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Sample records for human airway tissues

  1. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve and the dynamic force moduli (storage and loss) are measured at low frequency (from 3 to 45 Hz). All the samples were preserved in the PBS solution at room temperature and the measurements were perfomed within 4 hours after surgery. Young's modulus of the human bronchial airway walls are fond ranged between 0.17 and 1.65 MPa, ranged between 0.25 to 1.96 MPa for cartilages, and between 0.02 to 0.28 MPa for mucosa. The storage modulus are found varying 0.10 MPa with frequency while the loss modulus are found increasing from ...

  2. Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelteret, J-P V; Reddy, B D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus.

  3. Rapid Expansion of Human Epithelial Stem Cells Suitable for Airway Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Gowers, Kate H C; Lee, Dani Do Hyang; Brown, James M; Crowley, Claire; Teixeira, Vitor H; Smith, Claire M; Urbani, Luca; Hamilton, Nicholas J; Thakrar, Ricky M; Booth, Helen L; Birchall, Martin A; De Coppi, Paolo; Giangreco, Adam; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Janes, Sam M

    2016-07-15

    Stem cell-based tracheal replacement represents an emerging therapeutic option for patients with otherwise untreatable airway diseases including long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis and upper airway tumors. Clinical experience demonstrates that restoration of mucociliary clearance in the lungs after transplantation of tissue-engineered grafts is critical, with preclinical studies showing that seeding scaffolds with autologous mucosa improves regeneration. High epithelial cell-seeding densities are required in regenerative medicine, and existing techniques are inadequate to achieve coverage of clinically suitable grafts. To define a scalable cell culture system to deliver airway epithelium to clinical grafts. Human respiratory epithelial cells derived from endobronchial biopsies were cultured using a combination of mitotically inactivated fibroblasts and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition using Y-27632 (3T3+Y). Cells were analyzed by immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry to assess airway stem cell marker expression. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were performed to assess cell safety. Differentiation capacity was tested in three-dimensional tracheospheres, organotypic cultures, air-liquid interface cultures, and an in vivo tracheal xenograft model. Ciliary function was assessed in air-liquid interface cultures. 3T3-J2 feeder cells and ROCK inhibition allowed rapid expansion of airway basal cells. These cells were capable of multipotent differentiation in vitro, generating both ciliated and goblet cell lineages. Cilia were functional with normal beat frequency and pattern. Cultured cells repopulated tracheal scaffolds in a heterotopic transplantation xenograft model. Our method generates large numbers of functional airway basal epithelial cells with the efficiency demanded by clinical transplantation, suggesting its suitability for use in tracheal reconstruction.

  4. Airways, vasculature, and interstitial tissue: anatomically informed computational modeling of human lungs for virtual clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Ehsan; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Agasthya, Greeshma; Harrawood, Brian; Hoeschen, Christoph; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W. P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to model virtual human lung phantoms including both non-parenchymal and parenchymal structures. Initial branches of the non-parenchymal structures (airways, arteries, and veins) were segmented from anatomical data in each lobe separately. A volume-filling branching algorithm was utilized to grow the higher generations of the airways and vessels to the level of terminal branches. The diameters of the airways and vessels were estimated using established relationships between flow rates and diameters. The parenchyma was modeled based on secondary pulmonary lobule units. Polyhedral shapes with variable sizes were modeled, and the borders were assigned to interlobular septa. A heterogeneous background was added inside these units using a non-parametric texture synthesis algorithm which was informed by a high-resolution CT lung specimen dataset. A voxelized based CT simulator was developed to create synthetic helical CT images of the phantom with different pitch values. Results showed the progressive degradation in depiction of lung details with increased pitch. Overall, the enhanced lung models combined with the XCAT phantoms prove to provide a powerful toolset to perform virtual clinical trials in the context of thoracic imaging. Such trials, not practical using clinical datasets or simplistic phantoms, can quantitatively evaluate and optimize advanced imaging techniques towards patient-based care.

  5. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of

  6. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using comp...

  7. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  9. Water permeability in human airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Procida, Kristina; Larsen, Per Leganger;

    2005-01-01

    Osmotic water permeability (P(f)) was studied in spheroid-shaped human airway epithelia explants derived from nasal polyps by the use of a new improved tissue collection and isolation procedure. The fluid-filled spheroids were lined with a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane...

  10. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maughan, E.; Lesage, F; Butler, C. R.; Hynds, R.E. (Robert E.); Hewitt, R; Janes, S. M.; Deprest, J. A.; Coppi, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper...

  11. Response to rhinovirus infection by human airway epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an in vitro two-chamber tissue culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections are associated with the common cold, occasionally with more serious lower respiratory tract illnesses, and frequently with asthma exacerbations. The clinical features of HRV infection and its association with asthma exacerbation suggest that some HRV disease results from virus-induced host immune responses to infection. To study the HRV-infection-induced host responses and the contribution of these responses to disease, we have developed an in vitro model of HRV infection of human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cells and subsequent exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to these infected cells in a two-chamber trans-well tissue culture system. Using this model, we studied HRV 14 (species B and HRV 16 (species A induced cytokine and chemokine responses with PBMCs from four healthy adults. Infection of Calu-3 cells with either virus induced HRV-associated increases in FGF-Basic, IL-15, IL-6, IL-28A, ENA-78 and IP-10. The addition of PBMCs to HRV 14-infected cells gave significant increases in MIP-1β, IL-28A, MCP-2, and IFN-α as compared with mock-infected cells. Interestingly, ENA-78 levels were reduced in HRV 14 infected cells that were exposed to PBMCs. Addition of PBMCs to HRV 16-infected cells did not induce MIP-1β, IL-28A and IFN-α efficiently nor did it decrease ENA-78 levels. Our results demonstrate a clear difference between HRV 14 and HRV 16 and the source of PBMCs, in up or down regulation of several cytokines including those that are linked to airway inflammation. Such differences might be one of the reasons for variation in disease associated with different HRV species including variation in their link to asthma exacerbations as suggested by other studies. Further study of immune responses associated with different HRVs and PBMCs from different patient groups, and the mechanisms leading to these differences, should help characterize pathogenesis of HRV disease and generate

  12. Human Lung Small Airway-on-a-Chip Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benam, Kambez H; Mazur, Marc; Choe, Youngjae; Ferrante, Thomas C; Novak, Richard; Ingber, Donald E

    2017-01-01

    Organs-on-chips are microfluidic cell culture devices created using microchip manufacturing techniques that contain hollow microchannels lined by living cells, which recreate specialized tissue-tissue interfaces, physical microenvironments, and vascular perfusion necessary to recapitulate organ-level physiology in vitro. Here we describe a protocol for fabrication, culture, and operation of a human lung "small airway-on-a-chip," which contains a differentiated, mucociliary bronchiolar epithelium exposed to air and an underlying microvascular endothelium that experiences fluid flow. First, microengineering is used to fabricate a multilayered microfluidic device that contains two parallel elastomeric microchannels separated by a thin rigid porous membrane; this requires less than 1 day to complete. Next, primary human airway bronchiolar epithelial cells isolated from healthy normal donors or patients with respiratory disease are cultured on the porous membrane within one microchannel while lung microvascular endothelial cells are cultured on the opposite side of the same membrane in the second channel to create a mucociliated epithelium-endothelium interface; this process take about 4-6 weeks to complete. Finally, culture medium containing neutrophils isolated from fresh whole human blood are flowed through the microvascular channel of the device to enable real-time analysis of capture and recruitment of circulating leukocytes by endothelium under physiological shear; this step requires less than 1 day to complete. The small airway-on-a-chip represents a new microfluidic tool to model complex and dynamic inflammatory responses of healthy and diseased lungs in vitro.

  13. Airway vascular reactivity and vascularisation in human chronic airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Simon R; Boustany, Sarah; Burgess, Janette K; Hirst, Stuart J; Sharma, Hari S; Simcock, David E; Suravaram, Padmini R; Weckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Altered bronchial vascular reactivity and remodelling including angiogenesis are documented features of asthma and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Expansion of the bronchial vasculature under these conditions involves both functional (vasodilation, hyperperfusion, increased microvascular

  14. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained.

  15. Basal Secretion of Lysozyme from Human Airways in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Roger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the basal release of lysozyme from isolated human lung tissues. Measurements of lysozyme in the fluids derived from lung preparations were performed using a rate-of-lysis assay subsequent to acidification of the biological samples. Lysozyme released from bronchial preparations into fluids was greater than that observed for parenchymal tissues. The lysozyme quantities detected in bronchial fluids were not modified by removal of the surface epithelium. Furthermore, the quantities of lysozyme in bronchial fluids was correlated with the size of the bronchial preparations. These results suggest that the lysozyme was principally secreted by the human bronchi (submucosal layer rather than by parenchyma tissues and that a greater release was observed in the proximal airways.

  16. Human airway organoid engineering as a step toward lung regeneration and disease modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qi; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Organoids represent both a potentially powerful tool for the study cell-cell interactions within tissue-like environments, and a platform for tissue regenerative approaches. The development of lung tissue-like organoids from human adult-derived cells has not previously been reported. Here we combined human adult primary bronchial epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung microvascular endothelial cells in supportive 3D culture conditions to generate airway organoids. We demonstrate that randomly-seeded mixed cell populations undergo rapid condensation and self-organization into discrete epithelial and endothelial structures that are mechanically robust and stable during long term culture. After condensation airway organoids generate invasive multicellular tubular structures that recapitulate limited aspects of branching morphogenesis, and require actomyosin-mediated force generation and YAP/TAZ activation. Despite the proximal source of primary epithelium used in the airway organoids, discrete areas of both proximal and distal epithelial markers were observed over time in culture, demonstrating remarkable epithelial plasticity within the context of organoid cultures. Airway organoids also exhibited complex multicellular responses to a prototypical fibrogenic stimulus (TGF-β1) in culture, and limited capacity to undergo continued maturation and engraftment after ectopic implantation under the murine kidney capsule. These results demonstrate that the airway organoid system developed here represents a novel tool for the study of disease-relevant cell-cell interactions, and establishes this platform as a first step toward cell-based therapy for chronic lung diseases based on de novo engineering of implantable airway tissues.

  17. Directed differentiation of airway epithelial cells of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The ability to generate lung and airway epithelial cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) would have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening, and studies of human lung development. In this research, hBMSCs were cultured in specialized airway epithelial cell growth media for differentiation of airway epithelial cells, including keratinocyte growth factor transferrin, bovine pituitary extract, epinephrine, triiodothyronine and retinoic acid. The surfactant protein C, a specific marker of type II pneumocytes, and its corresponding protein were demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting after differentiation of airway epithelial cells, respectively. These cells were then transferred into an induced acute lung injury model. The results showed that the hBMSCs could induce differentiation in airway epithelial cells under the special conditions of the medium, the result for surfactant protein C was positive in differentiated airway epithelial cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting, and these cells were successfully colonized in the injured lung airway. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of airway epithelial cells can be specifically generated from hBMSCs and that induced cells may be allowed to participate in tissue repair.

  18. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced.

  19. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchelle Edith

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa.

  20. In vivo models of human airway epithelium repair and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Coraux

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite an efficient defence system, the airway surface epithelium, in permanent contact with the external milieu, is frequently injured by inhaled pollutants, microorganisms and viruses. The response of the airway surface epithelium to an acute injury includes a succession of cellular events varying from the loss of the surface epithelium integrity to partial shedding of the epithelium or even to complete denudation of the basement membrane. The epithelium has then to repair and regenerate to restore its functions. The in vivo study of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to reconstitute a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Humanised tracheal xenograft models have been developed in immunodeficient nude and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice in order to mimic the natural regeneration process of the human airway epithelium and to analyse the cellular and molecular events involved during the different steps of airway epithelial reconstitution. These models represent very powerful tools for analysing the modulation of the biological functions of the epithelium during its regeneration. They are also very useful for identifying stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in airway epithelium regeneration, as well as the characterisation of the epithelial stem and progenitor cells, may pave the way to regenerative therapeutics, allowing the reconstitution of a functional airway epithelium in numerous respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, cystic fibrosis and bronchiolitis.

  1. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2009-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potential molecular origins of field cancerization and the field of injury following cigarette smoke exposure in lung and airway epithelia are critical to understanding the impact of the field of injury on clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:19138985

  2. Recombinant human DNase in children with airway malacia and lower respiratory tract infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, R.; Jongste, J.C. de; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.; Hop, W.C.J.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with airway malacia often have protracted courses of airway infections, because dynamic airway collapse during coughing results in impaired mucociliary clearance. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the mucolytic drug recombinant human deoxyribonuclease

  3. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  4. A mechanical design principle for tissue structure and function in the airway tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrad, Adam S; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    With every breath, the dynamically changing mechanical pressures must work in unison with the cells and soft tissue structures of the lung to permit air to efficiently traverse the airway tree and undergo gas exchange in the alveoli. The influence of mechanics on cell and tissue function is becoming apparent, raising the question: how does the airway tree co-exist within its mechanical environment to maintain normal cell function throughout its branching structure of diminishing dimensions? We introduce a new mechanical design principle for the conducting airway tree in which mechanotransduction at the level of cells is driven to orchestrate airway wall structural changes that can best maintain a preferred mechanical microenvironment. To support this principle, we report in vitro radius-transmural pressure relations for a range of airway radii obtained from healthy bovine lungs and model the data using a strain energy function together with a thick-walled cylinder description. From this framework, we estimate circumferential stresses and incremental Young's moduli throughout the airway tree. Our results indicate that the conducting airways consistently operate within a preferred mechanical homeostatic state, termed mechanical homeostasis, that is characterized by a narrow range of circumferential stresses and Young's moduli. This mechanical homeostatic state is maintained for all airways throughout the tree via airway wall dimensional and mechanical relationships. As a consequence, cells within the airway walls throughout the airway tree experience similar oscillatory strains during breathing that are much smaller than previously thought. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of how the maintenance of mechanical homeostasis, while facilitating healthy tissue-level alterations necessary for maturation, may lead to airway wall structural changes capable of chronic asthma.

  5. Robust system for human airway-tree segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael W.; Gibbs, Jason D.; Higgins, William E.

    2008-03-01

    Robust and accurate segmentation of the human airway tree from multi-detector computed-tomography (MDCT) chest scans is vital for many pulmonary-imaging applications. As modern MDCT scanners can detect hundreds of airway tree branches, manual segmentation and semi-automatic segmentation requiring significant user intervention are impractical for producing a full global segmentation. Fully-automated methods, however, may fail to extract small peripheral airways. We propose an automatic algorithm that searches the entire lung volume for airway branches and poses segmentation as a global graph-theoretic optimization problem. The algorithm has shown strong performance on 23 human MDCT chest scans acquired by a variety of scanners and reconstruction kernels. Visual comparisons with adaptive region-growing results and quantitative comparisons with manually-defined trees indicate a high sensitivity to peripheral airways and a low false-positive rate. In addition, we propose a suite of interactive segmentation tools for cleaning and extending critical areas of the automatically segmented result. These interactive tools have potential application for image-based guidance of bronchoscopy to the periphery, where small, terminal branches can be important visual landmarks. Together, the automatic segmentation algorithm and interactive tool suite comprise a robust system for human airway-tree segmentation.

  6. The Diacetyl-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Secretome: New Insights into Flavoring-Induced Airways Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, David M; Gwinn, William M; Valente, Ashlee M; Kelly, Francine L; Brinkley, Christie D; Nagler, Andrew E; Moseley, M Arthur; Morgan, Daniel L; Palmer, Scott M; Foster, Matthew W

    2017-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is an increasingly important lung disease characterized by fibroproliferative airway lesions and decrements in lung function. Occupational exposure to the artificial food flavoring ingredient diacetyl, commonly used to impart a buttery flavor to microwave popcorn, has been associated with BO development. In the occupational setting, diacetyl vapor is first encountered by the airway epithelium. To better understand the effects of diacetyl vapor on the airway epithelium, we used an unbiased proteomic approach to characterize both the apical and basolateral secretomes of air-liquid interface cultures of primary human airway epithelial cells from four unique donors after exposure to an occupationally relevant concentration (∼1,100 ppm) of diacetyl vapor or phosphate-buffered saline as a control on alternating days. Basolateral and apical supernatants collected 48 h after the third exposure were analyzed using one-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Paired t tests adjusted for multiple comparisons were used to assess differential expression between diacetyl and phosphate-buffered saline exposure. Of the significantly differentially expressed proteins identified, 61 were unique to the apical secretome, 81 were unique to the basolateral secretome, and 11 were present in both. Pathway enrichment analysis using publicly available databases revealed that proteins associated with matrix remodeling, including degradation, assembly, and new matrix organization, were overrepresented in the data sets. Similarly, protein modifiers of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling were significantly altered. The ordered changes in protein expression suggest that the airway epithelial response to diacetyl may contribute to BO pathogenesis.

  7. Mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorly, D J; Taylor, D J; Schroter, R C

    2008-11-30

    The mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways is reviewed, drawing on the findings of experimental and computational model studies. Modelling inevitably requires simplifications and assumptions, particularly given the complexity of the nasal airways. The processes entailed in modelling the nasal airways (from defining the model, to its production and, finally, validating the results) is critically examined, both for physical models and for computational simulations. Uncertainty still surrounds the appropriateness of the various assumptions made in modelling, particularly with regard to the nature of flow. New results are presented in which high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and direct numerical simulation are applied to investigate the development of flow instability in the nasal cavity. These illustrate some of the improved capabilities afforded by technological developments for future model studies. The need for further improvements in characterising airway geometry and flow together with promising new methods are briefly discussed.

  8. Human airway musculature on a chip: an in vitro model of allergic asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, Alexander Peyton; Agarwal, Ashutosh; McCain, Megan Laura; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-10-21

    Many potential new asthma therapies that show promise in the pre-clinical stage of drug development do not demonstrate efficacy during clinical trials. One factor contributing to this problem is the lack of human-relevant models of the airway that recapitulate the tissue-level structural and functional phenotypes of asthma. Hence, we sought to build a model of a human airway musculature on a chip that simulates healthy and asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation in vitro by engineering anisotropic, laminar bronchial smooth muscle tissue on elastomeric thin films. In response to a cholinergic agonist, the muscle layer contracts and induces thin film bending, which serves as an in vitro analogue for bronchoconstriction. To mimic asthmatic inflammation, we exposed the engineered tissues to interleukin-13, which resulted in hypercontractility and altered relaxation in response to cholinergic challenge, similar to responses observed clinically in asthmatic patients as well as in studies with animal tissue. Moreover, we reversed asthmatic hypercontraction using a muscarinic antagonist and a β-agonist which are used clinically to relax constricted airways. Importantly, we demonstrated that targeting RhoA-mediated contraction using HA1077 decreased basal tone, prevented hypercontraction, and improved relaxation of the engineered tissues exposed to IL-13. These data suggest that we can recapitulate the structural and functional hallmarks of human asthmatic musculature on a chip, including responses to drug treatments for evaluation of safety and efficacy of new drugs. Further, our airway musculature on a chip provides an important tool for enabling mechanism-based search for new therapeutic targets through the ability to evaluate engineered muscle at the levels of protein expression, tissue structure, and tissue function.

  9. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    During the award period, a number of studies have been carried out related to the overall objective of the project which is to elucidate important factors which influence the upper airway deposition and dose of particles in the size range 0.5 nm - 10 {mu}m, such as particle size, breathing conditions, age, airway geometry, and mode of breathing. These studies are listed below. (1) A high voltage electrospray system was constructed to generate polydispersed 1-10 {mu}m diameter di-ethylhexyl sebacate aerosol for particle deposition studies in nasal casts and in human subjects. (2) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage geometry, and nasal resistance on particle deposition efficiency in forty healthy, nonsmoking adults at a constant flowrate were studied. (3) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage dimensions and nasal resistance on the percentage of particle deposition in the anterior 3 cm of the nasal passage of spontaneously breathing humans were studied. (4) The region of deposition of monodispersed aerosols were studied using replicate casts. (5) Ultrafine aerosol deposition using simulated breath holding path and natural path was compared. (6) An experimental technique was proposed and tested to measure the oral deposition of inhaled ultrafine particles. (7) We have calculated the total deposition fraction of ultrafine aerosols from 5 to 200 n in the extrathoracic airways and in the lung. (8) The deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways was studied using several head airway models.

  10. Connective tissue growth factor induces extracellular matrix in asthmatic airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and connective tissue growth factor may be implicated in extracellular matrix protein deposition in asthma. We have recently reported that TGF-beta increased connective tissue growth factor expression in airway smooth muscle cells isolated from patients with ast

  11. On locating the obstruction in the human upper airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, S.

    2013-11-01

    The fluid dynamical properties of the air flow in the human upper airway (UA) are not fully understood at present due to the three-dimensional, patient-specific complex geometry of the airway, flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow-structure interaction during the breathing cycle. One of the major challenges to surgeons is determining the location of the UA obstruction before performing corrective surgeries. It is quite difficult at present to experimentally measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure at specific points in the human airway. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) can predict all the flow properties and resolve all its relevant length- and time-scales. We developed a DNS solver with lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and used it to investigate the flow in two patient-specific UAs reconstructed from CT scan data. Inspiration and expiration flows through these two airways are studied and compared. Pressure gradient-time signals at different locations in the UAs are used to determine the location of the obstruction. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  12. Mechanisms of Cigarette Smoke Effects on Human Airway Smooth Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Wylam

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke contributes to or exacerbates airway diseases such as asthma and COPD, where airway hyperresponsiveness and airway smooth muscle (ASM proliferation are key features. While factors such as inflammation contribute to asthma in part by enhancing agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+]i responses of ASM, the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke affect ASM are still under investigation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoke enhances the expression and function of Ca(2+ regulatory proteins leading to increased store operated Ca(2+ entry (SOCE and cell proliferation. Using isolated human ASM (hASM cells, incubated in the presence and absence cigarette smoke extract (CSE we determined ([Ca(2+]i responses and expression of relevant proteins as well as ASM proliferation, reactive oxidant species (ROS and cytokine generation. CSE enhanced [Ca(2+]i responses to agonist and SOCE: effects mediated by increased expression of TRPC3, CD38, STIM1, and/or Orai1, evident by attenuation of CSE effects when siRNAs against these proteins were used, particularly Orai1. CSE also increased hASM ROS generation and cytokine secretion. In addition, we found in the airways of patients with long-term smoking history, TRPC3 and CD38 expression were significantly increased compared to life-long never-smokers, supporting the role of these proteins in smoking effects. Finally, CSE enhanced hASM proliferation, an effect confirmed by upregulation of PCNA and Cyclin E. These results support a critical role for Ca(2+ regulatory proteins and enhanced SOCE to alter airway structure and function in smoking-related airway disease.

  13. Transport and deposition of cohesive pharmaceutical powders in human airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Chu, Kaiwei; Yu, Aibing

    2017-06-01

    Pharmaceutical powders used in inhalation therapy are in the size range of 1-5 microns and are usually cohesive. Understanding the cohesive behaviour of pharmaceutical powders during their transportation in human airway is significant in optimising aerosol drug delivery and targeting. In this study, the transport and deposition of cohesive pharmaceutical powders in a human airway model is simulated by a well-established numerical model which combines computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM). The van der Waals force, as the dominant cohesive force, is simulated and its influence on particle transport and deposition behaviour is discussed. It is observed that even for dilute particle flow, the local particle concentration in the oral to trachea region can be high and particle aggregation happens due to the van der Waals force of attraction. It is concluded that the deposition mechanism for cohesive pharmaceutical powders, on one hand, is dominated by particle inertial impaction, as proven by previous studies; on the other hand, is significantly affected by particle aggregation induced by van der Waals force. To maximum respiratory drug delivery efficiency, efforts should be made to avoid pharmaceutical powder aggregation in human oral-to-trachea airway.

  14. Regulation of human airway smooth muscle cell migration and relevance to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Brittany; Pray, Cara; Radford, Katherine; Martin, James G; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-08-16

    Airway remodelling is an important feature of asthma pathogenesis. A key structural change inherent in airway remodelling is increased airway smooth muscle mass. There is emerging evidence to suggest that the migration of airway smooth muscle cells may contribute to cellular hyperplasia, and thus increased airway smooth muscle mass. The precise source of these cells remains unknown. Increased airway smooth muscle mass may be collectively due to airway infiltration of myofibroblasts, neighbouring airway smooth muscle cells in the bundle, or circulating hemopoietic progenitor cells. However, the relative contribution of each cell type is not well understood. In addition, although many studies have identified pro and anti-migratory agents of airway smooth muscle cells, whether these agents can impact airway remodelling in the context of human asthma, remains to be elucidated. As such, further research is required to determine the exact mechanism behind airway smooth muscle cell migration within the airways, how much this contributes to airway smooth muscle mass in asthma, and whether attenuating this migration may provide a therapeutic avenue for asthma. In this review article, we will discuss the current evidence with respect to the regulation of airway smooth muscle cell migration in asthma.

  15. Human eosinophil–airway smooth muscle cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Margaret Hughes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are present throughout the airway wall of asthmatics. The nature of the interaction between human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC and eosinophils was investigated in this study. We demonstrated, using light microscopy, that freshly isolated eosinophils from healthy donors rapidly attach to ASMC in vitro. Numbers of attached eosinophils were highest at 2 h, falling to 50% of maximum by 20 h. Eosinophil attachment at 2 h was reduced to 72% of control by anti-VCAM-1, and to 74% at 20 h by anti-ICAM-1. Pre-treatment of ASMC for 24 h with TNF-α, 10 nM, significantly increased eosinophil adhesion to 149 and 157% of control after 2 and 20 h. These results provide evidence that eosinophil interactions with ASMC involve VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and are modulated by TNF-α.

  16. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  17. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  18. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapparel, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Tapparel@hcuge.ch [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Sobo, Komla [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song [Epithelix sárl, 14 Chemin des Aulx, 1228 Plan les Ouates, Geneva (Switzerland); Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent. - Highlights: • A 3D human upper airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro supports HRV-C growth. • HRV-Cs enter and exit preferentially at the apical side of this ALI culture system. • HRV-Cs are acid sensitive. • Temperature sensitivity may be type-dependent for HRV-Cs.

  19. Dexamethasone and N-acetyl-cysteine attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced mucus expression in human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Lisa; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Steffen, Armin; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter; Hauber, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) induces mucus hypersecretion in airways. Therapeutic options to attenuate excessive mucus expression are sparse. To investigate the effect of steroids and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on PA-induced mucus expression. Calu-3 cells and explanted human mucosa from the upper airways were stimulated with either PA, lipopolysaccharide from alginate producing PA (smooth, sPA-LPS) or non-alginate producing PA (rough, rPA-LPS). Dexamethasone (DEX) and NAC were added in different concentrations. Expression of mucin (MUC5AC) gene and mucin protein expression was quantified using PAS (periodic acids Schiff) staining and real time PCR. PA, sPA-LPS or rPA-LPS significantly induced mucin protein and MUC5AC gene expression in Calu-3 cells and explanted mucosal tissue (P NAC significantly decreased PA-, sPA-LPS- and rPA-LPS-induced mucin protein expression both in vitro and ex vivo (P 0.05). Our data show that both an anti-inflammatory drug (DEX) and an anti-oxidative agent (NAC) can attenuate PA-induced mucus expression in human airways. These results support the use of steroids and NAC in clinical practice to treat PA-induced mucus hypersecretion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiantao; Gu, Suicheng; Liu, Shusen; Zhu, Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M; Gur, David

    2012-05-01

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  1. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People' s Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  2. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  3. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    OpenAIRE

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2008-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potentia...

  4. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor prevents airway obstruction, respiratory failure and death due to sulfur mustard analog inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rancourt, Raymond C., E-mail: raymond.rancourt@ucdenver.edu; Veress, Livia A., E-mail: livia.veress@ucdenver.edu; Ahmad, Aftab, E-mail: aftab.ahmad@ucdenver.edu; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B., E-mail: tara.hendry-hofer@ucdenver.edu; Rioux, Jacqueline S., E-mail: jacqueline.rioux@ucdenver.edu; Garlick, Rhonda B., E-mail: rhonda.garlick@ucdenver.edu; White, Carl W., E-mail: carl.w.white@ucdenver.edu

    2013-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes airway injury, with enhanced vascular permeability, coagulation, and airway obstruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) could inhibit this pathogenic sequence. Methods: Rats were exposed to the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) via nose-only aerosol inhalation. One hour later, TFPI (1.5 mg/kg) in vehicle, or vehicle alone, was instilled into the trachea. Arterial O{sub 2} saturation was monitored using pulse oximetry. Twelve hours after exposure, animals were euthanized and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were analyzed for prothrombin, thrombin–antithrombin complex (TAT), active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels, and fluid fibrinolytic capacity. Lung steady-state PAI-1 mRNA was measured by RT-PCR analysis. Airway-capillary leak was estimated by BALF protein and IgM, and by pleural fluid measurement. In additional animals, airway cast formation was assessed by microdissection and immunohistochemical detection of airway fibrin. Results: Airway obstruction in the form of fibrin-containing casts was evident in central conducting airways of rats receiving CEES. TFPI decreased cast formation, and limited severe hypoxemia. Findings of reduced prothrombin consumption, and lower TAT complexes in BALF, demonstrated that TFPI acted to limit thrombin activation in airways. TFPI, however, did not appreciably affect CEES-induced airway protein leak, PAI-1 mRNA induction, or inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity present in airway surface liquid. Conclusions: Intratracheal administration of TFPI limits airway obstruction, improves gas exchange, and prevents mortality in rats with sulfur mustard-analog-induced acute lung injury. - Highlights: • TFPI administration to rats after mustard inhalation reduces airway cast formation. • Inhibition of thrombin activation is the likely mechanism for limiting casts. • Rats given TFPI

  5. Regenerative potential of human airway stem cells in lung epithelial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Wu, Tong; Evangelista-Leite, Daniele; Mathisen, Douglas J; Ott, Harald C

    2016-11-01

    Bio-engineered organs for transplantation may ultimately provide a personalized solution for end-stage organ failure, without the risk of rejection. Building upon the process of whole organ perfusion decellularization, we aimed to develop novel, translational methods for the recellularization and regeneration of transplantable lung constructs. We first isolated a proliferative KRT5(+)TP63(+) basal epithelial stem cell population from human lung tissue and demonstrated expansion capacity in conventional 2D culture. We then repopulated acellular rat scaffolds in ex vivo whole organ culture and observed continued cell proliferation, in combination with primary pulmonary endothelial cells. To show clinical scalability, and to test the regenerative capacity of the basal cell population in a human context, we then recellularized and cultured isolated human lung scaffolds under biomimetic conditions. Analysis of the regenerated tissue constructs confirmed cell viability and sustained metabolic activity over 7 days of culture. Tissue analysis revealed extensive recellularization with organized tissue architecture and morphology, and preserved basal epithelial cell phenotype. The recellularized lung constructs displayed dynamic compliance and rudimentary gas exchange capacity. Our results underline the regenerative potential of patient-derived human airway stem cells in lung tissue engineering. We anticipate these advances to have clinically relevant implications for whole lung bioengineering and ex vivo organ repair.

  6. Expression of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in Airway Epithelial Tissue of Asthmatic Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Weining; ZENG Daxiong; XU Yongjian; XIONG Shengdao; FANG Huijuan; CAO Yong; SONG Qingfeng; CAO Chao

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in airway epithelial tissues of normal and asthmatic rats, the influence of dexamethasone and the role of LIF in pathogenesis of asthma, 30 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 for each group): normal group, asthma model group, and dexamethasone-interfered group. In asthmamodel group and dexamethasone-interfered group, asthma rat models were established by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 10% ovalbumin (OVA) and challenge with 1% OVA via inhalation. Rats in dexamethasone-interfered group were pretreated with dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p) 30 min before each challenge. The expression of LIF protein in lung was detected by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that LIF protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm of bronchial epithelial cells. The expression of LIF protein in the airway epithelial tissue of asthma model group was significantly higher than that in normal group and dexamethasone-interfered group (P<0.01), but there was no significant difference between normal group and dexamethasone-interfered group (P>0.05). It was concluded that the expression of LIF was increased significantly in the airway epithelial tissue of the asthma rats, and dexamethasone could down-regulate the expression of LIF. It was suggested that LIF might play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma as an inflammation regulator.

  7. Submucosa 1.0 x 0.1 mm in size is sufficient to count inflammatory cell numbers in human airway biopsy specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hacken, NHT; Aleva, RM; Oosterhoff, Y; Smith, M; Kraan, J; Postma, DS; Timens, W

    1998-01-01

    Counting of inflammatory cells in human airway biopsy specimens is difficult because immunopositive cells are present in varying density in lung tissue. The goal of our study was to assess the minimal amount of tissue that is necessary for the counting of constant cell numbers. In bronchial biopsy s

  8. Flow in the human upper airway: work of breathing and the compliant soft palate and tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermy, Mark; Adams, Cletus; Aplin, Jonathan; Buchajczyk, Marcin; van Hove, Sibylle; Kabaliuk, Natalia; Geoghegan, Patrick; Cater, John

    2016-11-01

    The human upper airway (nasal cavity, pharynx and trachea) filters, heats and humidifies inspired air. Its pressure drop affects the work of breathing (WOB, energy expended to inspire and expire) to a degree which varies from person to person, and which is altered by breathing therapy devices. We report experimental studies using 3D printed models of the upper airway based on CT scans of single individuals (adult and paediatric), and average geometries based on PCA analysis of 150 individuals. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), gas concentration and pressure measurements, coupled with CFD simulation. These reveal the details of the washout of CO2 rich exhaled gas, the direction-dependent time-varying pressure drop, and the effect of high-flow nasal therapy (HFNT) on these phenomena. A 1D multi-compartment model is used to estimate the work of breathing. For the first time, soft (compliant) elements have been included in the model airways and show that the assumption of rigid tissue is acceptable for unassisted breathing, but unrealistic for therapy-assisted flows.

  9. Human Tissue Stimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  10. Mandibular advancement decreases pressures in the tissues surrounding the upper airway in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairaitis, Kristina; Stavrinou, Rosie; Parikh, Radha; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2006-01-01

    The pharyngeal airway can be considered as an airway luminal shape formed by surrounding tissues, contained within a bony enclosure formed by the mandible, skull base, and cervical vertebrae. Mandibular advancement (MA), a therapy for obstructive sleep apnea, is thought to increase the size of this bony enclosure and to decrease the pressure in the upper airway extraluminal tissue space (ETP). We examined the effect of MA on upper airway airflow resistance (Rua) and ETP in a rabbit model. We studied 11 male, supine, anesthetized, spontaneously breathing New Zealand White rabbits in which ETP was measured via pressure transducer-tipped catheters inserted into the tissues surrounding the lateral (ETPlat) and anterior (ETPant) pharyngeal wall. Airflow, measured via surgically inserted pneumotachograph in series with the trachea, and tracheal pressure were recorded while graded MA at 75 degrees and 100 degrees to the horizontal was performed using an external traction device. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects statistical model. We found that MA at 100 degrees increased mouth opening from 4.7 +/- 0.4 to 6.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) mm (n = 7; P < 0.004), whereas mouth opening did not change from baseline (4.0 +/- 0.2 mm) with MA at 75 degrees . MA at both 75 degrees and 100 degrees decreased mean ETPlat and ETPant by approximately 0.1 cmH2O/mm MA (n = 7-11; all P < 0.0005). However, the fall in Rua (measured at 20 ml/s) with MA was greater for MA at 75 degrees (approximately 0.03 mmH2O.ml(-1).s.mm(-1)) than at 100 degrees (approximately 0.01 mmH2O.ml(-1).s.mm(-1); P < 0.02). From these findings, we conclude that MA decreases ETP and is more effective in reducing Rua without mouth opening.

  11. Interleukin-13–Induced Mucous Metaplasia Increases Susceptibility of Human Airway Epithelium to Rhinovirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infection of airway epithelium by rhinovirus is the most common cause of asthma exacerbations. Even in mild asthma, airway epithelium exhibits mucous metaplasia, which increases with increasing severity of the disease. We previously showed that squamous cultures of human airway epithelium manifest rhinoviral infection at levels many times higher than in well-differentiated cultures of a mucociliary phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that mucous metaplasia is also associated with increas...

  12. Arsenic compromises conducting airway epithelial barrier properties in primary mouse and immortalized human cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM and submicromolar (0.8 μM arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-. We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway.

  13. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  14. An unclassified microorganism: novel pathogen candidate lurking in human airways.

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    Kazumasa Fukuda

    Full Text Available During the assessments of the correlation of the diseases and the microbiota of various clinical specimens, unique 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequences (less than 80% similarity to known bacterial type strains were predominantly detected in a bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF specimen from a patient with chronic lower respiratory tract infection. The origin of this unique sequence is suspected to be the causative agent of the infection. We temporarily named the owner organism of this sequence "IOLA" (Infectious Organism Lurking in Airways. In order to evaluate the significance of IOLA in human lung disorders, we performed several experiments. IOLA-16S rRNA genes were detected in 6 of 386 clone libraries constructed from clinical specimens of patients with respiratory diseases (in our study series. The gene sequences (1,427 bp are identical, and no significantly similar sequence was found in public databases (using NCBI blastn except for the 8 shorter sequences detected from patients with respiratory diseases in other studies from 2 other countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the 16S rRNA gene of IOLA is more closely related to eukaryotic mitochondria than bacteria. However, the size and shape of IOLA seen by fluorescent in-situ hybridization are similar to small bacteria (approximately 1 µm with a spherical shape. Furthermore, features of both bacteria and mitochondria were observed in the genomic fragment (about 19 kb of IOLA, and the GC ratio of the sequence was extremely low (20.5%. Two main conclusions were reached: (1 IOLA is a novel bacteria-like microorganism that, interestingly, possesses features of eukaryotic mitochondria. (2 IOLA is a novel pathogen candidate, and it may be the causative agent of human lung or airway disease. IOLA exists in BALF specimens from patients with remarkable symptoms; this information is an important piece for helping solve the elusive etiology of chronic respiratory disorders.

  15. Kinetics of naphthalene metabolism in target and non-target tissues of rodents and in nasal and airway microsomes from the Rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckpitt, Alan, E-mail: arbuckpitt@ucdavis.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Morin, Dexter [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Murphy, Shannon; Edwards, Patricia; Van Winkle, Laura [Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Center for Health and the Environment, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 United States (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Naphthalene produces species and cell selective injury to respiratory tract epithelial cells of rodents. In these studies we determined the apparent K{sub m}, V{sub max}, and catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) for naphthalene metabolism in microsomal preparations from subcompartments of the respiratory tract of rodents and non-human primates. In tissues with high substrate turnover, major metabolites were derived directly from naphthalene oxide with smaller amounts from conjugates of diol epoxide, diepoxide, and 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinones. In some tissues, different enzymes with dissimilar K{sub m} and V{sub max} appeared to metabolize naphthalene. The rank order of V{sub max} (rat olfactory epithelium > mouse olfactory epithelium > murine airways ≫ rat airways) correlated well with tissue susceptibility to naphthalene. The V{sub max} in monkey alveolar subcompartment was 2% that in rat nasal olfactory epithelium. Rates of metabolism in nasal compartments of the monkey were low. The catalytic efficiencies of microsomes from known susceptible tissues/subcompartments are 10 and 250 fold higher than in rat airway and monkey alveolar subcompartments, respectively. Although the strong correlations between catalytic efficiencies and tissue susceptibility suggest that non-human primate tissues are unlikely to generate metabolites at a rate sufficient to produce cellular injury, other studies showing high levels of formation of protein adducts support the need for additional studies. - Highlights: • Naphthalene is metabolized with high catalytic efficiency in susceptible tissue. • Naphthalene is metabolized at low catalytic efficiency in non-susceptible tissue. • Respiratory tissues of the non human primate metabolize naphthalene slowly.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances calcium regulatory mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amard J Abcejo

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins (NTs, which play an integral role in neuronal development and function, have been found in non-neuronal tissue (including lung, but their role is still under investigation. Recent reports show that NTs such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as well as NT receptors are expressed in human airway smooth muscle (ASM. However, their function is still under investigation. We hypothesized that NTs regulate ASM intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](i by altered expression of Ca(2+ regulatory proteins. Human ASM cells isolated from lung samples incidental to patient surgery were incubated for 24 h (overnight in medium (control or 1 nM BDNF in the presence vs. absence of inhibitors of signaling cascades (MAP kinases; PI3/Akt; NFκB. Measurement of [Ca(2+](i responses to acetylcholine (ACh and histamine using the Ca(2+ indicator fluo-4 showed significantly greater responses following BDNF exposure: effects that were blunted by pathway inhibitors. Western analysis of whole cell lysates showed significantly higher expression of CD38, Orai1, STIM1, IP(3 and RyR receptors, and SERCA following BDNF exposure, effects inhibited by inhibitors of the above cascades. The functional significance of BDNF effects were verified by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of proteins that were altered by this NT. Overall, these data demonstrate that NTs activate signaling pathways in human ASM that lead to enhanced [Ca(2+](i responses via increased regulatory protein expression, thus enhancing airway contractility.

  17. Quantification of collagen I in airway tissues using second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Gavin; Xu, Paul; Kable, Scott H; Kable, Eleanor P W; Burgess, Janette K

    2014-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling contributes to the pathogenic changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is both complex and not well understood. Collagen I, a component of the ECM altered in COPD airways, has second harmonic generation (SHG) properties. The SHG signal is coherent, propagating both forward (F) (primarily organized/mature collagen fibrils) and backward (B) (primarily disorganized/immature collagen fibrils) parallel to the incident light. The F/B SHG ratio was used to determine the proportion of organized to disorganized collagen, with lower variation in F/B ratio between sampling regions within the same patient and between patients in the same disease group compared with analyzing F and B data alone. The F/B ratio was independent of laser power drift, regions analyzed within a tissue and tissue orientation during analysis. Using this method, we identified a significant difference in collagen organization in airway tissue between COPD and non diseased. We have developed a robust optimization and calibration methodology that will allow direct comparison of data obtained at different times and from multiple microscopes, which is directly adaptable for use with other tissue types. We report a powerful new tool for advancing our understanding of pathological ECM remodeling that may uncover new therapeutic targets in the future.

  18. CORRELATES BETWEEN HUMAN LUNG INJURY AFTER PARTICLE EXPOSURE AND RECURRENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION IN THE HORSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of the clinical presentation, physiologic changes, and pathology of the human response to particulate matter (PM) are comparable to inflammatory airway disease (lAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)lheaves in the horse. Both present with symptoms of cough,...

  19. CORRELATES BETWEEN HUMAN LUNG INJURY AFTER PARTICLE EXPOSURE AND RECURRENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION IN THE HORSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of the clinical presentation, physiologic changes, and pathology of the human response to particulate matter (PM) are comparable to inflammatory airway disease (lAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)lheaves in the horse. Both present with symptoms of cough,...

  20. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, Brian G G; Johnston, Sebastian L; Baraket, Melissa; Burgess, Janette K; King, Nicholas J C; Roth, Michael; Lim, Sam; Black, Judith L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV) are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscl

  1. Influence of horse stable environment on human airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pringle John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people spend considerable amount of time each day in equine stable environments either as employees in the care and training of horses or in leisure activity. However, there are few studies available on how the stable environment affects human airways. This study examined in one horse stable qualitative differences in indoor air during winter and late summer conditions and assessed whether air quality was associated with clinically detectable respiratory signs or alterations to selected biomarkers of inflammation and lung function in stable personnel. Methods The horse stable environment and stable-workers (n = 13 in one stable were investigated three times; first in the winter, second in the interjacent late summer and the third time in the following winter stabling period. The stable measurements included levels of ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, total and respirable dust, airborne horse allergen, microorganisms, endotoxin and glucan. The stable-workers completed a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, underwent nasal lavage with subsequent analysis of inflammation markers, and performed repeated measurements of pulmonary function. Results Measurements in the horse stable showed low organic dust levels and high horse allergen levels. Increased viable level of fungi in the air indicated a growing source in the stable. Air particle load as well as 1,3-β-glucan was higher at the two winter time-points, whereas endotoxin levels were higher at the summer time-point. Two stable-workers showed signs of bronchial obstruction with increased PEF-variability, increased inflammation biomarkers relating to reported allergy, cold or smoking and reported partly work-related symptoms. Furthermore, two other stable-workers reported work-related airway symptoms, of which one had doctor's diagnosed asthma which was well treated. Conclusion Biomarkers involved in the development of airway diseases have been studied in relation to

  2. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapparel, Caroline; Sobo, Komla; Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song; Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent.

  3. Tissue engineering and the use of stem/progenitor cells for airway epithelium repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GM Roomans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem/progenitor cells can be used to repair defects in the airway wall, resulting from e.g., tumors, trauma, tissue reactions following long-time intubations, or diseases that are associated with epithelial damage. Several potential sources of cells for airway epithelium have been identified. These can be divided into two groups. The first group consists of endogenous progenitor cells present in the respiratory tract. This group can be subdivided according to location into (a a ductal cell type in the submucosal glands of the proximal trachea, (b basal cells in the intercartilaginous zones of the lower trachea and bronchi, (c variant Clara cells (Clarav-cells in the bronchioles and (d at the junctions between the bronchioles and the alveolar ducts, and (e alveolar type II cells. This classification of progenitor cell niches is, however, controversial. The second group consists of exogenous stem cells derived from other tissues in the body. This second group can be subdivided into: (a embryonic stem (ES cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, or amniotic fluid stem cells, (b side-population cells from bone marrow or epithelial stem cells present in bone marrow or circulation and (c fat-derived mesenchymal cells. Airway epithelial cells can be co-cultured in a system that includes a basal lamina equivalent, extracellular factors from mesenchymal fibroblasts, and in an air-liquid interface system. Recently, spheroid-based culture systems have been developed. Several clinical applications have been suggested: cystic fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary edema, and pulmonary hypertension. Clinical applications so far are few, but include subglottic stenosis, tracheomalacia, bronchiomalacia, and emphysema.

  4. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  5. Chlamydophila spp. infection in horses with recurrent airway obstruction: similarities to human chronic obstructive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotzel Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO in horses is a naturally occurring dust-induced disease mainly characterized by bronchiolitis which shows histological and pathophysiological similarities to human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In human COPD previous investigations indicated an association with Chlamydophila psittaci infection. The present study was designed (1 to clarify a possible role of this infectious agent in RAO and (2 to investigate the suitability of this equine disorder as a model for human COPD. Methods Clinico-pathological parameters of a total of 45 horses (25 horses with clinical signs of RAO and 20 clinically healthy controls were compared to histological findings in lung tissue samples and infection by Chlamydiaceae using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and PCR. Results Horses with clinical signs of RAO vs. controls revealed more inflammatory changes in histology (p = 0.01, and a higher detection rate of Chlamydia psittaci antigens in all cells (p OmpA sequencing identified Chlamydophila psittaci (n = 9 and Chlamydophila abortus (n = 13 in both groups with no significant differences. Within the group of clinically healthy horses subgroups with no changes (n = 15 and slight inflammation of the small airways (n = 5 were identified. Also in the group of animals with RAO subgroups with slight (n = 16 and severe (n = 9 bronchiolitis could be formed. These four subgroups can be separated in parts by the number of cells positive for Chlamydia psittaci antigens. Conclusion Chlamydophila psittaci or abortus were present in the lung of both clinically healthy horses and those with RAO. Immunohistochemistry revealed acute chlamydial infections with inflammation in RAO horses, whereas in clinically healthy animals mostly persistent chlamydial infection and no inflammatory reactions were seen. Stable dust as the known fundamental abiotic factor in RAO is comparable to smoking in human disease. These

  6. Regional deposition of radon decay products in human airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, R.; Moere, H.; Nyblom, L.; Oestergren, I. (Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of the uptake and deposition pattern in the human airways of inhaled radon decay products have been carried out using two different techniques. The deposition in the nasal, bronchial and lung regions was assessed by external gamma measurements on the subject. The exposure of the subject was performed in a 'walk-in' radon chamber with controlled conditions. Results from exposure with high and low aerosol concentrations show that no rapid clearance occurred for the deposited decay products. About 20% of the attached inhaled decay products are retained and deposited in the lungs when mouth breathing during resting conditions, while nasal breathing gave about 26% retention, of which 5% was deposited in the nasal region and about 21% in the lungs. Exposure at low aerosol concentration with unattached fraction of about 80% shows a total retention of about 90% indicating a 100% retention of the unattached fraction. Only about 20% of the unattached fraction is found to penetrate the nasal cavity and it seems to be deposited in the bronchial region. (author).

  7. Three-dimensional Organization of Layered Apical Cytoskeletal Networks Associated with Mouse Airway Tissue Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Tomoki; Inoue, Kanako; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2017-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an essential cellular component that enables various sophisticated functions of epithelial cells by forming specialized subcellular compartments. However, the functional and structural roles of cytoskeletons in subcellular compartmentalization are still not fully understood. Here we identified a novel network structure consisting of actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules directly beneath the apical membrane in mouse airway multiciliated cells and in cultured epithelial cells. Three-dimensional imaging by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy and immunofluorescence revealed that the morphological features of each network depended on the cell type and were spatiotemporally integrated in association with tissue development. Detailed analyses using Odf2 mutant mice, which lack ciliary basal feet and apical microtubules, suggested a novel contribution of the intermediate filaments to coordinated ciliary beating. These findings provide a new perspective for viewing epithelial cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis through the structure and function of apical cytoskeletal networks.

  8. Airway skills training using a human patient simulator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thesegan Moodley

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... We incorporated the METI® HPS (Medical Education Technology,. Sarasota, USA) ... developed an airway care skills training programme using. METI's® HPS ..... analyse the cost-effectiveness of the simulator, on its own, or.

  9. Tissue sensitivity of the rat upper and lower extrapulmonary airways to the inhaled electrophilic air pollutants diacetyl and acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Smith, Gregory J; Morris, John B

    2014-11-01

    The target site for inhaled vapor-induced injury often differs in mouth-breathing humans compared with nose-breathing rats, thus complicating the use of rat inhalation toxicity data for assessment of human risk. We sought to examine sensitivity of respiratory/transitional nasal (RTM) and tracheobronchial (TBM) mucosa to two electrophilic irritant vapors: diacetyl and acrolein. Computational fluid dynamic physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling was coupled with biomarker assessment to establish delivered dose-response relationships in RTM and TBM in male F344 rats following 6 h exposure to diacetyl or acrolein. Biomarkers included glutathione status, proinflammatory and antioxidant gene mRNA levels, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). Modeling revealed that 0.0094-0.1653 μg acrolein/min-cm(2) and 3.9-21.6 μg diacetyl/min-cm(2) were deposited into RTM/TBM. Results indicate RTM and TBM were generally of similar sensitivity to diacetyl and acrolein. For instance, both tissues displayed induction of antioxidant and proinflammatory genes, and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 after electrophile exposure. Hierarchical cellular response patterns were similar in RTM and TBM but differed between vapors. Specifically, diacetyl exposure induced proinflammatory and antioxidant genes concomitantly at low exposure levels, whereas acrolein induced antioxidant genes at much lower exposure levels than that required to induce proinflammatory genes. Generally, diacetyl was less potent than acrolein, as measured by maximal induction of transcripts. In conclusion, the upper and lower extrapulmonary airways are of similar sensitivity to inhaled electrophilic vapors. Dosimetrically based extrapolation of nasal responses in nose-breathing rodents may provide an approach to predict risk to the lower airways of humans during mouth-breathing.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  11. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  12. Connective tissue growth factor : a role in airway remodelling in asthma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K

    2005-01-01

    1. Severe persistent asthma is accompanied by structural changes in the airway, referred to as remodelling. The mechanisms driving airway remodelling are poorly understood. 2. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is increased in the airways of patients with asthma. Many of the effects of TGF-beta a

  13. Characterisation of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor variants in human airway and peripheral cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayers Ian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (UPAR has been shown to have clinical relevance in various cancers. We have recently identified UPAR as an asthma susceptibility gene and there is evidence to suggest that uPAR may be upregulated in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma. uPAR is a key receptor involved in the formation of the serine protease plasmin by interacting with uPA and has been implicated in many physiological processes including proliferation and migration. The current aim was to determine key regulatory regions and splice variants of UPAR and quantify its expression in primary human tissues and cells (including lung, bronchial epithelium (HBEC, airway smooth muscle (HASM and peripheral cells. Results Using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE a conserved transcription start site (-42 to -77 relative to ATG was identified and multiple transcription factor binding sites predicted. Seven major splice variants were identified (>5% total expression, including multiple exon deletions and an alternative exon 7b (encoding a truncated, soluble, 229aa protein. Variants were differentially expressed, with a high proportion of E7b usage in lung tissue and structural cells (55–87% of transcripts, whereas classical exon 7 (encoding the GPI-linked protein was preferentially expressed in peripheral cells (~80% of transcripts, often with exon 6 or 5+6 deletions. Real-time PCR confirmed expression of uPAR mRNA in lung, as well as airway and peripheral cell types with ~50–100 fold greater expression in peripheral cells versus airway cells and confirmed RACE data. Protein analysis confirmed expression of multiple different forms of uPAR in the same cells as well as expression of soluble uPAR in cell supernatants. The pattern of expression did not directly reflect that seen at the mRNA level, indicating that post-translational mechanisms of regulation may also play an important role. Conclusion We have

  14. Ion transport in epithelial spheroids derived from human airway cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Frederiksen, O; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we describe a novel three-dimensional airway epithelial explant preparation and demonstrate its use for ion transport studies by electrophysiological technique. Suspension cultures of sheets of epithelial cells released by protease treatment from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non...

  15. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reena Berman, Di Jiang, Qun Wu, Hong Wei Chu Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Human rhinovirus (HRV infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. Keywords: α1-antitrypsin, rhinovirus, COPD, cigarette smoke, ICAM-1

  16. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery and/or the body (transdermal delivery. In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commercially as clinical skin substitutes and as models for permeation and toxicity screening. Several academic laboratories have developed their own human skin equivalent models and applied these models for studying skin permeation, corrosivity and irritation, compound toxicity, biochemistry, metabolism and cellular pharmacology. Various aspects of the state of the art of human skin equivalents are reviewed and discussed.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  18. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available J McCarthy1, X Gong2, D Nahirney2, M Duszyk2, MW Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Physiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function.Methods: Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Cl- channels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches.Results: Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl- channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl- and HCO3- secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl- channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl- channels by the nanoparticles.Conclusion: This is the first study to identify

  19. Propagation of respiratory viruses in human airway epithelia reveals persistent virus-specific signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi-Laziosi, Manel; Brito, Francisco; Benaoudia, Sacha; Royston, Léna; Cagno, Valeria; Fernandes-Rocha, Mélanie; Piuz, Isabelle; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Huang, Song; Constant, Samuel; Boldi, Marc-Olivier; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2017-08-07

    Leading etiologies of acute illnesses, respiratory viruses typically cause self-limited diseases, though severe complications can occur in fragile patients. Rhinoviruses, respiratory enteroviruses, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial viruses and coronaviruses are highly prevalent respiratory pathogens, but due to the lack of reliable animal models, their differential pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. To compare infections by respiratory viruses isolated from clinical specimens using reconstituted human airway epithelia. Tissues were infected with rhinoviruses RV-A55, RV-A49, RV-B48, RV-C8 and RV-C15, respiratory enterovirus EV-D68, influenza virus H3N2, respiratory syncytial virus RSV-B and coronavirus HCoV-OC43. Replication kinetics, cell tropism, impact on tissue integrity and cytokine secretion were compared. Virus adaptation and tissue response were assessed through RNA-sequencing. Rhinoviruses, RSV-B and HCoV-OC43 infected ciliated cells and caused no major cell death while H3N2 and EV-D68 induced ciliated cell loss and tissue integrity disruption. H3N2 was also detected in rare goblet and basal cells. All viruses except RV-B48 and HCoV-OC43 altered cilia beating and MCC. H3N2 was the strongest cytokine-inducer and HCoV-OC43 the weakest. Persistent infection was observed in all cases. RNA-sequencing highlighted perturbation of tissue metabolism and induction of a transient but important immune response at 4-days post-infection. No majority mutations emerged in the viral population. Our results highlight the differential in vitro pathogenesis of respiratory viruses during the acute infection-phase and their ability to persist under immune tolerance. These data help to appreciate the range of disease severity observed in vivo and the occurrence of chronic respiratory infections in immunocompromised hosts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Davis, C.W.; Boucher, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    exposure (10 min) to 430 mosM luminal solution elicited no regulation of any parameter. Optical measurements revealed a reduction in the thickness of preparations only in response to luminal hypertonic solutions. We conclude that (a) airway epithelial cells exhibit asymmetric water transport properties......- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall....

  1. Multi-Scale Computational Analyses of JP-8 Fuel Droplets and Vapors in Human Respiratory Airway Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-31

    Deposition Clearance and Effects in the Lung 20, 294-309. Kleinstreuer, C., Zhang, Z., 2003. Laminar-to-turbulent fluid-particle flows in a human airway ...FA9550-04-1-0422 Vapors in Human Respiratory Airway Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Kleinstreuer...tracheobronchial airway models, transient 3- D as well as equivalent steady-state solutions have been obtained for the transport and deposition of

  2. Stimulation of aquaporin-5 and transepithelial water permeability in human airway epithelium by hyperosmotic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Jørgensen, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    Osmotic water permeability (P(f )) was measured in spheroid-shaped human nasal airway epithelial explants pre-exposed to increasing levels of hyperosmotic stress. The fluid-filled spheroids, derived from nasal polyps, were lined by a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane facing......-CF spheroids and were not significantly influenced by hyperosmotic stress. The results suggest that hyperosmotic stress is an important activator of AQP-5 in human airway epithelium, leading to significantly increased transepithelial water permeability.......Osmotic water permeability (P(f )) was measured in spheroid-shaped human nasal airway epithelial explants pre-exposed to increasing levels of hyperosmotic stress. The fluid-filled spheroids, derived from nasal polyps, were lined by a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane facing...

  3. Cigarette Smoke and Estrogen Signaling in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalem Sathish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cigarette smoke (CS in active smokers and second-hand smoke exposure exacerbate respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. While women are known to experience a more asthmatic response to CS than emphysema in men, there is limited information on the mechanisms of CS-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesize that CS interferes with a normal (protective bronchodilatory role of estrogens, thus worsening airway contractility. Methods: We tested effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on 17β-estradiol (E2 signaling in enzymatically-dissociated bronchial airway smooth muscle (ASM obtained from lung samples of non-smoking female patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Results: In fura-2 loaded ASM cells, CSE increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i responses to 10µM histamine. Acute exposure to physiological concentrations of E2 decreased [Ca2+]i responses. However, in 24h exposed CSE cells, although expression of estrogen receptors was increased, the effect of E2 on [Ca2+]i was blunted. Acute E2 exposure also decreased store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibited stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 phosphorylation: effects blunted by CSE. Acute exposure to E2 increased cAMP, but less so in 24h CSE-exposed cells. 24h CSE exposure increased S-nitrosylation of ERα. Furthermore, 24h CSE-exposed bronchial rings showed increased bronchoconstrictor agonist responses that were not reduced as effectively by E2 compared to non-CSE controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that CS induces dysregulation of estrogen signaling in ASM, which could contribute to increased airway contractility in women exposed to CS.

  4. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  5. Phenotypic responses of differentiated asthmatic human airway epithelial cultures to rhinovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwu Bai

    Full Text Available Human airway epithelial cells are the principal target of human rhinovirus (HRV, a common cold pathogen that triggers the majority of asthma exacerbations. The objectives of this study were 1 to evaluate an in vitro air liquid interface cultured human airway epithelial cell model for HRV infection, and 2 to identify gene expression patterns associated with asthma intrinsically and/or after HRV infection using this model.Air-liquid interface (ALI human airway epithelial cell cultures were prepared from 6 asthmatic and 6 non-asthmatic donors. The effects of rhinovirus RV-A16 on ALI cultures were compared. Genome-wide gene expression changes in ALI cultures following HRV infection at 24 hours post exposure were further analyzed using RNA-seq technology. Cellular gene expression and cytokine/chemokine secretion were further evaluated by qPCR and a Luminex-based protein assay, respectively.ALI cultures were readily infected by HRV. RNA-seq analysis of HRV infected ALI cultures identified sets of genes associated with asthma specific viral responses. These genes are related to inflammatory pathways, epithelial structure and remodeling and cilium assembly and function, including those described previously (e.g. CCL5, CXCL10 and CX3CL1, MUC5AC, CDHR3, and novel ones that were identified for the first time in this study (e.g. CCRL1.ALI-cultured human airway epithelial cells challenged with HRV are a useful translational model for the study of HRV-induced responses in airway epithelial cells, given that gene expression profile using this model largely recapitulates some important patterns of gene responses in patients during clinical HRV infection. Furthermore, our data emphasize that both abnormal airway epithelial structure and inflammatory signaling are two important asthma signatures, which can be further exacerbated by HRV infection.

  6. Decellularization of human and porcine lung tissues for pulmonary tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, John D; Anfang, Rachel; Anandappa, Annabelle; Costa, Joseph; Javidfar, Jeffrey; Wobma, Holly M; Singh, Gopal; Freytes, Donald O; Bacchetta, Matthew D; Sonett, Joshua R; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-09-01

    The only definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is orthotopic transplantation. Lung extracellular matrix (LECM) holds great potential as a scaffold for lung tissue engineering because it retains the complex architecture, biomechanics, and topologic specificity of the lung. Decellularization of human lungs rejected from transplantation could provide "ideal" biologic scaffolds for lung tissue engineering, but the availability of such lungs remains limited. The present study was designed to determine whether porcine lung could serve as a suitable substitute for human lung to study tissue engineering therapies. Human and porcine lungs were procured, sliced into sheets, and decellularized by three different methods. Compositional, ultrastructural, and biomechanical changes to the LECM were characterized. The suitability of LECM for cellular repopulation was evaluated by assessing the viability, growth, and metabolic activity of human lung fibroblasts, human small airway epithelial cells, and human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells over a period of 7 days. Decellularization with 3-[(3-Cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) showed the best maintenance of both human and porcine LECM, with similar retention of LECM proteins except for elastin. Human and porcine LECM supported the cultivation of pulmonary cells in a similar way, except that the human LECM was stiffer and resulted in higher metabolic activity of the cells than porcine LECM. Porcine lungs can be decellularized with CHAPS to produce LECM scaffolds with properties resembling those of human lungs, for pulmonary tissue engineering. We propose that porcine LECM can be an excellent screening platform for the envisioned human tissue engineering applications of decellularized lungs. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  8. Human Tissue Research: Who Owns the Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Allen B.

    1987-01-01

    Ownership issues in the results of research generally and of human tissue research specifically are explored. While acknowledging some uncertainty in the law, it is found that human tissue may be lawfully accessed for research and that use of human tissue does not modify the general allocation of interests. (MSE)

  9. [Response mechanisms of the airway smooth muscle tissue in experimental bronchial spasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zashikhin, A L; Agafonov, Iu V; Barmina, A O

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at the complex evaluation of the reactivity mechanisms of bronchial smooth muscle tissue (SMT) in experimental bronchial spasm. Morphometric, cytospectrophotometric and electron microscopical analysis demonstrated the presence of three types of smooth muscle cells (SMC) within the bronchial SMT (small, medium, large), that differed in their linear and metabolic parameters. The findings of this study indicate that under the conditions of experimental bronchial spasm development, the ratios of SMC in bronchial SMT are changed with the increase in proportion of small SMC and the elimination of large SMC. In the dynamics of experimental bronchial spasm development, the activation of cytoplasmic synthesis as well as of DNA synthesis was detected mainly in group of small SMC. The reactive-dystrophic changes were marked at the subcellular level, that were most often identified in large SMC resulting in their elimination from population in the dynamics of an experiment. The data obtained suggest that one of the important mechanisms of airway SMT adaptation to the bronchial spasm development is a dynamic reorganization of SMC population.

  10. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gierok

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS and (HPLC-MS. To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model.

  12. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the num

  13. Trehalose-mediated autophagy impairs the anti-viral function of human primary airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5 effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations.

  14. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS. Zhe Zhang*, Huawei Shi, Clement Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910; Chong S. Kim, National Health and En...

  15. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxie@njmu.edu.cn; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hongwang@njmu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  16. Smooth muscle in human bronchi is disposed to resist airway distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Morgan; Henry, Cyndi; Couture, Christian; Marsolais, David; King, Gregory G; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Bossé, Ynuk

    2016-07-15

    Studying airway smooth muscle (ASM) in conditions that emulate the in vivo environment within which the bronchi normally operate may provide important clues regarding its elusive physiological function. The present study examines the effect of lengthening and shortening of ASM on tension development in human bronchial segments. ASM from each bronchial segment was set at a length approximating in situ length (Linsitu). Bronchial tension was then measured during a slow cyclical strain (0.004Hz, from 0.7Linsitu to 1.3Linsitu) in the relaxed state and at graded levels of activation by methacholine. In all cases, tension was greater at longer ASM lengths, and greater during lengthening than shortening. The threshold of methacholine concentration that was required for ASM to account for bronchial tension across the entire range of ASM lengths tested was on average smaller by 2.8 logs during lengthening than during shortening. The length-dependency of ASM tension, together with this lower threshold of methacholine concentration during lengthening versus shortening, suggest that ASM has a greater ability to resist airway dilation during lung inflation than to narrow the airways during lung deflation. More than serving to narrow the airway, as has long been thought, these data suggest that the main function of ASM contraction is to limit airway wall distension during lung inflation.

  17. In vivo deposition of ultrafine aerosols in human nasal and oral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Swift, D.L. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Simpson, S.Q. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The extrathoracic airways, including the nasal passage, oral passage, pharynx, and larynx, are the first targets for inhaled particles and provide an important defense for the lung. Understanding the deposition efficiency of the nasal and oral passages is therefore crucial for assessing doses of inhaled particles to the extrathoracic airways and the lung. Significant inter-subject variability in nasal deposition has been shown in recent studies by Rasmussen, T.R. et al, using 2.6 {mu}m particles in 10 human subjects and in our preliminary studies using 0.004-0.15 {mu}m particles in four adult volunteers. No oral deposition was reported in either of these studies. Reasons for the intersubject variations have been frequently attributed to the geometry of the nasal passages. The aims of the present study were to measure in vivo the nasal airway dimensions and the deposition of ultrafine aerosols in both the nasal and oral passages, and to determine the relationship between nasal airway dimensions and aerosol deposition. A statistical procedure incorporated with the diffusion theory was used to model the dimensional features of the nasal airways which may be responsible for the biological variability in particle deposition. In summary, we have correlated deposition of particles in the size range of 0.004 to 0.15 {mu}m with the nasal dimensions of each subject.

  18. Premature infants have impaired airway antiviral IFNγ responses to human metapneumovirus compared to respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancham, Krishna; Perez, Geovanny F.; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Jain, Amisha; Kurdi, Bassem; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Preciado, Diego; Rose, Mary C.; Nino, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is unknown why human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cause severe respiratory infection in children, particularly in premature infants. Our aim was to investigate if there are defective airway antiviral responses to these viruses in young children with history of prematurity. METHODS Nasal airway secretions were collected from 140 children ≤3 y old without detectable virus (n = 80) or with PCR-confirmed HMPV or RSV infection (n = 60). Nasal protein levels of IFNγ, CCL5/RANTES, IL-10, IL-4, and IL-17 were determined using a multiplex magnetic bead immunoassay. RESULTS Full-term children with HMPV and RSV infection had increased levels of nasal airway IFNγ, CCL5, and IL-10 along with an elevation in Th1 (IFNγ)/Th2 (IL-4) ratios, which is expected during antiviral responses. In contrast, HMPV-infected premature children (< 32 wk gestation) did not exhibit increased Th1/Th2 ratios or elevated nasal airway secretion of IFNγ, CCL5, and IL-10 relative to uninfected controls. CONCLUSION Our study is the first to demonstrate that premature infants have defective IFNγ, CCL5/RANTES, and IL-10 airway responses during HMPV infection and provides novel insights about the potential reason why HMPV causes severe respiratory disease in children with history of prematurity. PMID:26086642

  19. Apical Localization of Zinc Transporter ZnT4 in Human Airway Epithelial Cells and Its Loss in a Murine Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Murgia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The apical cytoplasm of airway epithelium (AE contains abundant labile zinc (Zn ions that are involved in the protection of AE from oxidants and inhaled noxious substances. A major question is how dietary Zn traffics to this compartment. In rat airways, in vivo selenite autometallographic (Se-AMG-electron microscopy revealed labile Zn-selenium nanocrystals in structures resembling secretory vesicles in the apical cytoplasm. This observation was consistent with the starry-sky Zinquin fluorescence staining of labile Zn ions confined to the same region. The vesicular Zn transporter ZnT4 was likewise prominent in both the apical and basal parts of the epithelium both in rodent and human AE, although the apical pools were more obvious. Expression of ZnT4 mRNA was unaffected by changes in the extracellular Zn concentration. However, levels increased 3-fold during growth of cells in air liquid interface cultures and decreased sharply in the presence of retinoic acid. When comparing nasal versus bronchial human AE cells, there were significant positive correlations between levels of ZnT4 from the same subject, suggesting that nasal brushings may allow monitoring of airway Zn transporter expression. Finally, there were marked losses of both basally-located ZnT4 protein and labile Zn in the bronchial epithelium of mice with allergic airway inflammation. This study is the first to describe co-localization of zinc vesicles with the specific zinc transporter ZnT4 in airway epithelium and loss of ZnT4 protein in inflamed airways. Direct evidence that ZnT4 regulates Zn levels in the epithelium still needs to be provided. We speculate that ZnT4 is an important regulator of zinc ion accumulation in secretory apical vesicles and that the loss of labile Zn and ZnT4 in airway inflammation contributes to AE vulnerability in diseases such as asthma.

  20. Dexamethasone inhibits repair of human airway epithelial cells mediated by glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ.

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    Jingyue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids (GCs are a first-line treatment for asthma for their anti-inflammatory effects, but they also hinder the repair of airway epithelial injury. The anti-inflammatory protein GC-induced leucine zipper (GILZ is reported to inhibit the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway, which promotes the repair of airway epithelial cells around the damaged areas. We investigated whether the inhibition of airway epithelial repair imposed by the GC dexamethasone (DEX is mediated by GILZ. METHODS: We tested the effect of DEX on the expressions of GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein and the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells, via RT-PCR and Western blot. We further evaluated the role of GILZ in mediating the effect of DEX on the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway and in airway epithelium repair by utilizing small-interfering RNAs, MTT, CFSE labeling, wound-healing and cell migration assays. RESULTS: DEX increased GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein levels in a human airway epithelial cell line. Furthermore, DEX inhibited the phosphorylation of Raf-1, Mek1/2, Erk1/2 (components of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. However, the inhibitory effect of DEX was mitigated in cells when the GILZ gene was silenced. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of epithelial injury repair by DEX is mediated in part by activation of GILZ, which suppressed activation of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. Our study implicates the involvement of DEX in this process, and furthers our understanding of the dual role of GCs.

  1. Matched-Comparative Modeling of Normal and Diseased Human Airway Responses Using a Microengineered Breathing Lung Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benam, Kambez H; Novak, Richard; Nawroth, Janna; Hirano-Kobayashi, Mariko; Ferrante, Thomas C; Choe, Youngjae; Prantil-Baun, Rachelle; Weaver, James C; Bahinski, Anthony; Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-11-23

    Smoking represents a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it is difficult to characterize smoke-induced injury responses under physiological breathing conditions in humans due to patient-to-patient variability. Here, we show that a small airway-on-a-chip device lined by living human bronchiolar epithelium from normal or COPD patients can be connected to an instrument that "breathes" whole cigarette smoke in and out of the chips to study smoke-induced pathophysiology in vitro. This technology enables true matched comparisons of biological responses by culturing cells from the same individual with or without smoke exposure. These studies led to identification of ciliary micropathologies, COPD-specific molecular signatures, and epithelial responses to smoke generated by electronic cigarettes. The smoking airway-on-a-chip represents a tool to study normal and disease-specific responses of the human lung to inhaled smoke across molecular, cellular and tissue-level responses in an organ-relevant context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulation of muscle and adipose tissue deformation in the passive human pharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, Nicholas B; Carey, Jason P; Martin, Andrew R; Remmers, John E; Zareian, Ali; Topor, Zbigniew; Grosse, Joshua; Noga, Michelle; Finlay, Warren H

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the contribution of passive mechanical deformation in the human pharynx to upper airway collapse is fundamental to understanding the competing biomechanical processes that maintain airway patency. This study uses finite element analysis to examine deformation in the passive human pharynx using an intricate 3D anatomical model based on computed tomography scan images. Linear elastic properties are assigned to bone, cartilage, ligament, tendon, and membrane structures based on a survey of values reported in the literature. Velopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cross-sectional area versus airway pressure slopes are determined as functions of Young's moduli of muscle and adipose tissue. In vivo pharyngeal mechanics for small deformations near atmospheric pressure are matched by altering Young's moduli of muscle and adipose tissue. The results indicate that Young's moduli ranging from 0.33 to 14 kPa for muscle and adipose tissue matched the in vivo range of area versus pressure slopes. The developed anatomical model and determined Young's moduli range are expected to be useful as a starting point for more complex simulations of human upper airway collapse and obstructive sleep apnea therapy.

  3. Neutrophil recruitment by human IL-17 via C-X-C chemokine release in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, M; Cui, Z H; Hoshino, H; Lötvall, J; Sjöstrand, M; Gruenert, D C; Skoogh, B E; Lindén, A

    1999-02-15

    IL-17 is a recently discovered cytokine that can be released from activated human CD4+ T lymphocytes. This study assessed the proinflammatory effects of human (h) IL-17 in the airways. In vitro, hIL-17 increased the release of IL-8 in human bronchial epithelial and venous endothelial cells, in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. This effect of hIL-17 was inhibited by cotreatment with an anti-hIL-17 Ab and was potentiated by hTNF-alpha. In addition, hIL-17 increased the expression of hIL-8 mRNA in bronchial epithelial cells. Conditioned medium from hIL-17-treated bronchial epithelial cells increased human neutrophil migration in vitro. This effect was blocked by an anti-hIL-8 Ab. In vivo, intratracheal instillation of hIL-17 selectively recruited neutrophils into rat airways. This recruitment of neutrophils into the airways was inhibited by an anti-hIL-17 Ab and accompanied by increased levels of rat macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (rMIP-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The BAL neutrophilia was also blocked by an anti-rMIP-2 Ab. The effect of hIL-17 on the release of hIL-8 and rMIP-2 was also inhibited by glucocorticoids, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These data demonstrate that hIL-17 can specifically and selectively recruit neutrophils into the airways via the release of C-X-C chemokines from bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a novel mechanism linking the activation of T-lymphocytes to recruitment of neutrophils into the airways.

  4. TRPC3 Regulates Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor From Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vohra, Pawan K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M.; Singh, Brij B.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca2+ signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors suc...

  5. A new removable airway stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Amundsen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods: To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results: The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions: The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use.

  6. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum

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    Maria B. Sukkar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin–1β (IL–1β and tumour necrosis factor–α (TNF–α induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1 allergic asthmatic serum (AAS modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL–1β and TNF–α, and (2 IL–1β/TNF–α prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL–5 and GMCSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1 ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, non-allergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS or MonomedTM (a serum substitute and subsequently stimulated with IL–1β and TNF–α and (2 ASMC stimulated with IL–1β/TNF–α and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or MonomedTM. IL-1g and TNF–α induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or MonomedTM. IL–1β and TNF–α, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL–1β/TNF–α and serum exposure (AAS or NAS was significantly greater than that following IL–1β /TNF–α and MonomedTM exposure or IL–1β/TNF–α exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage.

  7. Dimensional change in soft tissues with complete dental prosthesis and its effect on airway space and natural head position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insertion of the intraoral prosthesis causes deflection of the tongue, soft palate affecting the patency of the airway. Aims: To evaluate the cephalometric soft tissue variation in tongue, soft palate, and its effect on posterior airway space in edentulous patients with the insertion of the denture. Settings and Design: Randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Complete denture (CD prosthesis was fabricated for first time denture wearers comprising 22 males and 18 females within the age range of 50-65 years. Lateral skull radiographs were taken for each of the subjects in their resting position without CDs (T0, with CDs (T1 at least 1-week postinsertion and after 6 months of usage (T2, respectively. The reference points, lines, and angles on the cephalometric films were used to evaluate the position or inclination of the head, variations in tongue position and length, the changes in the anteroposterior dimension of the soft palate, and posterior airway space variations. Intra-investigator error variance was not found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05. Statistical Analysis Used: Using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS v16.0 the significant difference in the paired samples (without CD and with CD was found using the paired t-test. The probability value P = 0.05 is considered as a significant level. Results : On comparison of T1 and T0, the heads were more extended with the downward position of the tongue with an increase in its length and the posterior airway space was decreased in T1. Significant differences in values were not observed between T1 and T2. Conclusions : With CDs, the change in airway space was related to alteration in soft palate and tongue dimension. There were no changes in dimension at 6 months follow-up.

  8. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV infection.We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6 production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1 in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  9. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Minor, Maisha; Chu, Hong Wei

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV) infection. We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6) production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1) in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  10. Ciliary beating recovery in deficient human airway epithelial cells after lentivirus ex vivo gene therapy.

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    Brigitte Chhin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is a heterogeneous genetic disease that is characterized by cilia dysfunction of the epithelial cells lining the respiratory tracts, resulting in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Despite lifelong physiological therapy and antibiotics, the lungs of affected patients are progressively destroyed, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Recessive mutations in Dynein Axonemal Intermediate chain type 1 (DNAI1 gene have been described in 10% of cases of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Our goal was to restore normal ciliary beating in DNAI1-deficient human airway epithelial cells. A lentiviral vector based on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein was used to transduce cultured human airway epithelial cells with a cDNA of DNAI1 driven by the Elongation Factor 1 promoter. Transcription and translation of the transduced gene were tested by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Human airway epithelial cells that were DNAI1-deficient due to compound heterozygous mutations, and consequently had immotile cilia and no outer dynein arm, were transduced by the lentivirus. Cilia beating was recorded and electron microscopy of the cilia was performed. Transcription and translation of the transduced DNAI1 gene were detected in human cells treated with the lentivirus. In addition, immotile cilia recovered a normal beat and outer dynein arms reappeared. We demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a normalization of ciliary beat frequency of deficient human airway epithelial cells by using a lentivirus to transduce cells with the therapeutic gene. This preliminary step constitutes a conceptual proof that is indispensable in the perspective of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia's in vivo gene therapy. This is the first time that recovery of cilia beating is demonstrated in this disease.

  11. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

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    Matthew J Kesic

    Full Text Available Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2, whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility.

  12. Isoform-specific regulation and localization of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor in human airway epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J D A Excoffon

    Full Text Available Adenovirus is an important respiratory pathogen. Adenovirus fiber from most serotypes co-opts the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR to bind and enter cells. However, CAR is a cell adhesion molecule localized on the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelia. Separation from the lumen of the airways by tight junctions renders airway epithelia resistant to inhaled adenovirus infection. Although a role for CAR in viral spread and egress has been established, the mechanism of initial respiratory infection remains controversial. CAR exists in several protein isoforms including two transmembrane isoforms that differ only at the carboxy-terminus (CAR(Ex7 and CAR(Ex8. We found low-level expression of the CAR(Ex8 isoform in well-differentiated human airway epithelia. Surprisingly, in contrast to CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 localizes to the apical membrane of epithelia where it augments adenovirus infection. Interestingly, despite sharing a similar class of PDZ-binding domain with CAR(Ex7, CAR(Ex8 differentially interacts with PICK1, PSD-95, and MAGI-1b. MAGI-1b appears to stoichiometrically regulate the degradation of CAR(Ex8 providing a potential mechanism for the apical localization of CAR(Ex8 in airway epithelial. In summary, apical localization of CAR(Ex8 may be responsible for initiation of respiratory adenoviral infections and this localization appears to be regulated by interactions with PDZ-domain containing proteins.

  13. Interleukin-13-induced mucous metaplasia increases susceptibility of human airway epithelium to rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz-Scroggins, Marrah E; Boushey, Homer A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2010-12-01

    Infection of airway epithelium by rhinovirus is the most common cause of asthma exacerbations. Even in mild asthma, airway epithelium exhibits mucous metaplasia, which increases with increasing severity of the disease. We previously showed that squamous cultures of human airway epithelium manifest rhinoviral infection at levels many times higher than in well-differentiated cultures of a mucociliary phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that mucous metaplasia is also associated with increased levels of rhinoviral infection. Mucous metaplasia was induced with IL-13, which doubled the numbers of goblet cells. In both control (mucociliary) and IL-13- treated (mucous metaplastic) cultures, goblet cells were preferentially infected by rhinovirus. IL-13 doubled the numbers of infected cells by increasing the numbers of infected goblet cells. Furthermore, IL-13 increased both the maturity of goblet cells and the probability that a goblet cell would be infected. The infection of cells other than goblet cells was unaltered by IL-13. Treatment with IL-13 did not alter the levels of rhinovirus receptor ICAM-1, nor did the proliferative effects of IL-13 enhance infection, because rhinovirus did not colocalize with dividing cells. However, the induction of mucous metaplasia caused changes in the apical membrane structure, notably a marked decrease in overall ciliation, and an increase in the overall flatness of the apical surface. We conclude that mucous metaplasia in asthma increases the susceptibility of airway epithelium to infection by rhinovirus because of changes in the overall architecture of the apical surface.

  14. Comparative analysis of realistic CT-scan and simplified human airway models in airflow simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Nasrul Hadi; Osman, Kahar; Helmi, Nor Harris N; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed A Rafiq

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to model the human upper respiratory system have undergone many phases. Geometrical proximity to the realistic shape has been the subject of many research projects. In this study, three different geometries of the trachea and main bronchus were modelled, which were reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) scan images. The geometrical variations were named realistic, simplified and oversimplified. Realistic refers to the lifelike image taken from digital imaging and communications in medicine format CT scan images, simplified refers to the reconstructed image based on natural images without realistic details pertaining to the rough surfaces, and oversimplified describes the straight wall geometry of the airway. The characteristics of steady state flows with different flow rates were investigated, simulating three varied physical activities and passing through each model. The results agree with previous studies where simplified models are sufficient for providing comparable results for airflow in human airways. This work further suggests that, under most exercise conditions, the idealised oversimplified model is not favourable for simulating either airflow regimes or airflow with particle depositions. However, in terms of immediate analysis for the prediction of abnormalities of various dimensions of human airways, the oversimplified techniques may be used.

  15. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Chi; Wang, Yuefang; Liu, Yingxi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate movement attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper airway cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original configuration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  16. Numerical simulation of soft palate movement and airflow in human upper airway by fluid-structure interaction method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuzhen Sun; Chi Yu; Yuefang Wang; Yingxi Liu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present airflow field characteristics of human upper airway and soft palate move-ment attitude during breathing. On the basis of the data taken from the spiral computerized tomography images of a healthy person and a patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS), three-dimensional models of upper air-way cavity and soft palate are reconstructed by the method of surface rendering. Numerical simulation is performed for airflow in the upper airway and displacement of soft palate by fluid-structure interaction analysis. The reconstructed three-dimensional models precisely preserve the original config-uration of upper airways and soft palate. The results of the pressure and velocity distributions in the airflow field are quantitatively determined, and the displacement of soft palate is presented. Pressure gradients of airway are lower for the healthy person and the airflow distribution is quite uniform in the case of free breathing. However, the OSAHS patient remarkably escalates both the pressure and velocity in the upper airway, and causes higher displacement of the soft palate. The present study is useful in revealing pathogenesis and quantitative mutual relationship between configuration and function of the upper airway as well as in diagnosing diseases related to anatomical structure and function of the upper airway.

  17. Recurrent pregnancy-related upper airway obstruction caused by intratracheal ectopic thyroid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, H; Jørgensen, K E; Oster-Jørgensen, E

    1999-01-01

    An unusual case of recurrent pregnancy-related thyroid growth stimulation is reported. A 27-year-old euthyroid woman had pulmonary symptoms, thought to be asthma during her first pregnancy, that improved postpartum. Bronchodilatators had no effect and symptoms recurred from gestational week 22...... developed normally. We believe that this case illustrates the recurrent effect of pregnancy-related thyroid tissue stimulation by a combination of increasing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation and iodine deficiency in a borderline iodine-deficient region. This is the first report on symptomatic...

  18. Action of N-acylated ambroxol derivatives on secretion of chloride ions in human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Takemura, Yoshizumi; Niisato, Naomi; Mitsuyama, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2009-03-13

    We report the effects of new N-acylated ambroxol derivatives (TEI-588a, TEI-588b, TEI-589a, TEI-589b, TEI-602a and TEI-602b: a, aromatic amine-acylated derivative; b, aliphatic amine-acylated derivative) induced from ambroxol (a mucolytic agent to treat human lung diseases) on Cl(-) secretion in human submucosal serous Calu-3 cells under a Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter-1 (NKCC1)-mediated hyper-secreting condition. TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a diminished hyper-secretion of Cl(-) by diminishing the activity of NKCC1 without blockade of apical Cl(-) channel (TEI-589a>TEI-602a>TEI-589b), while any other tested compounds including ambroxol had no effects on Cl(-) secretion. These indicate that the inhibitory action of an aromatic amine-acylated derivative on Cl(-) secretion is stronger that that of an aliphatic amine-acylated derivative, and that 3-(2,5-dimethyl)furoyl group has a strong action in inhibition of Cl(-) secretion than cyclopropanoyl group. We here indicate that TEI-589a, TEI-589b and TEI-602a reduce hyper-secretion to an appropriate level in the airway, providing a possibility that the compound can be an effective drug in airway obstructive diseases including COPD by reducing the airway resistance under a hyper-secreting condition.

  19. Cryobanking of human ovarian tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is one way of preserving fertility in young women with a malignant disease or other disorders that require gonadotoxic treatment. The purpose of the study was to explore how many women remained interested in continued cryostorage of their ovarian tissue beyond...... an initial 5-year period. Between 1999 and 2006, a total of 201 girls and young women had one ovary cryopreserved for fertility preservation in Denmark. One hundred of these met our inclusion criteria, which included a follow-up period of at least 5 years, and were mailed a questionnaire. The response rate...... was 95%. Sixteen of the patients (17%) stated that they wanted disposal of their tissue; the main reason was completion of family (63%). The mean age of those requesting disposal was 36.6 years, whereas those still wanting their tissue stored were significantly younger, with a mean age of 33.0 years (P...

  20. MicroRNA expression profiling in mild asthmatic human airways and effect of corticosteroid therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common disease characterised by reversible airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and chronic inflammation, which is commonly treated using corticosteroids such as budesonide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a recently identified family of non-protein encoding genes that regulate protein translation by a mechanism entitled RNA interference. Previous studies have shown lung-specific miRNA expression profiles, although their importance in regulating gene expression is unresolved. We determined whether miRNA expression was differentially expressed in mild asthma and the effect of corticosteroid treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have examined changes in miRNA using a highly sensitive RT-PCR based approach to measure the expression of 227 miRNAs in airway biopsies obtained from normal and mild asthmatic patients. We have also determined whether the anti-inflammatory action of corticosteroids are mediated through miRNAs by determining the profile of miRNA expression in mild asthmatics, before and following 1 month twice daily treatment with inhaled budesonide. Furthermore, we have analysed the expression of miRNAs from individual cell populations from the airway and lung. We found no significant difference in the expression of 227 miRNAs in the airway biopsies obtained from normal and mild asthmatic patients. In addition, despite improved lung function, we found no significant difference in the miRNA expression following one month treatment with the corticosteroid, budesonide. However, analysis of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, alveolar macrophages and lung fibroblasts demonstrate a miRNA expression profile that is specific to individual cell types and demonstrates the complex cellular heterogeneity within whole tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in miRNA expression do not appear to be involved in the development of a mild asthmatic phenotype or in the anti

  1. Sustainable three-dimensional tissue model of human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Evangelia; Marra, Kacey G; Kaplan, David L

    2013-10-01

    The need for physiologically relevant sustainable human adipose tissue models is crucial for understanding tissue development, disease progression, in vitro drug development and soft tissue regeneration. The coculture of adipocytes differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells, with endothelial cells, on porous silk protein matrices for at least 6 months is reported, while maintaining adipose-like outcomes. Cultures were assessed for structure and morphology (Oil Red O content and CD31 expression), metabolic functions (leptin, glycerol production, gene expression for GLUT4, and PPARγ) and cell replication (DNA content). The cocultures maintained size and shape over this extended period in static cultures, while increasing in diameter by 12.5% in spinner flask culture. Spinner flask cultures yielded improved adipose tissue outcomes overall, based on structure and function, when compared to the static cultures. This work establishes a tissue model system that can be applied to the development of chronic metabolic dysfunction systems associated with human adipose tissue, such as obesity and diabetes, due to the long term sustainable functions demonstrated here.

  2. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Konishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM as a surface marker of NKX2-1+-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs, we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM+ VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a “9 + 2” microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine.

  3. Aluminium in human breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Charles, Lisa M; Barr, Lester; Martin, Claire; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa D

    2007-09-01

    Aluminium is omnipresent in everyday life and increased exposure is resulting in a burgeoning body burden of this non-essential metal. Personal care products are potential contributors to the body burden of aluminium and recent evidence has linked breast cancer with aluminium-based antiperspirants. We have used graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) to measure the aluminium content in breast biopsies obtained following mastectomies. The aluminium content of breast tissue and breast tissue fat were in the range 4-437 nmol/g dry wt. and 3-192 nmol/g oil, respectively. The aluminium content of breast tissue in the outer regions (axilla and lateral) was significantly higher (P=0.033) than the inner regions (middle and medial) of the breast. Whether differences in the regional distribution of aluminium in the breast are related to the known higher incidence of tumours in the outer upper quadrant of the breast remains to be ascertained.

  4. Nitric oxide gas phase release in human small airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an imbalance in both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Exhaled nitric oxide (NO is elevated in asthma, and is a potentially useful non-invasive marker of airway inflammation. However, the origin and underlying mechanisms of intersubject variability of exhaled NO are not yet fully understood. We have previously described NO gas phase release from normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEs, tracheal origin. However, smaller airways are the major site of morbidity in asthma. We hypothesized that IL-13 or cytomix (IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation of differentiated small airway epithelial cells (SAECs, generation 10–12 and A549 cells (model cell line of alveolar type II cells in culture would enhance NO gas phase release. Methods Confluent monolayers of SAECs and A549 cells were cultured in Transwell plates and SAECs were allowed to differentiate into ciliated and mucus producing cells at an air-liquid interface. The cells were then stimulated with IL-13 (10 ng/mL or cytomix (10 ng/mL for each cytokine. Gas phase NO release in the headspace air over the cells was measured for 48 hours using a chemiluminescence analyzer. Results In contrast to our previous result in NHBE, baseline NO release from SAECs and A549 is negligible. However, NO release is significantly increased by cytomix (0.51 ± 0.18 and 0.29 ± 0.20 pl.s-1.cm-2, respectively reaching a peak at approximately 10 hours. iNOS protein expression increases in a consistent pattern both temporally and in magnitude. In contrast, IL-13 only modestly increases NO release in SAECs reaching a peak (0.06 ± 0.03 pl.s-1.cm-2 more slowly (30 to 48 hours, and does not alter NO release in A549 cells. Conclusion We conclude that the airway epithelium is a probable source of NO in the exhaled breath, and intersubject variability may be due, in part, to variability in the type (Th1 vs Th2 and location (large vs small airway

  5. Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in human tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Qing; Vicki L Clifton; CUI Ying; HUI Ning; ZHOU Xiao-ning; HE Qian; HAN Qing-feng; SHA Jin-yan; Roger Smith

    2001-01-01

    To localize where urocortin is expressed in human tissue in an attempt to study its physiological functions. Methods: Expression of immunoreactive urocortin in different human tissue was examined using a specific urocortin antibody and the immunoperoxidase staining method. Results: Immunoreactive urocortin was observed in the anterior pituitary cells, decidual stromal cells, syncytiotrophoblasts, amnion epithelium, the vascular smooth muscles of myometrium, fallopian tube and small intestine. Conclusion: The study indicates that urocortin is expressed in some specific areas of human tissue. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that urocortin is produced locally as an endocrine factor, which may act as a neural regulator and a regulator of local blood flow.

  6. Cervical CT derived neck fat tissue distribution differences in Japanese males and females and its effect on retroglossal and retropalatal airway volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Yuko; Enciso, Reyes; Ogawa, Takumi; Ikawa, Tomoko; Clark, Glenn T

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of neck fat tissue distribution by sex and its correlation with retropalatal and retroglossal airway. Study Design 38 consecutive patients (Male:19;Female:19) who received a CT scan were compared in the retroglossal region and at the narrowest cross-section of the airway. Retroglossal fat tissue volume (FV) was segmented with Amira software and separated into subcutaneous and internal fat volume (SFV, IFV). These volumes were normalized by retroglossal neck volume (NV). Results Men had 51.9% more IFV/NV and 64.4% less SFV/NV compared to the women. Age-adjusted BMI was negatively correlated with retroglossal airway volume (normalized by NV) and with the lateral width of the smallest cross-section airway (LW) in females. In males the IFV/NV was negatively correlated with LW, after adjusting for BMI and age. Conclusion Upper airway collapsibility analysis is needed to rule out whether increased BMI or IFV causes an increase in airway collapsibility. PMID:18554948

  7. Generation of Novel AAV Variants by Directed Evolution for Improved CFTR Delivery to Human Ciliated Airway Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an...

  8. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  9. A Numerical Study of Water Loss Rate Distributions in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    Both three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) computational fluid dynamics methods are applied to study regional water loss in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airway models at the minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. The overall water losses predicted by both 3D and 1D models in the entire respiratory tract agree with available experimental measurements. However, 3D and 1D models reveal different regional water loss rate distributions due to the 3D secondary flows formed at bifurcations. The secondary flows cause local skewed temperature and humidity distributions on inspiration acting to elevate the local water loss rate; and the secondary flow at the carina tends to distribute more cold air to the lower lobes. As a result, the 3D model predicts that the water loss rate first increases with increasing airway generation, and then decreases as the air approaches saturation, while the 1D model predicts a monotonic decrease of water loss rate with increasing airway generation. Moreover, the 3D (or 1D) model predicts relatively higher water loss rates in lower (or upper) lobes. The regional water loss rate can be related to the non-dimensional wall shear stress (τ (*)) by the non-dimensional mass transfer coefficient (h 0 (*) ) as [Formula: see text].

  10. A numerical study of heat and water vapor transfer in MDCT-based human airway models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airways with minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditions for the 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, D a is the airway equivalent diameter, and [Formula: see text] is the tracheal equivalent diameter.

  11. Convective dispersion during steady flow in the conducting airways of the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresconi, Frank E; Prasad, Ajay K

    2008-02-01

    The adverse health effects of inhaled particulate matter from the environment depend on its dispersion, transport, and deposition in the human airways. Similarly, precise targeting of deposition sites by pulmonary drug delivery systems also relies on characterizing the dispersion and transport of therapeutic aerosols in the respiratory tract. A variety of mechanisms may contribute to convective dispersion in the lung; simple axial streaming, augmented dispersion, and steady streaming are investigated in this effort. Flow visualization of a bolus during inhalation and exhalation, and dispersion measurements were conducted during steady flow in a three-generational, anatomically accurate in vitro model of the conducting airways to support this goal. Control variables included Reynolds number, flow direction, generation, and branch. Experiments illustrate transport patterns in the lumen cross section and map their relation to dispersion metrics. These results indicate that simple axial streaming, rather than augmented dispersion, is the dominant steady convective dispersion mechanism in symmetric Weibel generations 7-13 during normal respiration. Experimental evidence supports the branching nature of the airways as a possible contributor to steady streaming in the lung.

  12. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiyeh Marc A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223 of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC criteria established, included: (1 RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN ≥ 7.0; (2 cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3 the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3% passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6% passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04 were significantly lower (p Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation.

  13. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  14. Contraction of human airways by oxidative stress protection by N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, J; Martí-Cabrera, M; de la Asuncíon, J G; Pallardó, F V; Esteras, A; Bruseghini, L; Viña, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    We examined the in vitro effects of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBu-OOH) in human bronchial muscle. tert-Butylhydroperoxide produced concentration-dependent contractions of bronchial rings (maximum effect was 56.5 +/- 9.6% of contraction by 1 mM acetylcholine; effective concentration 50% was approximately 100 microM). tert-Butylhydroperoxide (0.5 mM)-induced contraction was enhanced by epithelial removal but abolished by indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and zileuton (lipoxygenase inhibitor). tert-Butylhydroperoxide produced a transient rise in intracellular calcium in human cultured airway smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). The bronchial reactivity to acetylcholine and histamine was not altered by tBu-OOH. In HCASMC, tBu-OOH (0.5 mM, 30 min) increased malondialdehyde levels (MDA; from 7.80 +/- 0.83 to 26.82 +/- 1.49 nmol mg(-1) protein), accompanied by a decrease of reduced glutathione (GSH; from 16.7 +/- 2.6 to 6.9 +/- 1.9 nmol mg(-1) protein) and an increase of oxidized glutathione (from 0.09 +/- 0.03 to 0.18 +/- 0.03 nmol mg(-1) protein). N-acetylcysteine (0.3 mM) inhibited by approximately 60% the bronchial contraction resulting from tBu-OOH (0.5 mM) and protected cultured cells exposed to tBu-OOH (MDA was lowered to 19.51 +/- 1.19 nmol mg(-1) protein, and GSH content was replenished). In summary, tBu-OOH caused contraction of human bronchial muscle mediated by release of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products without producing airways hyperreactivity. N-acetylcysteine decreases tBu-OOH-induced contraction and protects human cultured airway smooth muscle cells exposed to tBu-OOH.

  15. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  16. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  17. Epidermal growth factor (urogastrone) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Y; Orth, D N

    1979-04-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), which stimulates the growth of a variety of tissues, was first isolated from mouse submandibular glands, but is also excreted in large amounts (about 50 micrograms/day) in human urine and is probably identical to human beta-urogastrone (hUG), a potent inhibitor of stimulated gastric acid secretion. However, the primary tissue source of hEGF/hUG is as yet unknown. The hEGF/hUG in homogenates of human salivary glands and a wide variety of other endocrine and nonendocrine tissues was extracted by Amberlite CG-50 cation exchange chromatography and immune affinity chromatography using the immunoglobulin fraction of rabbit anti-hEGF serum covalently bound to agarose. The extracts were subjected to homologous hEGF RIA. Immunoreactive hEGF was found in extracts of adult submandibular gland, thyroid gland, duodenum, jejunum, and kidney, but not in several fetal tissues. The tissue immunoreactive hEGF was similar to standard hEGF in terms of immunoreactivity and elution from Sephadex G-50 Fine resin, but its concentrations were very low (1.3-5.5 ng/g wet tissue). Thus, it is not certain that these tissues represent the only source of the large amounts of hEGF/hUG that appear to be filtered by the kidneys each day.

  18. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    in human subcutaneous adipose tissue by a microdialysis technique. Seven healthy young volunteers each had four microdialysis probes placed in the fat (subcutaneous) layer of the abdominal skin. After the administration of a 240-mg gentamicin intravenous bolus, consecutive measurements of the drug...... of the gentamicin concentration in human subcutaneous tissue. In this adipose tissue, the peak concentrations of gentamicin were approximately seven times the MIC for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 33 times the MIC for Staphylococcus aureus after the administration of an intravenous bolus of 240 mg, indicating......Wound infections frequently originate from the subcutaneous tissue. The effect of gentamicin in subcutaneous tissue has, however, normally been evaluated from concentrations in blood or wound fluid. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of gentamicin...

  19. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of the noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae: adaptation and pathogenesis in the human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Moleres, Javier; Puig, Carmen; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-12-01

    The human respiratory tract contains a highly adapted microbiota including commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Noncapsulated or nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human-restricted member of the normal airway microbiota in healthy carriers and an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The duality of NTHi as a colonizer and as a symptomatic infectious agent is closely related to its adaptation to the host, which in turn greatly relies on the genetic plasticity of the bacterium and is facilitated by its condition as a natural competent. The variable genotype of NTHi accounts for its heterogeneous gene expression and variable phenotype, leading to differential host-pathogen interplay among isolates. Here we review our current knowledge of NTHi diversity in terms of genotype, gene expression, antigenic variation, and the phenotypes associated with colonization and pathogenesis. The potential benefits of NTHi diversity studies discussed herein include the unraveling of pathogenicity clues, the generation of tools to predict virulence from genomic data, and the exploitation of a unique natural system for the continuous monitoring of long-term bacterial evolution in human airways exposed to noxious agents. Finally, we highlight the challenge of monitoring both the pathogen and the host in longitudinal studies, and of applying comparative genomics to clarify the meaning of the vast NTHi genetic diversity and its translation to virulence phenotypes.

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-G expression in differentiated human airway epithelial cells: lack of modulation by Th2-associated cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G is a nonclassical class I antigen with immunomodulatory roles including up-regulation of suppressor T regulatory lymphocytes. HLA-G was recently identified as an asthma susceptibility gene, and expression of a soluble isoform, HLA-G5, has been demonstrated in human airway epithelium. Increased presence of HLA-G5 has been demonstrated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from patients with mild asthma; this suggests a role for this isoform in modulating airway inflammation though the mechanisms by which this occurs is unclear. Airway inflammation associated with Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 is a principal feature of asthma, but whether these cytokines elicit expression of HLA-G is not known. Methods We examined gene and protein expression of both soluble (G5 and membrane-bound (G1 HLA-G isoforms in primary differentiated human airway epithelial cells collected from normal lungs and grown in air-liquid interface culture. Cells were treated with up to 10 ng/ml of either IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13, or 100 ng/ml of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10, or 10,000 U/ml of the Th1-associated cytokine interferon-beta, for 24 hr, after which RNA was isolated for evaluation by quantitative PCR and protein was collected for Western blot analysis. Results HLA-G5 but not G1 was present in dAEC as demonstrated by quantitative PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Neither G5 nor G1 expression was increased by the Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5 or IL-13 over 24 hr, nor after treatment with IL-10, but was increased 4.5 ± 1.4 fold after treatment with 10,000 U/ml interferon-beta. Conclusions These data demonstrate the constitutive expression of a T lymphocyte regulatory molecule in differentiated human airway epithelial cells that is not modulated by Th2-associated cytokines.

  1. Clonality evaluation in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant proliferations are usually clonal. While most times the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic and clinical examinations, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, in some situations there are dominant clones whose analysis is important, such as in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality, namely: evaluation of gene rearrangements of antigen receptor, and evaluation of human antigen receptor gene.

  2. Bioaerosols from a Food Waste Composting Plant Affect Human Airway Epithelial Cell Remodeling Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The composting procedure in food waste plants generates airborne bioaerosols that have the potential to damage human airway epithelial cells. Persistent inflammation and repair responses induce airway remodeling and damage to the respiratory system. This study elucidated the expression changes of airway remodeling genes in human lung mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 cells exposed to bioaerosols from a composting plant. Different types of microorganisms were detectable in the composting plant, using the agar culture method. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the level of Aspergillus fumigatus and the profile of remodeling genes. The real-time PCR results indicated that the amount of A. fumigatus in the composting hall was less than 102 conidia. The endotoxins in the field bioaerosols were determined using a limulus amebocyte lysate test. The endotoxin levels depended on the type of particulate matter (PM, with coarse particles (2.5–10 μm having higher endotoxin levels than did fine particles (0.5–2.5 μm. After exposure to the conditioned medium of field bioaerosol samples, NCI-H292 cells showed increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL-6 release and activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21WAF1/CIP1 gene expression, but not of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP-9. Airborne endotoxin levels were higher inside the composting hall than they were in other areas, and they were associated with PM. This suggested that airborne bioaerosols in the composting plant contained endotoxins and microorganisms besides A. fumigatus that cause the inflammatory cytokine secretion and augment the expression of remodeling genes in NCI-H292 cells. It is thus necessary to monitor potentially hazardous materials from bioaerosols in food composting plants, which could affect the health of workers.

  3. Connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from airway smooth muscle interact with the extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree H; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L; Johnson, Peter R A

    2006-01-01

    Airway remodeling describes the structural changes that occur in the asthmatic airway that include airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, increases in vascularity due to angiogenesis, and thickening of the basement membrane. Our aim in this study was to examine the effect of transforming growth factor-be

  4. PAR-2 activation, PGE2, and COX-2 in human asthmatic and nonasthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, Linda S.; Black, Judith L.; Ge, Qi; Carlin, Stephen M.; Au, Wendy W.; Poniris, Maree; Thompson, Joanne; Johnson, Peter R.; Burgess, Janette K.

    2003-01-01

    The protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is present on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and can be activated by mast cell tryptase, trypsin, or an activating peptide (AP). Trypsin induced significant increases in PGE 2 release from human ASM cells after 6 and 24 h and also induced cyclooxygen

  5. PAR-2 activation, PGE2, and COX-2 in human asthmatic and nonasthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, Linda S; Black, Judith L; Ge, Qi; Carlin, Stephen M; Au, Wendy W; Poniris, Maree; Thompson, Joanne; Johnson, Peter R; Burgess, Janette K

    2003-01-01

    The protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is present on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and can be activated by mast cell tryptase, trypsin, or an activating peptide (AP). Trypsin induced significant increases in PGE2 release from human ASM cells after 6 and 24 h and also induced cyclooxygena

  6. Demand for human allograft tissue in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Jonathan R T; Mirbolooki, Mohammadreza; Rogers, Christina; Mohr, Jim

    2007-01-01

    There is relatively little known about the demand for allograft tissues in Canada. The Canadian Council for Donation and Transplantation (CCDT) is a national advisory body that undertook a comprehensive "market survey" to estimate surgical demand for human allograft tissues in Canada. The report "Demand for Human Allograft Tissue in Canada" reflects survey results sent to 5 prominent User Groups. User Groups were identified as orthopaedic surgeons; neurosurgeons; corneal transplant surgeons; plastic surgeons, specifically those at Canadian Burn Units; and cardiac surgeons (adult and paediatric surgery). The demand for allograft grafts was determined and then extrapolated across the total User Group and then increases in allograft tissue use over the next 1-2 years across User Groups were predicted. The overall response rate for the survey was 21.4%. It varied from a low of 19.6% for the orthopaedic survey to a high of 40.5% for the corneal survey. The estimated current demand for allograft tissue in Canada ranges from a low of 34,442 grafts per year to a high of 62,098 grafts per year. The predicted increase in use of allograft tissue over the next 1-2 year period would suggest that annual demand could rise to somewhere in the range of 42,589-72,210 grafts. The highest rated preferences (98% and 94%) were for accredited and Canadian tissue banks, respectively. This study represents a key step in addressing the paucity of information concerning the demand for allograft tissue in Canada.

  7. Olfactory receptors modulate physiological processes in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kalbe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases.

  8. LMTK2-mediated phosphorylation regulates CFTR endocytosis in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Simão; Cihil, Kristine M; Brautigan, David L; Amaral, Margarida D; Farinha, Carlos M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2014-05-23

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl(-)-selective ion channel expressed in fluid-transporting epithelia. Lemur tyrosine kinase 2 (LMTK2) is a transmembrane protein with serine and threonine but not tyrosine kinase activity. Previous work identified CFTR as an in vitro substrate of LMTK2, suggesting a functional link. Here we demonstrate that LMTK2 co-immunoprecipitates with CFTR and phosphorylates CFTR-Ser(737) in human airway epithelial cells. LMTK2 knockdown or expression of inactive LMTK2 kinase domain increases cell surface density of CFTR by attenuating its endocytosis in human airway epithelial cells. Moreover, LMTK2 knockdown increases Cl(-) secretion mediated by the wild-type and rescued ΔF508-CFTR. Compared with the wild-type CFTR, the phosphorylation-deficient mutant CFTR-S737A shows increased cell surface density and decreased endocytosis. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism of the phospho-dependent inhibitory effect of CFTR-Ser(737) mediated by LMTK2 via endocytosis and inhibition of the cell surface density of CFTR Cl(-) channels. These data indicate that targeting LMTK2 may increase the cell surface density of CFTR Cl(-) channels and improve stability of pharmacologically rescued ΔF508-CFTR in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  9. T cell subsets in human airways prior to and following endobronchial administration of endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Plovsing, Ronni R; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bronchial instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provides a reversible model of lung inflammation that may resemble early stages of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We investigated the distributions of T-cell subsets in the human airways and sought to deter......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bronchial instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provides a reversible model of lung inflammation that may resemble early stages of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We investigated the distributions of T-cell subsets in the human airways and sought...... to determine whether pro- and anti-inflammatory T cells are involved in the local immune response to lung inflammation. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 15 healthy volunteers, after which Escherichia coli LPS (4 ng/kg) was administered. BAL was repeated at 2, 4, 6, 8 or 24 h after...... instillation of LPS. RESULTS: BALF CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were characterized by expression of activation markers (HLA-DR+CD38+), the proportion of cells expressing naïve markers (CD45RA+CD27+CCR7+) was lower, and that of cells expressing effector memory markers (CD45RA-CD27+CCR7-) was higher, compared...

  10. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurally mediated airway constriction in human and other species: a comparative study using precision-cut lung slices (PCLS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Schlepütz

    Full Text Available The peripheral airway innervation of the lower respiratory tract of mammals is not completely functionally characterized. Recently, we have shown in rats that precision-cut lung slices (PCLS respond to electric field stimulation (EFS and provide a useful model to study neural airway responses in distal airways. Since airway responses are known to exhibit considerable species differences, here we examined the neural responses of PCLS prepared from mice, rats, guinea pigs, sheep, marmosets and humans. Peripheral neurons were activated either by EFS or by capsaicin. Bronchoconstriction in response to identical EFS conditions varied between species in magnitude. Frequency response curves did reveal further species-dependent differences of nerve activation in PCLS. Atropine antagonized the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction in human, guinea pig, sheep, rat and marmoset PCLS, showing cholinergic responses. Capsaicin (10 µM caused bronchoconstriction in human (4 from 7 and guinea pig lungs only, indicating excitatory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses (eNANC. However, this effect was notably smaller in human responder (30 ± 7.1% than in guinea pig (79 ± 5.1% PCLS. The transient receptor potential (TRP channel blockers SKF96365 and ruthenium red antagonized airway contractions after exposure to EFS or capsaicin in guinea pigs. In conclusion, the different species show distinct patterns of nerve-mediated bronchoconstriction. In the most common experimental animals, i.e. in mice and rats, these responses differ considerably from those in humans. On the other hand, guinea pig and marmoset monkey mimic human responses well and may thus serve as clinically relevant models to study neural airway responses.

  12. Generation of novel AAV variants by directed evolution for improved CFTR delivery to human ciliated airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium. Two independent and novel AAV variants were identified that contained capsid components from AAV-1, AAV-6, and/or AAV-9. The transduction efficiencies of the two novel AAV variants for human ciliated airway epithelium were three times higher than that for AAV-6. The novel variants were then used to deliver CFTR to ciliated airway epithelium from CF patients. Here we show that our novel AAV variants, but not the parental, AAV provide sufficient CFTR delivery to correct the chloride ion transport defect to ~25% levels measured in non-CF cells. These results suggest that directed evolution of AAV on relevant in vitro models will enable further improvements in CFTR gene transfer efficiency and the development of an efficacious and safe gene transfer vector for CF lung disease.

  13. Generation of Novel AAV Variants by Directed Evolution for Improved CFTR Delivery to Human Ciliated Airway Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium. Two independent and novel AAV variants were identified that contained capsid components from AAV-1, AAV-6, and/or AAV-9. The transduction efficiencies of the two novel AAV variants for human ciliated airway epithelium were three times higher than that for AAV-6. The novel variants were then used to deliver CFTR to ciliated airway epithelium from CF patients. Here we show that our novel AAV variants, but not the parental, AAV provide sufficient CFTR delivery to correct the chloride ion transport defect to ~25% levels measured in non-CF cells. These results suggest that directed evolution of AAV on relevant in vitro models will enable further improvements in CFTR gene transfer efficiency and the development of an efficacious and safe gene transfer vector for CF lung disease. PMID:19603002

  14. Prediction of localized aerosol deposition in a realistic replica of human airways using experimental data and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Belka, Miloslav; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The presence of aerosol deposition hot-spots in human airways presumably contributes to development of various diseases. The overall aerosol deposition in human lungs can be predicted with sufficient accuracy nowadays. However, the prediction of localized aerosol deposition poses arduous challenge, namely in diseased lungs. Numerical simulation is considered to be a promising tool for the successful prediction. Yet, the validation of such simulations is difficult to perform, as not enough experimental data acquired using realistic airway replicas is available. This paper presents a first comparison of localized deposition measurement and simulation performed on the identical realistic geometry. The analysis indicates that both approaches yield similar results for low Reynolds number flows.

  15. Sustained calcium entry through P2X nucleotide receptor channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsembery, Akos; Boyce, Amanda T; Liang, Lihua; Peti-Peterdi, János; Bell, P Darwin; Schwiebert, Erik M

    2003-04-11

    Purinergic receptor stimulation has potential therapeutic effects for cystic fibrosis (CF). Thus, we explored roles for P2Y and P2X receptors in stably increasing [Ca(2+)](i) in human CF (IB3-1) and non-CF (16HBE14o(-)) airway epithelial cells. Cytosolic Ca(2+) was measured by fluorospectrometry using the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. Expression of P2X receptor (P2XR) subtypes was assessed by immunoblotting and biotinylation. In IB3-1 cells, ATP and other P2Y agonists caused only a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) derived from intracellular stores in a Na(+)-rich environment. In contrast, ATP induced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that had transient and sustained components in a Na(+)-free medium; the sustained plateau was potentiated by zinc or increasing extracellular pH. Benzoyl-benzoyl-ATP, a P2XR-selective agonist, increased [Ca(2+)](i) only in Na(+)-free medium, suggesting competition between Na(+) and Ca(2+) through P2XRs. Biochemical evidence showed that the P2X(4) receptor is the major subtype shared by these airway epithelial cells. A role for store-operated Ca(2+) channels, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the ATP-induced sustained Ca(2+) signal was ruled out. In conclusion, these data show that epithelial P2X(4) receptors serve as ATP-gated calcium entry channels that induce a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In airway epithelia, a P2XR-mediated Ca(2+) signal may have therapeutic benefit for CF.

  16. Aldose reductase regulates acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh C S; Ramana, K V; Srivastava, Satish K

    2013-12-01

    Aldose reductase (AR), a glucose-metabolizing enzyme, reduces lipid aldehydes and their glutathione conjugates with more than 1000-fold efficiency (Km aldehydes 5-30 µM) relative to glucose. Acrolein, a major endogenous lipid peroxidation product as well as a component of environmental pollutants and cigarette smoke, is known to be involved in various pathologies including atherosclerosis, airway inflammation, COPD, and age-related disorders, but the mechanism of acrolein-induced cytotoxicity is not clearly understood. We have investigated the role of AR in acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). Exposure of SAECs to varying concentrations of acrolein caused cell death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. AR inhibition by fidarestat prevented the low-dose (5-10 µM) but not the high-dose (>10 µM) acrolein-induced SAEC death. AR inhibition protected SAECs from low-dose (5 µM) acrolein-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of acrolein-induced apoptosis by fidarestat was confirmed by decreased condensation of nuclear chromatin, DNA fragmentation, comet tail moment, and annexin V fluorescence. Further, fidarestat inhibited acrolein-induced translocation of the proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that of Bcl2 and BclXL from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Acrolein-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria was also prevented by AR inhibition. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and p38MAPK, and c-Jun were transiently activated in airway epithelial cells by acrolein in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. These results suggest that AR inhibitors could prevent acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in the lung epithelial cells.

  17. Test of the Starling resistor model in the human upper airway during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Andrew; Genta, Pedro R; Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Loring, Stephen H; White, David P; Jackson, Andrew C; Pedersen, Ole F; Butler, James P

    2014-12-15

    The human pharyngeal airway during sleep is conventionally modeled as a Starling resistor. However, inspiratory flow often decreases with increasing effort (negative effort dependence, NED) rather than remaining fixed as predicted by the Starling resistor model. In this study, we tested a major prediction of the Starling resistor model--that the resistance of the airway upstream from the site of collapse remains fixed during flow limitation. During flow limitation in 24 patients with sleep apnea, resistance at several points along the pharyngeal airway was measured using a pressure catheter with multiple sensors. Resistance between the nose and the site of collapse (the upstream segment) was measured before and after the onset of flow limitation to determine whether the upstream dimensions remained fixed (as predicted by the Starling resistor model) or narrowed (a violation of the Starling resistor model). The upstream resistance from early to mid inspiration increased considerably during flow limitation (by 35 ± 41 cmH2O · liter(-1) · s(-1), P < 0.001). However, there was a wide range of variability between patients, and the increase in upstream resistance was strongly correlated with the amount of NED (r = 0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, patients with little NED exhibited little upstream narrowing (consistent with the Starling model), and patients with large NED exhibited large upstream narrowing (inconsistent with the Starling model). These findings support the idea that there is not a single model of pharyngeal collapse, but rather that different mechanisms may dominate in different patients. These differences could potentially be exploited for treatment selection. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Ozonolysis products of membrane fatty acids activate eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Zhao, Q.; Zhou, S.; Santrock, J. (Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (United States))

    1993-12-01

    When inhaled, ozone reacts at the airway luminal surface with unsaturated fatty acids contained in the extracellular fluid and plasma membrane to form an aldehyde and hydroxyhydroperoxide. The resulting hydroxyhydroperoxide degrades in aqueous systems to yield a second aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Previously, we demonstrated that ozone can augment eicosanoid metabolism in bovine airway epithelial cells. To examine structure-activity relationships of ozone-fatty acid degradation products on eicosanoid metabolism in human airway epithelial cells, 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon saturated aldehydes and hydroxyhydroperoxides were synthesized and purified. Eicosanoid metabolism was evaluated by determination of total 3H-activity release from confluent cells previously incubated with [3H]arachidonic acid and by identification of specific metabolites with high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. The major metabolites detected were prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. The 9-carbon aldehyde, nonanal, in contrast to 3- or 6-carbon aldehydes, stimulated release at concentrations > or = 100 microM, suggesting that the stimulatory effect increases with increasing chain length. When tested under identical conditions, the 3-, 6-, and 9-carbon hydroxyhydroperoxides were more potent than the corresponding aldehydes. Again, a greater effect was noted when the chain length was increased. One possible explanation for the increased potency of the hydroxyhydroperoxides over the aldehydes could be due to degradation of the hydroxyhydroperoxide into H2O2 and aldehyde. We consider this an unlikely explanation because responses varied with chain length (although each hydroxyhydroperoxide would produce an equivalent amount of H2O2) and because exposure to H2O2 alone or H2O2 plus hexanal produced a response dissimilar to 1-hydroxy-1-hexanehydroperoxide.

  19. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  20. [Human lung connective tissue in postnatal ontogeny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimtsev, A A; Nikolaev, V G

    1993-01-01

    Changes of the connective tissue structures, appearing during all postnatal ontogenesis stages were studied in 147 human lung specimens of different age groups (from newborns up to 82-year-olds). Qualitative and quantitative composition of connective tissue structures changes with the age which leads to the lateral aggregation of the fibers and growth of the general mass of the connective tissue. Heterochronia of the age variability manifestations in different regions of the lung framework was demonstrated. The original age transformations of connective tissue structures are characteristic for the basal lung regions. With the exception of perivasal connective tissue, similar changes in the region of the lung apexes appear 3-5 years later. This gives an opportunity to distinguish three anatomic zones in the lungs in an apico-basal direction, characterising the local nature of the age changes manifestations.

  1. Modelling the human pharyngeal airway: validation of numerical simulations using in vitro experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Chouly, Franz; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Pelorson, Xavier; Payan, Yohan; 10.1007/s11517-008-0412-1

    2008-01-01

    In the presented study, a numerical model which predicts the flow-induced collapse within the pharyngeal airway is validated using in vitro measurements. Theoretical simplifications were considered to limit the computation time. Systematic comparisons between simulations and measurements were performed on an in vitro replica, which reflects asymmetries of the geometry and of the tissue properties at the base of the tongue and in pathological conditions (strong initial obstruction). First, partial obstruction is observed and predicted. Moreover, the prediction accuracy of the numerical model is of 4.2% concerning the deformation (mean quadratic error on the constriction area). It shows the ability of the assumptions and method to predict accurately and quickly a fluid-structure interaction.

  2. Tracing molecular and structural changes upon mucolysis with N-acetyl cysteine in human airway mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljevic, Branko; Murgia, Xabier; Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Windbergs, Maike

    2017-07-11

    The conducting airways of the human lungs are lined by mucus, which lubricates the lung epithelium and provides a first-line protection against airborne threats. As a novel approach for visualization of the human mucus microstructure, we applied confocal Raman microscopy as a label-free and chemically selective technique. We were successfully able to chemically resolve the pulmonary surfactant from the mucus matrix and show its spatial distribution, as well as to visualize the structural changes within the freeze-dried mucus mesh upon chemical mucolysis. Subsequently, we performed rheological measurements before and after mucolysis and correlated morphology and chemical structure of the mucus with its rheological characteristics. These results do not only enrich the knowledge about the mucus microstructure, but can also, significantly contribute to rational development of future lung therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties...... differences in DC stimulating properties of bacteria associated with the airway microbiota....... of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella...

  4. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  5. Human influenza is more effective than avian influenza at antiviral suppression in airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Chen-Yu; Barr, Ian; Hansbro, Philip M; Wark, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the initial site of infection with influenza viruses. The innate immune responses of airway epithelial cells to infection are important in limiting virus replication and spread. However, relatively little is known about the importance of this innate antiviral response to infection. Avian influenza viruses are a potential source of future pandemics; therefore, it is critical to examine the effectiveness of the host antiviral system to different influenza viruses. We used a human influenza (H3N2) and a low-pathogenic avian influenza (H11N9) to assess and compare the antiviral responses of Calu-3 cells. After infection, H3N2 replicated more effectively than the H11N9 in Calu-3 cells. This was not due to differential expression of sialic acid residues on Calu-3 cells, but was attributed to the interference of host antiviral responses by H3N2. H3N2 induced a delayed antiviral signaling and impaired type I and type III IFN induction compared with the H11N9. The gene encoding for nonstructural (NS) 1 protein was transfected into the bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), and the H3N2 NS1 induced a greater inhibition of antiviral responses compared with the H11N9 NS1. Although the low-pathogenic avian influenza virus was capable of infecting BECs, the human influenza virus replicated more effectively than avian influenza virus in BECs, and this was due to a differential ability of the two NS1 proteins to inhibit antiviral responses. This suggests that the subversion of human antiviral responses may be an important requirement for influenza viruses to adapt to the human host and cause disease.

  6. The Effects of High Frequency Oscillatory Flow on Particles' Deposition in Upper Human Lung Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid; Taherian, Shahab

    2016-11-01

    The effects of oscillatory inspiration on particles' deposition in upper airways of a human lung during inhalation/exhalation have been numerically investigated and results of flow characteristics, and particles' deposition pattern have been compared with the corresponding results without oscillation. The objective of the investigation was to develop an improved method for drug delivery for Asthma and COPD patients. Previous clinical investigations of using oral airway oscillations have shown enhanced expectoration in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, when the frequency of oscillation was at 8 Hz with 9:1 inspiratory/expiratory (I:E) ratio. Other investigations on oscillatory ventilation had frequency range of 0.5 Hz to 2.5 Hz. In the present investigations, the frequency of oscillation was changed between 2 Hz to 10 Hz. The particles were injected at the inlet and particle velocity was equal to the inlet air velocity. One-way coupling of air and particles was assumed. Lagrangian phase model was used for transport and depositions of solid 2.5 micron diameter round particles with 1200 kg/m3 density. Preliminary results have shown enhanced PM deposition with oscillatory flow with lower frequency having a higher deposition rate Graduate Assistant.

  7. In vitro assessment of human airway toxicity from major aldehydes in automotive emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafstroem, R.C. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Automotive exhausts can significantly contribute to the levels of reactive aldehydes, including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein, in urban air. The use of alcohols as an alternative fuel for gasoline or diesel may further increase these emissions. Since it is unclear if aldehyde inhalation may induce pathological states, including cancer, in human airways, the toxic properties of the above-mentioned aldehydes were studied in cultured target cell types. Each aldehyde modified vital cellular functions in a dose-dependent manner, and invariably inhibited growth and induced abnormal terminal differentiation. Decreases of cellular thiols and increases of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} were observed, and moreover, variable types and amounts of short-lived or persistent genetic damage were induced. The concentrations required for specified levels of a particular type of injury varied up to 10000-fold among the aldehydes. Overall, distinctive patterns of cytopathological activity were observed, which differed both qualitatively and quantitatively among the aldehydes. Finally, aldehydes inhibited DNA repair processes and increased cytotoxicity and mutagenesis in synergy with other known toxicants, indicating that aldehydes may also enhance damage by other constituents in automotive exhausts. In summary, the aldehydes, notably {sup m}u{sup M}-mM formaldehyde, caused pathological effects and induced mechanisms that relate to acute toxicity and cancer development in airway epithelial cells. Since `no-effect` levels may not exist for carcinogenic agents, the overall results support a need for elimination of aldehydes in automotive exhausts. 41 refs

  8. Proteomic analysis of pure human airway gland mucus reveals a large component of protective proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Soo Joo

    Full Text Available Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269-319 proteins per subject. We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38% had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican. A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment.

  9. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrita DOSANJH

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein that promotes extracellular matrix deposition. CTGF is selectively induced by transforming growth factor β and des-Arg kallidin in lung fibroblasts and increases steady-state mRNA levels of α type I collagen, 5α-integrin and fibronectin in fibroblasts. Bronchial epithelial cells have been proposed to functionally interact with lung fibroblasts. We therefore investigated if bronchial epithelial cells are able to synthesize CTGF. Human bronchial epithelial cells were grown to subconfluence in standard growth media. Proliferating cells grown in small airway growth media were harvested following starvation for up to 24 h. Expression of CTGF transcripts was measured by PCR. Immunocytochemistry was also completed using a commercially available antibody.The cells expressed readily detectable CTGF transcripts. Starvation of these cells resulted in a quantitative decline of CTGF transcripts. Direct sequencing of the PCR product identified human CTGF. Immunocytochemistry confirmed intracellular CTGF in the cells and none in negative control cells. We conclude that bronchial epithelial cells could be a novel source of CTGF. Bronchial epithelial cell-derived CTGF could thus directly influence the deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic lung diseases.

  10. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Proud

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  11. Lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Guo, Lifei; Orgill, Dennis P; Padera, Robert F; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    Capsular contraction is the most common complication of breast reconstruction surgery. While presence of the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) is considered among the causes of capsular contraction, the exact etiology and pathophysiology is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of lubricin in capsular formation and contraction by determining the presence and distribution of the lubricating protein lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules. Related aims were to evaluate select histopathologic features of the capsules, and the percentage of cells expressing α-SMA, which reflects the myofibroblast phenotype. Capsules from tissue expanders were obtained from eight patients. Lubricin, at the tissue-implant interface, in the extracellular matrix, and in cells, and α-SMA-containing cells were evaluated immunohistochemically. The notable finding was that lubricin was identified in all tissue expander capsules: as a discrete layer at the tissue-implant interface, extracellular, and intracellular. There was a greater amount of lubricin in the extracellular matrix in the intimal-subintimal zone when compared with the tissue away from the implant. Varying degrees of synovial metaplasia were seen at the tissue-implant interface. α-SMA-containing cells were also seen in all but one patient. The findings might help us better understand factors involved in capsule formation.

  12. Research of transport and deposition of aerosol in human airway replica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mravec Filip

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern about knowledge of aerosol transport in human lungs is caused by great potential of use of inhaled pharmaceuticals. Second substantial motive for the research is an effort to minimize adverse effects of particular matter emitted by traffic and industry on human health. We created model geometry of human lungs to 7th generation of branching. This model geometry was used for fabrication of two physical models. The first one is made from thin walled transparent silicone and it allows a measurement of velocity and size of aerosol particles by Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA. The second one is fabricated by stereolithographic method and it is designed for aerosol deposition measurements. We provided a series of measurements of aerosol transport in the transparent model and we ascertained remarkable phenomena linked with lung flow. The results are presented in brief. To gather how this phenomena affects aerosol deposition in human lungs we used the second model and we developed a technique for deposition fraction and deposition efficiency assessment. The results confirmed that non-symmetric and complicated shape of human airways essentially affects transport and deposition of aerosol. The research will now focus on deeper insight in aerosol deposition.

  13. The impact of low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching of human bronchi on airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Morgan; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Naline, Emmanuel; Buenestado, Amparo; Brollo, Marion; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Kleinmann, Philippe; Devillier, Philippe; Faisy, Christophe

    2016-11-14

    In vivo, the airways are constantly subjected to oscillatory strain (due to tidal breathing during spontaneous respiration) and (in the event of mechanical ventilation) positive pressure. This exposure is especially problematic for the cartilage-free bronchial tree. The effects of cyclic stretching (other than high-force stretching) have not been extensively characterized. Hence, the objective of the present study was to investigate the functional and transcriptional response of human bronchi to repetitive mechanical stress caused by low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching. After preparation and equilibration in an organ bath, human bronchial rings from 66 thoracic surgery patients were stretched in 1-min cycles of elongation and relaxation over a 60-min period. For each segment, the maximal tension corresponded to 80% of the reference contraction (the response to 3 mM acetylcholine). The impact of cyclic stretching (relative to non-stretched controls) was examined by performing functional assessments (epithelium removal and incubation with sodium channel agonists/antagonists or inhibitors of intracellular pathways), biochemical assays of the organ bath fluid (for detecting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines), and RT-PCR assays of RNA isolated from tissue samples. The application of low-force cyclic stretching to human bronchial rings for 60 min resulted in an immediate, significant increase in bronchial basal tone, relative to non-cyclic stretching (4.24 ± 0.16 g vs. 3.28 ± 0.12 g, respectively; p stretching up-regulated the early mRNA expression of MMP9 only, and was not associated with changes in organ bath levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching of whole human bronchi induced a myogenic response rather than activation of the pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated by mechanotransduction.

  14. Contribution of protein kinase C to passively sensitized human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许淑云; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Background Airway smooth muscle proliferation plays an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. But little is known about the intracellular signal pathway in the airway smooth muscle cell proliferation in asthma. The objective of this paper is to investigate the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) and its alpha isoform to passively sensitized human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) proliferation.Methods HASMCs in culture were passively sensitized with 10% serum from asthmatic patients, with non-asthmatic human serum treated HASMCs used as the control. The proliferation of HASMCs was examined by cell cycle analysis, 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence staining. The effect of PKC agonist phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 on the proliferation of HASMCs exposed to human asthmatic serum and non-asthmatic control serum was also examined by the same methods. The protein and mRNA expression of PKC-α in passively sensitized HASMCs were detected by immunofluorescence staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.Results The percentage of S phase, absorbance (value A) and the positive percentage of PCNA protein expression in HASMCs passively sensitized with asthmatic serum were (16.30±2.68)%, 0.430±0.060 and (63.4±7.4)% respectively, which were significantly increased compared with HASMCs treated with control serum [(10.01±1.38)%, 0.328±0.034 and (37.2±4.8)%, respectively] (P<0.05). After HASMCs were passively sensitized with asthmatic serum, they were treated with PMA, the percentage of S phase, value A and the positive percentage of PCNA protein expression were (20.33±3.39)%, 0.542±0.065 and (76.0±8.7)% respectively, which were significantly increased compared with asthmatic serum sensitized HASMCs without PMA(P<0.05). After HASMCs passively sensitized with asthmatic serum were treated with

  15. Expression of connective tissue growth factor in asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Johnson, Peter R A; Ge, Qi; Au, Wendy W; Poniris, Maree H; McParland, Brent E; King, Greg; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L

    2003-01-01

    There is strong evidence to implicate transforming growth factor-beta in the remodeling that occurs in asthma, as levels are increased in bronchial lavage fluid and gene expression is increased in bronchial tissue. Transforming growth factor-beta is also known to increase the release of collagen fro

  16. Recurrent pregnancy-related upper airway obstruction caused by intratracheal ectopic thyroid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, H; Jørgensen, K E; Oster-Jørgensen, E

    1999-01-01

    An unusual case of recurrent pregnancy-related thyroid growth stimulation is reported. A 27-year-old euthyroid woman had pulmonary symptoms, thought to be asthma during her first pregnancy, that improved postpartum. Bronchodilatators had no effect and symptoms recurred from gestational week 22 du...... intratracheal ectopic thyroid tissue diagnosed during pregnancy....

  17. Serelaxin improves the therapeutic efficacy of RXFP1-expressing human amnion epithelial cells in experimental allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Simon G; Tominaga, Anna M; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Lim, Rebecca; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2016-12-01

    Current asthma therapies primarily target airway inflammation (AI) and suppress episodes of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) but fail to treat airway remodelling (AWR), which can develop independently of AI and contribute to irreversible airway obstruction. The present study compared the anti-remodelling and therapeutic efficacy of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to that of human amnion epithelial stem cells (AECs) in the setting of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD), in the absence or presence of an anti-fibrotic (serelaxin; RLX). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD, were either vehicle-treated (OVA alone) or treated with MSCs or AECs alone [intranasally (i.n.)-administered with 1×10(6) cells once weekly], RLX alone (i.n.-administered with 0.8 mg/ml daily) or a combination of MSCs or AECs and RLX from weeks 9-11 (n=6/group). Measures of AI, AWR and AHR were then assessed. OVA alone exacerbated AI, epithelial damage/thickness, sub-epithelial extracellular matrix (ECM) and total collagen deposition, markers of collagen turnover and AHR compared with that in saline-treated counterparts (all P<0.01 compared with saline-treated controls). RLX or AECs (but not MSCs) alone normalized epithelial thickness and partially diminished the OVA-induced fibrosis and AHR by ∼40-50% (all P<0.05 compared with OVA alone). Furthermore, the combination treatments normalized epithelial thickness, measures of fibrosis and AHR to that in normal mice, and significantly decreased AI. Although AECs alone demonstrated greater protection against the AAD-induced AI, AWR and AHR, compared with that of MSCs alone, combining RLX with MSCs or AECs reversed airway fibrosis and AHR to an even greater extent. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  19. Tedizolid inhibits MUC5AC production induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazuaki; Kaku, Norihito; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2017-09-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role in early immunity against respiratory tract infection. Although airway epithelial cells produce mucus to eliminate pathogens and irritants, hypersecretion of mucus is harmful for the host as it may cause airway obstruction and inhibit influx of antimicrobial agents. It has been reported that several antimicrobial agents have an immunomodulatory effect in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about whether tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, can modulate immune responses. In this study, we evaluated whether tedizolid can suppress MUC5AC production in human airway epithelial cells stimulated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Compared with the control, tedizolid significantly inhibited MUC5AC protein production and mRNA overexpression at concentrations of both 2 and 10 μg/mL (representative of trough and peak concentrations in human epithelial lining fluid). Among the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors tested, only extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was inhibited by tedizolid as indicated by western blot analysis. These results indicate that tedizolid inhibits the overproduction of MUC5AC protein by inhibiting phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study revealed that tedizolid suppresses excessive mucin production in human airway epithelial cells. The immunomodulatory effect of tedizolid may improve outcomes in patients with severe respiratory infectious diseases caused by MRSA. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selection and fabrication of a non-woven polycarbonate urethane cover for a tissue engineered airway stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Weiluan; Clauser, Johanna; Thiebes, Anja Lena; McGrath, Donnacha J.; McHugh, Peter E.; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hennink, Wim E.; Kok, Robbert Jan

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems in end-stage bronchotracheal cancer is stenosis of the upper airways, either due to luminal ingrowth of the tumor or mucus plugging. Airway stents that suppress tumor ingrowth and sustain mucociliary transport can alleviate these problems in end-stage bronchial cancer. We

  1. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, J.M.; Steen-Jensen, D.B.; Laursen, J.M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Musavian, H.S.; Butt, T.M.; Brix, S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties o

  2. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.42 Human tissue offered for import. (a...

  3. Noise analysis and single-channel observations of 4 pS chloride channels in human airway epithelia.

    OpenAIRE

    Duszyk, M; French, A S; Man, S F

    1992-01-01

    Apical membranes of human airway epithelial cells have significant chloride permeability, which is reduced in cystic fibrosis (CF), causing abnormal electrochemistry and impaired mucociliary clearance. At least four types of chloride channels have been identified in these cells, but their relative roles in total permeability and CF are unclear. Noise analysis was used to measure the conductance of chloride channels in human nasal epithelial cells. The data indicate that channels with a mean c...

  4. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Dileepan

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle (ASM cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma.

  5. Effect of guaifenesin on mucin production, rheology, and mucociliary transport in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagrave, JeanClare; Albrecht, Helmut; Park, Yong Sung; Rubin, Bruce; Solomon, Gail; Kim, K Chul

    2011-12-01

    Guaifenesin is widely used to alleviate symptoms of excessive mucus accumulation in the respiratory tract. However, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. The authors hypothesized that guaifenesin improves mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing mucin release, by decreasing mucus viscoelasticity, and by increasing mucociliary transport. To test these hypotheses, human differentiated airway epithelial cells, cultured at an air-liquid interface, were treated with clinically relevant concentrations of guaifenesin by addition to the basolateral medium. To evaluate the effect on mucin secretion, the authors used an anzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the amounts of MUC5AC protein in apical surface fluid and cell lysates. To measure mucociliary transportability, additional cultures were treated for 1 or 6 hours with guaifenesin, and the movement of cell debris was measured from video data. Further, the authors measured mucus dynamic viscoelasticity using a micro cone and plate rheometer with nondestructive creep transformation. Guaifenesin suppressed mucin production in a dose-dependent manner at clinically relevant concentrations. The reduced mucin production was associated with increased mucociliary transport and decreased viscoelasticity of the mucus. Viability of the cultures was not significantly affected. These results suggest that guaifenesin could improve mucociliary clearance in humans by reducing the release and/or production of mucins, thereby altering mucus rheology.

  6. Feasibility of a 3D human airway epithelial model to study respiratory absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reus, Astrid A; Maas, Wilfred J M; Jansen, Harm T; Constant, Samuel; Staal, Yvonne C M; van Triel, Jos J; Kuper, C Frieke

    2014-03-01

    The respiratory route is an important portal for human exposure to a large variety of substances. Consequently, there is an urgent need for realistic in vitro strategies for evaluation of the absorption of airborne substances with regard to safety and efficacy assessment. The present study investigated feasibility of a 3D human airway epithelial model to study respiratory absorption, in particular to differentiate between low and high absorption of substances. Bronchial epithelial models (MucilAir™), cultured at the air-liquid interface, were exposed to eight radiolabeled model substances via the apical epithelial surface. Absorption was evaluated by measuring radioactivity in the apical compartment, the epithelial cells and the basolateral culture medium. Antipyrine, caffeine, naproxen and propranolol were highly transported across the epithelial cell layer (>5%), whereas atenolol, mannitol, PEG-400 and insulin were limitedly transported (absorption. The intra-experimental reproducibility of the results was considered adequate based on an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 15%. The inter-experimental reproducibility of highly absorbed compounds was in a similar range (CV of 15%), but this value was considerably higher for those compounds that were limitedly absorbed. No statistical significant differences between different donors and experiments were observed. The present study provides a simple method transposable in any lab, which can be used to rank the absorption of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, and is ready for further validation with respect to reproducibility and capacity of the method to predict respiratory transport in humans.

  7. Dung biomass smoke activates inflammatory signaling pathways in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Claire E; Duffney, Parker F; Gelein, Robert; Thatcher, Thomas H; Elder, Alison; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    Animal dung is a biomass fuel burned by vulnerable populations who cannot afford cleaner sources of energy, such as wood and gas, for cooking and heating their homes. Exposure to biomass smoke is the leading environmental risk for mortality, with over 4,000,000 deaths each year worldwide attributed to indoor air pollution from biomass smoke. Biomass smoke inhalation is epidemiologically associated with pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and respiratory infections, especially in low and middle-income countries. Yet, few studies have examined the mechanisms of dung biomass smoke-induced inflammatory responses in human lung cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dung biomass smoke causes inflammatory responses in human lung cells through signaling pathways involved in acute and chronic lung inflammation. Primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were exposed to dung smoke at the air-liquid interface using a newly developed, automated, and reproducible dung biomass smoke generation system. The examination of inflammatory signaling showed that dung biomass smoke increased the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in SAECs through activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. We propose that the inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed to dung biomass smoke contribute to the development of respiratory diseases.

  8. Endogenous laminin is required for human airway smooth muscle cell maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thai

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle (ASM contraction underlies acute bronchospasm in asthma. ASM cells can switch between a synthetic-proliferative phenotype and a contractile phenotype. While the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM components on modulation of ASM cells to a synthetic phenotype have been reported, the role of ECM components on maturation of ASM cells to a contractile phenotype in adult lung is unclear. As both changes in ECM components and accumulation of contractile ASM are features of airway wall remodelling in asthma, we examined the role of the ECM protein, laminin, in the maturation of contractile phenotype in human ASM cells. Methods Human ASM cells were made senescence-resistant by stable expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase. Maturation to a contractile phenotype was induced by 7-day serum deprivation, as assessed by immunoblotting for desmin and calponin. The role of laminin on ASM maturation was investigated by comparing the effects of exogenous laminin coated on culture plates, and of soluble laminin peptide competitors. Endogenous expression of laminin chains during ASM maturation was also measured. Results Myocyte binding to endogenously expressed laminin was required for ASM phenotype maturation, as laminin competing peptides (YIGSR or GRGDSP significantly reduced desmin and calponin protein accumulation that otherwise occurs with prolonged serum deprivation. Coating of plastic cell culture dishes with different purified laminin preparations was not sufficient to further promote accumulation of desmin or calponin during 7-day serum deprivation. Expression of α2, β1 and γ1 laminin chains by ASM cells was specifically up-regulated during myocyte maturation, suggesting a key role for laminin-2 in the development of the contractile phenotype. Conclusion While earlier reports suggest exogenously applied laminin slows the spontaneous modulation of ASM to a synthetic phenotype, we show for the

  9. Regulation of actin dynamics by wnt-5a : Implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Menzen, Mark; Halayko, Andrew; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    An important pathophysiological feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), characterized by exaggerated bronchoconstriction in which the airway smooth muscle (ASM) is fundamentally involved. How the ASM in asthmatics differs from that in non-asthmatics is a current focus for research. We

  10. A Computational Study of the Respiratory Airflow Characteristics in Normal and Obstructed Human Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    21 (1994) 119–136. [26] J.C. Hogg , P.T. Macklem, W.M. Thurlbeck, Site and nature of airway obstruction in chronic obstructive lung disease, N. Engl...Mayo, S.C. Lam, J.D. Cooper, J.C. Hogg , Small- airway obstruction and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, N. Engl. J. Med. 365 (2011

  11. The effect of inhaled menthol on upper airway resistance in humans: A randomized controlled crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie J Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Menthol (l-menthol is a naturally-occurring cold receptor agonist commonly used to provide symptomatic relief for upper airway congestion. Menthol can also reduce the sensation of dyspnea. It is unclear whether the physiological action of menthol in dyspnea reduction is through its cold receptor agonist effect or whether associated mechanical changes occur in the upper airway.

  12. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effect of the bifurcation angle on the flow within a synthetic model of lower human airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Moreno, Andres Santiago; Duque Daza, Carlos Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the bifurcation angle on the flow pattern developed during respiratory inhalation and exhalation processes was explored numerically using a synthetic model of lower human airways featuring three generations of a dichotomous morphology as described by a Weibel model. Laminar flow simulations were performed for six bifurcation angles and four Reynolds numbers relevant to human respiratory flow. Numerical results of the inhalation process showed a peak displacement trend of the velocity profile towards the inner walls of the model. This displacement exhibited correlation with Dean-type secondary flow patterns, as well as with the onset and location of vortices. High wall shear stress regions on the inner walls were observed for a range of bifurcation angles. Noteworthy, specific bifurcation angles produced higher values of pressure drop, compared to the average behavior, as well as changes in the volumetric flow through the branches. Results of the simulations for exhalation process showed a different picture, mainly the appearance of symmetrical velocity profiles and the change of location of the regions of high wall shear stress. The use of this modelling methodology for biomedical applications is discussed considering the validity of the obtained results. Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  14. Mometasone Furoate Suppresses PMA-Induced MUC-5AC and MUC-2 Production in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Monthanapisut, Paopanga; Pattanacharoenchai, Napaporn

    2017-01-01

    Background Mucus hypersecretion from airway epithelium is a characteristic feature of airway inflammatory diseases. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) regulates mucin synthesis. Glucocorticoids including mometasone fuorate (MF) have been used to attenuate airway inflammation. However, effects of MF on mucin production have not been reported. Methods Effects of MF and budesonide (BUD) on the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)–induction of mucin and TNF-α in human airway epithelial cells (NCI-H292) were investigated in the present study. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with PMA (200 nM) for 2 hours. Subsequently, the cells were stimulated with MF (1–500 ng/mL) or BUD (21.5 ng/mL) for 8 hours. Dexamethasone (1 µg/mL) was used as the positive control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine MUC2 and MUC5AC mRNA levels. The level of total mucin, MUC2, MUC5AC, and TNF-α in culture supernatants were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results MF and BUD significantly suppressed MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in PMA-stimulated NCI-H292 cells. The inhibitory effects of the two steroid drugs were also observed in the production of total mucin, MUC2 and MUC5AC proteins, and TNF-α. Conclusion Our findings demonstrated that MF and BUD attenuated mucin and TNF-α production in PMA-induced human airway epithelial cells.

  15. Interplay between matrix metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in acute asthma exacerbation and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Mahmoud Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: MMP-9 and TIMP-1 play an important role in pathophysiology of asthma exacerbation and airway remodeling. Clearly, a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of asthma is critical to the development of better therapeutic modalities.

  16. Human tissue legislation in South Africa: Focus on stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human tissue legislation in South Africa: Focus on stem cell research and therapy. ... Related Substances Act, the Consumer Protection Act, the Children's Act and ... human tissue legislation in SA, the legislator has an opportunity to mirror the ...

  17. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits mast cell-dependent bronchoconstriction in human small airways through the E prostanoid subtype 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, Jesper; Manson, Martijn L; Bood, Johan; Delin, Ingrid; Orre, Ann-Charlotte; Bergman, Per; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Adner, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled prostaglandin (PG) E2 might inhibit asthmatic responses, but the mechanisms involved remain undefined. We sought to characterize the direct and indirect effects of PGE2 on human small airways with particular reference to the receptors mediating the responses. Contraction and relaxation were studied in isolated human bronchi with an inner diameter of 1 mm or less. Low concentrations of PGE2 (0.01-1 μmol/L) relaxed the bronchi precontracted by histamine. The bronchodilator response was inhibited by the E prostanoid (EP) subtype 4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208 but unaffected by the EP2 receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Higher concentrations of PGE2 (10-100 μmol/L) contracted the small airways. However, the TP receptor agonists U-46,619, PGF2α, and PGD2 were more potent than PGE2. Moreover, the bronchoconstrictor responses to PGE2 and all other tested prostanoids, including the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 and the partial FP receptor agonist AL-8810, were uniformly abolished by the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29,548. In the presence of TP and EP4 antagonists, PGE2 inhibited the mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction resulting from anti-IgE challenge. Measurement of the release of histamine and cysteinyl leukotrienes documented that this bronchoprotective action of PGE2 was mediated by the EP2 receptor, unrelated to bronchodilation, and increased with time of exposure. The pharmacology of PGE2 in isolated human small airways was different from its profile in animal models. This first demonstration of powerful EP2 receptor-mediated inhibition of IgE-dependent contractions in human airways introduces a new selective target for the treatment of asthma. This EP2 control of mast cell-mediated bronchoconstriction is presumably exaggerated in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  20. Modeling the bifurcating flow in a CT-scanned human lung airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H Y; Liu, Y

    2008-08-28

    The inspiratory flow characteristics in a CT-scanned human lung model were numerically investigated using low Reynolds number (LRN) kappa-omega turbulent model. The five-generation airway is extracted from the trachea to segmental bronchi of a 60-year-old Chinese male patient. Computations were carried out in the Reynolds number range of 900-2100, corresponding to mouth-air breathing rates of 190-440 ml/s. Flow patterns on the Re=2100 and flow rate distribution were presented. In this model, the flow pattern is very complex. To count the effect of laryngeal jet on trachea inlet, the trachea was extended and modified to simulate the larynx, consequently the inlet velocity profile is biased towards the rear wall. In the inferior lobar bronchi, there are two stems in which the axial velocity is stronger but secondary velocity is weaker. Secondary flow in the lateral bronchi is stronger than the medial ones. With increasing Re, the air flow increases in the middle, inferior lobes and left main bronchus, i.e., flow biases to left and downward.

  1. Response of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelia to Alcohol Exposure and Klebsiella pneumoniae Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V. Raju

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized epithelium. This unique culture model allowed us to closely mimic lung infection in the context of alcohol abuse by basolateral alcohol exposure and apical live bacterial challenge. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of alcohol for 24 h did not significantly alter epithelial integrity or barrier function. When apically challenged with viable Klebsiella pneumoniae, the cultured epithelia had an enhanced tightness which was unaffected by alcohol. Further, alcohol enhanced apical bacterial growth, but not bacterial binding to the cells. The cultured epithelium in the absence of any treatment or stimulation had a base-level IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Apical bacterial challenge significantly elevated the basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. However, alcohol suppressed the observed cytokine burst in response to infection. Addition of adenosine receptor agonists negated the suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α. Thus, acute alcohol alters the epithelial cytokine response to infection, which can be partially mitigated by adenosine receptor agonists.

  2. Establishment and transformation of telomerase-immortalized human small airway epithelial cells by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a number of causally linked genes including the novel tumor suppressor Betaig-h3 that were differentially expressed in radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells. To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line, we show here that ectopic expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells resulted in the generation of several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal. Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings. The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice. These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression. Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV/nucleon of 56Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium. These findings indicate that hTERT-immortalized cells, being diploid and chromosomal stable, should be a useful model in assessing mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis.

  3. Cadmium regulates the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Butler, Susie; Maloney, Kevin; Boyaka, Prosper N; Davis, Ian C; Knoell, Daren L; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal ranked seventh on the Priority List of Hazardous Substances. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. It is also a major component of cigarette smoke, and its inhalation is associated with decreased pulmonary function, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), play a central role in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lung functions. CFTR is mostly expressed in epithelial cells, and little is known about the effect of cadmium exposure on lung epithelial cell function. We show that exposure to cadmium decreases the expression of the CFTR protein and subsequent chloride transport in human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Impairment of CFTR protein expression was also observed in vivo in the lung of mice after intranasal instillation of cadmium. We established that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was not a nonspecific effect of heavy metals, as nickel had no effect on CFTR protein levels. Finally, we show that selected antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), but not N-acetylcysteine, can prevent the cadmium-induced suppression of CFTR. In summary, we have identified cadmium as a regulator of the CFTR chloride channel present in lung epithelial cells. Future strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of cadmium on epithelial cells and lung functions may benefit from the finding that alpha-tocopherol protects CFTR expression and function.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Flow Characteristics in the Obstructed Realistic Human Upper Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics in the realistic human upper airway (HUA with obstruction that resulted from pharyngeal collapse were numerically investigated. The 3D anatomically accurate HUA model was reconstructed from CT-scan images of a Chinese male patient (38 years, BMI 25.7. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD with the large eddy simulation (LES method was applied to simulate the airflow dynamics within the HUA model in both inspiration and expiration processes. The laser Doppler anemometry (LDA technique was simultaneously adopted to measure the airflow fields in the HUA model for the purpose of testifying the reliability of LES approach. In the simulations, the representative respiration intensities of 16.8 L/min (slight breathing, 30 L/min (moderate breathing, and 60 L/min (severe breathing were conducted under continuous inspiration and expiration conditions. The airflow velocity field and static pressure field were obtained and discussed in detail. The results indicated the airflow experiences unsteady transitional/turbulent flow in the HUA model under low Reynolds number. The airflow fields cause occurrence of forceful injection phenomenon due to the narrowing of pharynx caused by the respiratory illness in inspiration and expiration. There also exist strong flow separation and back flow inside obstructed HUA owing to the vigorous jet flow effect in the pharynx. The present results would provide theoretical guidance for the treatment of obstructive respiratory disease.

  5. Human Airway Primary Epithelial Cells Show Distinct Architectures on Membrane Supports Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To facilitate drug development for lung delivery, it is highly demanding to establish appropriate airway epithelial cell models as transport barriers to evaluate pharmacokinetic profiles of drug molecules. Besides the cancer-derived cell lines, as the primary cell model, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells have been used for drug screenings because of physiological relevance to in vivo. Therefore, to accurately interpret drug transport data in NHBE measured by different laboratories, it is important to know biophysical characteristics of NHBE grown on membranes in different culture conditions. In this study, NHBE was grown on the polyester membrane in a different medium and its transport barrier properties as well as cell architectures were fully characterized by functional assays and confocal imaging throughout the days of cultures. Moreover, NHBE cells on inserts in a different medium were subject to either of air-interfaced culture (AIC) or liquid-covered culture (LCC) condition. Cells in the AIC condition were cultivated on the membrane with medium in the basolateral side only, whereas cells with medium in apical and basolateral sides under the LCC condition. Quantitative microscopic imaging with biophysical examination revealed distinct multilayered architectures of differentiated NHBE cells, suggesting NHBE as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeting drug transport.

  6. Acid and organic aerosol coatings on magnetic nanoparticles increase iron concentrations in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Andrew J; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Jang, Myoseon

    2009-07-01

    Numerous industrial applications for man-made nanoparticles have been proposed. Interactions of nanoparticles with agents in the atmosphere may impact human health. We tested the postulate that in vitro exposures of respiratory epithelial cells to airborne magnetic nanoparticles (MNP; Fe(3)O(4)) with and without a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and an inorganic acid could affect iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and interleukin (IL)-8 release. Cell iron concentrations were increased after exposures to MNP and values were further elevated with co-exposures to either SOA or inorganic acid. Increased expression of ferritin and elevated levels of RNA for DMT1, proteins for iron storage and transport respectively, followed MNP exposures, but values were significant for only those with co-exposures to inorganic acid and organic aerosols. Cell iron concentration corresponded to a measure of oxidative stress in the airway epithelial cells; MNP with co-exposures to SOA and inorganic acid increased both available metal and indices of oxidant generation. Finally, the release of a proinflammatory cytokine (i.e. IL-8) by the exposed cells similarly increased with cell iron concentration. We conclude that MNP can interact with a SOA and an inorganic acid to present metal in a catalytically reactive state to cultured respiratory cells. This produces an oxidative stress to affect a release of IL-8.

  7. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  8. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an "iron lung" and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2-4 s) or abruptly (<0.5 s) to lower downstream pressure and create inspiratory airflow. Pressure-flow curves were constructed for flow-limited breaths, and slow vs. fast reductions in downstream pressure were compared. All subjects exhibited an initial peak and then a decrease in flow with more negative pressures, demonstrating negative effort dependence (NED). The rate of change in downstream pressure did not affect the peak to plateau airflow ratio: %NED 22 ± 13% (slow) vs. 20 ± 5% (fast), P = not significant. We conclude that the initial peak in inspiratory airflow is not a transient but rather a distinct mechanical property of the upper airway. In contrast to the classical Starling resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects.

  9. ATP induced MUC5AC release from human airways in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Roger

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic airway diseases are often associated with marked mucus production, however, little is known about the regulation of secretory activity by locally released endogenous mediators.

  10. Hippocampus and epilepsy: Findings from human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberfeld, G; Blauwblomme, T; Miles, R

    2015-03-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several focal epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, cortical dysplasias, epilepsies associated with tumors and developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patients with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in the neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum, an output region, which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells, which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions and consequently suppressing interictal

  11. LES of Laminar-to-Turbulent Particle-Fluid Dynamics in Human and Nonhuman Primate Airways: Applications to Aerosolized Drug Delivery Animal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Taylor; Padhy, Sourav; Shaqfeh, Eric; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Both the human health benefit and risk from the inhalation of aerosolized medications is often predicted by extrapolating experimental data taken using nonhuman primates to human inhalation. In this study, we employ Large Eddy Simulation to simulate particle-fluid dynamics in realistic upper airway models of both humans and rhesus monkeys. We report laminar-to-turbulent flow transitions triggered by constrictions in the upper trachea and the persistence of unsteadiness into the low Reynolds number bifurcating lower airway. Micro-particle deposition fraction and locations are shown to depend significantly on particle size. In particular, particle filtration in the nasal airways is shown to approach unity for large aerosols (8 microns) or high-rate breathing. We validate the accuracy of LES mean flow predictions using MRV imaging results. Additionally, particle deposition fractions are validated against experiments in 3 model airways.

  12. Airway Epithelium Stimulates Smooth Muscle Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Malavia, Nikita K.; Raub, Christopher B.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Reynold A Panettieri; George, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air–liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (...

  13. Cigarette Smoke Activates the Proto-Oncogene c-Src to Promote Airway Inflammation and Lung Tissue Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke–exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke–mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  14. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  15. A confocal microscopic study of solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in human airway epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparrow Malcolm P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC are specialized epithelial cells that are thought to play important roles in lung development and airway function. PNEC occur either singly or in clusters called neuroepithelial bodies. Our aim was to characterize the three dimensional morphology of PNEC, their distribution, and their relationship to the epithelial nerves in whole mounts of adult human bronchi using confocal microscopy. Methods Bronchi were resected from non-diseased portions of a lobe of human lung obtained from 8 thoracotomy patients (Table 1 undergoing surgery for the removal of lung tumors. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies to reveal all nerves (PGP 9.5, sensory nerves (calcitonin gene related peptide, CGRP, and PNEC (PGP 9.5, CGRP and gastrin releasing peptide, GRP. The analysis and rendition of the resulting three-dimensional data sets, including side-projections, was performed using NIH-Image software. Images were colorized and super-imposed using Adobe Photoshop. Results PNEC were abundant but not homogenously distributed within the epithelium, with densities ranging from 65/mm2 to denser patches of 250/mm2, depending on the individual wholemount. Rotation of 3-D images revealed a complex morphology; flask-like with the cell body near the basement membrane and a thick stem extending to the lumen. Long processes issued laterally from its base, some lumenal and others with feet-like processes. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP was present in about 20% of PNEC, mainly in the processes. CGRP-positive nerves were sparse, with some associated with the apical part of the PNEC. Conclusion Our 3D-data demonstrates that PNEC are numerous and exhibit a heterogeneous peptide content suggesting an active and diverse PNEC population.

  16. PPARγ ligand ciglitazone inhibits TNFα-induced ICAM-1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

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    Chien-Da Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modification of human airway smooth muscle (ASM function by proinflammatory cytokines has been regarded as a potential mechanism underlying bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma. Human ASM cells express intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 in response to cytokines. Synthetic ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ reportedly possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we examined whether ciglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ ligand, can modulate the basal and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression in human ASM cells. Methods: Human ASM cells were treated with TNFα. ICAM-1 expression was assessed by flow cytometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. PPARγ activity was inhibited by target-specific small interfering (si RNA targeting PPARγ and GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Activity of nuclear factor (NF-κB was assessed by using immunoblot analysis, immune-confocal images, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Results: By flow cytometry, ciglitazone alone had no effect on ICAM-1 expression in ASM cells, but inhibited ICAM-1 expression in response to TNFα (10 ng/ml in a dose-dependent manner (1-10 μM. It also inhibited TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression by RT-PCR analysis. Knockdown of PPARγ gene by target-specific siRNA targeting PPARγ enhanced ICAM-1 expression and the inhibitory effect of ciglitazone on TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression was reversed by PPARγ siRNA and GW9662. SN-50 (10 μg/ml, an inhibitor for nuclear translocation of NF-κB, inhibited TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression. Ciglitazone did not prevent TNFα-induced degradation of the cytosolic inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB, but inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 induced by TNFα and suppressed the NF-κB/DNA binding activity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ciglitazone inhibits TNFα-induced ICAM1 gene expression in human ASM cells through

  17. Characterizing human lung tissue microbiota and its relationship to epidemiological and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoqin; Gail, Mitchell H; Consonni, Dario; Carugno, Michele; Humphrys, Michael; Pesatori, Angela C; Caporaso, Neil E; Goedert, James J; Ravel, Jacques; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-28

    The human lung tissue microbiota remains largely uncharacterized, although a number of studies based on airway samples suggest the existence of a viable human lung microbiota. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of lung microbiota in 165 non-malignant lung tissue samples from cancer patients. We show that the lung microbiota is distinct from the microbial communities in oral, nasal, stool, skin, and vagina, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum (60 %). Microbiota taxonomic alpha diversity increases with environmental exposures, such as air particulates, residence in low to high population density areas, and pack-years of tobacco smoking and decreases in subjects with history of chronic bronchitis. Genus Thermus is more abundant in tissue from advanced stage (IIIB, IV) patients, while Legionella is higher in patients who develop metastases. Moreover, the non-malignant lung tissues have higher microbiota alpha diversity than the paired tumors. Our results provide insights into the human lung microbiota composition and function and their link to human lifestyle and clinical outcomes. Studies among subjects without lung cancer are needed to confirm our findings.

  18. Pathogenic T-cell recruitment into the airway in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff, Benjamin D; Thomas, Seddon Y; Banerji, Aleena; Wain, John C; Zhang, Hui; Lilly, Craig M; Ginns, Leo C; Luster, Andrew D

    2005-12-01

    Effector T cells significantly contribute to inflammatory diseases. These cells are recruited into tissue, where they orchestrate an inflammatory response that can either protect against infection or sometimes stimulate human disease. The recruitment of T cells into tissue from the blood and lymphoid compartments is an active process controlled by chemokines and the chemokine receptors expressed on distinct effector T-cell subsets. Thus, the chemokines secreted in the tissue will determine the specific types of T lymphocyte recruited into that tissue based on the chemokine receptors expressed on these cells. It follows that the chemokine receptor profile on T cells isolated from the lungs of patients with inflammatory pulmonary disease will define the subtype of pathogenic T lymphocytes mediating the disease process and will identify the mechanisms that recruit these cells into the lung. This article reviews data from both human and animal studies that define the chemokine receptors involved in the recruitment of T lymphocytes into the lung in various inflammatory pulmonary diseases, including asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis, sarcoidosis, and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. We then speculate on the potential role of these chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of these disorders and potential novel therapeutic approaches suggested by these data.

  19. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  20. Smad Molecules Expression Pattern in Human Bronchial Airway Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Adelipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling is characterized by the thickening and reorganization of the airways seen in mustard  lung patients. Mustard lung is the  general description  for  the  chronic obstructive  pulmonary  disease induced  by  sulfur  mustard(SM. Pulmonary  disease was diagnosed as the most important  disorder in individuals that had been exposed to sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent developed during Wars. Iraqi forces frequently used it against Iranian during Iran –Iraq in the 1980–1988. Peribronchial fibrosis result  from  airway remodeling  that  include  excess  of  collagen of  extracellular matrix deposition  in  the  airway wall. Some of  Smads families in  association with TGF-β  are involved in airway remodeling due to lung fibrosis. In the present study we compared the mRNA expression of Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 and Smad7 genes in airway wall biopsies of chemical-injured patients with non-injured patients as control.We used airway wall biopsies of ten unexposed patients and fifteen SM-induced patients. Smads expression was evaluated by RT-PCR followed by bands densitometry.Expression levels of Smad3 and Smad4 in SM exposed patients were upregulated but Smad2 and Smad7 was not significantly altered.Our results revealed that Smad3, and 4 may be involved in airway remodeling process in SM induced  patients  by  activation of  TGF-β.  Smad pathway is  the  most  represented signaling mechanism for  airway remodeling and  peribronchial fibrosis. The  complex of Smads in the nucleus affects a series of genes that results in peribronchial fibrosis in SM- induced patients.

  1. Modulation of endocytic trafficking and apical stability of CFTR in primary human airway epithelial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholon, Deborah M.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Randell, Scott H.; Riordan, John R.

    2010-01-01

    CFTR is a highly regulated apical chloride channel of epithelial cells that is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, we characterized the apical stability and intracellular trafficking of wild-type and mutant CFTR in its native environment, i.e., highly differentiated primary human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures. We labeled the apical pool of CFTR and subsequently visualized the protein in intracellular compartments. CFTR moved from the apical surface to endosomes and then efficiently recycled back to the surface. CFTR endocytosis occurred more slowly in polarized than in nonpolarized HAE cells or in a polarized epithelial cell line. The most common mutation in CF, ΔF508 CFTR, was rescued from endoplasmic reticulum retention by low-temperature incubation but transited from the apical membrane to endocytic compartments more rapidly and recycled less efficiently than wild-type CFTR. Incubation with small-molecule correctors resulted in ΔF508 CFTR at the apical membrane but did not restore apical stability. To stabilize the mutant protein at the apical membrane, we found that the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore and the cholesterol-extracting agent cyclodextrin dramatically reduced internalization of ΔF508, whereas the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 completely blocked endocytosis of ΔF508. On examination of intrinsic properties of CFTR that may affect its apical stability, we found that N-linked oligosaccharides were not necessary for transport to the apical membrane but were required for efficient apical recycling and, therefore, influenced the turnover of surface CFTR. Thus apical stability of CFTR in its native environment is affected by properties of the protein and modulation of endocytic trafficking. PMID:20008117

  2. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  3. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease.

  4. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  5. Large-eddy Simulation of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in CT-Based Human Airway Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel imaging-based thermodynamic model to study local heat and mass transfers in the human airways. Both 3D and 1D CFD models are developed and validated. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is adopted to solve 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation along with temperature and water vapor transport equations and energy-flux based wall boundary condition. The 1D model provides initial and boundary conditions to the 3D model. The computed tomography (CT) lung images of three healthy subjects with sinusoidal waveforms and minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min are considered. Between 1D and 3D models and between subjects, the average temperature and water vapor distributions are similar, but their regional distributions are significantly different. In particular, unlike the 1D model, the heat and water vapor transfers in the 3D model are elevated at the bifurcations during inspiration. Moreover, the correlations of Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) with local Reynolds number and airway diameter are proposed. In conclusion, use of the subject-specific lung model is essential for accurate prediction of local thermal impacts on airway epithelium. Supported in part by NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494 and S10-RR022421.

  6. An automatic generation of non-uniform mesh for CFD analyses of image-based multiscale human airway models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    The authors have developed a method to automatically generate non-uniform CFD mesh for image-based human airway models. The sizes of generated tetrahedral elements vary in both radial and longitudinal directions to account for boundary layer and multiscale nature of pulmonary airflow. The proposed method takes advantage of our previously developed centerline-based geometry reconstruction method. In order to generate the mesh branch by branch in parallel, we used the open-source programs Gmsh and TetGen for surface and volume meshes, respectively. Both programs can specify element sizes by means of background mesh. The size of an arbitrary element in the domain is a function of wall distance, element size on the wall, and element size at the center of airway lumen. The element sizes on the wall are computed based on local flow rate and airway diameter. The total number of elements in the non-uniform mesh (10 M) was about half of that in the uniform mesh, although the computational time for the non-uniform mesh was about twice longer (170 min). The proposed method generates CFD meshes with fine elements near the wall and smooth variation of element size in longitudinal direction, which are required, e.g., for simulations with high flow rate. NIH Grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494, and S10-RR022421. Computer time provided by XSEDE.

  7. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  8. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large‐scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein‐coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue‐restricted manner. Here...

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginsenoside Rg3 via NF-κB Pathway in A549 Cells and Human Asthmatic Lung Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is limited information of the anti-inflammatory effects of Rg3 on inflamed lung cells and tissues. Therefore, we confirmed the anti-inflammatory mechanism of ginsenoside Rg3 in inflamed human airway epithelial cells (A549 and tissues whether Rg3 regulates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activity. Methods. To induce the inflammation, IL-1β (10 ng/ml was treated to A549 cells for 4 h. The effects of Rg3 on NF-κB activity and COX-2 expression were evaluated by western blotting analysis in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Using multiplex cytokines assay, the secretion levels of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines were measured. Result. Rg3 showed the significant inhibition of NF-κB activity thereby reduced COX-2 expression was determined in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. In addition, among NF-κB-mediated cytokines, the secretion levels of IL-4, TNF-α, and eotaxin were significantly decreased by Rg3 in asthma tissues. Even though there was no significant difference, IL-6, IL-9, and IL-13 secretion showed a lower tendency compared to saline-treated human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Conclusion. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of Rg3 as an anti-inflammatory agent through regulating NF-κB activity and reducing the secretion of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines.

  10. Human apolipoprotein E genotypes differentially modify house dust mite-induced airway disease in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Xianglan; Dai, Cuilian; Fredriksson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    with reductions in lung mRNA levels of Th2 and Th17 cytokines, as well as chemokines (CCL7, CCL11, CCL24). huApoE4 mice had an intermediate phenotype, with attenuated AHR and IgE production, compared with muApoE mice, whereas airway inflammation and mucous cell metaplasia were not reduced. In contrast, HDM...

  11. Tiotropium attenuates IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia of human airway epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Bouwman, Susanne; van den Berge, Maarten; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown that acetylcholine is both a neurotransmitter and acts as a local mediator, produced by airway cells including epithelial cells. In vivo studies have demonstrated an indirect role for acetylcholine in epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we aimed to investigate direct

  12. A bottom-up approach for labeling of human airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an airway labeling algorithm that allows for gaps between the labeled branches is introduced. A bottom-up approach for arriving to an optimal set of branches and their associated labels is used in the proposed method. A K nearest neighbor based appearance model is used...

  13. Effect of acute metabolic acid/base shifts on the human airway calibre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijker, F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Heijdra, Y.F.; Bosch, F.H.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Acute metabolic alkalosis (NaHCO(3)), acidosis (NH(4)Cl), and placebo (NaCl) were induced in 15 healthy volunteers (12 females, median age 34 (range 24-56) years) in a double blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the presence of the effects on airway calibre. Acid-base shifts were determined b

  14. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  15. Dielectric characterisation of human tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Nennie, F.; Deiana, D.; Veen, A.J. van der; Monni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues samples are required for investigation and simulation purposes in biomedical applications of EM sensors. While available open literature mostly deals with ex-vivo characterization of isolated tissues, knowledge on dielectric properties of these tissues in their o

  16. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M.; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome......Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide...

  17. Human rhinovirus induced cytokine/chemokine responses in human airway epithelial and immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Infections with human rhinovirus (HRV are commonly associated with acute upper and lower respiratory tract disease and asthma exacerbations. The role that HRVs play in these diseases suggests it is important to understand host-specific or virus-specific factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Since species A HRVs are often associated with more serious HRV disease than species B HRVs, differences in immune responses they induce should inform disease pathogenesis. To identify species differences in induced responses, we evaluated 3 species A viruses, HRV 25, 31 and 36 and 3 species B viruses, HRV 4, 35 and 48 by exposing human PBMCs to HRV infected Calu-3 cells. To evaluate the potential effect of memory induced by previous HRV infection on study responses, we tested cord blood mononuclear cells that should be HRV naïve. There were HRV-associated increases (significant increase compared to mock-infected cells for one or more HRVs for IP-10 and IL-15 that was unaffected by addition of PBMCs, for MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IFN-α, and HGF only with addition of PBMCs, and for ENA-78 only without addition of PBMCs. All three species B HRVs induced higher levels, compared to A HRVs, of MIP-1α and MIP-1β with PBMCs and ENA-78 without PBMCs. In contrast, addition of CBMCs had less effect and did not induce MIP-1α, MIP-1β, or IFN-α nor block ENA-78 production. Addition of CBMCs did, however, increase IP-10 levels for HRV 35 and HRV 36 infection. The presence of an effect with PBMCs and no effect with CBMCs for some responses suggest differences between the two types of cells possibly because of the presence of HRV memory responses in PBMCs and not CBMCs or limited response capacity for the immature CBMCs relative to PBMCs. Thus, our results indicate that different HRV strains can induce different patterns of cytokines and chemokines; some of these differences may be due to differences in memory responses induced by past HRV infections, and other differences

  18. Cryopreserved Human Precision-Cut Lung Slices as a Bioassay for Live Tissue Banking. A Viability Study of Bronchodilation with Bitter-Taste Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yan; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Patel, Kruti R; Rosas, Ivan; Sanderson, Michael J; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Human precision-cut lung slices (hPCLSs) provide a unique ex vivo model for translational research. However, the limited and unpredictable availability of human lung tissue greatly impedes their use. Here, we demonstrate that cryopreservation of hPCLSs facilitates banking of live human lung tissue for routine use. Our results show that cryopreservation had little effect on overall cell viability and vital functions of immune cells, including phagocytes and T lymphocytes. In addition, airway contraction and relaxation in response to specific agonists and antagonists, respectively, were unchanged after cryopreservation. At the subcellular level, cryopreserved hPCLSs maintained Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory mechanisms for the control of airway smooth muscle cell contractility. To exemplify the use of cryopreserved hPCLSs in smooth muscle research, we provide evidence that bitter-taste receptor (TAS2R) agonists relax airways by blocking Ca(2+) oscillations in airway smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, the banking of cryopreserved hPCLSs provides a robust bioassay for translational research of lung physiology and disease.

  19. Force-EMG changes during sustained contractions of a human upper airway muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kori; DelloRusso, Christiana; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2009-02-01

    Human upper airway and facial muscles support breathing, swallowing, speech, mastication, and facial expression, but their endurance performance in sustained contractions is poorly understood. The muscular fatigue typically associated with task failure during sustained contractions has both central and intramuscular causes, with the contribution of each believed to be task dependent. Previously we failed to show central fatigue in the nasal dilator muscles of subjects that performed intermittent maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Here we test the hypothesis that central mechanisms contribute to the fatigue of submaximal, sustained contractions in nasal dilator muscles. Nasal dilator muscle force and EMG activities were recorded in 11 subjects that performed submaximal contractions (20, 35, and 65% MVC) until force dropped to or=3 s, which we defined as task failure. MVC and twitch forces (the latter obtained by applying supramaximal shocks to the facial nerve) were recorded before the trial and at several time points over the first 10 min of recovery. The time to task failure was inversely related to contraction intensity. MVC force was depressed by roughly 30% at task failure in all three trials, but recovered within 2 min. Twitch force fell by 30-44% depending on contraction intensity and remained depressed after 10 min of recovery, consistent with low-frequency fatigue. Average EMG activity increased with time, but never exceeded 75% of the maximal, pretrial level despite task failure. EMG mean power frequency declined by 20-25% in all trials, suggesting reduced action potential conduction velocity at task failure. In contrast, the maximal evoked potential did not change significantly in any of the tasks, indicating that the EMG deficit at task failure was due largely to mechanisms proximal to the neuromuscular junction. Additional experiments using the interpolated twitch technique suggest that subjects can produce about 92% of the maximal evocable force

  20. Human Cell and Tissue Establishment Registration Public Query

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides Human Cell and Tissue registration information for registered, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by Establishment Name,...

  1. Human Cell and Tissue Establishment Registration Public Query

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides Human Cell and Tissue registration information for registered, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by Establishment Name,...

  2. Comparative effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on human airway epithelial cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio [University of Parma, Department of Experimental Medicine (Italy); Costa, Anna Luisa; Blosi, Magda [National Research Council, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics (Italy); Di Cristo, Luisana [University of Parma, Department of Pharmacological, Biological and Applied Chemical Sciences (Italy); Zanello, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Visigalli, Rossana [University of Parma, Department of Experimental Medicine (Italy); Bergamaschi, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.bergamaschi@unipr.it [University of Parma, Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Among nanomaterials of industrial relevance, metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, but their effects on airway cells are relatively poorly characterized. To compare the effects of metal NPs on cells representative of the lung-blood barrier, Calu-3 epithelial cells and Raw264.7 macrophages were incubated with three industrially relevant preparations of TiO{sub 2} NPs (size range 4-33 nm), two preparations of CeO{sub 2} NPs (9-36 nm) and CuO NPs (25 nm). While Raw264.7 were grown on standard plasticware, Calu-3 cells were seeded on permeable filters, where they form a high-resistance monolayer, providing an in vitro model of the airway barrier. Metal NPs, obtained from industrial sources, were characterized under the conditions adopted for the biological tests. Cytotoxicity was assessed with resazurin method in both epithelial and macrophage cells, while epithelial barrier permeability was monitored measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). In macrophages, titania and ceria had no significant effect on viability in the whole range of nominal doses tested (15-240 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of monolayer), while CuO NPs produced a marked viability loss. Moreover, only CuO NPs, but not the other NPs, lowered TEER of Calu-3 monolayers, pointing to the impairment of the epithelial barrier. TEER decreased by 30 % at the dose of 10 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} of CuO NPs, compared to untreated control, and was abolished at doses {>=}80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, in strict correlation with changes in cell viability. These results indicate that (1) CuO NPs increase airway epithelium permeability even at relatively low doses and are significantly toxic for macrophages and airway epithelial cells, likely through the release of Cu ions in the medium; (2) TiO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} NPs do not affect TEER and exhibit little acute toxicity for airway epithelial cells and macrophages; and (3) TEER measurement can provide a simple method to assess the impairment of in vitro airway

  3. Comparative effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on human airway epithelial cells and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Costa, Anna Luisa; Blosi, Magda; Di Cristo, Luisana; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Visigalli, Rossana; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Among nanomaterials of industrial relevance, metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, but their effects on airway cells are relatively poorly characterized. To compare the effects of metal NPs on cells representative of the lung-blood barrier, Calu-3 epithelial cells and Raw264.7 macrophages were incubated with three industrially relevant preparations of TiO2 NPs (size range 4-33 nm), two preparations of CeO2 NPs (9-36 nm) and CuO NPs (25 nm). While Raw264.7 were grown on standard plasticware, Calu-3 cells were seeded on permeable filters, where they form a high-resistance monolayer, providing an in vitro model of the airway barrier. Metal NPs, obtained from industrial sources, were characterized under the conditions adopted for the biological tests. Cytotoxicity was assessed with resazurin method in both epithelial and macrophage cells, while epithelial barrier permeability was monitored measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). In macrophages, titania and ceria had no significant effect on viability in the whole range of nominal doses tested (15-240 μg/cm2 of monolayer), while CuO NPs produced a marked viability loss. Moreover, only CuO NPs, but not the other NPs, lowered TEER of Calu-3 monolayers, pointing to the impairment of the epithelial barrier. TEER decreased by 30 % at the dose of 10 μg/cm2 of CuO NPs, compared to untreated control, and was abolished at doses ≥80 μg/cm2, in strict correlation with changes in cell viability. These results indicate that (1) CuO NPs increase airway epithelium permeability even at relatively low doses and are significantly toxic for macrophages and airway epithelial cells, likely through the release of Cu ions in the medium; (2) TiO2 and CeO2 NPs do not affect TEER and exhibit little acute toxicity for airway epithelial cells and macrophages; and (3) TEER measurement can provide a simple method to assess the impairment of in vitro airway epithelial barrier model by manufactured nanomaterials.

  4. Salmeterol and cytokines modulate inositol-phosphate signalling in Human airway smooth muscle cells via regulation at the receptor locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swan Caroline

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR is a key feature of asthma and a causal relationship between airway inflammation and AHR has been identified. The aim of the current study was to clarify the effect of proinflammatory cytokines and asthma medication on primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM inositol phosphate (IPx signalling and define the regulatory loci involved. Methods Primary Human ASM cells were isolated from explants of trachealis muscle from individuals with no history of respiratory disease. The effect of cytokine or asthma medication on histamine or bradykinin induced IPx signalling was assessed by [3H] inositol incorporation. Quantitative Real Time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels of receptors and downstream signalling components. Transcriptional mechanisms were explored using a combination of 5'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5'RACE and promoter-reporter techniques. Results Treatment of Human ASM cells with IL-13, IFNγ or salmeterol for 24 hours lead to a modest augmentation of histamine induced IPx responses (144.3 +/- 9.3, 126.4 +/- 7.5 and 117.7 +/- 5.2%, p i.e. H1 Histamine Receptor (HRH1, B2 Bradykinin Receptor (BDKRB2, Gαq/11 and PLC-β1 identified that a significant induction of receptor mRNA (>2 fold was a feature of these responses explaining the cytokine and spasmogen specificity. The HRH1 and BDKRB2 promoter regions were mapped in ASM and promoter-reporter analyses identified that salmeterol can induce HRH1 (>2 fold and BDKRB2 (2–5 fold transcription. The effect of cytokines on HRH1 and BDKRB2 promoter-reporter expression suggested a more complex regulation of mRNA expression involving additional loci to the core promoter. Conclusion Our results indicate that the spasmogen specific receptor locus may be a key site of regulation determining the magnitude of spasmogen mediated ASM IPx responses during airway inflammation or following asthma medication. These data provide further insight into the

  5. Study of cyclic and steady particle motion in a realistic human airway model using phase-Doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transport and deposition of particles in human airways has been of research interest for many years. Various experimental methods such as constant temperature anemometry, particle image velocimetry and laser-Doppler based techniques were employed for study of aerosol transport in the past. We use Phase-Doppler Particle Analyser (P/DPA for time resolved size and velocity measurement of liquid aerosol particles in a size range 1 to 8 μm. The di-2ethylhexyl sabacate (DEHS particles were produced by condensation monodisperse aerosol generator. A thin-wall transparent model of human airways with non-symmetric bifurcations and non-planar geometry containing parts from throat to 3rd-4th generation of bronchi was fabricated for the study. Several cyclic (sinusoidal breathing regimes were simulated using pneumatic breathing mechanism. Analogous steady-flow regimes were also investigated and used for comparison. An analysis of the particle velocity data was performed with aim to gain deeper understanding of the transport phenomena in the realistic bifurcating airway system. Flows of particles of different sizes in range 1 – 10 μm was found to slightly differ for extremely high Stokes numbers. Differences in steady and cyclic turbulence intensities were documented in the paper. Systematically higher turbulence intensity was found for cyclic flows and mainly in the expiration breathing phase. Negligible differences were found for behaviour of different particle size classes in the inspected range 1 to 8 μm. Possibility of velocity spectra estimation of air flow using the P/DPA data is discussed.

  6. A novel role of protein tyrosine kinase2 in mediating chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Liang

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ activated Cl(- channels (CaCC are up-regulated in cystic fibrosis (CF airway surface epithelia. The presence and functional properties of CaCC make it a possible therapeutic target to compensate for the deficiency of Cl(- secretion in CF epithelia. CaCC is activated by an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+, which not only activates epithelial CaCCs, but also inhibits epithelial Na(+ hyperabsorption, which may also be beneficial in CF. Our previous study has shown that spiperone, a known antipsychotic drug, activates CaCCs and stimulates Cl(- secretion in polarized human non-CF and CF airway epithelial cell monolayers in vitro, and in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR knockout mice in vivo. Spiperone activates CaCC not by acting in its well-known role as an antagonist of either 5-HT2 or D2 receptors, but through a protein tyrosine kinase-coupled phospholipase C-dependent pathway. Moreover, spiperone independently activates CFTR through a novel mechanism. Herein, we performed a mass spectrometry analysis and identified the signaling molecule that mediates the spiperone effect in activating chloride secretion through CaCC and CFTR. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2 is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, which belongs to the focal adhesion kinase family. The inhibition of PYK2 notably reduced the ability of spiperone to increase intracellular Ca(2+ and Cl(- secretion. In conclusion, we have identified the tyrosine kinase, PYK2, as the modulator, which plays a crucial role in the activation of CaCC and CFTR by spiperone. The identification of this novel role of PYK2 reveals a new signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

  7. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Systems Biology Investigations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in Association with Human Airway Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    Most knowledge about evolutionary adaptation has been gained from experimental evolution studies, in which organisms have been allowed to evolve under simple, well-defined conditions in the laboratory. While these studies have provided novel insight into the fundamental processes of evolutionary...... environments. The model system used for these investigations has been long-term chronic airway infections in Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using a systems biology approach, we have monitored the adaptive development of the clinically important P....... aeruginosa DK2 clone lineage during 200,000 generations of evolution in the CF airways from its entrance in the clinic in the 1970’ies until the end of 2010. Genetic analysis showed that the DK2 lineage between 1973 and 2007 accumulated mutations in a near-linear manner with an overall genomic signature...

  9. Tissue-based map of the human proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human......Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative...... secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns...

  10. Estrogen receptors in human vaginal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, M.A.H.M.; Poortman, J.; Agema, A.R.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of specific estrogen receptors could be demonstrated in vaginal tissue, obtained during operation from 38 women, age 27–75 yr. In 23 premenopausal women the receptor concentration in the vaginal tissue varied between 12 and 91 fmol/mg protein, no significant difference in the receptor

  11. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... of scan on airway dimensions in subjects with and without COPD. The results show measured airway dimensions to be affected by differences in the level of inspiration and this dependency is again influenced by COPD. Inspiration level should therefore be accounted for when measuring airways, and airway...

  12. Lipolysis in human adipose tissue during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Lorentsen, Jeanne; Isaksson, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis was studied in vivo by Fick's arteriovenous (a-v) principle using either calculated (microdialysis) or directly measured (catheterization) adipose tissue venous glycerol concentration. We compared results during steady-state (rest and prolonged continuous...... exercise), as well as during non-steady-state (onset of exercise and early exercise) experimental settings. Fourteen healthy women [age: 74 +/- 1 (SE) yr] were studied at rest and during 60-min continuous bicycling at 60% of peak O(2) uptake. Calculated and measured subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue...... adipose tissue venous glycerol concentration. Despite several methodological limitations inherent to both techniques, the results strongly suggest that microdialysis and catheterization provide similar estimates of subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis in steady-state experimental settings like rest...

  13. Electrostatic Charge Effects on Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition in Human Nasal–Laryngeal Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Xi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic charging occurs in most aerosol generation processes and can significantly influence subsequent particle deposition rates and patterns in the respiratory tract through the image and space forces. The behavior of inhaled aerosols with charge is expected to be most affected in the upper airways, where particles come in close proximity to the narrow turbinate surface, and before charge dissipation occurs as a result of high humidity. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the deposition of charged aerosols in an MRI-based nasal–laryngeal airway model. Particle sizes of 5 nm–30 µm and charge levels ranging from neutralized to ten times the saturation limit were considered. A well-validated low Reynolds number (LRN k–ω turbulence model and a discrete Lagrangian tracking approach that accounted for electrostatic image force were employed to simulate the nasal airflow and aerosol dynamics. For ultrafine aerosols, electrostatic charge was observed to exert a discernible but insignificant effect. In contrast, remarkably enhanced depositions were observed for micrometer particles with charge, which could be one order of magnitude larger than no-charge depositions. The deposition hot spots shifted towards the anterior part of the upper airway as the charge level increased. Results of this study have important implications for evaluating nasal drug delivery devices and for assessing doses received from pollutants, which often carry a certain level of electric charges.

  14. Fundamentals of gas phase plasmas for treatment of human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark J; Babaeva, Natalia Yu

    2011-01-01

    The use of gas phase plasmas for treating human tissue is at the intersection of two disciplines - plasma physics and engineering, and medicine. In this paper, a primer will be provided for the medical practitioner on the fundamentals of generating gas phase plasmas at atmospheric pressure in air for the treatment of human tissue. The mechanisms for gas phase plasmas interacting with tissue and biological fluids will also be discussed using results from computer modeling.

  15. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  16. Swelling of Erectile Nasal Tissue Induced by Human Sexual Pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; De Luca, C; Di Tano, A; Cacchio, M; Di Giulio, C; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Most chemically mediated sexual communication in humans remains uncharacterized. Yet the study of sexual communication is decisive for understanding sexual behavior and evolutive mechanisms in our species. Here we provide the evidence to consider 4,16-androstadien-3-one (AND) as a man's sexual pheromone. Our experiment provides support for the physiological effect of AND on nasal airway resistance (Rna) in women, as assessed by anterior rhinomanometry. We found that AND administration increased the area of turbinate during the ovulatory phase, resulting in an increase of Rna. Thus, we discovered that minute amounts of AND, acting through neuroendocrine brain control, regulate Rna and consequently affect the sexual physiology and behavior. Fascinatingly, this finding provides the evidence of the preservation of chemosexual communication in humans, which it has been largely neglected due to its unconscious perception and concealed nature. Therefore, chemical communication is a plesiomorphic evolutive phenomenon in humans.

  17. A novel small molecule target in human airway smooth muscle for potential treatment of obstructive lung diseases: a staged high-throughput biophysical screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Rechenberg Moritz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A newly identified mechanism of smooth muscle relaxation is the interaction between the small heat shock protein 20 (HSP20 and 14-3-3 proteins. Focusing upon this class of interactions, we describe here a novel drug target screening approach for treating airflow obstruction in asthma. Methods Using a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP assay, we screened a library of compounds that could act as small molecule modulators of HSP20 signals. We then applied two quantitative, cell-based biophysical methods to assess the functional efficacy of these molecules and rank-ordered their abilities to relax isolated human airway smooth muscle (ASM. Scaling up to the level of an intact tissue, we confirmed in a concentration-responsive manner the potency of the cell-based hit compounds. Results Among 58,019 compound tested, 268 compounds caused 20% or more reduction of the polarized emission in the FP assay. A small subset of these primary screen hits, belonging to two scaffolds, caused relaxation of isolated ASM cell in vitro and attenuated active force development of intact tissue ex vivo. Conclusions This staged biophysical screening paradigm provides proof-of-principle for high-throughput and cost-effective discovery of new small molecule therapeutic agents for obstructive lung diseases.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Levels of Human Spinal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Liam; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2017-09-06

    .: Systematic Review. .: The aim of this study was to investigate, quantify, compare and compile the various mesenchymal stem cell tissue sources within human spinal tissues to act as a compendium for clinical and research application. .: Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in academic and clinical understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously limited to cells isolated from bone marrow, the past decade has illicited the characterization and isolation of human MSCs from adipose, bone marrow, synovium, muscle, periosteum, peripheral blood, umbilical cord, placenta and numerous other tissues. As researchers explore practical applications of cells in these tissues, the absolute levels of MSCs in specific spinal tissue will be critical to guide future research. .: The PubMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for articles relating to the harvest, characterization, isolation and quantification of human mesenchymal stem cells from spinal tissues. Selected articles were examined for relevant data, categorized according to type of spinal tissue, and when possible, standardized to facilitate comparisons between sites. .: Human mesenchymal stem cell levels varied widely between spinal tissues. Yields for Intervertebral disc demonstrated roughly 5% of viable cells to be positive for MSC surface markers. Cartilage endplate cells yielded 18,500- 61,875 cells/ 0.8 mm thick sample of cartilage end plate. Ligamentum flavum yielded 250,000- 500,000 cells per gram of tissue. Annulus fibrosus FACS treatment found 29% of cells positive for MSC marker Stro-1. Nucleus pulposus yielded mean tissue samples of 40,584-234,137 MSCs/gram of tissue. .: Numerous tissues within and surrounding the spine represent a consistent and reliable source for the harvest and isolation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Among the tissues of the spine, the annulus fibrosus and ligamentum flavum each offer considerable levels of mesenchymal stem cells, and may

  19. Large-scale CFD simulations of the transitional and turbulent regime for the large human airways during rapid inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Hadrien; Gambaruto, Alberto M; Bates, Alister J; Vázquez, Mariano; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Doorly, Denis J

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of unsteady flow in the human large airways during a rapid inhalation were investigated using highly detailed large-scale computational fluid dynamics on a subject-specific geometry. The simulations were performed to resolve all the spatial and temporal scales of the flow, thanks to the use of massive computational resources. A highly parallel finite element code was used, running on two supercomputers, solving the transient incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Given that the finest mesh contained 350 million elements, the study sets a precedent for large-scale simulations of the respiratory system, proposing an analysis strategy for mean flow, fluctuations and wall shear stresses on a rapid and short inhalation (a so-called sniff). The geometry used encompasses the exterior face and the airways from the nasal cavity, through the trachea and up to the third lung bifurcation; it was derived from a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of a 48-year-old male. The transient inflow produces complex flows over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re). Thanks to the high fidelity simulations, many features involving the flow transition were observed, with the level of turbulence clearly higher in the throat than in the nose. Spectral analysis revealed turbulent characteristics persisting downstream of the glottis, and were captured even with a medium mesh resolution. However a fine mesh resolution was found necessary in the nasal cavity to observe transitional features. This work indicates the potential of large-scale simulations to further understanding of airway physiological mechanics, which is essential to guide clinical diagnosis; better understanding of the flow also has implications for the design of interventions such as aerosol drug delivery.

  20. Tissue localization of human trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Ole; Tornøe, Ida

    2007-01-01

    pattern of the three trefoil factors analyzing mRNA from a panel of 20 human tissues by conventional reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR and, in addition, by real-time PCR. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human tissues using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised...... against these factors. TFF1 showed highest expression in the stomach and colon, whereas TFF2 and TFF3 showed highest expression in stomach and colon, respectively. All three TFFs were found in the ducts of pancreas. Whereas TFF2 was found to be restricted to these two tissues, the structurally more...... closely related TFF1 and TFF3 showed a more general tissue distribution and were found to colocalize on an array of mucosal surfaces. This is the first thorough parallel description of the tissue distribution of TFFs in normal tissues, and it provides a baseline for similar analysis in diseased tissues...

  1. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  2. The potential of phage therapy in cystic fibrosis: Essential human-bacterial-phage interactions and delivery considerations for use in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; Fonceca, Angela M; Ditcham, William G; Kicic, Anthony; Cf, Arest

    2017-07-15

    As antimicrobial-resistant microbes become increasingly common and a significant global issue, novel approaches to treating these infections particularly in those at high risk are required. This is evident in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), who suffer from chronic airway infection caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, typically Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One option is bacteriophage (phage) therapy, which utilises the natural predation of phage viruses upon their host bacteria. This review summarises the essential and unique aspects of the phage-microbe-human lung interactions in CF that must be addressed to successfully develop and deliver phage to CF airways. The current evidence regarding phage biology, phage-bacterial interactions, potential airway immune responses to phages, previous use of phages in humans and method of phage delivery to the lung are also summarised. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood; Brix, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella spp.), healthy lungs (commensal Prevotella spp.) or both (commensal Veillonella spp. and Actinomyces spp.). All bacteria were found to induce activation of DCs as demonstrated by similar induction of CD83, CD40 and CD86 surface expression. However, asthma and COPD-associated pathogenic bacteria provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella spp. vs. Actinomyces spp.) reflecting their pro-inflammatory effects on DCs. Co-culture experiments found that Prevotella spp. were able to reduce Haemophillus influenzae-induced IL-12p70 in DCs, whereas no effect was observed on IL-23 and IL-10 production. This study demonstrates intrinsic differences in DC stimulating properties of bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

  4. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Madura Larsen

    Full Text Available Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties of individual bacterial species are unknown. In this study, we compared the immune stimulatory capacity on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs of selected airway commensal and pathogenic bacteria predominantly associated with lungs of asthma or COPD patients (pathogenic Haemophillus spp. and Moraxella spp., healthy lungs (commensal Prevotella spp. or both (commensal Veillonella spp. and Actinomyces spp.. All bacteria were found to induce activation of DCs as demonstrated by similar induction of CD83, CD40 and CD86 surface expression. However, asthma and COPD-associated pathogenic bacteria provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella spp. vs. Actinomyces spp. reflecting their pro-inflammatory effects on DCs. Co-culture experiments found that Prevotella spp. were able to reduce Haemophillus influenzae-induced IL-12p70 in DCs, whereas no effect was observed on IL-23 and IL-10 production. This study demonstrates intrinsic differences in DC stimulating properties of bacteria associated with the airway microbiota.

  5. SIGIRR inhibits toll-like receptor 4, 5, 9-mediated immune responses in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Wu, Xueling; Zhao, Yunfeng; Deng, Zhaoxia; Qian, Guisheng

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) may contribute to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through toll-like receptors (TLRs)-mediated molecular mechanisms. TLRs exist on the surface of HAEC where binding to their cognate ligands initiates airway inflammation. Single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related protein (SIGIRR) is a member of the toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) family that can negatively modulate the immune response. We carried out studies to characterize SIGIRR modulation of TLR-mediated immune response in HAEC and to define its mechanisms of action. Following treatment with various concentrations of LPS, flagellin and CpG DNA, the levels of cognate TLRs 4, 5, and 9 were measured in the supernatants of HAEC over-expressing the SIGIRR molecule. Moreover, the interaction of the TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) with SIGIRR in response to LPS-, flagellin- and CpG DNA-stimulation was examined by co-immunoprecipitation. The findings from this study revealed that overexpression of SIGIRR in HAEC stimulated by LPS, flagellin or CpG DNA resulted in attenuated production of the inflammatory mediators IL-6 and TNF-α. This attenuation was not the result of decreased expression of TLR4, 5 or 9, but rather a sequestration of MyD88 to the TLRs. In conclusion, SIGIRR can inhibit TLR4, 5, and 9-mediated immune responses in HAEC and may be a valuable therapeutic target for the prevention of ALI/ARDS.

  6. DNA methylome profiling of human tissues identifies global and tissue-specific methylation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokk, Kaie; Modhukur, Vijayachitra; Rajashekar, Balaji; Märtens, Kaspar; Mägi, Reedik; Kolde, Raivo; Koltšina, Marina; Nilsson, Torbjörn K; Vilo, Jaak; Salumets, Andres; Tõnisson, Neeme

    2014-04-01

    DNA epigenetic modifications, such as methylation, are important regulators of tissue differentiation, contributing to processes of both development and cancer. Profiling the tissue-specific DNA methylome patterns will provide novel insights into normal and pathogenic mechanisms, as well as help in future epigenetic therapies. In this study, 17 somatic tissues from four autopsied humans were subjected to functional genome analysis using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, covering 486 428 CpG sites. Only 2% of the CpGs analyzed are hypermethylated in all 17 tissue specimens; these permanently methylated CpG sites are located predominantly in gene-body regions. In contrast, 15% of the CpGs are hypomethylated in all specimens and are primarily located in regions proximal to transcription start sites. A vast number of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions are identified and considered likely mediators of tissue-specific gene regulatory mechanisms since the hypomethylated regions are closely related to known functions of the corresponding tissue. Finally, a clear inverse correlation is observed between promoter methylation within CpG islands and gene expression data obtained from publicly available databases. This genome-wide methylation profiling study identified tissue-specific differentially methylated regions in 17 human somatic tissues. Many of the genes corresponding to these differentially methylated regions contribute to tissue-specific functions. Future studies may use these data as a reference to identify markers of perturbed differentiation and disease-related pathogenic mechanisms.

  7. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT) are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification ...

  9. Study of the flow unsteadiness in the human airway using large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernate, Jorge A.; Geisler, Taylor S.; Padhy, Sourav; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-08-01

    The unsteady flow in a patient-specific geometry of the airways is studied. The geometry comprises the oral cavity, orophrarynx, larynx, trachea, and the bronchial tree extending to generations 5-8. Simulations are carried out for a constant inspiratory flow rate of 60 liters/min, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 4213 for a nominal tracheal diameter of 2 cm. The computed mean flow field is compared extensively with magnetic resonance velocimetry measurements by Banko et al. [Exp. Fluids 56, 117 (2015), 10.1007/s00348-015-1966-y] carried out in the same computed-tomography-based geometry, showing good agreement. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of the flow in the bronchial tree. After becoming unsteady at a constriction in the oropharynx, the flow is found to be chaotic, exhibiting fluctuations with broad-band spectra even at the most distal airways in which the Reynolds numbers are as low as 300. An inertial range signature is present in the trachea but not in the bronchial tree where a narrower range of scales is observed. The unsteadiness is attributed to the convection of turbulent structures produced at the larynx as well as to local kinetic energy production throughout the bronchial tree. Production occurs predominantly at shear layers bounding geometry-induced separation regions.

  10. Natural Rubber Nanocomposite with Human-Tissue-Like Mechanical Characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murniati, Riri; Novita, Nanda; Sutisna; Wibowo, Edy; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2017-07-01

    The blends of synthetic rubber and natural rubber with nanosilica were prepared using a blending technique in presence of different filler volume fraction. The effect of filler on morphological and mechanical characteristics was studied. Utilization of human cadaver in means of medical study has been commonly used primarily as tools of medical teaching and training such as surgery. Nonetheless, human cadaver brought inevitable problems. So it is necessary to find a substitute material that can be used to replace cadavers. In orthopaedics, the materials that resemble in mechanical properties to biological tissues are elastomers such as natural rubber (latex) and synthetic rubber (polyurethanes, silicones). This substitution material needs to consider the potential of Indonesia to help the development of the nation. Indonesia is the second largest country producer of natural rubber in the world. This paper aims to contribute to adjusting the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) to the recommended range of biological tissue value and thus allow the development of phantoms with greater stability and similarity to human tissues. Repeatability for the phantom fabrication process was also explored. Characteristics were then compared to the control and mechanical characteristics of different human body part tissue. Nanosilica is the best filler to produce the best nanocomposite similarities with human tissue. We produced composites that approaching the properties of human internal tissues.

  11. Structure and function of airway surface layer of the human lungs & mobility of probe particles in complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liheng

    Numerous infectious particles such as bacteria and pathogens are deposited on the airway surface of the human lungs during our daily breathing. To avoid infection the lung has evolved to develop a smart and powerful defense system called mucociliary clearance. The airway surface layer is a critical component of this mucus clearance system, which consists of two parts: (1) a mucus layer, that traps inhaled particles and transports them out of the lung by cilia-generated flow; and (2) a periciliary layer, that provides a favorable environment for ciliary beating and cell surface lubrication. For 75 years, it has been dogma that a single gel-like mucus layer, which is composed of secreted mucin glycoproteins, is transported over a "watery" periciliary layer. This one-gel model, however, does not explain fundamental features of the normal system, e.g. formation of a distinct mucus layer, nor accurately predict how the mucus clearance system fails in disease. In the first part of this thesis we propose a novel "Gel-on-Brush" model with a mucus layer (the "gel") and a "brush-like" periciliary layer, composed of mucins tethered to the luminal of airway surface, and supporting data accurately describes both the biophysical and cell biological bases for normal mucus clearance and its failure in disease. Our "Gel-on-Brush" model describes for the first time how and why mucus is efficiently cleared in health and unifies the pathogenesis of major human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is expected that this "Gel-on-Brush" model of airway surface layer opens new directions for treatments of airway diseases. A dilemma regarding the function of mucus is that, although mucus traps any inhaled harmful particulates, it also poses a long-time problem for drug delivery: mobility of cargos carrying pharmaceutical agents is slowed down in mucus. The second part of this thesis aims to answer the question: can we theoretically understand the

  12. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  14. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  15. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  16. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  17. MATRIX METALLOPROTEINS (MMP)-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR) IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZINC (ZN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-Mediated Phosphorylation of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in Human Airway Epithelial Cells (HAEC) Exposed to Zinc (Zn)Weidong Wu, James M. Samet, Robert Silbajoris, Lisa A. Dailey, Lee M. Graves, and Philip A. BrombergCenter fo...

  18. Photon emission from normal and tumor human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, F; Grillo, C; Musumeci, F; Triglia, A; Rodolico, G; Cammisuli, F; Rinzivillo, C; Fragati, G; Santuccio, A; Rodolico, M

    1992-01-15

    Photon emission in the visible and near ultraviolet range by samples of human tissue removed during surgery has been measured by means of a low noise photomultiplier coupled to a data acquisition system. The results show that among the 25 analyzed samples the 9 from normal tissues had an emission rate of the order of some tens of photons/cm2 min, while most of the 16 tumor tissue samples had a very much higher rate.

  19. Training human mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are an interesting source for cell therapies and tissue engineering applications, because these cells are able to differentiate into various target tissues, such as bone, cartilage, fat and endothelial cells. In addition, they secrete a wide array of growth fa

  20. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  1. Regulation of the cd38 promoter in human airway smooth muscle cells by TNF-α and dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walseth Timothy F

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD38 is expressed in human airway smooth muscle (HASM cells, regulates intracellular calcium, and its expression is augmented by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. CD38 has a role in airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark of asthma, since deficient mice develop attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness compared to wild-type mice following intranasal challenges with cytokines such as IL-13 and TNF-α. Regulation of CD38 expression in HASM cells involves the transcription factor NF-κB, and glucocorticoids inhibit this expression through NF-κB-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study, we determined whether the transcriptional regulation of CD38 expression in HASM cells involves response elements within the promoter region of this gene. Methods We cloned a putative 3 kb promoter fragment of the human cd38 gene into pGL3 basic vector in front of a luciferase reporter gene. Sequence analysis of the putative cd38 promoter region revealed one NF-κB and several AP-1 and glucocorticoid response element (GRE motifs. HASM cells were transfected with the 3 kb promoter, a 1.8 kb truncated promoter that lacks the NF-κB and some of the AP-1 sites, or the promoter with mutations of the NF-κB and/or AP-1 sites. Using the electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we determined the binding of nuclear proteins to oligonucleotides encoding the putative cd38 NF-κB, AP-1, and GRE sites, and the specificity of this binding was confirmed by gel supershift analysis with appropriate antibodies. Results TNF-α induced a two-fold activation of the 3 kb promoter following its transfection into HASM cells. In cells transfected with the 1.8 kb promoter or promoter constructs lacking NF-κB and/or AP-1 sites or in the presence of dexamethasone, there was no induction in the presence of TNF-α. The binding of nuclear proteins to oligonucleotides encoding the putative cd38 NF-κB site and some of the six AP-1 sites was increased by TNF-α, and to

  2. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  3. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  4. Sensory regulation of swallowing and airway protection: a role for the internal superior laryngeal nerve in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Samah; Prince, Rebecca A; Kim, Daniel Y; Paydarfar, David

    2003-07-01

    During swallowing, the airway is protected from aspiration of ingested material by brief closure of the larynx and cessation of breathing. Mechanoreceptors innervated by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (ISLN) are activated by swallowing, and connect to central neurones that generate swallowing, laryngeal closure and respiratory rhythm. This study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that the ISLN afferent signal is necessary for normal deglutition and airway protection in humans. In 21 healthy adults, we recorded submental electromyograms, videofluoroscopic images of the upper airway, oronasal airflow and respiratory inductance plethysmography. In six subjects we also recorded pressures in the hypopharynx and upper oesophagus. We analysed swallows that followed a brief infusion (4-5 ml) of liquid barium onto the tongue, or a sip (1-18 ml) from a cup. In 16 subjects, the ISLN was anaesthetised by transcutaneous injection of bupivacaine into the paraglottic compartment. Saline injections using the identical procedure were performed in six subjects. Endoscopy was used to evaluate upper airway anatomy, to confirm ISLN anaesthesia, and to visualise vocal cord movement and laryngeal closure. Comparisons of swallowing and breathing were made within subjects (anaesthetic or saline injection vs. control, i.e. no injection) and between subjects (anaesthetic injection vs. saline injection). In the non-anaesthetised condition (saline injection, 174 swallows in six subjects; no injection, 522 swallows in 20 subjects), laryngeal penetration during swallowing was rare (1.4 %) and tracheal aspiration was never observed. During ISLN anaesthesia (16 subjects, 396 swallows), all subjects experienced effortful swallowing and an illusory globus sensation in the throat, and 15 subjects exhibited penetration of fluid into the larynx during swallowing. The incidence of laryngeal penetration in the anaesthetised condition was 43 % (P swallow cycle to evaluate the

  5. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation is an ex vivo technique previously used in studies of airway epithelial ion and water transport. Explanted cells and sheets of nasal epithelium form fully differentiated spheroids enclosing a partly fluid-filled lumen with the ciliated apical....... Nasal ciliary cells and sheets were removed on day 1 by nasal brush biopsy and analyzed with regard to ciliary beat pattern-and frequency using high-speed video imaging for standard reference values. Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation was initiated in the same individual on the same day...... was successful in 15 out of 18 (82%) sampled individuals. Thus, formation was successful in seven healthy controls and eight PCD patients, while unsuccessful in 3 with PCD due to infection. Median (range) number of days in culture before harvesting of spheroids was 4 (1-5) in healthy versus 2 (1-5) in PCD...

  6. Directional secretory response of double stranded RNA-induced thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP and CCL11/eotaxin-1 in human asthmatic airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymic stromal lymphoproetin (TSLP is a cytokine secreted by the airway epithelium in response to respiratory viruses and it is known to promote allergic Th2 responses in asthma. This study investigated whether virally-induced secretion of TSLP is directional in nature (apical vs. basolateral and/or if there are TSLP-mediated effects occurring at both sides of the bronchial epithelial barrier in the asthmatic state. METHODS: Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC from control (n = 3 and asthmatic (n = 3 donors were differentiated into polarized respiratory tract epithelium under air-liquid interface (ALI conditions and treated apically with dsRNA (viral surrogate or TSLP. Sub-epithelial effects of TSLP were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC from normal (n = 3 and asthmatic (n = 3 donors. Clinical experiments examined nasal airway secretions obtained from asthmatic children during naturally occurring rhinovirus-induced exacerbations (n = 20 vs. non-asthmatic uninfected controls (n = 20. Protein levels of TSLP, CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL17/TARC, CCL22/MDC, TNF-α and CXCL8 were determined with a multiplex magnetic bead assay. RESULTS: Our data demonstrate that: 1 Asthmatic HBEC exhibit an exaggerated apical, but not basal, secretion of TSLP after dsRNA exposure; 2 TSLP exposure induces unidirectional (apical secretion of CCL11/eotaxin-1 in asthmatic HBEC and enhanced CCL11/eotaxin-1 secretion in asthmatic HASMC; 3 Rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations in children are associated with in vivo airway secretion of TSLP and CCL11/eotaxin-1. CONCLUSIONS: There are virally-induced TSLP-driven secretory immune responses at both sides of the bronchial epithelial barrier characterized by enhanced CCL11/eotaxin-1 secretion in asthmatic airways. These results suggest a new model of TSLP-mediated eosinophilic responses in the asthmatic airway during viral-induced exacerbations.

  7. Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy of Human Tissues Analysis: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Hoang, Vu Dang; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-05-04

    Vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared (IR) and Raman) and, in particular, micro-spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopic imaging have been used to characterize developmental changes in tissues, to monitor these changes in cell cultures and to detect disease and drug-induced modifications. The conventional methods for biochemical and histophatological tissue characterization necessitate complex and "time-consuming" sample manipulations and the results are rarely quantifiable. The spectroscopy of molecular vibrations using mid-IR or Raman techniques has been applied to samples of human tissue. This article reviews the application of these vibrational spectroscopic techniques for analysis of biological tissue published between 2005 and 2015.

  8. Hemagglutinin protein of Asian strains of human influenza virus A H1N1 binds to sialic acid--a major component of human airway receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Chai, H C

    2012-03-16

    Hemagglutinin (HA) protein plays an important role in binding the influenza virus to infected cells and therefore mediates infection. Deposited HA sequences of 86 Asian strains of influenza A (H1N1) viruses during the first outbreak were obtained from the NCBI database and compared. Interaction of the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) virus with the human sialic acid receptor was also studied using bioinformatics. Overall, not more than three single-point amino acid variants/changes were observed in the HA protein region of influenza A (H1N1) virus from Asian countries when a selected group sequence comparison was made. The bioinformatics study showed that the HA protein of influenza A (H1N1) binds to the sialic acid receptor in human airway receptors, possibly key to air-borne infection in humans.

  9. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  10. Chemical Probes for Visualizing Intact Animal and Human Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hei Ming; Ng, Wai-Lung; Gentleman, Steve M; Wu, Wutian

    2017-06-22

    Newly developed tissue clearing techniques can be used to render intact tissues transparent. When combined with fluorescent labeling technologies and optical sectioning microscopy, this allows visualization of fine structure in three dimensions. Gene-transfection techniques have proved very useful in visualizing cellular structures in animal models, but they are not applicable to human brain tissue. Here, we discuss the characteristics of an ideal chemical fluorescent probe for use in brain and other cleared tissues, and offer a comprehensive overview of currently available chemical probes. We describe their working principles and compare their performance with the goal of simplifying probe selection for neuropathologists and stimulating probe development by chemists. We propose several approaches for the development of innovative chemical labeling methods which, when combined with tissue clearing, have the potential to revolutionize how we study the structure and function of the human brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Jaw thrust can deteriorate upper airway patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Erb, T O; Frei, F J

    2005-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a frequent problem in spontaneously breathing children undergoing anesthesia or sedation procedures. Failure to maintain a patent airway can rapidly result in severe hypoxemia, bradycardia, or asystole, as the oxygen demand of children is high and oxygen reserve is low. We present two children with cervical masses in whom upper airway obstruction exaggerated while the jaw thrust maneuver was applied during induction of anesthesia. This deterioration in airway patency was probably caused by medial displacement of the lateral tumorous tissues which narrowed the pharyngeal airway.

  12. The Lung Microbiome and Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Susan V

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated relationships between the composition of the airway microbiota (mixed-species communities of microbes that exist in the respiratory tract) and critical features of immune response and pulmonary function. These studies provide evidence that airway inflammatory status and capacity for repair are coassociated with specific taxonomic features of the airway microbiome. Although directionality has yet to be established, the fact that microbes are known drivers of inflammation and tissue damage suggests that in the context of chronic inflammatory airway disease, the composition and, more importantly, the function, of the pulmonary microbiome represent critical factors in defining airway disease outcomes.

  13. Ozone-induced inflammation in the lower airways of human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B.; Graham, D.E.; Mann, R.; McGee, M.P.; Horstman, D.H.; Kozumbo, W.J.; Becker, S.; House, D.E.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1989-02-01

    Although ozone (O3) has been shown to induce inflammation in the lungs of animals, very little is known about its inflammatory effects on humans. In this study, 11 healthy nonsmoking men, 18 to 35 yr of age (mean, 25.4 +/- 3.5), were exposed once to 0.4 ppm O3 and once to filtered air for 2 h with intermittent exercise. Eighteen hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and the cells and fluid were analyzed for various indicators of inflammation. There was an 8.2-fold increase in the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the total cell population, and a small but significant decrease in the percentage of macrophages after exposure to O3. Immunoreactive neutrophil elastase often associated with inflammation and lung damage increased by 3.8-fold in the fluid while its activity increased 20.6-fold in the lavaged cells. A 2-fold increase in the levels of protein, albumin, and IgG suggested increased vascular permeability of the lung. Several biochemical markers that could act as chemotactic or regulatory factors in an inflammatory response were examined in the BAL fluid (BALF). The level of complement fragment C3 alpha was increased by 1.7-fold. The chemotactic leukotriene B4 was unchanged while prostaglandin E2 increased 2-fold. In contrast, three enzyme systems of phagocytes with potentially damaging effects on tissues and microbes, namely, NADPH-oxidase and the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase, were increased neither in the lavaged fluid nor cells. In addition, the amounts of fibrogenic-related molecules were assessed in BALF.

  14. Analysis of the expression of human bitter taste receptors in extraoral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggupilli, Appalaraju; Singh, Nisha; Upadhyaya, Jasbir; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Arakawa, Makoto; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Duan, Kangmin; Chelikani, Prashen

    2017-02-01

    The 25 bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) in humans perform a chemosensory function. However, very little is known about the level of expression of these receptors in different tissues. In this study, using nCounter gene expression we analyzed the expression patterns of human TAS2R transcripts in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CuFi-1), normal bronchial epithelial (NuLi-1), airway smooth muscle (ASM), pulmonary artery smooth muscle (PASM), mammary epithelial, and breast cancer cells. Our results suggest a specific pattern of TAS2R expression with TAS2R3, 4, 5, 10, 13, 19, and 50 transcripts expressed at moderate levels and TAS2R14 and TAS2R20 (or TASR49) at high levels in the various tissues analyzed. This pattern of expression is mostly independent of tissue origin and the pathological state, except in cancer cells. To elucidate the expression at the protein level, we pursued flow cytometry analysis of select T2Rs from CuFi-1 and NuLi-1 cells. The expression levels observed at the gene level by nCounter analysis correlate with the protein levels for the T2Rs analyzed. Next, to assess the functionality of the expressed T2Rs in these cells, we pursued functional assays measuring intracellular calcium mobilization after stimulation with the bitter compound quinine. Using PLC inhibitor, U-73122, we show that the calcium mobilized in these cells predominantly takes place through the Quinine-T2R-Gαβγ-PLC pathway. This report will accelerate studies aimed at analyzing the pathophysiological function of T2Rs in different extraoral tissues.

  15. Reverse-phase phosphoproteome analysis of signaling pathways induced by Rift valley fever virus in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taissia G Popova

    Full Text Available Rift valley fever virus (RVFV infection is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt. In this study we show that human small airway epithelial cells are highly susceptible to RVFV virulent strain ZH-501 and the attenuated strain MP-12. We used the reverse-phase protein arrays technology to identify phosphoprotein signaling pathways modulated during infection of cultured airway epithelium. ZH-501 infection induced activation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK and ERK and downstream transcriptional factors [STAT1 (Y701, ATF2 (T69/71, MSK1 (S360 and CREB (S133]. NF-κB phosphorylation was also increased. Activation of p53 (S15, S46 correlated with the increased levels of cleaved effector caspase-3, -6 and -7, indicating activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. RVFV infection downregulated phosphorylation of a major anti-apoptotic regulator of survival pathways, AKT (S473, along with phosphorylation of FOX 01/03 (T24/31 which controls cell cycle arrest downstream from AKT. Consistent with this, the level of apoptosis inhibitor XIAP was decreased. However, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway marker, caspase-9, demonstrated only a marginal activation accompanied by an increased level of the inhibitor of apoptosome formation, HSP27. Concentration of the autophagy marker, LC3B, which often accompanies the pro-survival signaling, was decreased. Cumulatively, our analysis of RVFV infection in lung epithelium indicated a viral strategy directed toward the control of cell apoptosis through a number of transcriptional factors. Analyses of MP-12 titers in challenged cells in the presence of MAPK inhibitors indicated that activation of p38 represents a protective cell response while ERK activation controls viral replication.

  16. Defective Resensitization in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Evokes β-Adrenergic Receptor Dysfunction in Severe Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manveen K Gupta

    Full Text Available β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR agonists (β2-agonist are the most commonly used therapy for acute relief in asthma, but chronic use of these bronchodilators paradoxically exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness. Activation of βARs by β-agonist leads to desensitization (inactivation by phosphorylation through G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs which mediate β-arrestin binding and βAR internalization. Resensitization occurs by dephosphorylation of the endosomal βARs which recycle back to the plasma membrane as agonist-ready receptors. To determine whether the loss in β-agonist response in asthma is due to altered βAR desensitization and/or resensitization, we used primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs isolated from the lungs of non-asthmatic and fatal-asthmatic subjects. Asthmatic HASMCs have diminished adenylyl cyclase activity and cAMP response to β-agonist as compared to non-asthmatic HASMCs. Confocal microscopy showed significant accumulation of phosphorylated β2ARs in asthmatic HASMCs. Systematic analysis of desensitization components including GRKs and β-arrestin showed no appreciable differences between asthmatic and non-asthmatic HASMCs. However, asthmatic HASMC showed significant increase in PI3Kγ activity and was associated with reduction in PP2A activity. Since reduction in PP2A activity could alter receptor resensitization, endosomal fractions were isolated to assess the agonist ready β2ARs as a measure of resensitization. Despite significant accumulation of β2ARs in the endosomes of asthmatic HASMCs, endosomal β2ARs cannot robustly activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, endosomes from asthmatic HASMCs are associated with significant increase in PI3Kγ and reduced PP2A activity that inhibits β2AR resensitization. Our study shows that resensitization, a process considered to be a homeostasis maintaining passive process is inhibited in asthmatic HASMCs contributing to β2AR dysfunction which may underlie

  17. Arsenic alters transcriptional responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and decreases antimicrobial defense of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Britton C; Rayack, Erica J; Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-09-15

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water and food threatens the health of hundreds of millions of people worldwide by increasing the risk of numerous diseases. Arsenic exposure has been associated with infectious lung disease in epidemiological studies, but it is not yet understood how ingestion of low levels of arsenic increases susceptibility to bacterial infection. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to examine the effect of arsenic on gene expression in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and to determine if arsenic altered epithelial cell responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen. Bronchial epithelial cells line the airway surface, providing a physical barrier and serving critical roles in antimicrobial defense and signaling to professional immune cells. We used RNA-seq to define the transcriptional response of HBE cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and investigated how arsenic affected HBE gene networks in the presence and absence of the bacterial challenge. Environmentally relevant levels of arsenic significantly changed the expression of genes involved in cellular redox homeostasis and host defense to bacterial infection, and decreased genes that code for secreted antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Using pathway analysis, we identified Sox4 and Nrf2-regulated gene networks that are predicted to mediate the arsenic-induced decrease in lysozyme secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that arsenic decreased lysozyme in the airway surface liquid, resulting in reduced lysis of Microccocus luteus. Thus, arsenic alters the expression of genes and proteins in innate host defense pathways, thereby decreasing the ability of the lung epithelium to fight bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemotaxis and Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Scratch-Wounded Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwarzer

    Full Text Available Confocal imaging was used to characterize interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA, expressing GFP or labeled with Syto 11 with CF airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o-, grown as confluent monolayers with unknown polarity on coverglasses in control conditions and following scratch wounding. Epithelia and PAO1-GFP or PAK-GFP (2 MOI were incubated with Ringer containing typical extracellular salts, pH and glucose and propidium iodide (PI, to identify dead cells. PAO1 and PAK swam randomly over and did not bind to nonwounded CFBE41o- cells. PA migrated rapidly (began within 20 sec, maximum by 5 mins and massively (10-80 fold increase, termed "swarming", but transiently (random swimming after 15 mins, to wounds, particularly near cells that took up PI. Some PA remained immobilized on cells near the wound. PA swam randomly over intact CFBE41o- monolayers and wounded monolayers that had been incubated with medium for 1 hr. Expression of CFTR and altered pH of the media did not affect PA interactions with CFBE41o- wounds. In contrast, PAO1 swarming and immobilization along wounds was abolished in PAO1 (PAO1ΔcheYZABW, no expression of chemotaxis regulatory components cheY, cheZ, cheA, cheB and cheW and greatly reduced in PAO1 that did not express amino acid receptors pctA, B and C (PAO1ΔpctABC and in PAO1 incubated in Ringer containing a high concentration of mixed amino acids. Non-piliated PAKΔpilA swarmed normally towards wounded areas but bound infrequently to CFBE41o- cells. In contrast, both swarming and binding of PA to CFBE41o- cells near wounds were prevented in non-flagellated PAKΔfliC. Data are consistent with the idea that (i PA use amino acid sensor-driven chemotaxis and flagella-driven swimming to swarm to CF airway epithelial cells near wounds and (ii PA use pili to bind to epithelial cells near wounds.

  19. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43 Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. (a) Upon a finding that human tissue may be in violation of the...

  20. The ΔF508-CFTR mutation inhibits wild-type CFTR processing and function when co-expressed in human airway epithelia and in mouse nasal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Torry A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rescue or correction of CFTR function in native epithelia is the ultimate goal of CF therapeutics development. Wild-type (WT CFTR introduction and replacement is also of particular interest. Such therapies may be complicated by possible CFTR self-assembly into an oligomer or multimer. Results Surprisingly, functional CFTR assays in native airway epithelia showed that the most common CFTR mutant, ΔF508-CFTR (ΔF-CFTR, inhibits WT-CFTR when both forms are co-expressed. To examine more mechanistically, both forms of CFTR were transfected transiently in varying amounts into IB3-1 CF human airway epithelial cells and HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells null for endogenous CFTR protein expression. Increasing amounts of ΔF-CFTR inhibited WT-CFTR protein processing and function in CF human airway epithelial cells but not in heterologous HEK-293 cells. Stably expressed ΔF-CFTR in clones of the non-CF human airway epithelial cell line, CALU-3, also showed reduction in cAMP-stimulated anion secretion and in WT-CFTR processing. An ultimate test of this dominant negative-like effect of ΔF-CFTR on WT-CFTR was the parallel study of two different CF mouse models: the ΔF-CFTR mouse and the bitransgenic CFTR mouse corrected in the gut but null in the lung and airways. WT/ΔF heterozygotes had an intermediate phenotype with regard to CFTR agonist responses in in vivo nasal potential difference (NPD recordings and in Ussing chamber recordings of short-circuit current (ISC in vitro on primary tracheal epithelial cells isolated from the same mice. In contrast, CFTR bitransgenic +/− heterozygotes had no difference in their responses versus +/+ wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken altogether, these data suggest that ΔF-CFTR and WT-CFTR co-assemble into an oligomeric macromolecular complex in native epithelia and share protein processing machinery and regulation at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. As a consequence, ΔF-CFTR slows WT

  1. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  3. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  4. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  5. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F.; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. PMID:27899616

  6. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  7. Electrical circuit models of the human respiratory system reflect small airway impairment measured by impulse oscillation (IOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Michael D; Nazeran, Homer; Ramos, Carlos; Toon, Emily; Oates, Katrina; Bilton, Diana; Meraz, Erika; Hafezi, Nazila; Diong, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The use of the forced oscillatory input impedance parameter, frequency-dependence of Resistance (fdR), to assess small airway impairment (SAI) has not been widely accepted due to concern about the effects of "upper airway shunt" on oscillometric resistance and low frequency reactance. On the other hand, recent medical studies suggest that low frequency reactance is a very sensitive index of treatment intervention directed at small airways. The present study was undertaken to analyze and compare Impulse Oscillometry (IOS) resistance and reactance data with model-derived indices of small airway function from two models of the respiratory impedance, one with, and the other without an element for upper airway shunt capacitance. Fifty six patients with stable chronic obstructive lung disease of varying severity due to Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and 21 patients with asthma were evaluated by IOS testing. IOS data were input into the augmented RIC (aRIC) model with an upper airway shunt capacitance, and the extended RIC (eRIC) model, without a shunt capacitance element. Model-derived indices were compared between the two models for CF patients separately from asthma patients. We conclude that IOS indices of SAI are modeled equally well with or without upper airway shunt capacitance, and do not seem to be dependent on upper airway shunt capacitance.

  8. High and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintain histological differential in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Lin, S J; Huo, C; Blick, T; Henderson, M A; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Morrison, W A; Campbell, I G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2012-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is the area of breast tissue that appears radiologically white on mammography. Although high MD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, independent of BRCA1/2 mutation status, the molecular basis of high MD and its associated breast cancer risk is poorly understood. MD studies will benefit from an animal model, where hormonal, gene and drug perturbations on MD can be measured in a preclinical context. High and low MD tissues were selectively sampled by stereotactic biopsy from operative specimens of high-risk women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The high and low MD tissues were transferred into separate vascularised biochambers in the groins of SCID mice. Chamber material was harvested after 6 weeks for histological analyses and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, vimentin and a human-specific mitochondrial antigen. Within-individual analysis was performed in replicate mice, eliminating confounding by age, body mass index and process-related factors, and comparisons were made to the parental human tissue. Maintenance of differential MD post-propagation was assessed radiographically. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the preservation of human glandular and stromal components in the murine biochambers, with maintenance of radiographic MD differential. Propagated high MD regions had higher stromal (p = 0.0002) and lower adipose (p = 0.0006) composition, reflecting the findings in the original human breast tissue, although glands appeared small and non-complex in both high and low MD groups. No significant differences were observed in glandular area (p = 0.4) or count (p = 0.4) between high and low MD biochamber tissues. Human mammary glandular and stromal tissues were viably maintained in murine biochambers, with preservation of differential radiographic density and histological features. Our study provides a murine model for future studies into the biomolecular basis of MD as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  9. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  10. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  11. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  12. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  13. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  14. Lactate kinetics in human tissues at rest and during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    of lactate in skeletal muscle. With the introduction of lactate isotopes muscle lactate kinetics and oxidation could be studied and a simultaneous lactate uptake and release was observed, not only in muscle but also in other tissues. Therefore, this review will discuss in vivo human: (1) skeletal muscle...... lactate metabolism at rest and during exercise and suggestions are put forward to explain the simultaneous lactate uptake and release; and (2) lactate metabolism in the heart, liver, kidneys, brain, adipose tissue and lungs will be discussed and its potential importance in these tissues....

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Pharyngeal Airways and Related Soft Tissues of Unilateral and Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients With the Noncleft Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Isil; Dogan, Servet

    2017-01-01

      This study is a comparison of pharyngeal airways and associated soft tissues of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients with the noncleft individuals.   Twenty-four unilateral cleft lip and palate patients (UCLP), 21 bilateral cleft lip and palate patients (BCLP), and 26 noncleft patients (NC) between ages 15 to 17 were included in the study. Eleven linear, 1 angular, and 1 proportional measurements were carried out on pretreatment lateral cephalometric head films of these individuals.   The nasopharyngeal depths were markedly reduced in BCLP when compared with the NC (P clefts, BCLP showed significant (P cleft groups compared to the controls. Similarly, the hyoid bone was positioned in a significantly (P cleft patients. Comparison of the mean ratio of velar length to nasopharyngeal depth of the three groups revealed significant (P cleft patients with significantly (P cleft patients show serious inadequacies compared to controls, with significant diversities among cleft types pertaining to some of the parameters investigated. It should be kept in mind that these variations can influence function in terms of respiration and phonation.

  16. Smoking-induced CXCL14 expression in the human airway epithelium links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Sackrowitz, Rachel; Fukui, Tomoya; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ion Wa; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    CXCL14, a recently described epithelial cytokine, plays putative multiple roles in inflammation and carcinogenesis. In the context that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are both smoking-related disorders associated with airway epithelial disorder and inflammation, we hypothesized that the airway epithelium responds to cigarette smoking with altered CXCL14 gene expression, contributing to the disease-relevant phenotype. Using genome-wide microarrays with subsequent immunohistochemical analysis, the data demonstrate that the expression of CXCL14 is up-regulated in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers and further increased in COPD smokers, especially within hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions, in association with multiple genes relevant to epithelial structural integrity and cancer. In vitro experiments revealed that the expression of CXCL14 is induced in the differentiated airway epithelium by cigarette smoke extract, and that epidermal growth factor mediates CXCL14 up-regulation in the airway epithelium through its effects on the basal stem/progenitor cell population. Analyses of two independent lung cancer cohorts revealed a dramatic up-regulation of CXCL14 expression in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. High expression of the COPD-associated CXCL14-correlating cluster of genes was linked in lung adenocarcinoma with poor survival. These data suggest that the smoking-induced expression of CXCL14 in the airway epithelium represents a novel potential molecular link between smoking-associated airway epithelial injury, COPD, and lung cancer.

  17. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, Elizabeth; Jensen, Christopher C.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; James, Alan L.; Elliot, John G.; Green, Francis H.; Liu, Jeffrey C.; Seow, Chun Y.; Park, Jin-Ah; Beckerle, Mary C.; Paré, Peter D.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI) whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms–and their failure in asthma–remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma. PMID:28278518

  18. Effect of static vs. dynamic imaging on particle transport in CT-based numerical models of human central airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-10-01

    Advances in quantitative computed tomography (CT) has provided methods to assess the detailed structure of the pulmonary airways and parenchyma, providing the means of applying computational fluid dynamics-based modeling to better understand subject-specific differences in structure-to-function relationships. Most of the previous numerical studies, seeking to predict patterns of inhaled particle deposition, have considered airway geometry and regional ventilation derived from static images. Because geometric alterations of the airway and parenchyma associated with regional ventilation may greatly affect particle transport, we have sought to investigate the effect of rigid vs. deforming airways, linear vs. nonlinear airway deformations, and step-wise static vs. dynamic imaging on particle deposition with varying numbers of intermediate lung volume increments. Airway geometry and regional ventilation at different time points were defined by four-dimensional (space and time) dynamic or static CT images. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent air flows were reproduced with a three-dimensional eddy-resolving computational fluid dynamics model. Finally, trajectories of particles were computed with the Lagrangian tracking algorithm. The results demonstrated that static-imaging-based models can contribute 7% uncertainty to overall particle distribution and deposition primarily due to regional flow rate (ventilation) differences as opposed to geometric alterations. The effect of rigid vs. deforming airways on serial distribution of particles over generations was significantly smaller than reported in a previous study that used the symmetric Weibel geometric model with smaller flow rate. Rigid vs. deforming airways were also shown to affect parallel particle distribution over lobes by 8% and the differences associated with use of static vs. dynamic imaging was 18%. These differences demonstrate that estimates derived from static vs. dynamic imaging can significantly affect the

  19. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  20. Modeling of inertial deposition in scaled models of rat and human nasal airways: Towards in vitro regional dosimetry in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Zhou, Yue

    2016-09-01

    Rodents are routinely used in inhalation toxicology tests as human surrogates. However, in vitro dosimetry tests in rodent casts are still scarce due to small rodent airways and in vitro tests to quantify sub-regional dosimetry are still impractical. We hypothesized that for inertial particles whose deposition is dominated by airflow convection (Reynolds number) and particle inertia (Stokes number), the deposition should be similar among airway replicas of different scales if their Reynolds and Stokes numbers are kept the same. In this study, we aimed to (1) numerically test the hypothesis in three airway geometries: a USP induction port, a human nose model, and a Sprague-Dawley rat nose model, and (2) find the range of applicability of this hypothesis. Five variants of the USP and human nose models and three variants of the rat nose model were tested. Inhalation rates and particle sizes were scaled to match the Reynolds number and Stokes numbers. A low-Reynolds-number k–ω model was used to resolve the airflow and a Lagrangian tracking algorithm was used to simulate the particle transport and deposition. Statistical analysis of predicted doses was conducted using ANOVA. For normal inhalation rates and particle dia- meters ranging from 0.5 to 24 mm, the deposition differences between the life-size and scaled models are insignificant for all airway geometries considered (i.e., human nose, USP, and rat nose). Furthermore, the deposition patterns and exit particle profiles also look similar among scaled models. However, deposition rates and patterns start to deviate if inhalation rates are too low, or particle sizes are too large. For the rat nose, the threshold velocity was found to be 0.71 m/s and the threshold Froude number to be 50. Results of this study provide a theoretical foundation for sub-regional in vitro dosimetry tests in small animals and for interpretation of data from inter-species or intra-species with varying body sizes.

  1. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  2. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  3. Human Bites of the Face with Tissue Losses in Cosmopolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Milaki Asuku

    Abstract. A retrospective series of thirty-six cases of human bites to the face with tissue losses requiring .... other authors 3, 5The expression 'snatched lover' featured .... literature is replete with reports on re-implantation of ... review of 22 cases.

  4. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  5. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical immunoreactivity. TGF...

  6. Anchored PDE4 regulates chloride conductance in wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Elise; Zlock, Lorna; Lao, Anna; Mika, Delphine; Namkung, Wan; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Gruenert, Dieter C; Verkman, Alan S; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that impair its expression and/or chloride channel function. Here, we provide evidence that type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are critical regulators of the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of CFTR in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. In non-CF cells, PDE4 inhibition increased CFTR activity under basal conditions (ΔISC 7.1 μA/cm(2)) and after isoproterenol stimulation (increased ΔISC from 13.9 to 21.0 μA/cm(2)) and slowed the return of stimulated CFTR activity to basal levels by >3-fold. In cells homozygous for ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation found in CF, PDE4 inhibition alone produced minimal channel activation. However, PDE4 inhibition strongly amplified the effects of CFTR correctors, drugs that increase expression and membrane localization of CFTR, and/or CFTR potentiators, drugs that increase channel gating, to reach ∼ 25% of the chloride conductance observed in non-CF cells. Biochemical studies indicate that PDE4s are anchored to CFTR and mediate a local regulation of channel function. Taken together, our results implicate PDE4 as an important determinant of CFTR activity in airway epithelia, and support the use of PDE4 inhibitors to potentiate the therapeutic benefits of CFTR correctors and potentiators.

  7. Use of sensitive, broad-spectrum molecular assays and human airway epithelium cultures for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Pyrc

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ~30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1-10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ~76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used.

  8. Use of Sensitive, Broad-Spectrum Molecular Assays and Human Airway Epithelium Cultures for Detection of Respiratory Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Krzysztof; Gawron, Katarzyna; Zeglen, Slawomir; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Bochenek, Grazyna; Sanak, Marek; Zembala, Marian; Szczeklik, Andrzej; Potempa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ∼30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1–10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ∼76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used. PMID:22403676

  9. Synchrotron refractive-index microradiography of human liver cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yongpeng; ZHANG Guilin; LI Yan; HWU Yeukuang; TSAI Wenli; JE Jung Ho; Margaritondo G.; YUAN Dong

    2005-01-01

    Three human liver tissue samples (~5 mm × 40 mm × 20 mm) were excised from a cancer patient's liver during surgery. The microradiology analysis was performed with a non-standard approach on a synchrotron. High-resolution refractive-index edge-enhanced microradiographs that cover a larger volume of the liver tissue sample were obtained. The cancer tissue and normal tissue could be clearly identified and distinguished based on their different textures. Furthermore, new blood vessel hyperplasia was found near the cancer area. Blood vessels with a diameter smaller than 20 μm could be identified. These findings were fully consistent with the histopathological examination of the same area. Microradiographs of the newly formed blood vessels at different angles were also obtained. This result shows that it is possible to further develop this approach into a technique of microradiographic imaging for clinic diagnosis of liver cancer at the early stage.

  10. Infrared absorption of human breast tissues in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chenglin [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Zhang Yuan [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yan Xiaohui [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China) and Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)]. E-mail: xy-zhang@fudan.edu.cn; Li Chengxiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Yang Wentao [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi Daren [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2006-07-15

    The spectral characteristics of human breast tissues in normal status and during different cancerous stages have been investigated by synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) absorption spectroscopy. Thanks to the excellent synchrotron radiation infrared (IR) source, higher resolving power is achieved in SR-FTIR absorption spectra than in conventional IR absorption measurements. Obvious variations in IR absorption spectrum of breast tissues were found as they change from healthy to diseased, or say in progression to cancer. On the other hand, some specific absorption peaks were found in breast cancer tissues by SR-FTIR spectroscopic methods. These spectral characteristics of breast tissue may help us in early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  11. Radioiodine plus recombinant human thyrotropin do not cause acute airway compression and are effective in reducing multinodular goiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albino, C.C., E-mail: ccalbino@uol.com.b [Instituto de Diabetes e Endocrinologia de Maringa, PR (Brazil); Graf, H.; Paz-Filho, G. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Endocrinologia e Metabologia; Diehl, L.A. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil); Olandoski, M.; Sabbag, A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Parana (PUCPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Nucleo de Bioestatistica; Buchpiguel, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2006-03-15

    Recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) reduces the activity of radioiodine required to treat multinodular goiter (MNG), but acute airway compression can be a life-threatening complication. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we assessed the efficacy and safety (including airway compression) of different doses of rhTSH associated with a fixed activity of {sup 131}I for treating MNG. Euthyroid patients with MNG (69.3 +- 62.0 mL, 20 females, 2 males, 64 +- 7 years) received 0.1 mg (group I, N = 8) or 0.01 mg (group II, N = 6) rhTSH or placebo (group III, N = 8), 24 h before 1.11 GBq {sup 131}I. Radioactive iodine uptake was determined at baseline and 24 h after rhTSH and thyroid volume (TV, baseline and 6 and 12 months after treatment) and tracheal cross-sectional area (TCA, baseline and 2, 7, 180, and 360 days after rhTSH) were determined by magnetic resonance; antithyroid antibodies and thyroid hormones were determined at frequent intervals. After 6 months, TV decreased significantly in groups I (28.5 +- 17.6%) and II (21.6 +- 17.8%), but not in group III (2.7 +- 15.3%). After 12 months, TV decreased significantly in groups I (36.7 +- 18.1%) and II (37.4 +- 27.1%), but not in group III (19.0 +- 24.3%). No significant changes in TCA were observed. T3 and free T4 increased transiently during the first month. After 12 months, 7 patients were hypothyroid (N 3 in group I and N = 2 in groups II and III). rhTSH plus a 1.11-GBq fixed {sup 131}I activity did not cause acute or chronic changes in TCA. After 6 and 12 months, TV reduction was more pronounced among patients treated with rhTSH plus {sup 131}I (author)

  12. IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-13 modulate responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells to IL-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michoud Marie-Claire

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-13 is a critical mediator of allergic asthma and associated airway hyperresponsiveness. IL-13 acts through a receptor complex comprised of IL-13Rα1 and IL-4Rα subunits with subsequent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. The IL-13Rα2 receptor may act as a decoy receptor. In human airway smooth muscle (HASM cells, IL-13 enhances cellular proliferation, calcium responses to agonists and induces eotaxin production. We investigated the effects of pre-treatment with IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-γ on the responses of HASM cells to IL-13. Methods Cultured HASM were examined for expression of IL-13 receptor subunits using polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Effects of cytokine pre-treatment on IL-13-induced cell responses were assessed by looking at STAT6 phosphorylation using Western blot, eotaxin secretion and calcium responses to histamine. Results IL-13Rα1, IL-4Rα and IL-13Rα2 subunits were expressed on HASM cells. IL-13 induced phosphorylation of STAT6 which reached a maximum by 30 minutes. Pre-treatment with IL-4, IL-13 and, to a lesser degree, IFN-γ reduced peak STAT6 phosphorylation in response to IL-13. IL-13, but not IFN-γ, pre-treatment abrogated IL-13-induced eotaxin secretion. Pre-treatment with IL-4 or IL-13 abrogated IL-13-induced augmentation of the calcium transient evoked by histamine. Cytokine pre-treatment did not affect expression of IL-13Rα1 and IL-4Rα but increased expression of IL-13Rα2. An anti-IL-13Rα2 neutralizing antibody did not prevent the cytokine pre-treatment effects on STAT6 phosphorylation. Cytokine pre-treatment increased SOCS-1, but not SOCS-3, mRNA expression which was not associated with significant increases in protein expression. Conclusion Pre-treatment with IL-4 and IL-13, but not IFN-γ, induced desensitization of the HASM cells to IL-13 as measured by eotaxin secretion and calcium transients to histamine

  13. A study of airway smooth muscle in asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David C.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. With standard Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), imaging ASM is often not possible due to poor structural contrast between the muscle and surrounding tissues. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize additional optical contrast factors intrinsic to the tissue, such as birefringence. Due to its highly ordered structure, ASM is strongly birefringent. Previously, we demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive OCT(PS-OCT) has the potential to be used to visualize ASM as well as easily segment it from the surrounding (weakly) birefringent tissue by exploiting a property which allows it to discriminate the orientation of birefringent fibers. We have already validated our technology with a substantial set of histological comparisons made against data obtained ex vivo. In this work we present a comprehensive comparison of ASM distributions in asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers. By isolating the ASM we parameterize its distribution in terms of both thickness and band width, calculated volumetrically over centimeters of airway. Using this data we perform analyses of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using a broad number and variety and subjects.

  14. Muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation increases cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R.; Rieks, D.; Meurs, H.; Ninaber, D. K.; Rabe, K. F.; Nanninga, J.; Kolahian, S.; Halayko, A. J.; Hiemstra, P. S.; Zuyderduyn, S.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways and is known to cause bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine also regulates aspects of remodelling and inflammation through its action on muscarinic receptors. In the present

  15. Muscarinic M3 receptor stimulation increases cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R.; Rieks, D.; Meurs, H.; Ninaber, D. K.; Rabe, K. F.; Nanninga, J.; Kolahian, S.; Halayko, A. J.; Hiemstra, P. S.; Zuyderduyn, S.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine is the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways and is known to cause bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine also regulates aspects of remodelling and inflammation through its action on muscarinic receptors. In the present stu

  16. Effect of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor KDR on human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU hui; XU Yong-jian; ZHANG Zhen-xiang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Airway remodeling with inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial shedding, basement membrane thickening and increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is an important determinant of bronchial obstruction and hyperresponsiveness in asthma.1,2 Increased ASM mass is by far the most important abnormality responsible for excessive airway narrowing and compliance of the airway wall in asthma.1-3 ASM growth and proliferation in asthma is a complex phenomenon of which the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in vivo. The increased amount of ASM in asthmatics is an indication of abnormal cell proliferation and growth, but little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms and factors that regulate ASM cell proliferation and growth in asthma.

  17. PKA and Epac cooperate to augment bradykinin-induced interleukin-8 release from human airway smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halayko Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases by secreting inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8. IL-8 production is in part regulated via activation of Gq-and Gs-coupled receptors. Here we study the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac1 and Epac2 in the bradykinin-induced IL-8 release from a human airway smooth muscle cell line and the underlying molecular mechanisms of this response. Methods IL-8 release was assessed via ELISA under basal condition and after stimulation with bradykinin alone or in combination with fenoterol, the Epac activators 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP and Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS, the PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP. Where indicated, cells were pre-incubated with the pharmacological inhibitors Clostridium difficile toxin B-1470 (GTPases, U0126 (extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 and Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS (PKA. The specificity of the cyclic nucleotide analogs was confirmed by measuring phosphorylation of the PKA substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. GTP-loading of Rap1 and Rap2 was evaluated via pull-down technique. Expression of Rap1, Rap2, Epac1 and Epac2 was assessed via western blot. Downregulation of Epac protein expression was achieved by siRNA. Unpaired or paired two-tailed Student's t test was used. Results The β2-agonist fenoterol augmented release of IL-8 by bradykinin. The PKA activator 6-Bnz-cAMP and the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly increased bradykinin-induced IL-8 release. The hydrolysis-resistant Epac activator Sp-8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMPS mimicked the effects of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, whereas the negative control 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cGMP did not. Fenoterol, forskolin and 6-Bnz-cAMP induced VASP phosphorylation, which was diminished by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP induced GTP

  18. Functional Tissue Analysis Reveals Successful Cryopreservation of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.; Koenders, Marije I.; Thurlings, Rogier M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting cartilage and is the most common form of arthritis worldwide. One third of OA patients have severe synovitis and less than 10% have no evidence of synovitis. Moreover, synovitis is predictive for more severe disease progression. This offers a target for therapy but more research on the pathophysiological processes in the synovial tissue of these patients is needed. Functional studies performed with synovial tissue will be more approachable when this material, that becomes available by joint replacement surgery, can be stored for later use. We set out to determine the consequences of slow-freezing of human OA synovial tissue. Therefore, we validated a method that can be applied in every routine laboratory and performed a comparative study of five cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions. To determine possible deleterious cryopreservation-thaw effects on viability, the synovial tissue architecture, metabolic activity, RNA quality, expression of cryopreservation associated stress genes, and expression of OA characteristic disease genes was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the cryopreserved tissue was determined by measuring cytokine secretion induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharides and Pam3Cys. Compared to non frozen synovium, no difference in cell and tissue morphology could be identified in the conditions using the CS10, standard and CryoSFM CPA solution for cryopreservation. However, we observed significantly lower preservation of tissue morphology with the Biofreeze and CS2 media. The other viability assays showed trends in the same direction but were not sensitive enough to detect significant differences between conditions. In all assays tested a clearly lower viability was detected in the condition in which synovium was frozen without CPA solution. This detailed analysis showed that OA synovial tissue explants can be cryopreserved while maintaining the morphology, viability and

  19. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Human Lung Squamous Carcinoma Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cui; TANG Can'e; DUAN Chaojun; YI Hong; XIAO Zhiqiang; CHEN Zhuchu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish the two-dimensional electrophoresis profiles with high resolution and reproducibility from human lung squamous carcinoma tissue and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissue, and to identify differential expression tumor-associated proteins by using proteome analysis. Methods: Comparative proteome analysis with 20 human lung squamous carcinoma tissues and the paired normal bronchial epithelial tissues adjacent to tumors was carried out. The total proteins of human lung squamous carcinoma tissue and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissue were separated by means of immobilized pH gradient-based two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and silver staining. The differential expression proteins were analyzed and then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Results: (1) Well-resolved, reproducible 2-DE patterns of human lung squamous carcinoma and adjacent normal bronchial epithelial tissues were obtained. For tumor tissue, average spots of 3 gels were 1567±46, and 1436±54 spots were matched with an average matching rate of 91.6%. For control, average spots of 3 gels were 1349±58, and 1228±35 spots were matched with an average matching rate of 91.03%. The average position deviation of matched spots was 0.924±0.128 mm in IEF direction, and 1.022±0.205 mm in SDS-PAGE direction; (2)A total of 1178±56 spots were matched between the electrophoretic maps of 20 human lung squamous carcinoma tissues and paired normal tumor-adjacent bronchial epithelial tissues. Seventy-six differentially expressed proteins were screened; (3) Sixty-eight differential proteins were identified by PMF, some proteins were the products of oncogenes, and others involved in the regulation of cell cycle and signal transduction;(4) In order to validate the reliability of the identified results, the expression of 3 proteins mdm2, c-jun and EGFR, which was correlated with lung

  20. Anti-CTGF single-chain variable fragment dimers inhibit human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation by down-regulating p-Akt and p-mTOR levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Cai, Liting; Xu, Xudong; Fan, Juxiang; Xue, Xiulei; Yan, Xuejiao; Qu, Qinrong; Wang, Xihua; Zhang, Chen; Wu, Guoqiu

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) contributes to airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell hyperplasia in asthma. Humanized single-chain variable fragment antibody (scFv) was well characterized as a CTGF antagonist in the differentiation of fibroblast into myofibroblast and pulmonary fibrosis in our previous studies. To further improve the bioactivity of scFv, we constructed a plasmid to express scFv-linker-matrilin-6×His fusion proteins that could self-assemble into the scFv dimers by disulfide bonds in matrilin under non-reducing conditions. An immunoreactivity assay demonstrated that the scFv dimer could highly bind to CTGF in a concentration-dependent manner. The MTT and EdU assay results revealed that CTGF (≥10 ng/mL) promoted the proliferation of ASM cells, and this effect was inhibited when the cells were treated with anti-CTGF scFv dimer. The western blot analysis results showed that increased phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR induced by CTGF could be suppressed by this scFv dimer. Based on these findings, anti-CTGF scFv dimer may be a potential agent for the prevention of airway remodeling in asthma.

  1. The long-acting β2 -adrenoceptor agonist, indacaterol, enhances glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription in human airway epithelial cells in a gene- and agonist-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M A

    2015-05-01

    Inhaled glucocorticoid (ICS)/long-acting β2 -adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with moderate/severe asthma in whom adequate control cannot be achieved by an ICS alone. Previously, we discovered that LABAs can augment dexamethasone-inducible gene expression and proposed that this effect may explain how these two drugs interact to deliver superior clinical benefit. Herein, we extended that observation by analysing, pharmacodynamically, the effect of the LABA, indacaterol, on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transcription induced by seven ligands with intrinsic activity values that span the spectrum of full agonism to antagonism. BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells stably transfected with a 2× glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter were used to model gene transcription together with an analysis of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes. Indacaterol augmented glucocorticoid-induced reporter activation in a manner that was positively related to the intrinsic activity of the GR agonist. This effect was demonstrated by an increase in response maxima without a change in GR agonist affinity or efficacy. Indacaterol also enhanced glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. However, the magnitude of this effect was dependent on both the GR agonist and the gene of interest. These data suggest that indacaterol activates a molecular rheostat, which increases the transcriptional competency of GR in an agonist- and gene-dependent manner without apparently changing the relationship between fractional GR occupancy and response. These findings provide a platform to rationally design ICS/LABA combination therapy that is based on the generation of agonist-dependent gene expression profiles in target and off-target tissues. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. NGS meta data analysis for identification of SNP and INDEL patterns in human airway transcriptome: A preliminary indicator for lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq was developed primarily to analyze global gene expression in different tissues. It is also an efficient way to discover coding SNPs and when multiple individuals with different genetic backgrounds were used, RNA-Seq is very effective for the identification of SNPs. The objective of this study was to perform SNP and INDEL discoveries in human airway transcriptome of healthy never smokers, healthy current smokers, smokers without lung cancer and smokers with lung cancer. By preliminary comparative analysis of these four data sets, it is expected to get SNP and INDEL patterns responsible for lung cancer. A total of 85,028 SNPs and 5738 INDELs in healthy never smokers, 32,671 SNPs and 1561 INDELs in healthy current smokers, 50,205 SNPs and 3008 INDELs in smokers without lung cancer and 51,299 SNPs and 3138 INDELs in smokers with lung cancer were identified. The analysis of the SNPs and INDELs in genes that were reported earlier as differentially expressed was also performed. It has been found that a smoking person has SNPs at position 62,186,542 and 62,190,293 in SCGB1A1 gene and 180,017,251, 180,017,252, and 180,017,597 in SCGB3A1 gene and INDELs at position 35,871,168 in NFKBIA gene and 180,017,797 in SCGB3A1 gene. The SNPs identified in this study provides a resource for genetic studies in smokers and shall contribute to the development of a personalized medicine. This study is only a preliminary kind and more vigorous data analysis and wet lab validation are required.

  3. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  4. Temporal correlation of optical coherence tomography in-vivo images of rabbit airway for the diagnosis of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, DongYel; Wang, Alex; Tjoa, Tjoson; Volgger, Veronika; Hamamoto, Ashley; Su, Erica; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, full-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have been developed to image the human airway. These novel systems utilize a fiber-based OCT probe which acquires three-dimensional (3-D) images with micrometer resolution. Following an airway injury, mucosal edema is the first step in the body's inflammatory response, which occasionally leads to airway stenosis, a life-threatening condition for critically ill newborns. Therefore, early detection of edema is vital for airway management and prevention of stenosis. In order to examine the potential of the full-range OCT to diagnose edema, we investigated temporal correlation of OCT images obtained from the subglottic airway of live rabbits. Temporally correlated OCT images were acquired at fixed locations in the rabbit subglottis of either artificially induced edema or normal tissues. Edematous tissue was experimentally modeled by injecting saline beneath the epithelial layer of the subglottic mucosa. The calculated cross temporal correlations between OCT images of normal airway regions show periodicity that correlates with the respiratory motion of the airway. However, the temporal correlation functions calculated from OCT images of the edematous regions show randomness without the periodic characteristic. These in-vivo experimental results of temporal correlations between OCT images show the potential of a computer-based or -aided diagnosis of edema in the human respiratory mucosa with a full-range OCT system.

  5. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  6. Zicam-induced damage to mouse and human nasal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H Lim

    Full Text Available Intranasal medications are used to treat various nasal disorders. However, their effects on olfaction remain unknown. Zicam (zinc gluconate; Matrixx Initiatives, Inc, a homeopathic substance marketed to alleviate cold symptoms, has been implicated in olfactory dysfunction. Here, we investigated Zicam and several common intranasal agents for their effects on olfactory function. Zicam was the only substance that showed significant cytotoxicity in both mouse and human nasal tissue. Specifically, Zicam-treated mice had disrupted sensitivity of olfactory sensory neurons to odorant stimulation and were unable to detect novel odorants in behavioral testing. These findings were long-term as no recovery of function was observed after two months. Finally, human nasal explants treated with Zicam displayed significantly elevated extracellular lactate dehydrogenase levels compared to saline-treated controls, suggesting severe necrosis that was confirmed on histology. Our results demonstrate that Zicam use could irreversibly damage mouse and human nasal tissue and may lead to significant smell dysfunction.

  7. Prognostic values of tissue factor and its alternatively splice transcripts in human gastric cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Chen, Lujun; Xu, Ting; Xu, Bin; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping

    2017-08-08

    We have previously reported that the higher expression of TF in human esophageal cancer tissues was significantly associated with tumor invasion, intratumoral microvessel density and patients' postoperative prognoses. Besides its trans-membranous form, TF also has alternatively spliced transcripts. In the present study, the transcripts of the two TF isoforms, flTF and asTF, in human gastric cancer tissues were determined by real-time PCR, and the correlation between the expression of TF isoforms and patient's clinicopathological features was also analyzed. Our results showed that the relative mRNA expression levels of flTF and asTF in human gastric cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in normal tissues (P=0.035 and P=0.006, respectively). The relative mRNA expression level of asTF was significantly associated with age (P=0.018), meanwhile, we could not find that flTF or asTF expression level was correlated with any other characteristics of the patients, including gender, TNM stage, pathological grade, tumor size, histological type, or chemotherapy sensitivity. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients with lower flTF or asTF expression level was greater than those with higher expression level (P=0.018 and =0.038, respectively). Multivariate COX model analysis also demonstrated that flTF expression (P=0.048) or asTF expression (P=0.002) could be used as independent prognostic predictors in human gastric cancer. Thus, both flTF and asTF mRNA expression levels in cancer tissues could be used as useful risk factors for evaluating the prognoses of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  8. Carcinogenic effects of oil dispersants: A KEGG pathway-based RNA-seq study of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zhang, Lei; Roy-Engel, Astrid M; Saito, Shigeki; Lasky, Joseph A; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, He

    2017-02-20

    The health impacts of the BP oil spill are yet to be further revealed as the toxicological effects of oil products and dispersants on human respiratory system may be latent and complex, and hence difficult to study and follow up. Here we performed RNA-seq analyses of a system of human airway epithelial cells treated with the BP crude oil and/or dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 that were used to help break up the oil spill. Based on the RNA-seq data, we then systemically analyzed the transcriptomic perturbations of the cells at the KEGG pathway level using two pathway-based analysis tools, GAGE (generally applicable gene set enrichment) and GSNCA (Gene Sets Net Correlations Analysis). Our results suggested a pattern of change towards carcinogenesis for the treated cells marked by upregulation of ribosomal biosynthesis (hsa03008) (p=1.97E-13), protein processing (hsa04141) (p=4.09E-7), Wnt signaling (hsa04310) (p=6.76E-3), neurotrophin signaling (hsa04722) (p=7.73E-3) and insulin signaling (hsa04910) (p=1.16E-2) pathways under the dispersant Corexit 9527 treatment, as identified by GAGE analysis. Furthermore, through GSNCA analysis, we identified gene co-expression changes for several KEGG cancer pathways, including small cell lung cancer pathway (hsa05222, p=9.99E-5), under various treatments of oil/dispersant, especially the mixture of oil and Corexit 9527. Overall, our results suggested carcinogenic effects of dispersants (in particular Corexit 9527) and their mixtures with the BP crude oil, and provided further support for more stringent safety precautions and regulations for operations involving long-term respiratory exposure to oil and dispersants.

  9. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  10. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  11. Identification of rheological properties of human body surface tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevicius, Vincas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2014-04-11

    According to World Health Organization obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. It has tripled since the 1980s and the numbers of those affected continue to rise at an alarming rate, especially among children. There are number of devices that act as a prevention measure to boost person's motivation for physical activity and its levels. The placement of these devices is not restricted thus the measurement errors that appear because of the body rheology, clothes, etc. cannot be eliminated. The main objective of this work is to introduce a tool that can be applied directly to process measured accelerations so human body surface tissue induced errors can be reduced. Both the modeling and experimental techniques are proposed to identify body tissue rheological properties and prelate them to body mass index. Multi-level computational model composed from measurement device model and human body surface tissue rheological model is developed. Human body surface tissue induced inaccuracies can increase the magnitude of measured accelerations up to 34% when accelerations of the magnitude of up to 27 m/s(2) are measured. Although the timeframe of those disruptions are short - up to 0.2 s - they still result in increased overall measurement error.

  12. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  13. Feasibility of a 3D human airway epithelial model to study respiratory absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, A.A.; Maas, W.J.M.; Jansen, H.T.; Constant, S.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Triel, J.J. van; Kuper, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory route is an important portal for human exposure to a large variety of substances. Consequently, there is an urgent need for realistic in vitro strategies for evaluation of the absorption of airborne substances with regard to safety and efficacy assessment. The present study investiga

  14. Occurrence of human bocaviruses and parvovirus 4 in solid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norja, Päivi; Hedman, Lea; Kantola, Kalle; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Suvilehto, Jari; Pitkäranta, Anne; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Seppänen, Mikko; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoV1-4) and parvovirus 4 (PARV4) are recently discovered human parvoviruses. HBoV1 is associated with respiratory infections of young children, while HBoV2-4 are enteric viruses. The clinical manifestations of PARV4 remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether the DNAs of HBoV1-4 and PARV4 persist in human tissues long after primary infection. Biopsies of tonsillar tissue, skin, and synovia were examined for HBoV1-4 DNA and PARV4 DNA by PCR. Serum samples from the tissue donors were assayed for HBoV1 and PARV4 IgG and IgM antibodies. To obtain species-specific seroprevalences for HBoV1 and for HBoV2/3 combined, the sera were analyzed after virus-like particle (VLP) competition. While HBoV1 DNA was detected exclusively in the tonsillar tissues of 16/438 individuals (3.7%), all of them ≤8 years of age. HBoV2-4 and PARV4 DNAs were absent from all tissue types. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence was 94.9%. No subject had HBoV1 or PARV4 IgM, nor did they have PARV4 IgG. The results indicate that HBoV1 DNA occurred in a small proportion of tonsils of young children after recent primary HBoV1 infection, but did not persist long in the other tissue types studied, unlike parvovirus B19 DNA. The results obtained by the PARV4 assays are in line with previous results on PARV4 epidemiology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tissue-engineered microenvironment systems for modeling human vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourovskaia, Anna; Fauver, Mark; Kramer, Gregory; Simonson, Sara; Neumann, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The high attrition rate of drug candidates late in the development process has led to an increasing demand for test assays that predict clinical outcome better than conventional 2D cell culture systems and animal models. Government agencies, the military, and the pharmaceutical industry have started initiatives for the development of novel in-vitro systems that recapitulate functional units of human tissues and organs. There is growing evidence that 3D cell arrangement, co-culture of different cell types, and physico-chemical cues lead to improved predictive power. A key element of all tissue microenvironments is the vasculature. Beyond transporting blood the microvasculature assumes important organ-specific functions. It is also involved in pathologic conditions, such as inflammation, tumor growth, metastasis, and degenerative diseases. To provide a tool for modeling this important feature of human tissue microenvironments, we developed a microfluidic chip for creating tissue-engineered microenvironment systems (TEMS) composed of tubular cell structures. Our chip design encompasses a small chamber that is filled with an extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding one or more tubular channels. Endothelial cells (ECs) seeded into the channels adhere to the ECM walls and grow into perfusable tubular tissue structures that are fluidically connected to upstream and downstream fluid channels in the chip. Using these chips we created models of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and tumor-cell extravasation. Our angiogenesis model recapitulates true angiogenesis, in which sprouting occurs from a "parent" vessel in response to a gradient of growth factors. Our BBB model is composed of a microvessel generated from brain-specific ECs within an ECM populated with astrocytes and pericytes. Our tumor-cell extravasation model can be utilized to visualize and measure tumor-cell migration through vessel walls into the surrounding matrix. The described technology can be used

  16. Effects of laser interaction with living human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, O. E.; Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Smirnova, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of a highly sensitive laser device with the wavelength λ = 0.808 pm, which is optimal for deep penetration of the radiation into biological tissues, the effects associated with the appearance of uncontrolled human infrasonic vibrations of different frequencies were investigated. It was established that the observed fluctuations are associated with the vascular system which is characterized by its own respiratory movements, occurring synchronously with the movements of the respiratory muscles, the operation of the heart muscle, and the effect of compression ischemia. The effect of “enlightenment” of a tissue is observed with stopping of blood flow in vessels by applying a tourniquet on the wrist.

  17. Effects of lung inflation on airway heterogeneity during histaminergic bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W; Mitzner, Wayne; Brown, Robert H

    2013-09-01

    Lung inflation has been shown to dilate airways by altering the mechanical equilibrium between opposing airway and parenchymal forces. However, it is not known how heterogeneously such dilation occurs throughout the airway tree. In six anesthetized dogs, we measured the diameters of five to six central airway segments using high-resolution computed tomography, along with respiratory input impedance (Zrs) during generalized aerosol histamine challenge, and local histamine challenge in which the agonist was instilled directly onto the epithelia of the imaged central airways. Airway diameters and Zrs were measured at 12 and 25 cmH2O. The Zrs spectra were fitted with a model that incorporated continuous distributions of airway resistances. Airway heterogeneity was quantified using the coefficient of variation for predefined airway distribution functions. Significant reductions in average central airway diameter were observed at 12 cmH2O for both aerosolized and local challenges, along with significant increases upon inflation to 25 cmH2O. No significant differences were observed for the coefficient of variation of airway diameters under any condition. Significant increases in effective airway resistance as measured by Zrs were observed only for the aerosolized challenge at 12 cmH2O, which was completely reversed upon inflation. We conclude that the lung periphery may be the most dominant contributor to increases in airway resistance and tissue elastance during bronchoconstriction induced by aerosolized histamine. However, isolated constriction of only a few central airway segments may also affect tissue stiffness via interdependence with their surrounding parenchyma.

  18. Phosphorylated dihydroceramides from common human bacteria are recovered in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C Nichols

    Full Text Available Novel phosphorylated dihydroceramide (PDHC lipids produced by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis include phosphoethanolamine (PE DHC and phosphoglycerol dihydroceramides (PG DHC lipids. These PDHC lipids mediate cellular effects through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 including promotion of IL-6 secretion from dendritic cells and inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and function in vitro and in vivo. The PE DHC lipids also enhance (TLR2-dependent murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model for multiple sclerosis. The unique non-mammalian structures of these lipids allows for their specific quantification in bacteria and human tissues using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM-mass spectrometry (MS. Synthesis of these lipids by other common human bacteria and the presence of these lipids in human tissues have not yet been determined. We now report that synthesis of these lipids can be attributed to a small number of intestinal and oral organisms within the Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Prevotella, Tannerella and Porphyromonas genera. Additionally, the PDHCs are not only present in gingival tissues, but are also present in human blood, vasculature tissues and brain. Finally, the distribution of these TLR2-activating lipids in human tissues varies with both the tissue site and disease status of the tissue suggesting a role for PDHCs in human disease.

  19. Relaxant effect of the H2-receptor antagonist oxmetidine on guinea-pig and human airways.

    OpenAIRE

    Advenier, C; Gnassounou, J. P.; Scarpignato, C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three different H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine and oxmetidine) were tested on isolated preparations of guinea-pig trachea and human bronchus against contractions induced by acetylcholine, histamine and potassium chloride (KCl). In addition, their influence on calcium concentration-response curves in guinea-pig tracheal spirals was examined in a potassium-rich solution (30 mM). Finally, their effects were studied in vivo against acetylcholine and histamine-induc...

  20. Characterization of the interaction between human respiratory syncytial virus and the cell cycle in continuous cell culture and primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Platt, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2011-10-01

    Viruses can modify conditions inside cells to make them more favorable for replication and progeny virus production. One way of doing this is through manipulation of the cell cycle, a process that describes the ordered growth and division of cells. Analysis of model cell lines, such as A549 cells and primary airway epithelial cells, infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has shown alteration of the cell cycle during infection, although the signaling events were not clearly understood. In this study, targeted transcriptomic analysis of HRSV-infected primary airway epithelial cells revealed alterations in the abundances of many mRNAs encoding cell cycle-regulatory molecules, including decreases in the D-type cyclins and corresponding cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6 [CDK4/6]). These alterations were reflected in changes in protein abundance and/or relocalization in HRSV-infected cells; taken together, they were predicted to result in G(0)/G(1) phase arrest. In contrast, there was no change in the abundances of D-type cyclins in A549 cells infected with HRSV. However, the abundance of the G(1)/S phase progression inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) was increased over that in mock-treated cells, and this, again, was predicted to result in G(0)/G(1) phase arrest. The G(0)/G(1) phase arrest in both HRSV-infected primary cells and A549 cells was confirmed using dual-label flow cytometry that accurately measured the different stages of the cell cycle. Comparison of progeny virus production in primary and A549 cells enriched in G(0)/G(1) using a specific CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor with asynchronously replicating cells indicated that this phase of the cell cycle was more efficient for virus production.

  1. Characterization of the Interaction between Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and the Cell Cycle in Continuous Cell Culture and Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C.; Howell, Gareth; Platt, Gareth; Barr, John N.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses can modify conditions inside cells to make them more favorable for replication and progeny virus production. One way of doing this is through manipulation of the cell cycle, a process that describes the ordered growth and division of cells. Analysis of model cell lines, such as A549 cells and primary airway epithelial cells, infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has shown alteration of the cell cycle during infection, although the signaling events were not clearly understood. In this study, targeted transcriptomic analysis of HRSV-infected primary airway epithelial cells revealed alterations in the abundances of many mRNAs encoding cell cycle-regulatory molecules, including decreases in the D-type cyclins and corresponding cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6 [CDK4/6]). These alterations were reflected in changes in protein abundance and/or relocalization in HRSV-infected cells; taken together, they were predicted to result in G0/G1 phase arrest. In contrast, there was no change in the abundances of D-type cyclins in A549 cells infected with HRSV. However, the abundance of the G1/S phase progression inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased over that in mock-treated cells, and this, again, was predicted to result in G0/G1 phase arrest. The G0/G1 phase arrest in both HRSV-infected primary cells and A549 cells was confirmed using dual-label flow cytometry that accurately measured the different stages of the cell cycle. Comparison of progeny virus production in primary and A549 cells enriched in G0/G1 using a specific CDK4/6 kinase inhibitor with asynchronously replicating cells indicated that this phase of the cell cycle was more efficient for virus production. PMID:21795354

  2. Features of Circulating Parainfluenza Virus Required for Growth in Human Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Palermo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory paramyxoviruses, including the highly prevalent human parainfluenza viruses, cause the majority of childhood croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia, yet there are currently no vaccines or effective treatments. Paramyxovirus research has relied on the study of laboratory-adapted strains of virus in immortalized cultured cell lines. We show that findings made in such systems about the receptor interaction and viral fusion requirements for entry and fitness—mediated by the receptor binding protein and the fusion protein—can be drastically different from the requirements for infection in vivo. Here we carried out whole-genome sequencing and genomic analysis of circulating human parainfluenza virus field strains to define functional and structural properties of proteins of circulating strains and to identify the genetic basis for properties that confer fitness in the field. The analysis of clinical strains suggests that the receptor binding-fusion molecule pairs of circulating viruses maintain a balance of properties that result in an inverse correlation between fusion in cultured cells and growth in vivo. Future analysis of entry mechanisms and inhibitory strategies for paramyxoviruses will benefit from considering the properties of viruses that are fit to infect humans, since a focus on viruses that have adapted to laboratory work provides a distinctly different picture of the requirements for the entry step of infection.

  3. Investigation of the Airflow inside Realistic and Semi-Realistic Replicas of Human Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizal Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of velocity in human lungs during breathing cycle is a challenging task for researchers, since the measuring location is accessible only with significant difficulties. A special measuring rig consisting of optically transparent replica of human lungs, breathing simulator, particle generator and Laser-Doppler anemometer was developed and used for investigation of the velocity in specific locations of lungs during simulated breathing cycle. Experiments were performed on two different replicas of human lungs in corresponding measuring points to facilitate the analysis of the influence of the geometry and its simplification on the flow. The analysis of velocity course and turbulence intensity revealed that special attention should be devoted to the modelling of vocal cords position during breathing, as the position of laryngeal jet created by vocal cords significantly influences velocity profiles in trachea. The shapes of velocity courses during expiration proved to be consistent for both replicas; however magnitudes of peak expiratory velocity differ between the corresponding measuring points in both the replicas.

  4. Soft tissues store and return mechanical energy in human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, R C; Kuo, A D

    2016-02-08

    During human running, softer parts of the body may deform under load and dissipate mechanical energy. Although tissues such as the heel pad have been characterized individually, the aggregate work performed by all soft tissues during running is unknown. We therefore estimated the work performed by soft tissues (N=8 healthy adults) at running speeds ranging 2-5 m s(-1), computed as the difference between joint work performed on rigid segments, and whole-body estimates of work performed on the (non-rigid) body center of mass (COM) and peripheral to the COM. Soft tissues performed aggregate negative work, with magnitude increasing linearly with speed. The amount was about -19 J per stance phase at a nominal 3 m s(-1), accounting for more than 25% of stance phase negative work performed by the entire body. Fluctuations in soft tissue mechanical power over time resembled a damped oscillation starting at ground contact, with peak negative power comparable to that for the knee joint (about -500 W). Even the positive work from soft tissue rebound was significant, about 13 J per stance phase (about 17% of the positive work of the entire body). Assuming that the net dissipative work is offset by an equal amount of active, positive muscle work performed at 25% efficiency, soft tissue dissipation could account for about 29% of the net metabolic expenditure for running at 5 m s(-1). During running, soft tissue deformations dissipate mechanical energy that must be offset by active muscle work at non-negligible metabolic cost.

  5. Selenoprotein P mRNA expression in human hepatic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Li Li; Ke-Jun Nan; Tao Tian; Chen-Guang Sui; Yan-Fang Liu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of Selenoprotein P mRNA (SePmRNA) in tissues of normal liver, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and its relationship with HCC occurrence and development.METHODS: The expression of SePmRNA in tissues of normal liver, liver cirrhosis and HCC were detected by in situ hybridization using a cDNA probe.RESULTS: The enzyme digesting products of pBluescript-Human Selenoprotein P were evaluated by electrophoresis.The positive expression of SePmRNA was found in the tissues of normal liver,liver cirrhosis and HCC.The expression of SeP mRNA was found in hepatic interstitial substance,especially in endothelial cells and lymphocytes of vasculature.The positive rate of SePmRNA in normal liver tissue was 84.6% (11/13) and the positive signals appeared in the nucleus and cytoplasm,mostly in the nucleolus,and the staining granules were larger in the nucleolus and around the nucleus.The positive rate of SePmRNA in liver cirrhosis tissue was 45.O% (9/20) and the positive signals were mainly in the nucleolus and cytoplasm,being less around the nucleus and inner nucleus than that in normal liver tissue. The positive rate of SePmRNA in HCC tissue was 30.0% (9/30) and the positive signals were in the cytoplasm, but less in the nucleus.CONCLUSION: SePmRNA expression in the tissues of normal liver and HCC is significantly different (84.6% vs 30.0%, P = 0.003), suggesting that SeP might play a role in the occurrence and development of HCC.

  6. Reduced expression of Tis7/IFRD1 protein in murine and human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell models homozygous for the F508del-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Elise; Marie, Solenne; Riffault, Laure; Bonora, Monique; Tabary, Olivier; Clement, Annick; Jacquot, Jacky

    2011-08-01

    12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced sequence 7/interferon related development regulator 1 (Tis7/IFRD1) has been recently identified as a modifier gene in lung inflammatory disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), based upon its capacity to regulate inflammatory activities in neutrophils. In CF patients, the F508del mutation in the Cftr gene encoding a chloride channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells results in an exaggerated inflammatory response of these cells. At present, it is unknown whether the Tis7/IFRD1 gene product is expressed in airway epithelial cells. We therefore investigated the possibility there is an intrinsic alteration in Tis7/IFRD1 protein level in cells lacking CFTR function in tracheal homogenates of F508del-CFTR mice and in a F508del-CFTR human bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o(-) cells). When Tis7/IFRD1 protein was detectable, trachea from F508del-CFTR mice showed a reduction in the level of Tis7/IFRD1 protein compared to wild-type control littermates. A significant reduction of IFRD1 protein level was found in CFBE41o(-) cells compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells 16HBE14o(-). Surprisingly, messenger RNA level of IFRD1 in CFBE41o(-) cells was found elevated. Treating CFBE41o(-) cells with the antioxidant glutathione rescued the IFRD1 protein level closer to control level and also reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 release. This work provides evidence for the first time of reduced level of IFRD1 protein in murine and human F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cell models, possibly mediated in response to oxidative stress which might contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory airway response observed in CF patients homozygous for the F508del mutation.

  7. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  8. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-04

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Induction of CFTR gene expression by 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3, 25OH vitamin D3, and vitamin D3 in cultured human airway epithelial cells and in mouse airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Kristina M; Mulligan, Jennifer K; Sumal, Aman S; Diamond, Gill

    2017-01-24

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which often leads to protein misfolding and no CFTR surface localization. This then leads to chronic airway infections, inflammation, and tissue damage. Although vitamin D has been explored as a therapy to treat CF due to its antimicrobial-inducing and anti-inflammatory properties, the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) on CFTR directly has not been studied. We treated cultured healthy and diseased bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) with 10nM 1α,25(OH)2D3 for 6 and 24h and found that 1α,25(OH)2D3 increases both mRNA and protein CFTR levels using RT-qPCR, flow cytometry and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Treatment of CF cells with 10nM 1α,25(OH)2D3 led to an increase in both total and surface CFTR expression, suggesting 1α,25(OH)2D3 could be used to increase properly localized CFTR in airway cells. To determine if BEC could convert the more clinically relevant cholecalciferol to 25OHD3, cultured non-CF and CF BECs were treated with a range of cholecalciferol concentrations, and 25OHD3 levels were quantified by ELISA. We found that 25OHD3 levels increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of BEC with 10μM cholecalciferol led to increases in both CYP24A1 and CFTR mRNA levels, even when added to the apical surface of cells grown in an air-liquid interface, suggesting that topical administration of vitamin D could be used therapeutically. To demonstrate this in vivo, we intranasally delivered 1μM 1α,25(OH)2D3 into mice. After 6h, we observed induction of both Cyp24A1 and CFTR expression in the tracheas of treated mice. The major findings of this study are that vitamin D can be converted to the active form when topically administered to the airway, and this could be used to increase CFTR levels in patients with CF. This could potentially be useful as an adjunctive therapy, together with

  10. Vanadium in foods and in human body fluids and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A R; Kosta, L

    1978-07-01

    Using neutron activation analysis, vanadium was analysed in a range of foods, human body fluids and tissues. On the basis of these results and those of other workers, it was concluded that daily dietary intake amounts to some tens of micrograms. Analysis of body fluids (including milk, blood and excreta) and organs and tissues provided an estimate for the total body pool of vanadium in man of about 100 microgram. Vanadium was not detectable in blood and urine at the level of 0.3 ng/g, while low levels were found in muscle, fat, bone, teeth and other tissues. The relationship between dietary intake to pulmonary absorption is discussed in relation to the occurrence of vanadium in man-made air particulates. The very low levels found in milks and eggs suggest minimal vanadium requirements in growth. The findings are discussed in the light of previous results and also in relation to the possible essentiality of vanadium.

  11. An Introduction to The Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Naeimeh Sadat; Ebrahimi, Bita; Fathi, Rouhollah; Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Mehdizadeh Kashi, Abolfazl; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh

    2016-01-01

    From December 2000 until 2010, the researchers at Royan Institute conducted a wide range of investigations on ovarian tissue cryopreservation with the intent to provide fertility pres- ervation to cancer patients that were considered to be candidates for these services. In 2010, Royan Institute established the Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank as a subgroup of the Embryology Department. Since its inception, approximately 180 patients between the ages of 747 years have undergone consultations. Ovarian samples were cryopreserved from 47 patients (age: 7-35 years) diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma (n=9); breast carcinoma (n=7), Ewing’s sarcoma (n=7), opposite side ovarian tumor (n=7), endometrial adenocarci- noma (n=4), malignant colon tumors (n=3), as well as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, major thalas- semia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=1-2 patients for each disease). Additionally, two patients requested ovarian tissue transplantation after completion of their treatments. PMID:27441061

  12. Insensitivity of volume-sensitive chloride currents to chromones in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Lantero, Sabina; Sacco, Oliviero; Rossi, Giovanni A; Galietta, Luis J V

    1998-01-01

    Chromones (sodium cromoglycate and sodium nedocromil) block cell swelling-activated Cl− channels in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and endothelial cells. This has led to hypothesize that cell volume regulation might be involved in asthma pathogenesis.Using whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, we studied the effect of chromones on volume-sensitive Cl− currents in transformed human tracheal epithelial cells (9HTEo-) and in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells (BE).Cl− currents activated by hypotonic shock were poorly blocked by extracellular nedocromil or cromoglycate. The block was voltage-dependent since it was observed only at positive membrane potentials. At the concentration of 5 mM, the current inhibition by both chromones at +80 mV was about 40% for 9HTEo- and only 20% for BE.Intracellular application of chromones elicited a voltage-independent inhibition in 9HTEo- cells. Under this condition, volume-sensitive Cl− currents were reduced at all membrane potentials (60 and 45% inhibition by 2 mM nedocromil and cromoglycate respectively). In contrast intracellular chromones were ineffective in BE cells.The relative refractoriness to chromones, in contrast with the high sensitivity shown by other Cl− channels, suggests that the epithelial volume-sensitive Cl− channel is not involved in asthma. PMID:9863671

  13. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells.

  14. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  15. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...

  16. Glucocorticoids modulate human brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Scotney, Hannah; Symonds, Michael E; Law, James; Budge, Helen; Sharkey, Don; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a thermogenic organ with substantial metabolic capacity and has important roles in the maintenance of body weight and metabolism. Regulation of BAT is primarily mediated through the ß-adrenoceptor (ß-AR) pathway. The in vivo endocrine regulation of this pathway in humans is unkown. The objective of our study was to assess the in vivo BAT temperature responses to acute glucocorticoid administration.\\ud Methods: We studied 8 healthy male volunteers, n...

  17. Ambroxol-induced modification of ion transport in human airway Calu-3 epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Isao; Niisato, Naomi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2006-05-05

    Ambroxol is often used as a mucolytic agent in various lung diseases. However, it is unclear how ambroxol acts on bronchial epithelial cells. To clarify the action of ambroxol, we studied the effects of ambroxol on the ion transport in human Calu-3 cells, a human submucosal serous cell line, measuring the transepithelial short-circuit current and conductance across monolayers of Calu-3 cells. Ambroxol of 100 microM diminished the terbutaline (a beta2-adrenergic agonist)-stimulated Cl-/HCO3(-)-dependent secretion without any decreases in the conductance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel locating on the apical membrane. On the other hand, under the basal (unstimulated) condition ambroxol increased the Cl(-)-dependent secretion with no significant change in the apical CFTR channel conductance and decreased the HCO3- secretion associated with a decrease in the apical CFTR channel conductance. Ambroxol had no major action on the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) or the ENaC-mediated Na+ absorption. These results indicate that in Calu-3 cells: (1) under the basal (unstimulated) condition ambroxol increases Cl- secretion by stimulating the entry step of Cl- and decreases HCO3- secretion by diminishing the activity of the CFTR channel and/or the Na+/HCO3(-)-dependent cotransporter, (2) under the adrenergic agonist-stimulated condition, ambroxol decreases Cl- secretion by acting on the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, and (3) ambroxol has a more powerful action than the adrenergic agonist on the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, leading fluid secretion to a moderately stimulated level from a hyper-stimulated level.

  18. Biodiesel exhaust-induced cytotoxicity and proinflammatory mediator production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Kicic, Anthony; Ling, Kak-Ming; Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Larcombe, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Increasing use of biodiesel has prompted research into the potential health effects of biodiesel exhaust exposure. Few studies directly compare the health consequences of mineral diesel, biodiesel, or blend exhaust exposures. Here, we exposed human epithelial cell cultures to diluted exhaust generated by the combustion of Australian ultralow-sulfur-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100% canola biodiesel (B100), and a blend of 20% canola biodiesel mixed with 80% ULSD. The physicochemical characteristics of the exhaust were assessed and we compared cellular viability, apoptosis, and levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) in exposed cultured cells. Different fuel types produced significantly different amounts of exhaust gases and different particle characteristics. All exposures resulted in significant apoptosis and loss of viability when compared with control, with an increasing proportion of biodiesel being correlated with a decrease in viability. In most cases, exposure to exhaust resulted in an increase in mediator production, with the greatest increases most often in response to B100. Exposure to pure canola oil (PCO) exhaust did not increase mediator production, but resulted in a significant decrease in IL-8 and RANTES in some cases. Our results show that canola biodiesel exhaust exposure elicits inflammation and reduces viability of human epithelial cell cultures in vitro when compared with ULSD exhaust exposure. This may be related to an increase in particle surface area and number in B100 exhaust when compared with ULSD exhaust. Exposure to PCO exhaust elicited the greatest loss of cellular viability, but virtually no inflammatory response, likely due to an overall increase in average particle size.

  19. Regulatory roles of microRNAs in human dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Amer; Tulek, Amela; Khuu, Cuong; Nirvani, Minou; Sand, Lars Peter; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2017-01-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding RNAs that provide an efficient pathway for regulation of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. Tooth development is regulated by a complex network of cell-cell signaling during all steps of organogenesis. Most of the congenital dental defects in humans are caused by mutations in genes involved in developmental regulatory networks. Whereas the developmental morphological stages of the tooth development already are thoroughly documented, the implicated genetic network is still under investigation. The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of tooth genetic network was suggested for the first time in 2008. MiRNAs regulate tooth morphogenesis by fine-tuning the signaling networks. Unique groups of miRNAs are expressed in dental epithelium compared with mesenchyme, as well as in molars compared with incisors. The present review focuses on the current state of knowledge on the expression and function of miRNAs in human dental tissues, including teeth and the surrounding structures. Herein, we show that miRNAs exhibit specific roles in human dental tissues and are involved in gingival and periodontal disease, tooth movement and eruption, dental pulp physiology including repair and regeneration, differentiation of dental cells, and enamel mineralization. In light of similarities between the tooth development and other organs originating from the epithelium, further understanding of miRNAs` function in dental tissues may have wide biological relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissecting cis regulation of gene expression in human metabolic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Dobrin

    Full Text Available Complex diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes can result from a failure in multiple organ systems including the central nervous system and tissues involved in partitioning and disposal of nutrients. Studying the genetics of gene expression in tissues that are involved in the development of these diseases can provide insights into how these tissues interact within the context of disease. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL studies identify mRNA expression changes linked to proximal genetic signals (cis eQTLs that have been shown to affect disease. Given the high impact of recent eQTL studies, it is important to understand what role sample size and environment plays in identification of cis eQTLs. Here we show in a genotyped obese human population that the number of cis eQTLs obey precise scaling laws as a function of sample size in three profiled tissues, i.e. omental adipose, subcutaneous adipose and liver. Also, we show that genes (or transcripts with cis eQTL associations detected in a small population are detected at approximately 90% rate in the largest population available for our study, indicating that genes with strong cis acting regulatory elements can be identified with relatively high confidence in smaller populations. However, by increasing the sample size we allow for better detection of weaker and more distantly located cis-regulatory elements. Yet, we determined that the number of tissue specific cis eQTLs saturates in a modestly sized cohort while the number of cis eQTLs common to all tissues fails to reach a maximum value. Understanding the power laws that govern the number and specificity of eQTLs detected in different tissues, will allow a better utilization of genetics of gene expression to inform the molecular mechanism underlying complex disease traits.

  1. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  2. Suppression of cytokine release by fluticasone furoate vs. mometasone furoate in human nasal tissue ex-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topical glucocorticosteroids are the first line therapy for airway inflammation. Modern compounds with higher efficacy have been developed, but head-to-head comparison studies are sparse. OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity of two intranasal glucocorticoids, fluticasone furoate (FF and mometasone furoate (MF with respect to the inhibition of T helper (Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine release in airway mucosa. METHODS: We used an ex-vivo human nasal mucosal tissue model and employed pre- and post- Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB-challenge incubations with various time intervals and drug concentrations to mimic typical clinical situations of preventive or therapeutic use. RESULTS: At a fixed concentration of 10-10 M, FF had significantly higher suppressive effects on interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-2 and IL-17 release, but not IL-5 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, vs. MF. While the maximal suppressive activity was maintained when FF was added before or after tissue stimulation, the cytokine suppression capacity of MF appeared to be compromised when SEB-induced cell activation preceded the addition of the drug. In a pre-challenge incubation setting with removal of excess drug concentrations, MF approached inhibition of IL-5 and TNF-α after 6 and 24 hours while FF maximally blocked the release of these cytokines right after pre-incubation. Furthermore, FF suppressed a wider range of T helper cytokines compared to MF. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates the potential of our human mucosal model and shows marked differences in the ability to suppress the release of various cytokines in pre- and post-challenge settings between FF and MF mimicking typical clinical situations of preventive or therapeutic use.

  3. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  4. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. Conclusions The SOM technique

  5. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löffler Markus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs. SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues. SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues

  6. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Henry; Löffler, Markus; von Bergen, Martin; Binder, Hans

    2011-07-27

    Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. The SOM technique provides a more intuitive and

  7. Increased expression of transforming growth factor-β and receptors in primary human airway fibroblasts from chemical inhalation patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Sadat Mirzamani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of sulfur mustard  (SM as a chemical warfare agent in the  past century has proved its long-lasting toxic effects. Despite a lot of research over the past decades on Iranian veterans, there are still major gaps in the SM literature. Transforming growth  factor  (TGF-β,  a  cytokine  that  affects  many  different  cell processes,  has  an important role in the lungs of patients with some of chronic airway diseases, especially with respect to airway remodeling in mustard lung.Primary airway fibroblasts from epibronchial biopsies were cultured, and gene expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TbR-I and TbR-II in fibroblasts of SM injured patients and controls were investigated. Expression of TGF-βs and receptors was measured by RT-PCR. Protein level of TGF-β1was surveyed by western blot.Our  findings revealed that expression levels of TGF-β1,  TGF-β2,  TbR-I and TbR-II were upregulated in the  airway fibroblasts of  SM exposed patients  in comparison  with control samples. TGF-β1 expression was shown to be markedly increased in primary lung fibroblasts of chemically injured patients.Our  novel data, suggested that  over-expression of TGF-β  molecule and receptors  in primary airway fibroblasts of mustard gas injured patients may be involved in progression of airway remodeling of these patients.

  8. Visualizing dissolved oxygen transport for liquid ventilation in an in vitro model of the human airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, T.; Bauer, K.

    2017-04-01

    Up until to now, the measurement of dissolved oxygen concentrations during liquid ventilation is limited to the determination of averaged concentrations of the liquid entering or leaving the body. The work presented in this paper aims to extend the possible measurement techniques in the research of liquid ventilation. Therefore optical measurements of the dissolved oxygen concentration, using a luminescent sensor dye, are performed. The preparation of a suitable sensor liquid, based on the metal complex Dichlorotris(1,10)-(phenanthroline)ruthenium(II), is presented. A transparent simplified human lung geometry is used for conducting the experiments. Inspiratory as well as expiratory flow at three different constant flow rates is investigated, covering the flow regimes \\text{Re}=83 -333 and \\text{Pe}=33 300 -133 000. The applied measurement technique is capable to reveal distinctive concentration patterns during inspiration and expiration caused by the laminar flow characteristics. Allowing a sufficiently long flow duration, local concentration inhomogeneities disappear and an exponential rise and decay of the mean values can be observed for inspiration and expiration.

  9. Elastic, permeability and swelling properties of human intervertebral disc tissues: A benchmark for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; DeLucca, John F; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-06-27

    The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the extra-fibrillar matrix was higher in the CEP (390kPa) compared to the NP (100kPa) or AF (30kPa). The permeability was very different across tissue regions, with the AF permeability (64 E(-16)m(4)/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (~5.5 E(-16)m(4)/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000s) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  10. Ultrasound of the airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kundra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the role of ultrasound (US in anaesthesia-related airway assessment and procedural interventions is encouraging, though it is still ill defined. US can visualise anatomical structures in the supraglottic, glottic and subglottic regions. The floor of the mouth can be visualised by both transcutaneous view of the neck and also by transoral or sublinguial views. However, imaging the epiglottis can be challenging as it is suspended in air. US may detect signs suggestive of difficult intubation, but the data are limited. Other possible applications in airway management include confirmation of correct endotracheal tube placement, prediction of post-extubation stridor, evaluation of soft tissue masses in the neck prior to intubation, assessment of subglottic diameter for determination of paediatric endotracheal tube size and percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. With development of better probes, high-resolution imaging, real-time picture and clinical experience, US has become the potential first-line noninvasive airway assessment tool in anaesthesia and intensive care practice.

  11. 组织贴块法建立人气道平滑肌细胞体外培养模型的研究%Construction of Model of Human Airway Smooth Muscle in Vitro by Attachment-block Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘媛; 黄茂; 李涛; 刘红

    2011-01-01

    背景:人气道平滑肌已被证实参与气道重塑,气道平滑肌的重塑已成为慢性呼吸道疾病的主要病理改变之一.人气道平滑肌细胞的培养对慢性呼吸道疾病的研究有重要意义.组织贴块法培养人气道平滑肌细胞是原代培养人气遭平滑肌细胞的基本方法之一.目的:采用组织贴块法建立人气道平滑肌体外培养模型.方法:采集人气道组织,用组织贴块法进行人气道平滑肌细胞的原代培养,获得的细胞经形态学和免疫细胞化学染色鉴定.结果:培养的细胞呈典型的"谷峰"状生长,胞浆内特异性的平滑肌肌动蛋白阳性表达,符合平滑肌细胞的形态学特征和生物学特性.结论:组织贴块法易操作,结果可信,并可培养出高纯度活性好的人气道平滑肌细胞,成功建立了体外人气道平滑肌细胞增殖模型,提供了研究慢性呼吸道疾病的细胞培养模型.%Objective: To establish the model of human airway smooth muscle in vitro by attachment-block culture. Methods: The human airway wall was separated from lung resection carefully and cut into small pieces about 1 mm3, and then these pieces were attached on the wall of culture bottle. After 3 hours, those tissue pieces were cultivated in DMEM with 20 % calf serum. Results: Cells had grown on the bottom of culture bottle like peak-valley in shape. All cells almost were smooth muscle cells identified through An- tiα-actin immunohistochemistry stain. Conclusion: Attachment-block culture of human airway smooth muscle cells is simple to operate, reliable in result, high in purity and useful as a cellular model for study of respiratory diseases.

  12. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  13. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  14. Maturing human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in human engineered cardiac tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feric, Nicole T; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-15

    Engineering functional human cardiac tissue that mimics the native adult morphological and functional phenotype has been a long held objective. In the last 5 years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has transitioned from cardiac tissues derived from various animal species to the production of the first generation of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs), due to recent advances in human stem cell biology. Despite this progress, the hECTs generated to date remain immature relative to the native adult myocardium. In this review, we focus on the maturation challenge in the context of hECTs, the present state of the art, and future perspectives in terms of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, preclinical safety testing and pathophysiological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of specific prostanoid EP receptor agonists on cell proliferation and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akemi; Ito, Satoru; Morioka, Masataka; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-05-20

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass due to cell proliferation contributes to airway hyper-responsiveness and remodeling in patients with asthma. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibits proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells, but the role of prostanoid EP receptor subtypes in mechanisms involved has not been fully elucidated yet. We investigated the effects of specific prostanoid EP receptor agonists on cell proliferation and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in human airway smooth muscle cells. Cell numbers were assessed by mitochondria-dependent reduction of 4-[3-(4-lodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio]-1, 3-benzene disulfonate to formazan (WST-1 assay). RT-PCR data showed that human airway smooth muscle cells express EP2, EP3, and EP4 but not EP1 receptor mRNA. PGE2 (1nM-1μM) inhibited cell proliferation induced by 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in a concentration-dependent manner. (16S)-9-deoxy-9β-chloro-15-deoxy-16-hydroxy-17, 17-trimethylene-19, 20-didehydro PGE2 sodium salt (ONO-AE1-259-01; EP2 receptor agonist) and 16-(3-methoxymethyl)phenyl-ω-tetranor-3,7-dithia PGE2 (ONO-AE1-329; EP4 receptor agonist) inhibited the 5% FBS-induced cell proliferation. ONO-AE1-259-01 and ONO-AE1-329 also significantly increased the cytosolic cAMP levels. In contrast, 11,15-O-dimethyl PGE2 (ONO-AE-248; EP3 receptor agonist) elicited an oscillatory increase in [Ca(2+)]i but did not affect the cell growth or cAMP levels. [(17S)-2,5-ethano-6-oxo-17,20-dimethyl PGE1] (ONO-DI-004; EP1 receptor agonist) did not affect cell growth, cAMP levels, or [Ca(2+)]i. In conclusion, PGE2 inhibits FBS-induced cell proliferation mostly via EP2 and EP4 receptor activation and subsequent cAMP elevation. The EP3 receptor agonist causes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i without affecting cell growth. There is no functional expression of the EP1 receptor. Research on prostanoid EP receptors may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of asthma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B

  16. Brown adipose tissue in humans: therapeutic potential to combat obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Andrew L; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2013-10-01

    Harnessing the considerable capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to consume energy was first proposed as a potential target to control obesity nearly 40years ago. The plausibility of this approach was, however, questioned due to the prevailing view that BAT was either not present or not functional in adult humans. Recent definitive identification of functional BAT in adult humans as well as a number of important advances in the understanding of BAT biology has reignited interest in BAT as an anti-obesity target. Proof-of-concept evidence demonstrating drug-induced BAT activation provides an important foundation for development of targeted pharmacological approaches with clinical application. This review considers evidence from both human and relevant animal studies to determine whether harnessing BAT for the treatment of obesity via pharmacological intervention is a realistic goal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence for two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Heglind, Mikael; Elander, Louise; Slawik, Marc; Mussack, Thomas; Nilsson, Daniel; Romu, Thobias; Nuutila, Pirjo; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Beuschlein, Felix; Persson, Anders; Borga, Magnus; Enerbäck, Sven

    2013-05-01

    The previously observed supraclavicular depot of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans was commonly believed to be the equivalent of the interscapular thermogenic organ of small mammals. This view was recently disputed on the basis of the demonstration that this depot consists of beige (also called brite) brown adipocytes, a newly identified type of brown adipocyte that is distinct from the classical brown adipocytes that make up the interscapular thermogenic organs of other mammals. A combination of high-resolution imaging techniques and histological and biochemical analyses showed evidence for an anatomically distinguishable interscapular BAT (iBAT) depot in human infants that consists of classical brown adipocytes, a cell type that has so far not been shown to exist in humans. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that infants, similarly to rodents, have the bona fide iBAT thermogenic organ consisting of classical brown adipocytes that is essential for the survival of small mammals in a cold environment.

  18. Characterization of Leukocyte Formin FMNL1 Expression in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Vanina D.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Carpén, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Formins are cytoskeleton regulating proteins characterized by a common FH2 structural domain. As key players in the assembly of actin filaments, formins direct dynamic cytoskeletal processes that influence cell shape, movement and adhesion. The large number of formin genes, fifteen in the human, suggests distinct tasks and expression patterns for individual family members, in addition to overlapping functions. Several formins have been associated with invasive cell properties in experimental models, linking them to cancer biology. One example is FMNL1, which is considered to be a leukocyte formin and is known to be overexpressed in lymphomas. Studies on FMNL1 and many other formins have been hampered by a lack of research tools, especially antibodies suitable for staining paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues. Here we characterize, using bioinformatics tools and a validated antibody, the expression pattern of FMNL1 in human tissues and study its subcellular distribution. Our results indicate that FMNL1 expression is not restricted to hematopoietic tissues and that neoexpression of FMNL1 can be seen in epithelial cancer. PMID:24700756

  19. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  20. Analysis of the scattering performance of human retinal tissue layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhisan; Ye, Haishui; Yuan, Qun

    2017-02-01

    Human retina is different from other ocular tissues, such as cornea, crystalline lens and vitreous because of high scattering performance. As an anisotropic tissue, we cannot neglect its impact on the polarization state of the scattered light. In this paper, Mie scattering and radiative transfer theory are applied to analyze the polarization state of backscattered light from four types of retinal tissues, including neural retina, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE), choroid and sclera. The results show that the most backscattered zones in different depths have almost the same electrical fields of Jones vector, which represents the polarization state of light, whether neural retina layer is under normal incidence or oblique incidence. Very little change occurs in the polarization of backscattered light compared to that of the incident light. Polarization distribution of backward scattered light from neural retina layer doesn't make apparent effects on polarization phase shifting in spectral domain OCT because its thickness is far less than photon mean free path, while other retinal tissues do not meet this rule.

  1. Chromium Content in the Human Hip Joint Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Brodziak-Dopiera; Jerzy Kwapuliski; Krzysztof Sobczyk; Danuta Wiechua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chromium has many important functions in the human body. For the osseous tissue, its role has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed at determining chromium content in hip joint tissues. Methods A total of 91 hip joint samples were taken in this study, including 66 from females and 25 from males. The sample tissues were separated according to their anatomical parts. The chromium content was determined by the AAS method. The statistical analysis was performed with U Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test, P≤0.05. Results The overall chromium content in tissues of the hip joint in the study subjects was as follows:5.73 µg/g in the articular cartilage, 5.33 µg/g in the cortical bone, 17.86 µg/g in the cancellous bone, 5.95 µg/g in the fragment of the cancellous bone from the intertrochanteric region, and 1.28 µg/g in the joint capsule. The chromium contents were observed in 2 group patients, it was 7.04 µg/g in people with osteoarthritis and 12.59 µg/g in people with fractures. Conclusion The observed chromium content was highest in the cancellous bone and the lowest in the joint capsule. Chromium content was significantly different between the people with hip joint osteoarthritis and the people with femoral neck fractures.

  2. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  3. Effects of lung disease on the three-dimensional structure and air flow pattern in the human airway tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Wendt, Christine; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    The morphological features of the airway tree directly affect the air flow features during breathing, which determines the gas exchange and inhaled particle transport. Lung disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in this study, affects the structural features of the lungs, which in turn negatively affects the air flow through the airways. Here bronchial tree air volume geometries are segmented from Computed Tomography (CT) scans of healthy and diseased subjects. Geometrical analysis of the airway centerlines and corresponding cross-sectional areas provide insight into the specific effects of COPD on the airway structure. These geometries are also used to 3D print anatomically accurate, patient specific flow models. Three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields within these models are acquired using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The three-dimensional flow fields provide insight into the change in flow patterns and features. Additionally, particle trajectories are determined using the velocity fields, to identify the fate of therapeutic and harmful inhaled aerosols. Correlation between disease-specific and patient-specific anatomical features with dysfunctional airflow patterns can be achieved by combining geometrical and flow analysis.

  4. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  5. Distinct microRNA Expression in Human Airway Cells of Asthmatic Donors Identifies a Novel Asthma-associated Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airway inflammation is the hallmark of asthma and suggests a dysregulation of homeostatic mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression, necessary for the proper function of cellular processes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that differences between healthy...

  6. Isolation of human β-defensin-4 in lung tissue and its increase in lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-defensin-4 (hBD-4, a new member of the β-defensin family, was discovered by an analysis of the genomic sequence. The objective of this study was to clarify hBD-4 expression in human lung tissue, along with the inducible expression in response to infectious stimuli, localization, and antimicrobial activities of hBD-4 peptides. We also investigated the participation of hBD-4 in chronic lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI by measuring the concentrations of hBD-4 peptides in human bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF. Methods The antimicrobial activity of synthetic hBD-4 peptides against E. coli and P. aeruginosa was measured by radial diffusion and colony count assays. We identified hBD-4 in homogenated human lung tissue by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a radioimmunoassay (RIA. Localization of hBD-4 was studied through immunohistochemical analysis (IHC. We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS on hBD-4 expression and its release from small airway epithelial cells (SAEC. We collected ELF from patients with chronic LRTI using bronchoscopic microsampling to measure hBD-4 concentrations by RIA. Results hBD-4 exhibited salt-sensitive antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. We detected the presence of hBD-4 peptides in human lung tissue. IHC demonstrated the localization of hBD-4-producing cells in bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium. The levels of hBD-4 peptides released from LPS-treated SAECs were higher than those of untreated control cells. ELF hBD-4 was detectable in 4 of 6 patients with chronic LRTI, while the amounts in controls were all below the detectable level. Conclusion This study suggested that hBD-4 plays a significant role in the innate immunity of the lower respiratory tract.

  7. Tissue specific DNA methylation of CpG islands in normal human adult somatic tissues distinguishes neural from non-neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Yates, Allan J; Frühwald, Michael C; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C; Plass, Christoph; Smiraglia, Dominic

    2010-08-16

    Although most CpG islands are generally thought to remain unmethylated in all adult somatic tissues, recent genome-wide approaches have found that some CpG islands have distinct methylation patterns in various tissues, with most differences being seen between germ cells and somatic tissues. Few studies have addressed this among human somatic tissues and fewer still have studied the same sets of tissues from multiple individuals. In the current study, we used Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning to study tissue specific methylation patterns in a set of twelve human tissues collected from multiple individuals. We identified 34 differentially methylated CpG islands among these tissues, many of which showed consistent patterns in multiple individuals. Of particular interest were striking differences in CpG island methylation, not only among brain regions, but also between white and grey matter of the same region. These findings were confirmed for selected loci by quantitative bisulfite sequencing. Cluster analysis of the RLGS data indicated that several tissues clustered together, but the strongest clustering was in brain. Tissues from different brain regions clustered together, and, as a group, brain tissues were distinct from either mesoderm or endoderm derived tissues which demonstrated limited clustering. These data demonstrate consistent tissue specific methylation for certain CpG islands, with clear differences between white and grey matter of the brain. Furthermore, there was an overall pattern of tissue specifically methylated CpG islands that distinguished neural tissues from non-neural.

  8. Characterization of human myoblast cultures for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bran, Gregor; Riedel, Frank; Sauter, Alexander; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering, a promising specialty, aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss. In vitro tissue engineering attempts to achieve this goal by creating differentiated, functional muscle tissue through a process in which stem cells are extracted from the patient, e.g. by muscle biopsies, expanded and differentiated in a controlled environment, and subsequently re-implanted. A prerequisite for this undertaking is the ability to cultivate and differentiate human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Evidently, optimal culture conditions must be investigated for later clinical utilization. We therefore analysed the proliferation of human cells in different environments and evaluated the differentiation potential of different culture media. It was shown that human myoblasts have a higher rate of proliferation in the alamarBlue assay when cultured on gelatin-coated culture flasks rather than polystyrene-coated flasks. We also demonstrated that myoblasts treated with a culture medium with a high concentration of growth factors [growth medium (GM)] showed a higher proliferation compared to cultures treated with a culture medium with lower amounts of growth factors [differentiation medium (DM)]. Differentiation of human myoblast cell cultures treated with GM and DM was analysed until day 16 and myogenesis was verified by expression of MyoD, myogenin, alpha-sarcomeric actin and myosin heavy chain by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, Myf-5 and alpha-sarcomeric actin was performed to verify the myogenic phenotype of extracted satellite cells and to prove the maturation of cells. Cultures treated with DM showed positive staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin. Notably, markers of differentiation were also detected in cultures treated with GM, but there was no formation of myotubes. In the enzymatic assay of creatine phosphokinase, cultures treated with DM showed a higher activity, evidencing a higher degree of differentiation

  9. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  10. Ex-vivo evaluation of gene therapy vectors in human pancreatic (cancer) tissue slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geer, M.A.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Bakker, C.T.; ten Kate, F.J.W.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bosma, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To culture human pancreatic tissue obtained from small resection specimens as a pre-clinical model for examining virus-host interactions. METHODS: Human pancreatic tissue samples (malignant and normal) were obtained from surgical specimens and processed immediately to tissue slices. Tissue slic

  11. Expression of PKD2 gene in human renal tissue and other tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-kun; SHEN Xue-fei; MEI Chang-lin; TANG Bing; SUN Tian-mei; SONG Ji

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of PKD2 gene in human kidney and other tissues. Methods: The expression of PKD2 was detected by reverse transcription PCR(RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization(ISH). The results of ISH were analyzed by micromegakargocytes. Results: Distribution of pkd-2 in normal adult kidney was stronger in proximal convoluted tubule, Henle's loop ascending branch, distal convoluted tubule and cortical collecting ducts, and inferior signal were observed in fetal kidney. Negative was seen in ADPKD 2 kidney. Conclusion: Down-regulation of PKD2 gene expression in kidney may take effect on the occurrence and development of ADPKD2.

  12. In vitro metabolism of beclomethasone dipropionate, budesonide, ciclesonide, and fluticasone propionate in human lung precision-cut tissue slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Robyn

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The therapeutic effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS may be affected by the metabolism of the drug in the target organ. We investigated the in vitro metabolism of beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP, budesonide (BUD, ciclesonide (CIC, and fluticasone propionate (FP in human lung precision-cut tissue slices. CIC, a new generation ICS, is hydrolyzed by esterases in the upper and lower airways to its pharmacologically active metabolite desisobutyryl-ciclesonide (des-CIC. Methods Lung tissue slices were incubated with BDP, BUD, CIC, and FP (initial target concentration of 25 μM for 2, 6, and 24 h. Cellular viability was assessed using adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and protein synthesis in lung slices. Metabolites and remaining parent compounds in the tissue samples were analyzed by HPLC with UV detection. Results BDP was hydrolyzed to the pharmacologically active metabolite beclomethasone-17-monopropionate (BMP and, predominantly, to inactive beclomethasone (BOH. CIC was hydrolyzed initially to des-CIC with a slower rate compared to BDP. A distinctly smaller amount (approximately 10-fold less of fatty acid esters were formed by BMP (and/or BOH than by BUD or des-CIC. The highest relative amounts of fatty acid esters were detected for BUD. For FP, no metabolites were detected at any time point. The amount of drug-related material in lung tissue (based on initial concentrations at 24 h was highest for CIC, followed by BUD and FP; the smallest amount was detected for BDP. Conclusion The in vitro metabolic pathways of the tested ICS in human lung tissue were differing. While FP was metabolically stable, the majority of BDP was converted to inactive polar metabolites. The formation of fatty acid conjugates was confirmed for BMP (and/or BOH, BUD, and des-CIC.

  13. Resolution of cell-mediated airways diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    "Inflammation resolution" has of late become a topical research area. Activation of resolution phase mechanisms, involving select post-transcriptional regulons, transcription factors, 'autacoids', and cell phenotypes, is now considered to resolve inflammatory diseases. Critical to this discourse on resolution is the elimination of inflammatory cells through apoptosis and phagocytosis. For major inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD we propose an alternative path to apoptosis for cell elimination. We argue that transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes, followed by mucociliary clearance, efficiently and non-injuriously eliminates pro-inflammatory cells from diseased airway tissues. First, it seems clear that numerous infiltrated granulocytes and lymphocytes can be speedily transmitted into the airway lumen without harming the epithelial barrier. Then there are a wide range of 'unexpected' findings demonstrating that clinical improvement of asthma and COPD is not only associated with decreasing numbers of airway wall inflammatory cells but also with increasing numbers of these cells in the airway lumen. Finally, effects of inhibition of transepithelial migration support the present hypothesis. Airway inflammatory processes have thus been much aggravated when transepithelial exit of leukocytes has been inhibited. In conclusion, the present hypothesis highlights risks involved in drug-induced inhibition of transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes. It helps interpretation of common airway lumen data, and suggests approaches to treat cell-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:20540713

  14. CFTR and calcium-activated chloride channels in primary cultures of human airway gland cells of serous or mucous phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Sachs, Lorne; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2010-10-01

    Using cell culture models, we have investigated the relative importance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) in Cl secretion by mucous and serous cells of human airway glands. In transepithelial recordings in Ussing chambers, the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)-172 abolished 60% of baseline Cl secretion in serous cells and 70% in mucous. Flufenamic acid (FFA), an inhibitor of CaCC, reduced baseline Cl secretion by ∼20% in both cell types. Methacholine and ATP stimulated Cl secretion in both cell types, which was largely blocked by treatment with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) and partially by mucosal FFA or CFTR(inh)-172 with the exception of methacholine responses in mucous cells, which were not blocked by FFA and partially (∼60%) by CFTR(inh)-172. The effects of ionomycin on short-circuit current (I(sc)) were less than those of ATP or methacholine. Forskolin stimulated Cl secretion only if Cl in the mucosal medium was replaced by gluconate. In whole cell patch-clamp studies of single isolated cells, cAMP-induced Cl currents were ∼3-fold greater in serous than mucous cells. Ionomycin-induced Cl currents were 13 times (serous) or 26 times (mucous) greater than those generated by cAMP and were blocked by FFA. In serous cells, mRNA for transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was ∼10 times more abundant than mRNA for CFTR. In mucous cells it was ∼100 times more abundant. We conclude: 1) serous and mucous cells both make significant contributions to gland fluid secretion; 2) baseline Cl secretion in both cell types is mediated predominantly by CFTR, but CaCC becomes increasingly important after mediator-induced elevations of intracellular Ca; and 3) the high CaCC currents seen in patch-clamp studies and the high TMEM16A expression in intact polarized cells sheets are not reflected in transepithelial current recordings.

  15. Evaluation of four airway training manikins as patient simulators for the insertion of single use laryngeal mask airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Green, C; McGrath, J; Srivastava, R

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of four manikins: Airsim(trade mark), Bill 1, Airway Management Trainer and Airway Trainer, as simulators for insertion of single-use laryngeal mask airways and the reusable LMA Classic. Sixteen volunteer anaesthetists inserted each laryngeal mask airway into each manikin twice. Insertions were scored for ease of insertion, clinical and fibreoptic position, and lung ventilation (maximum score 10). Scores mask airway performance. Poor insertion rate was 15% (range 9-21%) and was lowest for the VBM manikin (p = 0.02). Insertion failure rate was 2.6% and did not differ significantly between manikins (p = 0.2). Overall manikin performance was significantly different (p mask airways. Overall performance differences of laryngeal mask airways were statistically significant (p mask airways. The methodology is useful for future evaluations of devices, both manikins and supraglottic airways. Further human clinical research is required.

  16. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Ian P

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The availability of a draft sequence for the human genome will revolutionise research into airway disease. This review deals with two of the most important areas impinging on the treatment of patients: pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Considerable inter-individual variation exists at the DNA level in targets for medication, and variability in response to treatment may, in part, be determined by this genetic variation. Increased knowledge about the human genome might also permit the identification of novel therapeutic targets by expression profiling at the RNA (genomics or protein (proteomics level. This review describes recent advances in pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics with regard to airway disease.

  17. 75 FR 9226 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Human Tissue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Human Tissue Intended for Transplantation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... solicits comments on the information collection requirements relating to FDA regulations for human tissue... of information technology. Human Tissue Intended for Transplantation--21 CFR Part 1270 (OMB Control...

  18. 78 FR 41403 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Human Tissue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Human Tissue Intended for Transplantation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... solicits comments on the information collection requirements relating to FDA regulations for human tissue... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Human Tissue Intended for Transplantation--21 CFR Part...

  19. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Wölfle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  20. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfle, Ute; Elsholz, Floriana A; Kersten, Astrid; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schumacher, Udo; Schempp, Christoph M

    2016-03-03

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  1. Tissue engineered humanized bone supports human hematopoiesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Boris M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Nowlan, Bianca; Barbier, Valerie; Thibaudeau, Laure; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hooper, John D; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A; Russell, Pamela J; Pettit, Allison R; Winkler, Ingrid G; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Advances in tissue-engineering have resulted in a versatile tool-box to specifically design a tailored microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in order to study diseases that develop within this setting. However, most current in vivo models fail to recapitulate the biological processes seen in humans. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to engineer humanized bone constructs that are able to recapitulate the morphological features and biological functions of the HSC niches. Ectopic implantation of biodegradable composite scaffolds cultured for 4 weeks with human mesenchymal progenitor cells and loaded with rhBMP-7 resulted in the development of a chimeric bone organ including a large number of human mesenchymal cells which were shown to be metabolically active and capable of establishing a humanized microenvironment supportive of the homing and maintenance of human HSCs. A syngeneic mouse-to-mouse transplantation assay was used to prove the functionality of the tissue-engineered ossicles. We predict that the ability to tissue engineer a morphologically intact and functional large-volume bone organ with a humanized bone marrow compartment will help to further elucidate physiological or pathological interactions between human HSCs and their native niches. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Marketing of human organs and tissues is justified and necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, J

    1989-01-01

    The bioethical guidelines now banning commerce in human body parts to be used for transplantation manifest unrealistic and arbitrary inflexibility which perpetuates and worsens the deficit in organ supply. Instead of relying on traditionally revered but now outmoded and even irrelevant bioethical maxims, formulators of the guidelines should have concentrated on a more meaningful situational adaptation to contemporary real-life circumstances. Many unexpectedly relevant and important nuances of concepts such as property, ownership, and altruism must now be taken into account. Hypothetical examples explore the morality of a universal ban by fiat and the associated problems of organ supply and demand, of cost and affordability, and of fair equity. It is difficult to justify purely altruistic organ donation today, when the health care professions and industries are frantically pursuing commercial profits. It is concluded that the ban should be scrapped in favor of a well-organized, open, and legally regulated commercial market for human organs and tissues.

  3. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios. G. Aggelis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the acoustic emission (AE activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis. The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure.

  4. Identification of Tissue-Specific Protein-Coding and Noncoding Transcripts across 14 Human Tissues Using RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinhang; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Li, Suqing; Wen, Zhuo; Bin Li; Zheng, Yuanting; Shi, Leming

    2016-06-22

    Many diseases and adverse drug reactions exhibit tissue specificity. To better understand the tissue-specific expression characteristics of transcripts in different human tissues, we deeply sequenced RNA samples from 14 different human tissues. After filtering many lowly expressed transcripts, 24,729 protein-coding transcripts and 1,653 noncoding transcripts were identified. By analyzing highly expressed tissue-specific protein-coding transcripts (TSCTs) and noncoding transcripts (TSNTs), we found that testis expressed the highest numbers of TSCTs and TSNTs. Brain, monocytes, ovary, and heart expressed more TSCTs than the rest tissues, whereas brain, placenta, heart, and monocytes expressed more TSNTs than other tissues. Co-expression network constructed based on the TSCTs and TSNTs showed that each hub TSNT was co-expressed with several TSCTs, allowing functional annotation of TSNTs. Important biological processes and KEGG pathways highly related to the specific functions or diseases of each tissue were enriched with the corresponding TSCTs. These TSCTs and TSNTs may participate in the tissue-specific physiological or pathological processes. Our study provided a unique data set and systematic analysis of expression characteristics and functions of both TSCTs and TSNTs based on 14 distinct human tissues, and could facilitate future investigation of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific diseases and adverse drug reactions.

  5. Airway management in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid M Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma has assumed epidemic proportion. 10% of global road accident deaths occur in India. Hypoxia and airway mismanagement are known to contribute up to 34% of pre-hospital deaths in these patients. A high degree of suspicion for actual or impending airway obstruction should be assumed in all trauma patients. Objective signs of airway compromise include agitation, obtundation, cyanosis, abnormal breath sound and deviated trachea. If time permits, one should carry out a brief airway assessment prior to undertaking definitive airway management in these patients. Simple techniques for establishing and maintaining airway patency include jaw thrust maneuver and/or use of oro- and nas-opharyngeal airways. All attempts must be made to perform definitive airway management whenever airway is compromised that is not amenable to simple strategies. The selection of airway device and route- oral or -nasal, for tracheal intubation should be based on nature of patient injury, experience and skill level.

  6. Endocannabinoid metabolism in human glioblastomas and meningiomas compared to human non-tumour brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The endogenous levels of the two cannabinoid receptor ligands 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, and their respective congeners, monoacyl glycerols and N-acylethanolamines, as well as the phospholipid precursors of N-acylethanolamines, were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in...... in glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) tissue and meningioma (WHO grade I) tissue and compared with human non-tumour brain tissue. Furthermore, the metabolic turnover of N-acylethanolamines was compared by measurements of the enzymatic activity of N-acyltransferase, N...

  7. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  8. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  9. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  10. Bronchoconstriction and airway biology : potential impact and therapeutic opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Grainge, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that mechanical forces occurring in the airway as a consequence of bronchoconstriction are sufficient to not only induce symptoms but also influence airway biology. Animal and human in vitro and in vivo work demonstrates that the airways are structurally and functionally

  11. The PAXgene(® tissue system preserves phosphoproteins in human tissue specimens and enables comprehensive protein biomarker research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibylle Gündisch

    Full Text Available Precise quantitation of protein biomarkers in clinical tissue specimens is a prerequisite for accurate and effective diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized medicine. Although progress is being made, protein analysis from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues is still challenging. In previous reports, we showed that the novel formalin-free tissue preservation technology, the PAXgene Tissue System, allows the extraction of intact and immunoreactive proteins from PAXgene-fixed and paraffin-embedded (PFPE tissues. In the current study, we focused on the analysis of phosphoproteins and the applicability of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to the analysis of a variety of malignant and non-malignant human tissues. Using western blot analysis, we found that phosphoproteins are quantitatively preserved in PFPE tissues, and signal intensities are comparable to that in paired, frozen tissues. Furthermore, proteins extracted from PFPE samples are suitable for 2D-PAGE and can be quantified by ELISA specific for denatured proteins. In summary, the PAXgene Tissue System reliably preserves phosphoproteins in human tissue samples, even after prolonged fixation or stabilization times, and is compatible with methods for protein analysis such as 2D-PAGE and ELISA. We conclude that the PAXgene Tissue System has the potential to serve as a versatile tissue fixative for modern pathology.

  12. Con A affinity glycoproteomics of normal human liver tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN QiangLing; LU HaoJie; LIU YinKun; LU WenJing; CHENG Gang; ZHOU HaiJun; ZHOU XinWen; WEI LiMing; DAI Zhi; GUO Kun

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish the novel high throughput, high efficiency and Iow cost technological platform for the research of N-glycoproteomics, to resolve the significance of characteristic expression profile of glycoprotein and to find the proteins with biological functional importance, the glycoproteins with high-mannose core and the two antennary types were purified and enriched by the Con A affinity chromatography. Con A affinity protein expression profiles of normal human liver tissue were generated by using SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by fast fluorescence staining based on multiplexed proteomics (MP) technology. 301 visible protein spots on the gel were detected and 85 of glycoproteins were further successfully identified via peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS/MS) and annotated to IPI databases. Identified glycoproteins definitely take part in the regulation of cell cycle and metabolic processes. The glycosylation sites were predicted with NetNGlyc 1.0 and NetOGlyc 3.1 software, meanwhile they were classified according to the geneontology methods. The construction of Con A affinity glycoprotein database of normal human liver tissue would contribute to the subsequent research.

  13. Con A affinity glycoproteomics of normal human liver tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish the novel high throughput, high efficiency and low cost technological platform for the research of N-glycoproteomics, to resolve the significance of characteristic expression profile of glycoprotein and to find the proteins with biological functional importance, the glycoproteins with high-mannose core and the two antennary types were purified and enriched by the Con A affinity chromatography. Con A affinity protein expression profiles of normal human liver tissue were gener- ated by using SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by fast fluorescence stain- ing based on multiplexed proteomics (MP) technology. 301 visible protein spots on the gel were de- tected and 85 of glycoproteins were further successfully identified via peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF- MS/MS) and annotated to IPI databases. Identified glycoproteins definitely take part in the regulation of cell cycle and metabolic processes. The glycosylation sites were predicted with NetNGlyc 1.0 and NetOGlyc 3.1 software, meanwhile they were classified according to the geneontology methods. The construction of Con A affinity glycoprotein database of normal human liver tissue would contribute to the subsequent research.

  14. A theoretical model of the application of RF energy to the airway wall and its experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Robert H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial thermoplasty is a novel technique designed to reduce an airway's ability to contract by reducing the amount of airway smooth muscle through controlled heating of the airway wall. This method has been examined in animal models and as a treatment for asthma in human subjects. At the present time, there has been little research published about how radiofrequency (RF energy and heat is transferred to the airways of the lung during bronchial thermoplasty procedures. In this manuscript we describe a computational, theoretical model of the delivery of RF energy to the airway wall. Methods An electro-thermal finite-element-analysis model was designed to simulate the delivery of temperature controlled RF energy to airway walls of the in vivo lung. The model includes predictions of heat generation due to RF joule heating and transfer of heat within an airway wall due to thermal conduction. To implement the model, we use known physical characteristics and dimensions of the airway and lung tissues. The model predictions were tested with measurements of temperature, impedance, energy, and power in an experimental canine model. Results Model predictions of electrode temperature, voltage, and current, along with tissue impedance and delivered energy were compared to experiment measurements and were within ± 5% of experimental averages taken over 157 sample activations. The experimental results show remarkable agreement with the model predictions, and thus validate the use of this model to predict the heat generation and transfer within the airway wall following bronchial thermoplasty. Conclusions The model also demonstrated the importance of evaporation as a loss term that affected both electrical measurements and heat distribution. The model predictions showed excellent agreement with the empirical results, and thus support using the model to develop the next generation of devices for bronchial thermoplasty. Our results suggest

  15. MUC5AC mucin release from human airways in vitro: Effects of indomethacin and Bay X1005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Roger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased secretion of mucus is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases and contributes significantly to the airflow limitation experienced by many patients. While the current pharmacological approach to reducing mucus and sputum production in patients is limited, clinical studies have suggested that drugs which inhibit the cyclooxygenase and/or 5-lipoxygenase enzymatic pathways may reduce secretory activity in patients with airway disease.

  16. Synergistic up-regulation of CXCL10 by virus and IFN γ in human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Oslund

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against viral infections and are instrumental in coordinating the inflammatory response. In this study, we demonstrate the synergistic stimulation of CXCL10 mRNA and protein, a key chemokine responsible for the early immune response to viral infection, following treatment of airway epithelial cells with IFN γ and influenza virus. The synergism also occurred when the cells were treated with IFN γ and a viral replication mimicker (dsRNA both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the requirement of type I interferon (IFNAR signaling in dsRNA-induced CXCL10, the synergism was independent of the IFNAR pathway since it wasn't affected by the addition of a neutralizing IFNAR antibody or the complete lack of IFNAR expression. Furthermore, the same synergistic effect was also observed when a CXCL10 promoter reporter was examined. Although the responsive promoter region contains both ISRE and NFκB sites, western blot analysis indicated that the combined treatment of IFN γ and dsRNA significantly augmented NFκB but not STAT1 activation as compared to the single treatment. Therefore, we conclude that IFN γ and dsRNA act in concert to potentiate CXCL10 expression in airway epithelial cells via an NFκB-dependent but IFNAR-STAT independent pathway and it is at least partly regulated at the transcriptional level.

  17. Device for Investigation of Mechanical Tension of Isolated Smooth Muscle Vessels and Airway Segments of Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinik, A.; Karpovich, N.; Turgunova, N.; Nosarev, A.

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of testing and the search for new drug compounds, designed to heal many human diseases, it is necessary to investigate the deformation of experimental tissue samples under influence of these drugs. For this task a precision force sensor for measuring the mechanical tension, produced by isolated ring segments of blood vessels and airways was created. The hardware and software systems for the study of changes in contractile responses of the airway smooth muscles and blood vessels of experimental animals was developed.

  18. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity. © FASEB.

  19. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  20. Prostate tissue stiffness as measured with a resonance sensor system: a study on silicone and human prostate tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2006-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Europe and in the USA. Some prostate tumours are stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, and it could therefore be of interest to measure prostate tissue stiffness. Resonance sensor technology based on piezoelectric resonance detects variations in tissue stiffness due to a change in the resonance frequency. An impression-controlled resonance sensor system was used to detect stiffness in silicone rubber and in human prostate tissue in vitro using two parameters, both combinations of frequency change and force. Variations in silicone rubber stiffness due to the mixing ratio of the two components could be detected (pprostate tissue showed that there existed a statistically significant (MANOVA test, pprostates. Our results indicated that the resonance sensor could be used to detect stiffness variations in silicone and in human prostate tissue in vitro. This is promising for the development of a future diagnostic tool for prostate cancer.

  1. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Eric J.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Shimko, Michael J.; Wells, J.R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A.; Case, Shannon L.; Thompson, Janet A.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance, we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity. We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport, without affecting Cl− transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100–360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro. PMID:26454031

  2. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Eric J; Goldsmith, W Travis; Shimko, Michael J; Wells, J R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A; Case, Shannon L; Thompson, Janet A; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-15

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance,we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity.We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥ 60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport,without affecting Cl- transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100-360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro.

  3. Ozone-induced increases in substance P and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2 alpha in the airways of human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazbun, M.E.; Hamilton, R.; Holian, A.; Eschenbacher, W.L. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We are interested in the mechanisms of ozone-induced lung effects after short-term exposure and the relationship with subsequent pulmonary inflammation and disease. Our hypothesis is that ozone, as a powerful oxidant, will diminish the activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in the airways of humans with resulting increased concentrations of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP). We have exposed seven (two women, five men) healthy, nonsmoking individuals (22 to 30 yr of age) to filtered air and ozone (0.25 ppm) for 1 h in an environmental chamber during heavy exercise. Bronchoscopy with airway lavage (AL) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed immediately after ozone exposure. The lavage samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for SP and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-epi-PGF2 alpha) (a marker for oxidative free radical reaction) and by radioimmunoassay for complement fragments. FEV1 had declined 12.4 +/- 1.9% (mean +/- SEM) as a result of ozone exposure. The AL concentration for SP and 8-epi-PGF2 alpha and BAL concentration of C3a after ozone exposure were significantly higher than after the filtered air exposure (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between SP and 8-epi-PGF2 alpha concentrations in the AL fluid (r2 = 0.89 and P < 0.05). There were no changes in C5a in either compartment or any of the mediators in the plasma samples. These results extend previous results from animal studies suggesting that ozone's mechanism of action is through an oxidative reaction resulting in a decreased activity of NEP in the airways with a subsequent increase in the concentration and activity of SP.

  4. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  5. New dimensions in tissue engineering: possible models for human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering is a discipline of great promise. In some areas, such as the cornea, tissues engineered in the laboratory are already in clinical use. In other areas, where the tissue architecture is more complex, there are a number of obstacles to manoeuvre before clinically relevant tissues can be produced. However, even in areas where clinically relevant tissues are decades away, the tissues being produced at the moment provide powerful new models to aid the understanding of complex physiological processes. This article provides a personal view of the role of tissue engineering in advancing our understanding of physiology, with specific attention being paid to musculoskeletal tissues.

  6. MicroRNA expression variability in human cervical tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M Pereira

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short (approximately 22 nt non-coding regulatory RNAs that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Deregulation of miRNA expression has been discovered in a wide variety of tumours and it is now clear that they contribute to cancer development and progression. Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and there is a strong need for a non-invasive, fast and efficient method to diagnose the disease. We investigated miRNA expression profiles in cervical cancer using a microarray platform containing probes for mature miRNAs. We have evaluated miRNA expression profiles of a heterogeneous set of cervical tissues from 25 different patients. This set included 19 normal cervical tissues, 4 squamous cell carcinoma, 5 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL and 9 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL samples. We observed high variability in miRNA expression especially among normal cervical samples, which prevented us from obtaining a unique miRNA expression signature for this tumour type. However, deregulated miRNAs were identified in malignant and pre-malignant cervical tissues after tackling the high expression variability observed. We were also able to identify putative target genes of relevant candidate miRNAs. Our results show that miRNA expression shows natural variability among human samples, which complicates miRNA data profiling analysis. However, such expression noise can be filtered and does not prevent the identification of deregulated miRNAs that play a role in the malignant transformation of cervical squamous cells. Deregulated miRNAs highlight new candidate gene targets allowing for a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the development of this tumour type.

  7. Cartilage tissue engineering using pre-aggregated human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first aimed at determining whether human articular chondrocytes (HAC proliferate in aggregates in the presence of strong chondrocyte mitogens. We then investigated if the aggregated cells have an enhanced chondrogenic capacity as compared to cells cultured in monolayer. HAC from four donors were cultured in tissue culture dishes either untreated or coated with 1% agarose in the presence of TGFb-1, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Proliferation and stage of differentiation were assessed by measuring respectively DNA contents and type II collagen mRNA. Expanded cells were induced to differentiate in pellets or in Hyaff®-11 meshes and the formed tissues were analysed biochemically for glycosaminoglycans (GAG and DNA, and histologically by Safranin O staining. The amount of DNA in aggregate cultures increased significantly from day 2 to day 6 (by 3.2-fold, but did not further increase with additional culture time. Expression of type II collagen mRNA was about two orders of magnitude higher in aggregated HAC as compared to monolayer expanded cells. Pellets generated by aggregated HAC were generally more intensely stained for GAG than those generated by monolayer-expanded cells. Scaffolds seeded with aggregates accumulated more GAG (1.3-fold than scaffolds seeded with monolayer expanded HAC. In conclusion, this study showed that HAC culture in aggregates does not support a relevant degree of expansion. However, aggregation of expanded HAC prior to loading into a porous scaffold enhances the quality of the resulting tissues and could thus be introduced as an intermediate culture phase in the manufacture of engineered cartilage grafts.

  8. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  9. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  10. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema...... and emphysema, respectively. Conclusions – Airway distensibility decreases significantly with increasing severity of both GOLD status and emphysema, indicating that in COPD the dynamic change in airway calibre during respiration is compromised. Chronic bronchitis and emphysema appear to be interacting...

  11. Down-regulation of IL-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells through helper-dependent adenoviral-mediated RNA interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huibi CAO; Anan WANG; Bernard MARTIN; David R.KOEHLER; Pamela L.ZEITLIN; A.Keith TANAWELL; Jim HU

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 is a potent neutrophil chemotactic factor and a crucial mediator in neutrophil-dependent inflammation.Various cell types produce IL-8, either in response to external stimuli such as cytokines or bacterial infection, or after malignant transformation. Anti-IL-8 strategies have been considered for anti-inflammatory therapy. In this paper we demonstrate that the RNA interference technique can be used to efficiently down-regulate IL-8 protein expression in airway epithelial cells. We used a helper-dependent adenoviral vector to express a small hairpin (sh)RNA targeting human IL-8 in cultured airway epithelial cells (IB3-1, Cftr-/-; C38, Cftr-corrected) stimulated with TNF-α, IL-1 β or heat-inactivated Burkholderia cenocepacia. Stimulated IL-8 expression in IB3-1 and C38 cells was significantly reduced by shRNA expression. The shRNA targeting IL-8 had no effect on the activation of NF-κB, or on the protein levels of Iκ B or IL-6, suggesting that this anti-IL-8 strategy was highly specific, and therefore may offer potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Procoagulant tissue factor-exposing vesicles in human seminal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, C; Böing, A N; Hau, C M; Montag, M; Strowitzki, T; Nieuwland, R; Toth, B

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that various types of vesicles, like microparticles (MP) and exosomes, are present in blood, saliva, bone marrow, urine and synovial fluid. These vesicles, which are released upon activation or shear stress, are thought to play a role in coagulation, neovascularisation, inflammation and intercellular signalling. Seminal fluid is a cell-, sperm- and protein-rich suspension. Although seminal fluid is known to contain vesicles like prostasomes, MP and exosomes have never been characterised. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyse and characterise vesicles in seminal fluid in male partners of patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF/ICSI. MP from seminal fluid of patients during routine IVF/ICSI procedures were detected and analysed with flow cytometry (FACS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using antibodies against tissue factor (TF), CD10, CD13, CD26 and annexin V. The coagulant properties of vesicles were studied using a fibrin generation test. MP were detected in human seminal fluid by both flow cytometry and TEM. Seminal fluid-derived MP expressed CD10, CD13, CD26 and TF, which was highly procoagulant and a powerful trigger of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The extent to which the procoagulant activity of MP in seminal fluid contributes to the implantation process itself and therefore affects human reproduction needs to be further elucidated.

  14. Human epithelial tissue culture study on restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, András; Ungvári, Krisztina; Györgyey, Ágnes; Kukovecz, Ákos; Turzó, Kinga; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Health condition of the gingival tissues contacting the surfaces of fixed prostheses is a result of multiple etiologic factors. The aim of the investigation discussed here was to evaluate the attachment and proliferation rate of cultured human epithelial cells on three commonly used restorative materials under in vitro conditions. Morphological and chemical structure of polished lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Germany), yttrium modified zirconium dioxide (5-TEC ICE Zirkon Translucent, Zirkonzahn GmbH Srl, Germany) and cobalt chromium alloy (Remanium star, Dentaurum GmbH & Co. KG, Germany) discs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cells harvested and cultured from one donor, were applied to investigate cell attachment (24h observation) and proliferation (72h observation) via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and AlamarBlue(®) (AB) assays on control surface (cell-culture plate) and on the restorative materials (n=3×20 specimens/material). SEM and AFM revealed typical morphology and roughness features for the materials. Zirconia presented significantly higher Ra value. EDS confirmed typical elements on the investigated restorative materials: lithium-disilicate (Si, O); Zirconia (Zi, Y, O); CoCr (Co, Cr, W). All surfaces except CoCr exhibited significant cell proliferation according to MTT and AB assays after 72h compared to 24h. Among the restorative materials, CoCr samples showed the highest cell attachment as indicated by MTT assay. AB results showed that attachment and proliferation of human epithelial cells is supported more on lithium-disilicate. Both assays indicated the lowest value for zirconia. The results indicate that the restorative materials examined are equally suitable for subgingival restorations. Lithium-disilicate exhibited the best biocompatibility. The examined materials are indicated for use

  15. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J F; Stenderup, K; Hansen, F D

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...... that infused cells were efficiently arrested in microvasculature during first-pass, but only for a fraction of the infused cells was arrest followed by vascular emigration and tissue engraftment. Few engrafted cells in lungs, heart, and kidney glomeruli remained after 4 weeks. These observations are consistent...

  16. Physiological Function and Transplantation of Scaffold-Free and Vascularized Human Cardiac Muscle Tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K. R. Stevens; K. L. Kreutziger; S. K. Dupras; F. S. Korte; M. Regnier; V. Muskheli; M. B. Nourse; K. Bendixen; H. Reinecke; C. E. Murry; William A. Catterall

    2009-01-01

    Success of human myocardial tissue engineering for cardiac repair has been limited by adverse effects of scaffold materials, necrosis at the tissue core, and poor survival after transplantation due to ischemie injury...

  17. Expression of Resistin Protein in Normal Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Pregnant Women Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue and Placenta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yongming; GUO Tiecheng; ZHANG Muxun; GUO Wei; YU Meixia; XUE Keying; HUANG Shiang; CHEN Yanhong; ZHU Huanli; XU Lijun

    2006-01-01

    The expression of resistin protein in normal human abdominal, thigh, pregnant women abdominal, non-pregnant women abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and placenta and the relationship between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pregnant physiological insulin resistance (IR) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was investigated. The expression of resistin protein in normal human abdominal, thigh, pregnant women abdominal, non-pregnant women abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and placenta was detected by using Western blotting method.Fasting serum glucose concentration was measured by glucose oxidase assay. Serum cholesterol (CHOL), serum triglycerides (TG), serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and serum LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) were determined by full automatic biochemical instrument. Fasting insulin was measured by enzyme immunoassay to calculate insulin resistance index (IRI). Height, weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (BF %). Resistin protein expression in pregnant women placental tissue (67 905±8441) (arbitrary A values) was much higher than that in subcutaneous adipose tissue in pregnant women abdomen (40 718 ± 3818, P < 0.01), non-pregnant women abdomen (38 288±2084, P<0.01), normal human abdomen (39 421±6087, P<0.01)and thigh (14 942 ±6706, P<0. 001) respectively. The resistin expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue showed no significant difference among pregnant, non-pregnant women and normal human, but much higher than that in thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (P<0. 001). Pearson analysis revealed that resistin protein was correlated with BMI (r=0.42), fasting insulin concentration (r=0.38),IRI (r=0. 34), BF % (r=0.43) and fasting glucose (r=0. 39), but not with blood pressure,CHOL, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C. It was suggested that resistin protein expression in human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was much higher

  18. 75 FR 34146 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With an Epidemiology Profile (NCI) SUMMARY... Collection: Title: Resource for the Collection and Evaluation of Human Tissues and Cells From Donors With an...

  19. A tissue and developmental specific enhancer is located downstream from the human β-globin gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kollias (George); J. Hurst; E. de Boer (Ernie); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe human P-globin gene is part of a multigene family and is expressed specifically in adult human erythroid tissue (for review, 1). When the human P-globin is introduced into fertilized mouse eggs, it is first activated in foetal liver and remains expressed in adult erythroid tissues

  20. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  1. The Diagnosis and Management of Airway Complications Following Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Amit K; Folch, Erik; Khandhar, Sandeep J; Channick, Colleen L; Santacruz, Jose F; Mehta, Atul C; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-03-05

    Airway complications following lung transplantation result in considerable morbidity and are associated with a mortality of 2-4 percent. The incidence of lethal and non-lethal airway complications has decreased since the early experiences with double- and single-lung transplantation. The most common risk factor associated with post-lung transplant airway complications is anastomotic ischemia. Airway complications include development of exophytic granulation tissue, bronchial stenosis, bronchomalacia, airway fistula, endobronchial infection, and anastomotic dehiscence. The broadening array of bronchoscopic therapies has enhanced treatment options for lung transplant recipients with airway complications. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical manifestations, and treatments of airway complications following lung transplantation, and provides our expert opinion where evidence is lacking.

  2. Epithelial cell senescence impairs repair process and exacerbates inflammation after airway injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai Atsushi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotoxic stress, such as by exposure to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and cigarette smoke, induces premature cell senescence. Recent evidence indicates that cellular senescence of various types of cells is accelerated in COPD patients. However, whether the senescence of airway epithelial cells contributes to the development of airway diseases is unknown. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that premature senescence of airway epithelial cells (Clara cells impairs repair processes and exacerbates inflammation after airway injury. Methods C57/BL6J mice were injected with the Clara-cell-specific toxicant naphthalene (NA on days 0, 7, and 14, and each NA injection was followed by a daily dose of BrdU on each of the following 3 days, during which regenerating cells were allowed to incorporate BrdU into their DNA and to senesce. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 was injected 30 minutes before each BrdU dose. Mice were sacrificed at different times until day 28 and lungs of mice were obtained to investigate whether Clara cell senescence impairs airway epithelial regeneration and exacerbates airway inflammation. NCI-H441 cells were induced to senesce by exposure to BrdU or the telomerase inhibitor MST-312. Human lung tissue samples were obtained from COPD patients, asymptomatic smokers, and nonsmokers to investigate whether Clara cell senescence is accelerated in the airways of COPD patients, and if so, whether it is accompanied by p38 MAPK activation. Results BrdU did not alter the intensity of the airway epithelial injury or inflammation after a single NA exposure. However, after repeated NA exposure, BrdU induced epithelial cell (Clara cell senescence, as demonstrated by a DNA damage response, p21 overexpression, increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, and growth arrest, which resulted in impaired epithelial regeneration. The epithelial senescence was accompanied by p38 MAPK-dependent airway

  3. Simulation modeling of the tissue disposition of formaldehyde to predict nasal DNA-protein cross-links in Fischer 344 rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conolly, R B; Lilly, P D; Kimbell, J S

    2000-10-01

    Formaldehyde inhalation causes formation of DNA-protein cross-links (DPX) in the nasal mucosa of Fischer 344 (F344) rats and rhesus monkeys. DPX are considered to be part of the mechanism by which cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects of formaldehyde in laboratory animals are exerted, and DPX data have been used as a measure of tissue dose in cancer risk assessments for formaldehyde. Accurate prediction of DPX concentrations in humans is therefore desirable. The goal of this work was to increase confidence in the prediction of human DPX by refining earlier models of formaldehyde disposition and DPX kinetics in the nasal mucosa. Anatomically accurate, computational fluid dynamics models of the nasal airways of F344 rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans were used to predict the regional flux of formaldehyde to the respiratory and olfactory mucosa. A previously developed model of the tissue disposition of formaldehyde and of DPX kinetics was implemented in the graphical simulation tool SIMULINK and linked to the regional flux predictions. Statistical optimization was used to identify parameter values, and good simulations of the data were obtained. The parameter estimates for rats and monkeys were used to guide allometric scale-up to the human case. The relative levels of nasal mucosal DPX in rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans for a given inhaled concentration of formaldehyde were predicted by the model to vary with concentration. This modeling approach reduces uncertainty in the prediction of human nasal mucosal DPX resulting from formaldehyde inhalation.

  4. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for use in whole human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haim, Yulia; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Bashari, Dana; Rudich, Assaf

    2013-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become a central method when studying in vivo protein-DNA interactions, with the major challenge being the hope to capture "authentic" interactions. While ChIP protocols have been optimized for use with specific cell types and tissues including adipose tissue-derived cells, a working ChIP protocol addressing the challenges imposed by fresh whole human adipose tissue has not been described. Utilizing human paired omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained during elective abdominal surgeries, we have carefully identified and optimized individual steps in the ChIP protocol employed directly on fresh tissue fragments. We describe a complete working protocol for using ChIP on whole adipose tissue fragments. Specific steps required adaptation of the ChIP protocol to human whole adipose tissue. In particular, a cross-linking step was performed directly on fresh small tissue fragments. Nuclei were isolated before releasing chromatin, allowing better management of fat content; a sonication protocol to obtain fragmented chromatin w