over dry surfaces suggest that the use of high-albedo surfaces to reduce overall urban heat gain may not improve acute human thermal comfort in clear conditions due to increased reflected radiation. Further, the use of low-cost instrumentation, such as the CRT, shows potential in quantifying radiative heat loads within urban areas at temporal scales of 5-10 min or greater, yet further research is needed. Fine-scale radiative information in urban areas can aid in the decision-making process for urban heat mitigation using non-vegetated urban surfaces, with surface type choice is dependent on the need for short-term thermal comfort, or reducing cumulative heat gain to the urban fabric.

  4. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Isabel; Klich, Katharina; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Radstaak, Martina; Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Radke, Teja F; Psathaki, Olympia E; Hargus, Gunnar; Kramer, Jan; Einhaus, Martin; Kim, Jeong Beom; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Schöler, Hans R; Schlenke, Peter; Zaehres, Holm

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex vivo expansion of induced pluripotent stem cells into erythroid cells, we compared induced pluripotent stem cells from human neural stem cells and human cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells and evaluated their potential for differentiation into hematopoietic progenitor and mature red blood cells. Although genome-wide DNA methylation profiling at all promoter regions demonstrates that the epigenetic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells is influenced by the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, we found a similar hematopoietic induction potential and erythroid differentiation pattern of induced pluripotent stem cells of different somatic cell origin. All human induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed terminal maturation into normoblasts and enucleated reticulocytes, producing predominantly fetal hemoglobin. Differences were only observed in the growth rate of erythroid cells, which was slightly higher in the induced pluripotent stem cells derived from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. More detailed methylation analysis of the hematopoietic and erythroid promoters identified similar CpG methylation levels in the induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from CD34(+) cells and those derived from neural stem cells, which confirms their comparable erythroid differentiation potential.

  5. Action of uracil analogs on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and its reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, G; Dutschman, G E; Im, G J; Pan, B C; Chu, S H; Cheng, Y C

    1995-02-01

    Three structural analogs of 5-ethyl-1-benzyloxymethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil (E-BPU) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication without cytotoxicity in vitro and were more potent than azidothymidine and were as potent as E-BPU. The target of these compounds is HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Reverse transcriptases resistant to nevirapine (tyrosine at position 181 to cysteine) and TIBO R82150 (leucine at position 100 to isoleucine) are cross resistant to E-BPU analogs. Nevirapine- or TIBO R82150-resistant HIV-1 were cross resistant to E-BPU analogs but were inhibited at concentrations 11- to 135-fold lower than the cytotoxic doses.

  6. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M;

    1991-01-01

    . This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus......The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  7. Lifelong persistent infection of hamster brain by human adenovirus type 6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabe,Yoshiro

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available To establish an experimental persistent infection of the brain with human adenoviruses, adenovirus type 6 (ad 6 was inoculated intracerebrally into young adult hamsters. Hamsters appeared languid for a few days after inoculation, but recovered rapidly. By cocultivation of tissue fragments with HeLa cells, ad 6 was always recovered from the brains of hamsters throughout their lives, as long as 29 months, indicating the establishment of a lifelong persistent infection. Except for the first few days after inoculation, however, attempts to recover virus by inoculation of tissue extracts onto HeLa cells or by cultivation of tissue fragments alone were unsuccessful.

  8. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells......; this binding was inhibitable by pure Tn antigen, and indications were found that this inhibition occurred at a pre-entry step. Boosting the naturally occurring low-titer anti-Tn activity may be of prophylactic value, as suggested by the in vitro neutralization found in this study....

  9. Comparative analysis of Rev function in human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, E D; Cullen, B R

    1992-01-01

    The Rev proteins of the related but distinct human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) display incomplete functional reciprocity. One possible explanation for this observation is that HIV-2 Rev is unable to interact with the HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE1). However, an analysis of the biological activity of chimeric proteins derived from HIV-1 and HIV-2 Rev reveals that this target specificity does not map to the Rev RNA binding domain but is instead primarily determined ...

  10. Human tandem-repeat-type galectins bind bacterial non-βGal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knirel, Yu A.; Gabius, H.-J.; Blixt, Klas Ola;

    2014-01-01

    ), prompted us to establish an array with bacterial polysaccharides. We addressed the question whether sugar determinants other than β-galactosides may be docking sites, using human galectins-4, -8, and -9. Positive controls with histo-blood group ABH-epitopes and the E. coli 086 polysaccharide ascertained...... the suitability of the set-up. Significant signal generation, depending on type of galectin and polysacchride, was obtained. Presence of cognate β-galactoside-related epitopes within a polysaccharide chain or its branch will not automatically establish binding properties, and structural constellations lacking...

  11. Failure to demonstrate human T cell lymphotropic virus type I in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P;

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed in searching for human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) gag, env and pol sequences in samples of DNA prepared from two HTLV-I seropositive patients with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), the Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS...... and detection probes. In MS patients and healthy individuals, no signals were obtained with gag and env. In occasional experiments, weak signals were seen for the pol segment for a single MS patient and/or healthy individuals, but these signals were not reproducible in subsequent experiments. Thus, the present...

  12. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal......' innate immune response seems to not be linked to the health-promoting effects ofprobiotics....

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted......Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) is responsible for cleaving ten different sites in the viral Gag and Gag-pol polyproteins, thereby releasing the structural proteins and enzymes necessary for the maturation and infectivity of the HIV-1 virus. The vital role of HIV-1 PR...

  14. Type I collagen synthesis and degradation in peritendinous tissue after exercise determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Petersen, L J;

    1999-01-01

    in the peritendinous region by measuring interstitial concentrations of a collagen propeptide (PICP; 100 kDa) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP; 9 kDa) as well as an inflammatory mediator (PGE2). 2. Seven trained human runners were studied before and after (2 and 72 h) 3 h of running (36 km). Two microdialysis...... increased in blood during running, and returned to baseline in the recovery period, whereas interstitial PGE2 concentration was elevated in the early recovery phase. 4. The findings of the present study indicate that acute exercise induces increased formation of type I collagen in peritendinous tissue...

  15. Abnormal colonic motility in mice overexpressing human wild-type α-synuclein

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The presynaptic protein α-synuclein (αSyn) has been implicated in both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson’s disease. We examined whether human αSyn-overexpressing mice under Thy1 promoter (Thy1-αSyn) display alterations of colonic function. Basal fecal output was decreased in Thy1-αSyn mice fed ad libitum. Fasted/refed Thy1-αSyn mice had a slower distal colonic transit than the wild-type mice, as monitored by 2.2-fold increase in time to expel an intracolonic bead and 2.9-fold higher co...

  16. Isolation of Klebsiella terrigena from human feces: biochemical reactions, capsule types, and antibiotic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R

    1991-04-01

    Colonization of the human intestinal tract by a newly proposed species, K. terrigena, was investigated. 5377 different stool specimens from healthy persons (food handlers) yielded 50 isolates (0.9%). Biochemically, low frequencies in the degradation of urea, dulcitol, and utilization of citrate at 37 degrees C were found when compared to K. pneumoniae. At 30 degrees C, urea hydrolysis was observed twice as often as at 37 degrees C. Apart from ampicillin, K. terrigena was susceptible to 12 other antimicrobial drugs tested. Multiple drug resistance was rare, few isolates being resistant against 2-4 antibiotic agents. Capsule typing revealed 30 different serotypes, K 70 and K 14 were the most frequent. Six strains expressed capsule types K 2 and K 5, which have been reported to be associated with virulence in K. pneumoniae. A possible pathogenic role of K. terrigena is discussed.

  17. Molecular diversity of L-type Ca2+ channel transcripts in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, N M

    1992-05-15

    The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the human fibroblast Ca2+ channel of L type (HFCC) has been determined. It is highly homologous to L-type channels previously cloned from rabbit lung and heart as well as from rat brain. At least four sites of molecular diversity were identified in the nucleotide sequence of HFCC. Three of these include regions encoding the transmembrane segments IIS6, IIIS2, and IVS3, which are known to be important for channel gating properties. The positions of these sites correlate with RNA splice sites, indicating that the molecular diversity of the transcripts is a result of alternative splicing. The fourth diversity region is located at the C-terminal region and comprises insertions and deletions. It is suggested that these variations may give rise to multiple subforms of HFCC with altered electrophysiological properties.

  18. Different types of biotechnological wound coverages created with the application of alive human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papuga A. Ye.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the development and the implementation of the new biotechnological wound coverings (skin equivalents designed for temporal or permanent replacement of damaged or destroyed areas of human skin remains extremely actual relevant in clinical practice. Skin equivalents or equivalents of individual skin layers which include alive cells of different types take a special place among the artificial wound coverings. They mostly contain two basic types of cells – fibroblasts and keratinocytes (together or separately. Such bioconstructions are usually served as temporary coverings, which supply the damaged skin by biologically active substances and stimulate the regeneration of the patient's own tissues. In this review we consider as commercially available wound coverings and those which are still studied in the laboratories. Until now ideal substitutes of natural skin have not yet created, so the efforts of many researchers are focusing on the solution of this problem.

  19. Human exposure to environmental health concern by types of urban environment: The case of Tel Aviv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Izhak; Potchter, Oded; Yaakov, Yaron; Epstein, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    This study classifies urban environments into types characterized by different exposure to environmental risk factors measured by general sense of discomfort and Heart Rate Variability (HRV). We hypothesize that a set of environmental factors (micro-climatic, CO, noise and individual heart rate) that were measured simultaneously in random locations can provide a better understanding of the distribution of human exposure to environmental loads throughout the urban space than results calculated based on measurements from close fixed stations. We measured micro-climatic and thermal load, CO and noise, individual Heart Rate, Subjective Social Load and Sense of Discomfort (SD) were tested by questionnaire survey. The results demonstrate significant differences in exposure to environmental factors among 8 types of urban environments. It appears that noise and social load are the more significant environmental factors to enhance health risks and general sense of discomfort.

  20. A Stromal Cell Niche for Human and Mouse Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation, and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized stromal niche for ILC3 has not been identified. A novel lineage-tracing approach now identifies a subset of murine fetal lymphoid tissue organizer cells that gives rise exclusively to adult marginal reticular cells. Moreover, both cell types are conserved from mice to humans and colocalize with ILC3 in secondary lymphoid tissues throughout life. In sum, we provide evidence that fetal stromal organizers give rise to adult marginal reticular cells and form a dedicated stromal niche for innate ILC3 in adaptive lymphoid organs.

  1. Direct evidence of fiber type-dependent GLUT-4 expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Poulsen, P; Handberg, A

    2000-01-01

    GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers of human skeletal muscles in younger and older adults was studied. Furthermore, the dependency of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake on fiber type distribution was investigated. Fiber type distribution was determined in cryosections of muscle biopsies from 8...... younger (29 yr) and 8 older (64 yr) healthy subjects, and estimates of GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers were obtained by combining immunohistochemistry and stereology. GLUT-4 was more abundantly expressed in slow compared with fast muscle fibers in both younger (P ...) subjects. A 25% reduction of GLUT-4 density in fast fibers (P GLUT-4 density in slow fibers were demonstrated in older compared with younger subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rates measured by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp were not correlated with the fraction...

  2. [Teaching design and practice of human blood type traits in genetics comprehensive laboratory course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Hu, Dongmei; Yu, Dade; Dong, Mingliang; Li, Yun; Fan, Yingming; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive laboratory courses, which enable students to aptly apply theoretic knowledge and master experiment skills, play an important role in the present educational reform of laboratory courses. We utilized human ABO blood type as the experimental subject, and designed the experiment--"Molecular Genotyping of Human ABO Blood Type and Analysis of Population Genetic Equilibrium". In the experiment, DNA in mucosal cells is extracted from students' saliva, and each student's genotype is identified using a series of molecular genetics technologies, including PCR amplification of target fragments, enzymatic digestion, and electrophoretic separation. Then, taking the whole class as an analogous Mendel population, a survey of genotype frequency of ABO blood type is conducted, followed with analyses of various population genetic parameters using Popgene. Through the open laboratory course, students can not only master molecular genetic experimental skills, but also improve their understanding of theoretic knowledge through independent design and optimization of molecular techniques. After five years of research and practice, a stable experimental system of molecular genetics has been established to identify six genotypes of ABO blood types, namely I(A)I(A), I(A)i, I(B)I(B), I(B)i, I(A)I(B) and ii. Laboratory courses of molecular and population genetics have been integrated by calculating the frequencies of the six genotypes and three multiple alleles and testing population genetic equilibrium. The goal of the open laboratory course with independent design and implementation by the students has been achieved. This laboratory course has proved effective and received good reviews from the students. It could be applied as a genetics laboratory course for the biology majors directly, and its ideas and methods could be promoted and applied to other biological laboratory courses.

  3. Functional Importance of L- and P/Q-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Human Renal Vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B; Poulsen, Christian B; Walter, Steen

    2011-01-01

    in kidney function. It was hypothesized that human renal vascular excitation-contraction coupling involves different subtypes of channels. In human renal artery and dissected intrarenal blood vessels from nephrectomies, PCR analysis showed expression of L-type (Ca(v) 1.2), P/Q-type (Ca(v) 2.1), and T-type......, and L- and P/Q-type channels are of functional importance for the depolarization-induced vasoconstriction. The contribution of P/Q-type channels to contraction in the human vasculature is a novel mechanism for the regulation of renal blood flow and suggests that clinical treatment with calcium blockers......Calcium channel blockers are widely used for treatment of hypertension, because they decrease peripheral vascular resistance through inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Animal studies of renal vasculature have shown expression of several types of calcium channels that are involved...

  4. Canine classical seminoma: a specific malignant type with human classifications is highly correlated with tumor angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong-Hyuk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human seminoma is classified as classical seminoma (SE and spermatocytic seminoma (SS. Human SE is known to be more malignant and metastasizing more frequently than SS. Tumor angiogenesis is highly related with tumor progression and metastasis, with microvessel density (MVD being an important parameter of metastatic potential. Canine seminoma is not yet well-established as SE or SS type including correlation with angiogenesis. We classified canine SE and SS, and then compared them to tumor associated vessels. Methods Twenty-three cases of canine seminomas (2 intratubular, 9 diffuse, and 12 intratubular/diffuse seminomas showing both intratubular and diffuse patterns were classified as SE or SS by immunohistochemistry (IHC using monoclonal antibody against PLAP and by PAS stain. The histopathological data were then compared to see if there was a correlation with SE or SS. Angiogenesis of seminomas were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay using polyclonal antibody against Von Willebrand factor (vWF and by calculating the means of MVD, vessels area and perimeters using computerized image analysis. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS program was used for various statistical analyses. Results The numbers of PLAP+/PAS+ canine SEs were 8/23 (34.8% and PLAP-/PAS- SSs were 15/23 (61.2%. All SE cases (8/8, 100% were intratubular/diffuse types. SS types included 2 intratubular (2/15, 13.3%, 9 diffuse (9/15, 60%, and 4 intratubular/diffuse (4/15, 26.7% types. MVD and vascular parameters in SEs were significantly higher than in SSs, showing the highest value in the intratubular/diffuse type. Seminomas observed with neoplastic cells invasion of vessels presented higher perimeter and area values than seminomas without conformed neoplastic cells invasion. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated a positive relationship between canine SE and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we also showed that a tumor cells invasion of vessels

  5. Canine classical seminoma: a specific malignant type with human classifications is highly correlated with tumor angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Human seminoma is classified as classical seminoma (SE) and spermatocytic seminoma (SS). Human SE is known to be more malignant and metastasizing more frequently than SS. Tumor angiogenesis is highly related with tumor progression and metastasis, with microvessel density (MVD) being an important parameter of metastatic potential. Canine seminoma is not yet well-established as SE or SS type including correlation with angiogenesis. We classified canine SE and SS, and then compared them to tumor associated vessels. Methods Twenty-three cases of canine seminomas (2 intratubular, 9 diffuse, and 12 intratubular/diffuse seminomas showing both intratubular and diffuse patterns) were classified as SE or SS by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using monoclonal antibody against PLAP and by PAS stain. The histopathological data were then compared to see if there was a correlation with SE or SS. Angiogenesis of seminomas were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay using polyclonal antibody against Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and by calculating the means of MVD, vessels area and perimeters using computerized image analysis. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program was used for various statistical analyses. Results The numbers of PLAP+/PAS+ canine SEs were 8/23 (34.8%) and PLAP-/PAS- SSs were 15/23 (61.2%). All SE cases (8/8, 100%) were intratubular/diffuse types. SS types included 2 intratubular (2/15, 13.3%), 9 diffuse (9/15, 60%), and 4 intratubular/diffuse (4/15, 26.7%) types. MVD and vascular parameters in SEs were significantly higher than in SSs, showing the highest value in the intratubular/diffuse type. Seminomas observed with neoplastic cells invasion of vessels presented higher perimeter and area values than seminomas without conformed neoplastic cells invasion. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated a positive relationship between canine SE and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we also showed that a tumor cells invasion of vessels were a correlated

  6. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gary M; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-11-01

    HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 3846 HIV-negative (89.6%) ICC, but HIV-positive ICC harbored significantly more multiple HPV infections (PR = 1.75, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18 to 2.58), which were significantly more prevalent in ICC tested from cells than from biopsies. HPV16 was the most frequently detected type in HIV-positive ICC (42.5%), followed by HPV18 (22.2%), HPV45 (14.4%), and HPV35 (7.1%). Nevertheless, HIV-positive ICC were significantly less frequently infected with HPV16 than HIV-negative ICC (PR = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals: 0.79 to 0.99). Other high-risk types were significantly more prevalent in HIV-positive ICC, but only for HPV18 was there a significantly higher prevalence of both single and multiple infections in HIV-positive ICC. Increases for other high-risk types were primarily accounted for by multiple infections. The proportion of HPV-positive ICC estimated attributable to HPV16/18 (71.8% in HIV positive, 73.4% in HIV negative) or HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58 (88.8%, 89.5%) was not affected by HIV. HIV alters the relative carcinogenicity of HPV types, but prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines may nevertheless prevent a similar proportion of ICC, irrespective of HIV infection.

  7. Type-specific human papillomavirus biological features: validated model-based estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacopo Baussano

    Full Text Available Infection with high-risk (hr human papillomavirus (HPV is considered the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Vaccination against HPV16 and 18 types, which are responsible of about 75% of cervical cancer worldwide, is expected to have a major global impact on cervical cancer occurrence. Valid estimates of the parameters that regulate the natural history of hrHPV infections are crucial to draw reliable projections of the impact of vaccination. We devised a mathematical model to estimate the probability of infection transmission, the rate of clearance, and the patterns of immune response following the clearance of infection of 13 hrHPV types. To test the validity of our estimates, we fitted the same transmission model to two large independent datasets from Italy and Sweden and assessed finding consistency. The two populations, both unvaccinated, differed substantially by sexual behaviour, age distribution, and study setting (screening for cervical cancer or Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Estimated transmission probability of hrHPV types (80% for HPV16, 73%-82% for HPV18, and above 50% for most other types; clearance rates decreasing as a function of time since infection; and partial protection against re-infection with the same hrHPV type (approximately 20% for HPV16 and 50% for the other types were similar in the two countries. The model could accurately predict the HPV16 prevalence observed in Italy among women who were not infected three years before. In conclusion, our models inform on biological parameters that cannot at the moment be measured directly from any empirical data but are essential to forecast the impact of HPV vaccination programmes.

  8. Distribution Patterns of Infection with Multiple Types of Human Papillomaviruses and Their Association with Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-De Leon, Sara; Camargo, Milena; Sanchez, Ricardo; Munoz, Marina; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Purroy, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with multiple types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical lesions. In this study, cervical samples collected from 1,810 women with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, who attended to their cervical screening program in different geographical regions of Colombia, were examined for the presence of cervical lesions and HPV by Papanicolau testing and DNA PCR detection, respectively. Principal Findings The negative binomial distribution model used in this study showed differences between the observed and expected values within some risk factor categories analyzed. Particularly in the case of single infection and coinfection with more than 4 HPV types, observed frequencies were smaller than expected, while the number of women infected with 2 to 4 viral types were higher than expected. Data analysis according to a negative binomial regression showed an increase in the risk of acquiring more HPV types in women who were of indigenous ethnicity (+37.8%), while this risk decreased in women who had given birth more than 4 times (−31.1%), or were of mestizo (−24.6%) or black (−40.9%) ethnicity. Conclusions According to a theoretical probability distribution, the observed number of women having either a single infection or more than 4 viral types was smaller than expected, while for those infected with 2–4 HPV types it was larger than expected. Taking into account that this study showed a higher HPV coinfection rate in the indigenous ethnicity, the role of underlying factors should be assessed in detail in future studies. PMID:21379574

  9. Distribution patterns of infection with multiple types of human papillomaviruses and their association with risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Soto-De Leon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with multiple types of human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the main risk factors associated with the development of cervical lesions. In this study, cervical samples collected from 1,810 women with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, who attended to their cervical screening program in different geographical regions of Colombia, were examined for the presence of cervical lesions and HPV by Papanicolau testing and DNA PCR detection, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The negative binomial distribution model used in this study showed differences between the observed and expected values within some risk factor categories analyzed. Particularly in the case of single infection and coinfection with more than 4 HPV types, observed frequencies were smaller than expected, while the number of women infected with 2 to 4 viral types were higher than expected. Data analysis according to a negative binomial regression showed an increase in the risk of acquiring more HPV types in women who were of indigenous ethnicity (+37.8%, while this risk decreased in women who had given birth more than 4 times (-31.1%, or were of mestizo (-24.6% or black (-40.9% ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: According to a theoretical probability distribution, the observed number of women having either a single infection or more than 4 viral types was smaller than expected, while for those infected with 2-4 HPV types it was larger than expected. Taking into account that this study showed a higher HPV coinfection rate in the indigenous ethnicity, the role of underlying factors should be assessed in detail in future studies.

  10. Cervical Infection of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Huang, Ke; Ji, Pei Li; Song, Lei; Liu, Hong Tu

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical infections in Beijing, China, and to investigate the odds ratio (OR) of HPV single and multiple infections in abnormal cytology. A total of 19,018 specimens from outpatients in the department of obstetric and gynecology were collected. They were detected using high-risk HPV genotyping real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kit and analyzed by ThinPrep cytology test for cervical pathological diagnosis. HPV prevalence, age-specific prevalence, and OR of each type of HPV in abnormal cytology were analyzed. Overall, 19.1% (3,623/19,018) of the individuals were positive for HPV infection, 14.9% (2,833/19,018) were positive for a single HPV type, and 4.2% (790/19,018) were positive for multiple types. Among the 3,623 HPV-positive individuals, the most predominant HPV types were HPV52 (4.4%, 834/19,018), HPV16 (3.7%, 710/19,018), and HPV58 (3.4%, 644/19,018). The OR of multiple infections and single infection differed significantly among disease severities. The OR of dual infection was higher than that of each of the two single infection types, respectively. HPV prevalence in the outpatients was 19.1%, and the most predominant HPV types in the study were HPV52, HPV16, and HPV58. Women with multiple infectionswere more likely to have abnormal cytology. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  11. Cervical Infection of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; HUANG Ke; JI Pei Li; SONG Lei; LIU Hong Tu

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to determine the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical infections in Beijing, China, and to investigate the odds ratio (OR) of HPV single and multiple infections in abnormal cytology. MethodsA total of 19,018 specimens from outpatients in thedepartment ofobstetric andgynecology were collected. They were detected usinghigh-risk HPV genotyping real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kit and analyzed by ThinPrep cytology test for cervical pathological diagnosis. HPV prevalence, age-specific prevalence, andOR of each type of HPV in abnormal cytology were analyzed. ResultsOverall, 19.1% (3,623/19,018) of the individuals were positive for HPV infection, 14.9%(2,833/19,018) were positive for a single HPV type, and 4.2% (790/19,018) were positive for multiple types. Among the 3,623 HPV-positive individuals, the most predominant HPV types were HPV52 (4.4%, 834/19,018), HPV16 (3.7%, 710/19,018), and HPV58 (3.4%, 644/19,018). TheOR of multiple infections and single infection differed significantly among disease severities. TheOR of dual infection was higher than that of each of the two single infection types, respectively. ConclusionHPV prevalence in the outpatients was 19.1%, and the most predominant HPV types in the study were HPV52, HPV16, and HPV58. Women with multiple infectionswere more likely to have abnormal cytology.

  12. [Detection and typing by molecular biology of human papillomavirus in genital samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Moya, A; Esquivias Gómez, J I; Vidart Aragón, J A; Picazo de la Garza, J J

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the etiological relationship between some HPV genotypes and genital cancer has been confirmed. Therefore, we used current molecular biology techniques to evaluate the prevalence of these viruses and their genotype in genital samples. We processed 401 genital samples from 281 women and 120 men, all with a diagnosis compatible with HPV infection. Virus was detected using PCR, and positive samples were typed using an array technique which enabled us to detect the 35 most common types of mucous-associated HPV. Of the 401 patients studied, 185 (46.1%) were positive, and only one type of HPV was detected in 133 cases. We found that 41.6% of the women and 56.7% of the men were positive. A total of 260 HPVs were typed; 154 were high oncogenic risk. They infected 16 men (23.5%) and 88 women (75.2%). The difference was statistically significant (pHVP 16 in 52 cases. We found a 46% prevalence of HPV infection. More than half of these patients were infected by high-risk HPV. The presence of high-risk HPV was significantly higher in women.

  13. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Consortium, The Fantom; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in cervical cancerous and precancerous lesions of Ecuadorian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Lorena; Muñoz, Diana; Trueba, Gabriel; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Zapata, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide and it is responsible for most cases of uterine cancer. In Ecuador there is limited information about HPV types (and variants) in cancerous lesions; however, identifying the type-specific HPV prevalence in cervical lesions of women living in Ecuador is important to better predict the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccination in this country. We studied the prevalence of HPV types in cervical cancerous or precancerous lesions from 164 Ecuadorian women and found that 86.0% were HPV positive. The most common types were HPV16 (41.8%) and HPV58 (30.5%). Interestingly, HPV18 was detected only in 2.8% of the HPV-positive samples. Fifteen DNA sequences (genes E6 and L1) from 16 samples positive for HPV16 belonged to the European lineage, considered one of the least carcinogenic lineages, and 1 (6.25%) to the Asian-American lineage. Similar analysis in 12 HPV58 positive samples showed that 10 (83.3%) sequences grouped in sublineage A2, which belongs to the oldest HPV58 lineage, 1 belonged to A3 and 1 to lineage C. This study suggests that the currently used HPV vaccines (bivalent and tetravalent) may have lower effectiveness in Ecuador than in other geographic locations where HPV18 is more prevalent.

  15. Seroprevalence of 34 human papillomavirus types in the German general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Michael

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of infections with many human papillomavirus (HPV types is poorly understood. Here, we describe for the first time the age- and sex-dependent antibody prevalence for 29 cutaneous and five mucosal HPV types from 15 species within five phylogenetic genera (alpha, beta, gamma, mu, nu in a general population. Sera from 1,797 German adults and children (758 males and 1,039 females between 1 and 82 years (median 37 years were analysed for antibodies to the major capsid protein L1 by Luminex-based multiplex serology. The first substantial HPV antibody reactions observed already in children and young adults are those to cutaneous types of the genera nu (HPV 41 and mu (HPV 1, 63. The antibody prevalence to mucosal high-risk types, most prominently HPV 16, was elevated after puberty in women but not in men and peaked between 25 and 34 years. Antibodies to beta and gamma papillomaviruses (PV were rare in children and increased homogeneously with age, with prevalence peaks at 40 and 60 years in women and 50 and 70 years in men. Antibodies to cutaneous alpha PV showed a heterogeneous age distribution. In summary, these data suggest three major seroprevalence patterns for HPV of phylogenetically distinct genera: antibodies to mu and nu skin PV appear early in life, those to mucosal alpha PV in women after puberty, and antibodies to beta as well as to gamma skin PV accumulate later in life.

  16. The experience of two European preimplantation genetic diagnosis centres on human leukocyte antigen typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Hilde; De Rycke, Martine; De Man, Caroline; De Hauwere, Kim; Fiorentino, Francesco; Kahraman, Semra; Pennings, Guido; Verpoest, Willem; Devroey, Paul; Liebaers, Inge

    2009-03-01

    Two European centres report on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing of preimplantation embryos for haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation: 'UZ Brussel' in Brussels and 'Genoma' in Rome. Both centres have 6 years' experience with technical and clinical aspects of this type of genetic analysis on single blastomeres. Both centres apply a similar technique for preimplantation HLA typing using short tandem repeats linked to the HLA locus in multiplex PCR for haplotyping. At present, a conclusive HLA diagnosis could be assured in 92.8% and 90.3% of the embryos at UZ Brussel and at Genoma, respectively. The implantation rates were 32.4% and 28.2%, respectively, and the birth rates per cycle were 9.4% and 18.6%, respectively. The HLA programme at UZ Brussel and at Genoma resulted in the birth of 9 babies and 3 successful HSC transplantations, and 42 babies and 7 successful HSC transplantations, respectively, so far. Drastic embryo selection for preimplantation HLA typing (in theory 1/4 for HLA, 1/8 for HLA in combination with sexing for X-linked recessive diseases, 3/16 for HLA in combination with autosomal recessive disorders) resulted overall in the birth of 51 babies (15.9% live birth rate per started cycle) in two European centres.

  17. Decreased type III collagen expression in human uterine cervix of prolapse uteri

    Science.gov (United States)

    IWAHASHI, MASAAKI; MURAGAKI, YASUTERU

    2011-01-01

    The precise mechanism of prolapse uteri is not fully understood. There is evidence to suggest that abnormalities of collagen, the main component of extracellular matrix, or its repair mechanism, may predispose women to prolapse. To investigate the characteristic structure of human uterine cervix of patients with prolapse uteri, various types of collagen expression in the uterine cervix tissues of the prolapse uteri were compared to those of normal uterine cervix. After informed consent, 36 specimens of uterine cervical tissues were obtained at the time of surgery from 16 postmenopausal women with prolapse uteri (stage III–IV by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination) and 20 postmenopausal women without prolapse uteri (control group). Collagens were extracted from the uterine cervix tissues by salt precipitation methods. The relative levels of various collagens were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The uterine cervix was longer in the patients with prolapse uteri than those of postmenopausal controls without prolapse uteri. The ratios of type III to type I collagen in the uterine cervical tissues were significantly decreased in the prolapse uteri, as compared to those of the postmenopausal uterine cervix without prolapse. These results suggest that decreased type III collagen expression may play an important role in determing the physiology and structure of the uterine cervix tissues of prolapse uteri. PMID:22977496

  18. Human papillomavirus type-specific prevalence in the cervical cancer screening population of Czech women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Tachezy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPVtypes has been recognized as a causal factor for the development of cervical cancer and a number of other malignancies. Today, vaccines against HPV, highly effective in the prevention of persistent infection and precancerous lesions, are available for the routine clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: The data on the prevalence and type-specific HPV distribution in the population of each country are crucial for the surveillance of HPV type-specific prevalence at the onset of vaccination against HPV. METHODS: Women attending a preventive gynecological examination who had no history of abnormal cytological finding and/or surgery for cervical lesions were enrolled. All samples were tested for the presence of HPV by High-Risk Hybrid Capture 2 (HR HC2 and by a modified PCR-reverse line blot assay with broad spectrum primers (BS-RLB. RESULTS: Cervical smears of 1393 women were analyzed. In 6.5% of women, atypical cytological findings were detected. Altogether, 28.3% (394/1393 of women were positive for any HPV type by BS-RLB, 18.2% (254/1393 by HR HC2, and 22.3% (310/1393 by BS-RLB for HR HPV types. In women with atypical findings the prevalence for HR and any HPV types were significantly higher than in women with normal cytological findings. Overall, 36 different HPV types were detected, with HPV 16 being the most prevalent (4.8%. HPV positivity decreased with age; the highest prevalence was 31.5% in the age group 21-25 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our study subjects represent the real screening population. HPV prevalence in this population in the Czech Republic is higher than in other countries of Eastern Europe. Also the spectrum of the most prevalent HPV types differs from those reported by others but HPV 16 is, concordantly, the most prevalent type. Country-specific HPV type-specific prevalences provide baseline information which will enable to measure the impact of HPV vaccination in the future.

  19. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  20. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  1. Doxycycline inhibits neutrophil (PMN)-type matrix metalloproteinases in human adult periodontitis gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L M; Sorsa, T; Lee, H M; Ciancio, S; Sorbi, D; Ramamurthy, N S; Gruber, B; Salo, T; Konttinen, Y T

    1995-02-01

    We previously reported that low-dose doxycycline (DOXY) therapy reduces host-derived collagenase activity in gingival tissue of adult periodontitis (AP) patients. However, it was not clear whether this in vivo effect was direct or indirect. In the present study, inflamed human gingival tissue, obtained from AP patients during periodontal surgery, was extracted and the extracts partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The extracts were then analyzed for collagenase activity using SDS-PAGE/fluorography/laser densitometry, and for gelatinase activity using type I gelatin zymography as well as a new quantitative assay using biotinylated type I gelatin as substrate. DOXY was added to the incubation mixture at a final concentration of 0-1000 microM. The concentration of DOXY required to inhibit 50% of the gingival tissue collagenase (IC50) was found to be 16-18 microM in the presence or absence of 1.2 mM APMA (an optimal organomercurial activator of latent procollagenases); this IC50 for DOXY was similar to that exhibited for collagenase or matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and from gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of AP patients. Of interest, Porphyromonas gingivalis collagenase was also inhibited by similar DOXY levels (IC50 = 15 microM), however the collagenase activity observed in the gingival tissue extracts was found to be of mammalian not bacterial origin based on the production of the specific alpha A (3/4) and alpha B (1/4) collagen degradation fragments. In contrast, the inhibition of collagenase purified from culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (MMP-1) required much greater DOXY levels (IC50 = 280 microM). The predominant molecular forms of gelatinolytic activity presented in the AP patients gingival tissue extracts were found to closely correspond to the 92 kD PMN-type gelatinase (MMP-9) although small quantities of 72 kD fibroblast-type gelatinase (MMP-2), and some other low molecular weight gelatinases

  2. The Earth as a living planet: human-type diseases in the earthquake preparation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contoyiannis, Y. F.; Potirakis, S. M.; Eftaxias, K.

    2013-01-01

    The new field of complex systems supports the view that a number of systems arising from disciplines as diverse as physics, biology, engineering, and economics may have certain quantitative features that are intriguingly similar. The Earth is a living planet where many complex systems run perfectly without stopping at all. The earthquake generation is a fundamental sign that the Earth is a living planet. Recently, analyses have shown that human-brain-type disease appears during the earthquake generation process. Herein, we show that human-heart-type disease appears during the earthquake preparation of the earthquake process. The investigation is mainly attempted by means of critical phenomena, which have been proposed as the likely paradigm to explain the origins of both heart electric fluctuations and fracture-induced electromagnetic fluctuations. We show that a time window of the damage evolution within the heterogeneous Earth's crust and the healthy heart's electrical action present the characteristic features of the critical point of a thermal second-order phase transition. A dramatic breakdown of critical characteristics appears in the tail of the fracture process of heterogeneous system and the injured heart's electrical action. Analyses by means of Hurst exponent and wavelet decomposition further support the hypothesis that a dynamical analogy exists between the geological and biological systems under study.

  3. Isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion associated with human papilloma virus type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Kim, Eo-Jin; Choi, Jong Sun; Chuck, Roy S

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of a corneal papilloma-like lesion associated with human papilloma virus type 6. A 48-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of ocular discomfort and gradual visual deterioration in her right eye. Ophthalmic examination revealed an elevated, semitranslucent, well-defined vascularized mass approximately 4 × 2.5 mm in size localized to the right cornea. The surface of the mass appeared smooth and many small, shallow, and irregular elevations were noted. An excisional biopsy was performed. The underlying cornea was markedly thinned, and fine ramifying vasculature was also noted on the exposed corneal stroma. Typical koilocytic change was observed on the histopathologic examination. Polymerase chain reaction revealed the existence of human papilloma virus type 6 DNA. Here we describe a case of an isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion. Although the corneal extension of the limbal or the conjunctival papillomas has been commonly observed, an isolated corneal papilloma-like lesion with underlying stromal destruction has only rarely been reported.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of cell type-specific expression patterns in the human mammary epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Maruyama

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation is an epigenetic program that involves the gradual loss of pluripotency and acquisition of cell type-specific features. Understanding these processes requires genome-wide analysis of epigenetic and gene expression profiles, which have been challenging in primary tissue samples due to limited numbers of cells available. Here we describe the application of high-throughput sequencing technology for profiling histone and DNA methylation, as well as gene expression patterns of normal human mammary progenitor-enriched and luminal lineage-committed cells. We observed significant differences in histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27me3 enrichment and DNA methylation of genes expressed in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting their regulation by epigenetic mechanisms and a dynamic interplay between the two processes that together define developmental potential. The technologies we developed and the epigenetically regulated genes we identified will accelerate the characterization of primary cell epigenomes and the dissection of human mammary epithelial lineage-commitment and luminal differentiation.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type-2-A milder, kinder virus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannangai, R; David, S; Sridharan, G

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-2 (HIV-2) belongs to the family retroviridae which is phylogenetically clusters with SIV SM from sooty mangabeys. This virus is morphologically similar to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) but has got only a 40% homology at the nucleotide level. There is a distinct geographical distribution of HIV-2 unlike HIV-1. There are currently eight subtypes/groups identified with subtype/group A responsible for the majority of infections. HIV-2 shows a considerable difference in the course of the disease. Clinical, haematological and immunological evaluation of individuals infected with HIV-2 has shown the virus to be less pathogenic than HIV-1 although the exact mechanism underlying this difference is not well defined. Similar to HIV-1, the HIV-2 isolates also showed distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics. The transmission rate for HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 is very low both by heterosexual route and mother to child transmission. The clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency associated with HIV-2 are similar to the ones seen among the HIV-1-infected individuals and they can also progress to AIDS. It is naturally resistant to NNRTI and hence the diagnosis become important as it affects the treatment strategy. Similar to HIV-1, HIV-2 strains of infected individuals also show mutations that can cause drug resistance. The current evidence suggests that there is no protective effective for HIV-2 against HIV-1.

  6. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 populations from human patients are clonal and display geographical genetic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Liam J; Tait, Andy; McCormack, Gillian; Sweeney, Lindsay; Black, Alana; Truc, Philippe; Likeufack, Anne C L; Turner, C Michael; MacLeod, Annette

    2008-12-01

    We have rigorously tested the hypothesis that Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 is composed of genetically homogenous populations by examining the parasite population present in Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon (CAM). We amplified eight microsatellite markers by PCR directly from blood spots on FTA filters, thereby avoiding the significant parasite selection inherent in the traditional isolation techniques of rodent inoculation or in vitro culture. All microsatellite markers were polymorphic, although for four markers there was only polymorphism between the DRC and CAM populations, not within populations, suggesting very limited genetic exchange. Within the largest population from the DRC, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is not evident at any loci. This evidence suggests a clonal population. However, there was significant sub-structuring between the DRC and CAM samples (F(ST) = 0.32), indicating that Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Type 1 has genetically distinct clades. The data combine to indicate that genetic exchange plays a very limited role. The finding of distinct clades in different places suggests the possibility that samples from humans with clinical signs represent clonal expansions from an underlying population that requires identifying and characterising.

  7. Establishment of human cell type-specific iPS cells with enhanced chondrogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Rosa M; Scanlon, Vanessa; Sanjay, Archana; Xu, Ren-He; Drissi, Hicham

    2014-12-01

    The propensity of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to differentiate into specific lineages may be influenced by a number of factors, including the selection of the somatic cell type used for reprogramming. Herein we report the generation of new iPS cells, which we derived from human articular chondrocytes and from cord blood mononucleocytes via lentiviral-mediated delivery of Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and cMyc. Molecular, cytochemical, and cytogenic analyses confirmed the acquisition of hallmark features of pluripotency, as well as the retention of normal karyotypes following reprogramming of both the human articular chondrocytes (AC) and the cord blood (CB) cells. In vitro and in vivo functional analyses formally established the pluripotent differentiation capacity of all cell lines. Chondrogenic differentiation assays comparing iPS cells derived from AC, CB, and a well established dermal fibroblast cell line (HDFa-Yk26) identified enhanced proteoglycan-rich matrix formation and cartilage-associated gene expression from AC-derived iPS cells. These findings suggest that the tissue of origin may impact the fate potential of iPS cells for differentiating into specialized cell types, such as chondrocytes. Thus, we generated new cellular tools for the identification of inherent features driving high chondrogenic potential of reprogrammed cells.

  8. On a fully closed state of native human type-1 VDAC enriched in Nonidet P40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinnes, Friedrich P; Burckhardt, Gerhard

    2012-11-01

    There is indication that human type-1 VDAC/Porin31HL complexes, when purified from highly enriched cell membrane preparations of human B-lymphocytes by classical ion-exchange chromatography in the detergent Nonidet P40, rest in fully closed state, its N-terminus being accessible for mAbs. Cholesterol appears to be involved as a channel modulator. The channel switches to anion-selective or "open state" while being incorporated into black membranes at zero transmembrane potential. In this case, its N-terminus is hidden in the channel lumen. The cation-selective or "closed state" can be induced by transmembrane potentials beyond 30 mV, the N-terminus putatively now being positioned outside the channel lumen. The latter situation might allow one to decide if type-1 VDAC, preincubated with adequate antibodies against its N-terminal part, would enter black membranes in fully closed state or stay in the application medium, respectively, may be complexed to dimers.

  9. The Earth as a living planet: human-type diseases in the earthquake preparation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Contoyiannis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new field of complex systems supports the view that a number of systems arising from disciplines as diverse as physics, biology, engineering, and economics may have certain quantitative features that are intriguingly similar. The Earth is a living planet where many complex systems run perfectly without stopping at all. The earthquake generation is a fundamental sign that the Earth is a living planet. Recently, analyses have shown that human-brain-type disease appears during the earthquake generation process. Herein, we show that human-heart-type disease appears during the earthquake preparation of the earthquake process. The investigation is mainly attempted by means of critical phenomena, which have been proposed as the likely paradigm to explain the origins of both heart electric fluctuations and fracture-induced electromagnetic fluctuations. We show that a time window of the damage evolution within the heterogeneous Earth's crust and the healthy heart's electrical action present the characteristic features of the critical point of a thermal second-order phase transition. A dramatic breakdown of critical characteristics appears in the tail of the fracture process of heterogeneous system and the injured heart's electrical action. Analyses by means of Hurst exponent and wavelet decomposition further support the hypothesis that a dynamical analogy exists between the geological and biological systems under study.

  10. Early human herpes virus type 6 reactivation in umbilical cord blood allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, Frank; Ippoliti, Cindy; Wang, Hanhan; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Shore, Tsiporah; van Besien, Koen

    2016-11-01

    Human herpes virus type 6 can reactivate in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and has been associated with serious sequelae such as delayed engraftment and an increased risk of developing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This study investigated human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) reactivation within 60 days of transplantation in stem cell transplants utilizing single umbilical cord blood, double umbilical cord blood, or umbilical cord blood plus haploidentical stem cells. Of 92 patients, 60 (65%) had HHV-6 reactivation. Reactivation was not significantly influenced by any patient characteristics, disease characteristics, or by stem cell source (umbilical cord blood only versus haploidentical plus umbilical cord blood). We did not observe any impact of HHV-6 reactivation on neutrophil or platelet count recovery or on relapse-free survival. HHV-6 reactivation was associated with subsequent development of prerelapse acute GVHD (HR = 3.00; 95% CI, 1.4 to 6.4; p = 0.004).

  11. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-Ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-05-19

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1p(H168C)) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering.

  12. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M. Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2–9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  13. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörmann, Mirka E; Horien, Corey L; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M; Exley, Rachel M

    2016-03-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host-pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus-pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms.

  14. A group of type I keratin genes on human chromosome 17: Characterization and expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M.; Chaudhury, A.R.; Shows, T.B.; LeBeau, M.M.; Fuchs, E.

    1988-02-01

    The human type I keratins K16 and K14 are coexpressed in a number of epithelial tissues, including esophagus, tongue, and hair follicles. The authors determined that two genes encoding K16 and three genes encoding K14 were clustered in two distinct segments of chromosome 17. The genes within each cluster were tightly linked, and large parts of the genome containing these genes have been recently duplicated. The sequences of the two K16 genes showed striking homology not only within the coding sequences, but also within the intron positions and sequences and extending at least 400 base pairs 5' upstream and 850 base pairs 3' downstream from these genes. Despite the strong homologies between these two genes, only one of the genes encoded a protein which assembled into keratin filaments when introduced into simple epithelial cells. While there were no obvious abnormalities in the sequence of the other gene, its promoter seemed to be significantly weaker, and even a hybrid gene with the other gene's promoter gave rise to a much reduced mRNA level after gene transfection. To demonstrate that the functional K16 gene that they identified was in fact responsible for the K16 expressed in human tissues, we made a polyclonal antiserum which recognized our functional K16 gene product in both denatured and filamentous form and which was specific for bona fide human K16.

  15. Epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F

    2010-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review.

  16. Reduced cell turnover in lymphocytic monkeys infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq, Christophe; Héraud, Jean-Michel; Asquith, Becca; Bangham, Charles; Merien, Fabrice; Moules, Vincent; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Burny, Arsène; Kettmann, Richard; Kazanji, Mirdad; Willems, Luc

    2005-11-17

    Understanding cell dynamics in animal models have implications for therapeutic strategies elaborated against leukemia in human. Quantification of the cell turnover in closely related primate systems is particularly important for rare and aggressive forms of human cancers, such as adult T-cell leukemia. For this purpose, we have measured the death and proliferation rates of the CD4+ T lymphocyte population in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The kinetics of in vivo bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed no modulation of the cell turnover in HTLV-1-infected monkeys with normal CD4 cell counts. In contrast, a substantial decrease in the proliferation rate of the CD4+ T population was observed in lymphocytic monkeys (e.g. characterized by excessive proportions of CD4+ T lymphocytes and by the presence of abnormal flower-like cells). Unexpectedly, onset of HTLV-associated leukemia thus occurs in the absence of increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation. This dynamics significantly differs from the generalized activation of the T-cell turnover induced by other primate lymphotropic viruses like HIV and SIV.

  17. Species identification and molecular typing of human Brucella isolates from Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Abu S; Habibi, Nazima; Osman, Amr; Shaheed, Faraz; Khan, Mohd W

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of major concern in Kuwait and the Middle East. Human brucellosis can be caused by several Brucella species with varying degree of pathogenesis, and relapses are common after apparently successful therapy. The classical biochemical methods for identification of Brucella are time-consuming, cumbersome, and provide information limited to the species level only. In contrast, molecular methods are rapid and provide differentiation at intra-species level. In this study, four molecular methods [16S rRNA gene sequencing, real-time PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 were evaluated for the identification and typing of 75 strains of Brucella isolated in Kuwait. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of all isolates showed 90-99% sequence identity with B. melitensis and real-time PCR with genus- and species- specific primers identified all isolates as B. melitensis. The results of ERIC-PCR suggested the existence of 75 ERIC genotypes of B. melitensis with a discriminatory index of 0.997. Cluster classification of these genotypes divided them into two clusters, A and B, diverging at ~25%. The maximum number of genotypes (n = 51) were found in cluster B5. MLVA-8 analysis identified all isolates as B. melitensis, and MLVA-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 typing divided the isolates into 10, 32 and 71 MLVA types, respectively. Furthermore, the combined minimum spanning tree analysis demonstrated that, compared to MLVA types discovered all over the world, the Kuwaiti isolates were a distinct group of MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 types in the East Mediterranean Region.

  18. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Inst. of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Biology Centre ASCR; Garbe, James C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Stampfer, Martha R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Futscher, Bernard W. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  19. High-resolution recombination patterns in a region of human chromosome 21 measured by sperm typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Tiemann-Boege

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, classical crossover studies and linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis of genomic regions suggested that human meiotic crossovers may not be randomly distributed along chromosomes but are focused instead in "hot spots." Recent sperm typing studies provided data at very high resolution and accuracy that defined the physical limits of a number of hot spots. The data were also used to test whether patterns of LD can predict hot spot locations. These sperm typing studies focused on several small regions of the genome already known or suspected of containing a hot spot based on the presence of LD breakdown or previous experimental evidence of hot spot activity. Comparable data on target regions not specifically chosen using these two criteria is lacking but is needed to make an unbiased test of whether LD data alone can accurately predict active hot spots. We used sperm typing to estimate recombination in 17 almost contiguous ~5 kb intervals spanning 103 kb of human Chromosome 21. We found two intervals that contained new hot spots. The comparison of our data with recombination rates predicted by statistical analyses of LD showed that, overall, the two datasets corresponded well, except for one predicted hot spot that showed little crossing over. This study doubles the experimental data on recombination in men at the highest resolution and accuracy and supports the emerging genome-wide picture that recombination is localized in small regions separated by cold areas. Detailed study of one of the new hot spots revealed a sperm donor with a decrease in recombination intensity at the canonical recombination site but an increase in crossover activity nearby. This unique finding suggests that the position and intensity of hot spots may evolve by means of a concerted mechanism that maintains the overall recombination intensity in the region.

  20. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. (Servizio di Endocrinologia, Milano, (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Disease Stratified Human Pancreas Tissue Indicates Unique Signature of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Tanya C; Morris, Margaret A; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Pugliese, Alberto; Nadler, Jerry L; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with functional beta cell loss due to ongoing inflammation. Despite shared similarities, T1D is an autoimmune disease with evidence of autoantibody production, as well as a role for exocrine pancreas involvement. Our hypothesis is that differential protein expression occurs in disease stratified pancreas tissues and regulated proteins from endocrine and exocrine tissues are potential markers of disease and potential therapeutic targets. The study objective was to identify novel proteins that distinguish the pancreas from donors with T1D from the pancreas from patients with T2D, or autoantibody positive non-diabetic donors. Detailed quantitative comprehensive proteomic analysis was applied to snap frozen human pancreatic tissue lysates from organ donors without diabetes, with T1D-associated autoantibodies in the absence of diabetes, with T1D, or with T2D. These disease-stratified human pancreas tissues contain exocrine and endocrine tissues (with dysfunctional islets) in the same microenvironment. The expression profiles of several of the proteins were further verified by western blot. We identified protein panels that are significantly and uniquely upregulated in the three disease-stratified pancreas tissues compared to non-disease control tissues. These proteins are involved in inflammation, metabolic regulation, and autoimmunity, all of which are pathways linked to, and likely involved in, T1 and T2 diabetes pathogenesis. Several new proteins were differentially upregulated in prediabetic, T1D, and T2D pancreas. The results identify proteins that could serve as novel prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools to preserve functional islet mass in Type 1 Diabetes.

  2. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study included 36 male adults with a broad range of age and body-mass indices (BMIs, among which 18 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes type 2. The fecal bacterial composition was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR and in a subgroup of subjects (N = 20 by tag-encoded amplicon pyrosequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The proportions of phylum Firmicutes and class Clostridia were significantly reduced in the diabetic group compared to the control group (P = 0.03. Furthermore, the ratios of Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes as well as the ratios of Bacteroides-Prevotella group to C. coccoides-E. rectale group correlated positively and significantly with plasma glucose concentration (P = 0.04 but not with BMIs. Similarly, class Betaproteobacteria was highly enriched in diabetic compared to non-diabetic persons (P = 0.02 and positively correlated with plasma glucose (P = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies to control metabolic diseases by modifying the gut microbiota.

  3. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3.

  4. Localized-statistical quantification of human serum proteome associated with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Xia Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent advances in proteomics have shed light to discover serum proteins or peptides as biomarkers for tracking the progression of diabetes as well as understanding molecular mechanisms of the disease. RESULTS: In this work, human serum of non-diabetic and diabetic cohorts was analyzed by proteomic approach. To analyze total 1377 high-confident serum-proteins, we developed a computing strategy called localized statistics of protein abundance distribution (LSPAD to calculate a significant bias of a particular protein-abundance between these two cohorts. As a result, 68 proteins were found significantly over-represented in the diabetic serum (p<0.01. In addition, a pathway-associated analysis was developed to obtain the overall pathway bias associated with type 2 diabetes, from which the significant over-representation of complement system associated with type 2 diabetes was uncovered. Moreover, an up-stream activator of complement pathway, ficolin-3, was observed over-represented in the serum of type 2 diabetic patients, which was further validated with statistic significance (p = 0.012 with more clinical samples. CONCLUSIONS: The developed LSPAD approach is well fit for analyzing proteomic data derived from biological complex systems such as plasma proteome. With LSPAD, we disclosed the comprehensive distribution of the proteins associated with diabetes in different abundance levels and the involvement of ficolin-related complement activation in diabetes.

  5. Human papillomavirus type 16 viral load measurement as a predictor of infection clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Andrea; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Villa, Luisa L; Franco, Eduardo L

    2013-08-01

    Viral load measurements may predict whether human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infections may become persistent and eventually lead to cervical lesions. Today, multiple PCR methods exist to estimate viral load. We tested three protocols to investigate viral load as a predictor of HPV clearance. We measured viral load in 418 HPV16-positive cervical smears from 224 women participating in the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study by low-stringency PCR (LS-PCR) using consensus L1 primers targeting over 40 known HPV types, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) targeting the HPV16 E6 and L1 genes. HPV16 clearance was determined by MY09/11 and PGMY PCR testing on repeated smears collected over 5 years. Correlation between viral load measurements by qRT-PCR (E6 versus L1) was excellent (Spearman's rank correlation, ρ = 0.88), but decreased for L1 qRT-PCR versus LS-PCR (ρ = 0.61). Viral load by LS-PCR was higher for HPV16 and related types independently of other concurrent HPV infections. Median duration of infection was longer for smears with high copy number by all three PCR protocols (log rank P<0.05). Viral load is inversely related to HPV16 clearance independently of concurrent HPV infections and PCR protocol.

  6. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  7. Esophageal verrucous carcinoma arising from hyperkeratotic plaques associated with human papilloma virus type 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonna, J; Palefsky, J M; Rabban, J; Campos, G M; Theodore, P; Ladabaum, U

    2010-07-01

    Esophageal verrucous carcinoma is a rare variant of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We report a case of esophageal verrucous carcinoma associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) type 51. The patient had long-standing dysphagia and odynophagia, and white esophageal plaques showing hyperkeratosis on biopsy. At repeat endoscopy, the esophagus was covered with verrucous white plaques and areas of nodular mucosa with white fronds, with a distal 10-cm smooth mass protruding into the lumen. Biopsies demonstrated an atypical squamoproliferative lesion but no frank malignancy. HPV type 51 DNA was detected in endoscopic biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction. Because the size of the lesion favored an underlying verrucous carcinoma, our patient underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy with gastric pull-up and cervical anastomosis. The pathologic diagnosis was a well-differentiated esophageal verrucous carcinoma. One year after esophagectomy, the patient feels well and is free of disease. Although HPV DNA was not detected in the cancer tissue obtained at surgery, our case suggests an association between HPV type 51 and esophageal verrucous carcinoma. The clinical evolution in this case highlights the importance of endoscopic surveillance in patients with exuberant esophageal hyperkeratosis, and of definitive surgical resection when malignancy is suspected even if frank malignancy is not demonstrated on superficial biopsies.

  8. Comparison of molecular assays for detection and typing of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koidl, Christoph; Bozic, Michael; Hadzisejdic, Ita; Grahovac, Maja; Grahovac, Blazenka; Kranewitter, Wolfgang; Marth, Egon; Kessler, Harald H

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the performance of 3 different extraction instruments in conjunction with 4 different amplification and detection kits for detection and typing of human papillomavirus (HPV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). A total of 42 cervical swabs were investigated. HPV DNA was extracted on the 3 different instruments. Each of the extracts was then amplified, and HPV DNA amplification products were detected with 4 different kits. In 31 samples, HPV DNA was detected by both the Amplicor HPV test and the LINEAR ARRAY HPV genotyping test in conjunction with DNA extraction on the easyMAG instrument. In another 6 samples, only low-risk types were detected with the linear array HPV genotyping test. After extraction on the easyMAG instrument, 32 samples tested positive when the PapilloCheck with the HotStarTaq DNA polymerase was used. Together with extraction on the easyMAG instrument, the Amplicor HPV test, the linear array HPV genotyping test, and the new PapilloCheck with the HotStarTaq DNA polymerase provide comparable results allowing reliable and safe HPV diagnostics in the routine laboratory. Use of alternative assays may lead to an increase of invalid and divergent HPV typing results.

  9. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  10. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T; Morgan, Alex A; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E; Bustamante, Carlos D; Butte, Atul J

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  11. Enrichment of putative human epidermal stem cells based on cell size and collagen type IV adhesiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juxue Li; Enkui Duan; Chenglin Miao; Weixiang Guo; Liwei Jia; Jiaxi Zhou; Baohua Ma; Sha Peng; Shuang Liu; Yujing Cao

    2008-01-01

    The enrichment and identification of human epidermal stem cells (EpSCs) are of paramount importance for both basic research and clinical application. Although several approaches for the enrichment of EpSCs have been established, enriching a pure population of viable EpSCs is still a challenging task. An improved approach is worth developing to enhance the purity and viability of EpSCs. Here we report that cell size combined with collagen type IV adhesiveness can be used in an improved approach to enrich pure and viable human EpSCs. We separated the rapidly adherent keratinocytes into three populations that range in size from 5-7 μm (population A), to 7-9 μm (population B), to >9 μm (population C) in diameter, and found that human putative EpSCs could be further enriched in population A with the smallest size. Among the three populations, population A displayed the highest density of βl-integrin receptor, contained the highest percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, showed the highest nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and possessed the highest colony formation efficiency (CFE). When injected into murine blastocysts, these cells participated in multi-tissue formation. More significantly, compared with a previous approach that sorted putative EpSCs according to pl-integrin antibody staining, the viability of the EpSCs enriched by the improved approach was significantly enhanced. Our results provide a putative strategy for the enrichment of human EpSCs, and encourage further study into the role of cell size in stem cell biology.

  12. Development of a human papillomavirus competitive luminex immunoassay for 9 HPV types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine; Green, Tina; Hess, Erica; Matys, Katie; Brown, Martha J; Haupt, Richard M; Luxembourg, Alain; Vuocolo, Scott; Saah, Alfred; Antonello, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In the clinical trials of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccine, antibodies were measured by a competitive Luminex immunoassay (HPV-4 cLIA). A nine-valent HPV (9vHPV) vaccine targeting the types in the qHPV vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18), as well as 5 of the next most frequent HPV types found in cervical cancers worldwide (HPV31/33/45/52/58) is under development. To support the 9vHPV vaccine program, a nine-multiplexed cLIA (HPV-9 cLIA) was developed. Antibody titers were determined in a competitive format, where type-specific phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled, neutralizing mAbs (mAbs-PE) compete with an individual's serum antibodies for binding to conformationally sensitive, neutralizing epitopes on the VLPs. Neutralizing antibody levels were quantitated against a reference standard - a pool of sera from 6 Rhesus macaques that were immunized with the 9vHPV vaccine. Specificity of the mAbs was assessed by measuring their individual binding capacities to the type-specific and non-type-specific VLPs at alternative concentrations of the mAbs. Antibody assignments to the HPV-9 cLIA reference standard for HPV6/11/16/18 were determined to provide for a measure of consistency in serostatus assignment between the HPV-4 and HPV-9 cLIAs. Antibody assignments to the HPV-9 reference standard for HPV31/33/45/52/58 were obtained by calibration to HPV11 using a direct binding IgG assay. For each HPV VLP type, the cross-reactivity of the mAb-PEs in the HPV-9 cLIA was <1% (i.e., the mAb-PEs result in <1% non-specific binding). The antibody concentrations assigned to the HPV-9 cLIA reference standard for types 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 were 3,817, 2,889, 23,061, 5,271, 3,942, 2,672, 1,489, 1274, and 2263 mMU/mL, respectively.

  13. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of human recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator, administered intra-abdominally, in a rat peritonitis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Bom, VJJ; van der Meer, J; Sluiter, WJ; Geerards, S; de Graaf, JS; Bleichrodt, RP; van der Schaaf, W

    1996-01-01

    Human recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA), administered intraperitoneally, may promote intraabdominal fibrinolysis in peritonitis, thereby preventing adhesion and abscess formation. The pharmacokinetics of a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.5 or 2.0 mg/ml human rtPA were assessed in

  15. R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of fetal thymic organ culture induces cytokine and CCR5 expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choudhary, S.K.; Choudhary, N.R.; Kimbrell, K.C.; Colasanti, J.; Ziogas, A.; Kwa, D.; Schuitemaker, H.; Camerini, D.

    2005-01-01

    Late-stage CCR5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates (R5 HIV-1) can deplete nearly all CD4+ thymocytes from human thymus/liver grafts, despite the fact that fewer than 5% of these cells express CCR5. To resolve this paradox, we studied the replication and cytopathic effects (C

  16. Phage types of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from production animals and humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1994-01-01

    S. Typhimurium is one of the 2 most common salmonella serotypes causing human salmonellosis in Denmark. In order to illustrate the significance of different production animals as a source of infection, 1461 isolates were characterized by phage typing. The isolates originated from human patients...

  17. Pharmacokinetics of human recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator, administered intra-abdominally, in a rat peritonitis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Bom, VJJ; van der Meer, J; Sluiter, WJ; Geerards, S; de Graaf, JS; Bleichrodt, RP; van der Schaaf, W

    1996-01-01

    Human recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA), administered intraperitoneally, may promote intraabdominal fibrinolysis in peritonitis, thereby preventing adhesion and abscess formation. The pharmacokinetics of a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.5 or 2.0 mg/ml human rtPA were assessed in

  18. Rapid, sensitive, type specific PCR detection of the E7 region of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 from paraffin embedded sections of cervical carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesnikova, Iana; Lidang, Marianne; Hamilton-Dutoit, Steven

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and in particularly infection with HPVs 16 and 18, is a central carcinogenic factor in the uterine cervix. We established and optimized a PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of HPV types 16 and 18 in archival formaldehyde fixed and paraffin...

  19. Rapid, sensitive, type specific PCR detection of the E7 region of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 from paraffin embedded sections of cervical carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesnikova, Iana; Lidang, Marianne; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and in particularly infection with HPVs 16 and 18 is a central carcinogenic factor in the uterine cervix. We established and optimized a PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of HPV types 16 and 18 in archival formaldehyde fixed and paraffin...

  20. Anti-Aspergillus human host defence relies on type 1 T helper (Th1), rather than type 17 T helper (Th17), cellular immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); F. van de Veerdonk (Frank); R.J. Marijnissen (Renoud); S.C. Cheng; A.L. Khoo; M. Hectors (Magda); K. Lagrou (Katrien); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); J. Maertens (Johan); L.A.B. Joosten (Leo); B.J. Kullberg (Bart Jan); M.G. Netea (Mihai)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSummary Both interferon-γ-producing type 1 T helper (Th1)- and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing Th17 cells have been proposed to be involved in anti-fungal host defence. Although invasive aspergillosis is one of the most severe human fungal infections, little is known regarding the relat

  1. Anti-Aspergillus human host defence relies on type 1 T helper (Th1), rather than type 17 T helper (Th17), cellular immunity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Marijnissen, R.J.; Cheng, S.C.; Khoo, A.L.; Hectors, M.P.C.; Lagrou, K.; Vonk, A.G.; Maertens, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Both interferon-gamma-producing type 1 T helper (Th1)- and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing Th17 cells have been proposed to be involved in anti-fungal host defence. Although invasive aspergillosis is one of the most severe human fungal infections, little is known regarding the relative importance o

  2. Construction of a recombinant adenovirus Vector of human papillomavirus type 16 L1_E7c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses are closely associated with human cervical cancer, especially HPV types 16 and 18. At present, HPV can not be produced in large quantity; it also has tumorgenicity and these properties of HPV have seriously hampered the development of HPV vaccine. HPV type 16 L1 proteins can assembled into virus-like particles (VLP), which are morphologically identical to the nature virion. In order to develop the recombinant adenovirus vectors of HPV, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus shuttle plasmid pCA14 L1-E7c. Methods: Human papillomavirus type 16 L1 open reading frame without terminator codon (TAA) (5559- 7152) and E7c (682- 855) were amplified using PCR. The L1 and E7c fragments were inserted into pGEM-T easy vectors by T- A strategy, named pTAL1 and pTAE7c. pTAL1 was cut with Hind III and BglII, the pTAE7c with BamHI and ClaI. The L1 DNA fragment, E7c and pBluesscript SK were ligated together using T4 DNA ligase. pBSL1-E7c and pBSL1-E7c was digested with Hind III and Xhol. The L1-E7c fragment was inserted into adenovirus shuttle plasmids pCAl4, named pCAl4L1-E7c. DNA sequence results indicated that The L1-E7c DNA fragment can encode the HPV16L1-E7 fusion protein correctly. Results: The L1 and E7c DNA fragments were amplified by PCR and recombinant plasmid pTAL1, pTAE7c, pBSL1-E7c and pCA14L1-E7c were constructed correctly. The pCAl4L1-E7c can be used in the further research work, cotransfected the 293 cell with the parent adenovirus pBHG10. Conclusion: Our results indicated that we have constructed a HPV16L1-E7 fusion DNA fragments and the adenovirus shuttle plasmids pCALl-E7c for the further research.

  3. Viral interactions in human lymphoid tissue: Human herpesvirus 7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 via CD4 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angélique; Vanpouille, Christophe; Origgi, Francesco; Malnati, Mauro S; Schols, Dominique; Lusso, Paolo; Margolis, Leonid B

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affects HIV-1 by upregulating RANTES, HHV-7 did not upregulate any CCR5-binding chemokine. Rather, the inhibition of R5 HIV-1 by HHV-7 was associated with a marked downregulation of CD4, the cellular receptor shared by HHV-7 and HIV-1. HHV-7-induced CD4 downregulation was sufficient for HIV-1 inhibition, since comparable downregulation of CD4 with cyclotriazadisulfonamide, a synthetic macrocycle that specifically modulates expression of CD4, resulted in the suppression of HIV infection similar to that seen in HHV-7-infected tissues. In contrast to R5 HIV-1, CXCR4-tropic (X4) HIV-1 was only minimally suppressed by HHV-7 coinfection. This selectivity in suppression of R5 and X4 HIV-1 is explained by a suppression of HHV-7 replication in X4- but not in R5-coinfected tissues. These results suggest that HIV-1 and HHV-7 may interfere in lymphoid tissue in vivo, thus potentially affecting the progression of HIV-1 disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction of HIV-1 with HHV-7, as well as with other pathogens that modulate HIV-1 replication, may provide new insights into HIV pathogenesis and lead to the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic strategies.

  4. ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 E7 RELATED TO CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL DATA IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAAY, MFD; DUK, JM; BURGER, MPM; WALBOOMERS, J; TERSCHEGGET, J; GROENIER, KH; DEBRUIJN, HWA; STOLZ, E; HERBRINK, P

    1995-01-01

    Aims-To investigate the correlation between antibodies to the transforming protein E7 of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and clinicopathological indices in women with cervical squamous carcinoma. Methods-A synthetic peptide of the HPV type 16 E7 protein (amino acids 6 to 35) was used to screen se

  5. Human papillomavirus type 16 and TP53 mutation in oral cancer: matched analysis of the IARC multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, M; Clifford, GM; Calvez, F le; Castellsague, X; Snijders, P.J.F.; Pawlita, M; Herrero, R; Hainaut, P; Franceschi, S

    2004-01-01

    TP53 mutations were analyzed in 35 human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA-positive cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx and in 35 HPV DNA-negative cancers matched by subsite, country, sex, age, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Wild-type TP53 was found more frequently in cancer specimens tha

  6. Antibodies to human papillomavirus type 16 E7 related to clinicopathological data in patients with cervical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.D. Baay (Marc); J.M. Duk; M.P.M. Burger; J. Walboomers; J. ter Schegget; K.H. Groenier; H.W. de Bruijn; E. Stolz (Ernst); P. Herbrink (Paul)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAIMS--To investigate the correlation between antibodies to the transforming protein E7 of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and clinicopathological indices in women with cervical squamous carcinoma. METHODS--A synthetic peptide of the HPV type 16 E7 protein (amino acid

  7. ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 E7 RELATED TO CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL DATA IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL-CARCINOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAAY, MFD; DUK, JM; BURGER, MPM; WALBOOMERS, J; TERSCHEGGET, J; GROENIER, KH; DEBRUIJN, HWA; STOLZ, E; HERBRINK, P

    1995-01-01

    Aims-To investigate the correlation between antibodies to the transforming protein E7 of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and clinicopathological indices in women with cervical squamous carcinoma. Methods-A synthetic peptide of the HPV type 16 E7 protein (amino acids 6 to 35) was used to screen se

  8. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    1997-01-01

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group compr

  9. Prevalence and Type Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Among 1813 Men in Tanzania and the Relationship to HIV Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Iftner, Thomas; Mwaiselage, Julius;

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with penile cancer in men, cervical cancer in women, and anal cancer and certain types of head and neck cancers in both sexes. Few studies have assessed the prevalence and type distribution of HPV among men in sub-Saharan Africa...

  10. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group

  11. Antibodies to human papillomavirus type 16 E7 related to clinicopathological data in patients with cervical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.D. Baay (Marc); J.M. Duk; M.P.M. Burger; J. Walboomers; J. ter Schegget; K.H. Groenier; H.W. de Bruijn; E. Stolz (Ernst); P. Herbrink (Paul)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAIMS--To investigate the correlation between antibodies to the transforming protein E7 of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and clinicopathological indices in women with cervical squamous carcinoma. METHODS--A synthetic peptide of the HPV type 16 E7 protein (amino acid

  12. Fiber type specific expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-18 in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Pedersen, Bente K

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is now recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to produce signal peptides in response to muscle contractions. Here we demonstrate that resting healthy human muscles express cytokines in a fiber type specific manner. Human muscle biopsies from seven healthy young males...... were obtained from m. triceps, m. quadriceps vastus lateralis and m. soleus. Type I fibers contributed (mean +/- SE) 24.0 +/- 2.5% in triceps of total fibers, 51.3 +/- 2.4% in vastus and 84.9 +/- 22% in soleus. As expected, differences in the fiber type composition were accompanied by marked...... differences between the three muscles with regard to MHC I and MHC IIa mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-18 were solely expressed by type II fibers, whereas the expression of IL-6 was more prominent in type I compared to type II...

  13. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  14. Splicing and Polyadenylation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengjun; Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) life cycle can be divided into an early stage in which the HPV16 genomic DNA is replicated, and a late stage in which the HPV16 structural proteins are synthesized and virions are produced. A strong coupling between the viral life cycle and the differentiation state of the infected cell is highly characteristic of all HPVs. The switch from the HPV16 early gene expression program to the late requires a promoter switch, a polyadenylation signal switch and a shift in alternative splicing. A number of cis-acting RNA elements on the HPV16 mRNAs and cellular and viral factors interacting with these elements are involved in the control of HPV16 gene expression. This review summarizes our knowledge of HPV16 cis-acting RNA elements and cellular and viral trans-acting factors that regulate HPV16 gene expression at the level of splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:28208770

  15. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  16. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady E. Beltran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of seven patients who were human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 carriers and had a pathological diagnosis of de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Interestingly, three of our cases showed positive expression of Epstein-Barr-virus, (EBV- encoded RNA within the tumor cells indicating a possible interaction between these two viruses. Furthermore, our three EBV-positive cases presented with similar clinical characteristics such as early clinical stage and low-risk indices. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case series describing the characteristics of HTLV-1-positive DLBCL patients. The potential relationship between HTLV-1 and EBV should be further explored.

  17. Phylogenetic Analyses Indicate an Atypical Nurse-to-Patient Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Christophe P.; Schneider, Véronique M.; Grofti, Jaouad; Montigny, Joëlle; Jeantils, Vincent; Astagneau, Pascal; Rozenbaum, Willy; Lot, Florence; Frocrain-Herchkovitch, Claudie; Delphin, Nathalie; Le Gal, Frédéric; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Milinkovitch, Michel C.; Dény, Paul

    2000-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patient with no risk factor experienced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primary infection 4 weeks after being hospitalized for surgery. Among the medical staff, only two night shift nurses were identified as HIV-1 seropositive. No exposure to blood was evidenced. To test the hypothesis of a possible nurse-to-patient transmission, phylogenetic analyses were conducted using two HIV-1 genomic regions (pol reverse transcriptase [RT] and env C2C4), each compared with reference strains and large local control sets (57 RT and 41 C2C4 local controls). Extensive analyses using multiple methodologies allowed us to test the robustness of phylogeny inference and to assess transmission hypotheses. Results allow us to unambiguously exclude one HIV-positive nurse and strongly suggest the other HIV-positive nurse as the source of infection of the patient. PMID:10684266

  18. Elevated expression of serine/threonine phosphatase type 5 correlates with malignant proliferation in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Gan, Zhihua; Lin, Shuchen; Hu, Haiyan; Shen, Zan; Min, Daliu

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. However, the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatase type 5 (PP5) in osteosarcoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional role of PP5 in osteosarcoma cells. Firstly, we found that PP5 is widely expressed in several human osteosarcoma cell lines. Then we used lentivirus-delivered siRNA to silence PP5 expression in Saos-2 and U2OS cell lines. Knockdown of endogenous PP5 expression by shRNA-expressing lentivirus significantly decreased the viability and proliferation of the osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, FACS analysis showed that knockdown of PP5 expression induced a significant arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, which was associated with the inhibition of cell proliferation. Therefore, knockdown of PP5 is likely to provide a novel alternative to targeted therapy of osteosarcoma and deserves further investigation.

  19. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Type 2 Related Sequence in Oral Papilloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taihei; Shindoh, Masanobu; Amemiya, Akira; Inoue, Nobuo; Kawamura, Masaaki; Sakaoka, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masakazu; Fujinaga, Kei

    1998-01-01

    Oral papilloma is a benign tumourous lesion. Part of this lesion is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We analysed the genetical and histopathological evidence for HPV type 2 infection in three oral papillomas. Southern blot hybridization showed HPV 2a sequence in one lesion. Cells of the positive specimen appeared to contain high copy numbers of the viral DNA in an episomal state. In situ staining demonstrated virus capsid antigen in koilocytotic cells and surrounding cells in the hyperplastic epithelial layer. Two other specimens contained no HPV sequences by labeled probe of full length linear HPVs 2a, 6b, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33 DNA under low stringency hybridization conditions. These results showed the possibility that HPV 2 plays a role in oral papilloma. PMID:9699941

  20. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh;

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified...... gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks that were strongly associated with islet insulin secretion and HbA(1c). We integrated our data to form a rank list of putative T2D genes, of which CHL1, LRFN2, RASGRP1, and PPM1K were validated in INS-1 cells to influence insulin secretion...... of genes potentially involved in T2D....

  1. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  2. Adenovirus vector-based vaccines for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H; Nabel, Gary J

    2005-02-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) vectors have received considerable attention for gene therapy because of their high transduction efficiency. However, recombinant gene expression from rAd vectors elicits rapid and potent immune responses to foreign transgene products. Such immunogenicity limits the duration of transgene expression and poses a major challenge to the use of rAd vectors for gene therapy. In contrast, the inherent immunogenicity of these vectors is a desirable feature for vaccine development. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rAd vector-based vaccines have now been demonstrated in a number of animal models, and rAd vaccines for a variety of pathogens are currently being explored in early-phase clinical trials. In this review, we describe progress in the development of rAd vector-based vaccines with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconversion in women with genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, P J; Pepin, J; Agoki, E; Ronald, A R; Ombette, J; Tyndall, M; Cheang, M; Ndinya-Achola, J O; D'Costa, L J; Plummer, F A

    1994-08-01

    Genital ulcers are implicated as a risk factor enhancing susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. A prospective study to determine the incidence of and risk factors associated with acquisition of HIV-1 in women with genital ulcers was done. HIV-1-seronegative women with genital ulcers attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases in Nairobi were followed to HIV-1 seroconversion over a 6-month period. Of 81 women, 10 seroconverted to HIV-1. The crude 6-month incidence of HIV-1 infection was 12%. Risk factors associated with seroconversion included cervical ectopy (rate ratio [RR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-15.6) and pelvic inflammatory disease (RR, 6.3; 95% CI, 1.9-20.4). Thus, cervical ectopy and pelvic inflammatory disease may increase susceptibility to HIV-1 in women with genital ulcers.

  4. Detection of some anaemia types in human blood smears using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsalamony, Hany A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification process based on measuring the level of haemoglobin and the classification of red blood cells using microscopic examination of blood smears is the principal way to diagnose anaemia. This paper presents a proposed algorithm for detecting some anaemia types like sickle and elliptocytosis and trying to count them with healthy ones in human red blood smears based on the circular Hough transform and some morphological tools. Some cells with unknown shapes (not platelets or white cells) also have been detected. The extracted data from the detection process has been analyzed by neural network. The experimental results have demonstrated high accuracy, and the proposed algorithm has achieved the highest detection of around 98.9% out of all the cells in 27 microscopic images. Effectiveness rates up to 100%, 98%, and 99.3% have been achieved by using neural networks for sickle, elliptocytosis and cells with unknown shapes, respectively.

  5. Waardenburg syndrome type 2 caused by mutations in the human microphthalmia (MITF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassabehji, M; Newton, V E; Read, A P

    1994-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is a dominantly inherited syndrome of hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. We recently mapped a WS2 gene to chromosome 3p12.3-p14.1 and proposed as a candidate gene MITF, the human homologue of the mouse microphthalmia (mi) gene. This encodes a putative basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor expressed in adult skin and in embryonic retina, otic vesicle and hair follicles. Mice carrying mi mutations show reduced pigmentation of the eyes and coat, and with some alleles, microphthalmia, hearing loss, osteopetrosis and mast cell defects. Here we show that affected individuals in two WS2 families have mutations affecting splice sites in the MITF gene.

  6. Type 2 diabetes and obesity induce similar transcriptional reprogramming in human myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Väremo, Leif; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle is one of the primary tissues involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The close association between obesity and T2D makes it difficult to isolate specific effects attributed to the disease alone. Therefore, here we set out to identify and characterize...... intrinsic properties of myocytes, associated independently with T2D or obesity. METHODS: We generated and analyzed RNA-seq data from primary differentiated myotubes from 24 human subjects, using a factorial design (healthy/T2D and non-obese/obese), to determine the influence of each specific factor...... on genome-wide transcription. This setup enabled us to identify intrinsic properties, originating from muscle precursor cells and retained in the corresponding myocytes. Bioinformatic and statistical methods, including differential expression analysis, gene-set analysis, and metabolic network analysis, were...

  7. Failure to demonstrate human T cell lymphotropic virus type I in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was employed in searching for human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) gag, env and pol sequences in samples of DNA prepared from two HTLV-I seropositive patients with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), the Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS......) patients who recently have been reported to be PCR-positive for HTLV-I gag and env sequences, and eight healthy individuals. Precautions were taken in order to reduce the risk of cross-contamination in the PCR. In the two TSP patients strong signals were obtained with gag, env and pol amplification primers...... data do not confirm the presence of HTLV-I sequences in MS patients....

  8. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes...

  9. Abnormal colonic motility in mice overexpressing human wild-type alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Fleming, Sheila M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Taché, Yvette

    2008-05-28

    The presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn) has been implicated in both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease. We examined whether human alphaSyn-overexpressing mice under Thy1 promoter (Thy1-alphaSyn) display alterations of colonic function. Basal fecal output was decreased in Thy1-alphaSyn mice fed ad libitum. Fasted/refed Thy1-alphaSyn mice had a slower distal colonic transit than the wild-type mice, as monitored by 2.2-fold increase in time to expel an intracolonic bead and 2.9-fold higher colonic fecal content. By contrast, Thy1-alphaSyn mice had an increased fecal response to novelty stress and corticotropin releasing factor injected intraperipherally. These results indicate that Thy1-alphaSyn mice display altered basal and stress-stimulated propulsive colonic motility and will be a useful model to study gut dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease.

  10. Role of TGF-beta1 in relation to exercise-induced type I collagen synthesis in human tendinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, Jens L

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tissue is known to influence local collagen synthesis, and microdialysis studies indicate that mechanical loading of human tendon during exercise elevates tendinous type I collagen production. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent stimulator of type I collag...... to exercise, suggest a role for TGF-beta1 in mechanical regulation of local collagen type I synthesis in tendon-related connective tissue in vivo....

  11. Lessons From the KK-Ay Mouse, a Spontaneous Animal Model for the Treatment of Human Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes throughout the world. In human glomeruli, expansion of diffuse mesangial matrices, exudative lesions and/or segmental nodular sclerosis are pathological features of diabetic nephropathy. There have been many reports on the pathogenesis and treatment of type 2 diabetes using various animal models. It appears that KK-Ay mice, especially in terms of their immunohistologic...

  12. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in diverse human tumour types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, J M; Baker, S J; Preisinger, A C; Jessup, J M; Hostetter, R; Cleary, K; Bigner, S H; Davidson, N; Baylin, S; Devilee, P

    1989-12-01

    The p53 gene has been a constant source of fascination since its discovery nearly a decade ago. Originally considered to be an oncogene, several convergent lines of research have indicated that the wild-type gene product actually functions as a tumour suppressor gene. For example, expression of the neoplastic phenotype is inhibited, rather than promoted, when rat cells are transfected with the murine wild-type p53 gene together with mutant p53 genes and/or other oncogenes. Moreover, in human tumours, the short arm of chromosome 17 is often deleted. In colorectal cancers, the smallest common region of deletion is centred at 17p13.1; this region harbours the p53 gene, and in two tumours examined in detail, the remaining (non-deleted) p53 alleles were found to contain mutations. This result was provocative because allelic deletion coupled with mutation of the remaining allele is a theoretical hallmark of tumour-suppressor genes. In the present report, we have attempted to determine the generality of this observation; that is, whether tumours with allelic deletions of chromosome 17p contain mutant p53 genes in the allele that is retained. Our results suggest that (1) most tumours with such allelic deletions contain p53 point mutations resulting in amino-acid substitutions, (2) such mutations are not confined to tumours with allelic deletion, but also occur in at least some tumours that have retained both parental 17p alleles, and (3) p53 gene mutations are clustered in four 'hot-spots' which exactly coincide with the four most highly conserved regions of the gene. These results suggest that p53 mutations play a role in the development of many common human malignancies.

  13. Epidemiology and clinical presentation of the four human parainfluenza virus types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs are important causes of upper respiratory tract illness (URTI and lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI. To analyse epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the four types of human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs, patients with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI were studied in Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=4755 were collected and tested from children and adults with ARTI over a 26-month period, and 4447 of 4755 (93.5% patients’ clinical presentations were recorded for further analysis. Results Of 4755 patients tested, 178 (3.7% were positive for HPIV. Ninety-nine (2.1% samples were positive for HPIV-3, 58 (1.2% for HPIV-1, 19 (0.4% for HPIV-2 and 8 (0.2% for HPIV-4. 160/178 (88.9% HPIV-positive samples were from paediatric patients younger than 5 years old, but no infant under one month of age was HPIV positive. Seasonal peaks of HPIV-3 and HPIV-1 occurred as autumn turned to winter and summer turned to autumn. HPIV-2 and HPIV-4 were detected less frequently, and their frequency of isolation increased when the frequency of HPIV-3 and HPIV-1 declined. HPIV infection led to a wide spectrum of symptoms, and more “hoarseness” (p=0.015, “abnormal pulmonary breathing sound” (p Conclusions HPIV infection led to a wide spectrum of symptoms, and similar clinical manifestations were found in the patients with four different types of HPIVs. The study suggested pathogenic activity of HPIV in gastrointestinal illness. The clinical presentation of HPIV infection may differ by patient age.

  14. Absence of C-type virus production in human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogura,Hajime

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscope observation of cultured human leukemic B cell, T cell and null cell lines and reverse transcriptase assay of the culture supernatants were all negative for the presence of C-type virus. Bat cell line, which propagates primate C-type viruses well, was cocultivated with the human leukemic cell lines, in the hope of amplification of virus if present. Three weeks after mixed culture, the culture supernatants were again examined for reverse transcriptase activity and the cells were tested for syncytia formation by cocultivation with rat XC, human KC and RSb cell lines. All these tests, except for the positive control using a simian sarcoma virus, were negative, suggesting that no C-type was produced from these human leukemic cell lines.

  15. Muse Cells, a New Type of Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived from Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ru-zhi; Li, Di; Cheng, Sai; Yang, Yu-hua; Tian, Ting; Pan, Xiao-ru

    2016-04-01

    A new type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that expresses stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3) and the mesenchymal cell marker CD105 are known as multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells. Studies have shown that stem cells in suspension cultures are more likely to generate embryoid body-like stem cell spheres and maintain an undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency. We separated Muse cells derived from human dermal fibroblasts by long-term trypsin incubation (LTT) through suspension cultures in methylcellulose. The Muse cells obtained expressed several pluripotency markers, including Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, and SSEA-3, and could differentiate in vitro into cells of the three germ layers, such as hepatocytes (endodermal), neural cells (ectodermal) and adipocytes, and osteocytes (mesodermal cells). These cells showed a low level of DNA methylation and a high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio. Our study provides an innovative and exciting platform for exploring the potential cell-based therapy of various human diseases using Muse cells as well as their great possibility for regenerative medicine.

  16. Two highly antigenic sites in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björling, E; Boucher, C A; Samuelsson, A; Wolfs, T F; Utter, G; Norrby, E; Chiodi, F

    1993-01-01

    Antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) are found in the serum of the majority of infected individuals, and inhibition of RT polymerase activity by HIV-1-positive sera can be demonstrated in vitro. The binding sites of human antibodies on the protein have not yet been identified. We synthesized overlapping peptides covering the entire RT protein of HIV-1 and used them in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to map the reactivities of HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody-positive sera. Two highly antigenic regions were identified by both HIV serotypes. One region was found in the central part of the RT protein (amino acids 261 to 280) and another was found at the carboxy terminus in the RNase H portion of RT (amino acids 517 to 536). Comparison of the serological results with the crystal structure of the RT revealed that the antigenic region in the RNase H portion is located at the surface of the protein. The other antibody-binding site (amino acids 261 to 280) was located in the "thumb" region of the polymerase domain of RT. Polyclonal antibodies to either of the antibody-binding sites do not affect the polymerase activity of the RT protein. PMID:7681439

  17. Deiodinases: the balance of thyroid hormone: type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Goemann, Iuri Martin; Meyer, Erika L Souza; Wajner, Simone Magagnin

    2011-06-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the normal function of virtually all tissues. The iodothyronine deiodinases catalyze the removal of an iodine residue from the pro-hormone thyroxine (T(4)) molecule, thus producing either the active form triiodothyronine (T(3); activation) or inactive metabolites (reverse T(3); inactivation). Type I deiodinase (D1) catalyzes both reactions. Over the last years, several studies have attempted to understand the mechanisms of D1 function, underlying its effects on normal thyroid hormone metabolism and pathological processes. Although peripheral D1-generated T(3) production contributes to a portion of plasma T(3) in euthyroid state, pathologically increased thyroidal D1 activity seems to be the main cause of the elevated T(3) concentrations observed in hyperthyroid patients. On the other hand, D1-deficient mouse models show that, in the absence of D1, inactive and lesser iodothyronines are excreted in feces with the loss of associated iodine, demonstrating the scavenging function for D1 that might be particularly important in an iodine deficiency setting. Polymorphisms in the DIO1 gene have been associated with changes in serum thyroid hormone levels, whereas decreased D1 activity has been reported in the nonthyroid illness syndrome and in several human neoplasias. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of the recent advances made in the biochemical and molecular properties of D1 as well as its role in human physiology.

  18. Towards a human-on-chip: culturing multiple cell types on a chip with compartmentalized microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Ziqing; Abdul Rahim, Nur Aida; van Noort, Danny; Yu, Hanry

    2009-11-21

    We have developed a multi-channel 3D microfluidic cell culture system (multi-channel 3D-microFCCS) with compartmentalized microenvironments for potential application in human drug screening. To this end, the multi-channel 3D-microFCCS was designed for culturing different 3D cellular aggregates simultaneously to mimic multiple organs in the body. Four human cell types (C3A, A549, HK-2 and HPA) were chosen to represent the liver, lung, kidney and the adipose tissue, respectively. Cellular functions were optimized by supplementing the common medium with growth factors. However, TGF-beta1 was found to enhance A549 functions but inhibit C3A functions. Therefore, TGF-beta1 was specifically controlled-released inside the A549 compartment by means of gelatin microspheres mixed with cells, thus creating a cell-specific microenvironment. The function of A549 cells was enhanced while the functions of C3A, HK-2 and HPA cells were uncompromised, demonstrating the limited cross-talk between cell culture compartments similar to the in vivo situation. Such a multi-channel 3D-microFCCS could be potentially used to supplement or even replace animal models in drug screening.

  19. Procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao reactivates latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takanori; Barnor, Jacob; Huu, Tung Nguyen; Morinaga, Osamu; Hamano, Akiko; Ndzinu, Jerry; Frimpong, Angela; Minta-Asare, Keren; Amoa-Bosompem, Mildred; Brandful, James; Odoom, John; Bonney, Joseph; Tuffour, Isaac; Owusu, Baffour-Awuah; Ofosuhene, Mark; Atchoglo, Philip; Sakyiamah, Maxwell; Adegle, Richard; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Ampofo, William; Koram, Kwadwo; Nyarko, Alexander; Okine, Laud; Edoh, Dominic; Appiah, Alfred; Uto, Takuhiro; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Uota, Shin; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2015-04-03

    Despite remarkable advances in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains incurable due to the incomplete elimination of the replication-competent virus, which persists in latent reservoirs. Strategies for targeting HIV reservoirs for eradication that involves reactivation of latent proviruses while protecting uninfected cells by cART are urgently needed for cure of HIV infection. We screened medicinal plant extracts for compounds that could reactivate the latent HIV-1 provirus and identified a procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao as a potent activator of the provirus in human T cells latently infected with HIV-1. This reactivation largely depends on the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways because either overexpression of a super-repressor form of IκBα or pretreatment with a MEK inhibitor U0126 diminished provirus reactivation by C1. A pan-PKC inhibitor significantly blocked the phorbol ester-induced but not the C1-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Although C1-induced viral gene expression persisted for as long as 48 h post-stimulation, NF-κB-dependent transcription peaked at 12 h post-stimulation and then quickly declined, suggesting Tat-mediated self-sustainment of HIV-1 expression. These results suggest that procyanidin C1 trimer is a potential compound for reactivation of latent HIV-1 reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Kunitz-type protease inhibitor engineered for enhanced matrix retention extends longevity of fibrin biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquez, Priscilla S; Lorentz, Kristen M; Larsson, Hans M; Frey, Peter; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2017-08-01

    Aprotinin is a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor used in the clinic as an anti-fibrinolytic agent in fibrin-based tissue sealants. However, upon re-exposure, some patients suffer from hypersensitivity immune reactions likely related to the bovine origin of aprotinin. Here, we aimed to develop a human-derived substitute to aprotinin. Based on sequence homology analyses, we identified the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) domain of human amyloid-β A4 precursor protein as being a potential candidate. While KPI has a lower intrinsic anti-fibrinolytic activity than aprotinin, we reasoned that its efficacy is additionally limited by its fast release from fibrin material, just as aprotinin's is. Thus, we engineered KPI variants for controlled retention in fibrin biomaterials, using either covalent binding through incorporation of a substrate for the coagulation transglutaminase Factor XIIIa or through engineering of extracellular matrix protein super-affinity domains for sequestration into fibrin. We showed that both engineered KPI variants significantly slowed plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis in vitro, outperforming aprotinin. In vivo, our best engineered KPI variant (incorporating the transglutaminase substrate) extended fibrin matrix longevity by 50%, at a dose at which aprotinin did not show efficacy, thus qualifying it as a competitive substitute of aprotinin in fibrin sealants. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. A-Type Cranberry Proanthocyanidins Inhibit the RANKL-Dependent Differentiation and Function of Human Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B. Howell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins (AC-PACs on osteoclast formation and bone resorption activity. The differentiation of human pre-osteoclastic cells was assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP staining, while the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8 and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs was measured by ELISA. Bone resorption activity was investigated by using a human bone plate coupled with an immunoassay that detected the release of collagen helical peptides. AC-PACs up to 100 µg/mL were atoxic for osteoclastic cells. TRAP staining evidenced a dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. More specifically, AC-PACs at 50 µg/mL caused a 95% inhibition of RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation. This concentration of AC-PACs also significantly increased the secretion of IL-8 (6-fold and inhibited the secretion of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Lastly, AC-PACs (10, 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml affected bone degradation mediated by mature osteoclasts by significantly decreasing the release of collagen helical peptides. This study suggests that AC-PACs can interfere with osteoclastic cell maturation and physiology as well as prevent bone resorption. These compounds may be considered as therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis.

  2. Human and mouse neuroinflammation markers in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologna, Stephanie M; Cluzeau, Celine V M; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Blank, Paul S; Dail, Michelle K; Siebel, Stephan; Toth, Cynthia L; Wassif, Christopher A; Lieberman, Andrew P; Porter, Forbes D

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive lipid storage disorder in which a pathological cascade, including neuroinflammation occurs. While data demonstrating neuroinflammation is prevalent in mouse models, data from NPC1 patients is lacking. The current study focuses on identifying potential markers of neuroinflammation in NPC1 from both the Npc1 mouse model and NPC1 patients. We identified in the mouse model significant changes in expression of genes associated with inflammation and compared these results to the pattern of expression in human cortex and cerebellar tissue. From gene expression array analysis, complement 3 (C3) was increased in mouse and human post-mortem NPC1 brain tissues. We also characterized protein levels of inflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from NPC1 patients and controls. We found increased levels of interleukin 3, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5, interleukin 16 and chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and decreased levels of interleukin 4, 10, 13 and 12p40 in CSF from NPC1 patients. CSF markers were evaluated with respect to phenotypic severity. Miglustat treatment in NPC1 patients slightly decreased IL-3, IL-10 and IL-13 CSF levels; however, further studies are needed to establish a strong effect of miglustat on inflammation markers. The identification of inflammatory markers with altered levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of NPC1 patients may provide a means to follow secondary events in NPC1 disease during therapeutic trials.

  3. Deltamethrin Inhibits the Human T-type Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channel (Cav3.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Symington

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the effect of deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, on CaV3.2, a human T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel expressed in Xenopus laevis (X.laevis oocytes. Cav3.2 cDNA was transcribed into cRNA; the cRNA was then injected into X.laevis oocytes and electrophysiologically characterized using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique with Ba2+ as a charge carrier. Deltamethrin (10-7 M reduced peak current in a nonreversible manner compared to the untreated control, but had no effect on the voltagedependent activation and inactivation kinetics. These findings confirm that human CaV3.2 is a target for deltamethrin and quite possibly other pyrethroid insecticides. These studies provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of the effect that pyrethroids have on voltage-sensitive calcium channels in general. This information will allow a more complete understanding of the molecular and cellular nature of pyrethroid-induced toxicity and expand our knowledge of the structure-activity relationships of pyrethroids with regard to their action on voltage-sensitive calcium channels.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr Induces DNA Replication Stress In Vitro and In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Erik S.; Sherman, Michael P.; Blackett, Jana L.; Neidleman, Jason A.; Kreis, Christophe; Mundt, Pamela; Williams, Samuel A.; Warmerdam, Maria; Kahn, James; Hecht, Frederick M.; Grant, Robert M.; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Greene, Warner C.; Planelles, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) causes cell cycle arrest in G2. Vpr-expressing cells display the hallmarks of certain forms of DNA damage, specifically activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase, ATR. However, evidence that Vpr function is relevant in vivo or in the context of viral infection is still lacking. In the present study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 infection of primary, human CD4+ lymphocytes causes G2 arrest in a Vpr-dependent manner and that this response requires ATR, as shown by RNA interference. The event leading to ATR activation in CD4+ lymphocytes is the accumulation of replication protein A in nuclear foci, an indication that Vpr likely induces stalling of replication forks. Primary macrophages are refractory to ATR activation by Vpr, a finding that is consistent with the lack of detectable ATR, Rad17, and Chk1 protein expression in these nondividing cells. These observations begin to explain the remarkable resilience of macrophages to HIV-1-induced cytopathicity. To study the in vivo consequences of Vpr function, we isolated CD4+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals and interrogated the cell cycle status of anti-p24Gag-immunoreactive cells. We report that infected cells in vivo display an aberrant cell cycle profile whereby a majority of cells have a 4N DNA content, consistent with the onset of G2 arrest. PMID:16956949

  5. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangdong; Vicker, Nigel; Trusselle, Melanie; Halem, Heather; Culler, Michael D; Potter, Barry V L

    2009-03-25

    11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSDs) are key enzymes regulating the pre-receptor metabolism of glucocorticoid hormones, which play essential roles in various vital physiological processes. The modulation of 11beta-HSD type 1 activity with selective inhibitors has beneficial effects on various conditions including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Therefore, inhibition of tissue-specific glucocorticoid action by regulating 11beta-HSD1 constitutes a promising treatment for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here we report the discovery of a series of novel adamantyl carboxamides as selective inhibitors of human 11beta-HSD1 in HEK-293 cells transfected with the HSD11B1 gene. Compounds 9 and 14 show inhibitory activity against 11beta-HSD1 with IC(50) values in 100nM range. Docking studies with the potent compound 8 into the crystal structure of human 11beta-HSD1 (1XU9) reveals how the molecule may interact with the enzyme and cofactor.

  6. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  7. Variations of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are associated with extreme human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Ariela; Orisio, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Castaldi, Davide; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Arai, Yasumichi; Todeschini, Marta; Ogliari, Giulia; Imai, Enyu; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Mari, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009). Based on the above study in mice, here we sought to search for AGTR1 variations associated to reduced AT1 receptor protein levels and to prolonged lifespan in humans. AGTR1 was sequenced in 173 Italian centenarians and 376 younger controls. A novel non-synonymous mutation was detected in a centenarian. Two polymorphisms in AGTR1 promoter, rs422858 and rs275653, in complete linkage disequilibrium, were significantly associated with the ability to attain extreme old age. We then replicated the study of rs275653 in a large independent cohort of Japanese origin (598 centenarians and semi-supercentenarians, 422 younger controls) and indeed confirmed its association with exceptional old age. In combined analyses, rs275653 was associated to extreme longevity either at recessive model (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) 3.57) or at genotype level (P = 0.015). Significance was maintained after correcting for confounding factors. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that subjects homozygous for the minor allele of rs275653 had less AT1R-positive peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells. Moreover, rs275653 was associated to lower blood pressure in centenarians. These findings highlight the role of AGTR1 as a possible candidate among longevity-enabling genes.

  8. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1.

  9. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  10. Elemental concentrations of four types of human gallstones by PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, M. (Department oh Hygiene and Public Health, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical Univ., Iwate (Japan)); Matsuda, K.; Sera, K.

    1998-01-01

    Elemental concentrations of human gallstones were determined by PIXE method. Gallstone samples analyzed in this report are classified into cholestrol gallstone (pure cholestrol stone and mixed stone) and pigment gallstone (black stone and calcium bilirubinate stone). The targets were prepared by paste spreading method previously reported, which enable us to determine also volatile elements, such as halogen atoms, Hg and so on, under acidic condition. Concentrations of 17 kinds of elements were determined and characteristic distributions are presented for each type of gallstone. Ca values are the highest among them in all types of gallstones. Pigment gallstones contain significantly higher concentrations of 9 kinds of elements (Na, Mg, S, Cl, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) than cholesterol gallstones. Concentrations of S, Fe, and Zn in black stones are significantly higher than those in calcium bilirubinate stones. Almost all elements contained in the samples can be determined by PIXE method, and it is supposed that the elements or some of them affect formation of gallstones and their pigment. Some samples of the pigment gallstones included I, Hg, and Pb. (author)

  11. Antiviral activity of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles against herpes simplex virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Swapnil Gaikwad,1 Avinash Ingle,1 Aniket Gade,1 Mahendra Rai,1 Annarita Falanga,3 Novella Incoronato,2 Luigi Russo,2 Stefania Galdiero,3 Massimilano Galdiero2 1Department of Biotechnology, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India; 2Department of Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, II University of Naples, 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples “Federico II”, DFM and Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, Naples, Italy Abstract: The interaction between silver nanoparticles and viruses is attracting great interest due to the potential antiviral activity of these particles, and is the subject of much research effort in the treatment of infectious diseases. In this work, we demonstrate that silver nanoparticles undergo a size-dependent interaction with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and with human parainfluenza virus type 3. We show that production of silver nanoparticles from different fungi is feasible, and their antiviral activity is dependent on the production system used. Silver nanoparticles are capable of reducing viral infectivity, probably by blocking interaction of the virus with the cell, which might depend on the size and zeta potential of the silver nanoparticles. Smaller-sized nanoparticles were able to inhibit the infectivity of the viruses analyzed. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, antiviral, herpes simplex virus, parainfluenza virus

  12. Sexual transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1

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    Arthur Paiva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is endemic in many parts of the world and is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse or from mother to child. Sexual transmission occurs more efficiently from men to women than women to men and might be enhanced by sexually transmitted diseases that cause ulcers and result in mucosal ruptures, such as syphilis, herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2, and chancroid. Other sexually transmitted diseases might result in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and could increase the risk of HTLV-1 acquisition and transmission. Additionally, factors that are associated with higher transmission risks include the presence of antibodies against the viral oncoprotein Tax (anti-Tax, a higher proviral load in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and increased cervicovaginal or seminal secretions. Seminal fluid has been reported to increase HTLV replication and transmission, whereas male circumcision and neutralizing antibodies might have a protective effect. Recently, free virions were discovered in plasma, which reveals a possible new mode of HTLV replication. It is unclear how this discovery might affect the routes of HTLV transmission, particularly sexual transmission, because HTLV transmission rates are significantly higher from men to women than women to men.

  13. Dynamics of High-Risk Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus Types after Actual Vaccination Scheme

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    Raúl Peralta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of cervical cancer (CC. This finding has propitiated the development of vaccines that help to prevent the HPVs 16 and 18 infection. Both genotypes are associated with 70% of CC worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to determine the emergence of high-risk nonvaccine HPV after actual vaccination scheme to estimate the impact of the current HPV vaccines. A SIR-type model was used to study the HPV dynamics after vaccination. According to the results, our model indicates that the application of the vaccine reduces infection by target or vaccine genotypes as expected. However, numerical simulations of the model suggest the presence of the phenomenon called vaccine—induced pathogen strain replacement. Here, we report the following replacement mechanism: if the effectiveness of cross-protective immunity is not larger than the effectiveness of the vaccine, then the high-risk nonvaccine genotypes emerge. In this scenario, further studies of infection dispersion by HPV are necessary to ascertain the real impact of the current vaccines, primarily because of the different high-risk HPV types that are found in CC.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF THE HUMAN DIET TO MAINTAIN BODY WEIGHT, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT DIFFERENT TYPES OF METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorko N. K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A diet of a modern man affects the formation of a healthy lifestyle very highly. It supplies the body with the main and irreplaceable nutrients, mineral components and energy. The Russian Federation population surveys, which were carried out by government agencies of the country show us that there is a lack of many nutrients with high nutritional value. Russian market is gradually stuffed with food products which have high nutritional value. For the maintenance of health, active longevity, and for improving their performance, people must consume their organism with all the necessary nutrients. That's why achieving an optimal balance among the nutrients is one of the important question of vital activity. In this article, there were considered optimization approaches to human diet with considering different types of metabolism and maintain weight with using economic and mathematical methods. Also in this article you can find the calculated values of the daily values depending on your calorie eating plan, anthropometric parameters and energy expenditure. We obtained daily value of calories and distributed basic food components- carbohydrates, proteins and fats, and also we calculate the optimal diet for the results of each type of physique - ectomorph, endomorph and mesomorph

  15. Dynamics of High-Risk Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus Types after Actual Vaccination Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Raúl; Vargas-De-León, Cruz; Cabrera, Augusto; Miramontes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of cervical cancer (CC). This finding has propitiated the development of vaccines that help to prevent the HPVs 16 and 18 infection. Both genotypes are associated with 70% of CC worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to determine the emergence of high-risk nonvaccine HPV after actual vaccination scheme to estimate the impact of the current HPV vaccines. A SIR-type model was used to study the HPV dynamics after vaccination. According to the results, our model indicates that the application of the vaccine reduces infection by target or vaccine genotypes as expected. However, numerical simulations of the model suggest the presence of the phenomenon called vaccine—induced pathogen strain replacement. Here, we report the following replacement mechanism: if the effectiveness of cross-protective immunity is not larger than the effectiveness of the vaccine, then the high-risk nonvaccine genotypes emerge. In this scenario, further studies of infection dispersion by HPV are necessary to ascertain the real impact of the current vaccines, primarily because of the different high-risk HPV types that are found in CC. PMID:24803952

  16. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  17. Type ⅡB human skeletal muscle fibers positively correlate with bone mineral density irrespective to age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wing-Hoi Cheung; Wing-Sze Lee; Ling Qin; Ning Tang; Vivian Wing-Yin Hung; Kwok-Sui Leung

    2010-01-01

    Background Age-associated decrease in type ⅡA/B human skeletal muscle fibers was detected in human biopsies in our previous study. The relationship between change in muscle fiber typing and bone mineral density (BMD) is, however,unknown either cross-sectionally or longitudinally. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate their correlation using human muscle biopsies.Methods Forty human subjects aged (53.4±20.2) years were recruited. Histomorphometric parameters of their muscle biopsies were measured by ATPase staining and image analysis, including average area percentage, fiber number percentage, mean fiber area, and area percentage of connective tissues. Hip and spine BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Partial correlation with adjusting age was performed.Results Type ⅡB muscle fiber was found positively correlated with hip BMD irrespective to age and demonstrated significantly stronger relationship with BMD among all fiber types, in terms of its cross-sectional area (r=0.380, P=0.029)and size (r=0.389, P=0.025). Type ⅡA muscle fibers associated with hip BMD in mean fiber area only (r=0.420, P=0.015).Conclusions Type ⅡB muscle fiber may play an important role in maintaining bone quality. This may also be a relatively more sensitive fiber type of sarcopenia and osteoporosis. These findings further consolidate the muscle-bone relationship.

  18. Characterization of neutralizing epitopes within the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33

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    Sapp Martin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with papillomaviruses induce type-specific immune responses, mainly directed against the major capsid protein, L1. Based on the propensity of the L1 protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs, type-specific vaccines have already been developed. In order to generate vaccines that target a broader spectrum of HPV types, extended knowledge of neutralizing epitopes is required. Despite the association of human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33 with cervical carcinomas, fine mapping of neutralizing conformational epitopes on HPV33 has not been reported yet. By loop swapping between HPV33 and HPV16 capsid proteins, we have identified amino acid sequences critical for the binding of conformation-dependent type-specific neutralizing antibodies to surface-exposed hyper variable loops of HPV33 capsid protein L1. Results Reactivities of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs H33.B6, H33.E12, H33.J3 and H16.56E with HPV16:33 and HPV33:16 hybrid L1 VLPs revealed the complex structures of their conformational epitopes as well as the major residues contributing to their binding sites. Whereas the epitope of mAb H33.J3 was determined by amino acids (aa 51–58 in the BC loop of HPV33 L1, sequences of at least two hyper variable loops, DE (aa 132–140 and FGb (aa 282–291, were found to be essential for binding of H33.B6. The epitope of H33.E12 was even more complex, requiring sequences of the FGa loop (aa 260–270, in addition to loops DE and FGb. Conclusion These data demonstrate that neutralizing epitopes in HPV33 L1 are mainly located on the tip of the capsomere and that several hyper variable loops contribute to form these conformational epitopes. Knowledge of the antigenic structure of HPV is crucial for designing hybrid particles as a basis for intertypic HPV vaccines.

  19. Is human Type 2 diabetes maternally inherited? Insights from an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Randall, R J; Adams, D; Ollerton, R L; Alcolado, J C

    2004-07-01

    Patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus more often report a history of an affected mother than father. However, in the few studies where both parents and offspring have been directly tested, this apparent maternal excess has not been confirmed. Rodent models of diabetes have the advantage that all parents and offspring can undergo glucose tolerance testing at a specific age in adult life. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the inheritance of human Type 2 diabetes by using a rat model. Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats (a model of Type 2 diabetes) were mated with non-diabetic Wistar rats. Offspring were produced from 20 GK female vs. Wistar male and 20 Wistar female vs. GK male crosses. Fasting blood glucose was measured at 6 weeks and 3 months of age and an intravenous glucose tolerance test (0.8 g/kg) performed at 6 months of age. Wistar mothers produced litters with almost twice as many viable offspring as GK mothers (14.1 vs. 7.4, P < 0.001). Despite the larger litter size, offspring in the two groups were of comparable weight at 6 weeks and 6 months of age. At 3 months of age, male offspring of Wistar mothers were heavier than offspring of GK mothers (415.7 g vs. 379.5 g, P = 0.016) but this difference was not sustained at 6 months of age. Fasting blood glucose at all ages and average blood glucose during the glucose tolerance test were similar in both groups. We therefore conclude that there is no evidence for maternal transmission of diabetes in the GK rat. Mothers were able to adjust their supply of milk so that offspring attained similar weights independent of litter size. The weight of the offspring remained independent of litter size into adult life.

  20. Type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus by cervical cytology among women in Brasov, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Irimie, Marius; Oanta, Alexandru; Pascu, Alina; Burtea, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in triggering cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, is well established. Romania ranks in first place in Europe in terms of the incidence of cervical cancer. Geographical widespread data on HPV type-distribution are essential for estimating the impact of HPV vaccines and cervical cancer screening programmes. In this study we aimed to identify the prevalence of HPV genotypes and to establish correlations with abnormal cervical cytology among the female population of Brasov County, Romania. A total of 1,000 women aged 17.3-57 years, attending routine cervical examination in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Brasov, Romania, and undergoing both cytological examination and HPV genotyping were screened. Infection with 35 different HPV genotypes was detected in 39.6% of cytological specimens. Overall HPV infections were highest in young women under 25 years (p<0.0001), in which cervical cytological abnormalities also reached the highest prevalence. Patients infected by HPV-16 or HPV-18 showed the highest prevalence of cervical cytological abnormalities. Some 48.2% of women with abnormal cytology were infected with high-risk HPV types whereas less than 3% of them were infected only with low-risk HPV types. Our study showed that the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection among Romanian women is higher compared to other studies in other geographic areas. Thus, we consider that in areas where there is an increased prevalence of high-risk HPV infections, HPV genotyping should be performed in all women aged between 18 and 45 years, and Pap test should be performed every 6 months in women with high-risk HPV infection, even those with previous normal cervical cytology.

  1. Amide-type local anesthetics and human mesenchymal stem cells: clinical implications for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregalla, Ryan C; Lyons, Nicolette F; Reischling, Patrick D; Centeno, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Amide-Type Local Anesthetics and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Clinical Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Nicolette F.; Reischling, Patrick D.; Centeno, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24436443

  3. SIRT1 Suppresses Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Gao, Wei-Wei; Chan, Chi-Ping; Cheng, Yun; Deng, Jian-Jun; Yuen, Kit-San; Iha, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated diseases are poorly treatable, and HTLV-1 vaccines are not available. High proviral load is one major risk factor for disease development. HTLV-1 encodes Tax oncoprotein, which activates transcription from viral long terminal repeats (LTR) and various types of cellular promoters. Counteracting T