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Sample records for human alpha globin

  1. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

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    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  2. Screening for mutations in human alpha-globin genes by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism

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    Jorge S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations and small insertions or deletions in the human alpha-globin genes may produce alpha-chain structural variants and alpha-thalassemia. Mutations can be detected either by direct DNA sequencing or by screening methods, which select the mutated exon for sequencing. Although small (about 1 kb, 3 exons and 2 introns, the alpha-globin genes are duplicate (alpha2 and alpha1 and highy G-C rich, which makes them difficult to denature, reducing sequencing efficiency and causing frequent artifacts. We modified some conditions for PCR and electrophoresis in order to detect mutations in these genes employing nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP. Primers previously described by other authors for radioactive SSCP and phast-SSCP plus denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were here combined and the resultant fragments (6 new besides 6 original per alpha-gene submitted to silver staining SSCP. Nine structural and one thalassemic mutations were tested, under different conditions including two electrophoretic apparatus (PhastSystem(TM and GenePhor(TM, Amersham Biosciences, different polyacrylamide gel concentrations, run temperatures and denaturing agents, and entire and restriction enzyme cut fragments. One hundred percent of sensitivity was achieved with four of the new fragments formed, using the PhastSystem(TM and 20% gels at 15ºC, without the need of restriction enzymes. This nonradioactive PCR-SSCP approach showed to be simple, rapid and sensitive, reducing the costs involved in frequent sequencing repetitions and increasing the reliability of the results. It can be especially useful for laboratories which do not have an automated sequencer.

  3. Cloning human fetal gamma globin and mouse alpha-type globin DNA: preparation and screening of shotgun collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, F R; Blechl, A E; Denniston-Thompson, K; Faber, H E; Richards, J E; Slightom, J L; Tucker, P W; Smithies, O

    1978-12-22

    Shotgun collections of Charon 3A bacteriophages containing Eco RI fragments of human and mouse DNA were constructed with the use of in vitro packaging. Plaques were screened by hybridization, and globin-specific clones were isolated from both human (Charon 3AHs51.1) and mouse (Charon 3AMm30.5). The fragments cloned were detected in unfractionated genomic DNA by the Southern method of hybridization.

  4. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the Xmn1 polymorphism (C/T) in γ- globin gene position -158 of β- thalassemia as a modulating factor of the disease severity. Presence of the polymorphism was found in two patients and this was not sufficient to explain the diversity of the phenotype encountered. Co-inheritance of alpha thalassaemia as a ...

  5. Long-range regulation of alpha globin gene expression during erythropoiesis.

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    Higgs, Douglas R; Wood, William G

    2008-05-01

    The analysis of globin gene expression during erythropoiesis has established many principles underlying normal mammalian gene expression. New aspects of gene regulation have been revealed by natural mutations that downregulate globin gene expression and cause thalassemia. Deletions involving sequences upstream of the alpha and beta clusters suggested that the globin genes might be controlled by remote regulatory elements. This was demonstrated experimentally and suggested that many mammalian genes may be controlled in a similar manner. Completion of the Human Genome Project and the associated encyclopaedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project confirmed that human gene expression is commonly controlled by long-range, cis-acting elements. The development of chromatin immunoprecipitation has allowed us to identify binding of transcription factors and chromatin modifications at the key cis-acting sequences in vivo. In addition, chromosome conformation capture has enabled us to address the topological models proposed to mediate long-range interactions. Together, these methods have given us some insight into how long-range elements may influence gene expression and how this process may be subverted in thalassemia. The review asks how remote elements regulate alpha globin expression and how natural mutations interfere with this mechanism to cause alpha thalassemia. We also speculate as to why long-range control of gene expression may have evolved in higher organisms.

  6. High-level, erythroid specific, expression of the human α-globin gene in transgenic mice and the production of human haemoglobin in murine erythrocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Hanscombe (Olivia); M. Vidal; J. Kaeda; L. Luzzatto; D.R. Greaves (David); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractUsing the dominant control region (DCR) sequences that flank the beta-globin gene locus, we have been able to achieve high-level expression of the human alpha-globin gene in transgenic mice. Expression in fetal liver and blood is copy number dependent and at levels comparable to that of

  7. Molecular nature of alpha-globin genes in the Saudi population

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    J. Francis Borgio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-thalassemia (α-thal is a disorder caused by the deletion of single or double α-globin genes, and/or point mutations in the α-globin genes. There are 2 common types of α-globin genes; HBA2 and HBA1. Recently, it has been discovered that the HBA2 gene is replaced by a unique HBA12 gene convert in 5.7% of the Saudi population. The α-globin genes have been emerging as a molecular target for the treatment of β-thalassemia (β-thal. Hence, it is essential to understand the molecular nature of α-globin genes to treat the most prevalent hemoglobin disorders, such as sickle cell disease, α-thal, and β-thal prevalent in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Thirty-two different α-globin genotypes have been observed in the Saudi population. This review outlines the classification of the α-globin genes on the basis of their molecular nature and complex combinations of α-globin genes, and their variants predominant in Saudis.

  8. Human γ-globin genes silenced independently of other genes in the β-globin locus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractErythropoiesis during human development is characterized by switches in expression of beta-like globin genes during the transition from the embryonic through fetal to adult stages. Activation and high-level expression of the genes is directed by the locus control region (LCR), located 5'

  9. A novel mutation of the alpha2-globin causing alpha(+)-thalassemia: Hb Plasencia [alpha125(H8)Leu--Arg (alpha2).

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    Martin, Guillermo; Villegas, Ana; González, Fernando Ataulfo; Ropero, Paloma; Hojas, Ricardo; Polo, Marta; Mateo, Marta; Salvador, Maria; Benavente, Celina

    2005-01-01

    We describe, in a Spanish family with moderate microcytosis and hypochromia, a novel nondeletional alpha-thalassemia (thal) mutation localized on the alpha2-globin gene. DNA sequencing revealed a point mutation at codon 125 (CTG --> CGG) in the heterozygous state, that was confirmed by restriction analysis. The resulting variant, which causes a nondeletional alpha-thal, was named Hb Plasencia [alpha125(H8)Leu --> Arg (alpha2)] after the place of residence of the affected family.

  10. Brain alpha- and beta-globin expression after intracerebral hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Lee, Jin-Yul; Liu, Wenquan; Keep, Richard F; Wang, Michael M.; Xi, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    Our recent study has demonstrated that hemoglobin (Hb) is present in cerebral neurons and neuronal Hb is inducible after cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we examined the effects of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on the mRNA levels of the α-globin (HbA) and the β-globin (HbB) components of Hb and Hb protein in the brain in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a needle insertion (sham) or an infusion of autologous whole blood into the basal ganglia and we...

  11. The population genetics of the alpha-2 globin locus of orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus).

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    Steiper, Michael E; Wolfe, Nathan D; Karesh, William B; Kilbourn, Annelisa M; Bosi, Edwin J; Ruvolo, Maryellen

    2005-03-01

    In this study, the molecular population genetics of the orangutan's alpha-2 globin (HBA2) gene were investigated in order to test for the action of natural selection. Haplotypes from 28 orangutan chromosomes were collected from a 1.46-kilobase region of the alpha-2 globin locus. While many aspects of the data were consistent with neutrality, the observed heterogeneous distribution of polymorphisms was inconsistent with neutral expectations. Furthermore, a single amino acid variant, found in both the Bornean and the Sumatran orangutan subspecies, was associated with different alternative synonymous variants in each subspecies, suggesting that the allele may have spread separately through the two subspecies after two distinct origination events. This variant is not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). These observations are consistent with neutral models that incorporate population structure and models that invoke selection. The orangutan Plasmodium parasite is a plausible selective agent that may underlie the variation at alpha-2 globin in orangutans.

  12. Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

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    Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M. [Kapiolani Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

  13. Active chromatin hub of the mouse alpha-globin locus forms in a transcription factory of clustered housekeeping genes.

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    Zhou, Guo-Ling; Xin, Li; Song, Wei; Di, Li-Jun; Liu, Guang; Wu, Xue-Song; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2006-07-01

    RNA polymerases can be shared by a particular group of genes in a transcription "factory" in nuclei, where transcription may be coordinated in concert with the distribution of coexpressed genes in higher-eukaryote genomes. Moreover, gene expression can be modulated by regulatory elements working over a long distance. Here, we compared the conformation of a 130-kb chromatin region containing the mouse alpha-globin cluster and their flanking housekeeping genes in 14.5-day-postcoitum fetal liver and brain cells. The analysis of chromatin conformation showed that the active alpha1 and alpha2 globin genes and upstream regulatory elements are in close spatial proximity, indicating that looping may function in the transcriptional regulation of the mouse alpha-globin cluster. In fetal liver cells, the active alpha1 and alpha2 genes, but not the inactive zeta gene, colocalize with neighboring housekeeping genes C16orf33, C16orf8, MPG, and C16orf35. This is in sharp contrast with the mouse alpha-globin genes in nonexpressing cells, which are separated from the congregated housekeeping genes. A comparison of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancies showed that active alpha1 and alpha2 gene promoters have a much higher RNA Pol II enrichment in liver than in brain. The RNA Pol II occupancy at the zeta gene promoter, which is specifically repressed during development, is much lower than that at the alpha1 and alpha2 promoters. Thus, the mouse alpha-globin gene cluster may be regulated through moving in or out active globin gene promoters and regulatory elements of a preexisting transcription factory in the nucleus, which is maintained by the flanking clustered housekeeping genes, to activate or inactivate alpha-globin gene expression.

  14. Alpha-2-globin gene polyadenylation (AATAAA-->AATAAG) mutation in hemoglobin H disease among Kuwaitis.

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    Haider, M; Adekile, A

    2005-01-01

    In the Arabian Gulf region, hemoglobin (Hb) H disease usually results from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity involving the alpha2-globin gene polyadenylation (poly A) signal (AATAAA-->AATAAG) mutation (alpha(T)alpha). Here we document the clinical and hemato logical characteristics of children with Hb H disease being followed in Kuwait. Twenty-four patients (0.5-12 years old, mean 4.7 +/- 3.5 years) with persistent microcytic, hypochromic anemia (and normal iron status as well as normal Hb A2 levels) were referred to the pediatric hematology clinic for further investigations. They were all screened for the alpha+-thalassemia (alpha+-thal; -3.7 kb) deletion using a standard PCR method. They were also screened for the alpha2-globin gene alpha(T)alpha allele and the 5nt deletion (-alpha5nt) in the first intervening sequence, which are common alpha-thal alleles in this population. They were followed up for periods ranging from 2 to 8 years. Of the 24 patients, 4 (16.7%) also had sickle cell trait (Hb-AS), while 7 (29.2%) were glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. Only 1 patient had significant hepatosplenomegaly and 1 developed gallstones. While none was on chronic transfusion therapy, 8 (33.3%) had been transfused at least once and, in 3 instances, this was secondary to parvovirus B19 +ve aplastic crisis. The alpha-globin genotype was successfully determined in almost all patients. The results showed that 17 (70.8%) patients were homozygous for the poly A mutation (alpha(T)alpha/alpha(T)alpha), 6 (25.0%) were compound heterozygotes for this and the alpha+-thal (-3.7 kb) deletion (-alpha/alpha(T)alpha) and 1 (4.2%) was undetermined. There were no significant differences in the phenotypes of the 2 genotypes and their hematological features were identical. Hb H disease involving the poly A mutation is a mild thal intermedia phenotype among Kuwaitis. There are no serious complications and there is no need for regular blood transfusion. Copyright 2005 S

  15. Mutations in the paralogous human α-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Moradkhani (Kamran); C. Prehu (Claude); J. Old (John); S. Henderson (Shirley); V. Balamitsa (Vera); H-Y. Luo; M-C. Poon (Man-Chiu); D.H. Chui (David); H. Wajcman (Henri); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe human α-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical α-globin chain. Over half of the α-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these

  16. Investigating alpha-globin structural variants: a retrospective review of 135,000 Brazilian individuals

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    Elza Miyuki Kimura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brazil has a multiethnic population with a high diversity of hemoglobinopathies. While screenings for beta-globin mutations are far more common, alterations affecting alpha-globin genes are usually more silent and less well known. The aim of this study was to describe the results of a screening program for alpha-globin gene mutations in a representative sample of the Southeastern Brazilian population. Methods: A total of 135,000 individuals, including patients with clinical suspicion of hemoglobinopathies and their family members, randomly chosen individuals submitted to blood tests and blood donors who were abnormal hemoglobin carriers were analyzed. The variants were screened by alkaline and acid electrophoreses, isoelectric focusing and cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and the abnormal chains were investigated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. Mutations were identified by molecular analyses, and the oxygen affinity, heme-heme cooperativity and Bohr effect of the variants were evaluated by functional tests. Results: Four new and 22 rare variants were detected in 98 families. Some of these variants were found in co-inheritance with other hemoglobinopathies. Of the rare hemoglobins, Hasharon, Stanleyville II and J-Rovigo were the most common, the first two being S-like and associated with alpha-thalassemia. Conclusion: The variability of alpha-globin alterations reflects the high degree of racial miscegenation and an intense internal migratory flow between different Brazilian regions. This diversity highlights the importance of programs for diagnosing hemoglobinopathies and preventing combinations that may lead to important clinical manifestations in multiethnic populations.

  17. alpha-Globin genes: thalassemic and structural alterations in a Brazilian population

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    M.R.S.C. Wenning

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven unrelated patients with hemoglobin (Hb H disease and 27 individuals with alpha-chain structural alterations were studied to identify the alpha-globin gene mutations present in the population of Southeast Brazil. The -alpha3.7, --MED and -(alpha20.5 deletions were investigated by PCR, whereas non-deletional alpha-thalassemia (alphaHphalpha, alphaNcoIalpha, aaNcoI, alphaIcalpha and alphaTSaudialpha was screened with restriction enzymes and by nested PCR. Structural alterations were identified by direct DNA sequencing. Of the seven patients with Hb H disease, all of Italian descent, two had the -(alpha20.5/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/alphaHphalpha genotype and three showed interaction of the -alpha3.7 deletion with an unusual, unidentified form of non-deletional alpha-thalassemia [-alpha3.7/(aaT]. Among the 27 patients with structural alterations, 15 (of Italian descent had Hb Hasharon (alpha47Asp->His associated with the -alpha3.7 deletion, 4 (of Italian descent were heterozygous for Hb J-Rovigo (alpha53Ala->Asp, 4 (3 Blacks and 1 Caucasian were heterozygous for Hb Stanleyville-II (alpha78Asn->Lys associated with the alpha+-thalassemia, 1 (Black was heterozygous for Hb G-Pest (alpha74Asp->Asn, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Kurosaki (alpha7Lys->Glu, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Westmead (alpha122His->Gln, and 1 (Caucasian was the carrier of a novel silent variant (Hb Campinas, alpha26Ala->Val. Most of the mutations found reflected the Mediterranean and African origins of the population. Hbs G-Pest and Kurosaki, very rare, and Hb Westmead, common in southern China, were initially described in individuals of ethnic origin differing from those of the carriers reported in the present study and are the first cases to be reported in the Brazilian population.

  18. The role of EKLF in human β-globin gene competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); T. Trimborn (Tolleiv); B. Nuez (Beatriz); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); P.J. Fraser (Peter)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are

  19. Activation of the alpha-globin gene expression correlates with dramatic upregulation of nearby non-globin genes and changes in local and large-scale chromatin spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Galitsyna, Aleksandra A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Golov, Arkadiy K; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Imakaev, Maxim V; Abdennur, Nezar A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-07-11

    In homeotherms, the alpha-globin gene clusters are located within permanently open genome regions enriched in housekeeping genes. Terminal erythroid differentiation results in dramatic upregulation of alpha-globin genes making their expression comparable to the rRNA transcriptional output. Little is known about the influence of the erythroid-specific alpha-globin gene transcription outburst on adjacent, widely expressed genes and large-scale chromatin organization. Here, we have analyzed the total transcription output, the overall chromatin contact profile, and CTCF binding within the 2.7 Mb segment of chicken chromosome 14 harboring the alpha-globin gene cluster in cultured lymphoid cells and cultured erythroid cells before and after induction of terminal erythroid differentiation. We found that, similarly to mammalian genome, the chicken genomes is organized in TADs and compartments. Full activation of the alpha-globin gene transcription in differentiated erythroid cells is correlated with upregulation of several adjacent housekeeping genes and the emergence of abundant intergenic transcription. An extended chromosome region encompassing the alpha-globin cluster becomes significantly decompacted in differentiated erythroid cells, and depleted in CTCF binding and CTCF-anchored chromatin loops, while the sub-TAD harboring alpha-globin gene cluster and the upstream major regulatory element (MRE) becomes highly enriched with chromatin interactions as compared to lymphoid and proliferating erythroid cells. The alpha-globin gene domain and the neighboring loci reside within the A-like chromatin compartment in both lymphoid and erythroid cells and become further segregated from the upstream gene desert upon terminal erythroid differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that the effects of tissue-specific transcription activation are not restricted to the host genomic locus but affect the overall chromatin structure and transcriptional output of the encompassing

  20. "PCR Application In Reognition Of Prevelant Deletion Of α Globin Gene In Alpha Thalasemia Carriers "

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    R. Kiani-Shirazi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:-thalassemia is the most common inherited disorder of hemoglobin (Hb synthesis in the world. Alpha thalassemia most frequently results from the loss of one (-  or both (- - of the duplicated  genes ( on chromosome 16. Carriers of deletional forms of -thalassemia (-/- /-, or --/ are clinically normal but have a mild hypochromic, microcytic anemia. Compound heterozygotes (--/-  called Hb H disease. Fetuses who inherit no  genes (--/-- (Hb Bart's Hydrops fetalis syndrome die either inutero or shortly after birth, More than 95% of recognized -thalassemia involves deletion of one or both  globin genes on chromosome 16. Materials and Methods: The assay was tested on 114 Iranian individuals with low MCV and MCH levels but normal HbA2 who had not responded to Iron treatment. patients was referred to the Department of Biotechnology, Pasteur Institute of Iran by Health Centers. Genomic DNA was isolated from white blood cells by salting out method. We have developed a reliable, single - tube multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for the 7 most frequent - thalassemia deletions (-- SEA , --THAI, --FIL , -α20.5 , --MED, -α4.2 , -α3.7. Results: DNA fromd thalassemia carriers was tested for the presence of different types of  globin gene deletion (s. The - 3.7 and - 4.2 single gene deletions, and the Mediterranean (-- MED and - 20.5 double gene deletions were found in some samples. Conclusion: The - 3.7 deletion was found to be the most common cause of  globin gene deletion in our samples. Multiplex PCR for α gene deletion analysis is simple, rapid and sensitive.

  1. Regulated expression of human A γ-, β-, and hybrid γ β-globin genes in transgenic mice: manipulation of the developmental expression patterns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kollias (George); N. Wrighton; J. Hurst; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced the human fetal gamma- and adult beta-globin genes into the germ line of mice. Analysis of the resulting transgenic mice shows that the human gamma-globin gene is expressed like an embryonic mouse globin gene; the human beta-globin gene is expressed (as previously

  2. Eos negatively regulates human γ-globin gene transcription during erythroid differentiation.

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    Hai-Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human globin gene expression is precisely regulated by a complicated network of transcription factors and chromatin modifying activities during development and erythropoiesis. Eos (Ikaros family zinc finger 4, IKZF4, a member of the zinc finger transcription factor Ikaros family, plays a pivotal role as a repressor of gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the role of Eos in globin gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR detected a gradual decrease in Eos expression during erythroid differentiation of hemin-induced K562 cells and Epo-induced CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs. DNA transfection and lentivirus-mediated gene transfer demonstrated that the enforced expression of Eos significantly represses the expression of γ-globin, but not other globin genes, in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. Consistent with a direct role of Eos in globin gene regulation, chromatin immunoprecipitaion and dual-luciferase reporter assays identified three discrete sites located in the DNase I hypersensitivity site 3 (HS3 of the β-globin locus control region (LCR, the promoter regions of the Gγ- and Aγ- globin genes, as functional binding sites of Eos protein. A chromosome conformation capture (3C assay indicated that Eos may repress the interaction between the LCR and the γ-globin gene promoter. In addition, erythroid differentiation was inhibited by enforced expression of Eos in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of the γ-globin gene during erythroid differentiation.

  3. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  4. Molecular analysis of deletions in the human beta-globin gene cluster: deletion junctions and locations of breakpoints.

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    Henthorn, P S; Smithies, O; Mager, D L

    1990-02-01

    DNA fragments that contain the deletion junction regions of four independent deletions involving the human beta-globin gene cluster have been isolated and cloned. The fragments were isolated from individuals with the conditions referred to as Sicilian (delta beta)zero-thalassemia, Turkish G gamma+(A gamma delta beta)zero-thalassemia, Black G gamma+(A gamma delta beta)zero-thalassemia, and HPFH-2. The sequences of the deletion junctions and of the normal DNA surrounding their 3' breakpoints were determined and compared to the previously determined sequences of normal DNA surrounding their 5' breakpoints. These comparisons show that the deletions were the result of nonhomologous recombinational events. Two of the deletion junctions contain "orphan" nucleotides, while the other two show very limited amounts of "junctional homology." Both types of junctions are common among recombination events in mammalian cells and we discuss a simple joining scheme that could account for the junctions reported here. Unlike other deletions in this cluster and in other gene clusters, none of the eight deletion breakpoints examined here occurred within Alu family repeats. To examine the significance of deletion breakpoints within various sequence categories, we analyzed the data from a well-defined set of deletions within this locus. In contrast to deletions in the alpha-globin gene cluster, the occurrence of breakpoints in Alu family repetitive sequences is not statistically significant within the beta-globin gene cluster. However, breakpoints do occur within transcriptional units of the beta-globin gene cluster more frequently than expected by chance alone. We conclude from our analysis that the mechanisms of DNA joining are not locus or location specific, but at least a portion of the mechanisms of chromosomal breakages do show locus specificity.

  5. The role of EKLF in human beta-globin gene competition.

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    Wijgerde, M; Gribnau, J; Trimborn, T; Nuez, B; Philipsen, S; Grosveld, F; Fraser, P

    1996-11-15

    We have investigated the role of erythroid Kruppel-like factor (EKLF) in expression of the human beta-globin genes in compound EKLF knockout/human beta-locus transgenic mice. EKLF affects only the adult mouse beta-globin genes in homozygous knockout mice; heterozygous mice are unaffected. Here we show that EKLF knockout mice express the human epsilon and gamma-globin genes normally in embryonic red cells. However, fetal liver erythropoiesis, which is marked by a period of gamma- and beta-gene competition in which the genes are alternately transcribed, exhibits an altered ratio of gamma- to beta-gene transcription. EKLF heterozygous fetal livers display a decrease in the number of transcriptionally active beta genes with a reciprocal increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes. beta-Gene transcription is absent in homozygous knockout fetuses with coincident changes in chromatin structure at the beta promoter. There is a further increase in the number of transcriptionally active gamma genes and accompanying gamma gene promoter chromatin alterations. These results indicate that EKLF plays a major role in gamma- and beta-gene competition and suggest that EKLF is important in stabilizing the interaction between the Locus Control Region and the beta-globin gene. In addition, these findings provide further evidence that developmental modulation of globin gene expression within individual cells is accomplished by altering the frequency and/or duration of transcriptional periods of a gene rather than changing the rate of transcription.

  6. The human β-globin gene contains multiple regulatory regions: identification of one promoter and two downstream enhancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Antoniou (Michael); E. de Boer (Ernie); G. Habets; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced into murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells several series of deletion mutants of hybrid genes between the human beta-globin gene and the murine H-2Kb gene. S1 nuclease and transcriptional run-off analysis showed that the human beta-globin gene contains at least three

  7. TBP binding and the rate of transcription initiation from the human β-globin gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Antoniou (Michael); E. Spanopoulou; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. de Boer (Ernie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractDNA-protein interaction studies in vitro revealed several factors binding over the TATA box and the region of transcription initiation (cap) site of the human beta-globin promoter; TATA binding protein TBP at -30, Sp1 at -19, GATA-1 at -12 and +5, YY1 at -9 and a novel factor C1 over the

  8. The human β-globin gene promoter; nuclear protein factors and erythroid specific induction of transcription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Boer (Ernie); M. Antoniou (Michael); V. Mignotte; L. Wall (Lee); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have shown that the promoter of the human beta-globin gene contains three regions in addition to the known CAC, CAAT and TATA box regions that are important for the induction of transcription in erythroid cells. By using DNaseI footprinting and gel mobility shift assays we were able

  9. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  10. SOX6 Downregulation Induces γ-Globin in Human β-Thalassemia Major Erythroid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF; α2γ2 is a potent genetic modifier of the severity of β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Differences in the levels of HbF that persist into adulthood affect the severity of sickle cell disease and the β-thalassemia syndromes. Sry type HMG box (SOX6 is a potent silencer of HbF. Here, we reactivated γ-globin expression by downregulating SOX6 to alleviate anemia in the β-thalassemia patients. Methods. SOX6 was downregulated by lentiviral RNAi (RNA interference in K562 cell line and an in vitro culture model of human erythropoiesis in which erythroblasts are derived from the normal donor mononuclear cells (MNC or β-thalassemia major MNC. The expression of γ-globin was analyzed by qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR and WB (western blot. Results. Our data showed that downregulation of SOX6 induces γ-globin production in K562 cell line and human erythrocytes from normal donors and β-thalassemia major donors, without altering erythroid maturation. Conclusions. This is the first report on γ-globin induction by downregulation of SOX6 in human erythroblasts derived from β-thalassemia major.

  11. Hb Hekinan in a Taiwanese subject: a G-->T substitution at codon 27 of the alpha1-globin gene abolishes an HaeIII site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hung-Chang; Shih, Mu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Chang; Peng, Ching-Tien; Chang, Tien-Jye; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2007-01-01

    We recently observed a heterozygote for Hb Hekinan in a Taiwanese subject. The molecular lesion of Hb Hekinan is a substitution of G-->T at codon 27 of the alpha1-globin gene, which abolishes an HaeIII restriction enzyme site. Hb Hekinan [alpha27(B8)Glu-->Asp, GAG-->GAC (alpha2)] has not been found in Taiwan. This variant can be detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) but not by capillary or cellulose electrophoresis.

  12. Initiation of DNA replication at the human β-globin 3′ enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzina, Alla; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kolman, John L.; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Ellis, James

    2005-01-01

    The origin of DNA replication in the human β-globin gene contains an initiation region (IR) and two flanking auxiliary elements. Two replicator modules are located within the upstream auxiliary sequence and the IR core, but the functional sequences in the downstream auxiliary element are unknown. Here, we use a combination of benzoylated-naphthoylated DEAE (BND) cellulose purification and nascent strand abundance assays to show that replication initiation occurs at the β-globin 3′ enhancer on human chromosome 11 in the Hu11 hybrid murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cell line. To examine replicator function, 3′ enhancer fragments were inserted into an ectopic site in MEL cells via an optimized FRT/EGFP-FLP integration system. These experiments demonstrate that the 1.6 kb downstream auxiliary element is a third replicator module called bGRep-E in erythroid cells. The minimal 260 bp 3′ enhancer is required but not sufficient to initiate efficient replication, suggesting cooperation with adjacent sequences. The minimal 3′ enhancer also cooperates with elements in an expressing HS3β/γ-globin construct to initiate replication. These data indicate that the β-globin replicator has multiple initiation sites in three closely spaced replicator modules. We conclude that a mammalian enhancer can cooperate with adjacent sequences to create an efficient replicator module. PMID:16085752

  13. Erythroid-Specific Expression of β-globin from Sleeping Beauty-Transduced Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjeklocha, Lucas M.; Park, Chang-Won; Wong, Phillip Y-P; Roney, Mark J.; Belcher, John D.; Kaufman, Dan S.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Hebbel, Robert P.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy for sickle cell disease will require efficient delivery of a tightly regulated and stably expressed gene product to provide an effective therapy. In this study we utilized the non-viral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system using the SB100X hyperactive transposase to transduce human cord blood CD34+ cells with DsRed and a hybrid IHK–β-globin transgene. IHK transduced cells were successfully differentiated into multiple lineages which all showed transgene integration. The mature erythroid cells had an increased β-globin to γ-globin ratio from 0.66±0.08 to 1.05±0.12 (p = 0.05), indicating expression of β-globin from the integrated SB transgene. IHK–β-globin mRNA was found in non-erythroid cell types, similar to native β-globin mRNA that was also expressed at low levels. Additional studies in the hematopoietic K562 cell line confirmed the ability of cHS4 insulator elements to protect DsRed and IHK–β-globin transgenes from silencing in long-term culture studies. Insulated transgenes had statistically significant improvement in the maintenance of long term expression, while preserving transgene regulation. These results support the use of Sleeping Beauty vectors in carrying an insulated IHK–β-globin transgene for gene therapy of sickle cell disease. PMID:22216176

  14. Editing an α-globin enhancer in primary human hematopoietic stem cells as a treatment for β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettananda, Sachith; Fisher, Chris A; Hay, Deborah; Badat, Mohsin; Quek, Lynn; Clark, Kevin; Hublitz, Philip; Downes, Damien; Kerry, Jon; Gosden, Matthew; Telenius, Jelena; Sloane-Stanley, Jackie A; Faustino, Paula; Coelho, Andreia; Doondeea, Jessica; Usukhbayar, Batchimeg; Sopp, Paul; Sharpe, Jacqueline A; Hughes, Jim R; Vyas, Paresh; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2017-09-04

    β-Thalassemia is one of the most common inherited anemias, with no effective cure for most patients. The pathophysiology reflects an imbalance between α- and β-globin chains with an excess of free α-globin chains causing ineffective erythropoiesis and hemolysis. When α-thalassemia is co-inherited with β-thalassemia, excess free α-globin chains are reduced significantly ameliorating the clinical severity. Here we demonstrate the use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of primary human hematopoietic stem/progenitor (CD34+) cells to emulate a natural mutation, which deletes the MCS-R2 α-globin enhancer and causes α-thalassemia. When edited CD34+ cells are differentiated into erythroid cells, we observe the expected reduction in α-globin expression and a correction of the pathologic globin chain imbalance in cells from patients with β-thalassemia. Xenograft assays show that a proportion of the edited CD34+ cells are long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells, demonstrating the potential of this approach for translation into a therapy for β-thalassemia.β-thalassemia is characterised by the presence of an excess of α-globin chains, which contribute to erythrocyte pathology. Here the authors use CRISP/Cas9 to reduce α-globin expression in hematopoietic precursors, and show effectiveness in xenograft assays in mice.

  15. The chromatin structure of the human epsilon globin gene: nuclease hypersensitive sites correlate with multiple initiation sites of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    We have mapped sites in chromatin flanking the epsilon-globin gene in the K562 cell which are hypersensitive to digestion with DNAseI, micrococcal nuclease and S1 nuclease. Many of those in the 5' flanking region correspond to minor upstream transcriptional starts. However, one prominent site occurs upstream of the boundary of transcription; it maps to a region with an unusual DNA sequence. In baby hamster kidney cells stably transformed with recombinant DNA containing the human epsilon-globin gene and in Cos 7 cells transiently transfected with DNA containing the epsilon-globin gene, hypersensitive sites can be demonstrated. Images PMID:6096822

  16. Characterisation of a new alpha thalassemia 1 defect due to a partial deletion of the alpha globin gene complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, L; Higgs, D R; Aldridge, B; Metaxatou-Mavromati, A; Clegg, J B; Weatherall, D J

    1980-01-01

    A new deletion causing alpha thalassemia has been characterised in a Greek family. Detailed mapping of the alpha gene complex shows that the deletion extends for 5.2 kb and removes the whole of the alpha 2 gene and the 5' end of the alpha 1 gene. The affected chromosome, therefore produces no normal alpha chains and results in a phenotype of alpha thalassemia 1. Images PMID:6255436

  17. Hb Hekinan observed in three Chinese from Macau; identification of the GAG----GAT mutation in the alpha 1-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W; Wilson, J B; Webber, B B; Kutlar, A; Tamagnini, G P; Kuam, B; Huisman, T H

    1990-01-01

    Hb Hekinan, an alpha chain variant that is characterized by a Glu----Asp mutation at position alpha 27, was observed in three Chinese females attending a prenatal clinic in Macau. The relative quantities of the stable hemoglobin were 13-14% (average 13.3%); its identification was greatly aided by the separation and purification of the peptides by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Dot-blot analysis of amplified DNA with 32P-labeled probes located the mutation in codon 27 of the minor alpha 1-globin gene; the change involved a GAG (coding for glutamic acid) to GAT (coding for aspartic acid) mutation.

  18. The hematopoietic regulator TAL1 is required for chromatin looping between the β-globin LCR and human γ-globin genes to activate transcription

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yun, Won Ju; Kim, Yea Woon; Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jungbae; Dean, Ann; Kim, AeRi

    2014-01-01

    .... The complex mediates long-range interaction between the β-globin locus control region (LCR) and active globin genes, and although TAL1 is one of the two DNA-binding complex members, its role is unclear...

  19. The human β-globin gene 3' enhancer contains multiple binding sites for an erythroid specific protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wall (Lee); E. de Boer (Ernie); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractWe have shown that the minimal enhancer fragment present in the 3'-flanking region of the human beta-globin gene contains four regions that bind nuclear proteins in vitro. By using gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays, we were able to show that each of these regions binds

  20. A dominant chromatin opening activity in 5' hypersensitive site 3 of the human β-globin locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; A. Harper; D. Michalovich (David); P.J. Fraser (Peter); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractSingle-copy human beta-globin transgenes are very susceptible to suppression by position effects of surrounding closed chromatin. However, these position effects are overcome by a 20 kbp DNA fragment containing the locus control region (LCR). Here we show that the 6.5 kbp microlocus LCR

  1. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β-Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Breveglieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6 carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin αmu-globin2/βhu-globin2 and, more importantly, (d the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia.

  2. Increased expression of alpha- and beta-globin mRNAs at the pituitary following exposure to estrogen during the critical period of neonatal sex differentiation in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, H; Navarro, V M; Nielsen, John E

    2006-01-01

    , we screened for differentially expressed genes at the pituitary and hypothalamus of rats after neonatal exposure to estradiol benzoate. Our analyses identified persistent up-regulation of alpha- and beta-globin mRNAs at the pituitary following neonatal estrogenization. This finding was confirmed...... by combination of RT-PCR analyses and in situ hybridization. Induction of alpha- and beta-globin mRNA expression at the pituitary by neonatal exposure to estrogen was demonstrated as dose-dependent and it was persistently detected up to puberty. In contrast, durable up-regulation of alpha- and beta-globin genes......-specific biomarkers of exposure to estrogenic (and/or anti-androgenic) compounds at critical periods of sex development, whose potential in the assessment of endocrine disrupting events at the HP unit merits further investigation....

  3. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies.

  4. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26029723

  5. Self-catalytic DNA depurination underlies human β-globin gene mutations at codon 6 that cause anemias and thalassemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Amosova, Olga; Fresco, Jacques R

    2013-04-19

    The human β-globin gene contains an 18-nucleotide coding strand sequence centered at codon 6 and capable of forming a stem-loop structure that can self-catalyze depurination of the 5'G residue of that codon. The resultant apurinic lesion is subject to error-prone repair, consistent with the occurrence about this codon of mutations responsible for 6 anemias and β-thalassemias and additional substitutions without clinical consequences. The 4-residue loop of this stem-loop-forming sequence shows the highest incidence of mutation across the gene. The loop and first stem base pair-forming residues appeared early in the mammalian clade. The other stem-forming segments evolved more recently among primates, thereby conferring self-depurination capacity at codon 6. These observations indicate a conserved molecular mechanism leading to β-globin variants underlying phenotypic diversity and disease.

  6. Synthetic Human β-Globin 5'HS2 Constructs Function as Partially Active Locus Control Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); D. Talbot; N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTransgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we

  7. Preimplantation diagnosis of a human beta-globin transgene in biopsied trophectoderm cells and blastomeres of the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheardown, S A; Findlay, I; Turner, A; Greaves, D; Bolton, V N; Mitchell, M; Layton, D M; Muggleton-Harris, A L

    1992-10-01

    The preimplantation diagnosis of a HbSA-globin transgene in biopsied trophectoderm cells and blastomeres in embryos using a transgenic mouse model for the trait of human sickle-cell anaemia has been undertaken. A sensitive procedure was developed for the amplification of the human beta-globin gene sequence flanking the sickle mutation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were undertaken on one to five biopsied trophectoderm cells and isolated blastomeres of the preimplantation mouse embryo. After biopsy the blastocysts were cultured whilst the cells were analysed for the presence of the transgene, and a high proportion (82-91%) were viable as assessed by the presence of a blastocoele cavity within a 5-h period. The majority of the biopsied cultured blastocysts were frozen and used to confirm the diagnosis; 90 biopsied cultured blastocysts were transferred to pseudopregnant recipients and 34% established pregnancy. Material from day 13.5 post-coitum fetuses was also used to confirm the original diagnosis. The time (4-5 h) required to carry out the analysis obviates a need for extended culture or cryopreservation of the biopsied embryo. In individual experiments under optimal conditions, the presence of the transgene in biopsied cells was detected with 100% accuracy, and the PCR analysis was sensitive at the 1-cell level. The overall success rate of diagnosis and confirmation of the presence or absence of the human beta-globin sequence in the biopsied embryo was 70%. Over the entire experimental period (14 months) DNA contamination from a variety of sources did occasionally occur; the methods used to overcome this problem are discussed.

  8. NF-Y recruits both transcription activator and repressor to modulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of human γ-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguo Zhu

    Full Text Available The human embryonic, fetal and adult β-like globin genes provide a paradigm for tissue- and developmental stage-specific gene regulation. The fetal γ-globin gene is expressed in fetal erythroid cells but is repressed in adult erythroid cells. The molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional switch during erythroid development is not completely understood. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to dissect the molecular assemblies of the active and the repressed proximal γ-globin promoter complexes in K562 human erythroleukemia cell line and primary human fetal and adult erythroid cells. We found that the proximal γ-globin promoter complex is assembled by a developmentally regulated, general transcription activator NF-Y bound strongly at the tandem CCAAT motifs near the TATA box. NF-Y recruits to neighboring DNA motifs the developmentally regulated, erythroid transcription activator GATA-2 and general repressor BCL11A, which in turn recruit erythroid repressor GATA-1 and general repressor COUP-TFII to form respectively the NF-Y/GATA-2 transcription activator hub and the BCL11A/COUP-TFII/GATA-1 transcription repressor hub. Both the activator and the repressor hubs are present in both the active and the repressed γ-globin promoter complexes in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Through changes in their levels and respective interactions with the co-activators and co-repressors during erythroid development, the activator and the repressor hubs modulate erythroid- and developmental stage-specific transcription of γ-globin gene.

  9. Monomethylfumarate induces γ-globin expression and fetal hemoglobin production in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and erythroid cells, and in intact retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promsote, Wanwisa; Makala, Levi; Li, Biaoru; Smith, Sylvia B; Singh, Nagendra; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Pace, Betty S; Martin, Pamela M

    2014-05-13

    Sickle retinopathy (SR) is a major cause of vision loss in sickle cell disease (SCD). There are no strategies to prevent SR and treatments are extremely limited. The present study evaluated (1) the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell as a hemoglobin producer and novel cellular target for fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction, and (2) monomethylfumarate (MMF) as an HbF-inducing therapy and abrogator of oxidative stress and inflammation in SCD retina. Human globin gene expression was evaluated by RT-quantitative (q)PCR in the human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and in primary RPE cells isolated from Townes humanized SCD mice. γ-Globin promoter activity was monitored in KU812 stable dual luciferase reporter expressing cells treated with 0 to 1000 μM dimethylfumarate, MMF, or hydroxyurea (HU; positive control) by dual luciferase assay. Reverse transcriptase-qPCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), immunofluorescence, and Western blot techniques were used to evaluate γ-globin expression and HbF production in primary human erythroid progenitors, ARPE-19, and normal hemoglobin producing (HbAA) and homozygous β(s) mutation (HbSS) RPE that were treated similarly, and in MMF-injected (1000 μM) HbAA and HbSS retinas. Dihydroethidium labeling and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), IL-1β, and VEGF expression were also analyzed. Retinal pigment epithelial cells express globin genes and synthesize adult and fetal hemoglobin MMF stimulated γ-globin expression and HbF production in cultured RPE and erythroid cells, and in HbSS mouse retina where it also reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. The production of hemoglobin by RPE suggests the potential involvement of this cell type in the etiology of SR. Monomethylfumarate influences multiple parameters consistent with improved retinal health in SCD and may therefore be of therapeutic potential in SR treatment. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  10. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  11. In Silico Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs) in Human β-Globin Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Mohammed; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Khan, Wajahatullah; Warsy, Arjumand S.; Elrobh, Mohamed; Khan, Zahid; Amri, Abdullah Al; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2011-01-01

    Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the most common forms of genetic variations that produce hemoglobinopathies- the most widespread inherited disorders worldwide. Several hemoglobinopathies result from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity to beta-globin (HBB) gene mutations, such as that producing sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), HbC, HbD and HbE. Several of these mutations are deleterious and result in moderate to severe hemolytic anemia, with associated complications, requiring lifelong care and management. Even though many hemoglobinopathies result from single amino acid changes producing similar structural abnormalities, there are functional differences in the generated variants. Using in silico methods, we examined the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. Using a sequence homology-based Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) server we have searched for the SNPs, which showed that 200 (80%) non-synonymous polymorphism were found to be deleterious. The structure-based method via PolyPhen server indicated that 135 (40%) non-synonymous polymorphism may modify protein function and structure. The Pupa Suite software showed that the SNPs will have a phenotypic consequence on the structure and function of the altered protein. Structure analysis was performed on the key mutations that occur in the native protein coded by the HBB gene that causes hemoglobinopathies such as: HbC (E→K), HbD (E→Q), HbE (E→K) and HbS (E→V). Atomic Non-Local Environment Assessment (ANOLEA), Yet Another Scientific Artificial Reality Application (YASARA), CHARMM-GUI webserver for macromolecular dynamics and mechanics, and Normal Mode Analysis, Deformation and Refinement (NOMAD-Ref) of Gromacs server were used to perform molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization calculations on β-Chain residue of the HBB gene before and after mutation. Furthermore, in the native and altered protein models, amino acid residues

  12. In silico analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs in human β-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alanazi

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the most common forms of genetic variations that produce hemoglobinopathies--the most widespread inherited disorders worldwide. Several hemoglobinopathies result from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity to beta-globin (HBB gene mutations, such as that producing sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS, HbC, HbD and HbE. Several of these mutations are deleterious and result in moderate to severe hemolytic anemia, with associated complications, requiring lifelong care and management. Even though many hemoglobinopathies result from single amino acid changes producing similar structural abnormalities, there are functional differences in the generated variants. Using in silico methods, we examined the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. Using a sequence homology-based Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT server we have searched for the SNPs, which showed that 200 (80% non-synonymous polymorphism were found to be deleterious. The structure-based method via PolyPhen server indicated that 135 (40% non-synonymous polymorphism may modify protein function and structure. The Pupa Suite software showed that the SNPs will have a phenotypic consequence on the structure and function of the altered protein. Structure analysis was performed on the key mutations that occur in the native protein coded by the HBB gene that causes hemoglobinopathies such as: HbC (E→K, HbD (E→Q, HbE (E→K and HbS (E→V. Atomic Non-Local Environment Assessment (ANOLEA, Yet Another Scientific Artificial Reality Application (YASARA, CHARMM-GUI webserver for macromolecular dynamics and mechanics, and Normal Mode Analysis, Deformation and Refinement (NOMAD-Ref of Gromacs server were used to perform molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization calculations on β-Chain residue of the HBB gene before and after mutation. Furthermore, in the native and altered protein models, amino acid

  13. Platypus globin genes and flanking loci suggest a new insertional model for beta-globin evolution in birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Wesley C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate alpha (α- and beta (β-globin gene families exemplify the way in which genomes evolve to produce functional complexity. From tandem duplication of a single globin locus, the α- and β-globin clusters expanded, and then were separated onto different chromosomes. The previous finding of a fossil β-globin gene (ω in the marsupial α-cluster, however, suggested that duplication of the α-β cluster onto two chromosomes, followed by lineage-specific gene loss and duplication, produced paralogous α- and β-globin clusters in birds and mammals. Here we analyse genomic data from an egg-laying monotreme mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, to explore haemoglobin evolution at the stem of the mammalian radiation. Results The platypus α-globin cluster (chromosome 21 contains embryonic and adult α- globin genes, a β-like ω-globin gene, and the GBY globin gene with homology to cytoglobin, arranged as 5'-ζ-ζ'-αD-α3-α2-α1-ω-GBY-3'. The platypus β-globin cluster (chromosome 2 contains single embryonic and adult globin genes arranged as 5'-ε-β-3'. Surprisingly, all of these globin genes were expressed in some adult tissues. Comparison of flanking sequences revealed that all jawed vertebrate α-globin clusters are flanked by MPG-C16orf35 and LUC7L, whereas all bird and mammal β-globin clusters are embedded in olfactory genes. Thus, the mammalian α- and β-globin clusters are orthologous to the bird α- and β-globin clusters respectively. Conclusion We propose that α- and β-globin clusters evolved from an ancient MPG-C16orf35-α-β-GBY-LUC7L arrangement 410 million years ago. A copy of the original β (represented by ω in marsupials and monotremes was inserted into an array of olfactory genes before the amniote radiation (>315 million years ago, then duplicated and diverged to form orthologous clusters of β-globin genes with different expression profiles in different lineages.

  14. A phylogenomic profile of globins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewilde Sylvia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globins occur in all three kingdoms of life: they can be classified into single-domain globins and chimeric globins. The latter comprise the flavohemoglobins with a C-terminal FAD-binding domain and the gene-regulating globin coupled sensors, with variable C-terminal domains. The single-domain globins encompass sequences related to chimeric globins and «truncated» hemoglobins with a 2-over-2 instead of the canonical 3-over-3 α-helical fold. Results A census of globins in 26 archaeal, 245 bacterial and 49 eukaryote genomes was carried out. Only ~25% of archaea have globins, including globin coupled sensors, related single domain globins and 2-over-2 globins. From one to seven globins per genome were found in ~65% of the bacterial genomes: the presence and number of globins are positively correlated with genome size. Globins appear to be mostly absent in Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi, Chlamydia, Lactobacillales, Mollicutes, Rickettsiales, Pastorellales and Spirochaetes. Single domain globins occur in metazoans and flavohemoglobins are found in fungi, diplomonads and mycetozoans. Although red algae have single domain globins, including 2-over-2 globins, the green algae and ciliates have only 2-over-2 globins. Plants have symbiotic and nonsymbiotic single domain hemoglobins and 2-over-2 hemoglobins. Over 90% of eukaryotes have globins: the nematode Caenorhabditis has the most putative globins, ~33. No globins occur in the parasitic, unicellular eukaryotes such as Encephalitozoon, Entamoeba, Plasmodium and Trypanosoma. Conclusion Although Bacteria have all three types of globins, Archaeado not have flavohemoglobins and Eukaryotes lack globin coupled sensors. Since the hemoglobins in organisms other than animals are enzymes or sensors, it is likely that the evolution of an oxygen transport function accompanied the emergence of multicellular animals.

  15. Decrease of alpha-chains in beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Papadaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the pathophysiology of beta-thalassemia, globin chain imbalance plays a central role in predicting red blood cell (RBC life span and disease severity. Strategies to improve globin chain imbalance are therefore a legitimate target in the management of this incurable genetic disorder. Classical gene addition with the available retroviral vectors can alter one of the two variables while combined reduction of achains could provide a more potent therapeutic effect. We developed foamy virus (FV vectors for the production of beta-globin and vectors targeting the a-globin transcript using the shRNA technology. Using FVderived vectors, we expressed human anti-a-globin short hairpin RNAs, off a potent PolIII promoter (H1; of the 4 different shRNAs tested, alpha-globin mRNA reduction varied from 6.3 to 54% of the control CD34+ cells. Similarly, vectors developed for the mouse alpha-globin, resulted in a significant reduction (range 15-28% of the control of aglobin in erythroid colonies of Lin- cells. To assay vector performance in vivo, we investigated the hematological parameters in thal3+/- mice transpalnted with FV-transduced Lin- cells, transduced with anti-alpha-globin shRNA. Despite low chimerism and low vector copy numbers (<0.5 per cell, we observed a 10% reduction in red cell distribution width, a marker for distorted erythropoiesis. We finally developed a combination FV vector expressing beta-globin off a HS40 enhancer and anti-alpha-globin shRNA and tested its performance in human CD34+ cells from a thalassemic patient. Globin chain imbalance was ameliorated from a beta/alpha ratio of 0.12 to the level of 0.5, clearly indicating a therapeutic benefit. Overall, shRNA control of alpha-globin excess is a feasible target but requires improvements since the RNAi effect is tough to predict and should ideally be combined with controllable elements.

  16. Computational construction of 3D chromatin ensembles and prediction of functional interactions of alpha-globin locus from 5C data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Gamze; Xu, Yun; Kenter, Amy L; Liang, Jie

    2017-11-16

    Conformation capture technologies measure frequencies of interactions between chromatin regions. However, understanding gene-regulation require knowledge of detailed spatial structures of heterogeneous chromatin in cells. Here we describe the nC-SAC (n-Constrained-Self Avoiding Chromatin) method that transforms experimental interaction frequencies into 3D ensembles of chromatin chains. nC-SAC first distinguishes specific from non-specific interaction frequencies, then generates 3D chromatin ensembles using identified specific interactions as spatial constraints. Application to α-globin locus shows that these constraints (∼20%) drive the formation of ∼99% all experimentally captured interactions, in which ∼30% additional to the imposed constraints is found to be specific. Many novel specific spatial contacts not captured by experiments are also predicted. A subset, of which independent ChIA-PET data are available, is validated to be RNAPII-, CTCF-, and RAD21-mediated. Their positioning in the architectural context of imposed specific interactions from nC-SAC is highly important. Our results also suggest the presence of a many-body structural unit involving α-globin gene, its enhancers, and POL3RK gene for regulating the expression of α-globin in silent cells. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. DNA sequences required for regulated expresson of the β-globin genes in murine erythroleukaemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wright; E. de Boer (Ernie); A. Rosenthal; R.A. Flavell (Richard); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced into murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells a series of human globin gene cosmids and two sets of hybrid genes constructed from the human beta-globin gene and the human gamma-globin or murine H-2Kbm1 genes. S1-nuclease analysis of the mRNA products from these genes before

  18. Combination of a triple alpha-globin gene with beta-thalassemia in a gypsy family: importance of the genetic testing in the diagnosis and search for a donor for bone marrow transplantation for one of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yus Cebrian, Flor; Recasens Flores, María del Valle; Izquierdo Álvarez, Silvia; Parra Salinas, Ingrid; Rodriguez-Vigil Iturrate, Carmen

    2016-04-14

    The simultaneous presence of a heterozygous β-thalassemia with α-gene triplication may cause anything from a thalassemia trait to thalassemia intermedia of mild to moderate severity. An 8-month-old ethnic Gypsy male infant with failure to thrive from birth, mild jaundice and splenomegaly. Clinical signs were compatible with severe microcytic anemia requiring bi-monthly blood transfusions. The β-thalassemia gene analysis found homozygous mutation IVS-I-110 (G>A) (c.93-21G>A) in intron 1 of the hemoglobin beta globin gene and a non-pathogenic sequence variant (single nucleotide polimorfism (SNP) Rs1609812). In addition, the patient had α gene triplication (ααα(anti 3.7)/αα) caused by double heterozygosity for a 3.7 kb fragment that contained only the hemoglobin alpha globin gene-2 gene. This finding led to screening and follow up in first-degree relatives, twin brothers and a sister and parents to provide them with appropriate genetic counseling. Nowadays, new horizons could open a new therapeutic management until definitive cure of these diseases through gene therapy or mutation-specific genome editing. Genetic testing can provide an early diagnosis and facilitates the search for a suitable donor for transplantation.

  19. Isolation of β-globin related genes from a human cosmid library.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Grosveld (Frank); H.H.M. Dahl; R.A. Flavell (Richard); E. de Boer (Ernie)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractA human gene library was constructed using an improved cloning technique for cosmid vectors. Human placental DNA was partially digested with restriction endonuclease MboI; size-fractionated and ligated to BamHI-cut and phosphatase-treated cosmid vector pJB8. After packaging in lambda

  20. Syntheses of alpha-arbutin-alpha-glycosides and their inhibitory effects on human tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kazuhisa; Nomura, Koji; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kiso, Taro; Sugimoto, Kenji; Kuriki, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Alpha-arbutin is a tyrosinase inhibitor. We synthesized alpha-arbutin-alpha-glycosides by the transglycosylation reaction of cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase from Bacillus macerans using alpha-arbutin and starch as acceptor and donor molecules, respectively. We isolated and characterized two major products from the reaction mixture. The structural analyses using 13C- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy proved that they were 4-hydroxyphenyl alpha-maltoside (alpha-Ab-alpha-G1) and 4-hydroxyphenyl alpha-maltotrioside (alpha-Ab-alpha-G2). Both alpha-Ab-alpha-G1 and alpha-Ab-alpha-G2 exhibited competitive-type inhibition on human tyrosinase as alpha-arbutin does. Their K(i) values were calculated to be 0.6 mM and 2.8 mM, respectively, which is slightly and significantly higher than that of alpha-arbutin (0.2 mM).

  1. Studies on Human γ-globin Gene Regulation: Transcription Factors in a Rubik’s Cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Papadopoulos (Petros)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe red blood cell is one of the most important blood cells in the human body. Hemoglobin is the major protein in the red blood cell, and functions as a gas transporter (oxygen and carbon dioxide) to all parts of the body. Changes in the structure or the amount of hemoglobin

  2. Importance of globin gene order for correct developmental expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Hanscombe (Olivia); D. Whyatt (David); P.J. Fraser (Peter); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); D.R. Greaves (David); N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe have used transgenic mice to study the influence of position of the human globin genes relative to the locus control region (LCR) on their expression pattern during development. The LCR, which is located 5' of the globin gene cluster, is normally required for the activation of all the

  3. Erythropoiesis and globin switching in compound Klf1::Bcl11a mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Gillemans, Nynke; Bilic, Ivan; van den Akker, Emile; Cantù, Ileana; van Gent, Teus; Klingmüller, Ursula; van Lom, Kirsten; von Lindern, Marieke; Grosveld, Frank; Bryn van Dijk, Thamar; Busslinger, Meinrad; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2013-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 11A (BCL11A) downregulation in human primary adult erythroid progenitors results in elevated expression of fetal γ-globin. Recent reports showed that BCL11A expression is activated by KLF1, leading to γ-globin repression. To study regulation of erythropoiesis and globin expression by

  4. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  5. Production of gene-corrected adult beta globin protein in human erythrocytes differentiated from patient iPSCs after genome editing of the sickle point mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosong; Wang, Ying; Yan, Wei; Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yongxing; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and genome editing provide a precise way to generate gene-corrected cells for disease modeling and cell therapies. Human iPSCs generated from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have a homozygous missense point mutation in the HBB gene encoding adult β-globin proteins, and are used as a model system to improve strategies of human gene therapy. We demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system designer nuclease is much more efficient in stimulating gene targeting of the endogenous HBB locus near the SCD point mutation in human iPSCs than ZFNs and TALENs. Using a specific guide RNA and Cas9, we readily corrected one allele of the SCD HBB gene in human iPSCs by homologous recombination with a donor DNA template containing the wild-type HBB DNA and a selection cassette that was subsequently removed to avoid possible interference of HBB transcription and translation. We chose targeted iPSC clones that have one corrected and one disrupted SCD allele for erythroid differentiation assays, using an improved xeno-free and feeder-free culture condition we recently established. Erythrocytes from either the corrected or its parental (uncorrected) iPSC line were generated with similar efficiencies. Currently ~6%-10% of these differentiated erythrocytes indeed lacked nuclei, characteristic of further matured erythrocytes called reticulocytes. We also detected the 16-kD β-globin protein expressed from the corrected HBB allele in the erythrocytes differentiated from genome-edited iPSCs. Our results represent a significant step towards the clinical applications of genome editing using patient-derived iPSCs to generate disease-free cells for cell and gene therapies. PMID:25702619

  6. Human alpha-defensins block papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B; Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lubkowski, Jacek; Lu, Wuyuan; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2006-01-31

    Sexually transmitted human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the primary cause of cervical cancer. Recent advances in techniques for production of papillomaviral vectors [known as pseudoviruses (PsVs)] have made it possible to perform high-throughput screens for compounds that might block the initial stages of papillomavirus infection. We have used PsVs to screen a variety of compounds that might function as inhibitors of HPV infection, with emphasis on human peptides previously implicated in innate antimicrobial immunity. Little is known about the possible activity of these peptides against nonenveloped viruses, such as HPVs. Our screen revealed that human alpha-defensins 1-3 [known as human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) 1-3] and human alpha-defensin 5 (HD-5) are potent antagonists of infection by both cutaneous and mucosal papillomavirus types. In contrast, human beta-defensins 1 and 2 displayed little or no anti-HPV activity. HD-5 was particularly active against sexually transmitted HPV types, with 50% inhibitory doses in the high ng/ml range. Microscopic studies of PsV inhibition by the alpha-defensins revealed that they block virion escape from endocytic vesicles but not virion binding or internalization. Consistent with this finding, PsVs remained susceptible to inhibition by alpha-defensins for many hours after initial binding to cells. HNPs 1-3 and HD-5 have been reported to be present in the female genital tract at levels that overlap those that inhibit HPVs in vitro, suggesting that they could present a natural barrier to the sexual transmission of HPV and could serve as the basis of a broad-spectrum topical microbicide.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) in human skin : A comparison of different antibodies for immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, N; de Leij, LFMH; Buurman, W; Timens, W; ten Duis, HJ

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding the localization and presence of TNF alpha in normal human skin, To study TNF alpha expression, we tested a panel of antibodies directed against human TNF alpha, First, antibodies were tested for immunoreactivity on cytospots of isolated

  8. Fetal Globin Gene Inducers: Novel Agents & New Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Susan P.; Castaneda, Serguei A.; Chui, David H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Berenson, Ronald J.; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2013-01-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (γ-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces β-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced γ-globin expression in beta thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as 7 years. However, prior generations were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of 3 major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used world-wide. PMID:20712788

  9. Fetal globin gene inducers: novel agents and new potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Susan P; Castaneda, Serguei A; Chui, David H K; Faller, Douglas V; Berenson, Ronald J; Siritanaratku, Noppadol; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2010-08-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (gamma-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces beta-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced gamma-globin expression in beta-thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as seven years. However, prior generation inducers were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic, sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate, is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of three major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used worldwide.

  10. Efficient Generation of β-Globin-Expressing Erythroid Cells Using Stromal Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naoya; Haro-Mora, Juan J; Fujita, Atsushi; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Winkler, Thomas; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F

    2017-03-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent an ideal source for in vitro modeling of erythropoiesis and a potential alternative source for red blood cell transfusions. However, iPS cell-derived erythroid cells predominantly produce ε- and γ-globin without β-globin production. We recently demonstrated that ES cell-derived sacs (ES sacs), known to express hemangioblast markers, allow for efficient erythroid cell generation with β-globin production. In this study, we generated several iPS cell lines derived from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and peripheral blood erythroid progenitors (EPs) from sickle cell disease patients, and evaluated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) generation after iPS sac induction as well as subsequent erythroid differentiation. MSC-derived iPS sacs yielded greater amounts of immature hematopoietic progenitors (VEGFR2 + GPA-), definitive HSPCs (CD34 + CD45+), and megakaryoerythroid progenitors (GPA + CD41a+), as compared to EP-derived iPS sacs. Erythroid differentiation from MSC-derived iPS sacs resulted in greater amounts of erythroid cells (GPA+) and higher β-globin (and βS-globin) expression, comparable to ES sac-derived cells. These data demonstrate that human MSC-derived iPS sacs allow for more efficient erythroid cell generation with higher β-globin production, likely due to heightened emergence of immature progenitors. Our findings should be important for iPS cell-derived erythroid cell generation. Stem Cells 2017;35:586-596. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Human hemoglobin genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  12. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  13. Sequence Determinants for Amyloid Fibrillogenesis of Human alpha-Synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaee, Shahin; Jakes, Ross; Fraser, Graham; Serpell, Louise C; Crowther, R Anthony; Goedert, Michel

    2007-11-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterized by the presence of filamentous inclusions in nerve cells. These filaments are amyloid fibrils that are made of the protein alpha-synuclein, which is genetically linked to rare cases of PD and DLB. beta-Synuclein, which shares 60% identity with alpha-synuclein, is not found in the inclusions. Furthermore, while recombinant alpha-synuclein readily assembles into amyloid fibrils, beta-synuclein fails to do so. It has been suggested that this may be due to the lack in beta-synuclein of a hydrophobic region that spans residues 73-83 of alpha-synuclein. Here, fibril assembly of recombinant human alpha-synuclein, alpha-synuclein deletion mutants, beta-synuclein and beta/alpha-synuclein chimeras was assayed quantitatively by thioflavin T fluorescence and semi-quantitatively by transmission electron microscopy. Deletion of residues 73-83 from alpha-synuclein did not abolish filament formation. Furthermore, a chimera of beta-synuclein with alpha-synuclein(73-83) inserted was significantly less fibrillogenic than wild-type alpha-synuclein. These findings, together with results obtained using a number of recombinant synucleins, showed a correlation between fibrillogenesis and mean beta-strand propensity, hydrophilicity and charge of the amino acid sequences. The combination of these simple physicochemical properties with a previously described calculation of beta-strand contiguity allowed us to design mutations that changed the fibrillogenic propensity of alpha-synuclein in predictable ways.

  14. The human beta-globin locus control region confers an early embryonic erythroid-specific expression pattern to a basic promoter driving the bacterial lacZ gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tewari (Rita); N. Gillemans (Nynke); A. Harper; M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); G. Zafarana (Gaetano); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is contained on a 20 kb DNA fragment and is characterized by the presence of five DNaseI hypersensitive sites in erythroid cells, termed 5'HS1-5. A fully active 6.5 kb version of the LCR, called the muLCR, has been

  15. The human β-globin locus control region confers an early embryonic erythroid-specific expression pattern to a basic promoter driving the bacterial β-galactosidase gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tewari (Rita); N. Gillemans (Nynke); A. Harper; M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); G. Zafarana (Gaetano); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is contained on a 20 kb DNA fragment and is characterized by the presence of five DNaseI hypersensitive sites in erythroid cells, termed 5'HS1-5. A fully active 6.5 kb version of the LCR, called the muLCR, has been described. Expression of the

  16. Overview Of Suborbital Human Transportation Concept Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirim, H.; Pilz, N.; Marini, M.; Hendrick, P.; Schmid, M.; Behr, R.; Barth, T.; Tarfeld, F.; Wiegand, A.; Charbonnier, D.; Haya Ramos, R.; Steeland, J.; Mack, A.

    2011-05-01

    Within the EC co-funded project FAST20XX (Future high-Altitude high-Speed Transport 20XX), the European suborbital passenger transportation system concept ALPHA (Airplane Launched PHoenix Aircraft), which shall be based to a maximum extent on existing technologies and capabilities, is currently being investigated as collaborative project by a European consortium under coordination of ESA. The ALPHA concept incorporates an air-launch from a carrier aircraft, which shall be used as first stage. The ALPHA vehicle shall be capable of transporting up to four passengers plus one pilot to an altitude of at least 100 km. The ALPHA vehicle is a down-scaled version of the suborbital space transportation concept Hopper, which was already deeply investigated within the European FESTIP System Study and the German ASTRA program including the successfully flown experimental landing demonstrator Phoenix. This approach has allowed the use of existing aerodynamic vehicle data and has led to the adaptation of the external Hopper/Phoenix configuration for ALPHA. In FESTIP and ASTRA, the Hopper configuration showed sufficient stability margins. Due to the geometric similarity of the ALPHA and Hopper vehicles, a trimable and flyable configuration could be derived by means of ALPHA flight trajectory calculations. In its current configuration, the ALPHA vehicle has a length of ca. 9 m and a gross take-off mass of ca. 3.5 Mg. The launch, staging and separation of ALPHA shall be performed either as internal air-launch from the cargo bay of the carrier aircraft, as under-wing air-launch or as towed air-launch. After separation from the carrier aircraft, the ALPHA vehicle ignites its onboard rocket propulsion system. Since conventional liquid and solid propulsion did not seem suitable for ALPHA due to Their high cost, limited safety and toxicity, a low-cost, “green” and non-hazardous hybrid propulsion system based on liquid nitrous oxide in combination with a solid polymer fuel was

  17. The structure and expression of globin genes in rabbit and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flavell, R.A.; Bernards, R.A.; Grosveld, G.C.; Hoeijmakers-van Dommelen, H.A.M.; Kooter, J.M.; Boer, E. de; Little, P.F.R.

    1979-01-01

    The rabbit and human β-related globin genes have been analysed using genomic 'Southern blotting' and molecular cloning. The rabbit β-globin gene structure has been worked out in detail and its transcripts have been characterized by S₁ nuclease transcription mapping. The arrangement of

  18. Entrainment of Human Alpha Oscillations Selectively Enhances Visual Conjunction Search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Notger G Müller

    Full Text Available The functional role of the alpha-rhythm which dominates the human electroencephalogram (EEG is unclear. It has been related to visual processing, attentional selection and object coherence, respectively. Here we tested the interaction of alpha oscillations of the human brain with visual search tasks that differed in their attentional demands (pre-attentive vs. attentive and also in the necessity to establish object coherence (conjunction vs. single feature. Between pre- and post-assessment elderly subjects received 20 min/d of repetitive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS over the occipital cortex adjusted to their individual alpha frequency over five consecutive days. Compared to sham the entrained alpha oscillations led to a selective, set size independent improvement in the conjunction search task performance but not in the easy or in the hard feature search task. These findings suggest that cortical alpha oscillations play a specific role in establishing object coherence through suppression of distracting objects.

  19. Identification of a major continuous epitope of human alpha crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Human lens proteins were digested with trypsin or V8 protease, and the resulting peptides resolved on a C18 reverse phase column. Fractions from this column were probed with polyclonal antiserum made against the whole alpha crystallin molecule. Peptides in the seropositive fraction were purified to homogeneity, then characterized by mass spectral analysis and partial Edman degradation. The tryptic and V8 digests contained only one seropositive peptide that was derived from the C-terminal region of the alpha-A molecule. To determine the exact boundaries of the epitope, various size analogues of this region were synthesized and probed with anti-alpha serum. Together, these studies demonstrate that the major continuous epitope of the alpha-A chain includes the sequence KPTSAPS, corresponding to residues 166-172 of the human alpha-A crystallin chain.

  20. Vomeronasal epithelial cells of human fetuses contain immunoreactivity for G proteins, Go(alpha) and Gi(alpha 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, S; Yukimatsu, M; Matsumura, G; Nishiyama, F

    2001-06-01

    Two G protein subfamilies, Go(alpha) and Gi(alpha 2), were identified and localized immunohistochemically in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) of 5-month-old human fetuses. Immunoreactivity for Go(alpha) and Gi(alpha 2) was present in a subset of vomeronasal epithelial cells. Prominent immunoreactivity was observed in apical processes and their apical terminals facing onto the vomeronasal lumen. Nerve fibers associated with the VNO exhibited intense immunoreactivity for Go(alpha) and weak immunoreactivity for Gi(alpha 2). Since Go(alpha) and Gi(alpha 2) are characteristically expressed and coupled with putative pheromone receptors in rodent vomeronasal receptor neurons, the present results suggest the possibility that vomeronasal epithelial cells containing Go(alpha) and Gi(alpha 2) in human fetuses are chemosensory neurons.

  1. Beta Globin Frameworks in Thalassemia Major Patients from North Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Banihashemi, Ali; Azizi, Mandana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Four combinations of five neutral sequence changes at rs713040, rs10768683, rs7480526, rs7946748, and rs1609812 occurring in the human beta globin gene defined as frameworks have been reported in beta globin gene. Here we report for the frequency of these frameworks in thalassemia major patients of North Iran. Methods Beta globin gene frameworks of 46 thalassemia major patients of North Iran were determined using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. Findings All these frameworks called framework 1, 2, 3, 3a were present at the frequency of 23.9%, 45.7%, 6.5% and 23.9% respectively. Conclusion These frameworks may be used for tracking mutant alleles in prenatal diagnosis programs. PMID:23399541

  2. Interaction of alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 integrins with human parechovirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitsonen, Jani; Susi, Petri; Heikkilä, Outi; Sinkovits, Robert S; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Hyypiä, Timo; Butcher, Sarah J

    2010-09-01

    Human parechovirus (HPEV) infections are very common in early childhood and can be severe in neonates. It has been shown that integrins are important for cellular infectivity of HPEV1 through experiments using peptide blocking assays and function-blocking antibodies to alpha(V) integrins. The interaction of HPEV1 with alpha(V) integrins is presumably mediated by a C-terminal RGD motif in the capsid protein VP1. We characterized the binding of integrins alpha(V)beta(3) and alpha(V)beta(6) to HPEV1 by biochemical and structural studies. We showed that although HPEV1 bound efficiently to immobilized integrins, alpha(V)beta(6) bound more efficiently than alpha(V)beta(3) to immobilized HPEV1. Moreover, soluble alpha(V)beta(6), but not alpha(V)beta(3), blocked HPEV1 cellular infectivity, indicating that it is a high-affinity receptor for HPEV1. We also showed that HPEV1 binding to integrins in vitro could be partially blocked by RGD peptides. Using electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction, we showed that HPEV1 has the typical T=1 (pseudo T=3) organization of a picornavirus. Complexes of HPEV1 and integrins indicated that both integrin footprints reside between the 5-fold and 3-fold symmetry axes. This result does not match the RGD position predicted from the coxsackievirus A9 X-ray structure but is consistent with the predicted location of this motif in the shorter C terminus found in HPEV1. This first structural characterization of a parechovirus indicates that the differences in receptor binding are due to the amino acid differences in the integrins rather than to significantly different viral footprints.

  3. Human alpha-defensins inhibit Clostridium difficile toxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesemann, Torsten; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A and B are major virulence factors implicated in pseudomembranous colitis and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The toxins are glucosyltransferases, which inactivate Rho proteins involved in cellular signaling. Human alpha-defensins as part of the innate immune system inactivate various microbial pathogens as well as specific bacterial exotoxins. Here, we studied the effects of alpha-defensins human neutrophil protein (HNP)-1, HNP-3, and enteric human defensin (HD)-5 on the activity of C difficile toxins A and B. Inactivation of C difficile toxins by alpha-defensins in vivo was monitored by microscopy, determination of the transepithelial resistance of CaCo-2 cell monolayers, and analysis of the glucosylation of Rac1 in toxin-treated cells. In vitro glucosylation was used to determine K(m) and median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values. Formation of defensin-toxin complexes was analyzed by precipitation and turbidity studies. Treatment of cells with human alpha-defensins caused loss of cytotoxicity of toxin B, but not of toxin A. Only alpha-defensins, but not beta-defensin-1 or cathelicidin LL-37, inhibited toxin B-catalyzed in vitro glucosylation of Rho guanosine triphosphatases in a competitive manner, increasing K(m) values for uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose up to 10-fold. The IC(50) values for inhibition of toxin B-catalyzed glucosylation by the alpha-defensins were 0.6-1.5 micromol/L. At high concentrations, defensins (HNP-1 > or = 2 micromol/L) caused high-molecular-mass aggregates, comparable to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor. Our data indicate that toxin B interacts with high affinity with alpha-defensins and suggest that defensins may provide a defense mechanism against some types of clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins.

  4. The alpha 1-alpha 6 subunits of integrins are characteristically expressed in distinct segments of developing and adult human nephron

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the alpha 1-alpha 6 subunits of beta 1 integrins in developing and adult human kidney using a panel of mAbs in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Uninduced mesenchyme displayed a diffuse immunoreactivity for only the alpha 1 integrin subunit. At the S-shaped body stage of nephron development, several of the alpha subunits were characteristically expressed in distinct fetal nephron segments, and the pattern was retained also in the adult nephron. Thus, the a...

  5. TNF-alpha, leptin, and lymphocyte function in human aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.

    2000-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased inflammatory activity and concomitant decreased T cell mediated immune responses. Leptin may provide a link between inflammation and T cell function in aging. The aim of the study was to investigate if plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were...... associated with leptin, circulating interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R), and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) induced IL-2 production in whole blood in elderly humans. Circulating levels of TNF-alpha and sIL-2R were higher in elderly humans (N=42) compared to a young control group (N=37) whereas...... there was no difference with regard to IL-2 production. Furthermore, there were no age-related differences in serum levels of leptin, However, women had higher levels than men. In the elderly people, serum levels of leptin were correlated with TNF-alpha in univariate regression analysis and in a multiple linear...

  6. The alpha 1-alpha 6 subunits of integrins are characteristically expressed in distinct segments of developing and adult human nephron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, M; Ylänne, J; Laitinen, L; Virtanen, I

    1990-09-01

    We studied the distribution of the alpha 1-alpha 6 subunits of beta 1 integrins in developing and adult human kidney using a panel of mAbs in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Uninduced mesenchyme displayed a diffuse immunoreactivity for only the alpha 1 integrin subunit. At the S-shaped body stage of nephron development, several of the alpha subunits were characteristically expressed in distinct fetal nephron segments, and the pattern was retained also in the adult nephron. Thus, the alpha 1 subunit was characteristically expressed in mesangial and endothelial cells, the alpha 2 in glomerular endothelium and distal tubules, the alpha 3 in podocytes, Bowman's capsule, and distal tubules, and the alpha 6 subunit basally in all tubules, and only transiently in podocytes during development. Unlike the alpha 3 and alpha 6 subunits, the alpha 2 subunit displayed an overall cell surface distribution in distal tubules. It was also distinctly expressed in glomerular endothelia during glomerulogenesis. The beta 4 subunit was expressed only in fetal collecting ducts, and hence the alpha 6 subunit seems to be complexed with the beta 1 rather than beta 4 subunit in human kidney. Of the two fibronectin receptor alpha subunits, alpha 4 and alpha 5, only the latter was expressed, confined to endothelia of developing and adult blood vessels, suggesting that these receptor complexes play a minor role during nephrogenesis. The present results suggest that distinct integrins play a role during differentiation of specific nephron segments. They also indicate that alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 integrin complexes may function as basement membrane receptors in podocytes and tubular epithelial cells.

  7. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins......-mediated endocytosis. In this regard our studies indicate a bait region in PZP significantly different from that present in alpha 2M. PZP could be the human equivalent of the acute-phase alpha-macroglobulins (e.g., rat alpha 2M and rabbit alpha 1M) described earlier...

  8. Autonomous Silencing as Well as Competition Controls γ-Globin Gene Expression during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Man; Han, Hemei; Xiang, Ping; Li, Qiliang; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the control of the γ-globin gene during development, we produced transgenic mice in which sequences of the β-gene promoter were replaced by equivalent sequences of the γ-gene promoter in the context of a human β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (βYAC) and analyzed the effects on globin gene expression during development. Replacement of 1,077 nucleotides (nt) of the β-gene promoter by 1,359 nt of the γ promoter resulted in striking inhibition of the γ-promoter/β-gene exp...

  9. A membrane-bound vertebrate globin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Blank

    Full Text Available The family of vertebrate globins includes hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other O(2-binding proteins of yet unclear functions. Among these, globin X is restricted to fish and amphibians. Zebrafish (Danio rerio globin X is expressed at low levels in neurons of the central nervous system and appears to be associated with the sensory system. The protein harbors a unique N-terminal extension with putative N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation sites, suggesting membrane-association. Intracellular localization and transport of globin X was studied in 3T3 cells employing green fluorescence protein fusion constructs. Both myristoylation and palmitoylation sites are required for correct targeting and membrane localization of globin X. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a vertebrate globin has been identified as component of the cell membrane. Globin X has a hexacoordinate binding scheme and displays cooperative O(2 binding with a variable affinity (P(50∼1.3-12.5 torr, depending on buffer conditions. A respiratory function of globin X is unlikely, but analogous to some prokaryotic membrane-globins it may either protect the lipids in cell membrane from oxidation or may act as a redox-sensing or signaling protein.

  10. Search for antisense copies of beta-globin mRNA in anemic mouse spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor John M

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies by Volloch and coworkers have reported that during the expression of high levels of β-globin mRNA in the spleen of anemic mice, they could also detect small but significant levels of an antisense (AS globin RNA species, which they postulated might have somehow arisen by RNA-directed RNA synthesis. For two reasons we undertook to confirm and possibly extend these studies. First, previous studies in our lab have focussed on what is an unequivocal example of host RNA-directed RNA polymerase activity on the RNA genome of human hepatitis delta virus. Second, if AS globin species do exist they could in turn form double-stranded RNA species which might induce post-transcriptional gene silencing, a phenomenon somehow provoked in eukaryotic cells by AS RNA sequences. Results We reexamined critical aspects of the previous globin studies. We used intraperitoneal injections of phenylhydrazine to induce anemia in mice, as demonstrated by the appearance and ultimate disappearance of splenomegaly. While a 30-fold increase in globin mRNA was detected in the spleen, the relative amount of putative AS RNA could be no more than 0.004%. Conclusions Contrary to earlier reports, induction of a major increase in globin transcripts in the mouse spleen was not associated with a detectable level of antisense RNA to globin mRNA.

  11. Assignment of casein kinase 2 alpha sequences to two different human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Klett, C; Göttert, E

    1992-01-01

    Human casein kinase 2 alpha gene (CK-2-alpha) sequences have been localized within the human genome by in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis using a CK-2 alpha cDNA as a probe. By in situ hybridization, the CK-2 alpha cDNA could be assigned to two different loci, one on 11p15.1-ter...

  12. Fetal globin induction--can it cure beta thalassemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    The beta thalassemias are one of a few medical conditions in which reactivation of a gene product that is expressed during fetal life can functionally replace a deficiency of essential proteins expressed at a later developmental stage. The fetal globin genes are present and normally integrated in hematopoietic stem cells, and at least one fetal gene appears accessible for reactivation, particularly in beta degrees thalassemia. However, rapid cellular apoptosis from alpha globin chain precipitation, and relatively low levels of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) in some beta(+) thalassemia patients contribute to the anemia in beta thalassemia syndromes. In clinical trials, three classes of therapeutics have demonstrated proof-of-principle of this approach by raising total hemoglobin levels by 1-4 g/dL above baseline in thalassemia patients: EPO preparations, short chain fatty acid derivatives (SCFADs), and chemotherapeutic agents. Although thalassemic erythrocytes survive only for a few days, the magnitude of these responses is similar to those induced by rhu-EPO in anemic conditions of normal erythrocyte survival. New oral therapeutic candidates, which stimulate both fetal globin gene expression and erythropoiesis, and combinations of therapeutics with complementary molecular actions now make this gene-reactivation approach feasible to produce transfusion independence in many patients. Development of the candidate therapeutics is hindered largely by costs of drug development for an orphan patient population.

  13. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  14. Enhancement of β-Globin Gene Expression in Thalassemic IVS2-654 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Erythroid Cells by Modified U7 snRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanthong, Phetcharat; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Jearawiriyapaisarn, Natee; Nuntakarn, Lalana; Saetan, Jirawat; Nualkaew, Tiwaporn; Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Khanit; Anurathapan, Usanarat; Dinnyes, Andras; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Hongeng, Suradej

    2017-04-01

    The therapeutic use of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is emerging as a potential treatment of β-thalassemia. Ideally, patient-specific iPSCs would be genetically corrected by various approaches to treat β-thalassemia including lentiviral gene transfer, lentivirus-delivered shRNA, and gene editing. These corrected iPSCs would be subsequently differentiated into hematopoietic stem cells and transplanted back into the same patient. In this article, we present a proof of principle study for disease modeling and screening using iPSCs to test the potential use of the modified U7 small nuclear (sn) RNA to correct a splice defect in IVS2-654 β-thalassemia. In this case, the aberration results from a mutation in the human β-globin intron 2 causing an aberrant splicing of β-globin pre-mRNA and preventing synthesis of functional β-globin protein. The iPSCs (derived from mesenchymal stromal cells from a patient with IVS2-654 β-thalassemia/hemoglobin (Hb) E) were transduced with a lentivirus carrying a modified U7 snRNA targeting an IVS2-654 β-globin pre-mRNA in order to restore the correct splicing. Erythroblasts differentiated from the transduced iPSCs expressed high level of correctly spliced β-globin mRNA suggesting that the modified U7 snRNA was expressed and mediated splicing correction of IVS2-654 β-globin pre-mRNA in these cells. Moreover, a less active apoptosis cascade process was observed in the corrected cells at transcription level. This study demonstrated the potential use of a genetically modified U7 snRNA with patient-specific iPSCs for the partial restoration of the aberrant splicing process of β-thalassemia. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1059-1069. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Immunostimulatory effects of natural human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) on carps Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Hironobu; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Korenaga, Hiroki; Kono, Tomoya; Shivappa, R B; Sakai, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    Human interferon-alpha (huIFN-alpha) is an important immunomodulatory substance used in the treatment and prevention of numerous infectious and immune-related diseases in animals. However, the immunostimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha in fish remain to be investigated. In the current study, the immune responses of the carp species Cyprinus carpio L. to treatment with huIFN-alpha were analyzed via measurement of superoxide anion production, phagocytic activity and the expression of cytokine genes including interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 10. Low doses of huIFN-alpha were administered orally once a day for 3 days, and sampling was carried out at 1, 3 and 5 days post-treatment. Our results indicate that a low dose of huIFN-alpha significantly increased phagocytic activity and superoxide anion production in the carp kidney. The huIFN-alpha-treated fish also displayed a significant upregulation in cytokine gene expression. The current study demonstrates the stimulatory effects of huIFN-alpha on the carp immune system and highlights the immunomodulatory role of huIFN-alpha in fish.

  16. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  17. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yea Woon [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, AeRi, E-mail: kimaeri@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  18. Evolutionary Constraints in the β-Globin Cluster: The Signature of Purifying Selection at the δ-Globin (HBD) Locus and Its Role in Developmental Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleirinho, Ana; Seixas, Susana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Bento, Celeste; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2013-01-01

    Human hemoglobins, the oxygen carriers in the blood, are composed by two α-like and two β-like globin monomers. The β-globin gene cluster located at 11p15.5 comprises one pseudogene and five genes whose expression undergoes two critical switches: the embryonic-to-fetal and fetal-to-adult transition. HBD encodes the δ-globin chain of the minor adult hemoglobin (HbA2), which is assumed to be physiologically irrelevant. Paradoxically, reduced diversity levels have been reported for this gene. In this study, we sought a detailed portrait of the genetic variation within the β-globin cluster in a large human population panel from different geographic backgrounds. We resequenced the coding and noncoding regions of the two adult β-globin genes (HBD and HBB) in European and African populations, and analyzed the data from the β-globin cluster (HBE, HBG2, HBG1, HBBP1, HBD, and HBB) in 1,092 individuals representing 14 populations sequenced as part of the 1000 Genomes Project. Additionally, we assessed the diversity levels in nonhuman primates using chimpanzee sequence data provided by the PanMap Project. Comprehensive analyses, based on classic neutrality tests, empirical and haplotype-based studies, revealed that HBD and its neighbor pseudogene HBBP1 have mainly evolved under purifying selection, suggesting that their roles are essential and nonredundant. Moreover, in the light of recent studies on the chromatin conformation of the β-globin cluster, we present evidence sustaining that the strong functional constraints underlying the decreased contemporary diversity at these two regions were not driven by protein function but instead are likely due to a regulatory role in ontogenic switches of gene expression. PMID:23431002

  19. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    anchorage-independent growth of normal cells and was, therefore, considered as an "oncogenic" growth factor. Later, its immunohistochemical presence in normal human cells as well as its biological effects in normal human tissues have been demonstrated. The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate...... the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical immunoreactivity. TGF......-alpha was found to be widely distributed in cells of normal human tissues derived from all three germ layers, most often in differentiated cells. In epithelial cells, three different kinds of staining patterns were observed, either diffuse cytoplasmic, cytoplasmic in the basal parts of the cells, or distinctly...

  20. The globin gene family of the cephalochordate amphioxus: implications for chordate globin evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marden Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lancelet amphioxus (Cephalochordata is a close relative of vertebrates and thus may enhance our understanding of vertebrate gene and genome evolution. In this context, the globins are one of the best studied models for gene family evolution. Previous biochemical studies have demonstrated the presence of an intracellular globin in notochord tissue and myotome of amphioxus, but the corresponding gene has not yet been identified. Genomic resources of Branchiostoma floridae now facilitate the identification, experimental confirmation and molecular evolutionary analysis of its globin gene repertoire. Results We show that B. floridae harbors at least fifteen paralogous globin genes, all of which reveal evidence of gene expression. The protein sequences of twelve globins display the conserved characteristics of a functional globin fold. In phylogenetic analyses, the amphioxus globin BflGb4 forms a common clade with vertebrate neuroglobins, indicating the presence of this nerve globin in cephalochordates. Orthology is corroborated by conserved syntenic linkage of BflGb4 and flanking genes. The kinetics of ligand binding of recombinantly expressed BflGb4 reveals that this globin is hexacoordinated with a high oxygen association rate, thus strongly resembling vertebrate neuroglobin. In addition, possible amphioxus orthologs of the vertebrate globin X lineage and of the myoglobin/cytoglobin/hemoglobin lineage can be identified, including one gene as a candidate for being expressed in notochord tissue. Genomic analyses identify conserved synteny between amphioxus globin-containing regions and the vertebrate β-globin locus, possibly arguing against a late transpositional origin of the β-globin cluster in vertebrates. Some amphioxus globin gene structures exhibit minisatellite-like tandem duplications of intron-exon boundaries ("mirages", which may serve to explain the creation of novel intron positions within the globin genes

  1. An extract from the bark of Aspidosperma quebracho blanco binds to human penile alpha-adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperling, Herbert; Lorenz, Annette; Krege, Susanne; Arndt, Rainer; Michel, Martin C.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We determined whether an extract from the bark of the tree Aspidosperma quebracho blanco, which is used as a prescription drug to treat erectile dysfunction in some countries, can bind to human penile alpha1 and alpha2-adrenoceptors, and cloned human alpha-adrenoceptor subtypes. MATERIALS

  2. Platelet alpha 2 adrenoceptors in human and canine narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtier, D; Nishino, S; Guilleminault, C; Dement, W C; Mignot, E

    1991-02-15

    We have recently established that canine narcolepsy (an autosomal recessive genetic model of the human disorder) is dramatically improved by treatment with alpha 2 antagonists such as yohimbine (Nishino et al: J Pharmacol Exp Ther 253:1145-1152, 1990). To further investigate the role of alpha 2 adrenoceptors in narcolepsy, receptors labeled with [3H] yohimbine were examined on platelets from human and canine narcoleptic subjects. Twenty-eight Doberman pinschers were studied, 7 controls (C), 7 heterozygous (Hz), and 14 narcoleptics (N) (age and sex matched), including eight animals born in a backcross setting (narcoleptic x heterozygous; 5 narcoleptics and 3 heterozygous). The Kd and Bmax of each group respectively, were as follows: C, Kd = 2.86 +/- 0.76 nmol/L, Bmax = 295.78 +/- 31.89 fmol/mg protein; Hz, Kd = 2.06 +/- 0.23 nmol/L, Bmax = 307.02 +/- 22.21 fmol/mg protein; and N, Kd = 2.72 +/- 0.45 nmol/L, Bmax = 267.52 +/- 19.47 fmol/mg protein. No statistical differences were found between groups using nonparametric (Kruskall-Wallis) statistical procedures, and there were no correlations between any binding parameter and symptom severity within the narcoleptic group. Platelet alpha 2 receptor affinity and density also did not differ between narcoleptic and heterozygous dogs in the backcross litter (N [n = 5], Kd = 1.94 +/- 0.59 nmol/L, Bmax = 290.6 +/- 64.7 fmol/mg protein; Hz [n = 3], Kd = 2.83 +/- 0.47 nmol/L, Bmax = 294.2 +/- 42.9 fmol/mg protein). Fourteen human subjects, seven control and seven narcoleptic patients (age and sex matched), were included in the study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Preclinical transfusion-dependent humanized mouse model of beta thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yongliang; McConnell, Sean C; Ryan, Thomas M

    2009-05-07

    A preclinical humanized mouse model of beta thalassemia major or Cooley anemia (CA) was generated by targeted gene replacement of the mouse adult globin genes in embryonic stem cells. The mouse adult alpha and beta globin genes were replaced with adult human alpha globin genes (alpha2alpha1) and a human fetal to adult hemoglobin (Hb)-switching cassette (gamma(HPFH)deltabeta(0)), respectively. Similar to human infants with CA, fully humanized mice survived postnatally by synthesizing predominantly human fetal Hb, HbF (alpha(2)gamma(2)), with a small amount of human minor adult Hb, HbA2 (alpha(2)delta(2)). Completion of the human fetal to adult Hb switch after birth resulted in severe anemia marked by erythroid hyperplasia, ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, and death. Similar to human patients, CA mice were rescued from lethal anemia by regular blood transfusion. Transfusion corrected the anemia and effectively suppressed the ineffective erythropoiesis, but led to iron overload. This preclinical humanized animal model of CA will be useful for the development of new transfusion and iron chelation regimens, the study of iron homeostasis in disease, and testing of cellular and genetic therapies for the correction of thalassemia.

  4. Induction of alpha interferon by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in human monocyte-macrophage cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Szebeni, J; Dieffenbach, C; Wahl, S M; Venkateshan, C N; Yeh, A; Popovic, M.; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Peterfy, M; Friedman, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The induction of interferon (IFN) by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary, nonstimulated monocyte-macrophage cultures was studied. HIV-1 infection, as confirmed by p24 antigen levels in the cell supernatant, led to the production of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) over 7 to 21 days following infection. In two of seven experiments, the IFN detected was acid labile. Coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the induction of IFN-alpha mRNA in cells...

  5. Phylogenetic analysis reveals wide distribution of globin X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makałowski Wojciech

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vertebrate globin gene repertoire consists of seven members that differ in terms of structure, function and phyletic distribution. While hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytoglobin, and neuroglobin are present in almost all gnathostomes examined so far, other globin genes, like globin X, are much more restricted in their phyletic distribution. Till today, globin X has only been found in teleost fish and Xenopus. Here, we report that globin X is also present in the genomes of the sea lamprey, ghost shark and reptiles. Moreover, the identification of orthologs of globin X in crustacean, insects, platyhelminthes, and hemichordates confirms its ancient origin.

  6. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in normal human pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Normal human pituitaries were extracted in boiling water and acetic acid, and the alpha-amidated peptide products of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha MSH), gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 1MSH), and amidated hinge peptide (HP-N), as well...

  7. DNA topoisomerase II alpha and -beta expression in human ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; van der Zee, AGJ; de Jong, S; Hollema, H; Smit, EF; Mulder, NH; de Vries, EGE

    To study DNA topoisomerase II alpha (Topo-II alpha) and -beta expression and regulation in human ovarian cancer, 15 ovarian tumour samples were investigated. To compare different levels of expression, the samples were screened for topo II alpha and -beta mRNA with Northern blotting and a

  8. Isolation and characterization of a precursor form of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase from human urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, R. P.; Brouwer-Kelder, E. M.; Surya, I.; Strijland, A.; Kroos, M.; Reuser, A. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A two-step procedure is described for the isolation of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase from human urine. In the second step, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-100, two fractions with acid alpha-glucosidase activity were obtained. Fraction I contained alpha-glucosidase of Mr 109000, whereas fraction

  9. A Novel Mutation in the Promoter Region of the β-Globin Gene: HBB: c.-127G > C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgen, Turker; Canatan, Duran; Delibas, Serpil; Keser, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Novel β-globin gene mutations are still occasionally being reported, especially when evaluating milder phenotypes. We report here a novel putative mutation in the promoter region of the β-globin gene and assess its clinical implications. A family, parents and four siblings, with hematological and clinical features suspected of being β-globin gene mutation(s), were involved in this study. In addition to hematological and clinical evaluations of the whole family, molecular analyses of the β-globin gene were performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing of the β-globin gene revealed a novel genomic alteration in the regulatory region of the gene. This novel genomic alteration was defined as HBB: c.-127G > C according to the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature. Two siblings were found to be carriers of the HBB: c.-127G > C mutation, while the other two siblings were carriers of the codon 8 (-AA) (HBB: c.25_26delAA) deletion of the β-globin gene. The mother was a compound heterozygote for the codon 8 and HBB: c.-127G > C mutations. Based on hematological and clinical evaluations, we conclude that this novel β-globin gene promoter region change would be associated with a mild phenotype of β-thalassemia (β-thal).

  10. Genetics Home Reference: methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... globin type is caused by mutations in the HBB gene. This gene provides instructions for making a ... that contains ferric iron is known as methemoglobin. HBB gene mutations that cause methemoglobinemia, beta-globin type ...

  11. Production of transgenic mice and rabbits that carry and express the human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA under the control of a bovine alpha S1 casein promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riego, E; Limonta, J; Aguilar, A; Pérez, A; de Armas, R; Solano, R; Ramos, B; Castro, F O; de la Fuente, J

    1993-05-01

    One-cell embryos from mice and rabbits were microinjected with a hybrid gene composed of 1.6 kilobases (kb) promoter/regulatory sequences of the bovine alphaS1 casein gene fused to the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding for the human tissue plasminogen activator (htPA) and 3'untranslated sequences from rabbit beta-globin and SV 40 genes. Transgenic mice and rabbits that carry the htPA gene were obtained. In mice, 11 founder females were generated, and 6 of them expressed low levels (about 50 mug/ml) of htPA in their milk. Some of the transgenic mice showed rearrangements of the microinjected DNA sequences as judged by Southern blot analysis. A position-dependent expression of the transgene is suspected to occur. The only live-born founder transgenic rabbit obtained was a male, and it transmitted the transgene in a Mendelian fashion to F1 females, which expressed htPA at very low levels (8 to 50 ng/ml). Although the 1.6-kb bovine alphaS1 casein promoter that was used directs the synthesis of htPA specifically to the mammary gland, it may not be sufficient for a high level of expression.

  12. Target based drug discovery for beta-globin disorders: Drug target prediction using quantitative modelling with hybrid functional Petri nets

    OpenAIRE

    Mehraei, Mani; Bashirov, Rza; Tüzmen, Şükrü

    2016-01-01

    Recent molecular studies provide important clues into treatment of beta-thalassemia, sickle-cell anaemia and other beta-globin disorders revealing that increased production of fetal hemoglobin, that is normally suppressed in adulthood, can ameliorate the severity of these diseases. In this paper, we present a novel approach for drug target prediction for beta-globin disorders. Our approach is centered upon quantitative modelling of interactions in human fetal-to-adult hemoglobin switch net...

  13. Bradykinin stimulation of nitric oxide production is not sufficient for gamma-globin induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čokić Vladan P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hydroxycarbamide, used in therapy of hemoglobinopathies, enhances nitric oxide (NO production both in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and human bone marrow endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC. Moreover, NO increases γ-globin and fetal hemoglobin levels in human erythroid progenitors. Objective. In order to find out whether simple physiologic stimulation of NO production by components of hematopoietic microenvironment can increase γ-globin gene expression, the effects of NO-inducer bradykinin were examined in endothelial cells. Methods. The study was performed in co-cultures of human erythroid progenitors, TrHBMEC and HUVECs by ozone-based chemiluminescent determination of NO and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results. In accordance with previous reports, the endogenous factor bradykinin increased endothelial cell production of NO in a dose- and time-dependent manner (0.1-0.6 μM up to 30 minutes. This induction of NO in HUVECs and TrHBMEC by bradykinin was blocked by competitive inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS, demonstrating NOS-dependence. It has been shown that bradykinin significantly reduced endothelial NOS (eNOS mRNA level and eNOS/Я-actin ratio in HUVEC (by twofold. In addition, bradykinin failed to increase γ-globin mRNA expression in erythroid progenitors only, as well as in co-culture studies of erythroid progenitors with TrHBMEC and HUVEC after 24 hours of treatment. Furthermore, bradykinin did not induce γ/β globin ratio in erythroid progenitors in co-cultures with HUVEC. Conclusion. Bradykinin mediated eNOS activation leads to short time and low NO production in endothelial cells, insufficient to induce γ-globin gene expression. These results emphasized the significance of elevated and extended NO production in augmentation of γ-globin gene expression. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175053

  14. Alpha interferon inhibits early stages of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Y; Pitha, P M

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) on a single replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the lymphocytic cell line CEM-174, which is highly sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN. Pretreatment of cells with 50 to 500 U of recombinant human IFN-alpha per ml resulted in a marked reduction in viral RNA and protein synthesis. The effect of IFN-alpha was dose dependent and was amplified in multiple infection cycle...

  15. Localization of G protein alpha-subunits in the human fetal adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, L; Chamoux, E; Lehoux, J G; Gallo-Payet, N

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence and localization of the main G protein alpha-subunits in the human fetal adrenal gland during the second trimester of gestation. Immunofluorescence studies conducted on sections from frozen glands obtained immediately after therapeutic abortion indicated that the alpha s subunit of the heterotrimeric Gs protein was detected in all adrenal cell types, except for endothelial cells. The other alpha-subunits had a more specific pattern of distribution. Indeed, the alpha il-2 protein was restricted to the definitive zone, whereas alpha i3 labeling was mainly expressed in the fetal zone. The alpha q protein subunit was localized in vascular endothelial cells at the periphery of the adrenal gland and in fetal cells at the center. Finally, chromaffin cells expressed alpha s, alpha q, and alpha o1, but not alpha o2 nor alpha i. Altogether, these results indicate that the human fetal adrenal gland is not only unique in its particular morphology and expression of steroidogenic enzymes, but also by the differential expression of G protein alpha-subunits. Such cell specific distribution in glands from midgestational fetuses may account for the absence or the different responses to stimuli, when compared with the adult adrenal gland.

  16. Inhibition of human plasma and serum butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) by alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, H N; Ramos, L E; Graham, E M; Sterling, J; Brown, S; Cornell, J A

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine the reversibility of alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine inhibition of human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). For the substrate alpha-naphthylacetate, optimal assay conditions were 0.50 M sodium phosphate buffer and a substrate concentration of 3-5 x 10(-4) M. Dibucaine (1 x 10(-5) M) indicated the usual phenotype for all subjects; alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine at 2.88 x 10(-6) M inhibited BuChE about 70 and 50%, respectively. One- and 24-hr incubations at 1 x 10(-5) M with alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, paraoxon, eserine, and ethanol yielded reversible inhibition with dilution except for paraoxon. Twenty-four-hour dialyses of incubations showed no inhibition except for paraoxon. PAGE enzyme activity gels of 1- and 24-hr incubations also showed no inhibition except for paraoxon. alpha-Chaconine and alpha-solanine are reversible inhibitors of human butyrylcholinesterase. At estimated tissue levels, alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and solanidine inhibited BuChE 10-86%. In assays which combined alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and solanidine, inhibition of BuChE was less than additive. No inhibition of albumin alpha-naphthylacetate esterase (an arylesterase) was noted with any inhibitor. The importance of these data to adverse toxicological effects of potato alkaloids is discussed.

  17. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kawada, Teruo, E-mail: fat@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha modulates human in vivo lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P; Ibfelt, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low-grade systemic inflammation is a feature of most lifestyle-related chronic diseases. Enhanced TNF-alpha concentrations have been implicated in the development of hyperlipidemia. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that an acute elevation of TNF-alpha in plasma would cause an increase in lipol...

  19. Molecular evidence for human alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, M; Umetsu, K; Ohki, T; Nagasawa, T; Suzuki, T; Takeichi, S

    1997-01-01

    Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) is a human plasma glycoprotein that exhibits genetic polymorphism on isoelectric focusing (IEF). To identify the origin of two common alleles, AHSG*1 and *2, we examined nucleotide exchanges in the gene. AHSG cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR from poly(A) RNA of seven liver tissue samples and subcloned into a plasmid vector. After sequencing, we found six single nucleotide differences in comparison with the originally reported sequence. In particular, the nucleotide substitutions of C to T at amino acid position 230 and C to G at position 238 were common among the samples exhibiting phenotype 2-1 or 2. Since these substitutions might give rise to a NlaIII site and a SacI site, respectively, for the potential AHSG*2, we analyzed these substitutions by PCR-RFLP using genomic DNA of 68 individuals. The result was consistent with the IEF analysis of the corresponding serum, indicating that AHSG*1 was characterized by ACG (Thr) at position 230 in exon 6 and ACC (Thr) at position 238 in exon 7, and that AHSG*2 was characterized by ATG (Met) at position 230 and AGC (Ser) at position 238.

  20. The depigmenting effect of alpha-tocopheryl ferulate on human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Y; Chakraborty, A K; Komoto, M; Ohashi, A; Ichihashi, M

    1999-07-01

    Oral vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol, alpha-T) supplementation has been reported to improve facial hyperpigmentation. alpha-Tocopheryl ferulate (alpha-TF) is a compound of alpha-T and ferulic acid connected by an ester bond; ferulic acid is also an antioxidant, and could scavenge free radicals induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus maintain the long-lasting antioxidative effect of alpha-T. Our aim was to see whether alpha-TF might be useful as a whitening agent and an antioxidant to improve and prevent facial hyperpigmentation following UV exposure. In this study, the inhibitory effect of alpha-TF on melanogenesis was examined biochemically using human melanoma cells in culture. The results show that alpha-TF, solubilized in ethanol or in 0.5% lecithin, inhibited melanization significantly, as did alpha-T at a concentration of 100 microg/mL, without inhibiting cell growth. This phenotypic change was associated with inhibition of tyrosinase and 5, 6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid polymerase activities, and the degree of inhibition was dose dependent. No significant effect on DOPAchrome tautomerase activity was observed. alpha-TF did not directly inhibit tyrosinase activity of the large granule fraction extracted from human melanoma cells, and Western blotting revealed that there were no changes in protein content or in molecular size of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-1 or TRP-2. Therefore, the inhibition of tyrosinase activity by alpha-TF might be due to effects at the post-translational level, and possibly by a secondary molecule activated by alpha-TF. These results suggest that alpha-TF is a candidate for an efficient whitening agent which suppresses melanogenesis and inhibits biological reactions induced by reactive oxygen species.

  1. Molecular evolution of globin genes in Gymnotiform electric fishes: relation to hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Losilla, Mauricio; Lu, Ying; Yang, Guang; Zakon, Harold

    2017-02-13

    Nocturnally active gymnotiform weakly electric fish generate electric signals for communication and navigation, which can be energetically taxing. These fish mainly inhabit the Amazon basin, where some species prefer well-oxygenated waters and others live in oxygen-poor, stagnant habitats. The latter species show morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations for hypoxia-tolerance. However, there have been no studies of hypoxia tolerance on the molecular level. Globins are classic respiratory proteins. They function principally in oxygen-binding and -delivery in various tissues and organs. Here, we investigate the molecular evolution of alpha and beta hemoglobins, myoglobin, and neuroglobin in 12 gymnotiforms compared with other teleost fish. The present study identified positively selected sites (PSS) on hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) genes using different maximum likelihood (ML) methods; some PSS fall in structurally important protein regions. This evidence for the positive selection of globin genes suggests that the adaptive evolution of these genes has helped to enhance the capacity for oxygen storage and transport. Interestingly, a substitution of a Cys at a key site in the obligate air-breathing electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) is predicted to enhance oxygen storage of Mb and contribute to NO delivery during hypoxia. A parallel Cys substitution was also noted in an air-breathing African electric fish (Gymnarchus niloticus). Moreover, the expected pattern under normoxic conditions of high expression of myoglobin in heart and neuroglobin in the brain in two hypoxia-tolerant species suggests that the main effect of selection on these globin genes is on their sequence rather than their basal expression patterns. Results indicate a clear signature of positive selection in the globin genes of most hypoxia-tolerant gymnotiform fishes, which are obligate or facultative air breathers. These findings highlight the critical role of globin genes in

  2. Saw palmetto extracts potently and noncompetitively inhibit human alpha1-adrenoceptors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepel, M; Hecker, U; Krege, S; Rübben, H; Michel, M C

    1999-02-15

    We wanted to test whether phytotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms have alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonistic properties in vitro. Preparations of beta-sitosterol and extracts of stinging nettle, medicinal pumpkin, and saw palmetto were obtained from several pharmaceutical companies. They were tested for their ability to inhibit [3H]tamsulosin binding to human prostatic alpha1-adrenoceptors and [3H]prazosin binding to cloned human alpha1A- and alpha1B-adrenoceptors. Inhibition of phenylephrine-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate formation by cloned receptors was also investigated. Up to the highest concentration which could be tested, preparations of beta-sitosterol, stinging nettle, and medicinal pumpkin were without consistent inhibitory effect in all assays. In contrast, all tested saw palmetto extracts inhibited radioligand binding to human alpha1-adrenoceptors and agonist-induced [3H]inositol phosphate formation. Saturation binding experiments in the presence of a single saw palmetto extract concentration indicated a noncompetitive antagonism. The relationship between active concentrations in vitro and recommended therapeutic doses for the saw palmetto extracts was slightly lower than that for several chemically defined alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists. Saw palmetto extracts have alpha1-adrenoceptor-inhibitory properties. If bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic properties of these ingredients are similar to those of the chemically defined alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonism might be involved in the therapeutic effects of these extracts in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction.

  3. The effect of a metalloproteinase inhibitor (GI5402) on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and TNF-alpha receptors during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, P. E.; Lauw, F. N.; ten Hove, T.; te Velde, A. A.; Lumley, P.; Becherer, D.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is released from the cell surface by cleavage of pro-TNF-alpha by metalloproteinases (MPs). In cell cultures, inhibition of MPs has been found not only to reduce the release of TNF-alpha, but also to enhance the surface expression of TNF-alpha and TNF-alpha

  4. A specific acid [alpha]-glucosidase in lamellar bodies of the human lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.C.J. de; Schram, A.W.; Tager, J.M.; Batenburg, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the present investigation, we have demonstrated that three lysosomal-type hydrolases, alpha-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase and a phosphatase, are present in lamellar bodies isolated from adult human lung. The hydrolase activities that were studied, all showed an acidic pH optimum, which is

  5. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvajal-Rodríguez Antonio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The

  6. Distinctive Patterns of Evolution of the δ-Globin Gene (HBD) in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleirinho, Ana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Seixas, Susana; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2015-01-01

    In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb) is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE)-γ(HBG)-ψβ(HBBP1), and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD) and β (HBB). While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω) ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively), these estimates corroborated a

  7. Distinctive patterns of evolution of the δ-globin gene (HBD in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moleirinho

    Full Text Available In most vertebrates, hemoglobin (Hb is a heterotetramer composed of two dissimilar globin chains, which change during development according to the patterns of expression of α- and β-globin family members. In placental mammals, the β-globin cluster includes three early-expressed genes, ε(HBE-γ(HBG-ψβ(HBBP1, and the late expressed genes, δ (HBD and β (HBB. While HBB encodes the major adult β-globin chain, HBD is weakly expressed or totally silent. Paradoxically, in human populations HBD shows high levels of conservation typical of genes under strong evolutionary constraints, possibly due to a regulatory role in the fetal-to-adult switch unique of Anthropoid primates. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the two adult β-like globin genes in a set of diverse mammalian taxa, focusing on the evolution and functional divergence of HBD in primates. Our analysis revealed that anthropoids are an exception to a general pattern of concerted evolution in placental mammals, showing a high level of sequence conservation at HBD, less frequent and shorter gene conversion events. Moreover, this lineage is unique in the retention of a functional GATA-1 motif, known to be involved in the control of the developmental expression of the β-like globin genes. We further show that not only the mode but also the rate of evolution of the δ-globin gene in higher primates are strictly associated with the fetal/adult β-cluster developmental switch. To gain further insight into the possible functional constraints that have been shaping the evolutionary history of HBD in primates, we calculated dN/dS (ω ratios under alternative models of gene evolution. Although our results indicate that HBD might have experienced different selective pressures throughout primate evolution, as shown by different ω values between apes and Old World Monkeys + New World Monkeys (0.06 versus 0.43, respectively, these estimates

  8. A phylogenetic analysis of the globins in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hoogewijs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All globins belong to one of three families: the F (flavohemoglobin and S (sensor families that exhibit the canonical 3/3 α-helical fold, and the T (truncated 3/3 fold globins characterized by a shortened 2/2 α-helical fold. All eukaryote 3/3 hemoglobins are related to the bacterial single domain F globins. It is known that Fungi contain flavohemoglobins and single domain S globins. Our aims are to provide a census of fungal globins and to examine their relationships to bacterial globins. RESULTS: Examination of 165 genomes revealed that globins are present in >90% of Ascomycota and ~60% of Basidiomycota genomes. The S globins occur in Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota in addition to the phyla that have FHbs. Unexpectedly, group 1 T globins were found in one Blastocladiomycota and one Chytridiomycota genome. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out on the fungal globins, alone and aligned with representative bacterial globins. The Saccharomycetes and Sordariomycetes with two FHbs form two widely divergent clusters separated by the remaining fungal sequences. One of the Saccharomycete groups represents a new subfamily of FHbs, comprising a previously unknown N-terminal and a FHb missing the C-terminal moiety of its reductase domain. The two Saccharomycete groups also form two clusters in the presence of bacterial FHbs; the surrounding bacterial sequences are dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli (Firmicutes. The remaining fungal FHbs cluster with Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The Sgbs cluster separately from their bacterial counterparts, except for the intercalation of two Planctomycetes and a Proteobacterium between the Fungi incertae sedis and the Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota. CONCLUSION: Our results are compatible with a model of globin evolution put forward earlier, which proposed that eukaryote F, S and T globins originated via horizontal gene transfer of their bacterial counterparts to the eukaryote

  9. Never resting brain: simultaneous representation of two alpha related processes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eti Ben-Simon

    Full Text Available Brain activity is continuously modulated, even at "rest". The alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz has been known as the hallmark of the brain's idle-state. However, it is still debated if the alpha rhythm reflects synchronization in a distributed network or focal generator and whether it occurs spontaneously or is driven by a stimulus. This EEG/fMRI study aimed to explore the source of alpha modulations and their distribution in the resting brain. By serendipity, while computing the individually defined power modulations of the alpha-band, two simultaneously occurring components of these modulations were found. An 'induced alpha' that was correlated with the paradigm (eyes open/ eyes closed, and a 'spontaneous alpha' that was on-going and unrelated to the paradigm. These alpha components when used as regressors for BOLD activation revealed two segregated activation maps: the 'induced map' included left lateral temporal cortical regions and the hippocampus; the 'spontaneous map' included prefrontal cortical regions and the thalamus. Our combined fMRI/EEG approach allowed to computationally untangle two parallel patterns of alpha modulations and underpin their anatomical basis in the human brain. These findings suggest that the human alpha rhythm represents at least two simultaneously occurring processes which characterize the 'resting brain'; one is related to expected change in sensory information, while the other is endogenous and independent of stimulus change.

  10. Regulation of the human SLC25A20 expression by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in human hepatoblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Keisuke, E-mail: nya@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamasaki, Daisuke [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishimoto, Kenji [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Laboratory for System Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Doi, Takefumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    Solute carrier family 25, member 20 (SLC25A20) is a key molecule that transfers acylcarnitine esters in exchange for free carnitine across the mitochondrial membrane in the mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of {beta}-oxidation. We previously established tetracycline-regulated human cell line that can be induced to express PPAR{alpha} and found that PPAR{alpha} induces the SLC25A20 expression. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of the human slc25a20 gene and showed that PPAR{alpha} regulates the expression of human SLC25A20 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

  11. alpha isoforms of soluble and membrane-linked folate-binding protein in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoier-Madsen, M.; Holm, J.; Hansen, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    supported the hypothesis that serum FBP (29 kDa) mainly originates from neutrophils. The presence of FBP/FR alpha isoforms were established for the first time in human blood using antibodies specifically directed against human milk FBP alpha. The alpha isoforms identified on erythrocyte membranes......, and in granulocytes and serum, only constituted an almost undetectable fraction of the functional FBP The FBP alpha in neutrophil granulocytes was identified as a cytoplasmic component by indirect immunofluorescence. Gel filtration of serum revealed a peak of FBP alpha (>120 kDa), which could represent receptor...... fragments from decomposed erythrocytes and granulocytes. The soluble FBPs may exert bacteriostatic effects and protect folates in plasma from biological degradation, whereas FRs on the surface of blood cells could be involved in intracellular folate uptake or serve as signal proteins. The latter receptors...

  12. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidation in peroxisomal disorders: studies in cultured human fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, N. M.; Schor, D. S.; Roe, C. R.; Wanders, R. J.; Jakobs, C.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid in human fibroblasts of controls and patients affected with classical Refsum disease, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, generalized peroxisomal disorders and peroxisomal bifunctional protein deficiency. Cultured fibroblasts were incubated with

  13. Expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human adipose tissue: a role for TNF-alpha?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigolini, M; Tonoli, M; Borgato, L; Frigotto, L; Manzato, F; Zeminian, S; Cardinale, C; Camin, M; Chiaramonte, E; De Sandre, G; Lunardi, C

    1999-03-01

    Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plasma levels, responsible for reduced fibrinolysis, are associated with animal and human obesity and with increased cardiovascular disease. The expression of PAI-1 has been found recently in animal and human adipose tissue. Factors and mechanisms regulating such an expression remain to be elucidated. In omental and/or subcutaneous biopsies from obese non-diabetic patients, incubated in Medium 199, we have confirmed that human adipose tissue expresses PAI-1 protein and mRNA; furthermore we have demonstrated that such an expression is clearly evident also in collagenase isolated human adipocytes and that it is stimulated by incubation itself and enhanced by exogenous human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (h-TNF-alpha). Since human adipose tissue produces TNF-alpha, to further characterize the relationship of PAI-1 to TNF-alpha, human fat biopsies were also incubated with Pentoxifylline (PTX) or Genistein, both known to inhibit endogenous TNF-alpha through different mechanisms. PTX caused a dose-dependent decrease of basal PAI-1 protein release, reaching 80% maximal inhibitory effect at 10(-3)M, the same inhibitory effect caused by Genistein at 100 microg/ml. This was associated to a marked inhibition of PAI-1 mRNA and of endogenous TNF-alpha production. Furthermore, when human fat biopsies were incubated in the presence of polyclonal rabbit neutralizing anti-human TNF-alpha antibody (at a concentration able to inhibit 100 UI/ml human TNF-alpha activity), a modest but significant decrease of the incubation induced expression of PAI-1 mRNA was observed (19.8+/-19.0% decrease, P = 0.04, n = 7). In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that PAI-I expression is present in human isolated adipocytes and that it is enhanced in human adipose tissue in vitro by exogenous TNF-alpha. Furthermore our data support the possibility of a main role of endogenous TNF-alpha on human adipose tissue PAI-1 expression. This

  14. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  15. Erythromycin increases plasma concentrations of alpha-dihydroergocryptine in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mey, C; Althaus, M; Ezan, E; Retzow, A

    Objective. Our objective was to investigate the potential for relevant pharmacotherapeutic interaction between cytochrome P4503A4 (CYP3A4)-inhibiting agents such as erythromycin and the dopamine agonist alpha -dihydroergocryptine (DHEC). Methods. The study was carried out as a single-center,

  16. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  17. Synergistic and Additive Properties of the Beta-Globin Locus Control Region (LCR) Revealed by 5′HS3 Deletion Mutations: Implication for LCR Chromatin Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xiangdong; Sun, Jin; Xiang, Ping; Yu, Man; Navas, Patrick A.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Li, Qiliang

    2005-01-01

    Deletion of the 234-bp core element of the DNase I hypersensitive site 3 (5′HS3) of the locus control region (LCR) in the context of a human beta-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (β-YAC) results in profound effects on globin gene expression in transgenic mice. In contrast, deletion of a 2.3-kb 5′HS3 region, which includes the 234-bp core sequence, has a much milder phenotype. Here we report the effects of these deletions on chromatin structure in the beta-globin locus of adult erythro...

  18. Phase synchronization between alpha and beta oscillations in the human electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulin, V V; Brismar, T

    2006-01-01

    Coordination of neuronal oscillations generated at different frequencies has been hypothesized to be an important feature of integrative brain functions. The present study aimed at the evaluation of the cross-frequency phase synchronization between electroencephalographic alpha and beta oscillations. The amplitude and phase information were extracted from electroencephalograms recorded in 176 healthy human subjects using an analytic signal approach based on the Hilbert transform. The results reliably demonstrated the presence of phase synchronization between alpha and beta oscillations, with a maximum in the occipito-parietal areas. The phase difference between alpha and beta oscillations showed characteristic peaks at about 2 and -1 radians, which were common for many subjects and electrodes. A specific phase difference might reflect similarity in the organization and interconnections of the networks generating alpha and beta oscillations across the entire cortex. Beta oscillations, which are phase-locked to alpha oscillations--alpha-synchronous beta oscillations--were largest in the occipito-parietal area with a second smaller maximum in the frontal area, thus demonstrating a topography, which was different from the conventional alpha and beta oscillations. The strength of the alpha-synchronous beta oscillations was not exclusively defined by the amplitude of the alpha rhythm indicating that they represent a distinct feature of the spontaneous electroencephalogram, which allows for a refined discrimination of the dynamics of beta oscillations.

  19. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The beta-thalassemias are among the most common autosomal recessive disorders. They have a remarkably high frequency in the Mediterranean region and represent one of the most common genetic diseases in Egypt. In this study, the spectrum of β- thalassemia mutations and genotype-to-phenotype correlations were ...

  20. Hairpin structures formed by alpha satellite DNA of human centromeres are cleaved by human topoisomerase IIα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Thomsen, Tina; Wang, Yong; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Koch, Jørn; Andersen, Anni H.

    2008-01-01

    Although centromere function has been conserved through evolution, apparently no interspecies consensus DNA sequence exists. Instead, centromere DNA may be interconnected through the formation of certain DNA structures creating topological binding sites for centromeric proteins. DNA topoisomerase II is a protein, which is located at centromeres, and enzymatic topoisomerase II activity correlates with centromere activity in human cells. It is therefore possible that topoisomerase II recognizes and interacts with the alpha satellite DNA of human centromeres through an interaction with potential DNA structures formed solely at active centromeres. In the present study, human topoisomerase IIα-mediated cleavage at centromeric DNA sequences was examined in vitro. The investigation has revealed that the enzyme recognizes and cleaves a specific hairpin structure formed by alpha satellite DNA. The topoisomerase introduces a single-stranded break at the hairpin loop in a reaction, where DNA ligation is partly uncoupled from the cleavage reaction. A mutational analysis has revealed, which features of the hairpin are required for topoisomerease IIα-mediated cleavage. Based on this a model is discussed, where topoisomerase II interacts with two hairpins as a mediator of centromere cohesion. PMID:18824478

  1. Splanchnic removal of human alpha-atrial natriuretic peptide in humans: enhancement after food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Gerbes, A L

    1990-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of food ingestion on splanchnic disposal of human alpha-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF), hepatic-intestinal removal of ANF was determined before and after a test meal. Hepatic venous and arterial plasma samples were obtained from six subjects, most of whom had only ...... .05). Splanchnic removal of ANF was 3.0 +/- 0.5 pmol/min before and increased to a maximum value (7.1 +/- 2.2 pmol/min, P less than .05) 35 minutes after ingestion of the meal. Our results showed enhanced splanchnic removal of ANF after food intake. This is due to increased hepatic...

  2. Effect of AGM and fetal liver-derived stromal cell lines on globin expression in adult baboon (P. anubis bone marrow-derived erythroid progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Lavelle

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that the erythroid micro-environment plays a role in regulation of globin gene expression during adult erythroid differentiation. Adult baboon bone marrow and human cord blood CD34+ progenitors were grown in methylcellulose, liquid media, and in co-culture with stromal cell lines derived from different developmental stages in identical media supporting erythroid differentiation to examine the effect of the micro-environment on globin gene expression. Adult progenitors express high levels of γ-globin in liquid and methylcellulose media but low, physiological levels in stromal cell co-cultures. In contrast, γ-globin expression remained high in cord blood progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures. Differences in γ-globin gene expression between adult progenitors in stromal cell line co-cultures and liquid media required cell-cell contact and were associated with differences in rate of differentiation and γ-globin promoter DNA methylation. We conclude that γ-globin expression in adult-derived erythroid cells can be influenced by the micro-environment, suggesting new potential targets for HbF induction.

  3. Zinc mediated dimer of human interferon-alpha 2b revealed by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Walter, L J; Hruza, A; Reichert, P; Trotta, P P; Nagabhushan, T L; Walter, M R

    1996-12-15

    The human alpha-interferon (huIFN-alpha) family displays broad spectrum antiviral, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities on a variety of cell types. The diverse biological activities of the IFN-alpha's are conveyed to cells through specific interactions with cell-surface receptors. Despite considerable effort, no crystal structure of a member of this family has yet been reported, because the quality of the protein crystals have been unsuitable for crystallographic studies. Until now, structural models of the IFN-alpha's have been based on the structure of murine IFN-beta (muIFN-beta). These models are likely to be inaccurate, as the amino acid sequence of muIFN-beta differs significantly from the IFN-alpha's at proposed receptor-binding sites. Structural information on a huIFN-alpha subtype would provide an improved basis for modeling the structures of the entire IFN-alpha family. The crystal structure of recombinant human interferon-alpha 2b (huIFN-alpha 2b) has been determined at 2.9 A resolution. HuIFN-alpha 2b exists in the crystal as a noncovalent dimer, which associates in a novel manner. Unlike other structurally characterized cytokines, extensive interactions in the dimer interface are mediated by a zinc ion (Zn2+). The overall fold of huIFN-alpha 2b is most similar to the structure of muIFN-beta. Unique to huIFN-alpha 2b is a 3(10) helix in the AB loop which is held to the core of the molecule by a disulfide bond. The structure of huIFN-alpha 2b provides an accurate model for analysis of the > 15 related type 1 interferon molecules. HuIFN-alpha 2b displays considerable structural similarity with muIFN-beta, interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma, which also bind related class 2 cytokine receptors. From these structural comparisons and numerous studies on the effects of mutations on biological activity, we have identified protein surfaces that appear to be important in receptor activation. This study also reveals the potential biological importance

  4. Correlation between Plasma Interleukin-3, the α/β Globin Ratio, and Globin mRNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rouhi Dehnabeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Globin chain synthesis (GCS analysis is used in the diagnosis of thalassemia. However, the wide reference range limits its use as a decisive diagnostic tool. It has been shown that α and β  globin mRNA increase through stimulation of cells by interleukin-3 (IL-3. Therefore, this study investigates the relationship between plasma IL-3 and the β/α  globin ratio. Methods. Blood samples were collected from 32 healthy participants on two occasions one month apart. GCS analysis, real-time PCR, and ELISA tests were conducted to determine the β/α  globin ratio, globin mRNA expression and stability rate, and IL-3 levels. Results. On the basis of IL-3 levels, the participants were divided in two groups. One group included participants who showed a significant increase in IL-3 as indicated by a significant rise in mean values of α, β, and γ  globin mRNA, α and β  globin, RBC, and hemoglobin. The other group included participants who showed no difference in IL-3 levels with no significant variations in the above-mentioned parameters. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that IL-3 has an equivalent positive effect on α and β  globin chain synthesis. Therefore, IL-3 levels do not explain the wide reference range of the α/β  globin ratio.

  5. Correlation between Plasma Interleukin-3, the α/β Globin Ratio, and Globin mRNA Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi Dehnabeh, S.; Mahdian, R.; Ajdary, S.; Mostafavi, E.; Khatami, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Globin chain synthesis (GCS) analysis is used in the diagnosis of thalassemia. However, the wide reference range limits its use as a decisive diagnostic tool. It has been shown that α and β   globin mRNA increase through stimulation of cells by interleukin-3 (IL-3). Therefore, this study investigates the relationship between plasma IL-3 and the β/α   globin ratio. Methods. Blood samples were collected from 32 healthy participants on two occasions one month apart. GCS analysis, real-time PCR, and ELISA tests were conducted to determine the β/α   globin ratio, globin mRNA expression and stability rate, and IL-3 levels. Results. On the basis of IL-3 levels, the participants were divided in two groups. One group included participants who showed a significant increase in IL-3 as indicated by a significant rise in mean values of α, β, and γ   globin mRNA, α and β   globin, RBC, and hemoglobin. The other group included participants who showed no difference in IL-3 levels with no significant variations in the above-mentioned parameters. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that IL-3 has an equivalent positive effect on α and β   globin chain synthesis. Therefore, IL-3 levels do not explain the wide reference range of the α/β   globin ratio. PMID:25478214

  6. alpha6 integrin cleavage: sensitizing human prostate cancer to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sangita C; Dougherty, Shona; Pennington, Michael E; Demetriou, Manolis C; Stea, B Dino; Dorr, Robert T; Cress, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    The goal was to determine if prostate tumor cells containing a mutant alpha6 integrin would be defective in tumor re-population following clinically relevant fractionated ionizing radiation (IR) treatments. Human prostate cancer cells derived from PC3N cells were used which conditionally expressed a cleavable, wild type form of alpha6 integrin (PC3N-alpha6-WT) or a mutated non-cleavable form of alpha6 integrin (PC3N-alpha6-RR). The resulting tumor growth before, during and after fractionated doses of IR (3 Gyx10 days) was analyzed using the endpoints of tumor growth inhibition (T/C), tumor growth delay (T-C), tumor doubling time (Td) and tumor cell kill (Log(10) cell kill). The T/C values were 36.1% and 39.5%, the T-C values were 20.5 days and 28.5 days and the Td values were 5.5 and 10.5 days for the irradiated PC3N-alpha6-WT and PC3N-alpha6-RR cells, respectively. The Log(10) was 1.1 for the PC3N-alpha6-WT cells and 0.8 for the PC3N-alpha6-RR cells. The tumor response to IR was altered in tumors expressing the mutant alpha6 integrin as indicated by a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition, an increase in tumor growth delay, an increase in tumor doubling time and an increase in tumor cell kill. Blocking integrin cleavage in vivo may be efficacious for increasing the IR responsiveness of slow growing, pro-metastatic human prostate cancer.

  7. Evidence of an alpha 2-macroglobulin-like molecule in plasma of Salamandra salamandra. Structural and functional similarity with human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M; Bellot, R

    1987-07-13

    A high-Mr (Mr 750,000) alpha 1-macroglobulin, obtained from Salamandra salamandra, is described. Salamander alpha 1-macroglobulin is composed of two monomers of equal Mr, which are composed of two polypeptide chains, each of Mr 180,000, linked by disulfide bonds. The molecular parameters of this protein, its binding to trypsin and inactivation by methylamine suggest that salamander alpha 1-macroglobulin is closely related to human alpha 2-macroglobulin and to other related proteins described in the animal kingdom.

  8. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  9. Computing the center of mass for traveling alpha waves in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, Elías; Vázquez, Montserrat; Flores, Amira

    2007-05-11

    The phenomenon of traveling waves of the brain is an intriguing area of research, and its mechanisms and neurobiological bases have been unknown since the 1950s. The present study offers a new method to compute traveling alpha waves using the center of mass algorithm. Electroencephalographic alpha waves are oscillations with a characteristic frequency range and reactivity to closed eyes. Several lines of evidence derived from qualitative observations suggest that the alpha waves represent a spreading wave process with specific trajectories in the human brain. We found that during a certain alpha wave peak recorded with 30 electrodes the trajectory starts and ends in distinct regions of the brain, mostly frontal-occipital, frontal-frontal, or occipital-frontal, but the position of the trajectory at the time in which the maximal positivity of the alpha wave occurs has a definite position near the central regions. Thus we observed that the trajectory always crossed around the central zones, traveling from one region to another region of the brain. A similar trajectory pattern was observed for different alpha wave peaks in one alpha burst, and in different subjects, with a mean velocity of 2.1+/-0.29 m/s. We found that all our results were clear and reproducible in all of the subjects. To our knowledge, the present method documents the first explicit description of a spreading wave process with a singular pattern in the human brain in terms of the center of mass algorithm.

  10. Recombinant DNA human interferon alpha 2 in advanced breast cancer: a phase 2 trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, N.; Balkwill, F. R.; Bodmer, J. G.; Rubens, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Effectiveness of recombinant DNA (rDNA) human interferon alpha 2 (IFN alpha 2) in advanced breast cancer was evaluated in 14 patients who had received prior endocrine and/or cytotoxic therapy. After randomization, 7 patients received IFN alpha 2 two million IU m-2 day-1, s.c., 3 times a week (schedule 1) and 7 patients received 50 million IU m-2 day-1, i.v., for 5 consecutive days, every 3 weeks (schedule 2). Treatment duration was 4-21 weeks in schedule 1 and 6-24 weeks (2-8 courses) in sche...

  11. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  12. [Study on sub-chronic toxicity of powered milk containing transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yuan; Liu, Haibo; Geng, Guiying; Wang, Huiling; Yang, Hua; Feng, Xiaolian; Gao, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Feng, Yongquan; Xu, Haibin

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the potential toxic or adverse effect of transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin powered milk on rats. Weanling Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups according the weight: three transgenic milk powder (T) groups, three non-transgenic milk powder (N) groups and the control (C) group. The diets of T groups contain 15%, 30% and 60% transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin milk powder. The diets of N groups contain 15%, 30% and 60% non-transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin milk powder for 90 days. The diet of C group contains only basic feed. Haematological and biochemical parameters was measured during the study (at 45th and 90th of the experiment). At the end of the 90th day, organ tissues analysis was performed. There were no transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin related adverse effects on the body weight, food intake, food consumption, hematology,serum biochemistry, as well as histopathology. There were no signs of toxic and adverse effects for transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin powdered milk on rats.

  13. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome : substrate specificities and their switch.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Tesar, C.; Wilton, R.; Keigher, L.; Babnigg, G.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a large number of microbes forming a complex microbial community that greatly affects the physiology and pathology of the host. In the human gut microbiome, the enrichment in certain protein gene families appears to be widespread. They include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as glucoside hydrolases of dietary polysaccharides and glycoconjugates. We report the crystal structures (wild type, 2 mutants, and a mutant/substrate complex) and the enzymatic activity of a recombinant {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut bacterium Ruminococcus obeum. The first ever protein structures from this bacterium reveal a structural homologue to human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase with a highly conserved catalytic domain and reduced auxiliary domains. The {alpha}-glucosidase, a member of GH31 family, shows substrate preference for {alpha}(1-6) over {alpha}(1-4) glycosidic linkages and produces glucose from isomaltose as well as maltose. The preference can be switched by a single mutation at its active site, suggestive of widespread adaptation to utilization of a variety of polysaccharides by intestinal micro-organisms as energy resources. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome: substrate specificities and their switch.

  14. An evolutionary tree for invertebrate globin sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M; Pedwaydon, J; Czelusniak, J; Suzuki, T; Gotoh, T; Moens, L; Shishikura, F; Walz, D; Vinogradov, S

    1988-01-01

    A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 245 globin amino acid sequences. Of the six plant globins, five represented the Leguminosae and one the Ulmaceae. Among the invertebrate sequences, 7 represented the phylum Annelida, 13 represented Insecta and Crustacea of the phylum Arthropoda, and 6 represented the phylum Mollusca. Of the vertebrate globins, 4 represented the Agnatha and 209 represented the Gnathostomata. A common alignment was achieved for the 245 sequences using the parsimony principle, and a matrix of minimum mutational distances was constructed. The most parsimonious phylogenetic tree, i.e., the one having the lowest number of nucleotide substitutions that cause amino acid replacements, was obtained employing clustering and branch-swapping algorithms. Based on the available fossil record, the earliest split in the ancestral metazoan lineage was placed at 680 million years before present (Myr BP), the origin of vertebrates was placed at 510 Myr BP, and the separation of the Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes was placed at 425 Myr BP. Local "molecular clock" calculations were used to date the branch points on the descending branches of the various lineages within the plant and invertebrate portions of the tree. The tree divided the 245 sequences into five distinct clades that corresponded exactly to the five groups plants, annelids, arthropods, molluscs, and vertebrates. Furthermore, the maximum parsimony tree, in contrast to the unweighted pair group and distance Wagner trees, was consistent with the available fossil record and supported the hypotheses that the primitive hemoglobin of metazoans was monomeric and that the multisubunit extracellular hemoglobins found among the Annelida and the Arthropoda represent independently derived states.

  15. Growth of human prostate carcinomas with and without hormone alpha- dehydrotestosterone in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, H; Otto, U; Fack, H

    1998-12-01

    The dependence of human prostate carcinoma growth on hormone was studied in xenotransplants in nude mice. The objective was to determine differences in cell kinetic parameters and volume growth of tumors growing with alpha-dehydrotestosterone (alphaDHT) and without alphaDHT. These differences could be used as arguments pro and contra the adaptation versus the clonal selection hypothesis. Human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Growth of tumors was observed in castrated male mice without and with implanted osmotic pumps secreting alphaDHT. In a further series of experiments the alphaDHT tubes were removed when the tumors had reached a volume of 0.3 cm3. Tumor volume was measured to determine tumor doubling time with and without alphaDHT. Detailed cell kinetics were analyzed using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) method with flow cytometry. Applying the relative movement (RM) and a simulation analysis to parallel single and multiple BrdUrd labelling experimental data we determined transit times through the phases of cell cycle, potential doubling time Tpot, growth fraction (GF) and cell loss. Five human prostate carcinomas were xenotransplanted into nude mice. Tumor take was only achieved when androgen hormone was present. However, when alphaDHT was removed when the tumors had grown to a volume of 0.3 cm3, they continued to grow at nearly the same Td as those tumors with continued alphaDHT application. The BrdUrd experiments, on the other hand, showed considerable increase of Tc and Tpot upon withdrawal of alphaDHT in 4 out of 5 tumors. The GF and labelling index (LI) were maintained at about the same level as alphaDHT consuming tumors. While small transplanted tumor pieces do not grow without alphaDHT, larger tumors grow with the same Td after removal of alphaDHT. The slower proliferation shown by the increased Tc and Tpot is balanced by less cell loss. Since GF and LI were maintained at about the same level, we conclude that in our tumors the

  16. Interaction of folk medicinal plant extracts with human alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Ammar; Engström, Mia; Wurster, Siegfried; Savola, Juha-Matti; Pihlaja, Kalevi

    2002-01-01

    Forty-two extracts of folk medicinal plant organs from Pakistan were tested in competition binding assays for their interaction with the specific ligand recognition sites on the human alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes alpha2A, alpha2B and alpha2C Strong binding of the extracts (40 mg/ml) from Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile leaves (88-98% displacement of radiolabel) and Peganum harmala seeds (89-96% displacement) on three subtypes prompted us to extract these plant materials with 40% and 80% methanol, ethanol, and acetone. The extraction results indicated an absence of alpha2-adrenoceptor binding activity in the stalk of A. nilotica and A. tortils, whereas the leaves of both plants contained activity. The extracts of A. nilotica leaves showed a slight, but consistent, preference for the alpha2C-adrenoceptor, whereas the leaves of A. tortils were slightly more active on the alpha2B subtype. The extract of P. harmala stalks was less active than that of its seeds. The binding activities of A. nilotica leaves and P. harmala seeds were mainly concentrated in the water and 30% methanol fractions and further sub-fractions. In a functional activity assay, the active fractions inhibited epinephrine-stimulated 35S-GTPyS binding, thus indicating a predominantly antagonistic nature of the compounds with alpha2-adrenoceptor affinity in these fractions. Among the known major alkaloids of P. harmala (demissidine, harmaline, harmine, 6-methoxyharmalan, and norharmane), only 6-methoxyharmalan showed moderate affinity (dissociation constant (Ki) of 530 +/- 40 nm for alpha2A subtype). This study is a first systematic attempt towards the discovery of potential drug candidates from these plant materials for treating alpha2-adrenoceptor related diseases.

  17. Purification and characterization of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreeve, S.M.; Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Mariani, A.P.; Venter, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor (..cap alpha../sub 2/-R) from human platelets has been purified to homogeneity using a four step process. An affinity column was prepared by coupling p-aminoclonidine to CH-Sepharose 4B via the p-NH/sub 2/ group. Digitonin solubilized ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R bound to the affinity matrix were eluted with 100 ..mu..M phentolamine and directly applied to a DEAE-Sepharose column. Bound receptors were eluted with a linear gradient of 0-500 mM NaCl, pooled and chromatographed on HPLC size exclusion columns. Three peaks of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding were eluted from HPLC columns (t = 33, 42, 47 min). Radioiodination of HPLC eluates and analysis by SDS-PAGE indicated that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R binding was associated with a 75-85 kDa protein. These data suggest that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R may exist in monomeric and oligomeric forms in the purified state and support previous target size data which indicate that the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R exists as a dimer in the native membrane. The pure radioiodinated ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R (77-85 kDa) is a glycoprotein with terminal sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine residues and has a pI of 4.1 on column isoelectric focusing. These data are consistent with those previously reported on the partially purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R. Electron micrographs confirm the oligomeric nature and size of the pure ..cap alpha../sub 2/-R.

  18. Alterations of branching and differential expression of sialic acid on alpha-1-acid glycoprotein in human seminal plasma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kratz, E; Poland, DC; Dijk, van W.; Katnik-Prastowska, I

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree of branching and types of fucosylation of glycans on alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) have been found to be associated with alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein concentrations in human seminal plasma. The glycosylation pattern of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein in seminal plasma obtained

  19. Nucleoplasmic LAP2alpha-lamin A complexes are required to maintain a proliferative state in human fibroblasts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekovic, V.; Harborth, J.; Broers, J.L.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Zglinicki, T. von; Foisner, R.; Hutchison, C.; Markiewicz, E.

    2007-01-01

    In human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs), expression of lamina-associated polypeptide 2 alpha (LAP2alpha) upon entry and exit from G(0) is tightly correlated with phosphorylation and subnuclear localization of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Phosphoisoforms of Rb and LAP2alpha are down-regulated in G(0).

  20. Replication of alpha-satellite DNA arrays in endogenous human centromeric regions and in human artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erliandri, Indri; Fu, Haiqing; Nakano, Megumi; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Miga, Karen H; Liskovykh, Mikhail; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kouprina, Natalay; Aladjem, Mirit I; Larionov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    In human chromosomes, centromeric regions comprise megabase-size arrays of 171 bp alpha-satellite DNA monomers. The large distances spanned by these arrays preclude their replication from external sites and imply that the repetitive monomers contain replication origins. However, replication within these arrays has not previously been profiled and the role of alpha-satellite DNA in initiation of DNA replication has not yet been demonstrated. Here, replication of alpha-satellite DNA in endogenous human centromeric regions and in de novo formed Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) was analyzed. We showed that alpha-satellite monomers could function as origins of DNA replication and that replication of alphoid arrays organized into centrochromatin occurred earlier than those organized into heterochromatin. The distribution of inter-origin distances within centromeric alphoid arrays was comparable to the distribution of inter-origin distances on randomly selected non-centromeric chromosomal regions. Depletion of CENP-B, a kinetochore protein that binds directly to a 17 bp CENP-B box motif common to alpha-satellite DNA, resulted in enrichment of alpha-satellite sequences for proteins of the ORC complex, suggesting that CENP-B may have a role in regulating the replication of centromeric regions. Mapping of replication initiation sites in the HAC revealed that replication preferentially initiated in transcriptionally active regions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-1alpha and interferon-alpha but not other cytokines in human immunoglobulin preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, M; Meager, A; Dilger, P; Bird, C; Dolman, C; Das, R G; Thorpe, R

    2000-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin preparations are used therapeutically for various disorders. Such therapy is generally safe but adverse effects occasionally occur in recipients. It has been suggested that antibodies to cytokines present in clinical immunoglobulin products may contribute to undesirable effects in recipients. Therefore, we investigated intravenous and intramuscular immunoglobulin products for the presence of cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies. Using validated bioassays, we detected neutralizing activity against human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon-alpha2a (IFN-alpha2a) and interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) in immunoglobulin products. We found no neutralization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, oncostatin M (OSM) and IFN-gamma. Most batches which neutralized IFN-alpha2a activity also neutralized other IFN-alpha subtypes, IFN-omega and IFN-beta. Most products (94%) neutralized the biological activity of GM-CSF. No correlation between batches and their ability to neutralize bioactivities of GM-CSF, IFN-alpha2a and IL-1alpha was found. This neutralizing activity could be traced to plasma pools used for manufacture of immunoglobulins. The neutralization was mediated by specific cytokine antibodies contained within immunoglobulin products as it was present in specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) fractions eluted from cytokine affinity chromatography columns. Specific binding of such IgG fractions to cytokines in immunoblots and in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) was observed. This contrasts with the broad non-specific recognition of cytokine proteins observed using unfractionated immunoglobulins in ELISAs. This is the first comprehensive study showing the presence of neutralizing antibodies against GM-CSF, IL-1alpha, or IFN-alpha2a in immunoglobulin products.

  2. alpha-MSH activates immediate defense responses to UV-induced oxidative stress in human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiuzu; Mosby, Nicole; Yang, Jennifer; Xu, Aie; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa; Kadekaro, Ana Luisa

    2009-12-01

    Exposure of cultured human melanocytes to ultraviolet radiation (UV) results in DNA damage. In melanoma, UV-signature mutations resulting from unrepaired photoproducts are rare, suggesting the possible involvement of oxidative DNA damage in melanocyte malignant transformation. Here we present data demonstrating immediate dose-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide in UV-irradiated melanocytes, which correlated directly with a decrease in catalase activity. Pretreatment of melanocytes with alpha-melanocortin (alpha-MSH) reduced the UV-induced generation of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxyguanine (8-oxodG), a major form of oxidative DNA damage. Pretreatment with alpha-MSH also increased the protein levels of catalase and ferritin. The effect of alpha-MSH on 8-oxodG induction was mediated by activation of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), as it was absent in melanocytes expressing loss-of-function MC1R, and blocked by concomitant treatment with an analog of agouti signaling protein (ASIP), ASIP-YY. This study provides unequivocal evidence for induction of oxidative DNA damage by UV in human melanocytes and reduction of this damage by alpha-MSH. Our data unravel some mechanisms by which alpha-MSH protects melanocytes from oxidative DNA damage, which partially explain the strong association of loss-of-function MC1R with melanoma.

  3. Effects of aging on the human ovary: the secretion of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, A; Marí, M; de los Santos, M J; Simón, C; Remohí, J; Tarín, J J

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the changes induced by age in the function and secretory pattern of the human ovary. Immunoreactive alpha-inhibin, E2, and P secretion in vivo and in vitro have been compared in two different populations. Prospective study. Women undergoing IVF-ET were divided into two groups according to age: group 1 (32.0 +/- 0.7 years; mean +/- SEM) and group 2 (40.3 +/- 0.3 years). In vitro fertilization program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. A total of 33 infertile women with regular menses, undergoing IVF-ET. Follicle aspiration performed by transvaginal ultrasound. Four follicles per patient were aspirated in individual plastic tubes. Granulosa-luteal cells isolated with Percoll columns and cultured in vitro up to 4 days in the presence of hCG. In vitro fertilization parameters, serum levels of E2, immunoreactive alpha-inhibin, and P, as well as the secretion of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and P by the cultured granulosa-luteal cells. Serum immunoreactive alpha-inhibin levels the day of ovum pick-up were significantly lower in group 2 compared with group 1. Incubation of cells for 96 hours showed a significantly higher ability to accumulate immunoreactive alpha-inhibin in group 1 than 2. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulated immunoreactive alpha-inhibin production after 96 hours. Cells from younger women displayed a significantly higher ability to secrete P than cells from older women. Human chorionic gonadotropin was able to significantly stimulate P production in group 1. These results confirm previous observations showing a reduced production of immunoreactive alpha-inhibin and steroids of ovaries from older women and suggest that a reduced cellular function, rather than a decrease in the follicular population, is the main mechanism by which these changes are produced.

  4. Suppression of saccharin-induced mutagenicity by interferon-alpha in human RSa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, N; Suzuki, H

    1995-10-01

    Saccharin is an artificial sweetener commonly used in the formulation of foods and beverages. Sodium saccharin-induced mutagenicity is detectable in human RSa cells by estimation of cloning efficiency of ouabain-resistant mutant cells and determination of K-ras codon 12 mutation in genomic DNA, analyzed by PCR and differential dot-blot hybridization. However, in this study no phenotypic or genetic mutations were detected in RSa cells cultured with human IFN (HuIFN)-alpha before sodium saccharin treatment. The suppressive effect was lessened by transient treatment with antipain immediately after sodium saccharin treatment. Elevation of antipain-sensitive protease activity was found, furthermore, in RSa cells cultured with HuIFN-alpha and subsequently treated with sodium saccharin. Thus, antipain-sensitive protease induction in cells tested here may be involved in suppression of the mutagenicity of saccharin by HuIFN-alpha.

  5. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mougey, E.H. [Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Acute moderate elevation of TNF-{alpha} does not affect systemic and skeletal muscle protein turnover in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Marie; Plomgaard, Peter; Fischer, Christian P

    2009-01-01

    Context: Skeletal muscle wasting has been associated with elevations in circulating inflammatory cytokines, in particular TNF-alpha. Objective: In this study, we investigated whether TNF-alpha affects human systemic and skeletal muscle protein turnover, via a 4 hours recombinant human TNF...... of either rhTNF-alpha (700 ng.m(-2).h(-1)) or 20% human albumin (Control) which was the vehicle of rhTNF-alpha. Systemic and skeletal muscle protein turnover were estimated by a combination of tracer dilution methodology (primed continuous infusion of L-[ring-(2)H5]phenylalanine and L-[(15)N...... with the phenylalanine 3-compartment model showed similar muscle synthesis, breakdown and net muscle degradation after 2 hours basal and after 4 hours Control or rhTNF-alpha infusion. Conclusion: This study is the first to show in humans that TNF-alpha does not affect systemic and skeletal muscle protein turnover, when...

  7. Characterization and Comparative Immunoreactivity of Antibody to Newt (T. cristatus) Globins

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, Louis A.; Walsh, Anne W.; Merrow, Martha; Paulekus, Wayne; Mackin, William; Grasso, Joseph A.

    1984-01-01

    1. Rabbit antisera to newt (T. cristatus) globin were produced by repeated injections of globin and antiglobin antibodies purified by chromatography on globin-Sepharose 4B. 2. Ouchterlony and SDS PAGE analysis indicated that the material eluted from the affinity column was rabbit IgG. 3. The antiglobin antibodies tested by immunodiffusion and ELISA cross-reacted with native hemoglobin and globin from T. cristatus and to varying extents with globins of N. viridescens, R. pipiens and X. laevis,...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin activates the NLRP3-inflammasome in human and mouse monocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin R Craven

    Full Text Available Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA causes severe necrotizing infections of the skin, soft tissues, and lungs. Staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin is an essential virulence factor in mouse models of CA-MRSA necrotizing pneumonia. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin has long been known to induce inflammatory signaling and cell death in host organisms, however the mechanism underlying these signaling events were not well understood. Using highly purified recombinant alpha-hemolysin, we now demonstrate that alpha-hemolysin activates the Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 protein (NLRP3-inflammasome, a host inflammatory signaling complex involved in responses to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Non-cytolytic mutant alpha-hemolysin molecules fail to elicit NLRP3-inflammasome signaling, demonstrating that the responses are not due to non-specific activation of this innate immune signaling system by bacterially derived proteins. In monocyte-derived cells from humans and mice, inflammasome assembly in response to alpha-hemolysin results in activation of the cysteine proteinase, caspase-1. We also show that inflammasome activation by alpha-hemolysin works in conjunction with signaling by other CA-MRSA-derived Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs to induce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-18. Additionally, alpha-hemolysin induces cell death in these cells through an NLRP3-dependent program of cellular necrosis, resulting in the release of endogenous pro-inflammatory molecules, like the chromatin-associated protein, High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1. These studies link the activity of a major S. aureus virulence factor to a specific host signaling pathway. The cellular events linked to inflammasome activity have clear relevance to the disease processes associated with CA-MRSA including tissue necrosis and inflammation.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin activates the NLRP3-inflammasome in human and mouse monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Robin R; Gao, Xi; Allen, Irving C; Gris, Denis; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; McElvania-Tekippe, Erin; Ting, Jenny P; Duncan, Joseph A

    2009-10-14

    Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) causes severe necrotizing infections of the skin, soft tissues, and lungs. Staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin is an essential virulence factor in mouse models of CA-MRSA necrotizing pneumonia. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin has long been known to induce inflammatory signaling and cell death in host organisms, however the mechanism underlying these signaling events were not well understood. Using highly purified recombinant alpha-hemolysin, we now demonstrate that alpha-hemolysin activates the Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 protein (NLRP3)-inflammasome, a host inflammatory signaling complex involved in responses to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Non-cytolytic mutant alpha-hemolysin molecules fail to elicit NLRP3-inflammasome signaling, demonstrating that the responses are not due to non-specific activation of this innate immune signaling system by bacterially derived proteins. In monocyte-derived cells from humans and mice, inflammasome assembly in response to alpha-hemolysin results in activation of the cysteine proteinase, caspase-1. We also show that inflammasome activation by alpha-hemolysin works in conjunction with signaling by other CA-MRSA-derived Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) to induce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-18. Additionally, alpha-hemolysin induces cell death in these cells through an NLRP3-dependent program of cellular necrosis, resulting in the release of endogenous pro-inflammatory molecules, like the chromatin-associated protein, High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). These studies link the activity of a major S. aureus virulence factor to a specific host signaling pathway. The cellular events linked to inflammasome activity have clear relevance to the disease processes associated with CA-MRSA including tissue necrosis and inflammation.

  10. Diversity of [beta]-globin mutations in Israeli ethnic groups reflects recent historic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filon, D.; Oron, V.; Krichevski, S.; Shaag, A.; Goldfarb, A.; Aker, M.; Rachmilewitz, E.A.; Rund, D.; Oppenheim, A. (Hebrew Univ. Hadassah-Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)) (and others)

    1994-05-01

    The authors characterized nearly 500 [beta]-thalassemia genes from the Israeli population representing a variety of ethnic subgroups. They found 28 different mutations in the [beta]-globin gene, including three mutations ([beta][sup S], [beta][sup C], and [beta][sup O-Arab]) causing hemoglobinopathies. Marked genetic heterogeneity was observed in both the Arab (20 mutations) and Jewish (17 mutations) populations. On the other hand, two ethnic isolates - Druze and Samaritans - had a single mutation each. Fifteen of the [beta]-thalassemia alleles are Mediterranean in type, 5 originated in Kurdistan, 2 are of Indian origin, and 2 sporadic alleles came from Europe. Only one mutant allele-nonsense codon 37-appears to be indigenous to Israel. While human habitation in Israel dates back to early prehistory, the present-day spectrum of [beta]-globin mutations can be largely explained by migration events that occurred in the past millennium. 26 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  12. Human CRISP-3 binds serum alpha(1)B-glycoprotein across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, Lene; Johnsen, Anders H; Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    CRISP-3 was previously shown to be bound to alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG) in human serum/plasma. All mammalian sera are supposed to contain A1BG, although its presence in rodent sera is not well-documented. Since animal sera are often used to supplement buffers in experiments, in particular...

  13. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...

  14. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  15. The alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in healing human myocardial scars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, I. E.; Havenith, M. G.; de Mey, J. G.; Daemen, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells in the scars of human myocardial infarctions of different postinfarction times (6 hours to 17 years old) were characterized by antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA), vimentin, and desmin. Basal lamina deposition was studied with antibodies to the basal lamina protein type

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of tripeptidyl alpha-ketoamides as human rhinovirus 3C protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Hui; Lamar, Jason; Victor, Frantz; Snyder, Nancy; Johnson, Robert; Heinz, Beverly A; Wakulchik, Mark; Wang, Q May

    2003-10-20

    We describe herein the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of tripeptidyl alpha-ketoamides as human rhinovirus (HRV) 3C protease inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor discussed in this manuscript, 4I, exhibited impressive enzyme inhibitory activity as well as antiviral activity against HRV-14.

  17. Hematologic Features of Alpha Thalassemia Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh; Youssefi Kamangari, Reza; Banihashemi, Ali; Kholghi Oskooei, Vahid; Azizi, Mandana; Tamaddoni, Ahmad; Sedaghat, Sadegh; Vakili, Mohsen; Mahmoudi Nesheli, Hassan; Shabani, Soraya

    2012-01-01

    Alpha thalassemia (α-thal) is relatively common worldwide. Most carriers are defective in either one or two alpha globin genes out of four functional ones, with deletions being more common than point mutations. The hematologic features are very important for the selection of the appropriate molecular tests while determining the genotype. The aim of this study was to compare hematologic features of patients with various types of α globin mutations. Hematological indices including red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and percentage of Hemoglobin (HBA1, HBA2 and HBF) of seven-hundred and twenty two patients presenting ten different α-thal genotypes were considered. All patients showed reduced MCV and/or MCH values.Moreover, MCV and MCH were lower in patients with two functional alpha globin genes in comparison to patients with one mutated alpha globin gene (P value<0.001). In conclusion, MCV and MCH valuescan be helpful for the selection of the appropriate molecular tests to determine the genotype of alphathalassemia carriers. PMID:24551772

  18. Human skeletal uptake of natural alpha radioactivity from {sup 210}Pb-supported {sup 210}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyedepo, A.C

    1998-06-01

    This thesis contributes to increasing knowledge on the dosimetry of natural alpha-particle radiation in skeletal tissues, particularly in utero, and associated risks of malignancy. Alpha-particle radiation is an established aetiological factor of cancer. In the human body, polonium-210 decayed from skeletal lead-210 ({sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po) is the predominant natural alpha-emitter. {sup 210}Pb displaces calcium (Ca) in mineral hydroxyapatite, especially during periods of rapid bone growth and remodelling when Ca is laid down. It was therefore necessary to study alpha activity uptake and calcification concurrently within bone. Human studies were undertaken on: fetal vertebrae, 17 - 42 weeks of gestation, 74 samples; adult vertebrae, 40 - 95 years, 40 samples; and adult ribs, 20 - 95 years, 51 samples. Specimens were unconcentrated and weighed <5 g each. TASTRAK alpha-particle autoradiography was used to assess the bone activity concentration and spatial microdistribution of {sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po. Alpha track data were resolved by specially written software named SPATS (Selection Program for Analysing Track Structures). Ca and phosphorus (P) were biochemically determined. Results were examined for trends in bone type, gender and chronological ageing in humans. The main research findings were: 1) The Ca content of fetal vertebrae increased linearly at a weekly rate of 0.2g Ca 100 g{sup -1} wet bone (typical values of 2, 4, 6 g 100 g{sup -1} at 16, 26 and 36 weeks). 2) The P concentration also increased with advancing fetal age. 3) The Ca:P bone weight ratio rose from 1.7 to 2.2 by 32 gestational weeks. 4) The overall range in bone {sup 210}Pb/{sup 210}Po alpha activity was 0.25 - 1.1 Bq kg{sup -1} with correlation between activity concentration and fetal age (0.47 {+-} 0.05 Bq kg{sup -1} for 17 - 26 weeks, 0.67 {+-} 0.04 Bq kg{sup -1} for 32 - 42 weeks). 5) The correlation between increased alpha radioactivity and increased Ca concentration approximating to 0

  19. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  20. Effects of bacteria-produced human alpha, beta, and gamma interferons on in vitro immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, M R; Weck, P K; Rinderknecht, E; Harkins, R N; Frane, J W; Ross, M J

    1984-04-01

    The effects of bacteria-produced human interferons (HuIFN) alpha, beta, and gamma on in vitro immune functions of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied. Proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin was significantly inhibited by the addition of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta at 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml. In contrast, HuIFN-gamma showed suppressive activities only when added at 1000 U/ml. HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta caused significant inhibition of human mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR) as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Similar inhibition was caused by HuIFN-gamma when it was added only at very low concentrations (1 U/ml); 10, 100, or 1000 U/ml resulted in no or only a modest increase in MLR. All three interferons exhibited dose-related effects on PWM-induced immunoglobulin synthesis in cultures of PBMC. These data demonstrate that purified interferons produced by recombinant DNA technology can significantly alter in vitro immune functions and that HuIFN-gamma has properties which are different from those of HuIFN-alpha 2 or HuIFN-beta.

  1. Splanchnic removal of human alpha-atrial natriuretic peptide in humans: enhancement after food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Bendtsen, F; Gerbes, A L

    1990-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of food ingestion on splanchnic disposal of human alpha-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF), hepatic-intestinal removal of ANF was determined before and after a test meal. Hepatic venous and arterial plasma samples were obtained from six subjects, most of whom had only...... disorders of minor degree. Hepatic blood flow (HBF) increased significantly after meal ingestion (1.10 +/- 0.17 [SEM] to 1.51 +/- 0.26 L/min, P less than .01). Baseline arterial ANF (10.9 +/- 3.1 pmol/L) did not change significantly. In contrast, hepatic venous ANF increased after meal intake (5.7 +/- 2...... .05). Splanchnic removal of ANF was 3.0 +/- 0.5 pmol/min before and increased to a maximum value (7.1 +/- 2.2 pmol/min, P less than .05) 35 minutes after ingestion of the meal. Our results showed enhanced splanchnic removal of ANF after food intake. This is due to increased hepatic...

  2. 13 native human interferon-alpha species assessed for immunoregulatory properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1983-01-01

    by IFN titration on human cells, the "immunological efficacies" of the 13 different HuIFN-alpha species were determined in three different immunological systems with the following results: (1) Augmentation of the NK function was a property of all species, although the two lower species (16.6 kD, 16.9 k......D) were clearly less efficient with "titers" in the NK system reduced 25-fold. (2) Enhanced expression of HLA on lymphocyte membranes was induced by all the HuIFN-alpha species to the same extent. (3) Addition of IFN to mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) augmented the CML outcome of the cultures....... In this system all 13 species exerted their effect equally well; no clear inferiority or superiority of individual species were seen. It is concluded that the fractionation of the IFN-alpha into 13 species does not give rise to IFN species which are specific only for some functions and not for others. All...

  3. Human Beta Cells Produce and Release Serotonin to Inhibit Glucagon Secretion from Alpha Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaça, Joana; Molina, Judith; Menegaz, Danusa; Pronin, Alexey N; Tamayo, Alejandro; Slepak, Vladlen; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2016-12-20

    In the pancreatic islet, serotonin is an autocrine signal increasing beta cell mass during metabolic challenges such as those associated with pregnancy or high-fat diet. It is still unclear whether serotonin is relevant for regular islet physiology and hormone secretion. Here, we show that human beta cells produce and secrete serotonin when stimulated with increases in glucose concentration. Serotonin secretion from beta cells decreases cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in neighboring alpha cells via 5-HT1F receptors and inhibits glucagon secretion. Without serotonergic input, alpha cells lose their ability to regulate glucagon secretion in response to changes in glucose concentration, suggesting that diminished serotonergic control of alpha cells can cause glucose blindness and the uncontrolled glucagon secretion associated with diabetes. Supporting this model, pharmacological activation of 5-HT1F receptors reduces glucagon secretion and has hypoglycemic effects in diabetic mice. Thus, modulation of serotonin signaling in the islet represents a drug intervention opportunity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Analysis of Maxi-K alpha subunit splice variants in human myometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison John J

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (Maxi-K channels are implicated in the modulation of human uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the regulatory mechanism(s governing the expression of Maxi-K channels with decreased calcium sensitivity at parturition are unclear. The objectives of this study were to investigate mRNA expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, in human non-pregnant and pregnant myometrium, prior to and after labour onset, to determine whether altered expression of these splice variants is associated with decreased calcium sensitivity observed at labour onset. Methods Myometrial biopsies were obtained at hysterectomy (non-pregnant, NP, and at Caesarean section, at elective (pregnant not-in-labour, PNL and intrapartum (pregnant in-labour, PL procedures. RNA was extracted from all biopsies and quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate for possible differential expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, between these functionally-distinct myometrial tissue sets. Results RT-PCR analysis identified the presence of a 132 bp and an 87 bp spliced exon of the Maxi-K alpha subunit in all three myometrial tissue sets. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a decrease in the expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit with labour onset. While there was no change in the proportion of Maxi-K alpha subunits expressing the 87 bp spliced exon, the proportion of alpha subunits expressing the 132 bp spliced exon was significantly increased with labour onset, compared to both non-pregnant and pregnant not-in-labour tissues. An increased proportion of 132 bp exon-containing alpha subunit variants with labour onset is of interest, as channels expressing this spliced exon have decreased calcium and voltage sensitivities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that decreased Maxi-K alpha subunit mRNA expression in human myometrium at

  5. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placent...

  6. Do saw palmetto extracts block human alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in vivo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepel, M; Dinh, L; Mitchell, A; Schäfers, R F; Rübben, H; Michel, M C

    2001-02-15

    To test whether saw palmetto extracts, which act as alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists in vitro, also do so in vivo in man. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, four-way cross-over study 12 healthy young men were treated with three different saw palmetto extract preparations (320 mg o.d.) for 8 days each. On the last day, before and 2, 4 and 6 hr after drug intake blood pressure and heart rate were determined and blood samples obtained, which were used in an ex vivo radioreceptor assay with cloned human alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. Saw palmetto extract treatment did not result in alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype occupancy in the radioreceptor assay. Although the saw palmetto extracts caused minor reductions of supine blood pressure, they did not affect blood pressure during orthostatic stress testing and did not alter heart rate under either condition. Moreover, plasma catecholamines remained largely unaltered. Despite their alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist effects in vitro, therapeutically used doses of saw palmetto extracts do not cause alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonism in man in vivo. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 modulates human adipocyte metabolism via nongenomic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H; Norman, A W; Okamura, W H; Sen, A; Zemel, M B

    2001-12-01

    We reported recently that suppression of the renal 1alpha,25-dihyroxyvitamin D3 (1lpha,25-(OH)2-D3) production in aP2-agouti transgenic mice by increasing dietary calcium decreases adipocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), stimulates lipolysis, inhibits lipogenesis, and reduces adiposity. However, it was not clear whether this modulation of adipocyte metabolism by dietary calcium is a direct effect of inhibition of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3-induced [Ca2+]i. Accordingly, we have now evaluated the direct role of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3. Human adipocytes exhibited a 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3 dose-responsive (1-50 nM) increase in [Ca2+]i (Pinhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis (Pinhibiting basal lipolysis (Pinhibition of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3-induced [Ca2+]i may contribute to an anti-obesity effect of dietary calcium, and the mVDR may represent an important target for obesity.

  8. Expression of β-globin by cancer cells promotes cell survival during blood-borne dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Miyamoto, David T.; Wittner, Ben S.; Sullivan, James P.; Aceto, Nicola; Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Yu, Min; Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Comaills, Valentine; Morris, Robert; Desai, Rushil; Desai, Niyati; Emmons, Erin; Milner, John D.; Lee, Richard J.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Sequist, Lecia V.; Haas, Wilhelm; Ting, David T.; Toner, Mehmet; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis-competent circulating tumour cells (CTCs) experience oxidative stress in the bloodstream, but their survival mechanisms are not well defined. Here, comparing single-cell RNA-Seq profiles of CTCs from breast, prostate and lung cancers, we observe consistent induction of β-globin (HBB), but not its partner α-globin (HBA). The tumour-specific origin of HBB is confirmed by sequence polymorphisms within human xenograft-derived CTCs in mouse models. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured breast CTCs triggers HBB induction, mediated through the transcriptional regulator KLF4. Depletion of HBB in CTC-derived cultures has minimal effects on primary tumour growth, but it greatly increases apoptosis following ROS exposure, and dramatically reduces CTC-derived lung metastases. These effects are reversed by the anti-oxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine. Conversely, overexpression of HBB is sufficient to suppress intracellular ROS within CTCs. Altogether, these observations suggest that β-globin is selectively deregulated in cancer cells, mediating a cytoprotective effect during blood-borne metastasis. PMID:28181495

  9. Alpha-lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Malin; Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Düringer, Caroline; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brooks, Charles L; Berliner, Lawrence; Linse, Sara; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-12-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism. Previous studies have shown that a conformational change is required to form HAMLET from alpha-lactalbumin, and that a partially unfolded conformation is maintained in the HAMLET complex. This study examined if unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. We used the bovine alpha-lactalbumin Ca(2+) site mutant D87A, which is unable to bind Ca(2+), and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the apoptosis assay, but could readily be converted to a HAMLET-like complex in the presence of oleic acid. BAMLET (bovine alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and D87A-BAMLET complexes were both able to kill tumor cells. This activity was independent of the Ca(2+)site, as HAMLET maintained a high affinity for Ca(2+) but D87A-BAMLET was active with no Ca(2+) bound. We conclude that partial unfolding of alpha-lactalbumin is necessary but not sufficient to trigger cell death, and that the activity of HAMLET is defined both by the protein and the lipid cofactor. Furthermore, a functional Ca(2+)-binding site is not required for conversion of alpha-lactalbumin to the active complex or to cause cell death. This suggests that the lipid cofactor stabilizes the altered fold without interfering with the Ca(2+)site.

  10. Integrin alphaIIbbeta3-specific synthetic human monoclonal antibodies and HCDR3 peptides that potently inhibit platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Junho; Rader, Christoph; Popkov, Mikhail; Hur, Young-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Young-Joon; Barbas, Carlos F

    2004-02-01

    The interaction of fibrinogen with integrin alphaIIbbeta3 (GPIIb/IIIa), in part mediated by an RGD tripeptide motif, is an essential step in platelet aggregation. Based on their inhibition of platelet aggregation, three integrin alphaIIbbeta3 inhibitors are clinically approved. The clinically most widely used integrin alphaIIbbeta3 inhibitor abciximab is a chimeric mouse/human antibody that induces thrombocytopenia, often severe, in 1-2% of patients due to a human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. In addition, unlike other ligands mimicking small molecular drugs, abciximab cross-reacts with integrin alphavbeta3 and alphaMbeta2. Here we used phage display to select monoclonal antibodies specific to integrin alphaIIbbeta3 from a synthetic human antibody library based on the randomized HCDR3 sequence VGXXXRADXXXYAMDV. The selected antibodies revealed a strong consensus in HCDR3 (V(V/W)CRAD(K/R)RC) and high specificity toward integrin alphaIIbbeta3 but not to other RGD binding integrins such as alphavbeta3, alphavbeta5, and alpha5beta1. The selected antibodies as well as three synthetic peptides (VWCRADRRC, VWCRADKRC, and VVCRADRRC) whose sequences were derived from the HCDR3 sequences of the selected antibodies strongly inhibited the interaction between integrin alphaIIbbeta3 and fibrinogen and platelet aggregation ex vivo. To our knowledge, these are the first fully human monoclonal antibodies that are specific to integrin alphaIIbbeta3 and can potently inhibit platelet aggregation.

  11. Hemoglobin alpha 2 gene +861 G>A polymorphism in Turkish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dilay Ciglidag Dungul

    Abstract Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder which is divided into two groups: alpha and beta. HBA1 and HBA2 are the two genes associated with alpha thalassemia. The aim of this study is to investigate abnormal hemoglobin variants of alpha globin gene in healthy abnormal hemoglobin carrying individuals with ...

  12. Hemoglobin alpha 2 gene +861 G>A polymorphism in Turkish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder which is divided into two groups: alpha and beta. HBA1 and HBA2 are the two genes associated with alpha thalassemia. The aim of this study is to investigate abnormal hemoglobin variants of alpha globin gene in healthy abnormal hemoglobin carrying individuals with intact beta ...

  13. Prevalence of -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles in sickle cell trait and beta-thalassemia patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, María Paulina; Ibarra, Bertha; Magaña, María Teresa; de la Luz Chávez, María; Perea, F Javier

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alpha-globin gene mutations in three groups of Mexican unrelated individuals. The first two groups were normal and sickle cell trait individuals from the Costa Chica region, a place with a 12.8% frequency of HbS carriers, and the third group comprised of Mexican mestizo patients with beta-thalassemia. We searched for -alpha(3.7) and -alpha(4.2) alpha(+)-thalassemia deletion alleles, as well as the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication through long-gap PCR. The alleles -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) were found in the heterozygote state only; 19% of the normal subjects had the -alpha(3.7) allele, and 2% showed the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) allele. In individuals with the sickle cell trait, 17% had the -alpha(3.7) deletion, and the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication was observed in 3% of these individuals. We revealed that 16% of the subjects with beta-thalassemia showed the -alpha(3.7) deletion and 28% the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication. The -alpha(4.2) deletion was not detected in any individual. The frequency of the -alpha(3.7) allele was roughly the same in the three groups studied; this can be explained by the fact that the three groups have common genes from Africa and the Mediterranean, where a high prevalence of alpha(+)-thalassemia has been observed. To our knowledge, the frequency of alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication observed in the Mexican beta-thalassemia patients is the highest reported. As the -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles are very common in our selected populations, we believe that there is a need to investigate systematically the alpha-globin gene mutations in all hemoglobinopathies in the Mexican population.

  14. Malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells by high linear energy transfer alpha-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhen; Gu, Yongpeng; Miki, Jun; Hukku, Bharati; McLeod, David G; Hei, Tom K; Rhim, Johng S

    2007-09-01

    Although epidemiological studies have suggested a positive correlation between environmental radon exposure and prostate cancer, the mechanism involved is not clear. In the present study, we examined the oncogenic transforming potency of alpha-particles using non-tumorigenic, telomerase-immortalized human benign prostate epithelial cells. We report the malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells after a single exposure to 0.6 Gy dose of alpha-particles. Transformed cells showed anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and induced progressively growing tumors when transplanted into SCID mice. The tumors were characterized histologically as poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. The cell line derived from tumor (SCID 5015), like the unirradiated cells, expressed cytokeratin 5, 8 and 18, NKX3.1 and AMACR. The malignant cells showed increased secretion of MMP2. Stepwise chromosomal changes in the progression to tumorigenicity were observed. Chromosome abnormalities were identified in both irradiated and tumorigenic cells relative to the non-irradiated control cells. Prominent changes in chromosomes 6, 11 and 16, as well as mutations and deletions of the p53 gene were observed in the tumor outgrowth and tumor cells. These findings provide the first evidence of malignant transformation of human benign prostate epithelial cells exposed to a single dose of alpha-particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular alterations that occur in radiation carcinogenesis in human prostate cells.

  15. Molecular characterization of alpha-Thalassemia in Adana, Turkey: A single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Birol; Yildiz, Sule Menziletoglu; Tekinturhan, Ferda; Dincer, Suleyman; Akyuzluer, Inci; Okten, Secaatin; Erkman, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Thalassemia (alpha-thal) is a widespread genetic disorder throughout the world caused primarily by reduced synthesis of the alpha-globin chains, and it has been found at a high incidence in Turkey. Our aim in this study was to determine the frequency and molecular properties of alpha-thal in Adana, Turkey. A total of 3,000 individuals comprising premarital couples or patients with anemia were screened between 2007 and 2008. Hematological parameters were analyzed using an automatic cell counter, and to detect the carriers of hemoglobin variants, high-performance liquid chromatography was used. Molecular screening of the alpha-globin gene was carried out by an Alpha-Globin StripAssay which is based on multiplex PCR for specific amplification. We have identified 225 cases with alpha-thal and found that the prevalence of alpha-thal is 7.5% in this area. In molecular analyses, the alpha-thal gene mutations alpha(3.7), alpha(4.2), --(MED), --(20.5), alpha(PA-2)alpha, alphaalphaalpha(anti-3.7), and alpha(PA-1)alpha were detected. Our results showed that the alpha-thal mutations represent a great heterogeneity and that the -alpha(3.7) deletion has the highest frequency in Adana. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene deletions in alpha thalassemia prove that the 5' zeta locus is functional.

    OpenAIRE

    Pressley, L; Higgs, D R; Clegg, J B; Weatherall, D J

    1980-01-01

    The deletions in the zeta-alpha globin gene cluster in two infants with the hemoglobin Bart's hydrops fetalis syndrome (homozygous alpha thalassemia 1) have been mapped by restriction endonuclease analysis using a zeta-specific probe. DNA from a Thai infant lacked the psi alpha 1 gene and both alpha genes, but the zeta genes were present. A Greek infant's DNA had also lost the 3' zeta 1 gene. Because zeta globin was synthesized in the infant's cord blood, this indicates that the 5' zeta 2 gen...

  18. Gene deletions in alpha thalassemia prove that the 5' zeta locus is functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, L; Higgs, D R; Clegg, J B; Weatherall, D J

    1980-01-01

    The deletions in the zeta-alpha globin gene cluster in two infants with the hemoglobin Bart's hydrops fetalis syndrome (homozygous alpha thalassemia 1) have been mapped by restriction endonuclease analysis using a zeta-specific probe. DNA from a Thai infant lacked the psi alpha 1 gene and both alpha genes, but the zeta genes were present. A Greek infant's DNA had also lost the 3' zeta 1 gene. Because zeta globin was synthesized in the infant's cord blood, this indicates that the 5' zeta 2 gene recently identified by Lauer et al. [Lauer, J., Shen, C. J. & Maniatis, T. (1980) Cell, in press] must be functional. Images PMID:6158051

  19. Monoclonal antibody based immunoassays to screen for alpha-thalassemia in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, N.; Than, K.A. Culp, K.M. [Isolab, Inc., Akron, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Alpha-thalassemia (alpha-thal) is characterized by the absence or reduction in synthesis of the alpha-globin chain due to either deletions or other abnormalities involving the alpha-globin genes located on the short arm of chromosome 16. The diploid cells have four alpha chain genes. The deletion of one, two, three or all four of these genes could result in mild to a complete alpha chain deficiency known as the Hydrops fetalis syndrome or alpha-thal-1, which causes fetal death. It is important to develop a sensitive test to detect carriers of alpha-thal-1 trait for genetic counseling. It has recently been observed that the presence of minute amounts of zeta-globin chains (0.01-1%) could serve as a biological marker of alpha-thal carriers. Because high sensitivity is required, we constructed a monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay which can be analyzed either by colorimetric or fluorimetric methods. By testing blood samples from individuals of Southeast Asian ancestry, we were able to show that various forms and combinations of deletions or inactivations of two or three alpha-globin genes results in alpha-thalassemia conditions that have elevated levels of the zeta-chain. Sensitivity achieved in these tests was < 0.1% zeta chain, or as low as 5 ng zeta-chain. Data correlate with results from reversed phase HPLC.

  20. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways.

  1. Use of a monoclonal antibody to distinguish between precursor and mature forms of human lysosomal alpha-glucosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, R. P.; Strijland, A.; Surya, I.; Brouwer-Kelder, E. M.; Kroos, M.; Hilkens, J.; Hilgers, J.; Reuser, A. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The maturation of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase in cultured human skin fibroblasts was studied using a monoclonal antibody that distinguishes between the precursor and mature forms of the enzyme. Monoclonal antibodies against alpha-glucosidase isolated from placenta were produced by the hybridoma

  2. The antagonistic effect of antipsychotic drugs on a HEK293 cell line stably expressing human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nourian, Zahra; Mulvany, Michael J; Nielsen, Karsten Bork

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs often cause orthostatic hypotension, probably through antagonist action on resistance vessel alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors. Here we have tested this possibility directly using cells transfected with a relevant human alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor splice variant. To determine a splice variant...

  3. On studying protein phosphorylation patterns using bottom-up LC-MS/MS: the case of human alpha-casein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Savitski, Mikhail M; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    -LC-MS/MS. The occupancy rates of phosphosites in proteins may differ by orders of magnitude, and thus the occupancy rate must be reported for each occupied phosphosite. To highlight potential pitfalls in quantifying the occupancy rates, alpha(s1)-casein from human milk was selected as a model molecule representing...... moderately phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, human milk from one Caucasian woman in the eighth month of lactation was used. The phosphorylation level of caseins is believed to have major implications for the formation of micelles that are involved in delivering valuable calcium phosphate and other...... minerals to the new-born. Human alpha(s1)-casein has been reported to be much less phosphorylated than ruminant caseins, which may indicate a different function of caseins in humans. Revealing the phosphorylation pattern in human casein can thus shed light on its function. The current study found...

  4. Alpha-beta and gamma rhythms subserve feedback and feedforward influences among human visual cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalareas, Georgios; Vezoli, Julien; van Pelt, Stan; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Kennedy, Henry; Fries, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Primate visual cortex is hierarchically organized. Bottom-up and top-down influences are exerted through distinct frequency channels, as was recently revealed in macaques by correlating inter-areal influences with laminar anatomical projection patterns. Because this anatomical data cannot be obtained in human subjects, we selected seven homologous macaque and human visual areas, and correlated the macaque laminar projection patterns to human inter-areal directed influences as measured with magnetoencephalography. We show that influences along feedforward projections predominate in the gamma band, whereas influences along feedback projections predominate in the alpha-beta band. Rhythmic inter-areal influences constrain a functional hierarchy of the seven homologous human visual areas that is in close agreement with the respective macaque anatomical hierarchy. Rhythmic influences allow an extension of the hierarchy to 26 human visual areas including uniquely human brain areas. Hierarchical levels of ventral and dorsal stream visual areas are differentially affected by inter-areal influences in the alpha-beta band. PMID:26777277

  5. Suppression of TNF-alpha production by S-adenosylmethionine in human mononuclear leukocytes is not mediated by polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Sauter, S.

    2006-01-01

    precursors or metabolites [phosphatidylcholine, choline, betaine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] have a modulating effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by endotoxin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes and whether SAM-dependent polyamines (spermidine, spermine) are mediators of SAM...... not alter TNF-alpha release. Inhibitors of polyamine synthesis that blocked either putrescine (difluoromethylornithine) or spermine (CGP48664A) production did not affect TNF-alpha synthesis. Endotoxin stimulation of leukocytes did not alter the intracellular levels of polyamines. In addition...

  6. The human genome encodes ten alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins: HspB1-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappé, G.; Franck, E.; Verschuure, P.; Boelens, W.C.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Jong, de W.W.

    2003-01-01

    To obtain an inventory of all human genes that code for alpha-crystallin-related small heat shock proteins (sHsps), the databases available from the public International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and the private Celera human genome project were exhaustively searched. Using the human

  7. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of membrane-anchored cell surface proteins with a putative role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. By immunostaining, ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) was up-regulated in several human carcinomas and could be detected along the tumor...... cell membranes. Because of this intriguing staining pattern, we investigated whether human ADAM 12 supports tumor cell adhesion. Using an in vitro assay using recombinant polypeptides expressed in Escherichia coli, we examined the ability of individual domains of human ADAM 12 and ADAM 15 to support...... tumor cell adhesion. We found that the disintegrin-like domain of human ADAM 15 supported adhesion of alphavbeta3-expressing A375 melanoma cells. In the case of human ADAM 12, however, recombinant polypeptides of the cysteine-rich domain but not the disintegrin-like domain supported cell adhesion...

  8. Exercise and IL-6 infusion inhibit endotoxin-induced TNF-alpha production in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starkie, Rebecca; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Jauffred, Sune

    2003-01-01

    and atherosclerosis. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments in which eight healthy males either rested (CON), rode a bicycle for 3 h (EX), or were infused with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) for 3 h while they rested. After 2.5 h, the volunteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli...... exercise and rhIL-6 infusion at physiological concentrations inhibit endotoxin-induced TNF-alpha production in humans. Hence, these data provide the first experimental evidence that physical activity mediates antiinflammatory activity and suggest that the mechanism include IL-6, which is produced...

  9. Effect of TNF{alpha} on activities of different promoters of human apolipoprotein A-I gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Sergey V., E-mail: serge@iem.sp.ru [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mogilenko, Denis A. [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shavva, Vladimir S. [Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Dizhe, Ella B.; Ignatovich, Irina A. [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Perevozchikov, Andrej P., E-mail: app@iem.sp.ru [Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Embryology, St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF{alpha} stimulates the distal alternative promoter of human apoA-I gene. {yields} TNF{alpha} acts by weakening of promoter competition within apoA-I gene (promoter switching). {yields} MEK1/2 and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs take part in apoA-I promoter switching. -- Abstract: Human apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a major structural and functional protein component of high-density lipoproteins. The expression of the apolipoprotein A-I gene (apoA-I) in hepatocytes is repressed by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta} and TNF{alpha}. Recently, two novel additional (alternative) promoters for human apoA-I gene have been identified. Nothing is known about the role of alternative promoters in TNF{alpha}-mediated downregulation of apoA-I gene. In this article we report for the first time about the different effects of TNF{alpha} on two alternative promoters of human apoA-I gene. Stimulation of HepG2 cells by TNF{alpha} leads to activation of the distal alternative apoA-I promoter and downregulation of the proximal alternative and the canonical apoA-I promoters. This effect is mediated by weakening of the promoter competition within human apoA-I 5'-regulatory region (apoA-I promoter switching) in the cells treated by TNF{alpha}. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 cascade and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs are important for TNF{alpha}-mediated apoA-I promoter switching.

  10. Ovine prolactin and human growth hormone derivatives. Specific modification of their alpha-amino groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridad, J J; Nowicki, C; Santomé, J A; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1988-06-01

    The alpha-amino group of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and human growth hormone (hGH) was selectively modified by transamination with glyoxylic acid. No difference was found in the binding capacity of transaminated oPRL to rat liver lactogenic receptors with respect to its control, although both samples showed a decrease in its binding capacity with reference to the native hormone. This decrease was due to conformational changes caused by the reaction conditions and not by the transamination itself, as shown by the circular dichroism spectra. Transaminated hGH retained the full binding capacity of the hormone. These results suggest that the alpha-amino group is not relevant for the binding to lactogenic liver receptors in both lactogenic hormones.

  11. A novel, secreted form of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) provokes myogenesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilpin, B J; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1998-01-01

    , membrane-bound form designated ADAM 12-L (L for long form). These two forms arise by alternative splicing of a single gene located on chromosome 10q26. Northern blotting demonstrated that mRNAs of both forms are abundant in human term placenta and are also present in some tumor cell lines. The ADAM 12-L......The ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease) family of cell-surface proteins may have an important role in cellular interactions and in modulating cellular responses. In this report we describe a novel, secreted form of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha), designated ADAM 12-S (S for short), and a larger...... transcript can also be detected in normal human adult skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. Human A204 embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells that do not differentiate into muscle cells and do not express any form of ADAM 12 were stably transfected with an ADAM 12-S minigene encoding the disintegrin domain...

  12. Physical mapping of the globin gene deletion in (δβ)° - thalassaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Kooter, J.M.; Flavell, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    We have constructed a physical map of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites in the (δ+β)-globin gene region in the DNA of patients with (δβ)°-thalassaemia. This map shows that a 10 kb deletion has occurred in (δβ)°-thalassaemia to remove the entire β-globin gene and the 3′ portion of the δ-globin

  13. Characterization and Comparative Immunoreactivity of Antibody to Newt (T. cristatus) Globins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalski, Louis A.; Walsh, Anne W.; Merrow, Martha; Paulekus, Wayne; Mackin, William; Grasso, Joseph A.

    1984-01-01

    1. Rabbit antisera to newt (T. cristatus) globin were produced by repeated injections of globin and antiglobin antibodies purified by chromatography on globin-Sepharose 4B. 2. Ouchterlony and SDS PAGE analysis indicated that the material eluted from the affinity column was rabbit IgG. 3. The

  14. Blockade of alcohol's amnestic activity in humans by an alpha5 subtype benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Besson, Marie; Wilson, Susan J; Dawson, Gerard R; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2007-12-01

    Alcohol produces many subjective and objective effects in man including pleasure, sedation, anxiolysis, plus impaired eye movements and memory. In human volunteers we have used a newly available GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist that is selective for the alpha5 subtype (a5IA) to evaluate the role of this subtype in mediating these effects of alcohol on the brain. After pre-treatment with a5IA, we found almost complete blockade of the marked impairment caused by alcohol (mean breath concentration 150mg/100ml) of word list learning and partial but non-significant reversal of subjective sedation without effects on other measures such as intoxication, liking, and slowing of eye movements. This action was not due to alterations in alcohol kinetics and so provides the first proof of concept that selectively decreasing GABA-A receptor function at a specific receptor subtype can offset some actions of alcohol in humans. It also supports growing evidence for a key role of the alpha5 subtype in memory. Inverse agonists at other GABA-A receptor subtypes may prove able to reverse other actions of alcohol, and so offer a new approach to understanding the actions of alcohol in the human brain and in the treatment of alcohol related disorders in humans.

  15. The group B streptococcal alpha C protein binds alpha1beta1-integrin through a novel KTD motif that promotes internalization of GBS within human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Gilles R; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2007-12-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis among neonates and a cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. GBS epithelial cell invasion is associated with expression of alpha C protein (ACP). Loss of ACP expression results in a decrease in GBS internalization and translocation across human cervical epithelial cells (ME180). Soluble ACP and its 170 amino acid N-terminal region (NtACP), but not the repeat protein RR', bind to ME180 cells and reduce internalization of wild-type GBS to levels obtained with an ACP-deficient isogenic mutant. In the current study, ACP colocalized with alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin, resulting in integrin clustering as determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. NtACP contains two structural domains, D1 and D2. D1 is structurally similar to fibronectin's integrin-binding region (FnIII10). D1's (KT)D146 motif is structurally similar to the FnIII10 (RG)D1495 integrin-binding motif, suggesting that ACP binds alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin via the D1 domain. The (KT)D146A mutation within soluble NtACP reduced its ability to bind alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin and inhibit GBS internalization within ME180 cells. Thus ACP binding to human epithelial cell integrins appears to contribute to GBS internalization within epithelial cells.

  16. Molecular design of the C alpha beta interface favors specific pairing of introduced TCR alpha beta in human T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, Ralf-Holger; Willemsen, Ralph A.; Kuball, Juergen; Grabowski, Margarete; Engel, Renate; Intan, Ratna S.; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Huber, Christoph; Theobald, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    A promising approach to adoptive transfer therapy of tumors is to reprogram autologous T lymphocytes by TCR gene transfer of defined Ag specificity. An obstacle, however, is the undesired pairing of introduced TCR alpha- and TCR beta-chains with the endogenous TCR chains. These events vary depending

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induces Cl- and K+ secretion in human distal colon driven by prostaglandin E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H; Fromm, M; Bode, H; Scholz, P; Riecken, E O; Schulzke, J D

    1996-10-01

    Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been found in, for example, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To investigate a possible contribution of TNF-alpha to the pathogenesis of diarrhea in these diseases, ion transport of human distal colon was studied in the Ussing chamber in vitro. Serosal addition of TNF-alpha increased short-circuit current (Isc) of partially stripped tissues in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum Isc increase of 1.8 +/- 0.2 mumol.h-1.cm-2 was reached after 60 +/- 9 min at 200 ng/ml TNF-alpha. Bidirectional tracer flux measurements revealed that TNF-alpha induced an increase in 36 Cl serosal-to-mucosal flux, a decrease in 36Cl- mucosal-to-serosal flux, and a slight increase in K+ secretion indicated by an increased secretory 86Rb net flux. In the highly differentiated colonic epithelial cell line HT-29/B6, TNF-alpha had no effect on Isc, suggesting a mediation step located in the subepithelium. This supposition was supported by measurements on totally stripped human tissues, since removal of subepithelial layers by total stripping reduced the TNF-alpha effect by 40%. Experiments with tetrodotoxin (10(-6)M) indicated that the TNF-alpha effect was not mediated by the enteric nervous system. The specific 5-lipoxygenase blocker ICI-230487 (5 x 10(-8)M) also had no effect on TNF-alpha action. In contrast, inhibition of cyclooxygenase by indomethacin (10(-6)M inhibited the effect of TNF-alpha. Radioimmunoassay of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the serosal bathing solution revealed an increase in PGE2 production/release after addition of TNF-alpha, which paralleled the Isc response. We conclude that TNF-alpha changed Cl- and K+ transport toward secretion in human colon. This effect was mediated by PGE2 produced by subepithelial cells. Thus TNF-alpha could be a mediator of diarrhea during intestinal inflammation, e.g., in IBD and HIV infection.

  18. A selective defect of interferon alpha production in human immunodeficiency virus-infected monocytes [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1991 Jan 1;173(1):277

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) induces significant antiretroviral activities that affect the ability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infect and replicate in its principal target cells, CD4+ T cells and macrophages. A major endogenous source of IFN-alpha during any infection is the macrophage. Thus, macrophages have the potential to produce both IFN-alpha and HIV. In this study, we examined the production of IFN-alpha and other cytokines by macrophage colony- stimulating factor (M-CSF)-...

  19. Effects of 2-aminoanthracene and benzo(. cap alpha. )pyrene on interferon production in human foreskin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw; Vaughn, J.M.; Morales, D.

    1987-11-01

    Human foreskin fibroblast cell cultures (Flow 7000, FS-35) were treated with varying concentrations of 2-aminoanthracene or benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene for a two-day period prior to interferon (IFN) induction by either poly I . poly C, or 'Vesicular' Stomatitis virus (VSV). IFN in test cell fluids was then assayed and compared to production in untreated cultures. Both cell lines produced similar amounts of beta-interferon in response to poly I . poly C simulus. However, Flow 7000 fibroblasts were extremely sensitive to benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene, with concentrations as low as 1 ..mu..M treatment inhibiting 93% of IFN-..beta.. productivity. Treatment of FS-35 cells with ten times this concentration was required to inhibit 85% of IFN-..beta.. productivity. Both test chemicals inhibited IFN-..beta.. productivity in FS-35 fibroblasts to the same extent. It was also noted that FS-35 produced alpha-interferon in response to VSV challenge, but this production was vulnerable to treatment with both test chemicals. In all cases, observed levels of IFN inhibition were directly proportional to the concentration of the applied chemical. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-05-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-alpha-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the beta-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the beta-domain of alpha-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed.

  1. Expression and characterization of bioactive recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin in the milk of transgenic cloned cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Yang, P; Tang, B; Sun, X; Zhang, R; Guo, C; Gong, G; Liu, Y; Li, R; Zhang, L; Dai, Y; Li, N

    2008-12-01

    Improvement of the nutritional value of cow milk with transgenic expression of recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) has been previously attempted. However, the detailed characterization of the recombinant protein and analysis of the transgenic milk components are not explored yet. Here, we first report production of healthy transgenic cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which expression of up to 1.55 g/L of recombinant human alpha-LA was achieved. The recombinant human alpha-LA was purified from transgenic milk and displayed physicochemical properties similar to its natural counterpart with respect to molecular weight, structure, and regulatory activity for beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase. Additionally, no N-glycosylation was found in the recombinant human alpha-LA, whereas the endogenous bovine alpha-LA was glycosylated at the unusual site (71)Asn-Ile-(73)Cys. Compared with milk from nontransgenic cows, expression of the transgene did not materially alter milk composition, such as fat and protein content. Our research thus provides scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of humanizing cow milk.

  2. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon...

  3. (3H)bunazosin, a novel selective radioligand of alpha 1 adrenoceptors in human prostates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kimura, R.; Maruyama, M.; Kawabe, K. (School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    The binding properties of a new radioligand, (3H)bunazosin, were studied in membranes of human prostates with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Specific binding of (3H)bunazosin was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity (Kd = 0.55 {plus minus} 0.04 nM). The density of (3H)bunazosin binding sites (Bmax) was 676 {plus minus} 33 fmol/mg. protein. (3H)Bunazosin rapidly associated with its binding sites in membranes of human prostates and reached steady state by 20 min. at 25C. The rate constants for association and dissociation of (3H)bunazosin binding were calculated to be 0.11 {plus minus} 0.01/nM/min. and 0.05 {plus minus} 0.02/min. (n = 4), respectively. Seven alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists competed with (3H)bunazosin for the binding sites in the rank order: R-(-)-YM-12617 greater than prazosin greater than SGB-1534 greater than bunazosin greater than terazosin greater than naftopidil greater than urapidil. In parallel studies with (3H)bunazosin, the Kd and Bmax values for (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates were slightly lower. There was a similarity in the potency and rank order of seven alpha 1, adrenoceptor antagonists for the inhibition of (3H) bunazosin and (3H)prazosin binding in human prostates. The new (3H)bunazosin binding assay in human prostates is remarkable for its low degree of nonspecific binding as compared to (3H)prazosin, especially at high ligand concentrations. Thus, (3H)bunazosin may become a useful radioligand for the further analysis of the alph 1 adrenoceptor binding sites in human prostates.

  4. Genetic evidence that HNF-1alpha-dependent transcriptional control of HNF-4alpha is essential for human pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara K; Párrizas, Marcelina; Jensen, Maria L

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) and HNF-1alpha impair insulin secretion and cause maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). HNF-4alpha is known to be an essential positive regulator of HNF-1alpha. More recent data demonstrates that HNF-4alpha expre...

  5. Wide diversity in structure and expression profiles among members of the Caenorhabditis elegans globin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov Serge

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high throughput genome sequencing facilities and powerful high performance bioinformatic tools has highlighted hitherto unexpected wide occurrence of globins in the three kingdoms of life. In silico analysis of the genome of C. elegans identified 33 putative globin genes. It remains a mystery why this tiny animal might need so many globins. As an inroad to understanding this complexity we initiated a structural and functional analysis of the globin family in C. elegans. Results All 33 C. elegans putative globin genes are transcribed. The translated sequences have the essential signatures of single domain bona fide globins, or they contain a distinct globin domain that is part of a larger protein. All globin domains can be aligned so as to fit the globin fold, but internal interhelical and N- and C-terminal extensions and a variety of amino acid substitutions generate much structural diversity among the globins of C. elegans. Likewise, the encoding genes lack a conserved pattern of intron insertion positioning. We analyze the expression profiles of the globins during the progression of the life cycle, and we find that distinct subsets of globins are induced, or repressed, in wild-type dauers and in daf-2(e1370/insulin-receptor mutant adults, although these animals share several physiological features including resistance to elevated temperature, oxidative stress and hypoxic death. Several globin genes are upregulated following oxygen deprivation and we find that HIF-1 and DAF-2 each are required for this response. Our data indicate that the DAF-2 regulated transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO positively modulates hif-1 transcription under anoxia but opposes expression of the HIF-1 responsive globin genes itself. In contrast, the canonical globin of C. elegans, ZK637.13, is not responsive to anoxia. Reduced DAF-2 signaling leads to enhanced transcription of this globin and DAF-16 is required for this effect

  6. Transcranial alternating current stimulation enhances individual alpha activity in human EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Zaehle

    Full Text Available Non-invasive electrical stimulation of the human cortex by means of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been instrumental in a number of important discoveries in the field of human cortical function and has become a well-established method for evaluating brain function in healthy human participants. Recently, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS has been introduced to directly modulate the ongoing rhythmic brain activity by the application of oscillatory currents on the human scalp. Until now the efficiency of tACS in modulating rhythmic brain activity has been indicated only by inference from perceptual and behavioural consequences of electrical stimulation. No direct electrophysiological evidence of tACS has been reported. We delivered tACS over the occipital cortex of 10 healthy participants to entrain the neuronal oscillatory activity in their individual alpha frequency range and compared results with those from a separate group of participants receiving sham stimulation. The tACS but not the sham stimulation elevated the endogenous alpha power in parieto-central electrodes of the electroencephalogram. Additionally, in a network of spiking neurons, we simulated how tACS can be affected even after the end of stimulation. The results show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP selectively modulates synapses depending on the resonance frequencies of the neural circuits that they belong to. Thus, tACS influences STDP which in turn results in aftereffects upon neural activity.The present findings are the first direct electrophysiological evidence of an interaction of tACS and ongoing oscillatory activity in the human cortex. The data demonstrate the ability of tACS to specifically modulate oscillatory brain activity and show its potential both at fostering knowledge on the functional significance of brain oscillations and for therapeutic application.

  7. ADAM12 and alpha9beta1 integrin are instrumental in human myogenic cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafuste, Peggy; Sonnet, Corinne; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    of alpha9 parallels that of ADAM12 and culminates at time of fusion. alpha9 and ADAM12 coimmunoprecipitate and participate to mpc adhesion. Inhibition of ADAM12/alpha9beta1 integrin interplay, by either ADAM12 antisense oligonucleotides or blocking antibody to alpha9beta1, inhibited overall mpc fusion...

  8. Fetal globin expression is regulated by Friend of Prmt1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Thamar Bryn; Gillemans, Nynke; Pourfarzad, Farzin; van Lom, Kirsten; von Lindern, Marieke; Grosveld, Frank; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 6% to 7% of the earth's population carries a mutation affecting red blood cell function. The β-thalassemias and sickle cell disease are the most common monogenic disorders caused by these mutations. Increased levels of γ-globin ameliorate the severity of these diseases because fetal

  9. Fetal globin expression is regulated by Friend of Prmt1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. van Dijk (Thamar); N. Gillemans (Nynke); F. Pourfarzad, F. (Farzin); K. van Lom (Kirsten); M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAnestimated 6% to 7% of the earth's population carries a mutation affecting red blood cell function. The β-thalassemias and sickle cell disease are the most common monogenic disorders caused by these mutations. Increased levels of γ-globin ameliorate the severity of these diseases

  10. Oxygen binding properties of non-mammalian nerve globins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen-binding globins occur in the nervous systems of both invertebrates and vertebrates. While the function of invertebrate nerve haemoglobins as oxygen stores that extend neural excitability under hypoxia has been convincingly demonstrated, the physiological role of vertebrate neuroglobins is ...

  11. [Effect of pectin substances on activity of human pancreatic alpha-amylase in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelpanova, T I; Vitiazev, F V; Mikhaleva, N Ia; Efimtseva, É A

    2012-06-01

    Pectin substances were extracted from food plants: sweet pepper Capsicum annuum L., carrot sowing Daucus sativus L., bulb onion Allium cepa L., white cabbage Brassica oleracea L. by two methods with acid solutions similar to gastric environment. The pectins that were extracted were characterized by Monosaccharide composition and quantitative contents of uronic acids, neutral monosaccharides, methoxy groups, protein. The inhibitory effect of all extracted pectin-protein complexes on activity of pharmaceutical drugs of human pancreatic alpha-amylase was detected. It was found that the inhibitory effect of isolated pectin substances was dependent upon the species of plant source, the manner of pectin substance extraction, the chemical composition and acting concentrations. The ability of pectin substances to suppress enzyme activity was found in a range of pectin concentrations from 0.5 up to 1.5 %. It was revealed that extracted pectin substances from bulb onion and white cabbage by acid solution with pepsin had a 2.4-3.4 times greater inhibiting effect on the human pancreatic alpha-amylase activity in comparison with pectin substances extracted by solution without pepsin from the same plant sources in high concentrations.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of human alpha-defensins 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Ericksen, B; Tucker, K; Lubkowski, J; Lu, W

    2004-09-01

    Human alpha-defensins are small, Cys-rich, cationic proteins expressed predominantly in neutrophils and intestinal epithelia. They play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity against infection. Progress in studying these molecules can be accelerated by access to large quantities of high-quality materials, which have been obtained mainly from natural sources. Here, we report total synthesis of human alpha-defensins 4, 5, and 6, also known as HNP4, HD5, and HD6, using the optimized N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIEA) in situ neutralization/2-(1 H-benzotriazolyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluroniumhexafluorophosphate (HBTU) activation protocol for solid-phase Boc chemistry. Oxidative folding/disulfide formation was achieved directly using crude peptides, resulting in an overall synthetic yield of 10-16% with high purity. Antimicrobial activity assays were performed with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, using colony-counting methods, and the results demonstrated differential activity against these strains. Our report describes a highly efficient synthetic approach that enables thorough structural and functional studies of these three important immunologic molecules.

  13. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Repeated Evolution of Chimeric Fusion Genes in the β-Globin Gene Family of Laurasiatherian Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J.; Storz, Jay F.; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB “Lepore” deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20–100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. PMID:24814285

  15. Implications of the genetic epidemiology of globin haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Merat, Ahmad; Gerard, Nathalie; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Nagel, Ronald L

    2006-12-01

    To determine the origin of sickle cell mutation in different ethnic groups living in southern Iran, we studied the haplotype background of the betaS and betaA genes in subjects from the provinces of Fars, Khuzestan, Bushehr, Hormozgan, and Kerman and from the islands of Khark and Qeshm. beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes were determined using the PCR-RFLP technique. Detection of -alpha 3.7 deletion and beta-thalassemia mutations were defined by PCR and reverse dot blot techniques, respectively. The framework of the beta-globin gene was determined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. We found that the betaS mutation in southern Iran is associated with multiple mutational events. Most of the patients were from two ethnic groups: Farsi speakers (presumably Persian in origin) from Fars province and patients of Arab origin from Khuzestan province. In both ethnic groups the Arab-Indian haplotype was the most prevalent. The frequencies of the Arab-Indian and African haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from the provinces of Fars and Khuzestan were similar. Among betaA chromosomes the Bantu A2 haplotype was the most prevalent. The decrease in alpha-globin production in SS patients and AS individuals appeared to be related to the reduction in mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin. The Arab-Indian haplotype gene flow into this region of Iran can be traced to the Sassanian Empire. It is likely that the influx of betaS genes linked to the Benin and Bantu haplotypes, of African origin, must have occurred during the Arab slave trade.

  16. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    ., Jaye, M., and Schlessinger, J. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 87, 7000-7004). Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, simultaneous expression of both isoforms was demonstrated in human T-cell and vascular smooth muscle libraries, as well as in the A431 human epidermal cancer cell line....... Following transient expression in COS-1 cells, each isoform gave rise to two proteins of 100 and 130 kDa, respectively. Endoglycosidase treatment showed that the 100-kDa species corresponded to a molecule exclusively glycosylated on N-residues, whereas the 130-kDa species contained both, N- and O......-linked carbohydrates. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the smaller RPTP alpha protein is a precursor of the larger one. A high affinity antibody was generated that recognizes the immature protein only; however, both proteins can be detected by Western blot analysis after a simple chemical hydrolysis...

  17. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in human pituitary tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human pituitary tumours, obtained at surgery for Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome, were extracted and the content and molecular forms of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides determined by radioimmunoassay, gel chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography...... (HPLC) and sequence analysis. In the tumours from patients with Cushing's disease the mean concentrations of amidated peptides relative to the total amount of POMC were as follows: alpha-MSH, 1.7%; amidated gamma-MSH (gamma 1-MSH), 8.5% and the peptide linking gamma-MSH and ACTH in the precursor (hinge....... In conclusion, all the molecular forms of the amidated peptides detected in tumours from patients with Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome were similar to the molecular forms found in the normal human pituitary. The main difference between the tumours and the normal pituitary was the greater amount...

  18. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  19. Unspliced precursors of NMD-sensitive β-globin transcripts exhibit decreased steady-state levels in erythroid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Morgado

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD is a quality control mechanism that detects and rapidly degrades mRNAs carrying premature translation-termination codons (PTCs. Mammalian NMD depends on both splicing and translation, and requires recognition of the premature stop codon by the cytoplasmic ribosomes. Surprisingly, some published data have suggested that nonsense codons may also affect the nuclear metabolism of the nonsense-mutated transcripts. To determine if nonsense codons could influence nuclear events, we have directly assessed the steady-state levels of the unspliced transcripts of wild-type and PTC-containing human β-globin genes stably transfected in mouse erythroleukemia (MEL cells, after erythroid differentiation induction, or in HeLa cells. Our analyses by ribonuclease protection assays and reverse transcription-coupled quantitative PCR show that β-globin pre-mRNAs carrying NMD-competent PTCs, but not those containing a NMD-resistant PTC, exhibit a significant decrease in their steady-state levels relatively to the wild-type or to a missense-mutated β-globin pre-mRNA. On the contrary, in HeLa cells, human β-globin pre-mRNAs carrying NMD-competent PTCs accumulate at normal levels. Functional analyses of these pre-mRNAs in MEL cells demonstrate that their low steady-state levels do not reflect significantly lower pre-mRNA stabilities when compared to the normal control. Furthermore, our results also provide evidence that the relative splicing efficiencies of intron 1 and 2 are unaffected. This set of data highlights potential nuclear pathways that might be promoter- and/or cell line-specific, which recognize the NMD-sensitive transcripts as abnormal. These specialized nuclear pathway(s may be superimposed on the general NMD mechanism.

  20. Alpha interferon-induced antiretroviral activities: restriction of viral nucleic acid synthesis and progeny virion production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Baca-Regen, L; Heinzinger, N; Stevenson, M; Gendelman, H E

    1994-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) restricts multiple steps of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle. A well-described effect of IFN-alpha is in the modulation of viral nucleic acid synthesis. We demonstrate that IFN-alpha influences HIV-1 DNA synthesis principally by reducing the production of late products of reverse transcription. The magnitude of IFN-alpha-induced downregulation of HIV-1 DNA and/or progeny virion production was dependent on the IFN-alpha concentration, the ...

  1. Aromatization of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione by human placental microsomes: effect of preincubation with suicide substrates of androstenedione aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Tachibana, Mii; Mutsumi, Ayako; Yoshimura, Akiko; Osawa, Yoshio

    2002-06-01

    Estrogen synthase (aromatase) catalyzes the aromatization of androstenedione (AD) as well as 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (16alpha-OHAD) leading to estrone and estriol, respectively. We found that several steroid analogs including 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (1), 6-oxoandrostenedione (6-oxoAD, 2) and its 19-hydroxy analog (3), 10beta-acetoxyestr-5-ene-7,17-dione (4), androst-5-ene-4,7,17-trione (5), and 17alpha-ethynyl-19-norteststerone (6), which are known suicide inactivators of AD aromatization, are not effective in inactivating 16alpha-OHAD aromatization in a time-dependent manner. The compounds were tested with the use of human placental microsomes and 1beta-tritiated-16alpha-OHAD as the substrate. The results of the tritium water method of 16alpha-OHAD aromatization was confirmed by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method of estriol formation. The 1beta-tritiated-AD was used to measure AD aromatization as a positive control for these experiments. The compounds were tested at concentrations up to 40-fold higher than the K(i)'s determined for inhibition of AD aromatization. These studies suggest that differences exist in the binding site structures responsible for aromatization of 16alpha-OHAD and AD.

  2. TRF2 and apollo cooperate with topoisomerase 2alpha to protect human telomeres from replicative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Lenain, Christelle; Bauwens, Serge; Rizzo, Angela; Saint-Léger, Adelaïde; Poulet, Anaïs; Benarroch, Delphine; Magdinier, Frédérique; Morere, Julia; Amiard, Simon; Verhoeyen, Els; Britton, Sébastien; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Bizard, Anna; Nadal, Marc; Salvati, Erica; Sabatier, Laure; Wu, Yunlin; Biroccio, Annamaria; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric

    2010-07-23

    Human telomeres are protected from DNA damage by a nucleoprotein complex that includes the repeat-binding factor TRF2. Here, we report that TRF2 regulates the 5' exonuclease activity of its binding partner, Apollo, a member of the metallo-beta-lactamase family that is required for telomere integrity during S phase. TRF2 and Apollo also suppress damage to engineered interstitial telomere repeat tracts that were inserted far away from chromosome ends. Genetic data indicate that DNA topoisomerase 2alpha acts in the same pathway of telomere protection as TRF2 and Apollo. Moreover, TRF2, which binds preferentially to positively supercoiled DNA substrates, together with Apollo, negatively regulates the amount of TOP1, TOP2alpha, and TOP2beta at telomeres. Our data are consistent with a model in which TRF2 and Apollo relieve topological stress during telomere replication. Our work also suggests that cellular senescence may be caused by topological problems that occur during the replication of the inner portion of telomeres. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-alpha mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Harry D; Collins, Gary; Pyle, Robert; Key, Michael; Taub, Dennis D

    2008-04-16

    We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA) promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), and the retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-alpha)-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-beta/gamma ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR). The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-alpha-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing effects of ATRA and 9-cis-RA, while the RAR-alpha-selective antagonist, RO 41-5253, inhibited these effects. These results strongly support a role for RAR-alpha engagement in the regulation of genes and proteins involved with human T cell activation and type 2 cytokine production.

  4. Fetal antigen 2: an amniotic protein identified as the aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of human procollagen type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teisner, B; Rasmussen, H B; Højrup, P

    1992-01-01

    with the aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of human procollagen type I as determined by nucleotide sequences. After oxidative procedures normally employed for radio-iodination (iodogen and chloramine-T), FA2 lost its immunoreactivity. An antigen which cross-reacted with polyclonal rabbit anti-human FA2 was demonstrated...... in fetal calf serum. Gel filtration with analysis of fractions by inhibition ELISA showed that the bovine homologue was present in the same molecular forms as those in human amniotic fluid, and immunohistochemical analysis with anti-human FA2 showed that its distribution in bovine skin was identical...... to that of FA2 in human skin. FA2 is a circulating form of the aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of procollagen type I, and this is the first description of its isolation and structural characterization in humans. Udgivelsesdato: 1992-Dec...

  5. Total beta-globin gene deletion has high frequency in Filipinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, N.; Miyakawa, F.; Hunt, J.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of {beta}-thalassemia [{beta}{sup Th}] mutations is unique to each ethnic group. Most mutations affect one or a few bases; large deletions have been rare. Among families screened in Hawaii, [{beta}{sup Th}] heterozygotes were diagnosed by microcytosis, absence of abnormal hemoglobins on isoelectric focusing, and raised Hb A{sub 2} by chromatography. Gene frequency for {beta}{sup Th} was 0.02 in Filipinos. In Filipinos, polymerase chain reaction [PCR] with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for {beta}{sup Th} mutations detected a mutation in only 6 of 42 {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes; an IVS2-666 C/T polymorphism showed non-heterozygosity in 37 and heterozygosity in only 5 of these {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes. One {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} major patient and his mother had no mutation detected by allele-specific oligomer hybridization; PCR failed to amplify any DNA from his {beta}-globin gene. After a total {beta}-globin gene deletion [{beta}{sup Del}] was found in a Filipino family in Ontario, specific PCR amplification for {beta}{sup Del} detected this in 43 of 53 {beta}{sup Th} Filipino samples tested; the above {beta}{sup Th}/{beta}{sup Th} patient was a ({beta}{sup Del}/{beta}{sup Del}) homozygote. The {beta}{sup Del} may account for over 60% of all {beta}{sup Th} alleles in Filipinos; this is the highest proportion of a deletion {beta}{sup Th} mutation reported from any population. Most but not all {beta}{sup Del} heterozygotes had high Hb F [5.13 {plus_minus} 3.94 mean {plus_minus} 1 s.d.] compared to the codon 41/42 four base deletion common in Chinese [2.30 {plus_minus} 0.86], or to {beta}{sup Th} heterozygotes with normal {alpha}-globin genes [2.23 {plus_minus} 0.80].

  6. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  7. Structure of the gene encoding human alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, M; Umetsu, K; Sato, M; Ohki, T; Yukawa, N; Suzuki, T; Takeichi, S

    1997-09-01

    Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) is a human plasma glycoprotein and fetuin is the homologue in the calf. In this report, we present the structure and organization of the AHSG gene. Introns and the 5' and 3'-flanking regions were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the inverted PCR, respectively, from genomic DNA using AHSG cDNA-specific oligonucleotide primers. The sequence of the PCR products shows that the coding region spans approximately 8.2 kb and is composed of seven exons interrupted by six introns. The exon-intron splice junctions agree with the consensus sequence, and the positions interrupted by introns are precisely identical to those of the rat insulin receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (fetuin) gene. The 5'-promoter region contains several characteristic sequences such as an A + T-rich sequence of TAAATAA, C/EBP-binding site, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-5 (HNF-5) and serum response factor (SRF) sites.

  8. A function for filamentous alpha-smooth muscle actin: Retardation of motility in human breast fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Petersen, Ole William

    1996-01-01

    Actins are known to comprise six mammalian isoforms of which beta- and gamma-nonmuscle actins are present in all cells, whereas alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-sm) actin is normally restricted to cells of the smooth muscle lineages. alpha-Sm actin has been found also to be expressed transiently in cer...

  9. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Replication Initiation Patterns in the β-Globin Loci of Totipotent and Differentiated Murine Cells: Evidence for Multiple Initiation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladjem, Mirit I.; Rodewald, Luo Wei; Lin, Chii Mai; Bowman, Sarah; Cimbora, Daniel M.; Brody, Linnea L.; Epner, Elliot M.; Groudine, Mark; Wahl, Geoffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    The replication initiation pattern of the murine β-globin locus was analyzed in totipotent embryonic stem cells and in differentiated cell lines. Initiation events in the murine β-globin locus were detected in a region extending from the embryonic Ey gene to the adult βminor gene, unlike the restricted initiation observed in the human locus. Totipotent and differentiated cells exhibited similar initiation patterns. Deletion of the region between the adult globin genes did not prevent initiation in the remainder of the locus, suggesting that the potential to initiate DNA replication was not contained exclusively within the primary sequence of the deleted region. In addition, a deletion encompassing the six identified 5′ hypersensitive sites in the mouse locus control region had no effect on initiation from within the locus. As this deletion also did not affect the chromatin structure of the locus, we propose that the sequences determining both chromatin structure and replication initiation lie outside the hypersensitive sites removed by the deletion. PMID:11756541

  11. Genetic heterogeneity of the β-globin gene in various geographic populations of Yunnan in southwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the geographic distribution of β-globin gene mutations in different ethnic groups in Yunnan province.From 2004 to 2014, 1,441 subjects with hemoglobin disorders, identified by PCR-reverse dot blot and DNA sequencing, were studied according to ethnicity and geographic origin. Haplotypes were examined among 41 unrelated thalassemia chromosomes.Eighteen β-thalassemia mutations and seven hemoglobin variants were identified for 1,616 alleles in 22 different ethnic groups from all 16 prefecture-level divisions of Yunnan. The prevalence of β-thalassemia was heterogeneous and regionally specific. CD 41-42 (-TCTT was the most prevalent mutation in the populations of northeastern Yunnan. CD 17 (A>T was the most common mutation in the populations of southeastern Yunnan, especially for the Zhuang minority, whereas Hb E (CD 26, G>A was the most prevalent mutation in populations of southwestern Yunnan, especially for the Dai minority. Among the seven types of haplotypes identified, CD 17 (A>T was mainly linked to haplotype VII (+ - - - - - + and IVS-II-654 (C>T was only linked to haplotype I (+ - - - - + +.Our data underline the heterogeneity of β-globin gene mutations in Yunnan. This distribution of β-globin mutations in the geographic regions and ethnic populations provided a detailed ethnic basis and evolutionary view of humans in southern China, which will be beneficial for genetic counseling and prevention strategies.

  12. Localization of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (CD26) to human pancreatic ducts and islet alpha cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augstein, Petra; Naselli, Gaetano; Loudovaris, Thomas; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Campbell, Peter; Bandala-Sanchez, Esther; Rogers, Kelly; Heinke, Peter; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W; Harrison, Leonard C

    2015-12-01

    DPP-4/CD26 degrades the incretins GLP-1 and GIP. The localization of DPP-4 within the human pancreas is not well documented but is likely to be relevant for understanding incretin function. We aimed to define the cellular localization of DPP-4 in the human pancreas from cadaveric organ donors with and without diabetes. Pancreas was snap-frozen and immunoreactive DPP-4 detected in cryosections using the APAAP technique. For co-localization studies, pancreas sections were double-stained for DPP-4 and proinsulin or glucagon and scanned by confocal microscopy. Pancreata were digested and cells in islets and in islet-depleted, duct-enriched digests analyzed for expression of DPP-4 and other markers by flow cytometry. DPP-4 was expressed by pancreatic duct and islet cells. In pancreata from donors without diabetes or with type 2 diabetes, DPP-4-positive cells in islets had the same location and morphology as glucagon-positive cells, and the expression of DPP-4 and glucagon overlapped. In donors with type 1 diabetes, the majority of residual cells in islets were DPP-4-positive. In the human pancreas, DPP-4 expression is localized to duct and alpha cells. This finding is consistent with the view that DPP-4 regulates exposure to incretins of duct cells directly and of beta cells indirectly in a paracrine manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alpha-2-macroglobulin loaded microcapsules enhance human leukocyte functions and innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici Canova, Donata; Pavlov, Anton M; Norling, Lucy V; Gobbetti, Thomas; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Le Fauder, Pauline; Cenac, Nicolas; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-11-10

    Synthetic microstructures can be engineered to deliver bioactive compounds impacting on their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Herein, we applied dextran-based layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules to deliver alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2MG), a protein with modulatory properties in inflammation. Extending recent observations made with dextran-microcapsules loaded with α2MG in experimental sepsis, we focused on the physical and chemical characteristics of these microstructures and determined their biology on rodent and human cells. We report an efficient encapsulation of α2MG into microcapsules, which enhanced i) human leukocyte recruitment to inflamed endothelium and ii) human macrophage phagocytosis: in both settings microcapsules were more effective than soluble α2MG or empty microcapsules (devoid of active protein). Translation of these findings revealed that intravenous administration of α2MG-microcapsules (but not empty microcapsules) promoted neutrophil migration into peritoneal exudates and augmented macrophage phagocytic functions, the latter response being associated with alteration of bioactive lipid mediators as assessed by mass spectrometry. The present study indicates that microencapsulation can be an effective strategy to harness the complex biology of α2MG with enhancing outcomes on fundamental processes of the innate immune response paving the way to potential future development in the control of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recombinant human interferon alpha 2b prevents and reverses experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M Bauer

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a progressive and fatal disease with no cure. Vascular remodeling in PH involves intraluminal growth of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, leading to obliterative vascular lesions. Cell growth in these lesions is quasi-neoplastic, with evidence of monoclonality, apoptosis resistance and cancer-like metabolic derangements. Herein we tested the effect of human interferon alpha 2b (IFNα, a pleiotropic cytokine and anti-cancer therapeutic, on the development and progression of PH in the rat SU5416/hypoxia (SUH model and mouse hypoxia model of the disease. In both models IFNα attenuated the development of PH and reversed established PH as assessed by measuring right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy. The effect of IFNα was dependent on the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR since mice lacking a subunit of the IFNAR were not protected by IFNα. Morphometric analysis of pulmonary aterioles from hypoxic mice or SUH rats showed that IFNα inhibited pulmonary vascular remodeling in both models and that IFNα reversed remodeling in SUH rats with established disease. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that IFNα decreased the number of PCNA and Tunel positive cells in the wall of pulmonary arterioles. In vitro, IFNα inhibited proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and as well as human pulmonary artery endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Together these findings demonstrate that IFNα reverses established experimental PH and provide a rationale for further exploration of the use of IFNα and other immunotherpies in PH.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of human T cell stimulating activity of an alpha-sulfatide analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Laura; Matto, Pamela; Ronchetti, Fiamma; Panza, Luigi; Barbieri, Lucia; Costantino, Valeria; Mangoni, Alfonso; Cavallari, Marco; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2007-08-15

    A concise synthesis of alpha-sulfatide 1, an analogue of natural glycolipid antigens with potential anti-tumor activity, was performed. Two different approaches to the alpha-glycosidic bond were explored, resulting in a high yield and excellent stereoselectivity. Compound 1 combines the structural features of sulfated beta-GalCer (sulfatide) and alpha-GalCer, which activate specific T cells. alpha-Sulfatide 1 was stimulatory for CD1d-restricted semi-invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cell clones, although less potent than alpha-GalCer, while it was not recognized by CD1a-restricted sulfatide-specific T cells.

  16. Neuroglobin and cytoglobin: two new members of globin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Tosqui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The globin family has long been defined by myoglobin and hemoglobin, proteins with the functions of oxygen storage and transportation, respectively. Recently, two new members of this family were discovered: neuroglobin present in neurons and retinal cells and cytoglobin found in various types of tissue. The increased expression of these proteins in hypoxic conditions first suggested a role in oxygen supply. However structural and functional differences, such as the hexacoordinated heme, a high autoxidation rate and different concentrations between different cellular types, have dismissed this hypothesis. The protective role of these globins has already been established. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated increased survival of neurons under stress in the presence of neuroglobin and increased resistance to neurodegenerative diseases. However the mechanism remains unknown. Functions, including detoxification of nitric oxide, free radical scavenging and as an antioxidant and signaling of apoptosis, have also been suggested for neuroglobin and an antifibrotic function for cytoglobin.

  17. A polymorphic variant in the human electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-chain (alpha-T171) displays decreased thermal stability and is overrepresented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient patients with mild childhood presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Pedersen, P; Winter, V

    1999-01-01

    The consequences of two amino acid polymorphisms of human electron transfer flavoprotein (alpha-T/I171 in the alpha-subunit and beta-M/T154 in the beta-subunit) on the thermal stability of the enzyme are described. The alpha-T171 variant displayed a significantly decreased thermal stability, wher....... This is compatible with a negative modulating effect of the less-stable alpha-T171 ETF variant in this group of VLCAD patients that harbor missense mutations in at least one allele and therefore potentially display residual levels of VLCAD enzyme activity....

  18. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n......AChR and the cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation, focusing on the translational aspects in the development of these drugs. The functional properties and anatomical localization of the alpha(7) nAChR makes it well suited to modulate cognitive function. Accordingly, systemic administration of alpha(7) n......AChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major...

  19. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2a...

  20. IFN-alpha antibodies in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with recombinant human IFN-alpha2a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Christian; Engler, Claus Bødker; Sander, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    We tested for development of binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) during IFN-alpha2a therapy of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) of the eyes. Antibodies were investigated retrospectively in sera of 34 patients treated with 3 x 10(6) IU IFN-alpha2...

  1. Assignment of a single disulphide bridge in human alpha2-antiplasmin: implications for the structural and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S; Valnickova, Z; Thogersen, I B; Olsen, E H; Enghild, J J

    1997-01-01

    Human alpha2-antiplasmin (alpha2AP) is a serpin involved in the regulation of blood coagulation. Most serpins, unlike smaller serine proteinase inhibitors, do not contain disulphide bridges. alpha2AP is an exception from this generalization and has previously been shown to contain four Cys residues organized into two disulphide bridges [Lijnen, Holmes, van Hoef, Wiman, Rodriguez and Collen (1987) Eur. J. Biochem. 166, 565-574]. However, we found that alpha2AP incorporates iodo[14C]acetic acid, suggesting that the protein contains reactive thiol groups. This observation prompted a re-examination of the state of the thiol groups, which revealed (i) a disulphide bridge between Cys43 and Cys116, (ii) that Cys76 is bound to a cysteinyl-glycine dipeptide, and (iii) and Cys125 exists as either a free thiol or in a mixed disulphide with another Cys residue. The disulphide identified between Cys43 and Cys116 appears to be conserved in orthologous proteins since the homologous Cys residues form disulphide bonds in bovine and possibly mouse alpha2AP. The conservation of this disulphide bridge suggests that it is important for functional aspects of alpha2AP. However, the structural and functional analysis described in this study does not support this conclusion. PMID:9169621

  2. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almayahi, B A; Tajuddin, A A; Jaafar, M S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm(-2) and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm(-2), whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm(-2) and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm(-2), respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2), whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm(-2). The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interferon-Alpha Promotes Th1 Response and Epithelial Apoptosis via Inflammasome Activation in Human Intestinal MucosaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Jarry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound & Aims: Several lines of investigation suggest that interferon (IFN alpha can alter human intestinal mucosa homeostasis. These include the endogenous production of IFN alpha in celiac disease or inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as the occurrence of intestinal side effects of exogenous IFN alpha used as a therapeutic tool. Here, we present an ex vivo translational approach to investigate the effects of IFN alpha on the human normal intestinal mucosa, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human normal colonic mucosa explants were cultured in the presence or absence of IFN alpha 2a. Epithelial homeostasis was assessed using the immunohistochemical marker of apoptosis M30. The Wnt inhibitor Dickkopf-Homolog-1 (DKK1 was assayed in the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activation of the inflammasome (caspase-1/interleukin [IL]18 and of a Th1 response was determined by in situ detection of active caspase-1, as well as by measurement of mature IL18 production and the prototype Th1 cytokine IFN gamma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, mechanistic studies were performed using the specific caspase-1 inhibitor Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (YVAD-FMK, IL18-binding protein, neutralizing anti–IFN gamma, and anti-DKK1 antibodies. Results: IFN alpha 2a elicited a rapid (24 hours disruption of surface and crypt colonic epithelial cells via apoptosis that was variable in intensity among the 20 individuals studied. This apoptotic effect was dependent on the initiation of an IFN gamma response elicited by resident T box expressed in T cells–positive lamina propria cells. Both apoptosis and Th1 response were subordinated to active caspase-1 and IL18 production. Finally, neutralization of IFN gamma–induced DKK1 partially protected against IFN alpha–induced epithelial apoptosis. Conclusions: By using an ex vivo model, we show an interindividual heterogeneity of IFN alpha effects

  4. [Beta globin haplotypes in hemoglobin S carriers in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Claudia Liliana; Morales, Olga Lucía; Echeverri, Sandra Johanna; Isaza, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The hemoglobin S (HbS) mutation is accompanied by other mutations in the region of chromosome 11 known as "beta globin cluster". The pattern of combination of these polymorphisms giving rise to the haplotypes that co-inherit the HbS mutation, are called haplotypes bs, and are of great epidemiological and clinical significance. The frequencies of major haplotypes associated with S beta-globin gene was determined in Colombian patients heterozygous for hemoglobin S. As part of the national neonatal screening program at Clínica Colsanitas, located in major cities of Colombia, nearly 1,200 children from different areas of the country were examined for hemoglobinopathies. The sickle cell trait was identified as the most common. S beta-globin gene haplotypes were determined by PCR and restriction enzymes in 33 children with AS hemoglobin electrophoretic patterns (carrier state). In addition, electrophoretic patterns of hemoglobin, fetal hemoglobin levels and hematologic parameters of each individual were identified. The most frequent haplotypes in Colombia were the Bantú haplotype (36.4 %), followed by Senegal (30.3 %), Benin (21.2 %) and Cameroon (12.1 %) haplotypes. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed the AS phenotype in all patients, and fetal hemoglobin levels below 1%. Other hematological parameters were normal in all cases. The HbS haplotypes found more frequently in the sample were of African origin, and their distribution varied according to the place of origin of the individual. The most frequent corresponded to the Bantu haplotype.

  5. The Caenorhabditis globin gene family reveals extensive nematode-specific radiation and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov Serge N

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globin isoforms with variant properties and functions have been found in the pseudocoel, body wall and cuticle of various nematode species and even in the eyespots of the insect-parasite Mermis nigrescens. In fact, much higher levels of complexity exist, as shown by recent whole genome analysis studies. In silico analysis of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an unexpectedly high number of globin genes featuring a remarkable diversity in gene structure, amino acid sequence and expression profiles. Results In the present study we have analyzed whole genomic data from C. briggsae, C. remanei, Pristionchus pacificus and Brugia malayi and EST data from several other nematode species to study the evolutionary history of the nematode globin gene family. We find a high level of conservation of the C. elegans globin complement, with even distantly related nematodes harboring orthologs to many Caenorhabditis globins. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis resolves all nematode globins into two distinct globin classes. Analysis of the globin intron-exon structures suggests extensive loss of ancestral introns and gain of new positions in deep nematode ancestors, and mainly loss in the Caenorhabditis lineage. We also show that the Caenorhabditis globin genes are expressed in distinct, mostly non-overlapping, sets of cells and that they are all under strong purifying selection. Conclusion Our results enable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the globin gene family in the nematode phylum. A duplication of an ancestral globin gene occurred before the divergence of the Platyhelminthes and the Nematoda and one of the duplicated genes radiated further in the nematode phylum before the split of the Spirurina and Rhabditina and was followed by further radiation in the lineage leading to Caenorhabditis. The resulting globin genes were subject to processes of subfunctionalization and diversification leading to cell

  6. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Hout, Johanna M P; Kamphoven, Joep H J; Winkel, Léon P F; Arts, Willem F M; De Klerk, Johannes B C; Loonen, M Christa B; Vulto, Arnold G; Cromme-Dijkhuis, Adri; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Hop, Wim; Van Hirtum, Hans; Van Diggelen, Otto P; Boer, Marijke; Kroos, Marian A; Van Doorn, Pieter A; Van der Voort, Edwin; Sibbles, Barbara; Van Corven, Emiel J J M; Brakenhoff, Just P J; Van Hove, Johan; Smeitink, Jan A M; de Jong, Gerard; Reuser, Arnold J J; Van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2004-05-01

    Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, even in small animals such as rabbits. We tested the long-term safety and efficacy of recombinant human -glucosidase (rhAGLU) from rabbit milk for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder Pompe disease. The disease occurs with an estimated frequency of 1 in 40,000 and is designated as orphan disease. The classic infantile form leads to death at a median age of 6 to 8 months and is diagnosed by absence of alpha-glucosidase activity and presence of fully deleterious mutations in the alpha-glucosidase gene. Cardiac hypertrophy is characteristically present. Loss of muscle strength prevents infants from achieving developmental milestones such as sitting, standing, and walking. Milder forms of the disease are associated with less severe mutations and partial deficiency of alpha-glucosidase. In the beginning of 1999, 4 critically ill patients with infantile Pompe disease (2.5-8 months of age) were enrolled in a single-center open-label study and treated intravenously with rhAGLU in a dose of 15 to 40 mg/kg/week. Genotypes of patients were consistent with the most severe form of Pompe disease. Additional molecular analysis failed to detect processed forms of alpha-glucosidase (95, 76, and 70 kDa) in 3 of the 4 patients and revealed only a trace amount of the 95-kDa biosynthetic intermediate form in the fourth (patient 1). With the more sensitive detection method, 35S-methionine incorporation, we could detect low-level synthesis of -glucosidase in 3 of the 4 patients (patients 1, 2, and 4) with some posttranslation modification from 110 kDa to 95 kDa in 1 of them (patient 1). One patient (patient 3) remained totally deficient with both detection methods (negative for cross

  7. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associate...

  8. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have created a stable HEK293 cell line expressing the human homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor (GlyR) and characterised its functional pharmacology in a conventional patch-clamp assay and in the FLIPR Membrane Potential (FMP) assay, a fluorescence-based high throughput scr...

  9. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidation: decarboxylation of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA to pristanic acid in human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, N. M.; Wanders, R. J.; Schor, D. S.; Jansen, G. A.; Jakobs, C.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of the first intermediate in the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid, 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA, was investigated. Human liver homogenates were incubated with 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA or 2-hydroxyphytanic acid, after which formation of 2-ketophytanic acid and pristanic acid were studied.

  10. Secretion of a precursor form of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase from the brush border of human kidney proximal tubule cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Oude Elferink, R.P.; Fransen, J.A.; Ginsel, L.A.; Tager, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have shown previously (R.P.J. Oude Elferink, E.M. Brouwer-Kelder, I. Surya, A. Strijland, M. Kroos, A.J.J. Reuser, J.M. Tager, Eur. J. Biochem. 139, 489-495 (1984)) that human urine contains considerable amounts of a precursor form of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase (about 50% of the total

  11. Steroid and G Protein Binding Characteristics of the Seatrout and Human Progestin Membrane Receptor Alpha Subtypes and Their Evolutionary Origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, P.; Pang, Y.; Dong, J.; Groenen, P.; Kelder, J.; Vlieg, J. de; Zhu, Y.; Tubbs, C.

    2006-01-01

    A novel progestin receptor (mPR) with seven-transmembrane domains was recently discovered in spotted seatrout and homologous genes were identified in other vertebrates. Here we show that cDNAs for the mPR alpha subtypes from spotted seatrout (st-mPRalpha) and humans (hu-mPRalpha) encode progestin

  12. Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Schütten, H J

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 (ANF) was assessed in 13 patients with cirrhosis (six Child-Turcotte class A, five class B, and two class C) and eight control subjects. The Fick principle was applied during hepatic vein catheterization. Arterial...

  13. Alpha-smooth muscle actin in pathological human disc nucleus pulposus cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, Dawn; Chao, Jeannie; Wang, Qi; Ozuna, Richard M; Spector, Myron

    2004-01-01

    That a contractile actin isoform has been found in cells of other cartilage tissues in healing and disease states prompted this investigation of the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in pathological human intervertebral disc tissue. The presence of this isoform has been reported in human intervertebral disc specimens obtained at autopsy from subjects for whom there were no reported symptoms. An objective of this study was to evaluate the cell density and percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells in pathological nucleus pulposus tissue obtained from lumbar disc surgery from 17 patients. Additionally, explants of nucleus pulposus material were cultured to determine how alpha-SMA expression changed with time in vitro. Seventy-six 5-mm diameter explants (approximately 2 mm thick) pooled from six lumbar surgeries were cultured for 1, 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Microtomed sections of paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-SMA. Histologically, cells were categorized as to alpha-SMA phenotype (positive or negative), and the areal cell density was determined. The evaluation of the cultured nucleus pulposus explants also included documentation of the percentage of cells that were round or elongated and the percentage of the cells that were part of a group (group: >/= 2 cells). Every nucleus pulposus section exhibited the presence of alpha-SMA-containing cells, which accounted for approximately 24 percent of the cells in vivo. In vivo, the cell density was significantly higher in older individuals (p = 0.02). The average time for cell outgrowth from the explants was 8.6 days. Approximately 10-15 percent of the cells in the explants stained positive for alpha-SMA. The time in culture had no significant effect on any of the outcome measures except the percentage of alpha-SMA-containing cells that were round (p = 0.008), with values decreasing through 4 weeks and then slightly rising at 6 weeks. The role of

  14. Human CRISP-3 binds serum alpha(1)B-glycoprotein across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udby, Lene; Johnsen, Anders H; Borregaard, Niels

    2010-04-01

    CRISP-3 was previously shown to be bound to alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG) in human serum/plasma. All mammalian sera are supposed to contain A1BG, although its presence in rodent sera is not well-documented. Since animal sera are often used to supplement buffers in experiments, in particular such that involve cell cultures, binding proteins present in sera might interfere in the experiments. We examined sera from five different animal species for CRISP-3 binding proteins using gel filtration and ligand blotting. We developed a rapid method for isolation of proteins that bind to human CRISP-3 and identified the isolated proteins by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. We identified A1BG as a CRISP-3 binding protein in sera from cow, horse and rabbit. CRISP-3 bound kininogen 1 in mouse serum, whereas rat serum showed no CRISP-3 binding activity. In equine serum, we furthermore detected a possible CRISP, already bound to A1BG. It seems to be a common mechanism that A1BGs bind CRISPs, also across species. Apart from the possible physiological implications hereof, complex binding of CRISPs by A1BG (and other proteins) may interfere with the detection and function of CRISPs, when these are studied in the presence of animal sera. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of Alpha-Gal Epitopes from Porcine Aortic Valve and Pericardium using Recombinant Human Alpha Galactosidase A

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seongsik; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Sun-Young; Kim, Yong-Jin

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that the immune response due to ?-Gal epitopes is an important factor in tissue valve failure. The elimination of the interaction between the natural anti-Gal antibodies and ?-gal epitopes on the xenografts is a prerequisite to the success of xenografts in humans. Previously, we reported that the green coffee bean ?-galactosidase could remove all ?-Gal epitopes from cell surface of porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue, but it has limitations on cost effectiveness. ...

  16. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    AChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major...... preclinical evaluation of alpha(7) nAChR activation. It is therefore important to consider the translational power of the animal models used before entering into a clinical evaluation of the pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation.......Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n...

  17. Access to a syllabus of human hemoglobin variants (1996) via the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, R C; Chui, D H; Riemer, C R; Miller, W; Carver, M F; Molchanova, T P; Efremov, G D; Huisman, T H

    1998-03-01

    Information on mutations in human hemoglobin is important in many efforts, including understanding the pathophysiology of hemoglobin diseases, developing therapies, elucidating the dynamics of sequence alterations inhuman populations, and dissecting the details of protein structure/function relationships. Currently, information is available on a large number of mutations and variants, but is distributed among thousands of papers. In an effort to organize this voluminous data set, two Syllabi have been prepared compiling succinct information on human hemoglobin abnormalities. In both of these, each entry provides amino acid and/or DNA sequence alterations, hematological and clinical data, methodology used for characterization, ethnic distribution, and functional properties and stability of the hemoglobin, together with appropriate literature references. A Syllabus of Human Hemoglobin Variants (1996) describes 693 abnormal hemoglobins resulting from alterations in the alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-globin chains, including special abnormalities such as double mutations, hybrid chains, elongated chains, deletions, and insertions. We have converted this resource to an electronic form that is accessible via the World Wide Web at the Globin Gene Server (http://globin.cse.psu.edu). Hyperlinks are provided from each entry in the tables of variants to the corresponding full description. In addition, a simple query interface allows the user to find all entries containing a designated word or phrase. We are in the process of converting A Syllabus of Thalassemia Mutations (1997) to a similar electronic format.

  18. Who is Mr. HAMLET? Interaction of human alpha-lactalbumin with monomeric oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Grishchenko, Valery M; Fadeev, Roman S; Akatov, Vladimir S; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2008-12-09

    A specific state of the human milk Ca(2+) binding protein alpha-lactalbumin (hLA) complexed with oleic acid (OA) prepared using an OA-pretreated ion-exchange column (HAMLET) triggers several cell death pathways in various tumor cells. The possibility of preparing a hLA-OA complex with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of the HAMLET but under solution conditions has been explored. The complex was formed by titration of hLA by OA at pH 8.3 up to OA critical micelle concentration. We have shown that complex formation strongly depends on calcium, ionic strength, and temperature; the optimal conditions were established. The spectrofluorimetrically estimated number of OA molecules irreversibly bound per hLA molecule (after dialysis of the OA-loaded preparation against water followed by lyophilization) depends upon temperature: 2.9 at 17 degrees C (native apo-hLA; resulting complex referred to as LA-OA-17 state) and 9 at 45 degrees C (thermally unfolded apo-hLA; LA-OA-45). Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements revealed substantially decreased thermal stability of Ca(2+)-free forms of HAMLET, LA-OA-45, and OA-saturated protein. The irreversibly bound OA does not affect the Ca(2+) association constant of the protein. Phase plot analysis of fluorimetric and CD data indicates that the OA binding process involves several hLA intermediates. The effective pseudoequilibrium OA association constants for Ca(2+)-free hLA were estimated. The far-UV CD spectra of Ca(2+)-free hLA show that all OA-bound forms of the protein are characterized by elevated content of alpha-helical structure. The various hLA-OA complexes possess similar cytotoxic activities against human epidermoid larynx carcinoma cells. Overall, the LA-OA-45 complex possesses physicochemical, structural, and cytotoxic properties closely resembling those of HAMLET. The fact that the HAMLET-like complex can be formed in aqueous solution makes the process of its preparation more transparent and

  19. The effect of alpha-lipoic acid on temporary threshold shift in humans: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, N; Dicorato, A; Matera, V; D'Elia, A; Quaranta, A

    2012-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NHIL) is a significant source of hearing loss in industrialized countries. Recent research on the cellular bases of NIHL has led to new avenues for protection through prophylactic drugs. Although in experimental animal models several compounds have shown a protective effect in NIHL, limited data are available in humans. Many authors are focusing their attention on the role of antioxidant on hearing protection. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), an essential cofactor in mitochondrial enzymes, is a novel biological antioxidant and a potent free radical scavenger and, in animal models, it has been shown to protect from age-induced and cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid on temporary threshold shift measured 2 minutes after the end of exposure (TTS(2)) induced by a 3 kHz tone in young normally hearing subjects. Thirty young normal hearing volunteers served as control subjects. Individuals were randomly assigned to three groups. Group A (10 subjects) subjects were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone for 10 min. Group B (10 subjects) subjects were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone one hour after oral ingestion of 600 mg of ALA. Group C (10 subjects) were exposed to a 90 dB HL 3 kHz pure tone after 10 days of oral ingestion of 600 mg of ALA. Statistical analysis showed that prior to the exposure the hearing thresholds did not differ significantly among the three groups. TTS(2) of group C was significantly lower that TTS2 of Groups A and B at 6 kHz (p 0.03), and TEOAEs amplitude change after noise exposure was lower for group C compared to Groups A (p = 0.089) and B (p = 0.03). ALA is a powerful lipophilic antioxidant and free radical scavenger currently used in clinical practice. A single dose of 600 mg of dose ALA did not induce any protection on the TTS(2) induced by a 90 dB HL 3 kHz tone, while 10 days of therapeutic dosage assumption of ALA was associated with significant

  20. Salivary alpha amylase activity in human beings of different age groups subjected to psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Gopal K; Upadhyay, Seema; Panna, Shradha M

    2014-10-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been proposed as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker for stress-induced changes in the body that reflect the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Though several experiments have been conducted to determine the validity of this salivary component as a reliable stress marker in human subjects, the effect of stress induced changes on sAA level in different age groups is least studied. This article reports the activity of sAA in human subjects of different age groups subjected to psychological stress induced through stressful video clip. Differences in sAA level based on sex of different age groups under stress have also been studied. A total of 112 subjects consisting of both the male and female subjects, divided into two groups on basis of age were viewed a video clip of corneal transplant surgery as stressor. Activity of sAA from saliva samples of the stressed subjects were measured and compared with the activity of the samples collected from the subjects before viewing the clip. The age ranges of subjects were 18-25 and 40-60 years. The sAA level increased significantly in both the groups after viewing the stressful video. The increase was more pronounced in the younger subjects. The level of sAA was comparatively more in males than females in the respective groups. No significant change in sAA activity was observed after viewing the soothed video clip. Significant increase of sAA level in response to psychological stress suggests that it might act as a reliable sympathetic activity biochemical marker in different stages of human beings.

  1. Functional effects of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17P on human myometrial contractility in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison John J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17P administration reportedly improves outcome for women with a previous spontaneous preterm delivery. This study, using in vitro strips of human uterine smooth muscle, aimed to investigate the direct non-genomic effects of 17P on spontaneous and induced contractions in tissues obtained during pregnancy, and in the non-pregnant state. Methods Biopsies of human myometrium were obtained at elective cesarean section, and from hysterectomy specimens, and dissected strips suspended for isometric recordings. The effects of 17P (1 nmol/L -10 micro mol/L on spontaneous and agonist-induced (oxytocin 0.5 nmol/L for pregnant, phenylephrine 10 μmol/L for non-pregnant contractions were measured. Integrals of contractile activity, including the mean maximal inhibition values (MMI observed at the maximal concentration, were compared with those from simultaneously run control strips. Results There was no significant direct effect exerted by 17P on pregnant or non-pregnant human myometrial contractility. The MMI ± SEM for spontaneous contractions in pregnant myometrium was 4.9% ± 7.2 (n = 6; P = 0.309 and for oxytocin-induced contractions was 2.2% ± 1.3 (n = 6; P = 0.128. For non-pregnant myometrium, the MMI ± SEM for spontaneous contractions was 8.8% ± 11.0 (n = 6; P = 0.121 and for phenylephrine induced contractions was -7.9% ± 6.5 (n = 6; P = 0.966. Conclusions The putative benefits of 17P for preterm labor prevention are not achieved, even partially, by a direct utero-relaxant effect. These findings outline the possibility that genomic effects of 17P, achieved over long periods of administration, are required for its reported therapeutic benefits.

  2. Removal of Alpha-Gal Epitopes from Porcine Aortic Valve and Pericardium using Recombinant Human Alpha Galactosidase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongsik; Kim, Woong-Han; Choi, Sun-Young

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that the immune response due to α-Gal epitopes is an important factor in tissue valve failure. The elimination of the interaction between the natural anti-Gal antibodies and α-gal epitopes on the xenografts is a prerequisite to the success of xenografts in humans. Previously, we reported that the green coffee bean α-galactosidase could remove all α-Gal epitopes from cell surface of porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue, but it has limitations on cost effectiveness. In this study we wanted to know whether the recently produced recombinant human α-galactosidase A has the same effective enzymatic activity as green coffee bean α-galactosidase in removing α-Gal epitopes from the same tissues. After treating fresh porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue with recombinant α-galactosidase A, each sample was stained with Griffonia simplicifolia type I isolectin B4 indirect immunoperoxidase avidin-biotin technique. We then examined whether the α-Gal epitopes were reduced or abolished in each consecutive concentration of recombinant α-galactosidase A by comparing the degree of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 staining. As a result, the recombinant α-galactosidase A could remove cell surface α-Gals on porcine aortic valve and pericardial tissue as effectively as green coffee bean α-galactosidase. PMID:19949670

  3. β-Globin Matrix Attachment Region Improves Stable Genomic Expression of the Sleeping Beauty Transposon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Meghan C.; Steer, Clifford J.; Kren, Betsy T.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an attractive target for gene therapy due to its extensive capability for protein production and the numerous diseases resulting from a loss of gene function it normally provides. The Sleeping Beauty Transposon (SB-Tn)1 system is a non-viral vector capable of delivering and mediating therapeutic transgene(s) insertion into the host genome for long-term expression. A current challenge for this system is the low efficiency of integration of the transgene. In this study we use a human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) and primary human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to test vectors containing DNA elements to enhance transposition without integrating themselves. We employed the human β-globin matrix attachment region (MAR) and the Simian virus 40 (SV40) nuclear translocation signal to increase the percent of HuH-7 cells persistently expressing a GFP::Zeo reporter construct by ~50% for each element; while combining both did not show an additive effect. Interestingly, both elements together displayed an additive effect on the number of insertion sites, and in BOECs the SV40 alone appeared to have an inhibitory effect on transposition. In long-term cultures the loss of plasmid DNA, transposase expression and mapping of insertion sites demonstrated bona fide transposition without episomal expression. These results show that addition of the β-globin MAR and potentially other elements to the backbone of SB-Tn system can enhance transposition and expression of therapeutic transgenes. These findings may have a significant influence on the use of SB transgene delivery to liver for the treatment of a wide variety of disorders. PMID:21520245

  4. The beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell anemia patients from Northeast Brazil: a clinical and molecular view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Elisângela Vitória; Zanette, Angela; Lyra, Isa; Souza, Cyntia Cajado; Santos, Leandro Ferraz; Menezes, Joelma Figueiredo; Dupuit, Marie France; Almeida, Mari Ney Tavares; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Gonçalves, Marilda Souza

    2004-08-01

    The beta(S)-globin haplotypes were studied in 78 sickle cell Brazilian patients from Bahia, Northeast Brazil, that has a large population of African origin. Hemoglobin (Hb) profiles were developed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and beta(S)-globin gene haplotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques. We identified 44 (55.0%) patients with the CAR/Ben (Central African Republic/Benin) genotype, 16 (20.0%) Ben/Ben, 13 (16.2%) CAR/CAR and seven (8.8%) with other genotypes. Analyses of the phenotypes showed clinical differences related only to Hb F levels and blood transfusion therapy; the presence of -alpha(-3.7)-thalassemia (thal) demonstrated statistical significance when associated with hematocrit (p=0.044), MCV (p=0.0007), MCH (p=0.012) and spleen sequestration events. The haplotype diversity found in the present study can be justified by information about the origin of the slave traffic period in Bahia during the 19th century. The specific characteristics described among the Bahian sickle cell patients could be confirmed by increasing the number of patients with specific genotypes and further studies of genetic markers.

  5. The 5 Alpha-Reductase Isozyme Family: A Review of Basic Biology and Their Role in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Azzouni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the discovery of 5 alpha-reduction as an enzymatic step in steroid metabolism in 1951, and the discovery that dihydrotestosterone is more potent than testosterone in 1968, the significance of 5 alpha-reduced steroids in human diseases was not appreciated until the discovery of 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency in 1974. Affected males are born with ambiguous external genitalia, despite normal internal genitalia. The prostate is hypoplastic, nonpalpable on rectal examination and approximately 1/10th the size of age-matched normal glands. Benign prostate hyperplasia or prostate cancer does not develop in these patients. At puberty, the external genitalia virilize partially, however, secondary sexual hair remains sparse and male pattern baldness and acne develop rarely. Several compounds have been developed to inhibit the 5 alpha-reductase isozymes and they play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases. This review describes the basic biochemical properties, functions, tissue distribution, chromosomal location, and clinical significance of the 5 alpha-reductase isozyme family.

  6. Genistein suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced proliferation via the apoptotic signaling pathway in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuck; Lee, Min-Ja; Kim, Jai-Eun; Park, Sun-Dong; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Won-Hwan

    2010-02-10

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Abnormal VSMC proliferation induces vascular dysfunction and several other pathological processes. The present study investigated the apoptotic effects of genistein on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced proliferation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The apoptotic effects of genistein were assessed to determine the mechanism(s) of its antiproliferative activity, including MTT, LDH assay, morphological change of cell, DNA fragmentation, and expression levels of pro- or anti-apoptotic molecules by RT-PCR and Western blots. The results show that genistein significantly reduced cell proliferation in TNF-alpha-induced HASMCs. Genistein also reduced intracellular nuclei staining with DAPI in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, genistein increased nucleosomal DNA fragmentation, increased the expression levels of Bax and c-Myc, and decreased the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL in TNF-alpha-induced HASMCs. Taken together, these findings indicate that genistein regulates the activation of apoptosis-related molecules in TNF-alpha-induced HASMCs, leading to the suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  7. Primary structure of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. V. The complete structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Stepanik, Terrence M; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    -macroglobulin subunit is discussed. A comparison of stretches of sequences from alpha 2-macroglobulin with partial sequence data for complement components C3 and C4 indicates that these proteins are evolutionary related. The properties of alpha 2-macroglobulin are discussed within the context of proteolytically...

  8. Carbohydrate as covalent crosslink in human inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, T E; Faarvang, K L; Ploug, M

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor is partially elucidated, but controversy about the construction of the polypeptide backbone still exists. We present evidence suggesting that inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor represents a novel plasma protein structure with two separate polypept...... polypeptide chains covalently crosslinked only by carbohydrate (chondroitin sulphate)....

  9. Regular endurance training reduces the exercise induced HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle in normoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Gassmann, Max; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2005-01-01

    and 2 (HIFs) are clearly related heterodimeric transcription factors that consist of an oxygen-depended alpha-subunit and a constitutive beta-subunit. With hypoxic exposure, HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha protein are stabilized. Upon heterodimerization, HIFs induce the transcription of a variety of genes...... legs exercised at the same absolute workload. In the untrained leg, the exercise bout induced an increase (Palpha fold and HIF-2alpha fold mRNA at 6 h of recovery. In contrast, HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha mRNA levels were not altered at any time point in the trained leg. Obviously, HIF-1...... including erythropoietin (EPO), transferrin and its receptor, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor. Considering that several of these genes are also induced with exercise, we tested the hypothesis that the mRNA level of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha subunits increases...

  10. Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2014-07-12

    The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (α)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving α-particles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of α-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either α-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the α-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no α-particle specific transcripts were identified. Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in α-particle radiation biodosimetry.

  11. Biliverdin is the endogenous ligand of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Mády, György

    2008-08-01

    alpha(1)-Acid glycoprotein (AAG), an acute phase component of the human serum, is a prominent member of the lipocalin family of proteins showing inflammatory/immunomodulatory activities and promiscuous drug binding properties. Both three-dimensional structure of AAG and its precise biological function are still unknown and only a few endogenous AAG ligands have been described to date. CD spectroscopic studies performed with commercial AAG and the separated genetic variants revealed high-affinity binding of biliverdin (BV) and biliverdin dimethyl ester to the 'F1/S' fraction of the protein. The preferential accommodation of the right-handed, P-helicity conformers of the pigments by the protein matrix resulted in strong induced CD activity, which was utilized for estimation of the binding parameters and to locate the binding site. It was concluded that both pigments are bound in the central beta-barrel cavity of AAG, held principally by hydrophobic interactions. Possible biological implications of the BV binding ability of AAG with special emphasis on the heme oxygenase-1 pathway are discussed.

  12. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (Vanderbilt); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  13. Obligatory heterotetramerization of three previously uncharacterized Kv channel alpha-subunits identified in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottschytsch, N; Raes, A; Van Hoorick, D; Snyders, D J

    2002-06-11

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels control excitability in neuronal and various other tissues. We identified three unique alpha-subunits of voltage-gated K(+)-channels in the human genome. Analysis of the full-length sequences indicated that one represents a previously uncharacterized member of the Kv6 subfamily, Kv6.3, whereas the others are the first members of two unique subfamilies, Kv10.1 and Kv11.1. Although they have all of the hallmarks of voltage-gated K(+) channel subunits, they did not produce K(+) currents when expressed in mammalian cells. Confocal microscopy showed that Kv6.3, Kv10.1, and Kv11.1 alone did not reach the plasma membrane, but were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Yeast two-hybrid experiments failed to show homotetrameric interactions, but showed interactions with Kv2.1, Kv3.1, and Kv5.1. Co-expression of each of the previously uncharacterized subunits with Kv2.1 resulted in plasma membrane localization with currents that differed from typical Kv2.1 currents. This heteromerization was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. The Kv2 subfamily consists of only two members and uses interaction with "silent subunits" to diversify its function. Including the subunits described here, the "silent subunits" represent one-third of all Kv subunits, suggesting that obligatory heterotetramer formation is more widespread than previously thought.

  14. Amplitude and phase relationship between alpha and beta oscillations in the human electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlqvist, H; Nikulin, V V; Strömberg, J O; Brismar, T

    2005-09-01

    The relationship between the electro-encephalographic (EEG) alpha and beta oscillations in the resting condition was investigated in the study. EEGs were recorded in 33 subjects, and alpha (7.5-12.5 Hz) and beta (15-25 Hz) oscillations were extracted with the use of a modified wavelet transform. Power, peak frequency and phase synchronisation were evaluated for both types of oscillation. The average beta-alpha peak frequency ratio was about 1.9-2.0 for all electrode derivations. The peak frequency of beta activity was within 70-90 % of the 95 % confidence interval of twice the alpha frequency. A significant (p beta and alpha power in all derivations in 32 subjects, with the slope of the regression line being approximately 0.3. There was no significant difference in the slope of the line in different electrode locations, although the power correlation was strongest in the occipital locations where alpha and beta oscillations had the largest power. A significant 1:2 phase synchronisation was present between the alpha and beta oscillations, with a phase lag of about pi/2 in all electrode derivations. The strong frequency relationship between the resting beta and alpha oscillations suggests that they are generated by a common mechanism. Power and phase relationships were weaker, suggesting that these properties can be modulated by additional mechanisms as well as be influenced by noise. A careful distinction between alpha-dependent and alpha-independent beta activity should be considered when making statements about the possible significance of genuine beta activity in different neurophysiological mechanisms.

  15. Inhibitory effect of human recombinant interferon gamma on synthesis of acute phase proteins in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells stimulated by leukocyte cytokines, TNF alpha and IFN-beta 2/BSF-2/IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magielska-Zero, D; Bereta, J; Czuba-Pelech, B; Pajdak, W; Gauldie, J; Koj, A

    1988-07-01

    Supernatants from endotoxin-stimulated human leukemic cells and human recombinant interferon-beta 2 similarly enhance synthesis of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and haptoglobin but suppress synthesis of albumin in cultured Hep G2 cells. Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor only slightly affects production of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and albumin in a similar manner as leukocyte cytokines. In distinction, recombinant human interferon-gamma profoundly inhibits synthesis of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and especially of haptoglobin, but stimulates production of alpha 2-macroglobulin thus modulating the acute phase response of these cells.

  16. Characterization of a globin-coupled oxygen sensor with a gene-regulating function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thijs, L.; Vinck, E.; Bolli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Globin-coupled sensors (GCSs) are multiple-domain transducers, consisting of a regulatory globin-like heme-binding domain and a linked transducer domain(s). GCSs have been described in both Archaea and bacteria. They are generally assumed to bind O2 (and perhaps other gaseous ligands) and to tran...

  17. N-Glycosylation of the alpha subunit does not influence trafficking or functional activity of the human organic solute transporter alpha/beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Carol J; Xu, Shuhua; Mennone, Albert; Lam, Ping; Boyer, James L

    2008-10-10

    The organic solute transporter (OSTalpha-OSTbeta) is a heteromeric transporter that is expressed on the basolateral membrane of epithelium in intestine, kidney, liver, testis and adrenal gland and facilitates efflux of bile acids and other steroid solutes. Both subunits are required for plasma membrane localization of the functional transporter but it is unclear how and where the subunits interact and whether glycosylation is required for functional activity. We sought to examine these questions for the human OSTalpha-OSTbeta transporter using the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, and COS7 cells transfected with constructs of human OSTalpha-FLAG and OSTbeta-Myc. Tunicamycin treatment demonstrated that human OSTalpha is glycosylated. In COS7 cells Western blotting identified the unglycosylated form (approximately 31 kD), the core precursor form (approximately 35 kD), and the mature, complex glycoprotein (approximately 40 kD). Immunofluorescence of both cells indicated that, in the presence of OSTbeta, the alpha subunit could still be expressed on the plasma membrane after tunicamycin treatment. Furthermore, the functional uptake of 3H-estrone sulfate was unchanged in the absence of N-glycosylation. Co-immunoprecipitation indicates that the immature form of OSTalpha interact with OSTbeta. However, immunoprecipitation of OSTbeta using an anti-Myc antibody did not co-precipitate the mature, complex glycosylated form of OSTalpha, suggesting that the primary interaction occurs early in the biosynthetic pathway and may be transient. In conclusion, human OSTalpha is a glycoprotein that requires interaction with OSTbeta to reach the plasma membrane. However, glycosylation of OSTalpha is not necessary for interaction with the beta subunit or for membrane localization or function of the heteromeric transporter.

  18. The protective antibodies induced by a novel epitope of human TNF-alpha could suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Gao, Yaping; Liu, Yu; Shi, Jinxia; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Zhanguo; Pan, Heping; Xue, Yanning; Liu, Chuan; Shen, Beifen; Shao, Ningsheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-01-27

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a major inflammatory mediator that exhibits actions leading to tissue destruction and hampering recovery from damage. At present, two antibodies against human TNF-alpha (hTNF-alpha) are available, which are widely used for the clinic treatment of certain inflammatory diseases. This work was undertaken to identify a novel functional epitope of hTNF-alpha. We performed screening peptide library against anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies, ELISA and competitive ELISA to obtain the epitope of hTNF-alpha. The key residues of the epitope were identified by means of combinatorial alanine scanning and site-specific mutagenesis. The N terminus (80-91 aa) of hTNF-alpha proved to be a novel epitope (YG1). The two amino acids of YG1, proline and valine, were identified as the key residues, which were important for hTNF-alpha biological function. Furthermore, the function of the epitope was addressed on an animal model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA could be suppressed in an animal model by prevaccination with the derivative peptides of YG1. The antibodies of YG1 could also inhibit the cytotoxicity of hTNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that YG1 is a novel epitope associated with the biological function of hTNF-alpha and the antibodies against YG1 can inhibit the development of CIA in animal model, so it would be a potential target of new therapeutic antibodies.

  19. Induction of retinoic acid receptor-alpha by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Takeda, K

    2000-08-15

    We reported previously that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces differentiation of human myeloblastic leukemia ML-1 cells to granulocytes, whereas treatment with ATRA alone induces practically no differentiation of these cells. To investigate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of these factors, we examined the effect of GM-CSF on retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in ML-1 cells. We reveal that GM-CSF induces the expression of RAR alpha mRNA and protein and stimulates the binding of nuclear proteins to direct repeat 5, a consensus sequence with high affinity for RAR-RXR heterodimers. Furthermore, expression of CD38 mRNA mediated through RAR alpha is induced synergistically by treatment with ATRA + GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF stimulates transcriptional activity mediated via RAR alpha in ML-1 cells. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF may therefore be a mechanism for stimulation by GM-CSF. The induction of RAR alpha by GM-CSF was also detected in other myeloid leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and KG-1) that showed a synergistic effect similar to that seen in ML-1 cells in response to ATRA + GM-CSF. We also found that GM-CSF induced the expression of RAR alpha in blood cells obtained from patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This activity of GM-CSF may serve as a useful adjunct to differentiation therapy for retinoic acid-nonresponsive leukemias.

  20. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  1. Alpha-beta and gamma rhythms subserve feedback and feedforward influences among human visual cortical areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalareas, G; Vezoli, J; Pelt, S. van; Schoffelen, J.M; Kennedy, H; Fries, P

    2016-01-01

    ... inter-areal directed influences as measured with magnetoencephalography. We show that influences along feedforward projections predominate in the gamma band, whereas influences along feedback projections predominate in the alpha-beta band...

  2. Correlations between personality traits and specific groups of alpha waves in the human EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannisson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Different individuals have alpha waves with different wavelengths. The distribution of the wavelengths is assumed to be bell-shaped and smooth. Although this view is generally accepted, it is still just an assumption and has never been critically tested. When exploring the relationship between alpha waves and personality traits, it makes a huge difference if the distribution of the alpha waves is smooth or if specific groups of alpha waves can be demonstrated. Previous studies have not considered the possibility that specific groups of alpha waves may exist. Methods. Computerized EEGs have become standard, but wavelength measurements are problematic when based on averaging procedures using the Fourier transformation because such procedures cause a large systematic error. If the actual wavelength is of interest, it is necessary to go back to basic physiology and use raw EEG signals. In the present study, measurements were made directly from sequences of alpha waves where every wave could be identified. Personality dimensions were measured using an inventory derived from the International Personality Item Pool. Results. Recordings from 200 healthy individuals revealed that there are three main groups of alpha waves. These groups had frequencies around 8, 10, and 12 waves per second. The middle group had a bimodal distribution, and a subdivision gave a total of four alpha groups. In the center of each group, the degree of extraversion was high and the degree of neuroticism was low. Many small differences in personality traits were found when the centers were compared with one another. This gave four personality profiles that resemble the four classical temperaments. When people in the surrounding zones were compared with those in the centers, relatively large differences in personality traits were found. Conclusions. Specific groups of alpha waves exist, and these groups have to be taken into account when correlations are made to personality dimensions and

  3. Correlations between personality traits and specific groups of alpha waves in the human EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Johannisson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Different individuals have alpha waves with different wavelengths. The distribution of the wavelengths is assumed to be bell-shaped and smooth. Although this view is generally accepted, it is still just an assumption and has never been critically tested. When exploring the relationship between alpha waves and personality traits, it makes a huge difference if the distribution of the alpha waves is smooth or if specific groups of alpha waves can be demonstrated. Previous studies have not considered the possibility that specific groups of alpha waves may exist. Methods. Computerized EEGs have become standard, but wavelength measurements are problematic when based on averaging procedures using the Fourier transformation because such procedures cause a large systematic error. If the actual wavelength is of interest, it is necessary to go back to basic physiology and use raw EEG signals. In the present study, measurements were made directly from sequences of alpha waves where every wave could be identified. Personality dimensions were measured using an inventory derived from the International Personality Item Pool. Results. Recordings from 200 healthy individuals revealed that there are three main groups of alpha waves. These groups had frequencies around 8, 10, and 12 waves per second. The middle group had a bimodal distribution, and a subdivision gave a total of four alpha groups. In the center of each group, the degree of extraversion was high and the degree of neuroticism was low. Many small differences in personality traits were found when the centers were compared with one another. This gave four personality profiles that resemble the four classical temperaments. When people in the surrounding zones were compared with those in the centers, relatively large differences in personality traits were found. Conclusions. Specific groups of alpha waves exist, and these groups have to be taken into account when correlations are made to

  4. Structure of the human gene and two rat cDNAs encoding the alpha chain of GTP-binding regulatory protein Go: two different mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, T; Toyama, R; Itoh, H; Kozasa, T; Matsuoka, M; Kaziro, Y

    1991-04-15

    Go is a specific class ("other") of signal-transducing heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) that is expressed in high levels in mammalian brain. We have cloned two different rat cDNAs encoding the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2) and a human Go alpha chromosomal gene. The human Go alpha gene spans more than 100 kilobases and contains 11 exons, including one noncoding exon in the 3' flanking region. The 5' flanking region is highly G + C-rich and contains five G.C boxes (Sp1 binding sites) but no TATA box. Exons 7 and 8 coding for amino acid residues 242-354 of Go alpha protein are duplicated (referred to as exons 7A, 7B, 8A, and 8B). It was found that exons 7A and 8A code for Go alpha-1, and 7B and 8B code for Go alpha-2. This indicates that two different Go alpha mRNAs may be generated by alternative splicing of a single Go alpha gene. The splice sites of the Go alpha-1 and Go alpha-2 genes are completely identical with those encoding human inhibitory G protein alpha subunits Gi2 alpha and Gi3 alpha [Itoh, H., Toyama, R., Kozasa, T., Tsukamoto, T., Matsuoka, M. & Kaziro, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 6656-6664] and also transducin G protein alpha subunit Gt1 alpha [Raport, C. J., Dere, B. & Hurley, J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 7122-7128]. Sequence homology and conservation of the exon-intron organization indicate that the genes coding for Go alpha, Gi2 alpha, Gi3 alpha, Gt1 alpha, and probably Gi1 alpha may be evolved from a common progenitor. Like Go alpha-1, Go alpha-2 is expressed mainly in brain.

  5. The linkage between binding of the C-terminal domain of hirudin and amidase activity in human alpha-thrombin.

    OpenAIRE

    de Cristofaro, R; Rocca, B; Bizzi, B; Landolfi, R

    1993-01-01

    A method derived from the analysis of viscosity effects on the hydrolysis of the amide substrates D-phenylalanylpipecolyl-arginine-p-nitroaniline, tosylglycylprolylarginine-p-nitroanaline and cyclohexylglycylalanylarginine-p-nitroalanine by human alpha-thrombin was developed to dissect the Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and kcat into the individual rate constants of the binding, acylation and deacylation reactions. This method was used to analyse the effect of the C-terminal hirudin (residues...

  6. Genetic polymorphism of human alpha 2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) in the resident population of the Basque Country (northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, O; Alonso, A

    1992-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of human alpha 2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) was studied in a sample of 466 healthy unrelated individuals resident in the Basque Country (Northern Spain) by isoelectric focusing on micro-ultrathin polyacrylamide gels followed by immunoblotting. The allele frequencies obtained were AHSG*1 = 0.7253, AHSG*2 = 0.2683 and AHSG*3 = 0.0064. These allele frequencies were compared with those reported in other European populations.

  7. Origin and Ascendancy of a Chimeric Fusion Gene: The β/δ-Globin Gene of Paenungulate Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C.; Sloan, Angela M.; Campbell, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    The δ-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked β-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric β/δ fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the β/δ fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric β/δ fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the β-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of β-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric β/δ fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of “Paenungulata,” a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived β/δ fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal δ/β fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin. PMID:19332641

  8. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Modulation of the oxygen affinity of cobalt-porphyrin by globin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marden, M C; Kiger, L; Poyart, C; Rashid, A K; Kister, J; Stetzkowski-Marden, F; Caron, G; Haque, M; Moens, L

    2000-04-28

    We have combined two extreme effects which influence the oxygen affinity to obtain a cobalt-based oxygen carrier with an affinity similar to that of human adult hemoglobin (HbA). The goal was to obtain an oxygen transporter with a lower oxidation rate. Exchange of the heme group (Fe-protoporphyrin IX) in Hb with a cobalt-porphyrin leads to a reduction in oxygen affinity by over a factor of 10, an oxygen affinity too low for use as a blood substitute. At the other extreme, certain globin sequences are known to provide a very high oxygen affinity; for example, Hb Ascaris displays an oxygen affinity 1000 times higher than HbA. We demonstrate here that these opposing effects can be additive, yielding an oxygen affinity similar to that of HbA, but with oxygen binding to a cobalt atom. We have tested the effect of substitution of cobalt-porphyrin for heme in normal HbA, sperm whale (SW) Mb (Mb), and high affinity globins for leghemoglobin, two trematode Hbs: Paramphistomum epiclitum (Pe) and Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gc). As for HbA or SW Mb, the transition from heme to cobalt-porphyrin in the trematode Hbs leads to a large decrease in the oxygen affinity, with oxygen partial pressures for half saturation (P(50)) of 5 and 25 mm Hg at 37 degrees C for cobalt-Pe and cobalt-Gc, respectively. A critical parameter for Hb-based blood substitutes is the autoxidation rate; while both metals oxidize to an inactive state, we observed a decrease in the oxidation rate of over an order of magnitude for cobalt versus iron, for similar oxygen affinities. The time constants for autoxidation at 37 degrees C were 250 and 100 h for Pe and Gc, respectively.

  10. Synthesis and intracellular localization of chick acid alpha-glucosidase in chick erythrocyte-human fibroblast heterokaryons. A model system for the study of lysosomal enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, H J; Reuser, A J; van der Veer, E

    1986-02-01

    The synthesis and localization of chick acid alpha-glucosidase has been studied in chick erythrocyte-human fibroblast heterokaryons. Monospecific antibodies raised against purified chick liver acid alpha-glucosidase were used. It was found that the acid alpha-glucosidase in the heterokaryons is of chick origin, and is localized in the same lysosomes as the human lysosomal enzymes. It is concluded that chick erythrocyte-human fibroblast heterokaryons provide a useful model system for the study of lysosomal enzyme synthesis and routing.

  11. Biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase in the human colon carcinoma cell-line Caco-2: secretion from the apical surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Fransen, J.A.; Boekestijn, J.C.; Oude Elferink, R.P.; Matter, K.; Hauri, H.P.; Tager, J.M.; Ginsel, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 was used for studies on the biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase in polarized epithelial cells. Metabolic labelling revealed that in Caco-2 cells alpha-glucosidase is synthesized as a precursor form of 110 x 10(3) Mr. This form is

  12. Biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2: secretion from the apical surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Fransen, J. A.; Boekestijn, T. C.; Oude Elferink, R. P.; Matter, K.; Hauri, H. P.; Tager, J. M.; Ginsel, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The human adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2 was used for studies on the biosynthesis and transport of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase in polarized epithelial cells. Metabolic labelling revealed that in Caco-2 cells alpha-glucosidase is synthesized as a precursor form of 110 x 10(3) Mr. This form is

  13. Primary structure of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. IV. Primary structure of two large CNBr fragments, located in the COOH-terminal part and accounting for 337 residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Wierzbicki, D M; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequences have been determined for two CNBr fragments of human alpha 2-macroglobulin which, due to the presence of an uncleaved Hse-Thr bond, form an Mr = 40,000 fragment. These fragments are located in the COOH-terminal part of alpha 2-macroglobulin (CB21, residues 955-1185 and CB22...

  14. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from

  15. Spatial-temporal structures of human alpha rhythms: theory, microcurrent sources, multiscale measurements, and global binding of local networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, P L; Wingeier, B M; Silberstein, R B

    2001-07-01

    A theoretical framework supporting experimental measures of dynamic properties of human EEG is proposed with emphasis on distinct alpha rhythms. Robust relationships between measured dynamics and cognitive or behavioral conditions are reviewed, and proposed physiological bases for EEG at cellular levels are considered. Classical EEG data are interpreted in the context of a conceptual framework that distinguishes between locally and globally dominated dynamic processes, as estimated with coherence or other measures of phase synchronization. Macroscopic (scalp) potentials generated by cortical current sources are described at three spatial scales, taking advantage of the columnar structure of neocortex. New EEG data demonstrate that both globally coherent and locally dominated behavior can occur within the alpha band, depending on narrow band frequency, spatial measurement scale, and brain state. Quasi-stable alpha phase structures consistent with global standing waves are observed. At the same time, alpha and theta phase locking between cortical regions during mental calculations is demonstrated, consistent with neural network formation. The brain-binding problem is considered in the context of EEG dynamic behavior that generally exhibits both of these local and global aspects. But specific experimental designs and data analysis methods may severely bias physiological interpretations in either local or global directions. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the function of the laminin alpha5-chain, previously identified in mice, cDNA clones encoding the 953-amino-acid carboxy terminal G-domain of the human laminin alpha5-chain were characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that the laminin alpha5-chain is expressed in human placenta......, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  17. Regional variations in certain cellular characteristics in human lumbar intervertebral discs, including the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, D; Ozuna, R M; Spector, M

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the regional variation of certain cellular features in the human intervertebral disc (IVD) could lead to a better understanding of site-specific properties relative to degradation, response to injury, and healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine how cell density, cell morphology, cell grouping, and expression of a specific actin isoform varied with location and degeneration in the human disc. A total of 41 human L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs removed postmortem from 21 individuals were analyzed. The discs were graded for degeneration based on the Thompson scale and processed for evaluation. Microtomed sections from paraffin-embedded specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or a monoclonal antibody to alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), an actin isoform often associated with contraction. A significant regional dependence was found for most of the measured parameters. A fourfold increase in cell density was found in proceeding from the nucleus pulposus (NP) to the outer annulus (OA) of the IVD. Approximately 30% of the cells in the NP were present in groups. Virtually all of the cells in the NP and 40% of those in the OA were round. Moreover, notable percentages (12-15%) of the cells in the NP and inner annulus (IA) contained alpha-SMA. Only pair density was found to be correlated with Thompson grade, with more degenerated specimens having higher values. A greater effect was also observed on the percentage of cells in groups. These findings provide the basis for future work to investigate the importance of cells in groups, the role of alpha-SMA in the disc, and the changes in these cellular characteristics in pathological disc conditions.

  18. (AC)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in 5' beta-globin gene in native and Mestizo Mexican populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, R; Delgado, P; Arenas, D; Barrientos, C; Buentello, L; Loeza, F; Salamanca, F

    2001-12-01

    Repeated sequences are dispersed along the human genome. These sequences are useful as markers in diagnosis of inherited diseases, in forensic medicine, and in tracking the origin and evolution of human populations. The (AC)n repeated element is the most frequent in the human genome. In this paper, the (AC)n repeated element located in the 5' flanking region of the beta-globin gene was studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Four ethnic Mexican groups (Mixteca, Nahua, Otomí, Purépecha) and a Mestizo population were analyzed. We observed three alleles, A [(AC)16, B [(AC)14], and C [(AC)18], with a frequency of between 68.2% and 86.9%, 13.1% and 18.2%, and 6.7% and 13.7%, respectively. Allele C was present only in Purépecha and Mestizo groups. The absence of this allele in the other ethnic groups studied suggests that there is low genetic admixture of Purépecha and that this is a relatively isolated population. However, it could be that the C allele occurs in low frequencies in the other groups as a result of small sample sizes. The (AC)n repeat polymorphism in the beta-globin gene has not been previously studied in Amerindian populations.

  19. Human alpha-n-acetylglucosaminidase. 2. Activity towards natural substrates and multiple recognition forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Figura, K

    1977-11-01

    Purified urinary alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase acts as an exoglycosidase. The enzyme removes from heparan sulfate exclusively alpha-glycosidically linked N-acetylglucosamine residues. The pH optimum of around 4.4 towards heparan sulfate and heparin is similar to that towards synthetic arylglycosides. Urinary alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase can be separated by isoelectric focusing into multiple forms with pI values between 3.3 and 6.0. The multiple forms differ in their recognition and endocytosis by cultivated skin fibroblasts. Forms with pI values of 4.8 +/- 0.3 respond best to endcytosis. From these forms up to 0.8 X 10(6) molecules may be recognized and taken up in an hour by a single cell. Sodium periodate treatment reduces the alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase recognition by fibroblasts and suggests that the recognition sites on the enzyme are associated with its carbohydrate moiety. Attempts to modify the recognition of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by pretreatment with purified glycosidases failed.

  20. Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect growth regulation of human mesothelioma cells: role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombino, Sonya; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, PierLuigi; Motta, Giovanni; Falugi, Carla; Russo, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    This study presents data suggesting that both human mesothelioma (cell lines and human mesothelioma biopsies) and human normal mesothelial cells express receptors for acetylcholine and that stimulation of these receptors by nicotine prompted cell growth via activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Thus, these data demonstrate that: (a) human mesothelioma cells and human biopsies of mesothelioma as well as of normal pleural mesothelial cells express functionally alpha-7 nicotinic acethlycholine receptors, evaluated by alpha-bungarotoxin-FITC binding, receptor binding assay, Western blot, and reverse transcription-PCR; (b) choline acetyltransferase immunostaining is present in mesothelioma cells; (c) mesothelioma cell growth is modulated by the cholinergic system in which agonists (i.e., nicotine) has a proliferative effect, and antagonists (i.e., curare) has an inhibitory effect, evaluated by cell cloning, DNA synthesis and cell cycle; (d) nicotine induces Ca(+2) influx, evaluated by [(45)Ca(2+)] uptake, and consequently activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p90(RSK) phosphorylation), evaluated by Western blot; and (e) apoptosis mechanisms in mesothelioma cells are under the control of the cholinergic system (nicotine antiapoptotic via induction of nuclear factor-kappaB complexes and phosphorylation of Bad at Ser(112); curare proapoptotic via G(0)-G(1) arrest p21(waf-1) dependent but p53 independent). The involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in mesothelioma appears reasonable and open up new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Molecular diversity of voltage-gated sodium channel alpha and beta subunit mRNAs in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candenas, Luz; Seda, Marian; Noheda, Pedro; Buschmann, Helmut; Cintado, Cristina G; Martin, Julio D; Pinto, Francisco M

    2006-07-10

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are composed of one alpha subunit and one or more auxiliary beta subunits. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay was used to analyse the expression of the nine known alpha subunits (Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.9) in 20 different human tissues. The mRNA expression of the currently known beta subunits (beta1, beta2, beta3 and beta4) was also assessed. The mRNAs of voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha and beta subunits were found in a wide variety of human tissues assayed and were present in neuronal and non-neuronal types of cells. These data suggest that, in addition to its well-established role in skeletal muscle, cardiac cells and neurons, voltage-gated Na+ channels might play important, still undetermined local roles in the regulation of cellular functions. These channels could emerge in the next future as potential, new therapeutic targets in the treatment of visceral diseases.

  2. Music genre preference and tempo alter alpha and beta waves in human non-musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Gentry

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of music genre and tempo on brain activation patterns in 10 nonmusicians.Two genres (rock and jazz and three tempos (slowed, medium/normal, andquickened were examined using EEG recording and analyzed through Fast Fourier Transform(FFT analysis. When participants listened to their preferred genre, an increase in alpha waveamplitude was observed. Alpha waves were not significantly affected by tempo. Beta waveamplitude increased significantly as the tempo increased. Genre had no effect on beta waves. Thefindings of this study indicate that genre preference and artificially modified tempo do affectalpha and beta wave activation in non-musicians listening to preselected songs.

  3. The 5'HS2 of the globin locus control region enhances transcription through the interaction of a multimeric complex binding at two functionally distinct NF-E2 binding sites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Talbot; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe locus control region (LCR) of the human beta-globin locus consists of four hypersensitive regions (5'HS 1-4). One of these sites, 5'HS2, is active in both transient and stable transfection assays and transgenic mice. It has previously been shown that the jun/fos consensus binding

  4. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  5. Diagnostic value of alpha 1-fetoprotein and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin in infancy and childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D T; Calaminus, G; Göbel, U

    2001-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the current literature and summarizes the experience of the German cooperative protocols for nontesticular germ cell tumors (MAKEI) on the use of alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) for diagnostic evaluation in pediatric oncology. Based on this evaluation, this review proposes guidelines for the initial diagnostic work-up for children with clinically suspected secreting tumors. AFP and beta-hCG represent the characteristic tumor markers of malignant epithelial liver tumors and malignant germ cell tumors (GCT). They play an important role in the initial diagnostic evaluation as well as in the follow-up examination during therapy. Current therapeutic strategies for both tumor types include preoperative chemotherapy followed by delayed tumor resection. Therefore, it is essential for the pediatrician in charge to be aware of the broad differential diagnosis of elevated AFP and beta-hCG. In a well-defined clinical setting, these tumor markers allow clinical diagnosis without histological confirmation, but the physiologically elevated AFP serum levels in infancy or unrecognized benign conditions, such as hepatic diseases or hereditary disorders, must also be considered as differential diagnoses. Therefore, the laboratory investigations should include liver parameters in all patients to exclude hepatic disease. In addition, pregnancy must be excluded in adolescents. Careful history taking and clinical examination will further help to rule out metabolic disorders or ataxia teleangiectasia that are associated with elevated AFP levels. Having excluded these conditions, elevated AFP levels above the age-related normal range (with or without high beta-hCG), indicate malignant epithelial liver tumors in primary liver lesions. At virtually all other sites, the diagnosis of a malignant GCT with a substantial yolk sac tumor and/or choriocarcinoma component can be established. Pancreaticoblastoma

  6. MicroRNA expression in alpha and beta cells of human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Klein

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98% subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels.In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different

  7. Identification of a novel human glucagon receptor promoter: regulation by cAMP and PGC-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Dichmann, Darwin Sorento; Abrahamsen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    inhibitory effects of cAMP on glucagon receptor mRNA expression is mediated at the level of gene transcription. The cAMP-mediated downregulation of the proximal promoter was examined by deletion analysis in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and the cAMP responsiveness was found to be located in a region...... between 1051 and 1016 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site, which contains several putative cAMP responsive elements. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), known to be upregulated in the liver by fasting, was found to abolish the c......AMP-dependent downregulation of glucagon receptor mRNA expression in vitro, whereas overexpression of PGC-1beta had no effect....

  8. N-glycans of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Susanne P; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Leeflang, Bas R; Koles, Kate; Mannesse, Maurice L M; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Pieper, Frank R; Kroos, Marian A; Reuser, Arnold J J; Zhou, Qun; Jin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Kate; Edmunds, Tim; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2007-06-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. More than 110 different pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding GAA have been observed. Patients with this disease are being treated by intravenous injection of recombinant forms of the enzyme. Focusing on recombinant approaches to produce the enzyme means that specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, human GAA was expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic rabbits. The N-linked glycans of recombinant human GAA (rhAGLU), isolated from the rabbit milk, were released by peptide-N(4)-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F. The N-glycan pool was fractionated and purified into individual components by a combination of anion-exchange, normal-phase, and Sambucus nigra agglutinin-affinity chromatography. The structures of the components were analyzed by 500 MHz one-dimensional and 600 MHz cryo two-dimensional (total correlation spectroscopy [TOCSY] nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, combined with two-dimensional (31)P-filtered (1)H-(1)H TOCSY spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-profiling of 2-aminobenzamide-labeled glycans combined with exoglycosidase digestions. The recombinant rabbit glycoprotein contained a broad array of different N-glycans, comprising oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type structures. Part of the oligomannose-type glycans showed the presence of phospho-diester-bridged N-acetylglucosamine. For the complex-type glycans (partially) (alpha2-6)-sialylated (nearly only N-acetylneuraminic acid) diantennary structures were found; part of the structures were (alpha1-6)-core-fucosylated or (alpha1-3)-fucosylated in the upper antenna (Lewis x). Using HPLC-mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, information was generated with respect to the

  9. Origins and spreads of Alpha 1 antitrypsin variants in world human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The similarities of the exon-intron structures between the AAT and alpha 1 antichymotrypsin and their ... In some of these studies nuclear DNA polymorphisms were analyzed in a large number of loci and in others ...... Severe α-1 antitrypsin deficiency caused by Q0Ourém allele: clinical features, haplotype characterization ...

  10. Saw palmetto extracts potently and noncompetitively inhibit human alpha1-adrenoceptors in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goepel, M.; Hecker, U.; Krege, S.; Rübben, H.; Michel, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We wanted to test whether phytotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms have alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonistic properties in vitro. METHODS: Preparations of beta-sitosterol and extracts of stinging nettle, medicinal pumpkin, and saw palmetto were obtained

  11. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in normal human pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    as their glycine-extended precursors, were characterized by sequence-specific radioimmunoassays, gel-chromatography, h.p.l.c. and amino acid sequencing. alpha MSH and gamma 1MSH constituted 0.27-1.32% and 0.10-5.10%, respectively, of the POMC-derived products [calculated as the sum of adrenocorticotropic hormone...

  12. Interferon-alpha induces transient suppressors of cytokine signalling expression in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Nielsen, M; Röpke, C

    2001-01-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins comprise a newly identified family of negative feedback regulators of cytokine signalling. SOCS expression is differentially induced upon cytokine stimulation in different cell types. Here we show that interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is a potent...... in cytokine sensitivity might be mediated via induction of SOCS expression with different kinetics in T cells....

  13. ATP Release from Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Baaske

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells reduce cytosolic ATP content in response to treatment with S. aureus alpha-toxin (hemolysin A, Hla. This study was undertaken to investigate whether this is due to attenuated ATP generation or to release of ATP from the cytosol and extracellular ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes. Exposure of cells to rHla did result in mitochondrial calcium uptake and a moderate decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that ATP regeneration may have been attenuated. In addition, ATP may have left the cells through transmembrane pores formed by the toxin or through endogenous release channels (e.g., pannexins activated by cellular stress imposed on the cells by toxin exposure. Exposure of cells to an alpha-toxin mutant (H35L, which attaches to the host cell membrane but does not form transmembrane pores, did not induce ATP release from the cells. The Hla-mediated ATP-release was completely blocked by IB201, a cyclodextrin-inhibitor of the alpha-toxin pore, but was not at all affected by inhibitors of pannexin channels. These results indicate that, while exposure of cells to rHla may somewhat reduce ATP production and cellular ATP content, a portion of the remaining ATP is released to the extracellular space and degraded by ecto-enzymes. The release of ATP from the cells may occur directly through the transmembrane pores formed by alpha-toxin.

  14. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...

  15. β-Thalassemia due to intronic LINE-1 insertion in the β-globin gene (HBB): molecular mechanisms underlying reduced transcript levels of the β-globin(L1) allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanikova, Lucie; Kucerova, Jana; Indrak, Karel; Divoka, Martina; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Prchal, Josef T; Divoky, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    We describe the molecular etiology of β(+)-thalassemia that is caused by the insertion of the full-length transposable element LINE-1 (L1) into the intron-2 of the β-globin gene (HBB). The transcript level of the affected β-globin gene was severely reduced. The remaining transcripts consisted of full-length, correctly processed β-globin mRNA and a minute amount of three aberrantly spliced transcripts with a decreased half-life due to activation of the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. The lower steady-state amount of mRNA produced by the β-globin(L1) allele also resulted from a reduced rate of transcription and decreased production of full-length β-globin primary transcripts. The promoter and enhancer sequences of the β-globin(L1) allele were hypermethylated; however, treatment with a demethylating agent did not restore the impaired transcription. A histone deacetylase inhibitor partially reactivated the β-globin(L1) transcription despite permanent β-globin(L1) promoter CpG methylation. This result indicates that the decreased rate of transcription from the β-globin(L1) allele is associated with an altered chromatin structure. Therefore, the molecular defect caused by intronic L1 insertion in the β-globin gene represents a novel etiology of β-thalassemia. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Small interfering RNA targeting HIF-1{alpha} reduces hypoxia-dependent transcription and radiosensitizes hypoxic HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, Adrian [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Fleischer, Markus [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Medical Clinic II; Loeffler, Juergen; Einsele, Herrmann [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Medical Clinic II; Said, Harun M.; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Plathow, Christian [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vordermark, Dirk [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-04-15

    Background: Hypoxia inducible factor-1 has been identified as a potential target to overcome hypoxia-induced radioresistance The aim of the present study was to investigate whether selective HIF-1 inhibition via small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) affects hypoxia-induced radioresistance in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Material and Methods: HIF-1{alpha} expression in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro was silenced using HIF-1{alpha} siRNA sequence primers. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was performed to quantify the mRNA expression of HIF-1{alpha}. HIF-1{alpha} protein levels were studied by Western blotting at 20% (air) or after 12 hours at 0.1% O{sub 2} (hypoxia). Cells were assayed for clonogenic survival after irradiation with 2, 5, or 10 Gy, under normoxic or hypoxic conditions in the presence of HIF-1{alpha}-targeted or control siRNA sequences. A modified oxygen enhancement ratio (OER') was calculated as the ratio of the doses to achieve the same survival at 0.1% O{sub 2} as at ambient oxygen tensions. OER' was obtained at cell survival levels of 50%, 37%, and 10%. Results: HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA enhanced radiation treatment efficacy under severely hypoxic conditions compared to tumor cells treated with scrambled control siRNA. OER was reduced on all survival levels after treatment with HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA, suggesting that inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA increases radiosensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells in vitro. Conclusion: Inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA clearly acts synergistically with radiotherapy and increase radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells in vitro. (orig.)

  17. Epstein-Barr virus promotes human monocyte survival and maturation through a paracrine induction of IFN-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Lyons, Stephen A; Arrand, John R

    2004-07-01

    The role of monocytes and macrophages during EBV infection is not clear. The interaction of EBV with human monocytes was investigated in terms of cell survival and morphological and phenotypic changes to gain a better understanding of the role of these cells during EBV infection. We show that EBV infection of PBMCs rescues monocytes from undergoing spontaneous apoptosis and dramatically enhances their survival. Results obtained with heat-inactivated virus, neutralizing anti-EBV mAb 72A1 and recombinant gp350, suggest that enhancement of viability by EBV requires both infectious virus and interaction between gp350 and its receptor. IFN-alpha either secreted within 24 h from PBMCs upon infection with EBV or exogenously added to unstimulated monocytes inhibited spontaneous apoptosis, indicating that induction of IFN-alpha is an early important survival signal responsible for the delay in the apoptosis of monocytes. EBV infection also induced acute maturation of monocytes to macrophages with morphological and phenotypic characteristics of potent APCs. Monocytes exposed to EBV became larger in size with increased granularity and expressed considerably higher levels of membrane HLA classes I and II, ICAM-1, CD80, CD86, and CD40 compared with uninfected cultures. These observations provide the first immunoregulatory links among EBV, IFN-alpha, and monocyte survival and maturation and importantly raise the possibility that these cells may serve as a vehicle for the dissemination of the virus as well as being active participants in eliciting anti-EBV T cell responses during acute infection.

  18. Restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by a deletion involving Alu sequences within the human. alpha. sub 2 -plasmin inhibitor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Osamu; Sugahara, Yuichi; Nakamura, Yuichi; Hirosawa, Shinsaku; Aoki, Nobuo (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan))

    1989-06-13

    A restriction fragment length polymorphism within the human {alpha}{sub 2}-plasmin inhibitor gene has been detected by Southern blot hybridization using an {alpha}{sub 2}-plasmin inhibitor cDNA probe. This restriction fragment length polymorphism can be attributed to the presence of two alleles, A and B, that are distributed in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with frequencies of 73.5% and 2.65%, respectively, in 66 unrelated Caucasian individuals or with frequencies of 51.0% and 49.0%, respectively, in 50 unrelated Japanese individuals. The minor allele, B, is due to a deletion of about 720 base pairs in intron 8 of the {alpha}{sub 2}-plasmin inhibitor gene. Sequence analysis of the deletion junction in allele B and the corresponding regions of allele A demonstrated the presence of oppositely oriented Alu sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} deletion boundaries. These data suggest that this restriction fragment length polymorphism was caused by intrastrand recombination between Alu sequences.

  19. A Myocardial Slice Culture Model Reveals Alpha-1A-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in the Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Croft Thomas, Jr., MD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors used 52 nonfailing and failing human hearts to develop a simple, high throughput left ventricular myocardial slice model that is stable by ATP and viability assays for at least 3 days. The model supports studies of signaling, contraction, and viral transduction. They use the model to show for the first time that the alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor, which is present at very low abundance in the human myocardium, activates cardioprotective ERK with nanomolar EC50 in failing heart slices and stimulates a positive inotropic effect. This model should be useful for translational studies, to test whether molecules discovered in basic experiments are functional in the human heart.

  20. Linear alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide analogs display receptor binding activity and inhibit alpha-hANP-induced cGMP accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Y; Minamitake, Y; Furuya, M; Takehisa, M; Katayama, T; Tanaka, S

    1989-11-15

    We have synthesized a series of [Cys(R)7,23]alpha-hANP analogs, in which the two Cys residues were modified with various alkyl groups(R); i.e., R=Acm, Pe, Qe, Cam, Me, Ae, Bzl, Cm, Ocam and sulfo. The Acm-, Cam-, and Me-analogs exhibited binding activity as potent as alpha-hANP in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Binding activity of the analogs decreased progressively as the bulkiness of the R group increased. None of the analogs caused accumulation of cGMP in VSMC and vasorelaxant activity in rat aorta. Acm-, Cam- and Me-analogs substantially antagonized alpha-hANP-induced cGMP accumulation, but did not antagonize vasorelaxation induced by alpha-hANP in vitro.

  1. Modulation of human uterine smooth muscle cell collagen contractility by thrombin, Y-27632, TNF alpha and indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm labour occurs in approximately 10% of pregnancies and is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. However, the pathways involved in regulating contractility in normal and preterm labour are not fully elucidated. Our aim was to utilise a human myometrial contractility model to investigate the effect of a number of uterine specific contractility agents in this system. Therefore, we investigated the contractile response of human primary uterine smooth muscle cells or immortalised myometrial smooth muscle cells cultured within collagen lattices, to known mediators of uterine contractility, which included thrombin, the ROCK-1 inhibitor Y-27632, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory indomethacin. Methods Cell contractility was calculated over time, with the collagen gel contraction assay, utilising human primary uterine smooth muscle cells (hUtSMCs and immortalised myometrial smooth muscle cells (hTERT-HM: a decrease in collagen gel area equated to an increase in contractility. RNA was isolated from collagen embedded cells and gene expression changes were analysed by real time fluorescence reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy were employed to observe cell morphology and cell collagen gel interactions. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc tests. Results TNF alpha increased collagen contractility in comparison to the un-stimulated collagen embedded hUtSMC cells, which was inhibited by indomethacin, while indomethacin alone significantly inhibited contraction. Thrombin augmented the contractility of uterine smooth muscle cell and hTERT-HM collagen gels, this effect was inhibited by the thrombin specific inhibitor, hirudin. Y-27632 decreased both basal and thrombin-induced collagen contractility in the hTERT-HM embedded gels. mRNA expression of the thrombin receptor, F2R was up

  2. Significance of radioimmunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin and alpha fetoprotein in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors of the testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausitz, J.; Hupka, S. (Institute for Postgradual Training of Physicians and Pharmaceutists, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)); Cerny, V.; Bohunicky, L.; Korec, S. (Ustav Klinickej Onkologie, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) made in 49 patients with nonseminomatous testicular tumors showed that these investigations make the diagnosis more precise, permit to follow up the dynamics of the course of the disease and the effectiveness of treatment and may help to reveal the presence of otherwise undetectable tumorous metastases. The significance of these assays is enhanced if the two tumorous proteins are investigated in parallel. The results proved positive in 43 (87.8%) and false negative in 6 (12.2%) of the patients. The absence of HCG and AFP production in some patients with active disorder has not as yet been elucidated.

  3. MOLECULAR DOCKING OF COMPOUNDS FROM Chaetomium Sp. AGAINST HUMAN ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA IN SEARCHING ANTI BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maywan Hariono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on molecular docking-based virtual screening has been conducted to select virtual hit of compounds, reported its existence in fungal endophytes of Chaetomium sp. as cytotoxic agent of breast cancer. The ligands were docked into Human Estrogen Receptor alpha (HERa as the protein which regulates the breast cancer growth via estradiol-estrogen receptor binding intervention. The results showed that two compounds bearing xanthone and two compounds bearing benzonaphtyridinedione scaffolds were selected as virtual hit ligands for HERa leading to the conclusion that these compounds were good to be developed as anti breast cancer.

  4. Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Bendtsen, F; Schütten, H J

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic-intestinal disposal of endogenous human alpha atrial natriuretic factor99-126 (ANF) was assessed in 13 patients with cirrhosis (six Child-Turcotte class A, five class B, and two class C) and eight control subjects. The Fick principle was applied during hepatic vein catheterization. Arterial...... ANF concentration in patients with cirrhosis [11.1 +/- 1.6 (SEM) pmol/L] was not significantly different from that of the control subjects (14.9 +/- 4.2 pmol/L, NS). Arteriohepatic venous extraction ratio of ANF (0.43 +/- 0.05 in cirrhosis vs 0.37 +/- 0.09 in controls, NS), hepatic...

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-alpha Is a Functional Target of p63 in Adult Human Keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Silvia; Boergesen, Michael; Sinha, Satrajit

    2009-01-01

    healing process, is a target of p63 in human keratinocytes. Silencing of p63 by RNA interference and transient transfections showed that p63 represses PPARalpha through a functional region of promoter B. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicate that p63 is bound to this region, in the absence...... of expression in the interfollicular epidermis under physiological conditions. Furthermore, we show that PPARalpha is a negative regulator of DeltaNp63alpha levels and that it also binds to a functional region of the DeltaNp63 promoter that lacks PPRE motifs. Therefore, the reciprocal regulation is exerted...

  6. Extended interferon-alpha therapy accelerates telomere length loss in human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M O'Bryan

    Full Text Available Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes.Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8(+CD45RA(+CD57(+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8(+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index.Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined.

  7. Association of the human CD3-zeta chain with the alpha beta-T cell receptor/CD3 complex. Clues from a T cell variant with a mutated T cell receptor-alpha chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Schøller, J; Wahi, M A

    1990-01-01

    The TCR for Ag, on the majority of human T cells, is a disulfide-linked heterodimer composed of TCR-alpha and -beta chains noncovalently associated with the monomorphic CD3 complex composed of the CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta chains. The interactions involved in the assembly...... of the various components of this multimeric protein complex are not fully understood. In this report, a variant of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat that synthesized all of the known components of the TCR/CD3 complex but fails to express the TCR/CD3 complex at the cell surface is further characterized....... This variant, J79, has a mutated TCR-alpha chain that does not affect the assembly of the pentameric form (TCR-alpha beta-CD3-gamma delta epsilon) of the TCR/CD3 complex but inhibits the assembly of the CD3-zeta homodimer with the rest of the complex (TCR-alpha beta-CD3-gamma delta epsilon----TCR-alpha beta-CD...

  8. Conversion of alpha-linolenic acid in humans is influenced by the absolute amounts of alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in the diet and not by their ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goyens, P.L.L.; Spilker, M.E.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.; Mensink, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human in vivo data on dietary determinants of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) metabolism are scarce. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether intakes of ALA or linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6) or their ratio influences ALA metabolism. DESIGN: During 4 wk, 29 subjects received a control diet (7% of

  9. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  10. Expression of alpha 3 beta 1 integrin receptor and its ligands in human lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolazzi, A; Cerboni, C; Flamini, G; Bigotti, A; Lauriola, L; Natali, P G

    1995-08-22

    Increasing experimental evidence demonstrates that malignant transformation is associated with changes in the repertoire of expression of the integrin family of molecules, which mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. We have analyzed immunohistochemically and immunochemically the expression of VLA-3 integrin and its known ligands, namely, laminin (LM), fibronectin (FN), collagen type IV (Coll IV), nicein (NIC), and entactin/nidogen (ENT), in lung tumors of various histological types. alpha 3 beta 1 was detectable in normal bronchial epithelium and along basement membranes of alveolar walls. In non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) the integrin was expressed in 82% of the cases, independently of histological type and degree of differentiation of the tumors. On the other hand, only 13% of the small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) displayed a weak and heterogeneous distribution of the alpha 3 beta 1 complex. Our findings were confirmed immunochemically using long-term tumor cell lines. While the expression of both alpha 3 beta 1 and ligands LM, FN, Coll IV, and Ent correlated in NSCLC with the presence of basement membranes, FN was the only ligand detectable in the stroma of SCLCs. A selective loss of nicein in basement membranes was demonstrated in NSCLC indicating an impairment of expression of this glycoprotein following malignant transformation.

  11. Deqi Induction by HT7 Acupuncture Alters Theta and Alpha Band Coherence in Human Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go-Eun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate the changes in phase synchronization in the theta and alpha bands before and during the performance of classical acupuncture on the Sinmun (HT7. The electroencephalogram (EEG signals from nine healthy young subjects were recorded before and during acupuncture in the “closed-eye” state. The EEG signals were acquired from 19 surface scalp electrodes (FP1, FP2, F7, F3, Fz F4, F8, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, T5, P3, Pz, P4, T6, O1, and O2. Needles were inserted into the HT7 bilaterally and were then manipulated to induce deqi and retained for 15 minutes. Phase synchronization was measured by phase coherence. In the theta band, coherence significantly increased between the temporal (T5, T6 and occipital areas (O1, O2 during the acupuncture stimulation. In the alpha band, coherence significantly increased between the left temporal area (T5 and other areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital. Phase coherence in the theta and alpha bands tended to increase during the retention of the acupuncture needles after deqi. Therefore, it can be concluded that acupuncture stimulation with deqi is clinically effective via the central nervous system (CNS.

  12. Generation of canine-human Fc IgE chimeric antibodies for the determination of the canine IgE domain of interaction with Fc epsilon RI alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Michael J; Vratimos, Athanassios P; Housden, Jonathan E M; Helm, Birgit A

    2008-04-01

    Identification of the domain(s) of canine IgE that interact with Fc epsilon RI alpha may lead to novel therapeutic intervention strategies that inhibit the ability of canine IgE to engage Fc epsilon RI alpha. A panel of canine-human Fc IgE chimeric antibodies was constructed to investigate this interaction by replacing canine IgE-Fc domains with the corresponding human IgE-Fc domains since human IgE-Fc does not recognize canine Fc epsilon RI alpha. beta-Hexosaminidase release assays were performed to assess the ability of the chimeric antibodies to bind to and sensitize a novel RBL cell line transfected with canine Fc epsilon RI alpha for antigen induced mediator release. Replacing canine C epsilon2 with human C epsilon2 resulted in similar levels of release as those elicited by canine Fc IgE from RBL-2H3 cells transfected with either canine Fc epsilon RI alpha or human Fc epsilon RI alpha. Substitution of canine C epsilon4 with human C epsilon4 resulted in approximately 10% lower levels of release compared to cells sensitized with canine Fc IgE. Receptor binding by flow cytometry and cell activation could not be detected when transfected RBL cells were incubated with chimeric constructs where canine C epsilon2 and C epsilon4 were substituted with human C epsilon2 and C epsilon4. However, when this construct was incubated with cognate antigen prior to cell challenge mediator release was observed, albeit at a 20% lower level, indicating that while canine C epsilon3 is the only domain essential for binding to canine or human Fc epsilon RI alpha, species specific residues in canine Cepsilon2 and C epsilon4 inhibit dissociation of the ligand from the receptor.

  13. The importance of conserved amino acids in heme-based globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua Wan

    Full Text Available Globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases contain globin, middle, and diguanylate cyclase domains that sense O2 to synthesize c-di-GMP and regulate bacterial motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. However, relatively few studies have extensively examined the roles of individual residues and domains of globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, which can shed light on their signaling mechanisms and provide drug targets. Here, we report the critical residues of two globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, EcGReg from Escherichia coli and BpeGReg from Bordetella pertussis, and show that their diguanylate cyclase activity requires an intact globin domain. In the distal heme pocket of the globin domain, residues Phe42, Tyr43, Ala68 (EcGReg/Ser68 (BpeGReg, and Met69 are required to maintain full diguanylate cyclase activity. The highly conserved amino acids His223/His225 and Lys224/Lys226 in the middle domain of EcGReg/BpeGReg are essential to diguanylate cyclase activity. We also identified sixteen important residues (Leu300, Arg306, Asp333, Phe337, Lys338, Asn341, Asp342, Asp350, Leu353, Asp368, Arg372, Gly374, Gly375, Asp376, Glu377, and Phe378 in the active site and inhibitory site of the diguanylate cyclase domain of EcGReg. Moreover, BpeGReg266 (residues 1-266 and BpeGReg296 (residues 1-296, which only contain the globin and middle domains, can inhibit bacterial motility. Our findings suggest that the distal residues of the globin domain affect diguanylate cyclase activity and that BpeGReg may interact with other c-di-GMP-metabolizing proteins to form mixed signaling teams.

  14. High-Density SNP Genotyping to Define β-Globin Locus Haplotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Muralidhar, Shalini; Singh, Manisha; Sylvan, Caprice; Kalra, Inderdeep S.; Quinn, Charles T.; Onyekwere, Onyinye C.; Pace, Betty S.

    2008-01-01

    Five major β-globin locus haplotypes have been established in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from the Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian populations. Historically, β-haplotypes were established using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis across the β-locus, which consists of five functional β-like globin genes located on chromosome 11. Previous attempts to correlate these haplotypes as robust predictors of clinical phenotypes observed in SCD have n...

  15. The primary structure of three hemoglobin chains from the indigo snake (Drymarchon corais erebennus, Serpentes): first evidence for alphaD chains and two beta chain types in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Gorr, Thomas; Kleinschmidt, Traute

    2002-12-01

    The hemoglobin of the indigo snake (Drymarchon corais erebennus, Colubrinae) consists of two components, HbA and HbD, in the ratio of 1:1. They differ in both their alpha and beta chains. The amino acid sequences of both a chains (alphaA and alphaD) and one beta chain (betaI) were determined. The presence of an alphaD chain in a snake hemoglobin is described for the first time. A comparison of all snake beta chain sequences revealed the existence of two paralogous beta chain types in snakes as well, which are designated as betaI and betaII type. For the discussion of the physiological properties of Drymarchon hemoglobin, the sequences were compared with those of the human alpha and beta chains and those of the closely related water snake Liophis milians where functional data are available. Among the heme contacts, the substitution alphaD58(E7)His-->Gln is unusual but most likely without any effect. The residues responsible for the main part of the Bohr effect are the same as in mammalian hemoglobins. In each of the three globin chains only two residues at positions involved in the alpha1/beta2 interface contacts, most important for the stability and the properties of the hemoglobin molecule, are substituted with regard to human hemoglobin. On the contrary, nine, eleven, and six alpha1/beta1 contact residues are replaced in the alphaA, alphaD, betaI chains, respectively.

  16. The effects of old and recent migration waves in the distribution of HBB*S globin gene haplotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana D. Lindenau

    Full Text Available Abstract Sickle cell hemoglobin is the result of a mutation at the sixth amino acid position of the beta (β globin chain. The HBB*S gene is in linkage disequilibrium with five main haplotypes in the β-globin-like gene cluster named according to their ethnic and geographic origins: Bantu (CAR, Benin (BEN, Senegal (SEN, Cameroon (CAM and Arabian-Indian (ARAB. These haplotypes demonstrated that the sickle cell mutation arose independently at least five times in human history. The distribution of βS haplotypes among Brazilian populations showed a predominance of the CAR haplotype. American populations were clustered in two groups defined by CAR or BEN haplotype frequencies. This scenario is compatible with historical records about the slave trade in the Americas. When all world populations where the sickle cell gene occurs were analyzed, three clusters were disclosed based on CAR, BEN or ARAB haplotype predominance. These patterns may change in the next decades due to recent migrations waves. Since these haplotypes show different clinical characteristics, these recent migrations events raise the necessity to develop optimized public health programs for sickle cell disease screening and management.

  17. The effects of old and recent migration waves in the distribution of HBB*S globin gene haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenau, Juliana D; Wagner, Sandrine C; Castro, Simone M de; Hutz, Mara H

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell hemoglobin is the result of a mutation at the sixth amino acid position of the beta (β) globin chain. The HBB*S gene is in linkage disequilibrium with five main haplotypes in the β-globin-like gene cluster named according to their ethnic and geographic origins: Bantu (CAR), Benin (BEN), Senegal (SEN), Cameroon (CAM) and Arabian-Indian (ARAB). These haplotypes demonstrated that the sickle cell mutation arose independently at least five times in human history. The distribution of βS haplotypes among Brazilian populations showed a predominance of the CAR haplotype. American populations were clustered in two groups defined by CAR or BEN haplotype frequencies. This scenario is compatible with historical records about the slave trade in the Americas. When all world populations where the sickle cell gene occurs were analyzed, three clusters were disclosed based on CAR, BEN or ARAB haplotype predominance. These patterns may change in the next decades due to recent migrations waves. Since these haplotypes show different clinical characteristics, these recent migrations events raise the necessity to develop optimized public health programs for sickle cell disease screening and management.

  18. Development of a fluorescence immunochromatographic assay for the detection of zeta globin in the blood of (--(SEA)) α-thalassemia carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liyan; Zhu, Ping; Liu, Yanjun; Pan, Qingjun; Qu, Yanxia; Xu, Xiangmin; Li, Xueli; Fu, Ning

    Southeast Asian deletion (--(SEA)) α-thalassemia is an inherited monogenic disorder of human hemoglobin, and embryonic globin ζ (hemoglobin ζ, zeta globin chain or Hb zeta chain) has been shown to be a marker that can be used for the identification of carriers of the (--(SEA)) α-thalassemia deletion. In this work, a fluorescence immunochromatographic assay (FL-ICA) was established to detect the zeta globin chain in the hemolysates of carriers of the (--(SEA)) α-thalassemia deletion. This assay can be completed within 10min using a simple UV detector and does not suffer from interference from the red background color of the hemolysate. A total of 314 blood samples were tested by FL-ICA and ELISA. The results of these assays were confirmed by PCR, the standard technique for genetic disease testing. The sensitivity and specificity of this novel FL-ICA were 100% and 98.0%, respectively; the corresponding values for the ELISA performed simultaneously were 100% and 99.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a new FL-ICA-a simple, fast, convenient, low-cost method-was developed that may be useful in both high-throughput screening and individual detection of the (--(SEA)) α-thalassemia deletion in carriers. Additionally, this qualitative FL-ICA may enlighten the development of a new systems for analysis of other target molecules using whole-blood samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression and function of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in human melanoma under non-hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sandeep S

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α protein is rapidly degraded under normoxic conditions. When oxygen tensions fall HIF-1α protein stabilizes and transactivates genes involved in adaptation to hypoxic conditions. We have examined the normoxic expression of HIF-1α RNA and protein in normal human melanocytes and a series of human melanoma cell lines isolated from radial growth phase (RGP, vertical growth phase (VGP and metastatic (MET melanomas. Results HIF-1α mRNA and protein was increased in RGP vs melanocytes, VGP vs RGP and MET vs VGP melanoma cell lines. We also detected expression of a HIF-1α mRNA splice variant that lacks part of the oxygen-dependent regulation domain in WM1366 and WM9 melanoma cells. Over-expression of HIF-1α and its splice variant in the RGP cell line SbCl2 resulted in a small increase in soft agar colony formation and a large increase in matrigel invasion relative to control transfected cells. Knockdown of HIF-1α expression by siRNA in the MET WM9 melanoma cell line resulted in a large decrease in both soft agar colony formation and matrigel invasion relative to cells treated with non-specific siRNA. There is a high level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in WM9 cells, indicating an activated Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Treatment of WM9 cells with 30 μM U0126 MEK inhibitor, decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and resulted in a decrease in HIF-1α expression. However, a 24 h treatment with 10 μM U0126 totally eliminated Erk1/2 phosphorylation, but did not change HIF-1alpha levels. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of MEK siRNA did not change HIF-1alpha levels. Conclusion We speculate that metabolic products of U0126 decrease HIF-1alpha expression through "off target" effects. Overall our data suggest that increased HIF-1α expression under normoxic conditions contributes to some of the malignant phenotypes exhibited by human melanoma cells. The expanded role of HIF-1α in melanoma biology increases

  20. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone modulates activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1 and secretion of interleukin-8 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, M; Schulte, U; Kalden, H; Luger, T A

    1999-10-20

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has evolved as a mediator of diverse biological activities in an ever-growing number of non-melanocytic cell types. One mechanism by which alpha-MSH exerts its effects is modulation of AP-1 and NF-kappa B. These two transcription factors also play an important role in fibroblasts, in extracellular matrix composition, and in cytokine expression. By use of electric mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that alpha-MSH (10(-6) to 10(-14) M) activates AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts, whereas coincubation with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) results in suppression of its activation. alpha-MSH also induces activation of NF-kappa B but does not modulate DNA binding on costimulation with IL-1 beta. Since AP-1 and NF-kappa B are key elements in controlling interleukin-8 (IL-8) transcription, human fibroblasts were treated with alpha-MSH and IL-1 beta for 24 hours, and cytokine levels in the supernatants were measured by ELISA. alpha-MSH alone had little effect, whereas coincubation with IL-1 beta led to marked downregulation of IL-8 secretion (at most 288 +/- 152 ng/mL) when compared to treatment with IL-1 beta alone (919 +/- 157 ng/mL). Our results indicate that alpha-MSH exerts modulatory effects on the activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1, and that it can regulate chemokine secretion in human dermal fibroblasts. These effects of alpha-MSH may have important regulatory functions in extracellular matrix composition, wound healing, or angiogenesis.

  1. Inhibition of alpha oscillations through serotonin-2A receptor activation underlies the visual effects of ayahuasca in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Marta; Maqueda, Ana Elda; Rabella, Mireia; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Barker, Steven; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea typically obtained from two plants, Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. It contains the psychedelic 5-HT2A and sigma-1 agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. Although the psychoactive effects of ayahuasca have commonly been attributed solely to agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor, the molecular target of classical psychedelics, this has not been tested experimentally. Here we wished to study the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to the neurophysiological and psychological effects of ayahuasca in humans. We measured drug-induced changes in spontaneous brain oscillations and subjective effects in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study involving the oral administration of ayahuasca (0.75mg DMT/kg body weight) and the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin (40mg). Twelve healthy, experienced psychedelic users (5 females) participated in four experimental sessions in which they received the following drug combinations: placebo+placebo, placebo+ayahuasca, ketanserin+placebo and ketanserin+ayahuasca. Ayahuasca induced EEG power decreases in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. Current density in alpha-band oscillations in parietal and occipital cortex was inversely correlated with the intensity of visual imagery induced by ayahuasca. Pretreatment with ketanserin inhibited neurophysiological modifications, reduced the correlation between alpha and visual effects, and attenuated the intensity of the subjective experience. These findings suggest that despite the chemical complexity of ayahuasca, 5-HT2A activation plays a key role in the neurophysiological and visual effects of ayahuasca in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the human platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afink, G. B.; Nistér, M.; Stassen, B. H.; Joosten, P. H.; Rademakers, P. J.; Bongcam-Rudloff, E.; van Zoelen, E. J.; Mosselman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor (PDGF alpha R) is strictly regulated during mammalian development and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specific regulation of PDGF alpha R expression are unknown, but transcriptional regulation of the PDGF alpha R

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  4. Selective decrease in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-induced alpha interferon production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells during HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferbas, J; Navratil, J; Logar, A; Rinaldo, C

    1995-01-01

    We previously reported that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and Sendai virus induce higher levels of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) in blood dendritic cells than in monocytes of healthy donors. In the present study, the levels of IFN-alpha induced by T-cell tropic (IIIb and RF) and monocytotropic (BaL) strains of HIV-1 and by HSV were significantly decreased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from subjects with asymptomatic and symptom...

  5. Human ribosomal protein L7 binds RNA with an alpha-helical arginine-rich and lysine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, P; Bosbach, S; von Mikecz, A; Krawinkel, U

    1997-05-01

    In this study we mapped the RNA-binding domain of human ribosomal protein L7 and characterized its conformation-dependent RNA-binding specificity. Binding competition assays demonstrated preferential binding of L7 to mRNAs and rRNA, but not to tRNA. The ribohomopolymer poly(G) is bound with high affinity whereas poly(U), poly(C), or poly(A) show low affinity to L7. Furthermore, L7 binds to double-stranded but not to single-stranded DNA. Deletion mapping showed that the RNA-binding domain of L7 is represented by an arginine-rich and lysine-rich oligopeptide (ELKIKRLRKKFAQKMLRKARRK), which is reminiscent of the arginine-rich motif (ARM) found in one family of RNA-binding proteins. The isolated RNA-binding domain is capable of high-affinity binding to the Rev-responsive element (RRE) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vitro. Circular dichroic studies demonstrated a concentration-dependent and ligand-induced alpha-helical transition of a synthetic peptide carrying the arginine-lysine-rich RNA-binding domain of protein L7. Peptides carrying a mutation that destroys the alpha-helical conformation do not bind RNA.

  6. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  7. Brief reports: Controlling the survival of human pluripotent stem cells by small molecule-based targeting of topoisomerase II alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Uri; Cowell, Ian G; Austin, Caroline A; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent-specific inhibitors (PluriSIns) make a powerful tool to study the mechanisms controlling the survival of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Here, we characterize the mechanism of action of PluriSIn#2, a compound that selectively eliminates undifferentiated hPSCs, while sparing various other cell types derived from them. Toxicogenomic analysis predicts this compound to be a topoisomerase inhibitor. Gene expression analyses reveal that one of the human topoisomerase enzymes, topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A), is uniquely expressed in hPSCs: TOP2A is highly expressed in undifferentiated cells, is downregulated during their differentiation, and its expression depends on the expression of core pluripotency transcription factors. Furthermore, siRNA-based knockdown of TOP2A in undifferentiated hPSCs results in their cell death, revealing that TOP2A expression is required for the survival of these cells. We find that PluriSIn#2 does not directly inhibit TOP2A enzymatic activity, but rather selectively represses its transcription, thereby significantly reducing TOP2A protein levels. As undifferentiated hPSCs require TOP2A activity for their survival, TOP2A inhibition by PluriSIn#2 thus causes their cell death. Therefore, TOP2A dependency can be harnessed for the selective elimination of tumorigenic hPSCs from culture. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  9. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX) induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL7702 cells against

  10. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Raekil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM. Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  11. Fiber type specific expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-18 in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Pedersen, Bente K

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is now recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to produce signal peptides in response to muscle contractions. Here we demonstrate that resting healthy human muscles express cytokines in a fiber type specific manner. Human muscle biopsies from seven healthy young males...... differences between the three muscles with regard to MHC I and MHC IIa mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-18 were solely expressed by type II fibers, whereas the expression of IL-6 was more prominent in type I compared to type II...... fibers. The fiber type specificity was found in triceps, vastus and soleus indicating that the level of daily muscle activity did not influence basal cytokine expression. The specificity of cytokine expression in different muscle fiber types in healthy young males suggests that cytokines may play...

  12. Structural and functional characterization of CSDA protein complexes involved in the modulation of fetal globin gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudino, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Impaired switching from fetal hemoglobin (HbF) to adult globin gene expression leads to hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) in adult life. This is of prime interest because elevated HbF levels ameliorate beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Fetal hemoglobin levels are regulated by complex mechanisms involving factors linked or not to the beta-globin gene locus. To search for factors putatively involved in gamma-globin gene expression, we examined the reticulocyte transcripto...

  13. Irreversible but not reversible pulpitis is associated with up-regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene expression in human pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkas, A B; Goulas, A; Varsamidis, K; Mirtsou, V; Tziafas, D

    2007-03-01

    To analyse the gene expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in human dental pulps, under normal and inflammatory conditions and to examine the association between any observed alterations in the expression of this cytokine with the severity of the clinical symptoms. Eighteen pulpal samples were obtained from single-rooted human teeth. Six of the teeth were normal (group A), six had been diagnosed with reversible pulpitis (group B), and the remaining six were from teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (group C). TNF-alpha gene expression was semi-quantitatively analysed in each sample with RT-PCR, and the results from each group of teeth were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha was detected in all three groups of dental pulp. Statistical analysis provided evidence of a significant increase of TNF-alpha gene expression associated with irreversible inflammation compared with healthy controls (P = 0.002). No such difference was detected in reversibly inflamed pulp in comparison to healthy teeth (P = 0.699). Tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene expression in inflamed human dental pulp tissue is positively associated with the severity of clinical symptoms.

  14. RT-PCR detection of Na,K-ATPase subunit isoforms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC): evidence for the presence of alpha1 and beta3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, S; Compe, E; Grillasca, J P; Plannells, R; Sampol, J; Pressley, T A; Maixent, J M

    2001-03-01

    The endothelial Na,K-ATPase is an active component in maintaining a variety of normal vascular functions. The enzyme is characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity that results from differential expression and association of multiple isoforms of both its alpha- and beta-subunits. The aim of the present study was to determine which isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are expressed in human endothelial cells. HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) were used as a model of well known human endothelial cells. The high sensitive method RT-PCR was used with primers specific for the various isoforms of the alpha- and beta-subunits of the Na,K-ATPase. The results show that HUVEC express alpha1-, but not alpha2-, alpha3- or alpha4-isoforms of the catalytic subunit and that beta3- but not beta2- or beta1-isoforms is present in these cells. These findings are in contradiction with our previous detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in HUVEC using antibodies (14). Such results raise the technical problem of the specificity of the available antibodies directed against the different isoforms as well as the question of the physiological relevance of the diversity of the Na,K-ATPase isoforms.

  15. Oxygen Association-Dissociation and Stability Analysis on Mouse Hemoglobins with Mutant α- and β-Globins

    OpenAIRE

    D'Surney, S. J.; Popp, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen association-dissociation and hemoglobin stability analysis were performed on mouse hemoglobins with amino acid substitutions in an α-globin (α89, His to Leu) and a β-globin (β59, Lys to Ile). The variant α-globin, designated chain 5(m) in the Hba(g2) haplotype, had a high oxygen affinity and was stable. The variant β-globin, (β(s2)) of the Hbb(s2) haplotype, also had an elevated oxygen affinity and in addition was moderately unstable in 19% isopropanol. Hemoglobins from the expected ni...

  16. Novel metabolism of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with C24-C25 bond cleavage catalyzed by human CYP24A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Natsumi; Kusudo, Tatsuya; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Hatakeyama, Susumi; Hanada, Makoto; Abe, Daisuke; Kamao, Maya; Okano, Toshio; Ohta, Miho; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2004-04-20

    Our previous study revealed that human CYP24A1 catalyzes a remarkable metabolism consisting of both C-23 and C-24 hydroxylation pathways that used both 25(OH)D(3) and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) as substrates, while rat CYP24A1 showed extreme predominance of the C-24 over C-23 hydroxylation pathway [Sakaki, T., Sawada, N., Komai, K., Shiozawa, S., Yamada, S., Yamamoto, K., Ohyama, Y. and Inouye, K. (2000) Eur. J. Biochem. 267, 6158-6165]. In this study, by using the Escherichia coli expression system for human CYP24A1, we identified 25,26,27-trinor-23-ene-D(3) and 25,26,27-trinor-23-ene-1alpha(OH)D(3) as novel metabolites of 25(OH)D(3) and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), respectively. These metabolites appear to be closely related to the C-23 hydroxylation pathway, because human CYP24A1 produces much more of these metabolites than does rat CYP24A1. We propose that the C(24)-C(25) bond cleavage occurs by a unique reaction mechanism including radical rearrangement. Namely, after hydrogen abstraction of the C-23 position of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), part of the substrate-radical intermediate is converted into 25,26,27-trinor-23-ene-1alpha(OH)D(3), while a major part of them is converted into 1alpha,23,25(OH)(3)D(3). Because the C(24)-C(25) bond cleavage abolishes the binding affinity of 1alpha,25(OH)D(3) for the vitamin D receptor, this reaction is quite effective for inactivation of 1alpha,25(OH)D(3).

  17. Bi-phasic effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha: IFN-alpha up- and down-regulates interleukin-4 signaling in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Sommer, Viveca Horst; Woetmann, Anders

    2003-01-01

    is not enhanced or prolonged by simultaneous stimulation with IFN-alpha and IL-4. Moreover, co-stimulation results in a selective increased STAT6/STAT2 association and an association between IFNAR/IL-4R components, suggesting that the IFNAR provides an additional STAT6 docking site via STAT2, leading to a more...

  18. Association between human alpha 2-Heremans Schmidt glycoprotein (AHSG) polymorphism and endometriosis in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Gu; Kim, Hoon; Ku, Seung-Yup; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the alpha 2-Heremans Schmidt glycoprotein (AHSG) gene polymorphism and endometriosis. Case-control study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Hospital, Korea. Seventy-nine women with endometriosis and 105 women without endometriosis. Determination of AHSG gene polymorphism. Prevalence of AHSG genotypes or alleles. The allele frequencies of AHSG 1 and AHSG 2 were found to be 0.69 and 0.31, respectively. The proportion of noncarriers of the AHSG 2 allele was significantly higher in women with endometriosis than in women without (55.7% vs. 39.0%). Women not carrying the AHSG 2 allele were found to have twice the risk of endometriosis than those carrying at least one copy of this allele. No significant difference was noted in the distribution of the AHSG alleles or AHSG genotypes between early stage endometriosis and late stage endometriosis. Endometriosis is associated with the AHSG gene polymorphism in Korean women.

  19. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  20. [Effects of human and rat interferons-alpha on the behavior of rats of different ages. Comparative study of the homology of amino acid sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loseva, E V; Loginova, N A; Nekliudov, V V; Mats, V N; Kurskaia, O V; Pasikova, N V

    2009-01-01

    Effects of chronic intranasal administration of human and rat interferons alpha on feeding and defensive behavior of rats were studied. Natural leukocyte human interferon "Lokferon" (a mixture of alpha interferon subtypes) and recombinant rat interferon alpha of the first subtype were used in the dose of 350 ME per rat daily. In addition, using the databases NCBI and EBI, we quantitatively estimated homology of amino-acid sequences between different subtypes of human and rat interferons. Both human (mostly in young rats) and rat interferons (mostly in old rats) increased rat feeding behavior after food conditioning to an audio tone. In old (but not in young) rats, both human and rat interferons worsened the ability of time interval assessment. In young (but not old) rats, both interferon kinds improved avoidance conditioning. The degree of homology between different human and rat interferons varied from 72% to 77%. Thus, generally, the effects of rat and human alpha interferons (350 ME) on rat conditioning were similar. This may be due to high degree of homology of amino-acid sequences between the two interferons.

  1. Kinetic analysis of reversible inhibition of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione aromatization in human placental microsomes by suicide substrates of androstenedione aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Mutsumi, Ayako; Tachibana, Mii; Yoshimura, Akiko

    2003-06-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase and its substrate specificity, we studied reversible inhibition of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (16alpha-OHAD) aromatization in human placental microsomes by several suicide substrates of androstenedione (AD) aromatization, including 4-hydroxyAD (1), 6-oxoAD (2) and its 19-hydroxy analogue 3, androst-5-ene-4,7,17-trione (4), and 10beta-acetoxyandrost-5-en-7,17-dione (5) that, in contrast, do not cause a suicide inactivation of 16alpha-OHAD aromatization. All inhibitors examined blocked 16alpha-OHAD aromatization in a competitive manner with apparent K(i) values ranging from 0.50 to 980 nM. The relative K(i) values between inhibitors 1-5 obtained in the 16alpha-OHAD aromatization experiments were markedly different from those obtained in the AD aromatization experiments. The results predict that all inhibitors examined bind to the 16alpha-OHAD binding site in a manner that does not cause suicide inactivation of 16alpha-OHAD aromatization. These findings would be useful for understanding the active (binding) site structure as well as the catalytic function of aromatase.

  2. X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Bound to a Humanized Variant of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Kimball, F.Scott; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L. (Scripps)

    2010-11-03

    Three cocrystal X-ray structures of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors 3-5 bound to a humanized variant of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed and comparatively discussed alongside those of 1 (OL-135) and its isomer 2. These five X-ray structures systematically probe each of the three active site regions key to substrate or inhibitor binding: (1) the conformationally mobile acyl chain-binding pocket and membrane access channel responsible for fatty acid amide substrate and inhibitor acyl chain binding, (2) the atypical active site catalytic residues and surrounding oxyanion hole that covalently binds the core of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors captured as deprotonated hemiketals mimicking the tetrahedral intermediate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction, and (3) the cytosolic port and its uniquely important imbedded ordered water molecules and a newly identified anion binding site. The detailed analysis of their key active site interactions and their implications on the interpretation of the available structure-activity relationships are discussed providing important insights for future design.

  3. Bladder cancers respond to intravesical instillation of HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Gustafsson, Lotta; Månsson, Wiking; Ljunggren, Eva; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-09-15

    We studied if bladder cancers respond to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) to establish if intravesical HAMLET application might be used to selectively remove cancer cells in vivo. Patients with nonmuscle invasive transitional cell carcinomas were included. Nine patients received 5 daily intravesical instillations of HAMLET (25 mg/ml) during the week before scheduled surgery. HAMLET stimulated a rapid increase in the shedding of tumor cells into the urine, daily, during the 5 days of instillation. The effect was specific for HAMLET, as intravesical instillation of NaCl, PBS or native alpha-lactalbumin did not increase cell shedding. Most of the shed cells were dead and an apoptotic response was detected in 6 of 9 patients, using the TUNEL assay. At surgery, morphological changes in the exophytic tumors were documented by endoscopic photography and a reduction in tumor size or change in tumor character was detected in 8 of 9 patients. TUNEL staining was positive in biopsies from the remaining tumor in 4 patients but adjacent healthy tissue showed no evidence of apoptosis and no toxic response. The results suggest that HAMLET exerts a direct and selective effect on bladder cancer tissue in vivo and that local HAMLET administration might be of value in the future treatment of bladder cancers. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Binding interactions of human interleukin 5 with its receptor alpha subunit. Large scale production, structural, and functional studies of Drosophila-expressed recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, K; Appelbaum, E; Doyle, M; Hensley, P; Zhao, B; Abdel-Meguid, S S; Young, P; Cook, R; Carr, S; Matico, R

    1995-04-21

    Human interleukin 5 (hIL5) and soluble forms of its receptor alpha subunit were expressed in Drosophila cells and purified to homogeneity, allowing a detailed structural and functional analysis. B cell proliferation confirmed that the hIL5 was biologically active. Deglycosylated hIL5 remained active, while similarly deglycosylated receptor alpha subunit lost activity. The crystal structure of the deglycosylated hIL5 was determined to 2.6-A resolution and found to be similar to that of the protein produced in Escherichia coli. Human IL5 was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to form a 1:1 complex with the soluble domain of the hIL5 receptor alpha subunit (shIL5R alpha). Additionally, the relative abundance of ligand and receptor in the hIL5.shIL5R alpha complex was determined to be 1:1 by both titration calorimetry and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of dissolved cocrystals of the complex. Titration microcalorimetry yielded equilibrium dissociation constants of 3.1 and 2.0 nM, respectively, for the binding of hIL5 to shIL5R alpha and to a chimeric form of the receptor containing shIL5R alpha fused to the immunoglobulin Fc domain (shIL5R alpha-Fc). Analysis of the binding thermodynamics of IL5 and its soluble receptor indicates that conformational changes are coupled to the binding reaction. Kinetic analysis using surface plasmon resonance yielded data consistent with the Kd values from calorimetry and also with the possibility of conformational isomerization in the interaction of hIL5 with the receptor alpha subunit. Using a radioligand binding assay, the affinity of hIL5 with full-length hIL5R alpha in Drosophila membranes was found to be 6 nM, in accord with the affinities measured for the soluble receptor forms. Hence, most of the binding energy of the alpha receptor is supplied by the soluble domain. Taken with other aspects of hIL5 structure and biological activity, the data obtained allow a prediction for how 1:1 stoichiometry and

  5. Positive and negative elements modulate the promoter of the human liver-specific alpha2-HS-glycoprotein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banine, F; Gangneux, C; Mercier, L; Le Cam, A; Salier, J P

    2000-02-01

    The human alpha2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) and the 63-kDa rat phosphoprotein (pp63) are homologous plasma proteins that belong to the fetuin family. AHSG and pp63 are involved in important functions such as inhibition of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity, inhibition of protease activities, and regulation of calcium metabolism and osteogenesis. Studies of the AHSG proximal promoter performed in vitro in rat and human cells indicate that several NF-1 and C/EBP binding sites exert a positive effect on its transcriptional activity. However, until now, no distal elements have been examined in this gene, in either species. We report that the human AHSG gene promoter acts in a liver-specific manner and is further controlled by three distal, 5'-flanking elements. The negative elements III and I are, respectively, located 5' and 3' of the positive element II. All three elements require the natural context of the human AHSG gene to fully exert their negative or positive effect. Element I harbours a single binding site for NF-1. This nuclear factor thus appears to be able to up- or downregulate the AHSG gene depending on the site it binds to. Elements I, II and possibly III are absent in the rodent Ahsg gene encoding pp63.

  6. The effects of dexamethasone and chlorpromazine on tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-10 in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, M W; Netea, M G; Kullberg, B J; Van der Ven-Jongekrijg, J; Van der Meer, J W

    1997-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that play an important role in severe infections, whereas IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and IL-10 are anti-inflammatory cytokines that counteract their effects. Chlorpromazine and dexamethasone protect mice against lethal endotoxaemia by decreasing circulating concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta. We investigated whether administration of chlorpromazine or dexamethasone to human volunteers is able to modulate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production capacity in whole blood. Blood samples were taken before and several time-points after medication. Circulating cytokine concentrations were low in all samples. LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta production in whole blood was inhibited by dexamethasone treatment, while chlorpromazine had no effect. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with LPS, the addition of chlorpromazine (1-100 ng/ml) had no modulatory action on TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-1ra or IL-10 synthesis. The chlorpromazine concentrations measured in circulation of volunteers were eight to 40 times lower than the concentrations shown to be effective in mice. In conclusion, chlorpromazine inhibits TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta production in mice at concentrations that cannot be reached in humans, thus precluding its usage in clinical anti-cytokine strategies. In contrast, dexamethasone is an effective inhibitor of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:9378493

  7. Interaction-Dominant Dynamics in Human Cognition: Beyond 1/f[superscript [alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlen, Espen A. F.; Vereijken, Beatrix

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that human behavior in general and cognitive performance in particular emerge from coordination between multiple temporal scales. In this article, we provide quantitative support for such a theory of interaction-dominant dynamics in human cognition by using wavelet-based multifractal analysis and accompanying multiplicative…

  8. Alpha-interferon induces enhanced expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin in vivo and in vitro in various subsets of human lymphoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Larsen, J K; Plesner, T

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cloned alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) on the in vitro and in vivo expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) on subpopulations of human lymphoid cells was studied by flow cytometry. Mononuclear cells isolated from patients and cell cultures were labelled...... with saturating amounts of FITC conjugated monoclonal anti-HLA-ABC or anti-beta-2-m. Phycoerythrin conjugated monoclonal antibodies were simultaneously used for the selection of T lymphocytes. T helper lymphocytes, T suppressor lymphocytes, B lymphocytes and monocytes. In vitro, alpha-IFN induced a significant......, except for T suppressor lymphocytes. The increase in beta-2-m only reached significance on T lymphocytes. T helper lymphocytes and monocytes (P less than 0.02). At 48 h after administration of alpha-IFN, expression of HLA-ABC antigens and beta-2-m approached pretreatment levels. Enhanced expression...

  9. Cyclic nucleotides differentially regulate the synthesis of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta by human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, S; Fülle, H J; Sinha, B; Stoll, D; Dinarello, C A; Gerzer, R; Weber, P.C.

    Recent reports have shown that phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors suppress production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in mouse macrophages. In the present study we show that theophylline, pentoxifylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine markedly suppress the lipopolysaccharide

  10. Variation in RNA-Seq transcriptome profiles of peripheral whole blood from healthy individuals with and without globin depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesun Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular profile of circulating blood can reflect physiological and pathological events occurring in other tissues and organs of the body and delivers a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. Blood has been useful in studying the pathobiology of many diseases. It is accessible and easily collected making it ideally suited to the development of diagnostic biomarker tests. The blood transcriptome has a high complement of globin RNA that could potentially saturate next-generation sequencing platforms, masking lower abundance transcripts. Methods to deplete globin mRNA are available, but their effect has not been comprehensively studied in peripheral whole blood RNA-Seq data. In this study we aimed to assess technical variability associated with globin depletion in addition to assessing general technical variability in RNA-Seq from whole blood derived samples. RESULTS: We compared technical and biological replicates having undergone globin depletion or not and found that the experimental globin depletion protocol employed removed approximately 80% of globin transcripts, improved the correlation of technical replicates, allowed for reliable detection of thousands of additional transcripts and generally increased transcript abundance measures. Differential expression analysis revealed thousands of genes significantly up-regulated as a result of globin depletion. In addition, globin depletion resulted in the down-regulation of genes involved in both iron and zinc metal ion bonding. CONCLUSIONS: Globin depletion appears to meaningfully improve the quality of peripheral whole blood RNA-Seq data, and may improve our ability to detect true biological variation. Some concerns remain, however. Key amongst them the significant reduction in RNA yields following globin depletion. More generally, our investigation of technical and biological variation with and without globin depletion finds that high-throughput sequencing by RNA

  11. IL-4R(alpha), a new member that associates with Syk kinase: implication in IL-4-induced human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaciri, Jamila; Girard, Denis

    2009-10-15

    Although Syk has been reported to be associated with IL-2R beta [corrected] and IL-15R alpha in some hematopoietic cells, its association has never been investigated in the IL-4/IL-4R system. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Syk is constitutively associated with IL-4R(alpha)in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and that IL-4 stimulation increases the amount of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha). Moreover, upon IL-4 treatment, a pool of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha) is phosphorylated. We also report that such association is not unique to PMNs because Syk associates with IL-4R(alpha) in Raji and in PBMC cells. Stimulation of PMNs by IL-4 increased the amount of Syk associated with PLC-gamma2, pAkt, and alpha-tubulin. Pretreatment of cells with the Syk-selective inhibitor piceatannol or Syk inhibitor II, significantly inhibited the ability of IL-4 to enhance phagocytosis and cell adhesion and to delay apoptosis, and these results correlate with the ability of piceatannol to reduce Syk activation and its association with IL-4R(alpha). Down-regulation of Syk by antisense techniques demonstrates the importance of Syk in the antiapoptotic effect of IL-4. We conclude that association of Syk to IL-4R(alpha) is of biological significance and that IL-4R(alpha) is a new candidate to be added to the few cytokine receptor components which associate with Syk.

  12. Post-transcriptional control of human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel protein by alpha-adrenergic receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Kun; Sroubek, Jakub; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Thomas, Dierk; Bian, Jin-Song; McDonald, Thomas V

    2010-08-01

    Stimulation of alpha1-adrenoreceptors (alpha1-AR) acutely alters ion channel behavior via several signaling pathways [calcium and protein kinase C (PKC)]. Little is known about sustained alpha1-adrenergic/PKC signaling and channel regulation as may occur during cardiovascular disease states. Here we describe the effects of prolonged alpha1A-AR and PKC activity on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channels (Kv11.1) expressed in a heterologous expression system. Stimulation of alpha1A-AR with phenylephrine or direct activation of PKC with phorbol ester increased HERG channel protein abundance and K(+) current density in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Channel augmentation reached a steady-state plateau within 24 h with a 2- to 6-fold induction. Phorbol ester and moderate alpha1A-AR stimulation enhanced HERG abundance in a PKC-dependent fashion but with stronger alpha1A-adrenergic stimulation; protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent activity also contributed. Comparable channel induction of other cardiac K(+) channels was not seen in this system. Comparison of wild-type HERG and channels with either mutated PKC phosphorylation sites (HERGDeltaPKC) or mutated PKA phosphorylation sites (HERGDeltaPKA) suggested that the mechanisms of augmentation of HERG by the two kinases were partially overlapping. The PKC-dependent effect was largely due to enhanced synthetic rates. Stimulation of alpha1-AR in cultured rat neonatal cardiac myocytes also enhanced the abundance of ERG channels. These findings show that alpha1A-AR stimulation is capable of influencing the balance of HERG channel synthesis and degradation via multiple signaling pathways, a process that may have relevance in cardiac diseases and treatment.

  13. Activation of cardiac human ether-a-go-go related gene potassium currents is regulated by alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dierk; Wu, Kezhong; Wimmer, Anna-Britt; Zitron, Edgar; Hammerling, Bettina C; Kathöfer, Sven; Lueck, Sonja; Bloehs, Ramona; Kreye, Volker A W; Kiehn, Johann; Katus, Hugo A; Schoels, Wolfgang; Karle, Christoph A

    2004-12-01

    Patients with cardiac disease typically develop life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias during physical or emotional stress, suggesting a link between adrenergic stimulation and regulation of the cardiac action potential. Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium channels conduct the rapid component of the repolarizing delayed rectifier potassium current, I(Kr). Previous studies have revealed that hERG channel activation is modulated by activation of the beta-adrenergic system. In contrast, the influence of the alpha-adrenergic signal transduction cascade on hERG currents is less well understood. The present study examined the regulation of hERG currents by alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors. hERG channels and human alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors were heterologously coexpressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and currents were measured using the two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Stimulation of alpha(1A)-receptors by applying 20 microM phenylephrine caused hERG current reduction due to a 9.6-mV shift of the activation curve towards more positive potentials. Simultaneous application of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (20 microM) prevented the activation shift. Inhibition of PKC (3 microM Ro-32-0432) or PKA (2.5 microM KT 5720) abolished the alpha-adrenergic activation shift, suggesting that PKC and PKA are required within the regulatory mechanism. The effect was still present when the PKA- and PKC-dependent phosphorylation sites in hERG were deleted by mutagenesis. In summary, cardiac repolarizing hERG/I(Kr) potassium currents are modulated by alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors via PKC and PKA independently of direct channel phosphorylation. This novel regulatory pathway of alpha1-adrenergic hERG current regulation provides a link between stress and ventricular arrhythmias, in particular in patients with heart disease.

  14. The CK2 alpha/CK2 beta interface of human protein kinase CK2 harbors a binding pocket for small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    . Inhibition kinetic studies corroborate the dual binding mode of the inhibitor. Structural comparisons reveal a surprising conformational plasticity of human CK2 alpha around both DRB binding sites. After local rearrangement, the allosteric site serves as a CK2 beta interface. This opens the potential......, selective CK2 inhibitors are required. An often-used CK2 inhibitor is 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). In a complex structure with human CK2 alpha, DRB binds to the canonical ATP cleft, but additionally it occupies an allosteric site that can be alternatively filled by glycerol...

  15. Significance of radioimmunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin and alpha fetoprotein in nonseminomatous germ cell tumors of the testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausitz, J; Hupka, S; Cerný, V; Bohunický, L; Korec, S

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) made in 49 patients with nonseminomatous testicular tumors have shown that these investigations make the diagnosis more precise, permit to follow up the dynamics of the course of the disease and the effectiveness of treatment and may help to reveal the presence of otherwise undetectable tumorous metastases. The significance of the these assays is enhanced if the two tumorous proteins are investigated in parallel. The results proved rightly positive in 43 (87.8%) and falsely negative in 6 (12.2%) of the patients. The absence of HCG and AFP production in some of the patients with an active disorder has not as yet been elucidated.

  16. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  17. Laboratory diagnosis of a compound heterozygosity for Hb Hekinan [alpha27(B8) Glu-Asp] and a deletional alpha-thalassaemia 2 in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunpanich, S; Ayukarn, K; Sanchaisuriya, K; Fucharoen, G; Fucharoen, S

    2004-10-01

    We report the haematological and molecular characterization of a previously undescribed condition of compound heterozygosity for haemoglobin (Hb) Hekinan [alpha27(B8) Glu-Asp] and a deletional alpha-thalassaemia 2 detected in a Thai individual. Hb analysis demonstrated that although this Hb variant co-migrates with Hb A on cellulose acetate electrophoresis and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the HPLC procedure using a weak cation-exchange material with polyaspartic acid could clearly differentiate the two Hb. The variant could then be confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the amplified alpha1-globin gene.

  18. Gingerol-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits human prion peptide-mediated neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Park, Yang-Gyu; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2013-08-01

    Prion diseases are a family member of neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of misfolded-prion proteins (scrapie form of PrP, PrP(Sc)). The accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the brain leads to neurotoxicity by the induction of mitochondrial-apoptotic pathways. Recent studies implicated gingerol in protection against neurodegeneration. However, the basis of the neuroprotection in prion disease remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the influence of gingerol on prion peptide-induced neuronal damage. Gingerol blocked PrP(106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity by protecting mitochondrial function. Moreover, the protective effect of gingerol against PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial damage was associated with hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression. Gingerol-induced HIF-1α expression inhibited the PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. On the other hand, inhibition of gingerol-induced HIF-1 α expression attenuated the gingerol-mediated neuroprotective effect. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that treatment with gingerol prevents prion peptide-mediated neuronal cell death and that the neuroprotection is induced by HIF-1α-mediated signals. This study suggests that treatment with gingerol may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for prion-mediated neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Alpha C Protein-Specific Immunity in Humans with Group B Streptococcal Colonization and Invasive Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannaraj, Pia S.; Kelly, Joanna K.; Rench, Marcia A.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Edwards, Morven S.; Baker, Carol J.

    2008-01-01

    Alpha C protein, found in 76% of non-type III strains of group B Streptococcus (GBS), elicits antibodies protective against α C-expressing strains in experimental animals, making it an appealing carrier for a GBS conjugate vaccine. We determined whether natural exposure to α C elicits antibodies in women. Geometric mean concentrations of α C-specific IgM and IgG were similar by ELISA in sera from 58 α C GBS strain colonized and 174 age-matched non-colonized women (IgG 245 and 313 ng/ml; IgM 257 and 229 ng/ml, respectively), but acute sera from 13 women with invasive α C-expressing GBS infection had significantly higher concentrations (IgM 383 and IgG 476 ng/ml [p=0.036 and 0.038, respectively]). Convalescent sera from 5 of these women 16–49 days later had high α C-specific IgM and IgG concentrations (1355 and 4173 ng/ml, respectively). In vitro killing of α C-expressing GBS correlated with total α C-specific antibody concentration. Invasive disease but not colonization elicits α C-specific IgM and IgG in adults. PMID:18155812

  20. Comparison of Methods for the Purification of Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein from Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. McCurdy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP is a highly glycosylated, negatively charged plasma protein suggested to have anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory activities. Purification of AGP could be simplified if methods that exploit its high solubility under chemically harsh conditions could be demonstrated to leave the protein in its native conformation. Procedures involving exposure of AGP to hot phenol or sulphosalicylic acid (SSA were compared to solely chromatographic methods. Hot phenol-purified AGP was more rapidly cleared from mice in vivo following intravenous injection than chromatographically purified AGP. In contrast, SSA-purified AGP demonstrated an identical in vivo clearance profile and circular dichroism spectrum to chromatographically purified AGP. Similarly, no differences in susceptibility to enzymatic deglycosylation or reactivity with Sambucus nigra lectin were detected between AGP purified via the two methods. Incorporation of the SSA step in the purification scheme for AGP eliminated the need for a large (4 mL resin/mL of plasma initial chromatographic step and simplified its purification without causing any detectable distortion in the conformation of the protein. Confirmation that this procedure is nondenaturing will simplify AGP purification and investigation of its possible biological roles in laboratory animals.

  1. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  2. Transcranial alternating current stimulation enhances individual alpha activity in human EEG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaehle, Tino; Rach, Stefan; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2010-01-01

    .... Recently, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been introduced to directly modulate the ongoing rhythmic brain activity by the application of oscillatory currents on the human scalp...

  3. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    OpenAIRE

    Hout, Johanna; Sibbles, Barbara; Brakenhoff, Just; Cromme-Dijkhuis, Adri; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Reuser, Arnold; Boer, Marijke; Smeitink, Jan; Diggelen, Otto; Voort, Edwin; Corven, Emiel; Hirtum, Hans; Kamphoven, Joep; Ploeg, Ans; Hove, Johan

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs, even in small animals such as rabbits. We tested the long-term safety and efficacy of recombinant human -glucosidase (rhAGLU) from rabbit milk for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder Pomp...

  4. The role and regulation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Sander; Stienstra, Rinke

    2017-05-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is abundantly expressed in liver. PPARα is activated by fatty acids and various other lipid species, as well as by a class of chemicals referred to as peroxisome proliferators. Studies in mice have shown that PPARα serves as the master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism during fasting. In addition, PPARα suppresses inflammation and the acute phase response. Comparatively little is known about PPARα in human liver. Here, an overview is provided of the role and regulation of PPARα in human liver. The main outcomes are: 1) the level of PPARA mRNA expression in human and mouse liver is similar. 2) Expression of PPARA in human liver is reduced in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or infected with the hepatitis C virus. 3) PPARα in human liver is able to effectively induce the expression of numerous genes involved in numerous lipid metabolic pathways, including microsomal, peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, fatty acid binding and activation, fatty acid elongation and desaturation, synthesis and breakdown of triglycerides and lipid droplets, lipoprotein metabolism, gluconeogenesis, bile acid metabolism, and various other metabolic pathways and genes. 4) PPARα activation in human liver causes the down-regulation of a large number of genes involved in various immunity-related pathways. 5) Peroxisome proliferators do not promote tumour formation in human liver as opposed to mouse liver because of structural and functional differences between human and mouse PPARα. 6) In addition to helping to correct dyslipidemia, PPARα agonists may hold promise as a therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and/or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Role of NF-kappaB in the antiproliferative effect of endothelin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human hepatic stellate cells. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallois, C; Habib, A; Tao, J; Moulin, S; Maclouf, J; Mallat, A; Lotersztajn, S

    1998-09-04

    During chronic liver diseases, hepatic stellate cells (HSC) acquire an activated myofibroblast-like phenotype and proliferate and synthesize fibrosis components. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), which inhibited the growth of human myofibroblastic HSC, increased the formation of two NF-kappaB DNA binding complexes; this effect was also observed with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The complexes were identified as the p50/p50 and p50/p65 NF-kappaB dimers. Activation of NF-kappaB was associated with the degradation of the inhibitory protein IkappaB-alpha; no IkappaB-beta was detected. Activation of NF-kappaB and degradation of IkappaB-alpha were prevented by the NF-kappaB inhibitors sodium salicylate and MG-132. In addition to cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2 is also constitutively expressed in human HSC, and the use of dexamethasone and of SC-58125, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, revealed that COX-2 accounts for basal COX activity. Moreover, COX-2 mRNA and protein were up-regulated by ET-1 and TNF-alpha, whereas COX-1 was unaffected. Induction of COX-2 and stimulation of COX activity by ET-1 and TNF-alpha were prevented by sodium salicylate and MG-132, suggesting that activation of NF-kappaB by either factor is needed for stimulation of COX-2. Finally, SC-58125 and dexamethasone reduced the growth inhibitory effect of ET-1 and TNF-alpha, indicating that activation of COX-2 is required for inhibition of HSC proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that NF-kappaB, by inducing COX-2 expression, may play an important role in the negative regulation of human myofibroblastic HSC proliferation.

  6. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. (Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  7. Human peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase transcripts derived by alternative mRNA splicing of an unreported exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, M D; Jones, J E; Treston, A M

    1995-10-03

    We are characterizing the alternatively spliced human peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (hPAM)-encoding mRNA transcripts expressed by human cells. Reverse transcription coupled to the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been used to identify four alternatively spliced variants that differ in the region joining the two catalytic domains. Two of the transcripts represent previously reported splice variants differentiated by the presence (hPAM-A) or absence (hPAM-B) of a 321-nucleotide (nt) linker (optional exon A) which in the rat produce functionally distinct enzymes. Different mRNAs represent two splice variants, hPAM-C and hPAM-D, that show the presence of an exon unreported for PAM in any other species. This new exon, designated exon C, is 54 nt in length, encodes an 18-amino-acid (aa) peptide containing a conserved dibasic aa endoproteolytic processing motif, and is located 3' of exon A in human genomic DNA. We propose that cell-specific regulation of mRNA splicing would provide a mechanism for control of prohormone activation by these variants of the PAM enzyme.

  8. Stable expression of human thyrotropin (hTSH) in mammalian cells (CHO) expressing {alpha}2,6 sialyltransferase; Expressao estavel tireotrofina humana (r-hTSH) em celulas de mamifero (CHO) que expressam {alpha}2,6 sialiltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, Renata

    2009-07-01

    A CHO cell line, previously genetically modified by the introduction of rat {alpha}2,6-sialyltransferase cDNA, generated for the first time a human-like sialylated recombinant hTSH (hlsr-hTSH) more similar to the native hormone, with 61% of {alpha}2,3- and 39% of {alpha}2,6-linked sialic acid residues. The best clone, when submitted to gene amplification with up to 8 {mu}M methotrexate, presented a secretion level of {approx}2 {mu}g hTSH/10{sup 6} cells/day, useful for product purification and characterization. The relative molecular masses (M{sub r}) of the heterodimer and of the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits of purified hlsr-hTSH, determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and the relative hydrophobicities, determined by RP-HPLC, were not remarkably different from those presented by two r-hTSH preparations secreted by normal CHO cells. Some differences were observed, though, in N-glycan composition, with more tri- and much more tetra-sialylated structures in hlsr-hTSH. When analyzed via an in vivo bioassay based on hTSH-induced T{sub 4} release in mice, hlsr-hTSH was shown to be equipotent (p > 0.05) with the commercial preparation of r-hTSH (Thyrogen), and 1.5-fold more potent than native hTSH (p < 0.001). (author)

  9. Cow's milk increases the activities of human nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and delta and retinoid X receptor alpha involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, obesity, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhara, W; Koide, H; Okuzawa, T; Hayashi, D; Hashimoto, T; Kojo, H

    2009-09-01

    The nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) have been shown to play crucial roles in regulating energy homeostasis including lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, inflammatory responses, and cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Because PPAR agonists have the potential to prevent or ameliorate diseases such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity, we have explored new natural agonists for PPAR. For this purpose, cow's milk was tested for agonistic activity toward human PPAR subtypes using a reporter gene assay. Milk increased human PPARalpha activity in a dose-dependent manner with a 3.2-fold increase at 0.5% (vol/vol). It also enhanced human PPARdelta activity in a dose-dependent manner with an 11.5-fold increase at 0.5%. However, it only slightly affected human PPARgamma activity. Ice cream, butter, and yogurt also increased the activities of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas vegetable cream affected activity of PPARdelta but not PPARalpha. Skim milk enhanced the activity of PPAR to a lesser degree than regular milk. Milk and fresh cream increased the activity of human retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha as well as PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas neither affected vitamin D3 receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or thyroid receptors alpha and beta. Both milk and fresh cream were shown by quantitative real-time PCR to increase the quantity of mRNA for uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an energy expenditure gene, in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in UCP2 mRNA was found to be reduced by treatment with PPARdelta-short interfering (si)RNA. This study unambiguously clarified at the cellular level that cow's milk increased the activities of human PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha. The possible role in enhancing the activities of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha, and the health benefits of cow's milk were discussed.

  10. The entire β-globin gene cluster is deleted in a form of τδβ-thalassemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Fearon; H.H.Jr. Kazazian; P.G. Waber (Pamela); J.I. Lee (Joseph); S.E. Antonarakis; S.H. Orkin (Stuart); E.F. Vanin; P.S. Henthorn; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.F. Scott; G.R. Buchanan

    1983-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonuclease mapping to study a deletion involving the beta-globin gene cluster in a Mexican-American family with gamma delta beta-thalassemia. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms demonstrated deletion of the beta-globin gene from the affected chromosome. Using a DNA

  11. Both PAX4 and MAFA are expressed in a substantial proportion of normal human pancreatic alpha cells and deregulated in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Bonnavion

    Full Text Available Pax4 and MafA (v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A are two transcription factors crucial for normal functions of islet beta cells in the mouse. Intriguingly, recent studies indicate the existence of notable difference between human and rodent islet in terms of gene expression and functions. To better understand the biological role of human PAX4 and MAFA, we investigated their expression in normal and diseased human islets, using validated antibodies. PAX4 was detected in 43.0±5.0% and 39.1±4.0% of normal human alpha and beta cells respectively. We found that MAFA, detected in 88.3±6.3% insulin(+cells as in the mouse, turned out to be also expressed in 61.2±6.4% of human glucagons(+ cells with less intensity than in insulin(+ cells, whereas MAFB expression was found not only in the majority of glucagon(+ cells (67.2±7.6%, but also in 53.6±10.5% of human insulin(+ cells. Interestingly, MAFA nuclear expression in both alpha and beta cells, and the percentage of alpha cells expressing PAX4 were found altered in a substantial proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes. Both MAFA and PAX4 display, therefore, a distinct expression pattern in human islet cells, suggesting more potential plasticity of human islets as compared with rodent islets.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα stimulates the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rougier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports that TNF-α is a potent mitogen for human bone marrow sternal cells in vitro (assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counts. In contrast, cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, LIF, SCF, M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect. The effect of TNF-α on the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells could be of importance during inflammatory processes which take place in the marrow, for example marrow fibrosis.

  13. A redox signalling globin is essential for reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Henau, Sasha; Tilleman, Lesley; Vangheel, Matthew; Luyckx, Evi; Trashin, Stanislav; Pauwels, Martje; Germani, Francesca; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Vanfleteren, Jacques R.; Bert, Wim; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; de Wael, Karolien; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now recognized as redox signalling molecules. However, thus far, only mitochondria and NADPH oxidases have been identified as cellular sources of ROS in signalling. Here we identify a globin (GLB-12) that produces superoxide, a type of ROS, which serves as an essential signal for reproduction in C. elegans. We find that GLB-12 has an important role in the regulation of multiple aspects in germline development, including germ cell apoptosis. We further describe how GLB-12 displays specific molecular, biochemical and structural properties that allow this globin to act as a superoxide generator. In addition, both an intra- and extracellular superoxide dismutase act as key partners of GLB-12 to create a transmembrane redox signal. Our results show that a globin can function as a driving factor in redox signalling, and how this signal is regulated at the subcellular level by multiple control layers.

  14. Do pyrimidine nucleotides regulate translatability of globin mRNA as purine nucleotides do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H N; Almendarez, E; Halim, M N

    1988-01-01

    1. When rabbit globin mRNA was incubated with rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of various concentrations of nucleotides, globin synthesis was inhibited or stimulated dependent on dose. 2. Pyrimidine nucleotides inhibited protein synthesis at 0.3 mM, whereas 2 mM of purine nucleotides were required to cause similar inhibition. 3. Adenosine mono- and diphosphate inhibited globin synthesis at a concentration of only 1 mM; however, the sequence is AMP greater than ADP greater than ATP. 4. Translation arrest by these nucleotides was instantaneous. 5. These results suggest that these nucleotides may provide a structural component for maintaining the integrity, the conformation of mRNA or of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP).

  15. Secretion of bioactive interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha proteins from primary cultured human fetal membrane chorion cells infected with influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchide, N; Suzuki, A; Ohyama, K; Bessho, T; Toyoda, H

    2006-01-01

    Influenza virus infection during pregnancy is implicated in one of the causes of premature delivery, abortion and stillbirth. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha produced by fetal membranes, are postulated to facilitate premature delivery. We investigated the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-alpha from primary cultured human fetal membrane chorion and amnion cells infected with influenza virus at protein and bioactivity levels in order to understand the pathology of premature delivery during influenza virus infection. Concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins were significantly increased in culture supernatants of chorion cells by influenza virus infection. Culture supernatants of the virus-infected chorion cells stimulated the proliferation of IL-6-sensitive 7-TD-1 cells and induced the cytolysis of TNF-alpha-sensitive L929 cells, both activities of which were inhibited by the addition of respective antibody, whereas no such phenomena were observed in amnion cells. The results demonstrated that only chorion cells secreted significant amounts of bioactive IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins responding to influenza virus infection. The present study suggests a possibility that the secretion of bioactive IL-6 and TNF-alpha proteins from fetal membrane chorion cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of premature delivery during influenza virus infection.

  16. Aromatization of androstenedione and 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione in human placental microsomes. Kinetic analysis of inhibition by the 19-oxygenated and 3-deoxy analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Watari, Yoko; Komatsu, Sachiko; Yamashita, Kouwa; Nagaoka, Masao

    2008-11-01

    Inhibition of aromatase activity in human placental microsomes with androstenedione (AD) (1a) and its 19-oxygenated derivatives 1b and 1c, their 16alpha-hydroxy compounds 2 and 3, and 3-deoxyandrost-4-ene compounds 5 and 6 was studied using [1beta-(3)H]AD as a substrate and compared to that with [1beta-(3)H]16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (16-OHAD). AD series of steroids, compounds 1, inhibited competitively [1beta-(3)H]AD aromatization whereas other 16alpha-hydroxy steroids 2, 3, 5, and 6 inhibited AD aromatization in a non-competitive manner. On the other hand, all of 16-OHAD series, compounds 2, blocked the [1beta-(3)H]16-OHAD aromatization in a competitive manner whereas the AD series steroids 1 as well as the 3-deoxy-16alpha-hydroxy-17-one steroids 5 and 3-deoxy-16alpha,17beta-diol steroids 6 inhibited 16-OHAD aromatization non-competitively. 3-carbonyl and 16alpha-hydroxy functions of 16-OHAD play a critical role of selection of the 16-OHAD binding site. The results suggest that the AD derivatives 1 are kinetically aromatized at a different site from the 16-OHAD derivatives 2. Physical and/or chemical environments around the aromatase protein in the microsomal membrane may play a significant role in the expression of the substrate specificity, and the present results do not exclude the idea that the placental microsomes have a single binding site.

  17. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, J.M. van den; Kamphoven, J.H.; Winkel, L.P.; Arts, W.F.M.; Klerk, J.B.C. de; Loonen, M.C.B.; Vulto, A.G.; Cromme-Dijkhuis, A.H.; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.; Hop, W.C.J.; Hirtum, H. van; Diggelen, O.P. van; Boer, M. de; Kroos, M.A.; Doorn, P.A. van; Voort, E.I. van der; Sibbles, B.; Corven, E.J. van; Brakenhoff, J.P.; Hove, J.L. van; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Jong, G. de; Reuser, A.J.J.; Ploeg, A.T. van der

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be obtained at relatively low costs,

  18. Long-term intravenous treatment of Pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. van den Hout (Johanna); B. Sibbles (Barbara); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); A.H. Cromme-Dijkhuis (Adri); N. Weisglas-Kuperus (Nynke); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); M.A. Boer (Marijke); J.A.M. Smeitink (Jan); O.P. van Diggelen (Otto); E. van der Voort (Edwin); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); H. van Hirtum (Hans); J.H.J. Kamphoven (Joep); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); J. van Hove (Johan); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); M.C.B. Loonen (Christa); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M.A. Kroos (Marian); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); L.P.F. Winkel (Léon); G. de Jong (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Recent reports warn that the worldwide cell culture capacity is insufficient to fulfill the increasing demand for human protein drugs. Production in milk of transgenic animals is an attractive alternative. Kilogram quantities of product per year can be

  19. Interferon-alpha treatment rapidly clears Hepatitis e virus infection in humanized mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn D.B.); S.D. Pas (Suzan); G.W. van Oord (Gertine); L. Gama (Lucio); Choi, Y. (Youkyung); R.A. de Man (Robert); P.A. Boonstra (André); T. Vanwolleghem (Thomas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAntiviral treatment options for chronic Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infections are limited and immunological determinants of viral persistence remain largely unexplored. We studied the antiviral potency of pegylated interferon-α (pegIFNα) against HEV infections in humanized mice and modelled

  20. Predominant alpha2/beta2/gamma3 AMPK activation during exercise in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Jesper Bratz; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and is regulated in muscle during exercise. We have previously established that only three of 12 possible AMPK a/ß/¿-heterotrimers are present in human skeletal muscle. Previous studies describe discrepancies between ...

  1. Alpha-amidated peptides derived from pro-opiomelanocortin in human pituitary tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Johnsen, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human pituitary tumours, obtained at surgery for Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome, were extracted and the content and molecular forms of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides determined by radioimmunoassay, gel chromatography, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography...

  2. Interleukin 2 and 15 activate Stat3alpha in human T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Nordahl, M; Svejgaard, A

    1998-01-01

    in response to interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15. Here, cytokine-induced activation of Stat3 in previously activated CD4(+) human T cells was examined using Stat3 antibodies directed against different regions of Stat3. As determined by tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding to an h...

  3. Transcriptome profiling reveals bisphenol A alternatives activate estrogen receptor alpha in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasticizers with estrogenic activity, such as bisphenol A (BPA), have potential adverse health effects in humans. Due to mounting evidence of these health effects, BPA is being phased out and replaced by other bisphenol variants in “BPA-free” products. We have compared estrogeni...

  4. A Globin Domain in a Neuronal Transmembrane Receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P.; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. PMID:25666609

  5. Ovarian cancer-derived lysophosphatidic acid stimulates secretion of VEGF and stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha from human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Su; Heo, Soon Chul; Lee, Il Hwan; Choi, Yoon Ji; Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Kyung Un; Park, Do Youn; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo; Kim, Jae Ho

    2010-04-30

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) stimulates growth and invasion of ovarian cancer cells and tumor angiogenesis. Cancer-derived LPA induces differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) to alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA)-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts. Presently, we explored whether cancer-derived LPA regulates secretion of pro-angiogenic factors from hASCs. Conditioned medium (CM) from the OVCAR-3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines stimulated secretion angiogenic factors such as stromal-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) and VEGF from hASCs. Pretreatment with the LPA receptor inhibitor Ki16425 or short hairpin RNA lentiviral silencing of the LPA((1)) receptor abrogated the cancer CM-stimulated expression of alpha-SMA, SDF-1, and VEGF from hASCs. LPA induced expression of myocardin and myocardin-related transcription factor-A, transcription factors involved in smooth muscle differentiation, in hASCs. siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous myocardin and MRTF-A abrogated the expression of alpha-SMA, but not SDF-1 and VEGF. LPA activated RhoA in hASCs and pretreatment with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 completely abrogated the LPA-induced expression of alpha-SMA, SDF-1, and VEGF in hASCs. Moreover, LPA-induced alpha-SMA expression was abrogated by treatment with the ERK inhibitor U0126 or the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, but not the PLC inhibitor U73122. LPA-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by LY294002, whereas LPA-induced SDF-1 secretion was markedly attenuated by U0126, U73122, and LY294002. These results suggest that cancer-secreted LPA induces differentiation of hASCs to cancer-associated fibroblasts through multiple signaling pathways involving Rho kinase, ERK, PLC, and phosphoinositide-3-kinase.

  6. A silent mutation in human alpha-A crystallin gene in patients with age-related nuclear or cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharani K Mynampati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A cataract is a complex multifactorial disease that results from alterations in the cellular architecture, i.e. lens proteins. Genes associated with the development of lens include crystallin genes. Although crystallins are highly conserved proteins among vertebrates, a significant number of polymorphisms exist in human population. In this study, we screened for polymorphisms in crystallin alpha A (CRYAA and alpha B (CRYAB genes in 200 patients over 40 years of age, diagnosed with age-related cataract (ARC; nuclear and cortical cataracts. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood. The coding regions of the CRYAA and CRYAB gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction and subjected to restriction digestion. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP was performed using known restriction enzymes for CRYAA and CRYAB genes. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing were performed to detect sequence variation in CRYAA gene. In silico analysis of secondary CRYAA mRNA structure was performed using CLC RNA Workbench. RFLP analysis did not show any changes in the restriction sites of CRYAA and CRYAB genes. In 6 patients (4 patients with nuclear cataract and 2 with cortical cataract, sequence analysis of the exon 1 in the CRYAA gene showed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism [D2D] (CRYAA: C to T transition. One of the patients with nuclear cataract was homozygous for this allele. The in silico analysis revealed that D2D mutation results in a compact CRYAA mRNA secondary structure, while the wild type CRYAA mRNA has a weak or loose secondary structure. D2D mutation in the CRYAA gene may be an additional risk factor for progression of ARC.

  7. New insights into conformational and functional stability of human alpha-thrombin probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luis Mauricio T R; Zingali, Russolina B; Foguel, Débora; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2004-09-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and urea on conformational transitions of human alpha-thrombin structure were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and by measuring the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Treatment of thrombin with urea produced a progressive red shift in the center of mass of the intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum, with a maximum displacement of 650 cm(-1). HHP (270 MPa) shifted the centre of mass by only 370 cm(-1). HHP combined with a subdenaturing urea concentration (1.5 m) displaced the centre of mass by approximately 750 cm(-1). The binding of the fluorescent probe bis(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) to thrombin was increased by 1.8-, 4.0-, and 2.7-fold after treatment with high urea concentration, HHP or HHP combined with urea, respectively, thus suggesting that all treatments convert the enzyme to partially folded intermediates with exposed hydrophobic regions. On the other hand, treatment of thrombin with urea (but not HHP) combined with dithiothreitol progressively displaced the fluorescent probe, thus suggesting that this condition converts the enzyme to a completely unfolded state. Urea and HHP also led to different conformations when changes in the thrombin catalytic site environment were assessed using the fluorescence emission of fluorescein-d-Phe-Pro-Arg-cloromethylketone-alpha-thrombin: addition of urea up to 2 m gradually decreased the fluorescence emission of the probe to 65% of the initial intensity, whereas HHP caused a progressive increase in fluorescence. Hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate S-2238 was enhanced (35%) in 2 m urea and gradually abolished at higher concentrations, while HHP (270 MPa) inhibited the enzyme's catalytic activity by 45% and abolished it when 1.5 m urea was also present. Altogether, analysis of urea and HHP effects on thrombin structure and activity indicates the formation of dissimilar intermediate states during denaturation by these agents.

  8. Differences in genotoxic activity of alpha-Ni3S2 on human lymphocytes from nickel-hypersensitized and nickel-unsensitized donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrouijal, F Z; Marzin, D; Hildebrand, H F; Pestel, J; Haguenoer, J M

    1992-05-01

    The genotoxic activity of alpha-Ni3S2 was assessed on human lymphocytes from nickel-hypersensitized (SSL) and nickel-unsensitized (USL) subjects. Three genotoxicity tests were performed: the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test, the metaphase analysis test and the micronucleus test. (i) The SCE test (3-100 micrograms/ml) showed a weak but statistically significant increase in the number of SCE in both lymphocyte types with respect to controls, USL presenting a slightly higher SCE incidence but only at one concentration. (ii) The metaphase analysis test demonstrated a high dose-dependent clastogenic activity of alpha-Ni3S2 in both lymphocyte types. The frequency of chromosomal anomalies was significantly higher in USL than in SSL for all concentrations applied. (iii) The micronucleus test confirmed the dose-dependent clastogenic activity of alpha-Ni3S2 and the differences already observed between USL and SSL, i.e. the number of cells with micronuclei was statistically higher in USL. Finally, the incorporation study with alpha-63Ni3S2 showed a higher uptake of its solubilized fraction by USL. This allows an explanation of the different genotoxic action of nickel on the two cell types. In this study we demonstrated that hypersensitivity has an influence on the incorporation of alpha-Ni3S2 and subsequently on the different induction of chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes.

  9. Comparative study of toxic effects of zearalenone and its two major metabolites alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol on cultured human Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid-Essefi, S; Bouaziz, C; Golli-Bennour, E El; Ouanes, Z; Bacha, Hassen

    2009-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a fusarotoxin converted predominantly into alpha-zearalenol (alpha-Zol) and beta-zearalenol (beta-Zol) by hepatic hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. The feeding of naturally contaminated grains with ZEN was associated with hyperestrogenic and adverse effects on humans and animals. There is a lack of information on the attribution of the toxic effects of these toxins. One wonders if these effects are due to the parent molecule (ZEN) or to its major metabolites (alpha-Zol and beta-Zol). Using human Caco-2 cells, we looked for the molecular mechanisms of toxicity of ZEN, alpha-Zol, and beta-Zol. Toxicity effects were studied by MTT viability assay and oxidative stress induction by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. To check whether the oxidative stress induction was associated to DNA lesions, we looked for DNA fragmentation by means of the Comet and the diphenylamine assays. To specify cell death pathway, we investigated caspase-3 activation, confirmed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and by Bcl-2 depletion. Our results clearly demonstrated that ZEN as well as its two metabolites presented variable toxic effects. They induced cell death and an increase in MDA generation. These effects were associated to DNA fragmentation as well as caspase-3 activation. The observed toxic effects seem to be relieved by the metabolism of ZEN into alpha-Zol and beta-Zol. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The pattern of metastasis of human melanoma to the central nervous system is not influenced by integrin alpha(v)beta(3) expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, B.; Westphal, J.R.; Smits, D.; Ruiter, D.J.; Wesseling, P.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Keilholz, U.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effect of integrin alpha(v)beta(3) expression on the metastatic pattern of human melanoma cells in the central nervous system (CNS). For this purpose, we developed a hematogenous CNS melanoma metastasis model in nude mice using a modified internal carotid artery infusion

  11. Effect of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on the response of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and FFAs to low-dose endotoxemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    Effect of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on the response of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and FFAs to low-dose endotoxemia in humans.Krogh-Madsen R, Moller K, Dela F, Kronborg G, Jauffred S, Pedersen BK. Professor of Internal Medicine, Dept. of Infectious Diseases 7641, Univ. Hospital Rigshospitalet...

  12. STAT5-induced self-renewal and impaired myelopoiesis of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells involves down-modulation of C/EBP alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, ATJ; Schepers, H; Moore, MAS; Vellenga, E; Schuringa, JJ

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that enforced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5A) in human cord blood (CB)-derived stem/progenitor cells results in enhanced self-renewal and impaired myelopoiesis. The present study identifies C/EBP alpha as a critical component that

  13. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Brozek, John [Genfit, Loos (France); Derudas, Bruno [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte [Inserm ERI-9 and Equipe d' Accueil 2693, IFR114, Universite de Lille, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Inserm U545, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  14. ABNORMAL LEVELS OF MATERNAL SERUM HUMAN CHORIONIC-GONADOTROPIN AND ALPHA-FETOPROTEIN IN THE 2ND-TRIMESTER - RELATION TO FETAL WEIGHT AND PRETERM DELIVERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORSSINK, LP; KORNMAN, LH; BEEKHUIS, [No Value; DEWOLF, BTHM; MANTINGH, A

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this prospective descriptive cross-sectional study was to examine the clinical significance of abnormal maternal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (MShCG) and alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) in the second trimester of pregnancy. The study group comprised 8892 women with a singleton pregnancy,

  15. Alpha-toxin induces programmed cell death of human T cells, B cells, and monocytes during USA300 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available This investigation examines the influence of alpha-toxin (Hla during USA300 infection of human leukocytes. Survival of an USA300 isogenic deletion mutant of hla (USA300Δhla in human blood was comparable to the parental wild-type strain and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN plasma membrane permeability caused by USA300 did not require Hla. Flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs following infection by USA300, USA300Δhla, and USA300Δhla transformed with a plasmid over-expressing Hla (USA300Δhla Comp demonstrated this toxin plays a significant role inducing plasma membrane permeability of CD14(+, CD3(+, and CD19(+ PBMCs. Rapid plasma membrane permeability independent of Hla was observed for PMNs, CD14(+ and CD19(+ PBMCs following intoxication with USA300 supernatant while the majority of CD3(+ PBMC plasma membrane permeability induced by USA300 required Hla. Addition of recombinant Hla to USA300Δhla supernatant rescued CD3(+ and CD19(+ PBMC plasma membrane permeability generated by USA300 supernatant. An observed delay in plasma membrane permeability caused by Hla in conjunction with Annexin V binding and ApoBrdU Tunel assays examining PBMCs intoxicated with recombinant Hla or infected with USA300, USA300Δhla, USA300Δhla Comp, and USA300ΔsaeR/S suggest Hla induces programmed cell death of monocytes, B cells, and T cells that results in plasma membrane permeability. Together these findings underscore the importance of Hla during S. aureus infection of human tissue and specifically demonstrate Hla activity during USA300 infection triggers programmed cell death of human monocytes, T cells and B cells that leads to plasma membrane permeability.

  16. Autotaxin expression and its connection with the TNF-alpha-NF-κB axis in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Romil

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autotaxin (ATX is an extracellular lysophospholipase D that generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Both ATX and LPA have been shown to be involved in many cancers. However, the functional role of ATX and the regulation of ATX expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remain elusive. Results In this study, ATX expression was evaluated in tissues from 38 human HCC and 10 normal control subjects. ATX was detected mainly in tumor cells within tissue sections and its over-expression in HCC was specifically correlated with inflammation and liver cirrhosis. In addition, ATX expression was examined in normal human hepatocytes and liver cancer cell lines. Hepatoma Hep3B and Huh7 cells displayed stronger ATX expression than hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells and normal hepatocytes did. Proinflammtory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α promoted ATX expression and secretion selectively in Hep3B and Huh7 cells, which led to a corresponding increase in lysophospholipase-D activity. Moreover, we explored the mechanism governing the expression of ATX in hepatoma cells and established a critical role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB in basal and TNF-α induced ATX expression. Further study showed that secreted enzymatically active ATX stimulated Hep3B cell invasion. Conclusions This report highlights for the first time the clinical and biological evidence for the involvement of ATX in human HCC. Our observation that links the TNF-α/NF-κB axis and the ATX-LPA signaling pathway suggests that ATX is likely playing an important role in inflammation related liver tumorigenesis.

  17. Annotation of suprachromosomal families reveals uncommon types of alpha satellite organization in pericentromeric regions of hg38 human genome assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shepelev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric alpha satellite (AS is composed of highly identical higher-order DNA repetitive sequences, which make the standard assembly process impossible. Because of this the AS repeats were severely underrepresented in previous versions of the human genome assembly showing large centromeric gaps. The latest hg38 assembly (GCA_000001405.15 employed a novel method of approximate representation of these sequences using AS reference models to fill the gaps. Therefore, a lot more of assembled AS became available for genomic analysis. We used the PERCON program previously described by us to annotate various suprachromosomal families (SFs of AS in the hg38 assembly and presented the results of our primary analysis as an easy-to-read track for the UCSC Genome Browser. The monomeric classes, characteristic of the five known SFs, were color-coded, which allowed quick visual assessment of AS composition in whole multi-megabase centromeres down to each individual AS monomer. Such comprehensive annotation of AS in the human genome assembly was performed for the first time. It showed the expected prevalence of the known major types of AS organization characteristic of the five established SFs. Also, some less common types of AS arrays were identified, such as pure R2 domains in SF5, apparent J/R and D/R mixes in SF1 and SF2, and several different SF4 higher-order repeats among reference models and in regular contigs. No new SFs or large unclassed AS domains were discovered. The dataset reveals the architecture of human centromeres and allows classification of AS sequence reads by alignment to the annotated hg38 assembly. The data were deposited here: http://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgTracks?db=hg38&hgt.customText=https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/22994534/AS-tracks/human-GRC-hg38-M1SFs.bed.bz2.

  18. Annotation of suprachromosomal families reveals uncommon types of alpha satellite organization in pericentromeric regions of hg38 human genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, V A; Uralsky, L I; Alexandrov, A A; Yurov, Y B; Rogaev, E I; Alexandrov, I A

    2015-09-01

    Centromeric alpha satellite (AS) is composed of highly identical higher-order DNA repetitive sequences, which make the standard assembly process impossible. Because of this the AS repeats were severely underrepresented in previous versions of the human genome assembly showing large centromeric gaps. The latest hg38 assembly (GCA_000001405.15) employed a novel method of approximate representation of these sequences using AS reference models to fill the gaps. Therefore, a lot more of assembled AS became available for genomic analysis. We used the PERCON program previously described by us to annotate various suprachromosomal families (SFs) of AS in the hg38 assembly and presented the results of our primary analysis as an easy-to-read track for the UCSC Genome Browser. The monomeric classes, characteristic of the five known SFs, were color-coded, which allowed quick visual assessment of AS composition in whole multi-megabase centromeres down to each individual AS monomer. Such comprehensive annotation of AS in the human genome assembly was performed for the first time. It showed the expected prevalence of the known major types of AS organization characteristic of the five established SFs. Also, some less common types of AS arrays were identified, such as pure R2 domains in SF5, apparent J/R and D/R mixes in SF1 and SF2, and several different SF4 higher-order repeats among reference models and in regular contigs. No new SFs or large unclassed AS domains were discovered. The dataset reveals the architecture of human centromeres and allows classification of AS sequence reads by alignment to the annotated hg38 assembly. The data were deposited here: http://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgTracks?db=hg38&hgt.customText=https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/22994534/AS-tracks/human-GRC-hg38-M1SFs.bed.bz2.

  19. Alpha-tocopherol and BAY 11-7082 reduce vascular cell adhesion molecule in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Ursula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Pons, Laia; Heras, Mercedes; Aragonés, Gemma; Anglès, Neus; Morelló, Jose-Ramon; Solà, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    In endothelial dysfunction, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression (collectively termed cell adhesion molecules; CAMs) increase at sites of atherosclerosis and are stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We evaluated the effect of alpha-tocopherol (AT; 10-150 µM) and BAY 11-7082 (BAY; 0.1 or 1 µM) on CAMs mRNA expression as well as their protein in soluble release form (sCAMs) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) activated by TNF-α (1 or 10 ng/ml). Also, we determined the extent of lymphocyte adhesion to activated HAECs. BAY reduced VCAM-1, E-selectin and ICAM-1 mRNA expression by 30, 30 and 10%, respectively. Furthermore, protein reduction of sVCAM-1 by 70%, sE-selectin by 51% and sICAM-1 by 25% compared to HAECs stimulated by TNF-α was observed (p adhesion to human Jurkat T lymphocytes was higher compared to nonactivated HAECs (p adhesion (p cell adhesion, while AT selectively inhibits VCAM-1; both induce endothelial dysfunction improvement. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases.

  1. Functional CD47/signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP(alpha)) interaction is required for optimal human T- and natural killer- (NK) cell homeostasis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legrand, Nicolas; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Nagasawa, Maho; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Schotte, Remko; Strick-Marchand, Hélène; de Geus, Sandra J.; Pouw, Stephan M.; Böhne, Martino; Voordouw, Arie; Weijer, Kees; Di Santo, James P.; Spits, Hergen

    2011-01-01

    The homeostatic control mechanisms regulating human leukocyte numbers are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the role of phagocytes in this process using human immune system (HIS) BALB/c Rag2(-/-)IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice in which human leukocytes are generated from transplanted hematopoietic progenitor

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in Syrian hamster Leydig cells: Inhibitory role on luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungieri, Mónica B; Gonzalez-Calvar, Silvia I; Parborell, Fernanda; Albrecht, Martin; Mayerhofer, Artur; Calandra, Ricardo S

    2006-09-01

    We have previously found that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), is present in the testicular interstitial cells of infertile men, whereas it is absent in human testes with no evident morphological changes or abnormalities. To find an animal model for further investigating COX-2 and its role in testicular steroidogenesis, we screened testes from adult species ranging from mice to monkeys. By using immunohistochemical assays, we found COX-2 expression only in Leydig cells of the reproductively active (peripubertal, pubertal, and adult) seasonal breeder Syrian hamster. COX-2 expression in hamster Leydig cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. In contrast, COX-1 expression was not detected in hamster testes. Because COX-2 expression implies PG synthesis, we investigated the effect of various PGs on testosterone production and found that PGF2 alpha stood out because it significantly reduced human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone release from isolated hamster Leydig cells in a dose-dependent manner. This mechanism involves a decreased expression of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Testicular concentration and content of PGF2 alpha in reproductively active hamsters as well as production of PGF2 alpha from isolated hamster Leydig cells were also determined. Moreover, PGF2 alpha receptors were localized in Leydig cells of hamsters and testicular biopsies from patients with Sertoli cell only and germ arrest syndromes. Thus, in this study, we described a COX-2-initiated pathway that via PGF2 alpha production, PGF2 alpha receptors, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase represents a physiological local inhibitory system of human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production in the Syrian hamster testes.

  3. NCX 4040, a nitric oxide-donating aspirin, exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of I kappa B-alpha degradation in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Emanuela; Dovizio, Melania; Di Francesco, Luigia; Anzellotti, Paola; Salvatore, Tania; Di Francesco, Andrea; Sciulli, Maria G; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Monopoli, Angela; Patrignani, Paola

    2010-02-15

    NO-donating aspirins consist of aspirin to which a NO-donating group is covalently linked via a spacer molecule. NCX 4040 and NCX 4016 are positional isomers with respect to the -CH(2)ONO(2) group (para and meta, respectively) on the benzene ring of the spacer. Because positional isomerism is critical for antitumor properties of NO-donating aspirins, we aimed to compare their anti-inflammatory effects with those of aspirin in vitro. Thus, we assessed their impacts on cyclooxygenase-2 activity (by measuring PGE(2) levels), protein expression, and cytokine generation(IL-1beta, IL-18, TNF-alpha, and IL-10) in human whole blood and isolated human monocytes stimulated with LPS. Interestingly, we found that micromolar concentrations of NCX 4040, but not NCX 4016 or aspirin, affected cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cytokine generation. We compared the effects of NCX 4040 with those of NCX 4016 or aspirin on IkappaB-alpha stabilization and proteasome activity in the LPS-stimulated human monocytic cell line THP1. Differently from aspirin and NCX 4016, NCX 4040, at a micromolar concentration range, inhibited IkappaB-alpha degradation. In fact, NCX 4040 caused concentration-dependent accumulation of IkappaB-alpha and its phosphorylated form. This effect was not reversed by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase, thus excluding the contribution of NO-dependent cGMP generation. In contrast, IkappaB-alpha accumulation by NCX 4040 may involve an inhibitory effect on proteasome functions. Indeed, NCX 4040 inhibited 20S proteasome activity when incubated with intact cells but not in the presence of cell lysate supernatants, thus suggesting an indirect inhibitory effect. In conclusion, NCX 4040 is an inhibitor of IkappaB-alpha degradation and proteasome function, and it should be taken into consideration for the development of novel anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive agents.

  4. Delta zero-thalassemia in cis of beta Knossos-globin gene. Normal structure transient expression of the delta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouazana, R; Bozon, D; Baklouti, F; Gonnet, C; Delaunay, J; Godet, J

    1989-07-31

    We have previously described the first homozygous cases of Hb Knossos in an Algerian family. The Hb A2 was completely absent, ascertaining the presence of a delta zero-thalassemia determinant in cis of the beta Knossos S gene. Here, we investigate the affected delta-globin gene. The complete DNA sequence of the gene and its 5' and 3' flanking regions was determined. Only two nucleotide changes were recorded: a C----T substitution at -199 and an AT insertion at -448 upstream from the cap site. To examine the involvement of these changes in gene function, the delta-gene was subcloned in an expression vector and introduced into COS cells. Analysis of RNA derived from these cells, using an S1 protection assay and dot-blot hybridization, revealed qualitatively and quantitatively normal transcription. The loss of delta-globin gene activity in vivo may be due to the alteration of a tissue-specific control.

  5. Major Outer Membrane Protein Omp25 of Brucella suis Is Involved in Inhibition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production during Infection of Human Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Boigegrain, Rose-Anne; Cloeckaert, Axel; Gross, Antoine; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Terraza, Annie; Liautard, Janny; Köhler, Stephan; Rouot, Bruno; Dornand, Jacques; Liautard, Jean Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. can establish themselves and cause disease in humans and animals. The mechanisms by which Brucella spp. evade the antibacterial defenses of their host, however, remain largely unknown. We have previously reported that live brucellae failed to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production upon human macrophage infection. This inhibition is associated with a nonidentified protein that is released into culture medium. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of gram-negative bacteria...

  6. An unusual DNA sequence observed in the. gamma. globin gene loci of two members of a Chinese family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Q.C.

    1989-01-01

    There are two nonallelic human {gamma} globin genes located on the short arm of chromosome No. 11 in the order 5{prime}-{sup G}{sub {gamma}}-{sup A}{sub {gamma}}-3{prime}. Various modifications of the two {gamma} genes have been reported and include: deletions, triplications, quadruplications and recently a quintuplication. These are generally created by one or more unequal crossovers in the {gamma} globin gene regions on adjacent chromosomes. During the course of looking for a {gamma}{sup {degree}} thalassemia, which might be due to a crossover of looking for a {gamma} genes, two cases were found in the family W. Bgl II mapping studies showed a 5 kb deletion at the {gamma} gene loci in these individuals. The Bgl II fragment from the {gamma} gene loci of R.W. was cloned into the phage vector QR1. Phage mapping showed that two out of the three Pst I sites within the Bgl II fragment were missing which suggested that the crossover might have occurred within the {gamma} gene, possibly within the {gamma}IVS II region. Sequence analysis of the cloned fragment revealed an unusual sequence which had no sequence homology with the {gamma} gene region except for a small 264 bp region near the 3{prime} end. The orientation of the 264 bp fragment is inverted relative to homologous sequences in the {sup G}{sub {gamma}} and {sup A}{sub {gamma}} IVS II. The unusual sequence was computer analyzed for homology with every DNA sequence file in the EMBL database and GenBank and did not show any significant homologies to all the available DNA sequences except for the 264 bp {gamma}IVS II homology.

  7. Uptake of neutral alpha- and beta-amino acids by human proximal tubular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, H; Røigaard, H; Jacobsen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    of AIB occurred by a single, saturable transport system, whereas the Na(+)-gradient dependent uptake data for beta-alanine could be described in terms of two-independent transport components as well as one-transport one-leak model with identical kinetic constants for the high-affinity system. Competition...... in the embryonic and AHKE cells. However, the uptake capacity of the above-mentioned transport proteins was relatively smaller in the embryonic kidney compared with the adult human kidney, which may explain, at least partly, the phenomenon of physiologic amino aciduria in neonates. Udgivelsesdato: 1996-Jul-25...

  8. Cross-neutralizing antibodies elicited by the Cervarix® human papillomavirus vaccine display a range of Alpha-9 inter-type specificities ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Bissett, Sara L; Draper, Eve; Myers, Richard E.; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The highly efficacious human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) representing genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, which together account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Vaccine-type protection is thought to be mediated by high titer, type-specific neutralizing antibodies. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically-related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39...

  9. MicroRNA-143 Downregulates Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha1 in Human Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiu Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-143 (miR-143 was found to be downregulated in allergic rhinitis, and bioinformatics analysis predicted that IL-13Rα1 was a target gene of miR-143. To understand the molecular mechanisms of miR-143 involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, recombinant miR-143 plasmid vectors were constructed, and human mast cell-1(HMC-1 cells which play a central role in the allergic response were used for study. The plasmids were transfected into HMC-1 cells using a lentiviral vector. Expression of IL-13Rα1 mRNA was then detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blotting. The miR-143 lentiviral vector was successfully stably transfected in HMC-1 cells for target gene expression. Compared to the control, the target gene IL-13Rα1 was less expressed in HMC-1 transfected with miR-143 as determined by RT-PCR and Western Blotting (p < 0.05; this difference in expression was statistically significant and the inhibition efficiency was 71%. It indicates that miR-143 directly targets IL-13Rα1 and suppresses IL-13Rα1 expression in HMC-1 cells. Therefore, miR-143 may be associated with allergic reaction in human mast cells.

  10. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase and Implications for Selective Treatment of Human Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Park, Hee-Won; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Harp, Joel M.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Nes, W. David; Pays, Etienne; Chaudhuri, Minu; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (ULdB); (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (Toronto); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-01-25

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (14DM, the CYP51 family of cytochrome P450) is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. It serves as a major drug target for fungal diseases and can potentially become a target for treatment of human infections with protozoa. Here we present 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of 14DM from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, ligand-free and complexed with a strong chemically selected inhibitor N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadi-azol-2-yl)benzamide that we previously found to produce potent antiparasitic effects in Trypanosomatidae. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic microsomal 14DM that acts on sterol biosynthesis, and it differs profoundly from that of the water-soluble CYP51 family member from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in organization of the active site cavity and in the substrate access channel location. Inhibitor binding does not cause large scale conformational rearrangements, yet induces unanticipated local alterations in the active site, including formation of a hydrogen bond network that connects, via the inhibitor amide group fragment, two remote functionally essential protein segments and alters the heme environment. The inhibitor binding mode provides a possible explanation for both its functionally irreversible effect on the enzyme activity and its selectivity toward the 14DM from human pathogens versus the human 14DM ortholog. The structures shed new light on 14DM functional conservation and open an excellent opportunity for directed design of novel antiparasitic drugs.

  11. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) Stimulates Expression of Integrin alpha6 in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells: A Downstream Modulator of TSP-1-Induced Cellular Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Anitha S; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2010-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is involved in a variety of different cellular processes including cell adhesion, tumor progression, and angiogenesis. This paper reports the novel finding that TSP-1 upregulates integrin alpha6 subunit in human keratinocytes and human breast cancer cells resulting in increased cell adhesion and tumor cell invasion. The effect of TSP-1 on alpha6 subunit expression was examined in human keratinocytes and breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MDA-MB-231) treated with TSP-1 and in TSP-1 stably transfected breast cancer cells. TSP-1 upregulated alpha6 message and protein in these cells as revealed by differential display, Northern and Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical localization studies. The increased expression of alpha6 was shown to mediate adhesion and invasion of these cells to laminin, a major component of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM). These data suggest that TSP-1 plays an integral role in the attachment of cells to the ECM facilitating cell motility and angiogenesis.

  12. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... substrates have been identified for Aurora B, so that the precise role it plays in controlling mitosis remains to be elucidated. To identify potential novel mitotic substrates of Aurora B, extracted chromosomes were prepared from mitotically-arrested HeLa S3 cells and incubated with recombinant human Aurora...... B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein...

  13. Synergistic inhibition of human cytomegalovirus replication by interferon-alpha/beta and interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that gamma interferon (IFN-γ synergizes with the innate IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β to inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 replication in vitro. To determine whether this phenomenon is shared by other herpesviruses, we investigated the effects of IFNs on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replication. Results We have found that as with HSV-1, IFN-γ synergizes with the innate IFNs (IFN-α/β to potently inhibit HCMV replication in vitro. While pre-treatment of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs with IFN-α, IFN-β or IFN-γ alone inhibited HCMV plaque formation by ~30 to 40-fold, treatment with IFN-α and IFN-γ or IFN-β and IFN-γ inhibited HCMV plaque formation by 163- and 662-fold, respectively. The generation of isobole plots verified that the observed inhibition of HCMV plaque formation and replication in HFFs by IFN-α/β and IFN-γ was a synergistic interaction. Additionally, real-time PCR analyses of the HCMV immediate early (IE genes (IE1 and IE2 revealed that IE mRNA expression was profoundly decreased in cells stimulated with IFN-α/β and IFN-γ (~5-11-fold as compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, decreased IE mRNA expression was accompanied by a decrease in IE protein expression, as demonstrated by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Conclusion These findings suggest that IFN-α/β and IFN-γ synergistically inhibit HCMV replication through a mechanism that may involve the regulation of IE gene expression. We hypothesize that IFN-γ produced by activated cells of the adaptive immune response may potentially synergize with endogenous type I IFNs to inhibit HCMV dissemination in vivo.

  14. Alpha-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive behavior of human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daft, Paul G; Yuan, Kaiyu; Warram, Jason M; Klein, Michael J; Siegal, Gene P; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2013-04-01

    Osteosarcoma is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. Despite improvements in osteosarcoma treatment, more specific molecular targets are needed as potential therapeutic options. One target of interest is α-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (α-CaMKII), a ubiquitous mediator of Ca(2+)-linked signaling, which has been shown to regulate tumor cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of α-CaMKII in the growth and tumorigenicity of human osteosarcoma. We show that α-CaMKII is highly expressed in primary osteosarcoma tissue derived from 114 patients, and is expressed in varying levels in different human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines [MG-63, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)/HOS, and 143B). To examine whether α-CaMKII regulates osteosarcoma tumorigenic properties, we genetically inhibited α-CaMKII in two osteosarcoma cell lines using two different α-CaMKII shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors and overexpressed α-CaMKII by retrovirus. The genetic deletion of α-CaMKII by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in MG-63 and 143B cells resulted in decreased proliferation (50% and 41%), migration (22% and 25%), and invasion (95% and 90%), respectively. The overexpression of α-CaMKII in HOS cells resulted in increased proliferation (240%), migration (640%), and invasion (10,000%). Furthermore, α-CaMKII deletion in MG-63 cells significantly reduced tumor burden in vivo (65%), whereas α-CaMKII overexpression resulted in tumor formation in a previously nontumor forming osteosarcoma cell line (HOS). Our results suggest that α-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of osteosarcoma, and its inhibition could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease. ©2013 AACR.

  15. Type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene expression in normal or diabetic sorted human alpha and beta cells: correlations with age or BMI of islet donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Kirkpatrick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility genes for development of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine whether a subset of these (comprising FTO, IDE, KCNJ11, PPARG and TCF7L2 were transcriptionally restricted to or enriched in human beta cells by sorting islet cells into alpha and beta - specific fractions. We also aimed to correlate expression of these transcripts in both alpha and beta cell types with phenotypic traits of the islet donors and to compare diabetic and non-diabetic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Islet cells were sorted using a previously published method and RNA was extracted, reverse transcribed and used as the template for quantitative PCR. Sorted cells were also analysed for insulin and glucagon immunostaining and insulin secretion from the beta cells as well as insulin, glucagon and GLP-1 content. All five genes were expressed in both alpha and beta cells, with significant enrichment of KCNJ11 in the beta cells and of TCF7L2 in the alpha cells. The ratio of KCNJ11 in beta to alpha cells was negatively correlated with BMI, while KCNJ11 expression in alpha cells was negatively correlated with age but not associated with BMI. Beta cell expression of glucagon, TCF7L2 and IDE was increased in cells from islets that had spent more time in culture prior to cell sorting. In beta cells, KCNJ11, FTO and insulin were positively correlated with each other. Diabetic alpha and beta cells had decreased expression of insulin, glucagon and FTO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study has identified novel patterns of expression of type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes within sorted islet cells and suggested interactions of gene expression with age or BMI of the islet donors. However, expression of these genes in islets is less associated with BMI than has been found for other tissues.

  16. The study of evolution and depression of the alpha-rhythm in the human brain EEG by means of wavelet-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnova, A. E.; Zhuravlev, M. O.; Khramova, M. V.; Pysarchik, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    We study the appearance, development and depression of the alpha-rhythm in human EEG data during a psychophysiological experiment by stimulating cognitive activity with the perception of ambiguous object. The new method based on continuous wavelet transform allows to estimate the energy contribution of various components, including the alpha rhythm, in the general dynamics of the electrical activity of the projections of various areas of the brain. The decision-making process by observe ambiguous images is characterized by specific oscillatory alfa-rhytm patterns in the multi-channel EEG data. We have shown the repeatability of detected principles of the alpha-rhythm evolution in a data of group of 12 healthy male volunteers.

  17. Synthesis of 17beta-N-substituted 19-Nor-10-azasteroids as inhibitors of human 5alpha-reductases I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpi, Dina; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario; Guarna, Antonio

    2002-11-01

    The synthesis of 17beta-[N-(phenyl)methyl/phenyl-amido] substituted 10-azasteroids has been accomplished by either the TiCl4- or TMSOTf-catalysed reaction of carbamates 11 and 12 with Danishefsky's diene. The reaction provided 5alpha-H isomers 3a-5a and 5beta-H isomers 3b-5b depending on the reaction conditions. Both epimers of each compound were tested against human 5alpha-reductase types I and II. Unexpectedly, 5beta-H compounds were found more active than their 5alpha-H counterparts, the best inhibitors being 3b (IC50=279 and 2000 nM toward isoenzyme I and II, respectively) and 5b (IC50=913 and 247 nM toward isoenzymes I and II, respectively).

  18. Puerarin protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced injury of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells via downregulating alpha-hemolysin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng; Li, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Yong-Hua; Li, Zhe; Tang, Yu-Shun; Kou, Xu; Wang, Shu-De; Bao, Min; Qu, Lian-Da; Li, Min; Li, Bing

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-hemolysin, a secreted pore-forming toxin, plays an indispensable role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of puerarin against S. aureus was investigated; as a result, puerarin showed no influence on the growth of this organism. However, hemolysis and western blotting assays showed that puerarin concentration dependently inhibited the secretion of alpha-hemolysin at low concentrations. Real-time RT-PCR assay was further employed to evaluate the transcriptional level of hla, the gene encoding alpha-hemolysin, and RNAIII, an effector molecule of the agr system. The results indicated that the RNAIII expression and subsequent hla transcription were also inhibited by puerarin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, puerarin significantly prevented human alveolar epithelial A549 cells from S. aureus-induced injury. Thereby, puerarin may be considered as a potential candidate for the development of antivirulence drugs in the treatment of S. aureus-mediated infections.

  19. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderman, Andreas; Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H

    2008-01-01

    through the use of co-immunoprecipitation that human Abeta-immunoreactive peptides bind to mice alpha7 nAChR in vivo. Agonists of the alpha7 nAChR improve memory and attentional properties and increase immediate early gene expression in the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens. We show that acute...... systemic administration of the alpha7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 (10 mg/kg) result in a significant increase in Fos protein levels in the shell of nucleus accumbens in wild-type mice, but has no effect in the transgene mice. There were fewer cell bodies expressing Fos in the prefrontal cortex of transgene...

  20. Involvement of retinoic acid receptor alpha in the stimulation of tissue-type plasminogen-activator gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, T; Lansink, M; Arts, J; Sitter, T; Toet, K

    1995-09-01

    Retinoids stimulate tissue-type plasminogen-activator (t-PA) gene expression in human endothelial cells, and are likely to do so by binding to one or more nuclear retinoid receptors. The present study was initiated to identify the retinoid receptor(s) involved in this process. Expression and regulation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) were analyzed by Northern-blot analysis of total or poly(A)-rich RNA prepared from cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Prior to any exposure to retinoids, HUVEC express two transcripts for RAR-alpha (3.6 kb and 2.8 kb), and low levels of transcripts for RAR-beta (3.4 kb and 3.2 kb) and RAR-gamma (3.3 kb and 3.1 kb). Two RXR subtypes were identified, RXR-alpha (4.8 kb) and, at a much lower concentration, RXR-beta (2.4 kb); no evidence for the presence of RXR-gamma was found. Furthermore, HUVEC express cellular retinol-binding protein I (CRBP-I) and cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein I (CRABP-I) mRNA. Exposure of HUVEC to 1 microM retinoic acid or the retinobenzoic acid, Ch55, led to the induction of the two RAR-beta mRNAs, RXR-alpha mRNA and CRBP-I mRNA, whereas the expression of the other receptor and CRABP-I transcripts did not change appreciably. Using retinoid analogues that bind preferentially to one of the RAR or RXR subtypes, we found evidence that RAR-alpha is involved in the retinoid-induced t-PA expression in HUVEC. This conclusion was strengthened by experiments in which blocking of RAR-alpha with a specific RAR-alpha antagonist, Ro 41-5253, was demonstrated to suppress the induction of t-PA by retinoids.

  1. Alpha stimulation of the human parietal cortex attunes tactile perception to external space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzoli, Manuela; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2014-02-03

    An intriguing question in neuroscience concerns how somatosensory events on the skin are represented in the human brain. Since Head and Holmes' [1] neuropsychological dissociation between localizing touch on the skin and localizing body parts in external space, touch is considered to operate in a variety of spatial reference frames [2]. At least two representations of space are in competition during orienting to touch: a somatotopic one, reflecting the organization of the somatosensory cortex (S1) [3], and a more abstract, external reference frame that factors postural changes in relation to body parts and/or external space [4, 5]. Previous transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) plays a key role in supporting representations as well as orienting attention in an external reference frame [4, 6]. Here, we capitalized on the TMS entrainment approach [7, 8], targeting the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). We found that frequency-specific (10 Hz) tuning of the PPC induced spatially specific enhancement of tactile detection that was expressed in an external reference frame. This finding establishes a tight causal link between a concrete form of brain activity (10 Hz oscillation) and a specific type of spatial representation, revealing a fundamental property of how the parietal cortex encodes information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Zonal variation in the distribution of an alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoform receptor in human adrenal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U O; Bøg-Hansen, T C; Kirkeby, S

    1999-01-01

    specific receptor. The binding of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoform B and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoform C to the glycoform specific receptor is inhibited by the steroid hormones cortisone, aldosterone, estradiol and progesterone but not by testosterone. The pronounced changes in the distribution...

  3. Evaluation of β-globin gene therapy constructs in single-copy transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; P. Pasceri; A. Harper; X. Wu; P.J. Fraser (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEffective gene therapy constructs based on retrovirus or adeno-associated virus vectors will require regulatory elements that direct expression of genes transduced at single copy. Most beta-globin constructs designed for therapy of beta-thalassemias are regulated by the 5'HS2 component

  4. Characterization of an ectopic beta-globin LCR: Good neighbors and a distant friend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Noordermeer (Daan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe work discussed in this thesis is aimed at answering questions related to nuclear and chromatin organization, and to functioning of the β-globin LCR. In the introduction these topics are introduced and questions regarding their function are being posed. In the following four

  5. Variations in the β-Globin genes of Sickle Cell Anaemia Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-28

    3077.196076. Original Article. How to cite this article: Awwalu S, Mamman AI, Hassan A, Dogara LG,. Waziri AD, Aminu SM, Musa AU, Bello-Manga H. Variations in the β-globin genes of sickle cell anaemia patients in Zaria, ...

  6. Technetium-99m-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptides for human melanoma imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jianquan; Guo Haixun [College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Miao Yubin, E-mail: ymiao@salud.unm.ed [College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether {sup 99m}Tc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ({alpha}-MSH) hybrid peptide targeting both melanocortin-1 (MC1) and {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptors was superior in melanoma targeting to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled {alpha}-MSH or RGD peptide targeting only the MC1 or {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptor. Methods: RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH, RAD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSHscramble were designed to target both MC1 and {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptors, MC1 receptor only and {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptor only, respectively. The MC1 or {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptor binding affinities of three peptides were determined in M21 human melanoma cells. The melanoma targeting properties of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH, RAD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSHscramble were determined in M21 human melanoma-xenografted nude mice. Meanwhile, the melanoma uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH was blocked with various non-radiolabeled peptides in M21 melanoma xenografts. Results: RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH displayed 2.0 and 403 nM binding affinities to both MC1 and {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptors, whereas RAD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH or RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSHscramble lost their {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin receptor binding affinity by greater than 248-fold or MC1 receptor binding affinity by more than 100-fold, respectively. The melanoma uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH was 2.49 and 2.24 times (P < .05) the melanoma uptakes of {sup 99m}Tc-RAD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH and {sup 99m}Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSHscramble at 2 h post-injection, respectively. Either RGD or (Arg{sup 11})CCMSH peptide co-injection could block 42% and 57% of the tumor uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-RGD-Lys-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH, whereas the coinjection of RGD+(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH peptide mixture

  7. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1 Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined alpha (α- particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1 for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure.

  8. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha- (α- particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  9. Mycoplasma fermentans inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis in the human myelomonocytic U937 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlic, M; Horowitz, J; Horowitz, S

    2004-11-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans (M. fermentans) was shown to be involved in the alteration of several eukaryotic cell functions (i.e. cytokine production, gene expression), and was suggested as a causative agent in arthritic diseases involving impaired apoptosis. We investigated whether M. fermentans has a pathogenic potential by affecting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha-induced apoptosis in the human myelomonocytic U937 cell line. A significant reduction in the TNFalpha-induced apoptosis (approximately 60%) was demonstrated upon either infection with live M. fermentans or by stimulation with non-live M. fermentans. To investigate the mechanism of M. fermentans antiapoptotic effect, the reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim) and the protease activity of caspase-8 were measured. In the infected cells, the reduction of DeltaPsim was inhibited (approximately 75%), and an approximately 60% reduction of caspase-8 activity was measured. In conclusion, M. fermentans significantly inhibits TNFalpha-induced apoptosis in U937 cells, and its effect is upstream of the mitochondria and upstream of caspase-8.

  10. Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli of human origin interfere with the growth of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, A; Dettori, G; Ragni, P; Guégan, R; Arcangeletti, M C; Medici, M C; Chezzi, C

    2002-04-01

    Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli of human origin interfere with the growth of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin producer reducing the clostridial growth area and colonies number when bacteria were cultivated together in sheep blood agar plates. The growth inhibition of C. perfringens was only observed when B. (S.) pilosicoli grew 72-96 hours sooner than C. perfringens and after the inoculum of this latter the plates were anaerobically incubated for additional 48 hours. The phenomenon was observed at concentrations of B. (S.) pilosicoli ranging from 10(7) to 10(4) CFU/ml and at concentrations of C. perfringens ranging from 10(7) to 10(1) CFU/ml when the bacteria were 0-10 mm away from each other. When B. (S.) pilosicoli and C. perfringens were inoculated at the same time and when B. (S.) pilosicoli grew 24-48 hours sooner than C. perfringens, the clostridial growth inhibition was not appreciated and only a cooperative haemolysis was observed between the bacteria.

  11. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed.

  12. Functional polymorphism of IL-1 alpha and its potential role in obesity in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Um

    Full Text Available Proinflammatory cytokines secreted from adipose tissue contribute to the morbidity associated with obesity. IL-1α is one of the proinflammatory cytokines; however, it has not been clarified whether IL-1α may also cause obesity. In this study, we investigated whether polymorphisms in IL-1α contribute to human obesity. A total of 260 obese subjects were genotyped for IL-1α C-889T (rs1800587 and IL-1α G+4845T (rs17561. Analyses of genotype distributions revealed that both IL-1α polymorphisms C-889T (rs1800587 and G+4845T (rs17561 were associated with an increase in body mass index in obese healthy women. In addition, the effect of rs1800587 on the transcriptional activity of IL-1α was explored in pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells. Significant difference was found between the rs1800587 polymorphism in the regulatory region of the IL-1α gene and transcriptional activity. We extended these observations in vivo to a high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model and in vitro to pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells. IL-1α levels were dramatically augmented in obese mice, and triglyceride was increased 12 hours after IL-1α injection. Taken together, IL-1α treatment regulated the differentiation of preadipocytes. IL-1α C-889T (rs1800587 is a functional polymorphism of IL-1α associated with obesity. IL-1α may have a critical function in the development of obesity.

  13. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  14. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ahirwar

    Full Text Available An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4 and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M(-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg. Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20. Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative

  15. Development of a quantitative bead capture assay for soluble IL-7 receptor alpha in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Faucher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IL-7 is an essential cytokine in T-cell development and homeostasis. It binds to the IL-7R receptor, a complex of the IL-7Ralpha (CD127 and common gamma (CD132 chains. There is significant interest in evaluating the expression of CD127 on human T-cells as it often decreased in medical conditions leading to lymphopenia. Previous reports showed the usefulness of CD127 as a prognostic marker in viral infections such as HIV, CMV, EBV and HCV. A soluble CD127 (sCD127 is released in plasma and may contribute to disease pathogenesis through its control on IL-7 activities. Measuring sCD127 is important to define its role and may complement existing markers used in lymphopenic disease management. We describe a new quantitative assay for the measurement of sCD127 in plasma and report sCD127 concentrations in healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a quantitative bead-based sCD127 capture assay. Polyclonal CD127-specific antibodies were chosen for capture and a biotinylated monoclonal anti-CD127 antibody was selected for detection. The assay can detect native sCD127 and recombinant sCD127 which served as the calibrator. The analytical performance of the assay was characterized and the concentration and stability of plasma sCD127 in healthy adults was determined. The assay's range was 3.2-1000 ng/mL. The concentration of plasma sCD127 was 164+/-104 ng/mL with over a log variation between subjects. Individual sCD127 concentrations remained stable when measured serially during a period of up to one year. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report on the quantification of plasma sCD127 in a population of healthy adults. Soluble CD127 plasma concentrations remained stable over time in a given individual and sCD127 immunoreactivity was resistant to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. This quantitative sCD127 assay is a valuable tool for defining the potential role of sCD127 in lymphopenic diseases.

  16. High-density SNP genotyping to define beta-globin locus haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Muralidhar, Shalini; Singh, Manisha; Sylvan, Caprice; Kalra, Inderdeep S; Quinn, Charles T; Onyekwere, Onyinye C; Pace, Betty S

    2009-01-01

    Five major beta-globin locus haplotypes have been established in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from the Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian populations. Historically, beta-haplotypes were established using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis across the beta-locus, which consists of five functional beta-like globin genes located on chromosome 11. Previous attempts to correlate these haplotypes as robust predictors of clinical phenotypes observed in SCD have not been successful. We speculate that the coverage and distribution of the RFLP sites located proximal to or within the globin genes are not sufficiently dense to accurately reflect the complexity of this region. To test our hypothesis, we performed RFLP analysis and high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping across the beta-locus using DNA samples from healthy African Americans with either normal hemoglobin A (HbAA) or individuals with homozygous SS (HbSS) disease. Using the genotyping data from 88 SNPs and Haploview analysis, we generated a greater number of haplotypes than that observed with RFLP analysis alone. Furthermore, a unique pattern of long-range linkage disequilibrium between the locus control region and the beta-like globin genes was observed in the HbSS group. Interestingly, we observed multiple SNPs within the HindIII restriction site located in the Ggamma-globin intervening sequence II which produced the same RFLP pattern. These findings illustrated the inability of RFLP analysis to decipher the complexity of sequence variations that impacts genomic structure in this region. Our data suggest that high-density SNP mapping may be required to accurately define beta-haplotypes that correlate with the different clinical phenotypes observed in SCD.

  17. Propagation of alpha-synuclein pathology: hypotheses, discoveries, and yet unresolved questions from experimental and human brain studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihara, Toshiki; Giasson, Benoit I

    2016-01-01

    Progressive aggregation of alpha-synuclein (αS) through formation of amorphous pale bodies to mature Lewy bodies or in neuronal processes as Lewy neurites may be the consequence of conformational protein changes and accumulations, which structurally represents "molecular template". Focal initiation and subsequent spread along anatomically connected structures embody "structural template". To investigate the hypothesis that both processes might be closely associated and involved in the progression of αS pathology, which can be observed in human brains, αS amyloidogenic precursors termed "seeds" were experimentally injected into the brain or peripheral nervous system of animals. Although these studies showed that αS amyloidogenic seeds can induce αS pathology, which can spread in the nervous system, the findings are still not unequivocal in demonstrating predominant transsynaptic or intraneuronal spreads either in anterograde or retrograde directions. Interpretation of some of these studies is further complicated by other concurrent aberrant processes including neuroimmune activation, injury responses and/or general perturbation of proteostasis. In human brain, αS deposition and neuronal degeneration are accentuated in distal axon/synapse. Hyperbranching of axons is an anatomical commonality of Lewy-prone systems, providing a structural basis for abundance in distal axons and synaptic terminals. This neuroanatomical feature also can contribute to such distal accentuation of vulnerability in neuronal demise and the formation of αS inclusion pathology. Although retrograde progression of αS aggregation in hyperbranching axons may be a consistent feature of Lewy pathology, the regional distribution and gradient of Lewy pathology are not necessarily compatible with a predictable pattern such as upward progression from lower brainstem to cerebral cortex. Furthermore, "focal Lewy body disease" with the specific isolated involvement of autonomic, olfactory or cardiac

  18. Assembly, intracellular processing, and expression at the cell surface of the human alpha beta T cell receptor/CD3 complex. Function of the CD3-zeta chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Kuhlmann, J; Rubin, B

    1989-01-01

    The TCR/CD3 complex is a multimeric protein complex composed of a minimum of seven transmembrane chains (TCR alpha beta-CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta 2). Whereas earlier studies have demonstrated that both the TCR-alpha and -beta chains are required for the cell surface expression of the TCR/CD3...... complex, the role of the CD3 chains for the TCR/CD3 expression have not been experimentally addressed in human T cells. In this study the function of the CD3-zeta chain for the assembly, intracellular processing, and expression of the TCR/CD3 complex in the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat...... was investigated. The results indicate that: 1) CD3-zeta is required for the cell surface expression of the TCR/CD3 complex; 2) the pentameric form (TCR alpha beta-CD3 gamma delta epsilon) of the TCR/CD3 complex and single TCR chains associated with CD3 (TCR alpha-CD3 gamma delta epsilon and TCR beta-CD3 gamma...

  19. In vitro inhibitory effect of rupatadine on histamine and TNF-alpha release from dispersed canine skin mast cells and the human mast cell line HMC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queralt, M; Brazís, P; Merlos, M; de Mora, F; Puigdemont, A

    2000-07-01

    To examine the inhibitory potential of rupatadine, a new H1-antihistamine and anti-PAF agent, on histamine and TNF-alpha release. Comparison with an H1-antihistamine (loratadine) and a PAF-antagonist (SR-27417A). Dispersed canine skin mast cells were used to assess the effect of the drugs tested on FcepsilonRI-dependent and -independent histamine release; the human HMC-1 cell line was used to study TNF-alpha release. Before stimulation mast cell populations were treated with increasing concentrations of rupatadine, loratadine and SR-27417A. Histamine and TNF-alpha release were measured following 15-30 min and 3 h activation, respectively. The IC50 for rupatadine in A23187, concanavalin A and anti-IgE induced histamine release was 0.7+/-0.4 microM, 3.2+/-0.7 microM and 1.5+/-0.4 microM, respectively whereas for loratadine the IC50 was 2.1+/-0.9 microM, 4.0+/-1.3 M and 1.7+/-0.5 microM. SR-27417A exhibited no inhibitory effect. Rupatadine, loratadine and SR-27417A inhibited TNF-alpha release with IC50 2.0+/-0.9 microM, 2.1+/-1.1 M and 4.3+/-0.6 microM, respectively. Rupatadine and loratadine showed similar inhibitory effect on histamine and TNF-alpha release, whereas SR-27417A only exhibited inhibitory effect against TNF-alpha.

  20. Expression of estrogen receptors-alpha and -beta in bladder cancer cell lines and human bladder tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Steven S; Smith, Carolyn L; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Yu, Jiang; Kim, Isaac Y; Jian, Weiguo; Sonpavde, Guru; Ayala, Gustavo E; Younes, Mamoun; Lerner, Seth P

    2006-06-15

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are known to mediate important physiologic responses as well as the growth of some tumors in response to estradiol stimulation. In a previous study the selective ER modulator raloxifene was shown to induce apoptosis in an ERbeta-positive bladder cancer cell line. However, the expression of ERbeta in human bladder cancer has not been thoroughly investigated. ERalpha and ERbeta expression in 224 bladder tumor samples was evaluated using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Levels of ERalpha and ERbeta protein and mRNA expression were determined in several bladder cancer cell lines using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The effect of estradiol and antiestrogen treatments on RT4 bladder cancer cell growth was determined by cell proliferation assays. Analyses revealed that only 2 human bladder cancers weakly expressed ERalpha. In contrast, the expression of ERbeta was detected in 141 tumors (63%). ERbeta was expressed in 58% of WHO Grade 1 and 2 tumors, whereas 70% of Grade 3 tumors demonstrated expression (P = .085). Importantly, although only 53% and 55% of Ta and T1 tumors demonstrated ERbeta expression, 80% of T2, 81% of T3, and 75% of T4 tumors showed ERbeta expression. The differences in ERbeta expression between Ta/T1 and T2/T3/T4 tumors were found to be highly significant (P cell carcinomas had ERbeta expression (80%) comparable to that of muscle invasive bladder cancers. Western blot analysis detected ERbeta protein expression in each of the 5 bladder cancer cell lines tested, whereas no or very low levels of ERalpha were found. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that higher levels of ERbeta than ERalpha mRNA were present in 5637, T-24, TSU-Pr1, and TCC-Sup bladder cancer cells, whereas ER-alpha mRNA levels were greater than ERbeta in RT4 cells. Treatment with 17beta-estradiol modestly increased RT4 cell growth, whereas the antiestrogens, 4-hydroxtamoxifen, raloxifene, or

  1. Towards a Non-Human Primate Model of Alpha-Synucleinopathy for Development of Therapeutics for Parkinson's Disease: Optimization of AAV1/2 Delivery Parameters to Drive Sustained Expression of Alpha Synuclein and Dopaminergic Degeneration in Macaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Koprich

    Full Text Available Recent failures in clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson's disease have highlighted the need for a non-human primate model of the synucleinopathy underpinning dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The present study was defined to begin the development of such a model in cynomolgus macaque. We have validated surgical and vector parameters to define a means to provide a robust over-expression of alpha-synuclein which is associated with Lewy-like pathology and robust degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Thus, an AAV1/2 vector incorporating strong transcription and transduction regulatory elements was used to deliver the gene for the human A53T mutation of alpha-synuclein. When injected into 4 sites within each substantia nigra (7 μl per site, 1.7 x 1012 gp/ml, this vector provided expression lasting at least 4 months, and a 50% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a 60% reduction in striatal dopamine. Further studies will be required to develop this methodology into a validated model of value as a drug development platform.

  2. Towards a Non-Human Primate Model of Alpha-Synucleinopathy for Development of Therapeutics for Parkinson’s Disease: Optimization of AAV1/2 Delivery Parameters to Drive Sustained Expression of Alpha Synuclein and Dopaminergic Degeneration in Macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprich, James B.; Johnston, Tom H.; Reyes, Gabriela; Omana, Vanessa; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent failures in clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson’s disease have highlighted the need for a non-human primate model of the synucleinopathy underpinning dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The present study was defined to begin the development of such a model in cynomolgus macaque. We have validated surgical and vector parameters to define a means to provide a robust over-expression of alpha-synuclein which is associated with Lewy-like pathology and robust degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Thus, an AAV1/2 vector incorporating strong transcription and transduction regulatory elements was used to deliver the gene for the human A53T mutation of alpha-synuclein. When injected into 4 sites within each substantia nigra (7 μl per site, 1.7 x 1012 gp/ml), this vector provided expression lasting at least 4 months, and a 50% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a 60% reduction in striatal dopamine. Further studies will be required to develop this methodology into a validated model of value as a drug development platform. PMID:27902767

  3. Towards a Non-Human Primate Model of Alpha-Synucleinopathy for Development of Therapeutics for Parkinson's Disease: Optimization of AAV1/2 Delivery Parameters to Drive Sustained Expression of Alpha Synuclein and Dopaminergic Degeneration in Macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprich, James B; Johnston, Tom H; Reyes, Gabriela; Omana, Vanessa; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent failures in clinical trials for disease modification in Parkinson's disease have highlighted the need for a non-human primate model of the synucleinopathy underpinning dopaminergic neuron degeneration. The present study was defined to begin the development of such a model in cynomolgus macaque. We have validated surgical and vector parameters to define a means to provide a robust over-expression of alpha-synuclein which is associated with Lewy-like pathology and robust degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Thus, an AAV1/2 vector incorporating strong transcription and transduction regulatory elements was used to deliver the gene for the human A53T mutation of alpha-synuclein. When injected into 4 sites within each substantia nigra (7 μl per site, 1.7 x 1012 gp/ml), this vector provided expression lasting at least 4 months, and a 50% loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a 60% reduction in striatal dopamine. Further studies will be required to develop this methodology into a validated model of value as a drug development platform.

  4. Nickel-induced plasma lipid peroxidation and effect of antioxidants in human blood: involvement hydroxyl radical formation and depletion of alpha-tocopherol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Yu; Su, Yuh-Juan; Wu, Pey-Fen; Shyu, Mei-Miin

    2002-06-28

    To provide evidence for the oxidative effect of nickel (Ni) treatment on blood, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and hydroxyl radical (*OH) generation were examined in human plasma. Nickel chloride induced LPO in plasma of human blood in vitro in a concentration-dependent (0-10 mM) and time-dependent (0-2 h) manner. The *OH production in plasma was quantified by measurement of conversion of salicylic acid (SA) into its hydroxylated products, 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB). The concentrations of 2,3- and 2,5-DHB in plasma increased in a concentration-dependent manner after Ni treatment for 1 h. Furthermore, a decreasing trend in alpha-tocopherol levels in plasma was observed after Ni treatment. Concurrent incubation with gluthathione (GSH), catechin (CTCH), and mannitol decreased lipid peroxidation and reduced *OH formation induced by Ni, but exacerbation of the decrease of alpha-tocopherol in plasma occurred with catechin.

  5. Differential expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta mRNA during differentiation of human osteoblast SV-HFO cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Arts (Janine); J.M.M.F. Janssen (Josine); J.A. Gustafsson (Jan-Ake); C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEstrogens have been shown to be essential for maintaining a sufficiently high bone mineral density and ER alpha expression has been demonstrated in bone cells. Recently, a novel estrogen receptor, estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has been identified. Here

  6. Determination of the Crystal Structure of Human Zn-Alpha 2-Gylcoprotein, A Protein Implicated in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjorkman, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 41 kDa soluble protein whose sequence and domain organization are surprisingly similar to those of the membrane glycoproteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC...

  7. Mitochondrial Effects of PGC-1alpha Silencing in MPP+ Treated Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinyong Ye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminergic neuron degeneration and loss that occurs in Parkinson’s disease (PD has been tightly linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the aged-related cause of the mitochondrial defect observed in PD patients remains unclear, nuclear genes are of potential importance to mitochondrial function. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α is a multi-functional transcription factor that tightly regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. The goal of the present study was to explore the potential pathogenic effects of interference by the PGC-1α gene on N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+-induced SH-SY5Y cells. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi technology to probe the pathogenic consequences of inhibiting PGC-1α in the SH-SY5Y cell line. Remarkably, a reduction in PGC-1α resulted in the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP content and intracellular H2O2 generation, leading to the translocation of cytochrome c (cyt c to the cytoplasm in the MPP+-induced PD cell model. The expression of related proteins in the signaling pathway (e.g., estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1, NRF-2 and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ also decreased. Our finding indicates that small interfering RNA (siRNA interference targeting the PGC-1α gene could inhibit the function of mitochondria in several capacities and that the PGC-1α gene may modulate mitochondrial function by regulating the expression of ERRα, NRF-1, NRF-2 and PPARγ. Thus, PGC-1α can be considered a potential therapeutic target for PD.

  8. [Interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy for co-infection of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-huang; He, Yan; Yang, Xu; Gong, Guo-zhong; Zhou, Hua-ying; Zhang, Chun-ying; Zhou, Wen; Huang, Li; Ding, Pei-pei; Li, Hui

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect and side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-a) and ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy for Chinese patients with co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and to compare them with only HIV infection patients. 10 patients with HCV-HIV and 17 patients with only HCV infection received 5 million units of IFNalpha-2b every other day intramuscularly, and 300 mg RBV orally three times a day. Dynamic observations were done for HCV RNA and HIV RNA loads, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts, liver function and blood cell measures, and the side-effects of the medicines. After 12 weeks and 24 weeks of IFNalpha and RBV combination therapy, mean HCV RNA levels reduced 1.14 log (t = 3.843, P HIV co-infection group, and reduced 1.48 log (t = 6.438, P less than 0.01) and 2.33 log (t = 7.343, P HIV RNA levels decreased 1.22 log (t = 3.662, P HIV and HCV patients at week 0, week 12 and week 24. All 27 patients showed satisfactory biochemical response to therapy. There were some mild or moderate influenza-like symptoms, intestinal discomfort and decreased blood cell counts in the early stages of the treatments. No neuropsychic and auto-immune disorders were found. IFNalpha-2b and RBV combination therapy showed similar anti-HCV effects during the 24 week treatment for HCV-HIV and HCV infected patients, and some anti-HIV effect was also observed. No obvious different biochemical responses and side-effects were found between the above two groups.

  9. Replication Study: The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, Stephen K

    2017-01-19

    In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Chroscinski et al., 2015) that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper "The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors "(Willingham et al., 2012). Here we report the results of those experiments. We found that treatment of immune competent mice bearing orthotopic breast tumors with anti-mouse CD47 antibodies resulted in short-term anemia compared to controls, consistent with the previously described function of CD47 in normal phagocytosis of aging red blood cells and results reported in the original study (Table S4; Willingham et al., 2012). The weight of tumors after 30 days administration of anti-CD47 antibodies or IgG isotype control were not found to be statistically different, whereas the original study reported inhibition of tumor growth with anti-CD47 treatment (Figure 6A,B; Willingham et al., 2012). However, our efforts to replicate this experiment were confounded because spontaneous regression of tumors occurred in several of the mice. Additionally, the excised tumors were scored for inflammatory cell infiltrates. We found IgG and anti-CD47 treated tumors resulted in minimal to moderate lymphocytic infiltrate, while the original study observed sparse lymphocytic infiltrate in IgG-treated tumors and increased inflammatory cell infiltrates in anti-CD47 treated tumors (Figure 6C; Willingham et al., 2012). Furthermore, we observed neutrophilic infiltration was slightly increased in anti-CD47 treated tumors compared to IgG control. Finally, we report a meta-analysis of the result.

  10. Regulation of the β-globin gene family expression, useful in the search for new therapeutic targets for hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen G. Scheps

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Different hemoglobin isoforms are expressed during the embryonic, fetal and postnatal stages. They are formed by combination of polypeptide chains synthesized from the α- and β-globin gene clusters. Based on the fact that the presence of high hemoglobin F levels is beneficial in both sickle cell disease and severe thalassemic syndromes, a revision of the regulation of the β-globin cluster expression is proposed, especially regarding the genes encoding the y-globin chains (HBG1 and HBG2. In this review we describe the current knowledge about transcription factors and epigenetic regulators involved in the switches of the β-globin cluster. It is expected that the consolidation of knowledge in this field will allow finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies.

  11. The crystal structure of the complex of Zea mays alpha subunit with a fragment of human beta subunit provides the clue to the architecture of protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistutta, R; Sarno, S; De Moliner, E

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of a complex between the catalytic alpha subunit of Zea mays CK2 and a 23-mer peptide corresponding the C-terminal sequence 181-203 of the human CK2 regulatory beta subunit has been determined at 3.16-A resolution. The complex, composed of two alpha chains and two peptides...

  12. Differential expression of DNA topoisomerase II alpha and -beta in P-gp and MRP-negative VM26, mAMSA and mitoxantrone-resistant sublines of the human SCLC cell line GLC(4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withoff, S; deVries, EGE; Keith, WN; Nienhuis, EF; vanderGraaf, WTA; Uges, DRA; Mulder, NH

    1996-01-01

    Sublines of the human small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell line GLC(4) with acquired resistance to teniposide, amsacrine and mitoxantrone (GLC(4)/VM(20x), GLC(4)/AM(3x) and GLC(4)/MIT(60x), respectively) were derived to study the contribution of DNA topoisomerase II alpha and -beta (TopuII alpha

  13. Low-dose radiation pretreatment improves survival of human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) under hypoxia via HIF-1 alpha and MMP-2 induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Naoki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kubota, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kubota-cbu@umin.ac.jp [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kosaka, Kentarou; Akita, Shinsuke; Sasahara, Yoshitarou; Kira, Tomoe [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Kuroda, Masayuki [Center for Advanced Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical-Laboratory and Experimental-Research Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba, #285-8741 (Japan); Satoh, Kaneshige [Department of Plastic Surgery, Chiba University, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba, #260-8677 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Poor survival is a major problem of adipocyte transplantation. We previously reported that VEGF and MMPs secreted from transplanted adipocytes are essential for angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Pretreatment with low-dose (5 Gy) radiation (LDR) increased VEGF, MMP-2, and HIF-1 alpha mRNA expression in human ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (hccdPAs). Gene expression after LDR differed between adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and hccdPAs. Pretreatment with LDR improved the survival of hccdPAs under hypoxia, which is inevitable in the early stages after transplantation. Upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 after LDR in hccdPAs is mediated by HIF-1 alpha expression. Our results suggest that pretreatment with LDR may improve adipocyte graft survival in a clinical setting through upregulation of VEGF and MMP-2 via HIF-1 alpha. - Highlights: • Ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs) react to radiation. • Low-dose radiation (LDR) pretreatment improves survival of ccdPAs under hypoxia. • Gene expression after LDR differs between ccdPAs and adipose-derived stem cells. • LDR-induced increase in MMP-2 and VEGF is dependent on HIF-1 alpha induction. • LDR pretreatment may improve the adipocyte graft survival rate in clinical settings.

  14. Synthesis Activity and Structural Analysis of Novel alpha-Hydroxytropolone Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase-Associated Ribonuclease H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Chung; D Himmel; J Jiang; K Wojtak; J Bauman; J Rausch; J Wilson; J Beutler; C Thomas; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The {alpha}-hydroxytroplone, manicol (5,7-dihydroxy-2-isopropenyl-9-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-benzocyclohepten-6-one), potently and specifically inhibits ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV RT) in vitro. However, manicol was ineffective in reducing virus replication in culture. Ongoing efforts to improve the potency and specificity over the lead compound led us to synthesize 14 manicol derivatives that retain the divalent metal-chelating {alpha}-hydroxytropolone pharmacophore. These efforts were augmented by a high resolution structure of p66/p51 HIV-1 RT containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), TMC278 and manicol in the DNA polymerase and RNase H active sites, respecti