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Sample records for human ad5 replication

  1. Intravenous administration of the conditionally replicative adenovirus Ad5-Δ24RGD induces regression of osteosarcoma lung metastases

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    Gerritsen Winald R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastatic osteosarcoma (OS has a very poor prognosis. New treatments are therefore wanted. The conditionally replicative adenovirus Ad5-Δ24RGD has shown promising anti-tumor effects on local cancers, including OS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravenous administration of Ad5-Δ24RGD could suppress growth of human OS lung metastases. Mice bearing SaOs-lm7 OS lung metastases were treated with Ad5-Δ24RGD at weeks 1, 2 and 3 or weeks 5, 6 and 7 after tumor cell injection. Virus treatment at weeks 1–3 did not cause a statistically significant effect on lung weight and total body weight. However, the number of macroscopic lung tumor nodules was reduced from a median of >158 in PBS-treated control mice to 58 in Ad5-Δ24RGD-treated mice (p = 0.15. Moreover, mice treated at weeks 5–7 showed a significantly reduced lung weight (decrease of tumor mass, p 149, p = 0.12 compared to PBS treated control animals. Adenovirus hexon expression was detected in lung tumor nodules at sacrifice three weeks after the last intravenous adenovirus administration, suggesting ongoing viral infection. These findings suggest that systemic administration of Ad5-Δ24RGD might be a promising new treatment strategy for metastatic osteosarcoma.

  2. Pre-existing adenovirus immunity modifies a complex mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine response to an Ad5/HIV-1 vaccine candidate in humans.

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    Samuel O Pine

    Full Text Available The results of the recent Step Study highlight a need to clarify the effects of pre-existing natural immunity to a vaccine vector on vaccine-induced T-cell responses. To investigate this interaction, we examined the relationship between pre-existing Ad5 immunity and T-cell cytokine response profiles in healthy, HIV-uninfected recipients of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine (HVTN 050, ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00849732. Participants were grouped by baseline Ad5 neutralizing antibody titer as either Ad5-seronegative (titer ≤18; n = 36 or Ad5-seropositive (titer >200; n = 34. Samples from vaccine recipients were analyzed for immune responses to either HIV-1 Gag peptide pools or Ad5 empty vector using an ex vivo assay that measures thirty cytokines in the absence of long-term culture. The overall profiles of cytokine responses to Gag and Ad5 had similar combinations of induced Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IP-10, IL-13, and IL-10, although the Ad5-specific responses were uniformly higher than the Gag-specific responses (p<0.0001 for 9 out of 11 significantly expressed analytes. At the peak response time point, PBMC from Ad5-seronegative vaccinees secreted significantly more IP-10 in response to Gag (p = 0.008, and significantly more IP-10 (p = 0.0009, IL-2 (p = 0.006 and IL-10 (p = 0.05 in response to Ad5 empty vector than PBMC from Ad5-seropositive vaccinees. Additionally, similar responses to the Ad5 vector prior to vaccination were observed in almost all subjects, regardless of Ad5 neutralizing antibody status, and the levels of secreted IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1Ra and GM-CSF were blunted following vaccination. The cytokine response profile of Gag-specific T cells mirrored the Ad5-specific response present in all subjects before vaccination, and included a number of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines not routinely assessed in current vaccine trials, such as IP-10, IL-10, IL-13, and GM-CSF. Together, these

  3. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

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    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences.

  4. Ganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathogenicity in permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters.

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    Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Dewhurst, Stephen; Capella, Cristina; Buller, R Mark L; Toth, Karoly; Wold, William S M

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients can develop into deadly multiorgan or systemic disease. The virus is especially threatening for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients; according to some studies, 10% or more of these patients succumb to disease resulting from adenovirus infection. At present, there is no drug approved for the treatment or prevention of adenovirus infections. Compounds that are approved to treat other virus infections are used off-label to combat adenovirus, but only anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of these drugs exists. Ganciclovir, a drug approved for the treatment of herpesvirus infection, was previously reported to be effective against human adenoviruses in vitro. To model adenovirus infections in immunocompromised humans, we examined ganciclovir's efficacy in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters intravenously infected with type 5 human adenovirus (Ad5). This animal model is permissive for Ad5 replication, and the animals develop symptoms similar to those seen in humans. We demonstrate that ganciclovir suppresses Ad5 replication in the liver of infected hamsters and that it mitigates the consequences of Ad5 infections in these animals when administered prophylactically or therapeutically. We show that ganciclovir inhibits Ad5 DNA synthesis and late gene expression. The mechanism of action for the drug is not clear; preliminary data suggest that it exerts its antiadenoviral effect by directly inhibiting the adenoviral DNA polymerase. While more extensive studies are required, we believe that ganciclovir is a promising drug candidate to treat adenovirus infections. Brincidofovir, a drug with proven activity against Ad5, was used as a positive control in the prophylactic experiment.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

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    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  6. Mechanism of ad5 vaccine immunity and toxicity: fiber shaft targeting of dendritic cells.

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    Cheng Cheng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant adenoviral (rAd vectors elicit potent cellular and humoral immune responses and show promise as vaccines for HIV-1, Ebola virus, tuberculosis, malaria, and other infections. These vectors are now widely used and have been generally well tolerated in vaccine and gene therapy clinical trials, with many thousands of people exposed. At the same time, dose-limiting adverse responses have been observed, including transient low-grade fevers and a prior human gene therapy fatality, after systemic high-dose recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 vector administration in a human gene therapy trial. The mechanism responsible for these effects is poorly understood. Here, we define the mechanism by which Ad5 targets immune cells that stimulate adaptive immunity. rAd5 tropism for dendritic cells (DCs was independent of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, its primary receptor or the secondary integrin RGD receptor, and was mediated instead by a heparin-sensitive receptor recognized by a distinct segment of the Ad5 fiber, the shaft. rAd vectors with CAR and RGD mutations did not infect a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types but retained their ability to transfect several DC types and stimulated adaptive immune responses in mice. Notably, the pyrogenic response to the administration of rAd5 also localized to the shaft region, suggesting that this interaction elicits both protective immunity and vector-induced fevers. The ability of replication-defective rAd5 viruses to elicit potent immune responses is mediated by a heparin-sensitive receptor that interacts with the Ad5 fiber shaft. Mutant CAR and RGD rAd vectors target several DC and mononuclear subsets and induce both adaptive immunity and toxicity. Understanding of these interactions facilitates the development of vectors that target DCs through alternative receptors that can improve safety while retaining the immunogenicity of rAd vaccines.

  7. 构建能转染人骨髓间充质干细胞的Ad5 GM-CSF-IL-2腺病毒载体*★%Construction of an adenoviral vector encoding Ad5GM-CSF-IL-2 in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

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    张玉萍; 张璇; 郭智; 谭晓华

    2013-01-01

    间充质干细胞后可连续7 d 高水平地分泌粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子和白细胞介素2。%BACKGROUND: A problem needed to be solved is how to deliver activating factors for dendritic cel s and T cel s into the tumors. Owing to the characteristics of tumor tropism and weak immunogenicity, human bone marrow mensenchymal stem cel s are used as a vehicle for transferring the activating factor genes of the dendritic cel s and T cel s to the tumor, which may be a protocol to solve the problem. OBJECTIVE: To construct a type 5 adenoviral (Ad) vector encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) genes, and detect the expression levels and duration of GM-CSF and IL-2 after infection of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cel s, providing experimental evidence for in vivo activation of dendritic cel s and T cel s. METHODS: GM-CSF and IL-2 cDNAs from the total RNA extracted by human peripheral blood mononuclear cel s were cloned by RT-PCR and inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1/Myc-His(-)B. GM-CSF and IL-2 cDNAs linked by the internal ribosomal entry sites (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus were subcloned into the shuttle vector pDC515 for the construction of pDC515 GM-CSF-IRES-IL-2. By using AdMaxTM adenovirus vector system, the shuttle vector pDC515 GM-CSF-IRES-IL-2 and the backbone vector pBGHfrt△E1,3 FLP were cotransfected into 293 cel s, and Ad5 GM-CSF-IL-2 was obtained by FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination. The amounts of GM-CSF and IL-2 in the culture supernatants at different time points were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cel s were infected by Ad5 GM-CSF-IL-2 and irradiated with γ-ray to lose proliferative activity. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The sequences of GM-CSF and IL-2 cDNAs were identical with those provided by GenBank NM_000758 (435 bp) and GenBank NM_000586 (462 bp) by sequencing, respectively

  8. Vaccination with Ad5 vectors expands Ad5-specific CD8 T cells without altering memory phenotype or functionality.

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    Natalie A Hutnick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviral (Ad vaccine vectors represent both a vehicle to present a novel antigen to the immune system as well as restimulation of immune responses against the Ad vector itself. To what degree Ad-specific CD8(+ T cells are restimulated by Ad vector vaccination is unclear, although such knowledge would be important as vector-specific CD8(+ T cell expansion could potentially further limit Ad vaccine efficacy beyond Ad-specific neutralizing antibody alone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we addressed this issue by measuring human Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5-specific CD8(+ T cells in recipients of the Merck Ad5 HIV-1 vaccine vector before, during, and after vaccination by multicolor flow cytometry. Ad5-specific CD8(+ T-cells were detectable in 95% of subjects prior to vaccination, and displayed primarily an effector-type functional profile and phenotype. Peripheral blood Ad5-specific CD8(+ T-cell numbers expanded after Ad5-HIV vaccination in all subjects, but differential expansion kinetics were noted in some baseline Ad5-neutralizing antibody (Ad5 nAb seronegative subjects compared to baseline Ad5 nAb seropositive subjects. However, in neither group did vaccination alter polyfunctionality, mucosal targeting marker expression, or memory phenotype of Ad5-specific CD8(+ T-cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that repeat Ad5-vector administration in humans expands Ad5-specific CD8(+ T-cells without overtly affecting their functional capacity or phenotypic properties. This is a secondary analysis of samples collected during the 016 trial. Results of the Merck 016 trial safety and immunogenicity have been previously published in the journal of clinical infectious diseases [1]. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00849680[http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00849680].

  9. Killing Effect of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA Recombinant Adenovirus in Combination with Hematoporphrphyrin Derivative-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy on Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

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    Lei Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to investigate the killing effects and molecular mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT mediated by the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus in combination with a hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro to provide a theoretical reference for treating lung cancer by HpD-PDT. By using the technologies of MTT, flow cytometry, ELISA, and western blot, we observed that the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of the A549 cells were significantly higher than the control group ( after HpD-PDT was performed. The inhibitory efficiency is dependent on the HpD concentration and laser intensity dose. The inhibitory effect on the proliferation of A549 cells of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA is more significant after combining with PDT, as indicated by a significant elevation of the intracellular ROS level and the expression of inflammatory factors (. The HpD-PDT-induced expression of the APE1 protein reached the peak after 24 h in A549 cells. The inhibition of APE1 expression in A549 cells was most significant after 48 hours of infection by Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus (10 MOI. In conclusion, the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus could efficiently inhibit the HpD-PDT-induced APE1 expression hence could significantly enhance the killing effect of HpD-PDT in lung cancer cells.

  10. Replication of biotinylated human immunodeficiency viruses.

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    Belshan, Michael; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated recently the adaptation of the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA - biotin acceptor sequence (BAS) labeling system to produce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viruses with biotinylated integrase (NLXIN(B)) and matrix (NLXMA(B)) proteins (Belshan et al., 2009). This report describes the construction of an HIV permissive cell line stably expressing BirA (SupT1.BirA). Consistent with the results in the previous report, NLXMA(B) replicated similar to wild-type levels and expressed biotinylated Gag and MA proteins in the SupT1.BirA cells, whereas the replication of NLXIN(B) was reduced severely. Three additional HIV type 2 (HIV-2) viruses were constructed with the BAS inserted into the vpx and vpr accessory genes. Two BAS insertions were made into the C-terminal half of the Vpx, including one internal insertion, and one at the N-terminus of Vpr. All three viruses were replication competent in the SupT1.BirA cells and their target proteins biotinylated efficiently and incorporated into virions. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the biotinylation system to label and capture HIV protein complexes in the context of replicating virus.

  11. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

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    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  12. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

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    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  13. Adenovirus vector-mediated RNA interference for the inhibition of human parvovirus B19 replication.

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    Brandt, Marius R G; Kirste, Ariane G; Pozzuto, Tanja; Schubert, Steffen; Kandolf, Reinhard; Fechner, Henry; Bock, C-Thomas; Kurreck, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been considered to cause acute and chronic myocarditis, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. Currently, no causative treatment option for B19V-infections is available. Since RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a highly potent antiviral approach, the aim of the current study was to develop an RNAi-based strategy to inhibit B19V replication. Three B19V-VP2-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) were designed and tested for their silencing activity in reporter assays and the expression cassette of the best one was introduced into an adenoviral shuttle vector (Ad5). B19V-permissive UT7/Epo-S1 cells were infected with B19V and the RNAi triggers were delivered by the adenoviral vector (Ad5shVP2) 24h thereafter. The shRNA targeting the B19V-VP2 gene significantly suppressed VP2 mRNA levels as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Additionally, also the expression levels of the non-targeted non-structural B19V-NS1 mRNA were strongly reduced. Our results demonstrate that vector-mediated delivery of shRNA expression cassettes targeting the structural B19-VP2 gene is a suitable approach to inhibit B19V replication.

  14. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

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    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  15. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

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    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  16. Twistor methods for AdS$_5$

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    Adamo, Tim; Williams, Jack

    2016-01-01

    We consider the application of twistor theory to five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. The twistor space of AdS$_5$ is the same as the ambitwistor space of the four-dimensional conformal boundary; the geometry of this correspondence is reviewed for both the bulk and boundary. A Penrose transform allows us to describe free bulk fields, with or without mass, in terms of data on twistor space. Explicit representatives for the bulk-to-boundary propagators of scalars and spinors are constructed, along with twistor action functionals for the free theories. Evaluating these twistor actions on bulk-to-boundary propagators is shown to produce the correct two-point functions.

  17. Intracardiac injection of a capsid-modified Ad5/35 results in decreased heart toxicity when compared to standard Ad5

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    Toivonen Raine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical gene therapy trials for cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated the crucial role of efficient gene delivery and transfection technologies in achieving clinically relevant results. We hypothesized that the use of tropism-modified adenoviruses would improve transduction efficacy and to this end we analyzed the transduction efficiency and toxicity of standard Ad5 and tropism-modified Ad5/35 in combination with ultrasound-guided intramyocardial gene delivery. Methods Ultrasound-guided intracardiac injections were used to deliver 1 × 1010 pfu/ml Ad5-lacZ and Ad5/35-lacZ vectors into mouse left ventricle wall. Since Ad5/35 uses human CD46 as its primary receptor, we used transgenic hCD46Ge mice expressing human CD46 at levels comparable to man. Mice were sacrificed 6 or 14 days post-injection and immunohistochemistry and X-gal staining were used to detect transgene and viral receptor expression. Virus-induced cardiac toxicity was evaluated by a pathologist. Results The intramyocardial injection was well tolerated and both Ad5-lacZ and Ad5/35-lacZ were able to give robust transgene expression after a single injection. Interestingly, while Ad5-lacZ was able to generate greater transgene expression than Ad5/35-lacZ, it also evoked more severe tissue damage with large areas of interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration and myocyte necrosis. Conclusions Ultrasound-guided intramyocardial injection is an effective and safe way to deliver vectors to the heart. The observed severe tissue damage of Ad5-lacZ greatly undermines the efficient transgene expression and suggests that Ad5/35 capsid modification can result in safer adenoviral vectors for cardiovascular gene therapy, although at the cost of some vector transduction efficacy.

  18. Functional interactions of DNA topoisomerases with a human replication origin.

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    Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Radulescu, Sorina; Sandoval, Oscar; Zahariev, Sotir; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; Santamaria, Laura; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Riva, Silvano; Falaschi, Arturo

    2007-02-21

    The human DNA replication origin, located in the lamin B2 gene, interacts with the DNA topoisomerases I and II in a cell cycle-modulated manner. The topoisomerases interact in vivo and in vitro with precise bonds ahead of the start sites of bidirectional replication, within the pre-replicative complex region; topoisomerase I is bound in M, early G1 and G1/S border and topoisomerase II in M and the middle of G1. The Orc2 protein competes for the same sites of the origin bound by either topoisomerase in different moments of the cell cycle; furthermore, it interacts on the DNA with topoisomerase II during the assembly of the pre-replicative complex and with DNA-bound topoisomerase I at the G1/S border. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity abolishes origin firing. Thus, the two topoisomerases are closely associated with the replicative complexes, and DNA topology plays an essential functional role in origin activation.

  19. Distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus isolates.

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    Fenyö, E M; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Chiodi, F; Lind, B; von Gegerfelt, A; Albert, J; Olausson, E; Asjö, B

    1988-01-01

    According to their capacity to replicate in vitro, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates can be divided into two major groups, rapid/high and slow/low. Rapid/high viruses can easily be transmitted to a variety of cell lines of T-lymphoid (CEM, H9, and Jurkat) and monocytoid (U937) origin. In contrast, slow/low viruses replicate transiently, if at all, in these cell lines. Except for a few isolates, the great majority of slow/low viruses replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Jurkat-tatIII cells constitutively expressing the tatIII gene of HIV-1. The viruses able to replicate efficiently cause syncytium formation and are regularly isolated from immunodeficient patients. Poorly replicating HIV isolates, often obtained from individuals with no or mild disease, show syncytium formation and single-cell killing simultaneously or, with some isolates, cell killing only. Images PMID:2459416

  20. Mitochondrial biology. Replication-transcription switch in human mitochondria.

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    Agaronyan, Karen; Morozov, Yaroslav I; Anikin, Michael; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2015-01-30

    Coordinated replication and expression of the mitochondrial genome is critical for metabolically active cells during various stages of development. However, it is not known whether replication and transcription can occur simultaneously without interfering with each other and whether mitochondrial DNA copy number can be regulated by the transcription machinery. We found that interaction of human transcription elongation factor TEFM with mitochondrial RNA polymerase and nascent transcript prevents the generation of replication primers and increases transcription processivity and thereby serves as a molecular switch between replication and transcription, which appear to be mutually exclusive processes in mitochondria. TEFM may allow mitochondria to increase transcription rates and, as a consequence, respiration and adenosine triphosphate production without the need to replicate mitochondrial DNA, as has been observed during spermatogenesis and the early stages of embryogenesis.

  1. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

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    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  2. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

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    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  3. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  4. Valganciclovir Inhibits Human Adenovirus Replication and Pathology in Permissive Immunosuppressed Female and Male Syrian Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoly Toth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients can develop into serious and often deadly multi-organ disease. There are no drugs approved for adenovirus infections. Cidofovir (an analog of 2-deoxycytidine monophosphate is used at times but it can be nephrotoxic and its efficacy has not been proven in clinical trials. Brincidofovir, a promising lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, is in clinical trials. Ganciclovir, an analog of 2-deoxyguanosine, has been employed occasionally but with unknown efficacy in the clinic. In this study, we evaluated valganciclovir against disseminated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 infection in our permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. We administered valganciclovir prophylactically, beginning 12 h pre-infection or therapeutically starting at Day 1, 2, 3, or 4 post-infection. Valganciclovir significantly increased survival, reduced viral replication in the liver, and mitigated the pathology associated with Ad5 infection. In cultured cells, valganciclovir inhibited Ad5 DNA replication and blocked the transition from early to late stage of infection. Valganciclovir directly inhibited Ad5 DNA polymerase in vitro, which may explain, at least in part, its mechanism of action. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are approved to treat infections by certain herpesviruses. Our results support the use of valganciclovir to treat disseminated adenovirus infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  5. Valganciclovir inhibits human adenovirus replication and pathology in permissive immunosuppressed female and male Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Karoly; Ying, Baoling; Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Balakrishnan, Lata; Sagartz, John E; Buller, Robert Mark L; Wold, William S M

    2015-03-23

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients can develop into serious and often deadly multi-organ disease. There are no drugs approved for adenovirus infections. Cidofovir (an analog of 2-deoxycytidine monophosphate) is used at times but it can be nephrotoxic and its efficacy has not been proven in clinical trials. Brincidofovir, a promising lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, is in clinical trials. Ganciclovir, an analog of 2-deoxyguanosine, has been employed occasionally but with unknown efficacy in the clinic. In this study, we evaluated valganciclovir against disseminated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) infection in our permissive immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. We administered valganciclovir prophylactically, beginning 12 h pre-infection or therapeutically starting at Day 1, 2, 3, or 4 post-infection. Valganciclovir significantly increased survival, reduced viral replication in the liver, and mitigated the pathology associated with Ad5 infection. In cultured cells, valganciclovir inhibited Ad5 DNA replication and blocked the transition from early to late stage of infection. Valganciclovir directly inhibited Ad5 DNA polymerase in vitro, which may explain, at least in part, its mechanism of action. Ganciclovir and valganciclovir are approved to treat infections by certain herpesviruses. Our results support the use of valganciclovir to treat disseminated adenovirus infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  6. Evidence for sequential and increasing activation of replication origins along replication timing gradients in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Arneodo, Alain; Goldar, Arach; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Audit, Benjamin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min) remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and provide a general

  7. A Tumor-stroma Targeted Oncolytic Adenovirus Replicated in Human Ovary Cancer Samples and Inhibited Growth of Disseminated Solid Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M Veronica; Rivera, Angel A; Viale, Diego L; Benedetti, Lorena; Cuneo, Nicasio; Kimball, Kristopher J; Wang, Minghui; Douglas, Joanne T; Zhu, Zeng B; Bravo, Alicia I; Gidekel, Manuel; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the tumor stroma in addition to the malignant cell compartment is of paramount importance to achieve complete tumor regression. In this work, we modified a previously designed tumor stroma-targeted conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) based on the SPARC promoter by introducing a mutated E1A unable to bind pRB and pseudotyped with a chimeric Ad5/3 fiber (Ad F512v1), and assessed its replication/lytic capacity in ovary cancer in vitro and in vivo. AdF512v1 was able to replicate in fresh samples obtained from patients: (i) with primary human ovary cancer; (ii) that underwent neoadjuvant treatment; (iii) with metastatic disease. In addition, we show that four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 5 × 1010 v.p. eliminated 50% of xenografted human ovary tumors disseminated in nude mice. Moreover, AdF512v1 replication in tumor models was enhanced 15–40-fold when the tumor contained a mix of malignant and SPARC-expressing stromal cells (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Contrary to the wild-type virus, AdF512v1 was unable to replicate in normal human ovary samples while the wild-type virus can replicate. This study provides evidence on the lytic capacity of this CRAd and highlights the importance of targeting the stromal tissue in addition to the malignant cell compartment to achieve tumor regression. PMID:22948673

  8. Quantum Field Theory and Unification in AdS5

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, Lisa; Randall, Lisa; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2001-01-01

    We consider gauge bosons in the bulk of AdS5 in a two-brane theory that addresses the hierarchy problem. We show such a theory can be consistent with gauge coupling unification at a high scale. We discuss subtleties in this calculation and show how to regulate consistently in a bounded AdS5 background. Our regularization is guided by the holographic dual of the calculation.

  9. Aminoguanidine delays the replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pei-chang; ZHANG Jian; ZHANG Zong-yu; TONG Tan-jun

    2007-01-01

    advanced glycation end products; comet assayBackground The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cell plays a very important role in replicative senescence. Aminoguanidine (AG) has potential antioxidant effects and decreases AGE levels. This study aimed to investigate its effect on replicative senescence in vitro.Methods The effects of aminoguanidine on morphology, replicative lifespan, cell growth and proliferation, AGEs, DNA damage, DNA repair ability and telomere length were observed in human fetal lung diploid fibroblasts (2BS).Results Aminoguanidine maintained the non-senescent phenotype of 2BS cells even at late population doubling (PD) and increased cumulative population doublings by at least 17-21 PDs. Aminoguanidine also improved the potentials of growth and proliferation of 2BS cells as detected by the MTT assay. The AGE levels of late PD cells grown from early PD in DMEM containing aminiguanidine decreased significantly compared with those of late PD control cells and were similar to those of young control cells. In addition, the cells pretreated with aminoguanidine had a significant reduction in DNA strand breaks when they were exposed to 200 μmol/L H2O2 for 5 minutes which indicated that the compound had a strong potential to protect genomic DNA against oxidative stress. And most of the cells exposed to 100 μmol/L H2O2 had much shorter comet tails and smaller tail areas after incubation with aminoguanidine-supplemented DMEM, which indicated that the compound strongly improved the DNA repair abilities of 2BS cells. Moreover, PD55 cells grown from PD28 in 2 mmol/L or 4 mmol/L aminoguanidine retain telomere lengths of 7.94 kb or 8.12 kb, which was 0.83 kb or 1.11kb longer than that of the control cells.Conclusion Aminoguanidine delays replicative senescence of 2BS cells and the senescence-delaying effect of aminoguanidine appear to be due to its many biological properties including its potential for proliferation

  10. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-06-15

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans.

  11. AdS_5 Black Holes with Fermionic Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Burrington, B A; Sabra, W A; Burrington, Benjamin A.; Liu, James T.

    2004-01-01

    The study of new BPS objects in AdS_5 has led to a deeper understanding of AdS/CFT. To help complete this picture, and to fully explore the consequences of the supersymmetry algebra, it is also important to obtain new solutions with bulk fermions turned on. In this paper we construct superpartners of the 1/2 BPS black hole in AdS_5 using a natural set of fermion zero modes. We demonstrate that these superpartners, carrying fermionic hair, have conserved charges differing from the original bosonic counterpart. To do so, we find the R-charge and dipole moment of the new system, as well as the mass and angular momentum, defined through the boundary stress tensor. The complete set of superpartners fits nicely into a chiral representation of AdS_5 supersymmetry, and the spinning solutions have the expected gyromagnetic ratio, g=1.

  12. Replication Kinetics of Coxsackievirus A16 in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Jin; Mingming Han; Lin Xu; Dong An; Wei Kong; Chunlai Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Coxsackievirns A16(CVA16),together with enterovirus type 71(EV71),is responsible for most cases of hand,foot and mouth disease(HFMD) worldwide.Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71,and the co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years.It is therefore important to further understand the virology,epidemlology,virus-host interactions and host pathogeuesis of CVA16.In this study,we describe the viral kinetics of CVAI6 in human rhabdomyosarcoma(RD) cells by analyzing the cytopathic effect(CPE),viral RNA replication,viral protein expression,viral RNA package and viral particle secretion in RD cells.We show that CVA16 appears to first attach,uncoat and enter into the host cell after adsorption for 1 h.Later on,CVA16 undergoes rapid replication from 3 to 6 h at MOI 1 and until 9 h at MOI 0.1.At MOI 0.1,CVA16 initiates a secondary infection as the virions were secreted before 9 h p.i.CPE was observed after 12 h p.i.,and viral antigen was first detected at 6 h p.i.at MOI 1 and at 9 h p.i.at MOI 0.1.Thus,our study provides important information for further investigation of CVA16 in order to better understand and ultimately control infections with this virus.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  14. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  15. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  16. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  17. AdS5 magnetized solutions in minimal gauged supergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Blázquez-Salcedo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We construct a generalization of the AdS charged rotating black holes with two equal magnitude angular momenta in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. In addition to the mass, electric charge and angular momentum, the new solutions possess an extra-parameter associated with a non-zero magnitude of the magnetic potential at infinity. In contrast with the known cases, these new black holes possess a non-trivial zero-horizon size limit which describes a one parameter family of spinning charged solitons. All configurations reported in this work approach asymptotically an AdS5 spacetime in global coordinates and are free of pathologies.

  18. Heavy quark potential from deformed AdS5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the heavy quark potential in some holographic QCD models. The calculation relies on a modified renormalization scheme mentioned in a previous work of Albacete et al. After studying the heavy quark potential in Pirner-Galow model and Andreev-Zakharov model, we extend the discussion to a general deformed AdS5 case. It is shown that the obtained potential is negative definite for all quark-antiquark separations, differs from that using the usual renormalization scheme.

  19. Ad5/48 hexon oncolytic virus expressing sTGFβRIIFc produces reduced hepatic and systemic toxicities and inhibits prostate cancer bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weidong; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Morgan, Melanie; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart; Guise, Theresa; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Brendler, Charles; Seth, Prem

    2014-08-01

    We are interested in developing oncolytic adenoviruses for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastases. A key limitation of Adenovirus 5 (Ad5) is that upon systemic administration, it produces major liver and systemic toxicities. To address this issue, a chimaeric Ad5/48 adenovirus mHAd.sTβRFc was created. Seven hypervariable regions of Ad5 hexon present in Ad5-based Ad.sTβRFc expressing soluble transforming growth factor beta receptor II-Fc fusion protein (sTGβRIIFc), were replaced by those of Ad48. mHAd.sTβRFc, like Ad.sTβRFc, was replication competent in the human PCa cells, and produced high levels of sTGβRIIFc expression. Compared to Ad.sTβRFc, the systemic delivery of mHAd.sTβRFc in nude mice resulted in much reduced systemic toxicity, and reduced liver sequestration. Ad.sTβRFc produced significant liver necrosis, and increases in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels, while mHAd.sTβRFc produced much reduced responses of these markers. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTβRFc or mHAd.sTβRFc (5 × 10(10) viral particles/mouse) in nude mice bearing PC-3-luc PCa bone metastases produced inhibition of bone metastases. Moreover, a larger dose of the mHAd.sTβRFc (4 × 10(11) viral particles /mouse) was also effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, mHAd.sTβRFc could be developed for the treatment of PCa bone metastases.

  20. The pathological consequences of impaired genome integrity in humans; disorders of the DNA replication machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and efficient replication of the human genome occurs in the context of an array of constitutional barriers, including regional topological constraints imposed by chromatin architecture and processes such as transcription, catenation of the helical polymer and spontaneously generated DNA lesions, including base modifications and strand breaks. DNA replication is fundamentally important for tissue development and homeostasis; differentiation programmes are intimately linked with stem cell division. Unsurprisingly, impairments of the DNA replication machinery can have catastrophic consequences for genome stability and cell division. Functional impacts on DNA replication and genome stability have long been known to play roles in malignant transformation through a variety of complex mechanisms, and significant further insights have been gained from studying model organisms in this context. Congenital hypomorphic defects in components of the DNA replication machinery have been and continue to be identified in humans. These disorders present with a wide range of clinical features. Indeed, in some instances, different mutations in the same gene underlie different clinical presentations. Understanding the origin and molecular basis of these features opens a window onto the range of developmental impacts of suboptimal DNA replication and genome instability in humans. Here, I will briefly overview the basic steps involved in DNA replication and the key concepts that have emerged from this area of research, before switching emphasis to the pathological consequences of defects within the DNA replication network; the human disorders. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Characterization of human chromosomal DNA sequences which replicate autonomously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, J F; Norbury, C J; Tuite, M F; Dobson, M J; Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1984-01-01

    We have characterised two restriction fragments, isolated from a "shotgun" collection of human DNA, which function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional domains of these fragments have been defined by subcloning and exonuclease (BAL 31) deletion analysis. Both fragments contain two spatially distinct domains. One is essential for high frequency transformation and is termed the Replication Sequence (RS) domain, the other, termed the Replication Enhancer (RE) domain, has no inherent replication competence but is essential for ensuring maximum function of the RS domain. The nucleotide sequence of these domains reveals several conserved sequences one of which is strikingly similar to the yeast ARS consensus sequence. PMID:6320114

  2. Open chromatin encoded in DNA sequence is the signature of 'master' replication origins in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Vaillant, Cédric; Chevereau, Guillaume; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-10-01

    For years, progress in elucidating the mechanisms underlying replication initiation and its coupling to transcriptional activities and to local chromatin structure has been hampered by the small number (approximately 30) of well-established origins in the human genome and more generally in mammalian genomes. Recent in silico studies of compositional strand asymmetries revealed a high level of organization of human genes around 1000 putative replication origins. Here, by comparing with recently experimentally identified replication origins, we provide further support that these putative origins are active in vivo. We show that regions approximately 300-kb wide surrounding most of these putative replication origins that replicate early in the S phase are hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated and present a significant enrichment in genomic energy barriers that impair nucleosome formation (nucleosome-free regions). This suggests that these putative replication origins are specified by an open chromatin structure favored by the DNA sequence. We discuss how this distinctive attribute makes these origins, further qualified as 'master' replication origins, priviledged loci for future research to decipher the human spatio-temporal replication program. Finally, we argue that these 'master' origins are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  3. Activation of GPR119 Stimulates Human β-Cell Replication and Neogenesis in Humanized Mice with Functional Human Islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansarullah; Free, Colette; Christopherson, Jenica; Chen, Quanhai; Gao, Jie; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Rabinovitch, Alex; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Using humanized mice with functional human islets, we investigated whether activating GPR119 by PSN632408, a small molecular agonist, can stimulate human β-cell regeneration in vivo. Human islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice with streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes. The recipient mice were treated with PSN632408 or vehicle and BrdU daily. Human islet graft function in the mice was evaluated by nonfasting glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance, and removal of the grafts. Immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, and BrdU or Ki67 was performed in islet grafts to evaluate α- and β-cell replication. Insulin and CK19 immunostaining was performed to evaluate β-cell neogenesis. Four weeks after human islet transplantation, 71% of PSN632408-treated mice achieved normoglycaemia compared with 24% of vehicle-treated mice. Also, oral glucose tolerance was significantly improved in the PSN632408-treated mice. PSN632408 treatment significantly increased both human α- and β-cell areas in islet grafts and stimulated α- and β-cell replication. In addition, β-cell neogenesis was induced from pancreatic duct cells in the islet grafts. Our results demonstrated that activation of GPR119 increases β-cell mass by stimulating human β-cell replication and neogenesis. Therefore, GPR119 activators may qualify as therapeutic agents to increase human β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. PMID:27413754

  4. Genome-wide studies highlight indirect links between human replication origins and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoret, Jean-Charles; Meisch, Françoise; Hassan-Zadeh, Vahideh; Luyten, Isabelle; Guillet, Claire; Duret, Laurent; Quesneville, Hadi; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-10-14

    To get insights into the regulation of replication initiation, we systematically mapped replication origins along 1% of the human genome in HeLa cells. We identified 283 origins, 10 times more than previously known. Origin density is strongly correlated with genomic landscapes, with clusters of closely spaced origins in GC-rich regions and no origins in large GC-poor regions. Origin sequences are evolutionarily conserved, and half of them map within or near CpG islands. Most of the origins overlap transcriptional regulatory elements, providing further evidence of a connection with gene regulation. Moreover, we identify c-JUN and c-FOS as important regulators of origin selection. Half of the identified replication initiation sites do not have an open chromatin configuration, showing the absence of a direct link with gene regulation. Replication timing analyses coupled with our origin mapping suggest that a relatively strict origin-timing program regulates the replication of the human genome.

  5. On jordanian deformations of AdS5 and supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Ben; van Tongeren, Stijn J.

    2016-10-01

    We consider various homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations of the {{AdS}}5× {{{S}}}5 superstring that can be obtained from the η-deformed superstring and related models by singular boosts. The jordanian deformations we obtain in this way behave similarly to the η-deformed model with regard to supergravity: T dualizing the classical sigma model it is possible to find corresponding solutions of supergravity, which, however, have dilatons that prevent T dualizing back. Hence the backgrounds of these jordanian deformations are not solutions of supergravity. Still, they do satisfy a set of recently found modified supergravity equations which implies that the corresponding sigma models are scale invariant. The abelian models that we obtain by singular boosts do directly correspond to solutions of supergravity. In addition to our main results we consider contraction limits of our main example, which do correspond to supergravity solutions.

  6. On jordanian deformations of AdS_5 and supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We consider various homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring that can be obtained from the eta-deformed superstring and related models by singular boosts. The jordanian deformations we obtain in this way behave similarly to the eta-deformed model with regard to supergravity: T dualizing the classical sigma model it is possible to find corresponding solutions of supergravity, which, however, have dilatons that prevent T dualizing back. Hence the backgrounds of these jordanian deformations are not solutions of supergravity. Still, they do satisfy a set of recently found modified supergravity equations which should imply that the corresponding sigma models are scale invariant. The abelian models that we obtain by singular boosts do directly correspond to solutions of supergravity. In addition to our main results we consider contraction limits of our main example, which also do not correspond to supergravity solutions.

  7. Pancreatic duct replication is increased with obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A E; Galasso, R; Matveyenko, A; Rizza, R A; Dry, S; Butler, P C

    2010-01-01

    In a high-fat-fed rat model of type 2 diabetes we noted increased exocrine duct replication. This is a predisposing factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both of which are more common in type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study reported here was to establish if obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication in humans. We obtained pancreas at autopsy from 45 humans, divided into four groups: lean (BMI obese (BMI >27 kg/m(2)); non-diabetic; and with type 2 diabetes. Pancreases were evaluated after immunostaining for the duct cell marker cytokeratin and Ki67 for replication. We show for the first time that both obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans are associated with increased pancreatic ductal replication. Specifically, we report that (1) replication of pancreatic duct cells is increased tenfold by obesity, and (2) lean subjects with type 2 diabetes demonstrate a fourfold increase in replication of pancreatic duct cells compared with their lean non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic duct cell replication is increased in humans in response to both obesity and type 2 diabetes, potentially providing a mechanism for the increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in those with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes.

  8. Restriction of human adenovirus replication in Chinese hamster cell lines and their hybrids with human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radna, R L; Foellmer, B; Feldman, L A; Francke, U; Ozer, H L

    1987-11-01

    We have found that the replication of human adenovirus (Ad2) is restricted in multiple Chinese hamster cell lines including CHO and V79. The major site of restriction involves differential accumulation of late viral proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without prior immunoprecipitation. Synthesis of fiber and penton base are markedly reduced, whereas others, such as the 100K polypeptide, are synthesized efficiently. This pattern of restriction is similar to that previously reported for Ad2 infection of several monkey cell lines; however, the restriction is more marked in the Chinese hamster cell lines. The restriction is most likely due to a deficient cellular function since stable cell hybrids between V79 or CHO and human cells are permissive for virus replication. By analysis of a series of hybrids with reduced numbers of human chromosomes, fiber synthesis was correlated with the presence of the short arm of human chromosome 3. More hybrids showed restoration of fiber synthesis than production of progeny virus, suggesting that more than one unlinked function is required for the latter.

  9. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof.

  10. The hexameric structure of the human mitochondrial replicative helicase Twinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Lázaro, Melisa; Cansız-Arda, Şirin; Gerhold, Joachim M; Rajala, Nina; Schmitz, Claus-A; Silva-Espiña, Cristina; Gil, David; Bernadó, Pau; Valle, Mikel; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Solà, Maria

    2015-04-30

    The mitochondrial replicative helicase Twinkle is involved in strand separation at the replication fork of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Twinkle malfunction is associated with rare diseases that include late onset mitochondrial myopathies, neuromuscular disorders and fatal infantile mtDNA depletion syndrome. We examined its 3D structure by electron microscopy (EM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and built the corresponding atomic models, which gave insight into the first molecular architecture of a full-length SF4 helicase that includes an N-terminal zinc-binding domain (ZBD), an intermediate RNA polymerase domain (RPD) and a RecA-like hexamerization C-terminal domain (CTD). The EM model of Twinkle reveals a hexameric two-layered ring comprising the ZBDs and RPDs in one layer and the CTDs in another. In the hexamer, contacts in trans with adjacent subunits occur between ZBDs and RPDs, and between RPDs and CTDs. The ZBDs show important structural heterogeneity. In solution, the scattering data are compatible with a mixture of extended hexa- and heptameric models in variable conformations. Overall, our structural data show a complex network of dynamic interactions that reconciles with the structural flexibility required for helicase activity.

  11. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  12. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  13. Regulation of human adenovirus replication by RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitenko, N. A.; SPEISEDER T.; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P. M.; TONAEVA KH. D.; S. A. Borzenok; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to...

  14. Efficient replication of the novel human betacoronavirus EMC on primary human epithelium highlights its zoonotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Muth, Doreen; Hamming, Ole J; Hartmann, Rune; Rodriguez, Regulo; Geffers, Robert; Fouchier, Ron A M; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A; Dijkman, Ronald; Thiel, Volker

    2013-02-19

    The recent emergence of a novel human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC) in the Middle East raised considerable concerns, as it is associated with severe acute pneumonia, renal failure, and fatal outcome and thus resembles the clinical presentation of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) observed in 2002 and 2003. Like SARS-CoV, HCoV-EMC is of zoonotic origin and closely related to bat coronaviruses. The human airway epithelium (HAE) represents the entry point and primary target tissue for respiratory viruses and is highly relevant for assessing the zoonotic potential of emerging respiratory viruses, such as HCoV-EMC. Here, we show that pseudostratified HAE cultures derived from different donors are highly permissive to HCoV-EMC infection, and by using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and RNAseq data, we experimentally determined the identity of seven HCoV-EMC subgenomic mRNAs. Although the HAE cells were readily responsive to type I and type III interferon (IFN), we observed neither a pronounced inflammatory cytokine nor any detectable IFN responses following HCoV-EMC, SARS-CoV, or HCoV-229E infection, suggesting that innate immune evasion mechanisms and putative IFN antagonists of HCoV-EMC are operational in the new host. Importantly, however, we demonstrate that both type I and type III IFN can efficiently reduce HCoV-EMC replication in HAE cultures, providing a possible treatment option in cases of suspected HCoV-EMC infection. IMPORTANCE A novel human coronavirus, HCoV-EMC, has recently been described to be associated with severe respiratory tract infection and fatalities, similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) observed during the 2002-2003 epidemic. Closely related coronaviruses replicate in bats, suggesting that, like SARS-CoV, HCoV-EMC is of zoonotic origin. Since the animal reservoir and circumstances of zoonotic transmission are yet elusive, it is critically important to assess potential species barriers of HCoV-EMC infection. An important first

  15. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  16. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  17. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  19. High-throughput mapping of origins of replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Isabelle; Palakodeti, Aparna; Jiang, Yanwen; Young, David J; Jiang, Nan; Fernald, Anthony A; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2007-08-01

    Mapping origins of replication has been challenging in higher eukaryotes. We have developed a rapid, genome-wide method to map origins of replication in asynchronous human cells by combining the nascent strand abundance assay with a highly tiled microarray platform, and we validated the technique by two independent assays. We applied this method to analyse the enrichment of nascent DNA in three 50-kb regions containing known origins of replication in the MYC, lamin B2 (LMNB2) and haemoglobin beta (HBB) genes, a 200-kb region containing the rare fragile site, FRAXA, and a 1,075-kb region on chromosome 22; we detected most of the known origins and also 28 new origins. Surprisingly, the 28 new origins were small in size and located predominantly within genes. Our study also showed a strong correlation between origin replication timing and chromatin acetylation.

  20. A Role of hIPI3 in DNA Replication Licensing in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Amin, Aftab; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ziyi; Jiang, Huadong; Liang, Lu; Shi, Linjing; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Ipi3p is required for DNA replication and cell viability in Sacharomyces cerevisiae. It is an essential component of the Rix1 complex (Rix1p/Ipi2p-Ipi1p-Ipi3p) that is required for the processing of 35S pre-rRNA in pre-60S ribosomal particles and for the initiation of DNA replication. The human IPI3 homolog is WDR18 (WD repeat domain 18), which shares significant homology with yIpi3p. Here we report that knockdown of hIPI3 resulted in substantial defects in the chromatin association of the MCM complex, DNA replication, cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Importantly, hIPI3 silencing did not result in a reduction of the protein level of hCDC6, hMCM7, or the ectopically expressed GFP protein, indicating that protein synthesis was not defective in the same time frame of the DNA replication and cell cycle defects. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of hIPI3 fluctuate in the cell cycle, with the highest levels from M phase to early G1 phase, similar to other pre-replicative (pre-RC) proteins. Moreover, hIPI3 interacts with other replication-initiation proteins, co-localizes with hMCM7 in the nucleus, and is important for the nuclear localization of hMCM7. We also found that hIPI3 preferentially binds to the origins of DNA replication including those at the c-Myc, Lamin-B2 and β-Globin loci. These results indicate that hIPI3 is involved in human DNA replication licensing independent of its role in ribosome biogenesis.

  1. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acety...

  2. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppres...

  3. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  4. Donor's age and replicative senescence favour the in-vitro mineralization potential of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; Di Bari, Caterina; Cocconi, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant mineralization of soft connective tissues (ectopic calcification) may occur as a frequent age-related complication. Still, it remains unclear the role of mesenchymal cell donor's age and of replicative senescence on ectopic calcification. Therefore, the ability of cells to deposit in-vitro hydroxyapatite crystals and the expression of progressive ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1), tissue non specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and osteopontin (OPN) have been evaluated in human dermal fibroblasts derived from neonatal (nHDF) and adult (aHDF) donors (ex-vivo ageing model) or at low and high cumulative population doublings (CPD) up to replicative senescence (in-vitro ageing model). This study demonstrates that: 1) replicative senescence favours hydroxyapatite formation in cultured fibroblasts; 2) donor's age acts as a major modulator of the mineralizing potential of HDF, since nHDF are less prone than aHDF to induce calcification; 3) donor's age and replicative senescence play in concert synergistically increasing the calcification process; 4) the ANKH+ENPP1/TNAP ratio, being crucial for pyrophosphate/inorganic phosphate balance, is greatly influenced by donor's age, as well as by replicative senescence, and regulates mineral deposition; 5) OPN is only modulated by replicative senescence.

  5. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  6. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  7. Inhibition of polyprotein processing and RNA replication of human rhinovirus by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate involves metal ions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenn, B.M.; Holzer, B.; Gaudernak, E.; Triendl, A.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Seipelt, J.

    2005-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an antiviral compound that was shown to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses (HRVs), poliovirus, and influenza virus. To elucidate the mechanism of PDTC, the effects on the individual steps of the infection cycle of HRV were investigated. PDTC did not i

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection and replication in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Lin; Qun Chen; Li-Ye Yang; Wen-Yu Li; Xi-Biao Cao; Jiao-Ren Wu; You-Peng Peng; Mo-Rui Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the infection and replication of hepatitis B virus(HBV)in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes(HFHs).METHODS:The human fetal hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium,HBV-positive serum was added into the medium to study the susceptibility of hepatocytes to HBV infection.The supernatant was collected for ELISA assay of HBsAg and HBeAg,and quantitative fluorescence PCR for HBV-DNA assay daily.Albumin and HBcAg,CK8 and CK18 expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry in cultured hepatocytes.Content of lactate dehydrogenate(LDH)was measured to find out the integrity of the cell membrane.RESULTS:A stable hepatocyte culture system was established.HBV could infect the hepatocytes and replicate,and HBcAg expression could be detected by immunohistochemistry in hepatocyte-like cells.HBV-DNA in the supernatant could be detected from d 2 to d 18 and HBsAg and HBeAg were positive on d 3-d 18 after HBV infection.HBV in medium increased from d 0 to d 6 and subsequently decreased as the cells were progressively loosing their hepatocyte phenotypes.CONCLUSION:HBV could infect human fetal hepatocytes and replicate.This in vitro model allowed a detailed Study on early events associated with human HBV entry into cells and subsequent replication.

  9. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-10-26

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase.

  10. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The V protein of canine distemper virus is required for virus replication in human epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Otsuki

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at position 267 of the V protein caused this growth defect. Analyses using H358 cells constitutively expressing the CDV V protein showed that the V protein with a cysteine, but not that with a tyrosine, at this position effectively blocked the interferon-stimulated signal transduction pathway, and supported virus replication of 007Lm in H358 cells. Thus, the V protein as well as the C protein appears to be functional and essential for CDV replication in human epithelial cells.

  12. A dual-targeting approach to inhibit Brucella abortus replication in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Daniel M.; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Shuman, Howard A.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and an etiological agent of the zoonotic disease known as brucellosis. Brucellosis can be challenging to treat with conventional antibiotic therapies and, in some cases, may develop into a debilitating and life-threatening chronic illness. We used multiple independent assays of in vitro metabolism and intracellular replication to screen a library of 480 known bioactive compounds for novel B. abortus anti-infectives. Eighteen non-cytotoxic compounds specifically inhibited B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche, which suggests these molecules function by targeting host cell processes. Twenty-six compounds inhibited B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture, thirteen of which are non-cytotoxic to human host cells and attenuate B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche. The most potent non-cytotoxic inhibitors of intracellular replication reduce B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture and perturb features of mammalian cellular biology including mitochondrial function and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. The efficacy of these molecules as inhibitors of B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche suggests “dual-target” compounds that coordinately perturb host and pathogen are promising candidates for development of improved therapeutics for intracellular infections. PMID:27767061

  13. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases.

  14. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Eric [Centre d' étude d’agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CPBS CNRS- UMR5236/UM1/UM2, Montpellier (France); Hamel, Rodolphe [Laboratoire Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution, Contrôle, UMR 5290 CNRS/IRD/UM1, Montpellier (France); Neyret, Aymeric [Centre d' étude d’agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CPBS CNRS- UMR5236/UM1/UM2, Montpellier (France); Ekchariyawat, Peeraya [Laboratoire Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution, Contrôle, UMR 5290 CNRS/IRD/UM1, Montpellier (France); Molès, Jean-Pierre [INSERM U1058, UM1, CHU Montpellier (France); Simmons, Graham [Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States); Chazal, Nathalie [Centre d' étude d’agents Pathogènes et Biotechnologies pour la Santé, CPBS CNRS- UMR5236/UM1/UM2, Montpellier (France); Desprès, Philippe [Unité Interactions Moléculaires Flavivirus-Hôtes, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); and others

    2015-02-15

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses. - Highlights: • Human keratinocytes support endocytosis of CHIKV and fusion of viral membranes. • CHIKV replication is blocked at a post entry step in these cells. • Infection upregulates type-I, –II and –III IFN genes expression. • Keratinocytes behave as immune sentinels against CHIKV.

  15. Determination of the minimal amount of Tat activity required for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, K; Koper, M; Berkhout, B

    1997-10-27

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a potent trans-activator of transcription from the viral LTR promoter. Previous mutagenesis studies have identified domains within Tat responsible for binding to its TAR RNA target and for transcriptional activation. The minimal Tat activation domain is composed of the N-terminal 48 residues, and mutational analyses identified a cluster of critical cysteines. The importance of four highly conserved aromatic amino acids within the activation domain has not been thoroughly investigated. We have systematically substituted these aromatic residues (Y26, F32, F38, Y47) of the HIV-1 LAI Tat protein with other aromatic residues (conservative mutation) or alanine (nonconservative mutation). The activity of the mutant Tat constructs was measured in different cell lines by transfection with a LTR-CAT reporter plasmid. The range of transcriptional activities measured for this set of Tat mutants allowed careful assessment of the level of Tat activity required for optimal viral replication. To test this, the mutant Tat genes were introduced into the pLAI infectious molecular clone and tested for their effect on virus replication in a T-cell line. We found that a twofold reduction in Tat activity already affects viral replication, and no virus replication was measured for Tat mutants with less than 15% activity. This strict correlation between Tat activity and viral replication demonstrates the importance of the Tat function to viral fitness. Interestingly, a less pronounced replication defect was observed in primary cell types. This finding may correlate with the frequent detection of proviruses with Tat-inactivating mutations in clinical samples. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  16. The human rhinovirus internal cis-acting replication element (cre) exhibits disparate properties among serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, K L

    2003-12-01

    It has been reported previously that the Human rhinovirus 14 (HRV-14) RNA genome contains a cis-acting replication element (cre) that maps to the capsid coding (P1) sequence [19]. Further characterization of the HRV-14 cre in the present study established that by moving the cre stem-loop structure downstream, adjacent to the 3'NCR, that its position is not critical for function. When the P1 sequences of two closely related serotypes of HRV-14 were analyzed for the presence of a cre, both HRV-3 and HRV-72 were found to contain similar sequence at the same positions as HRV-14. Moreover, sequence at these positions produced structures from MFOLD analysis that closely resembled the HRV-14 cre. It was also discovered that neither HRV serotypes 1a or 16 harbor replication elements that map to the P1 segments of their genomes. Computer and mutational analyses suggest that the cre in these latter HRV serotypes map instead to the 2A gene, as has been reported for HRV-2. The putative HRV-3 cre was determined to be unable to support replication when placed in an HRV-14 replicon background. Similarly, the previously identified HRV-2 cre was unable to support replication of the HRV-14 genome. This finding is in contrast to the cardiovirus cre, which has been shown to be functionally active between two members of its family, and further suggests that there is a close link between the evolution of the human rhinoviruses and the mechanisms of RNA replication.

  17. Mouse T-cells restrict replication of human immunodeficiency virus at the level of integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet Christine

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of an immunocompetent, genetically modified mouse model to study HIV-1 pathogenesis and to test antiviral strategies has been hampered by the fact that cells from native mice do not or only inefficiently support several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Upon HIV-1 infection, mouse T-cell lines fail to express viral proteins, but the underlying replication barrier has thus far not been unambiguously identified. Here, we performed a kinetic and quantitative assessment of consecutive steps in the early phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle in T-cells from mice and humans. Results Both T-cell lines and primary T-cells from mice harbor a severe post-entry defect that is independent of potential species-specTR transactivation. Reverse transcription occurred efficiently following VSV-G-mediated entry of virions into mouse T-cells, and abundant levels of 2-LTR circles indicated successful nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. To probe the next step in the retroviral replication cycle, i.e. the integration of HIV-1 into the host cell genome, we established and validated a nested real-time PCR to specifically quantify HIV-1 integrants exploiting highly repetitive mouse B1 elements. Importantly, we demonstrate that the frequency of integrant formation is diminished 18- to > 305-fold in mouse T-cell lines compared to a human counterpart, resulting in a largely abortive infection. Moreover, differences in transgene expression from residual vector integrants, the transcription off which is cyclin T1-independent, provided evidence for an additional, peri-integrational deficit in certain mouse T-cell lines. Conclusion In contrast to earlier reports, we find that mouse T-cells efficiently support early replication steps up to and including nuclear import, but restrict HIV-1 at the level of chromosomal integration.

  18. Dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2-7 are required for human cells to survive replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A; Blow, J Julian

    2007-12-15

    In late mitosis and early G1, Mcm2-7 complexes are loaded onto DNA to license replication origins for use in the upcoming S phase. However, the amount of Mcm2-7 loaded is in significant excess over the number of origins normally used. We show here that in human cells, excess chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 license dormant replication origins that do not fire during normal DNA replication, in part due to checkpoint activity. Dormant origins were activated within active replicon clusters if replication fork progression was inhibited, despite the activation of S-phase checkpoints. After lowering levels of chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 in human cells by RNA interference (RNAi), the use of dormant origins was suppressed in response to replicative stress. Although cells with lowered chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 replicated at normal rates, when challenged with replication inhibitors they had dramatically reduced rates of DNA synthesis and reduced viability. These results suggest that the use of dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2-7 is a new and physiologically important mechanism that cells utilize to maintain DNA replication rates under conditions of replicative stress. We propose that checkpoint kinase activity can preferentially suppress initiation within inactive replicon clusters, thereby directing new initiation events toward active clusters that are experiencing replication problems.

  19. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  20. Human herpesvirus 8-associated neoplasms: the roles of viral replication and antiviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey

    2011-08-01

    In this review, we highlight the importance of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) lytic replication and the potential for antiviral therapies to prevent or treat HHV-8-related neoplasms. Diseases caused by HHV-8 infection include Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which occur primarily in patients with HIV infection. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. MCD and PEL occur less commonly but, like Kaposi sarcoma, are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Like all herpesviruses, HHV-8 is capable of either latent or lytic infection of cells. Although HHV-8 infection of tumor cells is predominately latent, accumulating data point to the importance of both lytic phase viral gene products and production of infectious virus. Antiviral agents that target herpesvirus DNA synthesis, such as ganciclovir, inhibit HHV-8 lytic replication and can prevent Kaposi sarcoma. Several HIV protease inhibitors may interfere with tumor growth and angiogenesis, and one protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, directly inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro. Controlled trials are indicated to determine the clinical utility of antiviral suppression of HHV-8 replication, and identify the optimal antiretroviral regimens, for the prevention and treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  1. Replication timing of human telomeres is chromosome arm-specific, influenced by subtelomeric structures and connected to nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausica Arnoult

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms governing telomere replication in humans are still poorly understood. To fill this gap, we investigated the timing of replication of single telomeres in human cells. Using in situ hybridization techniques, we have found that specific telomeres have preferential time windows for replication during the S-phase and that these intervals do not depend upon telomere length and are largely conserved between homologous chromosomes and between individuals, even in the presence of large subtelomeric segmental polymorphisms. Importantly, we show that one copy of the 3.3 kb macrosatellite repeat D4Z4, present in the subtelomeric region of the late replicating 4q35 telomere, is sufficient to confer both a more peripheral localization and a later-replicating property to a de novo formed telomere. Also, the presence of beta-satellite repeats next to a newly created telomere is sufficient to delay its replication timing. Remarkably, several native, non-D4Z4-associated, late-replicating telomeres show a preferential localization toward the nuclear periphery, while several early-replicating telomeres are associated with the inner nuclear volume. We propose that, in humans, chromosome arm-specific subtelomeric sequences may influence both the spatial distribution of telomeres in the nucleus and their replication timing.

  2. "Replicable effects of primes on human behavior": Correction to Payne et al. (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Reports an error in "Replicable effects of primes on human behavior" by B. Keith Payne, Jazmin L. Brown-Iannuzzi and Chris Loersch (Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2016[Oct], Vol 145[10], 1269-1279). In the article, the graph in Figure 5 did not contain the asterisk mentioned in the figure caption, which was intended to indicate a statistically significant difference between bet and pass prime. The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-46925-002.) The effect of primes (i.e., incidental cues) on human behavior has become controversial. Early studies reported counterintuitive findings, suggesting that primes can shape a wide range of human behaviors. Recently, several studies failed to replicate some earlier priming results, raising doubts about the reliability of those effects. We present a within-subjects procedure for priming behavior, in which participants decide whether to bet or pass on each trial of a gambling game. We report 6 replications (N = 988) showing that primes consistently affected gambling decisions when the decision was uncertain. Decisions were influenced by primes presented visibly, with a warning to ignore the primes (Experiments 1 through 3) and with subliminally presented masked primes (Experiment 4). Using a process dissociation procedure, we found evidence that primes influenced responses through both automatic and controlled processes (Experiments 5 and 6). Results provide evidence that primes can reliably affect behavior, under at least some conditions, without intention. The findings suggest that the psychological question of whether behavior priming effects are real should be separated from methodological issues affecting how easily particular experimental designs will replicate. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. A Functional Role for ADAM10 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Replication

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    Rubin Donald H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene trap insertional mutagenesis was used as a high-throughput approach to discover cellular genes participating in viral infection by screening libraries of cells selected for survival from lytic infection with a variety of viruses. Cells harboring a disrupted ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 allele survived reovirus infection, and subsequently ADAM10 was shown by RNA interference to be important for replication of HIV-1. Results Silencing ADAM10 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA 48 hours before infection significantly inhibited HIV-1 replication in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in CD4+ cell lines. In agreement, ADAM10 over-expression significantly increased HIV-1 replication. ADAM10 down-regulation did not inhibit viral reverse transcription, indicating that viral entry and uncoating are also independent of ADAM10 expression. Integration of HIV-1 cDNA was reduced in ADAM10 down-regulated cells; however, concomitant 2-LTR circle formation was not detected, suggesting that HIV-1 does not enter the nucleus. Further, ADAM10 silencing inhibited downstream reporter gene expression and viral protein translation. Interestingly, we found that while the metalloprotease domain of ADAM10 is not required for HIV-1 replication, ADAM15 and γ-secretase (which proteolytically release the extracellular and intracellular domains of ADAM10 from the plasma membrane, respectively do support productive infection. Conclusions We propose that ADAM10 facilitates replication at the level of nuclear trafficking. Collectively, our data support a model whereby ADAM10 is cleaved by ADAM15 and γ-secretase and that the ADAM10 intracellular domain directly facilitates HIV-1 nuclear trafficking. Thus, ADAM10 represents a novel cellular target class for development of antiretroviral drugs.

  4. Bacterial Muramyl Dipeptide (MDP) Restricts Human Cytomegalovirus Replication via an IFN-β-Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Arun; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-02-02

    We recently reported that induction of NOD2 by human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resulted in virus inhibition and upregulation of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a bacterial cell wall component that activates NOD2, on HCMV replication and antiviral responses. HCMV infection of human foreskin fibroblasts induced NOD2, the downstream receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RIPK2), resulting in phosphorylation of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). MDP treatment following infection at low multiplicity (MOI = 0.1 PFU/cell) inhibited HCMV in a dose-dependent manner and further induced phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3 and expression of IFN-β. None of these effects of MDP were observed following infection at multiplicity of 1. In infected NOD2 knocked-down cells MDP did not induce IFN-β, irrespective of MOI. Treatment with MDP before infection also inhibited HCMV, an effect augmented with treatment duration. Treatment with an IFN-β receptor blocking antibody or knockdown of IFN-β significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of MDP on HCMV. MDP treatment before or after infection with herpesvirus 1 did not inhibit its replication. Summarized, NOD2 activation exerts anti-HCMV activities predominantly via IFN-β. Since MDP is a bacterial cell wall component, ongoing microbial exposure may influence HCMV replication.

  5. Persistent Amplification of DNA Damage Signal Involved in Replicative Senescence of Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts

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    Masatoshi Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX and ATM are the surrogate markers of DNA double strand breaks. We previously reported that the residual foci increased their size after irradiation, which amplifies DNA damage signals. Here, we addressed whether amplification of DNA damage signal is involved in replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Large phosphorylated H2AX foci (>1.5 μm diameter were specifically detected in presenescent cells. The frequency of cells with large foci was well correlated with that of cells positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Hypoxic cell culture condition extended replicative life span of normal human fibroblast, and we found that the formation of large foci delayed in those cells. Our immuno-FISH analysis revealed that large foci partially localized at telomeres in senescent cells. Importantly, large foci of phosphorylated H2AX were always colocalized with phosphorylated ATM foci. Furthermore, Ser15-phosphorylated p53 showed colocalization with the large foci. Since the treatment of senescent cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, suppressed p53 phosphorylation, it is suggested that amplification of DNA damage signaling sustains persistent activation of ATM-p53 pathway, which is essential for replicative senescence.

  6. Characteristics of HCV replication and expression in a cultured human liver carcinoma cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-qing; HAO Fei; MIN Feng; LIU Dao-jian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a cell culture system to support HCV long-term replication in vitro. Methods: A human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from chronic hepatitis C patient. Cells and supernatant of the culture medium were harvested at various time-phases during the culturing periods. The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supematant were examined with RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: It was found that the intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on the 2nd day after culture, and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least 3 months after culture. HCV NS3, CP10 antigens were expressed in the cells. The fresh cells could be infected with the supernatant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also observed. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the human liver carcinoma cell line7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also can support its long replication in vitro. This cell line with HCV infection in vitro can serve as a useful tool for the study of the mechanism of HCV infection and replication, the evaluation of antiviral agents, and the primary selection of neutralization assays and HCV vaccine development.

  7. Identification of host miRNAs that may limit human rhinovirus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor; Paky; Bondanese; Ana; Francisco-Garcia; Nicole; Bedke; Donna; E; Davies; Tilman; Sanchez-Elsner

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether the replication of human rhinovirus(HRV) is regulated by micro RNAs in human bronchial epithelial cells.METHODS: For the present study, the human cell line BEAS-2B(derived from normal human bronchial epithelial cells) was adopted. DICER knock-down, by si RNA transfection in BEAS-2B cells, was performed in order to inhibit micro RNA maturation globally. Alternatively, antisense oligonucleotides(anti-mi Rs) were transfectedto inhibit the activity of specific micro RNAs. Cells were infected with HRV-1B. Viral replication was assessed by measuring the genomic viral RNA by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction(RT-q PCR). Association between micro RNA-induced-silencing-complex and viral RNA was detected by Ago2 co-immunoprecipitation followed by RT-q PCR. Targetscan v.6 was used to predict micro RNA target sites on several HRV strains.RESULTS: Here, we show that micro RNAs affect replication of HRV-1B. DICER knock-down significantly reduced the expression of mature micro RNAs in a bronchial epithelial cell line(BEAS-2B) and in turn, increased the synthesis of HRV-1B RNA. Additionally, HRV-1B RNA co-immunoprecipitated with argonaute 2 protein, an important effector for micro RNA activity suggesting that micro RNAs bind to viral RNA during infection. In order to identify specific micro RNAs involved in this interaction, we employed bioinformatics analysis, and selected a group of micro RNAs that have been reported to be under-expressed in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells and were predicted to target different strains of rhinoviruses(HRV-1B,-16,-14,-27). Our results suggest that, out of this group of micro RNAs, mi R-128 and mi R-155 contribute to the innate defense against HRV-1B: transfection of specific anti-mi Rs increased viral replication, as anticipated in-silico.CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results suggest that pathological changes in micro RNA expression, as already reported for asthma or chronic obstructive

  8. Lycorine reduces mortality of human enterovirus 71-infected mice by inhibiting virus replication

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    Qin Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years old and this infection occasionally induces severe neurological complications. No vaccines or drugs are clinical available to control EV71 epidemics. In present study, we show that treatment with lycorine reduced the viral cytopathic effect (CPE on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells by inhibiting virus replication. Analysis of this inhibitory effect of lycorine on viral proteins synthesis suggests that lycorine blocks the elongation of the viral polyprotein during translation. Lycorine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of EV71 resulted in reduction of mortality, clinical scores and pathological changes in the muscles of mice, which were achieved through inhibition of viral replication. When mice were infected with a moderate dose of EV71, lycorine treatment was able to protect them from paralysis. Lycorine may be a potential drug candidate for the clinical treatment of EV71-infected patients.

  9. Inorganic replication of human hair and in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shuxia; HE Junhui

    2007-01-01

    The structure of hair was replicated via a sol-gel process using human hair as a template.When using silicate and tetraethoxysilane(TEOS)as the precursor,the cell structure of the hair cuticle was not well replicated.When using Ti(OnBu)4 as the precursor,however,titania microtubes were obtained,with nanopores in their walls and nanoporous platelets on meir outer surfaces,which were derived from cuticle cells on the hair surfaces.The nanopores in the microtubes acted as an effective nanoreactor for in situ synthesis of Au nanoparticles.The microchannels,nanopores and noble metal nanoparticles may provide a unique combination that would be attractive in applications such as catalysis,adsorption,and separation.

  10. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication

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    Molly L. Bristol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1, does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  11. Adenovirus replication as an in vitro probe for drug sensitivity in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, P G; Maynard, K R; Little, J H; McLeod, G R

    1986-04-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus 5 as an in vitro probe for chemosensitivity in short-term cultures of human tumors was evaluated using human melanoma cell lines and primary cultures of melanoma biopsies. A convenient immunoperoxidase method was developed for quantitating viral replication 2 days after infection. Two different approaches were explored: the host cell reactivation assay (HCR) using drug-treated virus; and the viral capacity assay using drug-treated cells. The HCR assay detected sensitivity to 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC) in Mer- (methyl excision repair deficient) cell lines as decreased ability of the cells to replicate MTIC-treated virus. This test should be applicable to DNA-damaging agents and repair-deficient tumors. Adenovirus replicated readily in nonproliferating primary cultures of melanoma biopsies; application of the HCR assays to this material identified one Mer- sample of 11 tested. Herpes viruses were not suitable for use in HCR because herpes simplex virus type 1 failed to distinguish Mer- from Mer+ melanoma cells; and nonproductive infection of MTIC-sensitive lymphoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus yielded an MTIC-resistant cell line. The second assay (viral capacity) involved determination of the inhibition of replication of untreated virus in treated cells. This approach correctly predicted sensitivity to hydroxyurea and deoxyadenosine in melanoma cell lines when compared with clonogenic survival assay. Viral capacity was also inhibited by cytosine arabinoside, fluorouracil, vincristine, adriamycin, 6-mercaptopurine and ionising radiation, and may therefore be useful for detecting sensitivity to a wide range of antitumor agents.

  12. The effect of the intra-S-phase checkpoint on origins of replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnani, Neerja; Dutta, Anindya

    2011-03-15

    Although many chemotherapy drugs activate the intra-S-phase checkpoint pathway to block S-phase progression, not much is known about how and where the intra-S-phase checkpoint regulates origins of replication in human chromosomes. A genomic analysis of replication in human cells in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) revealed that only the earliest origins fire, but the forks stall within 2 kb and neighboring clusters of dormant origins are activated. The initiation events are located near expressed genes with a preference for transcription start and end sites, and when they are located in intergenic regions they are located near regulatory factor-binding regions (RFBR). The activation of clustered neo-origins by HU suggests that there are many potential replication initiation sites in permissive parts of the genome, most of which are not used in a normal S phase. Consistent with this redundancy, we see multiple sites bound to MCM3 (representative of the helicase) in the region flanking three out of three origins studied in detail. Bypass of the intra-S-phase checkpoint by caffeine activates many new origins in mid- and late-replicating parts of the genome. The intra-S-phase checkpoint suppresses origin firing after the loading of Mcm10, but before the recruitment of Cdc45 and AND-1/CTF4; i.e., after helicase loading but before helicase activation and polymerase loading. Interestingly, Cdc45 recruitment upon checkpoint bypass was accompanied by the restoration of global Cdk2 kinase activity and decrease in both global and origin-bound histone H3 Lys 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), consistent with the suggestion that both of these factors are important for Cdc45 recruitment.

  13. Interferon-alpha mediates restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication in primary human macrophages at an early stage of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Cheney

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNα and β are induced directly in response to viral infection, resulting in an antiviral state for the cell. In vitro studies have shown that IFNα is a potent inhibitor of viral replication; however, its role in HIV-1 infection is incompletely understood. In this study we describe the ability of IFNα to restrict HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages in contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition to HIV-1 replication in cells pretreated with IFNα occurred at an early stage in the virus life cycle. Late viral events such as budding and subsequent rounds of infection were not affected by IFNα treatment. Analysis of early and late HIV-1 reverse transcripts and integrated proviral DNA confirmed an early post entry role for IFNα. First strand cDNA synthesis was slightly reduced but late and integrated products were severely depleted, suggesting that initiation or the nucleic acid intermediates of reverse transcription are targeted. The depletion of integrated provirus is disproportionally greater than that of viral cDNA synthesis suggesting the possibility of a least an additional later target. A role for either cellular protein APOBEC3G or tetherin in this IFNα mediated restriction has been excluded. Vpu, previously shown by others to rescue a viral budding restriction by tetherin, could not overcome this IFNα induced effect. Determining both the viral determinants and cellular proteins involved may lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Our results add to the understanding of HIV-1 restriction by IFNα.

  14. Relationships between resistance to cross-linking agents and glutathione metabolism, aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes and adenovirus replication in human tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, P G; Lean, J; Kable, E P; Favier, D; Khoo, S K; Hurst, T; Holmes, R S; Bellet, A J

    1990-12-15

    In a panel of 10 human tumour cell lines with no prior exposure to drugs in vitro, resistance to cisplatin correlated with resistance to the nitrogen mustard derivatives Asta Z-7557 (mafosfamide, an activated form of cyclophosphamide), melphalan and chlorambucil. Simultaneous treatment with DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine did not enhance the toxicity of cisplatin or Asta Z-7557, and no correlation was found between drug resistance and cellular levels of metallothioneins (as judged by sensitivity to cadmium chloride), glutathione (GSH), GSH reductase, GSH transferase, or gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. The two cell lines most resistant to Asta Z-7557 expressed aldehyde dehydrogenase cytosolic isozyme 1, found also in normal ovary, but not isozyme 3. Treatment of resistant cells with cisplatin or Asta Z-7557 inhibited cellular DNA synthesis and replication of adenovirus 5 to a lesser extent than in sensitive cells. The virus could be directly inactivated by both drugs prior to infection, subsequent replication being inhibited to the same extent in sensitive and resistant cells. In contrast to Asta Z-7557 and other DNA damaging agents, cisplatin was much more toxic to adenovirus (D37 0.022-0.048 microM) than to cells (D37 0.25-2.5 microM). The adenovirus 5 mutant Ad5ts125 having a G----A substitution was even more sensitive to cisplatin (D37 7-8 nM) than wild type virus and another mutant. Cisplatin was detoxified less by sonicated resistant resistant cells than sensitive cells, as judged by inactivation of Ad5ts125 added to the reaction mixture. It can be inferred that (i) the major differences in cellular resistance to cisplatin and Asta Z-7557 in the present material did not involve enhanced DNA repair or protection by metallothioneins or GSH, but were associated with the ability to continue cellular and viral DNA synthesis during treatment, (ii) resistance was not associated with less template damage, and (iii) the adenovirus genome may be a suitable probe for

  15. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  16. Human parvovirus B19: a mechanistic overview of infection and DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human pathogen that belongs to genus Erythroparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, which is composed of a group of small DNA viruses with a linear single-stranded DNA genome. B19V mainly infects human erythroid progenitor cells and causes mild to severe hematological disorders in patients. However, recent clinical studies indicate that B19V also infects nonerythroid lineage cells, such as myocardial endothelial cells, and may be associated with other disease outcomes. Several cell culture systems, including permissive and semipermissive erythroid lineage cells, nonpermissive human embryonic kidney 293 cells and recently reported myocardial endothelial cells, have been used to study the mechanisms underlying B19V infection and B19V DNA replication. This review aims to summarize recent advances in B19V studies with a focus on the mechanisms of B19V tropism specific to different cell types and the cellular pathways involved in B19V DNA replication including cellular signaling transduction and cell cycle arrest. PMID:26097496

  17. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  18. Merck Ad5艾滋病疫苗的研究进展%Progress in Research on Merck's Ad5-based AIDS Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强

    2011-01-01

    安全有效的疫苗是艾滋病防治的有效手段.上世纪90年代,Merck公司开始研发腺病毒5型(Ad5)载体T细胞概念艾滋病疫苗.2007年9月,在II b期临床观察中宣告失败,给疫苗学界带来沉重打击.本文就Merck Ad5艾滋病疫苗的构建、临床前期和I、Ⅱ期临床观察以及学术界对其失败原因的分析作一综述.%An effective vaccine remains the primary goal for a comprehensive strategy to curb the global HIV epidemic. Merck began to develop adenovirus type 5 ( Ad5 )-based AIDS vaccine in 1990s. In 2007, Merck and NIAID announced that a phase Ⅱb clinical trial of an Ad5-based AIDS vaccine was discontinued after an interim analysis revealed that the vaccine did not work. The vaccine construction, preclinical and clinical trials and causes of failure are reviewed in this paper.

  19. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  20. Monitoring of Biodistribution and Persistence of Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer Using Capsid-Incorporated mCherry and Expression of Human Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor P. Dmitriev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant limiting factor to the human clinical application of conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd-based virotherapy is the inability to noninvasively monitor these agents and their potential persistence. To address this issue, we proposed a novel imaging approach that combines transient expression of the human somatostatin receptor (SSTR subtype 2 reporter gene with genetic labeling of the viral capsid with mCherry fluorescent protein. To test this dual modality system, we constructed the Ad5/3Δ24pIXcherry/SSTR CRAd and validated its capacity to generate fluorescent and nuclear signals in vitro and following intratumoral injection. Analysis of 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE biodistribution in mice revealed reduced uptake in tumors injected with the imaging CRAd relative to the replication-incompetent, Ad-expressing SSTR2 but significantly greater uptake compared to the negative CRAd control. Optical imaging demonstrated relative correlation of fluorescent signal with virus replication as determined by viral genome quantification in tumors. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies demonstrated that we can visualize radioactive uptake in tumors injected with imaging CRAd and the trend for greater uptake by standardized uptake value analysis compared to control CRAd. In the aggregate, the plasticity of our dual imaging approach should provide the technical basis for monitoring CRAd biodistribution and persistence in preclinical studies while offering potential utility for a range of clinical applications.

  1. Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wati Durani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piper betle (PB is a traditional medicine that is widely used to treat different diseases around Asian region. The leaf extracts contain various bioactive compounds, which were reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In this study, the effect of PB aqueous extracts on replicative senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs was investigated by determining the expressions of senescence-associated genes using quantitative PCR. Our results showed that PB extracts at 0.4 mg/ml can improve cell proliferation of young (143%, presenescent (127.3%, and senescent (157.3% HDFs. Increased expressions of PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were observed in senescent HDFs compared to young and/or presenescent HDFs. Treatment with PB extracts modulates the transcriptional profile changes in senescent HDFs. By contrast, expressions of SOD1 increased, whereas GPX1, PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were decreased in PB-treated senescent HDFs compared to untreated senescent HDFs. In conclusion, this study indicates the modulation of PB extracts on senescence-associated genes expression of replicative senescent HDFs. Further studies warrant determining the mechanism of PB in modulating replicative senescence of HDFs through these signaling pathways.

  2. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  3. Scalable spheroid model of human hepatocytes for hepatitis C infection and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Nugraha, Bramasta; Triyatni, Miriam; Hart, Stefan; Sankuratri, Suryanarayana; Yu, Hanry

    2014-07-07

    Developing effective new drugs against hepatitis C (HCV) virus has been challenging due to the lack of appropriate small animal and in vitro models recapitulating the entire life cycle of the virus. Current in vitro models fail to recapitulate the complexity of human liver physiology. Here we present a method to study HCV infection and replication on spheroid cultures of Huh 7.5 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Spheroid cultures are constructed using a galactosylated cellulosic sponge with homogeneous macroporosity, enabling the formation and maintenance of uniformly sized spheroids. This facilitates easy handling of the tissue-engineered constructs and overcomes limitations inherent of traditional spheroid cultures. Spheroids formed in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge show enhanced hepatic functions in Huh 7.5 cells and maintain liver-specific functions of primary human hepatocytes for 2 weeks in culture. Establishment of apical and basolateral polarity along with the expression and localization of all HCV specific entry proteins allow for a 9-fold increase in viral entry in spheroid cultures over conventional monolayer cultures. Huh 7.5 cells cultured in the galactosylated cellulosic sponge also support replication of the HCV clone, JFH (Japanese fulminant hepatitis)-1 at higher levels than in monolayer cultures. The advantages of our system in maintaining liver-specific functions and allowing HCV infection together with its ease of handling make it suitable for the study of HCV biology in basic research and pharmaceutical R&D.

  4. The eIF4AIII RNA helicase is a critical determinant of human cytomegalovirus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziehr, Ben; Lenarcic, Erik; Cecil, Chad; Moorman, Nathaniel J., E-mail: nmoorman@med.unc.edu

    2016-02-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was recently shown to encode a large number of spliced mRNAs. While the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts has been extensively studied, the role of host mRNA export factors in HCMV mRNA trafficking remains poorly defined. We found that the eIF4AIII RNA helicase, a component of the exon junction complex, was necessary for efficient virus replication. Depletion of eIF4AIII limited viral DNA accumulation, export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus, and the production of progeny virus. However eIF4AIII was dispensable for the association of viral transcripts with ribosomes. We found that pateamine A, a natural compound that inhibits both eIF4AI/II and eIF4AIII, has potent antiviral activity and inhibits HCMV replication throughout the virus lytic cycle. Our results demonstrate that eIF4AIII is required for efficient HCMV replication, and suggest that eIF4A family helicases may be a new class of targets for the development of host-directed antiviral therapeutics. - Highlights: • The host eIF4AIII RNA helicase is required for efficient HCMV replication. • Depleting eIF4AIII inhibited the nuclear export of HCMV mRNAs. • HCMV mRNAs did not require eIF4AIII to associate with polyribosomes. • The eIF4A family helicases may be new targets for host-directed antiviral drugs.

  5. A SELEX-screened aptamer of human hepatitis B virus RNA encapsidation signal suppresses viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The specific interaction between hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase (P protein and the ε RNA stem-loop on pregenomic (pg RNA is crucial for viral replication. It triggers both pgRNA packaging and reverse transcription and thus represents an attractive antiviral target. RNA decoys mimicking ε in P protein binding but not supporting replication might represent novel HBV inhibitors. However, because generation of recombinant enzymatically active HBV polymerase is notoriously difficult, such decoys have as yet not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a SELEX approach, based on a new in vitro reconstitution system exploiting a recombinant truncated HBV P protein (miniP, to identify potential ε decoys in two large ε RNA pools with randomized upper stem. Selection of strongly P protein binding RNAs correlated with an unexpected strong enrichment of A residues. Two aptamers, S6 and S9, displayed particularly high affinity and specificity for miniP in vitro, yet did not support viral replication when part of a complete HBV genome. Introducing S9 RNA into transiently HBV producing HepG2 cells strongly suppressed pgRNA packaging and DNA synthesis, indicating the S9 RNA can indeed act as an ε decoy that competitively inhibits P protein binding to the authentic ε signal on pgRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the first successful identification of human HBV ε aptamers by an in vitro SELEX approach. Effective suppression of HBV replication by the S9 aptamer provides proof-of-principle for the ability of ε decoy RNAs to interfere with viral P-ε complex formation and suggests that S9-like RNAs may further be developed into useful therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  6. Human geminin promotes pre-RC formation and DNA replication by stabilizing CDT1 in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Melixetian, Marina; Zamponi, Raffaella

    2004-01-01

    -mediated degradation by inhibiting its ubiquitination. In particular, Geminin ensures basal levels of CDT1 during S phase and its accumulation during mitosis. Consistently, inhibition of Geminin synthesis during M phase leads to impairment of pre-RC formation and DNA replication during the following cell cycle....... Moreover, we show that inhibition of CDK1 during mitosis, and not Geminin depletion, is sufficient for premature formation of pre-RCs, indicating that CDK activity is the major mitotic inhibitor of licensing in human cells. Taken together with recent data from our laboratory, our results demonstrate...

  7. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus-1 enhances hepatitis C virus replication through interferon gamma-inducible protein-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Jing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV is associated with faster progression of liver disease and an increase in HCV persistence. However, the mechanism by which HIV-1 accelerates the progression of HCV liver disease remains unknown. Results HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. HCV RNA levels were higher in PBMCs of patients with HIV-1/HCV co-infection than in patients with HCV mono-infection. HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activated HCV replication in a time-dependent manner, and HIV-1 Tat induced IP-10 production. In addition, the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication was blocked by anti-IP-10 monoclonal antibody, demonstrating that the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication depends on IP-10. Taken together, these results suggest that HIV-1 Tat protein activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. Conclusions HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of IP-10 mRNA and replication of HCV RNA. Furthermore, both HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activate HCV replication. HIV-1 Tat activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. These results expand our understanding of HIV-1 in HCV replication and the mechanism involved in the regulation of HCV replication mediated by HIV-1 during co-infection.

  8. From the chromatin interaction network to the organization of the human genome into replication N/U-domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Rasha E.; Julienne, Hanna; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; dʼAubenton-Carafa, Yves; Goldar, Arach; Jensen, Pablo; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the mammalian nucleus is now being unraveled thanks to the recent development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) technologies. Here we report the results of a combined multiscale analysis of genome-wide mean replication timing and chromatin conformation data that reveal some intimate relationships between chromatin folding and human DNA replication. We previously described megabase replication N/U-domains as mammalian multiorigin replication units, and showed that their borders are ‘master’ replication initiation zones that likely initiate cascades of origin firing responsible for the stereotypic replication of these domains. Here, we demonstrate that replication N/U-domains correspond to the structural domains of self-interacting chromatin, and that their borders act as insulating regions both in high-throughput 3C (Hi-C) data and high-resolution 3C (4C) experiments. Further analyses of Hi-C data using a graph-theoretical approach reveal that N/U-domain borders are long-distance, interconnected hubs of the chromatin interaction network. Overall, these results and the observation that a well-defined ordering of chromatin states exists from N/U-domain borders to centers suggest that ‘master’ replication initiation zones are at the heart of a high-order, epigenetically controlled 3D organization of the human genome.

  9. Glucose stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in islets transplanted into NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, H. E.; Cyphert, T. J.; Pascoe, J. L.; Hollern, D. A.; Abraham, N.; Lundell, R. J.; Rosa, T.; Romano, L. C.; Zou, B.; O’Donnell, C. P.; Stewart, A. F.; Garcia-Ocaña, A.; Alonso, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis We determined whether hyperglycaemia stimulates human beta cell replication in vivo in an islet transplant model Methods Human islets were transplanted into streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Blood glucose was measured serially during a 2 week graft revascularisation period. Engrafted mice were then catheterised in the femoral artery and vein, and infused intravenously with BrdU for 4 days to label replicating beta cells. Mice with restored normoglycaemia were co-infused with either 0.9% (wt/vol.) saline or 50% (wt/vol.) glucose to generate glycaemic differences among grafts from the same donors. During infusions, blood glucose was measured daily. After infusion, human beta cell replication and apoptosis were measured in graft sections using immunofluorescence for insulin, and BrdU or TUNEL. Results Human islet grafts corrected diabetes in the majority of cases. Among grafts from the same donor, human beta cell proliferation doubled in those exposed to higher glucose relative to lower glucose. Across the entire cohort of grafts, higher blood glucose was strongly correlated with increased beta cell replication. Beta cell replication rates were unrelated to circulating human insulin levels or donor age, but tended to correlate with donor BMI. Beta cell TUNEL reactivity was not measurably increased in grafts exposed to elevated blood glucose. Conclusions/interpretation Glucose is a mitogenic stimulus for transplanted human beta cells in vivo. Investigating the underlying pathways may point to mechanisms capable of expanding human beta cell mass in vivo. PMID:20936253

  10. Hepatitis Delta Virus: Replication Strategy and Upcoming Therapeutic Options for a Neglected Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Florian A.; Urban, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The human Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) is unique among all viral pathogens. Encoding only one protein (Hepatitis Delta Antigen; HDAg) within its viroid-like self-complementary RNA, HDV constitutes the smallest known virus in the animal kingdom. To disseminate in its host, HDV depends on a helper virus, the human Hepatitis B virus (HBV), which provides the envelope proteins required for HDV assembly. HDV affects an estimated 15–20 million out of the 240 million chronic HBV-carriers and disperses unequally in disparate geographical regions of the world. The disease it causes (chronic Hepatitis D) presents as the most severe form of viral hepatitis, leading to accelerated progression of liver dysfunction including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and a high mortality rate. The lack of approved drugs interfering with specific steps of HDV replication poses a high burden for gaining insights into the molecular biology of the virus and, consequently, the development of specific novel medications that resiliently control HDV replication or, in the best case, functionally cure HDV infection or HBV/HDV co-infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HBV molecular biology, presents an update on novel cell culture and animal models to study the virus and provides updates on the clinical development of the three developmental drugs Lonafarnib, REP2139-Ca and Myrcludex B. PMID:28677645

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr Induces DNA Replication Stress In Vitro and In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Erik S.; Sherman, Michael P.; Blackett, Jana L.; Neidleman, Jason A.; Kreis, Christophe; Mundt, Pamela; Williams, Samuel A.; Warmerdam, Maria; Kahn, James; Hecht, Frederick M.; Grant, Robert M.; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Greene, Warner C.; Planelles, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) causes cell cycle arrest in G2. Vpr-expressing cells display the hallmarks of certain forms of DNA damage, specifically activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase, ATR. However, evidence that Vpr function is relevant in vivo or in the context of viral infection is still lacking. In the present study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 infection of primary, human CD4+ lymphocytes causes G2 arrest in a Vpr-dependent manner and that this response requires ATR, as shown by RNA interference. The event leading to ATR activation in CD4+ lymphocytes is the accumulation of replication protein A in nuclear foci, an indication that Vpr likely induces stalling of replication forks. Primary macrophages are refractory to ATR activation by Vpr, a finding that is consistent with the lack of detectable ATR, Rad17, and Chk1 protein expression in these nondividing cells. These observations begin to explain the remarkable resilience of macrophages to HIV-1-induced cytopathicity. To study the in vivo consequences of Vpr function, we isolated CD4+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals and interrogated the cell cycle status of anti-p24Gag-immunoreactive cells. We report that infected cells in vivo display an aberrant cell cycle profile whereby a majority of cells have a 4N DNA content, consistent with the onset of G2 arrest. PMID:16956949

  13. Primary Human Placental Trophoblasts are Permissive for Zika Virus (ZIKV) Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kjersti M.; Lahon, Anismrita; Suter, Melissa A.; Arya, Ravi P.; Seferovic, Maxim D.; Vogt, Megan B.; Hu, Min; Stossi, Fabio; Mancini, Michael A.; Harris, R. Alan; Kahr, Maike; Eppes, Catherine; Rac, Martha; Belfort, Michael A.; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, Daniel; Rico-Hesse, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne (Aedes genus) arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV has been predominately associated with a mild or asymptomatic dengue-like disease, its appearance in the Americas has been accompanied by a multi-fold increase in reported incidence of fetal microcephaly and brain malformations. The source and mode of vertical transmission from mother to fetus is presumptively transplacental, although a causal link explaining the interval delay between maternal symptoms and observed fetal malformations following infection has been missing. In this study, we show that primary human placental trophoblasts from non-exposed donors (n = 20) can be infected by primary passage ZIKV-FLR isolate, and uniquely allowed for ZIKV viral RNA replication when compared to dengue virus (DENV). Consistent with their being permissive for ZIKV infection, primary trophoblasts expressed multiple putative ZIKV cell entry receptors, and cellular function and differentiation were preserved. These findings suggest that ZIKV-FLR strain can replicate in human placental trophoblasts without host cell destruction, thereby serving as a likely permissive reservoir and portal of fetal transmission with risk of latent microcephaly and malformations. PMID:28128342

  14. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  15. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  16. Half BPS states in AdS_5 x Y^{p,q}

    CERN Document Server

    Gava, Edi; Milanesi, Giuseppe; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study a class of solutions of IIB Supergravity which are asymptotically AdS_5 x Y^{p,q}. They have an R x SO(4) x SU(2) x U(1) isometry and preserve half of the 8 supercharges of the background geometry. They are described by a set of second order differential equations that we have found and analysed in a previous paper, where we studied 1/8 BPS states in the maximally supersymmetric AdS_5 x S^5 background. These geometries correspond to certain chiral primary operators of the N=1 superconformal quiver theories, dual to IIB theory on AdS_5 x Y^{p,q}. We also show how to recover the AdS_5 x Y^{p,q} backgrounds by suitably doubling the number of preserved supersymmetries. We then solve the differential equations perturbatively in a large AdS_5 radius expansion, imposing asymptotic AdS_5 x Y^{p,q} boundary conditions. We compute the global baryonic and mesonic charges, including the R-charge. As for the computation of the mass, i.e. the conformal dimension D of the dual field theory operators, which is notor...

  17. MicroRNA-221 modulates RSV replication in human bronchial epithelium by targeting NGF expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar Othumpangat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early-life infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is associated with aberrant expression of the prototypical neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF and its cognate receptors in human bronchial epithelium. However, the chain of events leading to this outcome, and its functional implications for the progression of the viral infection, has not been elucidated. This study sought to test the hypothesis that RSV infection modulates neurotrophic pathways in human airways by silencing the expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs, and that this effect favors viral growth by interfering with programmed death of infected cells. METHODOLOGY: Human bronchial epithelial cells infected with green fluorescent protein-expressing RSV (rgRSV were screened with multiplex qPCR arrays, and miRNAs significantly affected by the virus were analyzed for homology with mRNAs encoding neurotrophic factors or receptors. Mimic sequences of selected miRNAs were transfected into non-infected bronchial cells to confirm the role of each of them in regulating neurotrophins expression at the gene and protein level, and to study their influence on cell cycle and viral replication. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RSV caused downregulation of 24 miRNAs and upregulation of 2 (p<0.01. Homology analysis of microarray data revealed that 6 of those miRNAs exhibited a high degree of complementarity to NGF and/or one of its cognate receptors TrKA and p75(NTR. Among the selected miRNAs, miR-221 was significantly downregulated by RSV and its transfection in bronchial epithelial cells maximally inhibited gene and protein expression of NGF and TrKA, increased apoptotic cell death, and reduced viral replication and infectivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that RSV upregulates the NGF-TrKA axis in human airways by silencing miR-221 expression, and this favors viral replication by interfering with the apoptotic death of infected cells. Consequently, the targeted delivery of

  18. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Isabel Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS, characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa. Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1 that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2 that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  19. Jak Inhibitors Modulate Production of Replication Competent Zika Virus in Human Hofbauer, Trophoblasts, and Neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gavegnano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika Virus (ZIKV is a Flavivirus that has been implicated in brain deformations, birth defects, and microcephaly of unborn fetuses and associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.  Mechanisms responsible for transmission of ZIKV across the placenta to the fetus are incompletely understood.  Herein, we define key events modulating infection in clinically relevant cells, including primary placental macrophages (human hofbauer cells; HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with previous findings, HC and trophoblasts are permissive to ZIKV infection. Decrease of interferon signaling by Jak 1/2 inhibition (via ruxolitinib significantly increased ZIKV replicationin HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblasts. Enhanced ZIKV production in ruxolitinib treated HC was associated with increased expression of HLA-DR and DC-SIGN. Nucleoside analogs blocked ruxolitinib-mediated production of extracellular virus. Although low-level ZIKV infection occurred in untreated HC and trophoblasts, the produced virus was incapable of infecting naïve Vero cells.  These deficient virions from untreated HC present “thin-coats” suggesting immature virion structure. Blocking Jak 1/2 signaling (with ruxolitinib restored replication competence as virions produced under these conditions confer CPE in naïve Vero cells.  These data demonstrate that Jak-STAT signaling directly impacts the ability of primary placental cells to produce replication competent virus and is a key gatekeeper in production of mature virions in clinically relevant cells including HC and trophoblasts. Design of targeted agents to prevent ZIKV replication in the placenta should consider Jak 1/2 signaling and the impact of its block on ZIKV infection and subsequent transmission to the fetus.

  20. Identification of replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ strain targets in a mouse model of human hepatocarcinoma xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria, E. (Enrique); Mora, M.I.; Carro-Roldan, E. (Elvira); M Molina; Fernandez-Irigoyen, J. (Joaquín); Marconi, P; Manservigi, R; Greco, A.; Epstein, A L; Prieto, J.; Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); Corrales, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies based on animal models have shown the advantages and potential of oncolytic viral therapy using HSV-1 -based replication-competent vectors in the treatment of liver tumors, but little is known about the cellular targets that are modulated during viral infection. In the present work, we have studied the effects of intratumoral injections of HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain in a murine model of human hepatoma xenografts. Viral replication was assessed for more than 1month, leading to a signi...

  1. Pharmacological manipulation of the akt signaling pathway regulates myxoma virus replication and tropism in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werden, Steven J; McFadden, Grant

    2010-04-01

    Viruses have evolved an assortment of mechanisms for regulating the Akt signaling pathway to establish a cellular environment more favorable for viral replication. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus that encodes many immunomodulatory factors, including an ankyrin repeat-containing host range protein termed M-T5 that functions to regulate tropism of MYXV for rabbit lymphocytes and certain human cancer cells. MYXV permissiveness in these human cancer cells is dependent upon the direct interaction between M-T5 and Akt, which has been shown to induce the kinase activity of Akt. In this study, an array of compounds that selectively manipulate Akt signaling was screened and we show that only a subset of Akt inhibitors significantly decreased the ability of MYXV to replicate in previously permissive human cancer cells. Furthermore, reduced viral replication efficiency was correlated with lower levels of phosphorylated Akt. In contrast, the PP2A-specific phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid promoted increased Akt kinase activation and rescued MYXV replication in human cancer cells that did not previously support viral replication. Finally, phosphorylation of Akt at residue Thr308 was shown to dictate the physical interaction between Akt and M-T5, which then leads to phosphorylation of Ser473 and permits productive MYXV replication in these human cancer cells. The results of this study further characterize the mechanism by which M-T5 exploits the Akt signaling cascade and affirms this interaction as a major tropism determinant that regulates the replication efficiency of MYXV in human cancer cells.

  2. Structural determinants of phenotypic diversity and replication rate of human prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri G Safar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infectious pathogen responsible for prion diseases is the misfolded, aggregated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. In contrast to recent progress in studies of laboratory rodent-adapted prions, current understanding of the molecular basis of human prion diseases and, especially, their vast phenotypic diversity is very limited. Here, we have purified proteinase resistant PrPSc aggregates from two major phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, determined their conformational stability and replication tempo in vitro, as well as characterized structural organization using recently emerged approaches based on hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. Our data clearly demonstrate that these phenotypically distant prions differ in a major way with regard to their structural organization, both at the level of the polypeptide backbone (as indicated by backbone amide H/D exchange data as well as the quaternary packing arrangements (as indicated by H/D exchange kinetics for histidine side chains. Furthermore, these data indicate that, in contrast to previous observations on yeast and some murine prion strains, the replication rate of sCJD prions is primarily determined not by conformational stability but by specific structural features that control the growth rate of prion protein aggregates.

  3. The citrus flavanone naringenin impairs dengue virus replication in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frabasile, Sandra; Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Kuczera, Diogo; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Verri, Waldiceu Aparecido; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Bordignon, Juliano

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant health problems in tropical and sub-tropical regions throughout the world. Nearly 390 million cases are reported each year. Although a vaccine was recently approved in certain countries, an anti-dengue virus drug is still needed. Fruits and vegetables may be sources of compounds with medicinal properties, such as flavonoids. This study demonstrates the anti-dengue virus activity of the citrus flavanone naringenin, a class of flavonoid. Naringenin prevented infection with four dengue virus serotypes in Huh7.5 cells. Additionally, experiments employing subgenomic RepDV-1 and RepDV-3 replicon systems confirmed the ability of naringenin to inhibit dengue virus replication. Antiviral activity was observed even when naringenin was used to treat Huh7.5 cells 24 h after dengue virus exposure. Finally, naringenin anti-dengue virus activity was demonstrated in primary human monocytes infected with dengue virus sertoype-4, supporting the potential use of naringenin to control dengue virus replication. In conclusion, naringenin is a suitable candidate molecule for the development of specific dengue virus treatments. PMID:28157234

  4. Transforming genes among three different oncogenic subgroups of human adenoviruses have similar replicative functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, J S; Chinnadurai, G

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the functional similarity of the transforming genes for replicative functions among three different subgroups of human adenoviruses (A, B, and C), using mutant complementation as an assay. A host range deletion mutant (dl201.2) of Ad2 (nononcogenic subgroup C) lacking about 5% of the viral DNA covering two early gene blocks (E1a and E1b) involved in cellular transformation was isolated and tested for its ability to replicate in nonpermissive KB cells in the presence of Ad7 (weakly oncogenic group B) or ad12 (highly oncogenic group A). The complementation of the mutant defect was demonstrated by cleaving the viral DNA extracted from mixed infected cells or the DNA extracted from purified virions from mixed infected cells with restriction endonuclease BamHI, which produces a different cleavage pattern with the DNA of each serotype. It was found that the defects in E1a plus E1b of dl201.2 could be complemented by Ad7 and Ad12, indicating that these genes in Ad2, Ad7, and Ad12 have similar functions during productive infection. Images PMID:7277578

  5. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  6. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  7. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by quercetin in human hepatoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhikui; Cheng; Ge; Sun; Wei; Guo; Yayun; Huang; Weihua; Sun; Fei; Zhao; Kanghong; Hu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection is one of the most serious and prevalent viral diseases in the world. Although several anti-HBV drugs have been used clinically, their side and adverse effects limit treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is necessary to identify novel potential anti-HBV agents. The flavonol quercetin has shown activity against some retroviruses, but its effect on HBV remains unclear. In the present study, quercetin was incubated with Hep G2.2.15 cells, as well as Hu H-7 cells transfected with an HBV plasmid. Quercetin was shown to significantly reduce Hepatitis B surface antigen(HBs Ag) and Hepatitis B e antigen(HBe Ag), secretion and HBV genomic DNA levels in both cell lines. In addition, co-incubation with lamivudine(3TC), entecavir(ETV), or adefovir(Ade) further enhanced the quercetin-induced inhibition of HBV replication. This inhibition was partially associated with decreased heat shock proteins and HBV transcription levels. The results indicate that quercetin inhibited HBV antigen secretion and genome replication in human hepatoma cell lines, which suggests that quercetin may be a potentially effective anti-HBV agent.

  8. Studying the replication history of human B lymphocytes by real-time quantitative (RQ)-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zelm, Menno C; Berkowska, Magdalena A; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2013-01-01

    The cells of the adaptive immune system, B and T lymphocytes, each generate a unique antigen receptor through V(D)J recombination of their immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell receptor (TCR) loci, respectively. Such rearrangements join coding elements to form a coding joint and delete the intervening DNA as circular excision products containing the signal joint. These excision circles are stable structures that cannot replicate and have no function in the cell. Since the coding joint in the genome is replicated with each cell division, the ratio between coding joints and signal joints in a population of B cells can be used as a measure for proliferation. This chapter describes a real-time quantitative (RQ-)PCR-based approach to quantify proliferation through calculating the ratio between coding joints and signal joints of the frequently occurring intronRSS-Kde rearrangements in the IGK light chain locus. The approach is useful to study basic B-cell biology as well as abnormal proliferation in human diseases.

  9. The Deacetylase SIRT1 Regulates the Replication Properties of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipon; Smith, Nathan; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2017-05-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) replicate their genomes in differentiating epithelium using the viral proteins E1 and E2 in association with host proteins. While the roles of E1 and E2 in this process are understood, the host factors involved and how they interact with and regulate E1-E2 are not. Our previous work identified the host replication and repair factor TopBP1 as an E2 partner protein essential for optimal E1-E2 replication and for the viral life cycle. The role of TopBP1 in host DNA replication is regulated by the class III deacetylase SIRT1; activation of the DNA damage response prevents SIRT1 deacetylation of TopBP1, resulting in a switch from DNA replication to repair functions for this protein and cell cycle arrest. Others have demonstrated an essential role for SIRT1 in regulation of the HPV31 life cycle; here, we report that SIRT1 can directly regulate HPV16 E1-E2-mediated DNA replication. SIRT1 is part of the E1-E2 DNA replication complex and is recruited to the viral origin of replication in an E1-E2-dependent manner. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to generate C33a clones with undetectable SIRT1 expression and lack of SIRT1 elevated E1-E2 DNA replication, in part due to increased acetylation and stabilization of the E2 protein in the absence of SIRT1. The results demonstrate that SIRT1 is a member of, and can regulate, the HPV16 replication complex. We discuss the potential role of this protein in the viral life cycle.IMPORTANCE HPV are causative agents in a number of human diseases, and currently only the symptoms of these diseases are treated. To identify novel therapeutic approaches for combating these diseases, the viral life cycle must be understood in more detail. This report demonstrates that a cellular enzyme, SIRT1, is part of the HPV16 DNA replication complex and is brought to the viral genome by the viral proteins E1 and E2. Using gene editing technology (CRISPR/Cas9), the SIRT1 gene was removed from cervical cancer cells. The consequence of this

  10. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  11. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology.

  12. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  13. Effects of antimetabolites on adenovirus replication in sensitive and resistant human melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk, P; Stowers, A; Parsons, P G

    1990-02-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) inhibited the replication of adenovirus (viral capacity) more in drug-sensitive than in resistant human melanoma cell lines. By comparison, inhibition of cellular DNA and RNA synthesis after short treatment periods (less than 48 hr) was not a good predictor of cellular sensitivity. MTX, an inhibitor of de novo nucleotide synthesis, was most effective when added to cells just before infection with virus and inhibited viral capacity at doses 10-1000-fold lower than those required to affect cell survival. The MTX-sensitive cell lines, members of a DNA repair deficient group sensitive also to killing by methylating agents (the Mer- phenotype), were not deficient in dihydrofolate reductase but exhibited DNA fragmentation after treatment with MTX for 48 hr. 6-TG and ara-C, inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine salvage, were most inhibitory to viral capacity when added greater than 36 hr before virus infection and were less effective than MTX (doses 5-7-fold and 4-24-fold higher than for cell survival respectively). No correlation was found between MTX sensitivity and sensitivity to 6-TG or ara-C. These results indicate that (i) inhibition of viral capacity is a more comprehensive test of antimetabolite cytotoxicity than inhibition of cellular DNA or RNA synthesis; (ii) the viral capacity assay correctly predicts cellular sensitivity to MTX, 6-TG and ara-C and therefore has potential for application to primary cultures of human tumours; and (iii) MTX-sensitive cell lines and adenovirus replication rely heavily on de novo nucleotide synthesis, which in Mer- cells appears to be linked to a DNA repair defect as yet undefined.

  14. In vitro inhibition of human cytomegalovirus replication by calcium trinatrium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinatl, J; Hoffmann, F; Cinatl, J; Weber, B; Scholz, M; Rabenau, H; Stieneker, F; Kabickova, H; Blasko, M; Doerr, H W

    1996-06-01

    Desferrioxamine (DFO) has been shown to inhibit human cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication in vitro. In the present study, we compared antiviral effects of DFO in human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells against several CMV strains with those of other chelators that interact with iron and other ions from different pools. DFO, a hydrophilic chelator, that may chelate both intracellular and extracellular ions inhibited production of CMV late antigen at 50% effective concentrations (EC50S) ranging from 6.2 to 8.9 microM. EC50S for calcium trinatrium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (CaDTPA) ranged from 6.1 to 9.9 microM. EC50S for 2,2'-bipyridine (BPD), a hydrophobic chelator, which diffuses into cell membranes ranged from 65 to 72 microM. Concentrations which inhibited BrdU incorporation into cellular DNA by 50% (IC50S) ranged from 8.2 to 12.0 microM (DFO), from 65 to 89 microM (BPD), and from 139 to 249 microM (CaDTPA). CaDTPA was the only chelator which completely inhibited production of infectious virus in HFF and vascular endothelial cells at concentrations which had no significant effects on cellular DNA synthesis and growth. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of Fe3+ in the culture medium of HFF cells completely eliminated antiviral effects of DFO while antiviral effects of CaDTPA and BPD were only moderately affected. Fe2+ and Cu2+ were stronger inhibitors of CaDTPA than Fe3+; however, Mn2+ and Zn2+ completely suppressed antiviral effects of CaDTPA. The results show that CaDTPA is a novel nontoxic inhibitor of CMV replication. The antiviral activity of CaDTPA is suppressed by metal ions with a decreasing potency order of Mn2+/Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Cu2+ > Fe3+.

  15. A note on vectorial AdS5/CFT4 duality for spin- j boundary theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jin-Beom; Joung, Euihun; Lal, Shailesh

    2016-12-01

    The vectorial holographic correspondences between higher-spin theories in AdS5 and free vector models on the boundary are extended to the cases where the latter is described by free massless spin- j field. The dual higher-spin theory in the bulk does not include gravity and can only be defined on rigid AdS5 background with S 4 boundary. We discuss various properties of these rather special higher-spin theories and calculate their one-loop free energies. We show that the result is proportional to the same quantity for spin- j doubleton treated as if it is a AdS5 field. Finally, we consider even more special case where the boundary theory itself is given by an infinite tower of massless higher-spin fields.

  16. AdS5×S(5) mirror model as a string sigma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; van Tongeren, Stijn J

    2014-12-31

    Doing a double Wick rotation in the world sheet theory of the light cone AdS5×S(5) superstring results in an inequivalent, so-called mirror theory that plays a central role in the field of integrability in the AdS-CFT correspondence. We show that this mirror theory can be interpreted as the light cone theory of a free string on a different background. This background is related to dS5×H(5) by a double T-duality, and has hidden supersymmetry. The geometry can also be extracted from an integrable deformation of the AdS5×S(5) sigma model, and we prove the observed mirror duality of these deformed models at the bosonic level as a byproduct. While we focus on AdS5×S(5), our results apply more generally.

  17. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  18. Sequence requirements for viral RNA replication and VPg uridylylation directed by the internal cis-acting replication element (cre) of human rhinovirus type 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Rijnbrand, Rene; McKnight, Kevin L; Wimmer, Eckard; Paul, Aniko; Martin, Annette; Lemon, Stanley M

    2002-08-01

    Until recently, the cis-acting signals required for replication of picornaviral RNAs were believed to be restricted to the 5' and 3' noncoding regions of the genome. However, an RNA stem-loop in the VP1-coding sequence of human rhinovirus type 14 (HRV-14) is essential for viral minus-strand RNA synthesis (K. L. McKnight and S. M. Lemon, RNA 4:1569-1584, 1998). The nucleotide sequence of the apical loop of this internal cis-acting replication element (cre) was critical for RNA synthesis, while secondary RNA structure, but not primary sequence, was shown to be important within the duplex stem. Similar cres have since been identified in other picornaviral genomes. These RNA segments appear to serve as template for the uridylylation of the genome-linked protein, VPg, providing the VPg-pUpU primer required for viral RNA transcription (A. V. Paul et al., J. Virol. 74:10359-10370, 2000). Here, we show that the minimal functional HRV-14 cre resides within a 33-nucleotide (nt) RNA segment that is predicted to form a simple stem-loop with a 14-nt loop sequence. An extensive mutational analysis involving every possible base substitution at each position within the loop segment defined the sequence that is required within this loop for efficient replication of subgenomic HRV-14 replicon RNAs. These results indicate that three consecutive adenosine residues (nt 2367 to 2369) within the 5' half of this loop are critically important for cre function and suggest that a common RNNNAARNNNNNNR loop motif exists among the cre sequences of enteroviruses and rhinoviruses. We found a direct, positive correlation between the capacity of mutated cres to support RNA replication and their ability to function as template in an in vitro VPg uridylylation reaction, suggesting that these functions are intimately linked. These data thus define more precisely the sequence and structural requirements of the HRV-14 cre and provide additional support for a model in which the role of the cre in RNA

  19. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M;

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related...... subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic...... repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability...

  20. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role...

  1. Supergravity on $AdS_{5/4}$ x Hopf Fibrations and Conformal Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, E

    2000-01-01

    We obtain three and four dimensional conformal field theories with less than maximal supersymmetry by using their supergravity duals. These supergravity theories are type II on $AdS_5 \\times CP^2$, IIA on $AdS_4 \\times CP^3$, IIB on $AdS_5 \\times S^5/Z_k$ and D=11 supergravity on $AdS_4 \\times S^7/Z_k$. They are obtained from the spherically compactified ten and eleven dimensional theories by either Hopf reduction or by winding the U(1) fiber over the base.

  2. The Tetrahedral Zamolodchikov Algebra and the {AdS_5× S^5} S-matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitev, Vladimir; Staudacher, Matthias; Tsuboi, Zengo

    2017-08-01

    The S-matrix of the {AdS_5× S^5} string theory is a tensor product of two centrally extended su{(2|2)\\ltimes R^2 S-matrices, each of which is related to the R-matrix of the Hubbard model. The R-matrix of the Hubbard model was first found by Shastry, who ingeniously exploited the fact that, for zero coupling, the Hubbard model can be decomposed into two XX models. In this article, we review and clarify this construction from the AdS/CFT perspective and investigate the implications this has for the {AdS_5× S^5} S-matrix.

  3. Supergravity on $AdS_{5/4} \\times$ Hopf Fibrations and Conformal Field Theories

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    We obtain three and four dimensional conformal field theories with less than maximal supersymmetry by using their supergravity duals. These supergravity theories are type II on $AdS_5 \\times CP^2$, IIA on $AdS_4 \\times CP^3$, IIB on $AdS_5 \\times S^5/Z_k$ and D=11 supergravity on $AdS_4 \\times S^7/Z_k$. They are obtained from the spherically compactified ten and eleven dimensional theories by either Hopf reduction or by winding the U(1) fiber over the base.

  4. The Tetrahedron Zamolodchikov Algebra and the AdS5 x S5 S-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Mitev, Vladimir; Tsuboi, Zengo

    2012-01-01

    The S-matrix of the AdS5 x S5 string theory is a tensor product of two centrally extended su(2|2) S-matrices, each of which is related to the R-matrix of the Hubbard model. The R-matrix of the Hubbard model was first found by Shastry, who ingeniously exploited the fact that, for zero coupling, the Hubbard model can be decomposed into two XX models. In this article, we review and clarify this construction from the AdS/CFT perspective and investigate the implications this has for the AdS5 x S5 S-matrix.

  5. Replicative bypass of abasic site in Escherichia coli and human cells: similarities and differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithri Weerasooriya

    Full Text Available Abasic [apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP] sites are the most common DNA damages, opposite which dAMP is frequently inserted ('A-rule' in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide insertion opposite the AP-site in eukaryotic cells depends on the assay system and the type of cells. Accordingly, a 'C-rule', 'A-rule', or the lack of specificity has been reported. DNA sequence context also modulates nucleotide insertion opposite AP-site. Herein, we have compared replication of tetrahydrofuran (Z, a stable analog of AP-site, in E. coli and human embryonic kidney 293T cells in two different sequences. The efficiency of translesion synthesis or viability of the AP-site construct in E. coli was less than 1%, but it was 7- to 8-fold higher in the GZGTC sequence than in the GTGZC sequence. The difference in viability increased even more in pol V-deficient strains. Targeted one-base deletions occurred in 63% frequency in the GZG and 68% frequency in GZC sequence, which dropped to 49% and 21%, respectively, upon induction of SOS. The full-length products with SOS primarily involved dAMP insertion opposite the AP-site, which occurred in 49% and 71% frequency, respectively, in the GZG and GZC sequence. dAMP insertion, largely carried out by pol V, was more efficient when the AP-site was a stronger replication block. In contrast to these results in E. coli, viability was 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher in human cells, and the 'A-rule' was more rigidly followed. The AP-site in the GZG and GZC sequences gave 76% and 89%, respectively, Z → T substitutions. In human cells, targeted one-base deletion was undetectable, and dTMP>dCMP were the next preferred nucleotides inserted opposite Z. siRNA knockdown of Rev1 or pol ζ established that both these polymerases are vital for AP-site bypass, as demonstrated by 36-67% reduction in bypass efficiency. However, neither polymerase was indispensable, suggesting roles of additional DNA polymerases in AP-site bypass in human cells.

  6. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  7. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  8. D-branes from Pure Spinor Superstring in AdS_5 x S^5 Background

    CERN Document Server

    Hanazawa, Sota

    2016-01-01

    We examine the surface term for the BRST transformation of the open pure spinor superstring in an AdS_5 x S^5 background. We find that the boundary condition to eliminate the surface term leads to a classification of possible configurations of 1/2 supersymmetric D-branes.

  9. Parametrization of cosets for AdS5xS5 superstring action

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, W

    2015-01-01

    A formulation recently proposed [arXiv:1506.07706] as an alternative to the usual coset PSU(2,2|4)/USp(2,2)USp(4) for the superspace geometry of the Type IIB superstring on an AdS5xS5 background is shown to be a particular parametrization of this coset. Standard methods can then be applied.

  10. S-matrix for strings on η-deformed AdS5 x S5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; Borsato, R.; Frolov, S.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the bosonic part of the superstring sigma model Lagrangian on η-deformed AdS5 x S5, and use it to compute the perturbative world-sheet scattering matrix of bosonic particles of the model. We then compare it with the large string tension limit of the q-deformed S-matrix and find exact ag

  11. Jordanian deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawaguchi, I.; Matsumoto, T.; Yoshida, K

    2014-01-01

    We consider Jordanian deformations of the AdS_5xS^5 superstring action. The deformations correspond to non-standard q-deformation. In particular, it is possible to perform partial deformations, for example, only for the S^5 part. Then the classical action and the Lax pair are constructed with a line

  12. S-matrix for strings on η-deformed AdS5 x S5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Borsato, Riccardo; Frolov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    We determine the bosonic part of the superstring sigma model Lagrangian on η-deformed AdS5 × S5, and use it to compute the perturbative world-sheet scattering matrix of bosonic particles of the model. We then compare it with the large string tension limit of the q-deformed S-matrix and find exact ag

  13. The spectral problem for strings on twisted AdS5 ×S5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, M.; van Tongeren, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the spectral problem for integrable superstrings on generically twisted AdS5 × S5, meaning all its orbifolds and TsT transformed versions. We explicitly give the asymptotic description of these theories through a twisted transfer matrix, and carefully match the geometric deformations with

  14. Simplified TBA equations of the AdS5 × S5 mirror model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; Frolov, S.

    2009-01-01

    We use the recently found integral representation for the dressing phase in the kinematic region of the mirror theory to simplify the TBA equations for the AdS5 × S5 mirror model. The resulting set of equations provides an efficient starting point for both analytic and numerical studies.

  15. S-matrix for strings on $\\eta$-deformed AdS5 x S5

    CERN Document Server

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Frolov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    We determine the bosonic part of the superstring sigma model Lagrangian on $\\eta$-deformed AdS5 x S5, and use it to compute the perturbative world-sheet scattering matrix of bosonic particles of the model. We then compare it with the large string tension limit of the q-deformed S-matrix and find exact agreement.

  16. Bound state transfer matrix for AdS5 × S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; de Leeuw, M.; Suzuki, R.; Torrielli, A.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the algebraic Bethe ansatz technique to compute the eigenvalues of the transfer matrix constructed from the general bound state S-matrix of the light-cone AdS5 × S5 superstring. This allows us to verify certain conjectures on the quantum characteristic function, and to extend them to the ge

  17. Yangian symmetry, S-Matrices and Bethe Ansats for the Ads5 x S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, M.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the relation between the recently derived bound state S-matrices for the AdS5× S5 superstring and Yangian symmetry. We will study the relation between this Yangian symmetry and the Bethe ansatz. In particular we can use it to derive the Bethe equations for bound states.

  18. The S-matrix of the AdS5xS5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, M.

    2010-01-01

    According to the gauge-string duality conjecture, the spectrum of scaling dimensions of composite gauge invariant operators of the planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions should be equivalent to the energy spectrum of superstrings propagating in the AdS5 x S5 space-time,

  19. D-branes from pure spinor superstring in AdS5 × S5 background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazawa, Sota; Sakaguchi, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    We examine the surface term for the BRST transformation of the open pure spinor superstring in an AdS5 ×S5 background. We find that the boundary condition to eliminate the surface term leads to a classification of possible configurations of 1/2 supersymmetric D-branes.

  20. The bound state S-matrix for AdS5×S5 superstring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; de Leeuw, M.; Torrielli, A.

    2009-01-01

    We determine the S-matrix that describes scattering of arbitrary bound states in the light-cone string theory in AdS5×S5. The corresponding construction relies on the Yangian symmetry and the superspace formalism for the bound state representations. The basic analytic structure supporting the S-matr

  1. String hypothesis for the AdS5 × S5 mirror

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arutyunov, G.E.; Frolov, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the states which contribute in the thermodynamic limit of the mirror theory, the latter is obtained from the light-cone gauge-fixed string theory in the AdS_5 x S^5 background by the double-Wick rotation. We analyze the Bethe-Yang equations for the mirror theory and formulate the string h

  2. The $AdS_{5}xS^(5)$ fermionic model

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Elcio

    2013-01-01

    We consider the $AdS_{5}xS^(5)$ integrable model. As it turns out, relying on well known arguments, we claim that the conformally invariant fermionic model is solvable, the resulting solution given in terms of two current algebras realizations.

  3. Inhibition of HCV replication by humanized-single domain transbodies to NS4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glab-Ampai, Kittirat; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Chulanetra, Monrat; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Tongtawe, Pongsri; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-08-05

    NS4B of hepatitis C virus (HCV) initiates membrane web formation, binds RNA and other HCV proteins for viral replication complex (RC) formation, hydrolyses NTP, and inhibits innate anti-viral immunity. Thus, NS4B is an attractive target of a novel anti-HCV agent. In this study, humanized-nanobodies (VHs/VHHs) that bound to recombinant NS4B were produced by means of phage display technology. The nanobodies were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, penetratin (PEN), for making them cell penetrable (become transbodies). Human hepatic (Huh7) cells transfected with HCV JFH1-RNA that were treated with transbodies from four Escherichia coli clones (PEN-VHH7, PEN-VHH9, PEN-VH33, and PEN-VH43) had significant reduction of HCV RNA amounts in their culture fluids and intracellularly when compared to the transfected cells treated with control transbody and medium alone. The results were supported by the HCV foci assay. The transbody treated-transfected cells also had upregulation of the studied innate cytokine genes, IRF3, IFNβ and IL-28b. The transbodies have high potential for testing further as a novel anti-HCV agent, either alone, adjunct of existing anti-HCV agents/remedies, or in combination with their cognates specific to other HCV enzymes/proteins.

  4. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Y Petit

    Full Text Available HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+ T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+CCR5(+ T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/- mice bearing human CD4(+CCR5(+ and CD8(+ T cells derived from CD34(+ progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+ T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+ T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+ T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+ T cells, showing that CD8(+ T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+ T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+ T cells.

  5. HIV Replication Is Not Controlled by CD8+ T Cells during the Acute Phase of the Infection in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Nicolas Y; Lambert-Niclot, Sidonie; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Garcia, Sylvie; Marodon, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    HIV replication follows a well-defined pattern during the acute phase of the infection in humans. After reaching a peak during the first few weeks after infection, viral replication resolves to a set-point thereafter. There are still uncertainties regarding the contribution of CD8(+) T cells in establishing this set-point. An alternative explanation, supported by in silico modeling, would imply that viral replication is limited by the number of available targets for infection, i.e. CD4(+)CCR5(+) T cells. Here, we used NOD.SCID.gc(-/-) mice bearing human CD4(+)CCR5(+) and CD8(+) T cells derived from CD34(+) progenitors to investigate the relative contribution of both in viral control after the peak. Using low dose of a CCR5-tropic HIV virus, we observed an increase in viral replication followed by "spontaneous" resolution of the peak, similar to humans. To rule out any possible role for CD8(+) T cells in viral control, we infected mice in which CD8(+) T cells had been removed by a depleting antibody. Globally, viral replication was not affected by the absence of CD8(+) T cells. Strikingly, resolution of the viral peak was equally observed in mice with or without CD8(+) T cells, showing that CD8(+) T cells were not involved in viral control in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, a marked and specific loss of CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T cells was observed in the spleen and in the bone marrow, but not in the blood, of infected animals. Our results strongly suggest that viral replication during the acute phase of the infection in humanized mice is mainly constrained by the number of available targets in lymphoid tissues rather than by CD8(+) T cells.

  6. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  7. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, J L

    1996-10-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the autocomplementary loop sequences. This hairpin motif with the palindromic loop sequence is referred to as the dimer initiation site (DIS), and the type of interaction is termed loop-loop kissing. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of the DIS motifs in different human and simian immunodeficiency viruses revealed conservation of the hairpin structure with a 6-mer palindrome in the loop, despite considerable sequence divergence. This finding supports the loop-loop kissing mechanism. To test this possibility, proviral genomes with mutations in the DIS palindrome were constructed. The appearance of infectious virus upon transfection into SupT1 T cells was delayed for the DIS mutants compared with that obtained by transfection of the wild-type provirus (pLAI), confirming that this RNA motif plays an important role in virus replication. Surprisingly, the RNA genome extracted from mutant virions was found to be fully dimeric and to have a normal thermal stability. These results indicate that the DIS motif is not essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA dimerization and suggest that DIS base pairing does not contribute to the stability of the mature RNA dimer. Instead, we measured a reduction in the amount of viral RNA encapsidated in the mutant virions, suggesting a role of the DIS motif in RNA packaging. This result correlates with the idea that the processes of RNA dimerization and packaging are intrinsically linked, and we propose that DIS pairing is a prerequisite for RNA packaging.

  8. Viral interactions in human lymphoid tissue: Human herpesvirus 7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 via CD4 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angélique; Vanpouille, Christophe; Origgi, Francesco; Malnati, Mauro S; Schols, Dominique; Lusso, Paolo; Margolis, Leonid B

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affects HIV-1 by upregulating RANTES, HHV-7 did not upregulate any CCR5-binding chemokine. Rather, the inhibition of R5 HIV-1 by HHV-7 was associated with a marked downregulation of CD4, the cellular receptor shared by HHV-7 and HIV-1. HHV-7-induced CD4 downregulation was sufficient for HIV-1 inhibition, since comparable downregulation of CD4 with cyclotriazadisulfonamide, a synthetic macrocycle that specifically modulates expression of CD4, resulted in the suppression of HIV infection similar to that seen in HHV-7-infected tissues. In contrast to R5 HIV-1, CXCR4-tropic (X4) HIV-1 was only minimally suppressed by HHV-7 coinfection. This selectivity in suppression of R5 and X4 HIV-1 is explained by a suppression of HHV-7 replication in X4- but not in R5-coinfected tissues. These results suggest that HIV-1 and HHV-7 may interfere in lymphoid tissue in vivo, thus potentially affecting the progression of HIV-1 disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction of HIV-1 with HHV-7, as well as with other pathogens that modulate HIV-1 replication, may provide new insights into HIV pathogenesis and lead to the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic strategies.

  9. Activation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 by human cytomegalovirus initiates innate immune responses and restricts virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kapoor

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease.

  10. Replicating DNA by cell factories: roles of central carbon metabolism and transcription in the control of DNA replication in microbes, and implications for understanding this process in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Sylwia; Glinkowska, Monika; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Nowicki, Dariusz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-05-29

    Precise regulation of DNA replication is necessary to ensure the inheritance of genetic features by daughter cells after each cell division. Therefore, determining how the regulatory processes operate to control DNA replication is crucial to our understanding and application to biotechnological processes. Contrary to early concepts of DNA replication, it appears that this process is operated by large, stationary nucleoprotein complexes, called replication factories, rather than by single enzymes trafficking along template molecules. Recent discoveries indicated that in bacterial cells two processes, central carbon metabolism (CCM) and transcription, significantly and specifically influence the control of DNA replication of various replicons. The impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the regulation of DNA synthesis is discussed in this review. It appears that CCM may influence DNA replication by either action of specific metabolites or moonlighting activities of some enzymes involved in this metabolic pathway. The role of transcription in the control of DNA replication may arise from either topological changes in nucleic acids which accompany RNA synthesis or direct interactions between replication and transcription machineries. Due to intriguing similarities between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory systems, possible implications of studies on regulation of microbial DNA replication on understanding such a process occurring in human cells are discussed.

  11. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Saberbaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05. In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  12. Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Nasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell-based therapy for cartilage or bone requires a large number of cells; serial passages of chondrocytes are, therefore, needed. However, fates of expanded chondrocytes from extra fingers remain unclarified. The chondrocytes from human epiphyses morphologically changed from small polygonal cells to bipolar elongated spindle cells and to large polygonal cells with degeneration at early passages. Gene of type II collagen was expressed in the cells only at a primary culture (Passage 0 and Passage 1 (P1 cells. The nodules by implantation of P0 to P8 cells were composed of cartilage and perichondrium. The cartilage consisted of chondrocytes with round nuclei and type II collagen-positive matrix, and the perichondrium consisted of spindle cells with type I collage-positive matrix. The cartilage and perichondrium developed to bone with marrow cavity through enchondral ossification. Chondrogenesis and osteogenesis by epiphyseal chondrocytes depended on replication number in culture. It is noteworthy to take population doubling level in correlation with pharmaceutical efficacy into consideration when we use chondrocytes for cell-based therapies.

  13. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberbaghi, Tayyebeh; Abbasian, Firouz; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Makpol, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV) on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P < 0.05). Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P < 0.05). Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  14. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L.; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP–chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization. PMID:24636987

  15. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP-chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization.

  16. Humanized-VH/VHH that inhibit HCV replication by interfering with the virus helicase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalaphol, Aninthita; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Poungpair, Ornnuthchar; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Sookrung, Nitat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2013-12-01

    NS3 helicase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the early and late phases of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The primary sequence and tertiary structure of this virus enzyme differ from human helicase to a certain extent; thus this virus protein has potential as a novel anti-HCV target. In this study, recombinant C-terminal NS3 protein of HCV genotype 3a with endowed helicase activity was produced and used as antigen by selecting VH/V(H)H display phage clones from an established humanized-camel single domain antibody library that bound specifically to HCV helicase. The VH/V(H)H derived from phage transfected Escherichia coli clones were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, i.e., penetratin (PEN). The cell penetrable VH/V(H)H (transbodies) could reduce the amounts of the HCV RNA released into the cell culture fluid and inside Huh7 cells infected with pJFH1 replicon with a greater effect on the former compared to the latter. Regions and residues of the helicase bound by the transbodies were determined by phage mimotope searching and multiple alignments as well as homology modeling and molecular docking. The epitope of one transbody (PEN-V(H)H9) encompassed residues 588RLKPTLHGPTPLLYRLGA605 of the domain 3 necessary for helicase activity while another transbody (PEN-VH59) interacted with the areas covering the phenylalanine loop and arginine clamp of the domain 2 which are important for the proper folding of the enzyme as well as nucleic acid substrate binding. Although the molecular mechanisms of the prototypic transbodies on NS3 helicase need further investigation, these transbodies have high potential as novel, safe and mutation tolerable anti-HCV agents.

  17. Ku80 binds to human replication origins prior to the assembly of the ORC complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, Sahar; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2005-05-31

    The Ku heterodimer, an abundant nuclear protein, binds DNA replication origins in a sequence-specific manner and promotes initiation. In this study, using HCT116 Ku80+/- haplo-insufficient and Orc2(delta/-) hypomorphic cells, the order of binding of Ku and the human origin recognition complex (HsORC) was determined. The nuclear expression of Ku80 was found to be decreased by 60% in Ku80+/- cells, while its general association with chromatin was decreased by 33%. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that the Ku heterodimer associates specifically with the human HsOrc-2, -3, -4, and -6 subunits. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, using cells synchronized to late G1, showed that the association of Ku80 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins in vivo was decreased by 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, in Ku80+/- cells. The association of HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 was consistently decreased in all three origins examined in Ku80+/- cells, while that of HsOrc-2 showed no significant variation, indicating that the HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 subunits bind to the origins after Ku80. In Orc2(delta/-) cells, the association of HsOrc-2 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins was decreased by 2.8-, 4.9-, and 2.8-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type HCT116 cells. Furthermore, nascent strand abundance at these three origins was decreased by 4.5-, 2.3-, and 2.6-fold in Orc2(delta/-) relative to HCT116 cells, respectively. Interestingly, the association of Ku80 with these origins was not affected in this hypomorphic cell line, indicating that Ku and HsOrc-2 bind to origins independently of each other.

  18. Supercoset construction of Yang-Baxter deformed AdS5×S5 backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hideki, Kyono

    2017-01-01

    We consider Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring theory. In previous works, the metric and B-field of some well-known string backgrounds concerned with the AdS/CFT correspondence have been obtained as deformations of AdS5×S5 based on r-matrices satisfying the homogeneous Yang-Baxter equation. Recently, the remaining fields including the Ramond-Ramond fields and the dilaton have been derived completely by performing the supercoset construction for abelian r-matrices. We also discuss the deformation with a non-abelian r-matrix and, in this case, the resulting background is not a solution of the type IIB supergravity. This article is based on the original paper [1].

  19. Hairy Black Holes in AdS$_5\\times S^5$

    CERN Document Server

    Markeviciute, J

    2016-01-01

    We use numerical methods to exhaustively study a novel family of hairy black hole solutions in AdS$_5$. These solutions can be uplifted to solutions of type IIB supergravity with AdS$_5\\times S^5$ asymptotics and are thus expected to play an important role in our understanding of AdS/CFT. We find an intricate phase diagram, with the aforementioned family of hairy black hole solutions branching from the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole at the onset of the superradiance instability. We analyse black holes with spherical and planar horizon topology and explain how they connect in the phase diagram. Finally, we detail their global and local thermodynamic stability across several ensembles.

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppress HIV-1 replication but contribute to HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were depleted prior to HIV-1 infection, the induction of IFN-I and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs were abolished during acute HIV-1 infection with either a highly pathogenic CCR5/CXCR4-dual tropic HIV-1 or a standard CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolate. Consistent with the anti-viral role of IFN-I, HIV-1 replication was significantly up-regulated in pDC-depleted mice. Interestingly, the cell death induced by the highly pathogenic HIV-1 isolate was severely reduced in pDC-depleted mice. During chronic HIV-1 infection, depletion of pDC also severely reduced the induction of IFN-I and ISGs, associated with elevated HIV-1 replication. Surprisingly, HIV-1 induced depletion of human immune cells including T cells in lymphoid organs, but not the blood, was reduced in spite of the increased viral replication. The increased cell number in lymphoid organs was associated with a reduced level of HIV-induced cell death in human leukocytes including CD4 T cells. We conclude that pDC play opposing roles in suppressing HIV-1 replication and in promoting HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis. These findings suggest that pDC-depletion and IFN-I blockade will provide novel strategies for treating those HIV-1 immune non-responsive patients with persistent immune activation despite effective anti-retrovirus treatment.

  1. Pre-potential in the $AdS_{5}\\,\\times\\,S^{5}$ Type IIB superspace

    CERN Document Server

    Poláček, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We found the pre-potential in the superspace with $AdS_{5}\\,\\times\\,S^{5}$ background. The pre-potential appears as part of the vielbeins, without derivatives. The space-cone gauge destroys the bulk Lorentz covariance, but still preserves boundary Lorentz covariance (projective superspace) $SO\\,(\\,3,\\,1\\,)\\,\\otimes\\,SO\\,(\\,4\\,)$, i.e. symmetries of boundary CFT are manifest.

  2. Quantum Consistency of the Superstring in AdS_5 x S^5 Background

    CERN Document Server

    Berkovits, N

    2005-01-01

    Using arguments based on BRST cohomology, the pure spinor formalism for the superstring in an AdS_5 x S^5 background is proven to be BRST invariant and conformally invariant at the quantum level to all orders in perturbation theory. Cohomology arguments are also used to prove the existence of an infinite set of non-local BRST-invariant charges at the quantum level.

  3. Higher spin contributions to holographic fluid dynamics in AdS5/CFT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjin; Polyakov, Dimitri

    2014-08-01

    We calculate the graviton's β function in the AdS string-theoretic sigma model, perturbed by vertex operators for Vasiliev's higher spin gauge fields in AdS5. The result is given by βmn=Rmn+4Tmn(g ,u) (with the AdS radius set to 1 and the graviton polarized along the AdS5 boundary), with the matter stress-energy tensor given by that of conformal holographic fluid in d =4, evaluated at the temperature given by T =1/π. The stress-energy tensor is given by Tmn=gmn+4umun+∑NTmn(N) where u is the vector excitation satisfying u2=-1 and N is the order of the gradient expansion in the dissipative part of the tensor. We calculate the contributions up to N =2. The higher spin excitations contribute to the β function, ensuring the overall Weyl covariance of the matter stress tensor. We conjecture that the structure of gradient expansion in d =4 conformal hydrodynamics at higher orders is controlled by the higher spin operator algebra in AdS5.

  4. Moduli Space of IIB Superstring and SUYM in AdS5 × S5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. In part Ⅰ, we interpret the hidden symmetry of the moduli space of IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 in terms of the chiral embedding in AdS5, which turns out to be the CP3 conformal affine Toda model. We review how the position μ of poles in the Riemann-Hilbert formulation of dressing transformation and the value of loop parameter μ in the vertex operator of affine algebra determine the moduli space of the soliton solutions, which describes the moduli space of the Green-Schwarz superstring. We show also how this affine SU(4) symmetry affinizes the con formal symmetry in the twistor space, and how a soliton string corresponds to a Robinson congruence with twist and dilation spin coefficients μ of twistor. In part H, by extending the dressing symmetric action of IIB string in AdS5 × S5 to the Da brane, we find a gauged WZW action of Higgs Yang-Mills field including the 2-cocycle of axially anomaly. The left and right twistor structures of left and right α-planes glue into an ambitwistor. The symmetry group of Nahm equations is centrally extended to an affine group, thus we explain why the spectral curve is given by affine Toda.

  5. Non-split and split deformations of AdS_5

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The eta-deformation of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring depends on a non-split r matrix for the superalgebra psu(2,2|4). Much of the investigation into this model has considered one particular choice, however there are a number of inequivalent alternatives. This is also true for the bosonic sector of the theory with su(2,2), the isometry algebra of AdS_5, admitting one split and three non-split r matrices. In this article we explore these r matrices and the corresponding geometries. We investigate their contraction limits, comment on supergravity backgrounds and demonstrate their relation to gauged-WZW deformations. We then extend the three non-split cases to AdS_5 x S^5 and compute four separate bosonic two-particle tree-level S-matrices based on inequivalent BMN-type light-cone gauges. The resulting S-matrices, while different, are related by momentum-dependent one-particle changes of basis.

  6. Development of replication-deficient adenovirus malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingdale, Michael R; Sedegah, Martha; Limbach, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Malaria remains a major threat to endemic populations and travelers, including military personnel to these areas. A malaria vaccine is feasible, as radiation attenuated sporozoites induce nearly 100% efficacy. Areas covered: This review covers current malaria clinical trials using adenoviruses and pre-clinical research. Heterologous prime-boost regimens, including replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 (HuAd5) carrying malaria antigens, are efficacious. However, efficacy appears to be adversely affected by pre-existing anti-HuAd5 antibodies. Current strategies focus on replacing HuAd5 with rarer human adenoviruses or adenoviruses isolated from non-human primates (NHPs). The chimpanzee adenovirus ChAd63 is undergoing evaluation in clinical trials including infants in malaria-endemic areas. Key antigens have been identified and are being used alone, in combination, or with protein subunit vaccines. Gorilla adenoviruses carrying malaria antigens are also currently being evaluated in preclinical models. These replacement adenovirus vectors will be successfully used to develop vaccines against malaria, as well as other infectious diseases. Expert commentary: Simplified prime-boost single shot regimens, dry-coated live vector vaccines or silicon microneedle arrays could be developed for malaria or other vaccines. Replacement vectors with similar or superior immunogenicity have rapidly advanced, and several are now in extensive Phase 2 and beyond in malaria as well as other diseases, notably Ebola.

  7. DNA Damage Signaling Is Required for Replication of Human Bocavirus 1 DNA in Dividing HEK293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuefeng; Xu, Peng; Zou, Wei; Shen, Weiran; Peng, Jianxin; Liu, Kaiyu; Engelhardt, John F; Yan, Ziying; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), an emerging human-pathogenic respiratory virus, is a member of the genus Bocaparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family. In human airway epithelium air-liquid interface (HAE-ALI) cultures, HBoV1 infection initiates a DNA damage response (DDR), activating all three phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PI3KKs): ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs. In this context, activation of PI3KKs is a requirement for amplification of the HBoV1 genome (X. Deng, Z. Yan, F. Cheng, J. F. Engelhardt, and J. Qiu, PLoS Pathog, 12:e1005399, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005399), and HBoV1 replicates only in terminally differentiated, nondividing cells. This report builds on the previous discovery that the replication of HBoV1 DNA can also occur in dividing HEK293 cells, demonstrating that such replication is likewise dependent on a DDR. Transfection of HEK293 cells with the duplex DNA genome of HBoV1 induces hallmarks of DDR, including phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA32, as well as activation of all three PI3KKs. The large viral nonstructural protein NS1 is sufficient to induce the DDR and the activation of the three PI3KKs. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of any one of the PI3KKs significantly decreases both the replication of HBoV1 DNA and the downstream production of progeny virions. The DDR induced by the HBoV1 NS1 protein does not cause obvious damage to cellular DNA or arrest of the cell cycle. Notably, key DNA replication factors and major DNA repair DNA polymerases (polymerase η [Pol η] and polymerase κ [Pol κ]) are recruited to the viral DNA replication centers and facilitate HBoV1 DNA replication. Our study provides the first evidence of the DDR-dependent parvovirus DNA replication that occurs in dividing cells and is independent of cell cycle arrest.

  8. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing.

  9. Interaction of the retinoblastoma protein with Orc1 and its recruitment to human origins of DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Mendoza-Maldonado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma protein (Rb is a crucial regulator of cell cycle progression by binding with E2F transcription factor and repressing the expression of a variety of genes required for the G1-S phase transition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Rb and E2F1 directly participate in the control of initiation of DNA replication in human HeLa, U2OS and T98G cells by specifically binding to origins of DNA replication in a cell cycle regulated manner. We show that, both in vitro and inside the cells, the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex (Orc1 specifically binds hypo-phosphorylated Rb and that this interaction is competitive with the binding of Rb to E2F1. The displacement of Rb-bound Orc1 by E2F1 at origins of DNA replication marks the progression of the G1 phase of the cell cycle toward the G1-S border. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The participation of Rb and E2F1 in the formation of the multiprotein complex that binds origins of DNA replication in mammalian cells appears to represent an effective mechanism to couple the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression to the activation of DNA replication.

  10. Effect of ethanol on innate antiviral pathways and HCV replication in human liver cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Nelson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcohol abuse reduces response rates to IFN therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. To model the molecular mechanisms behind this phenotype, we characterized the effects of ethanol on Jak-Stat and MAPK pathways in Huh7 human hepatoma cells, in HCV replicon cell lines, and in primary human hepatocytes. High physiological concentrations of acute ethanol activated the Jak-Stat and p38 MAPK pathways and inhibited HCV replication in several independent replicon cell lines. Moreover, acute ethanol induced Stat1 serine phosphorylation, which was partially mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway. In contrast, when combined with exogenously applied IFN-α, ethanol inhibited the antiviral actions of IFN against HCV replication, involving inhibition of IFN-induced Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. These effects of alcohol occurred independently of i alcohol metabolism via ADH and CYP2E1, and ii cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of ethanol. In this model system, ethanol directly perturbs the Jak-Stat pathway, and HCV replication. Infection with Hepatitis C virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. With a propensity to progress to chronic infection, approximately 70% of patients with chronic viremia develop histological evidence of chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The situation is even more dire for patients who abuse ethanol, where the risk of developing end stage liver disease is significantly higher as compared to HCV patients who do not drink 12. Recombinant interferon alpha (IFN-α therapy produces sustained responses (ie clearance of viremia in 8–12% of patients with chronic hepatitis C 3. Significant improvements in response rates can be achieved with IFN plus ribavirin combination 456 and pegylated IFN plus ribavirin 78 therapies. However, over 50% of chronically infected patients still do not clear viremia. Moreover, HCV-infected patients who abuse

  11. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important causes of human encephalitis cases, which result in a high mortality ratio and neurological sequelae after recovery. Understanding the mechanism of neuropathogenicity in these viral infections is important for the development of specific antiviral therapy. Here, we focused on human-derived neuronal and glial cells to understand the cellular responses against WNV and JEV infection. It was demonstrated that early IFN-β induction regulated virus replication in glioblastoma tbl98G cells, whereas delayed IFN-β induction resulted in efficient virus replication in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, the concealing of viral dsRNA in the intracellular membrane resulted in the delayed IFN response in SK-N-SH cells. These results, which showed different IFN responses between human neuronal and glial cells after WNV or JEV infection, are expected to contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for neuropathology in these viral infections.

  12. Differential replication of avian influenza H9N2 viruses in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiris Malik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avian influenza virus H9N2 isolates cause a mild influenza-like illness in humans. However, the pathogenesis of the H9N2 subtypes in human remains to be investigated. Using a human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 as host, we found that A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2/G1, which shares 6 viral "internal genes" with the lethal A/Hong Kong/156/97 (H5N1/97 virus, replicates efficiently whereas other H9N2 viruses, A/Duck/Hong Kong/Y280/97 (H9N2/Y280 and A/Chicken/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2/G9, replicate poorly. Interestingly, we found that there is a difference in the translation of viral protein but not in the infectivity or transcription of viral genes of these H9N2 viruses in the infected cells. This difference may possibly be explained by H9N2/G1 being more efficient on viral protein production in specific cell types. These findings suggest that the H9N2/G1 virus like its counterpart H5N1/97 may be better adapted to the human host and replicates efficiently in human alveolar epithelial cells.

  13. Selection and mapping of replication origins from a 500-kb region of the human X chromosome and their relationship to gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivella, S; Palermo, B; Pelizon, C; Sala, C; Arrigo, G; Toniolo, D

    1999-11-15

    In higher eukaryotes the mechanism controlling initiation of DNA replication remains largely unknown. New technologies are needed to shed light on how DNA replication initiates along the genome in specific regions. To identify the human DNA sequence requirements for initiation of replication, we developed a new method that allows selection of replication origins starting from large genomic regions of human DNA. We repeatedly isolated 15 new putative replication origins (PROs) from a human DNA region of 500 kb in which 17 genes have previously been characterized. Fine-mapping of these PROs showed that DNA replication can initiate at many specific points along actively transcribed DNA in the cell lines used for our selection. In conclusion, in this paper we describe a new method to identify PROs that suggests that the availability of initiation sites is dependent on the transcriptional state of the DNA.

  14. Comparison of replication-competent, first generation, and helper-dependent adenoviral vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available All studies using human serotype 5 Adenovirus (Ad vectors must address two major obstacles: safety and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies. Helper-Dependent (HD Ads have been proposed as alternative vectors for gene therapy and vaccine development because they have an improved safety profile. To evaluate the potential of HD-Ad vaccines, we compared replication-competent (RC, first-generation (FG and HD vectors for their ability to induce immune responses in mice. We show that RC-Ad5 and HD-Ad5 vectors generate stronger immune responses than FG-Ad5 vectors. HD-Ad5 vectors gave lower side effects than RC or FG-Ad, producing lower levels of tissue damage and anti-Ad T cell responses. Also, HD vectors have the benefit of being packaged by all subgroup C serotype helper viruses. We found that HD serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6 induce anti-HIV responses equivalently. By using these HD serotypes in heterologous succession we showed that HD vectors can be used to significantly boost anti-HIV immune responses in mice and in FG-Ad5-immune macaques. Since HD vectors have been show to have an increased safety profile, do not possess any Ad genes, can be packaged by multiple serotype helper viruses, and elicit strong anti-HIV immune responses, they warrant further investigation as alternatives to FG vectors as gene-based vaccines.

  15. The human Bloom syndrome gene suppresses the DNA replication and repair defects of yeast dna2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-07-08

    Bloom syndrome is a disorder of profound and early cancer predisposition in which cells become hypermutable, exhibit high frequency of sister chromatid exchanges, and show increased micronuclei. BLM, the gene mutated in Bloom syndrome, has been cloned previously, and the BLM protein is a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Many lines of evidence suggest that BLM is involved either directly in DNA replication or in surveillance during DNA replication, but its specific roles remain unknown. Here we show that hBLM can suppress both the temperature-sensitive growth defect and the DNA damage sensitivity of the yeast DNA replication mutant dna2-1. The dna2-1 mutant is defective in a helicase-nuclease that is required either to coordinate with the crucial Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sc) FEN1 nuclease in Okazaki fragment maturation or to compensate for scFEN1 when its activity is impaired. We show that human BLM interacts with both scDna2 and scFEN1 by using coimmunoprecipitation from yeast extracts, suggesting that human BLM participates in the same steps of DNA replication or repair as scFEN1 and scDna2.

  16. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  17. Mechanisms by which Human Cells Bypass Damaged Bases during DNA Replication after Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Cleaver

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication of damaged DNA involves cascading mechanisms of increasing complexity but decreasing accuracy. The most accurate mechanism uses low-fidelity DNA polymerases, Pol H and Pol I, which have active sites sufficiently large to accommodate a pyrimidine dimer. Replicative bypass of DNA damage by these polymerases produces an accurately replicated, newly synthesized strand. Pol H negative cells (XP-V cell lines either adopt a proposed secondary bypass mechanism or a recombinational mode. The mechanism of the secondary bypass is unclear, but a number of experiments suggests roles for excision repair to remove damage ahead of replication forks, hRad6/18 proteolysis to clear the blocked forks, and the Rad17-RFC and 9-1-1 complexes to establish a new replication apparatus. This alternative pathway requires functional p53. In Pol H negative cells in which p53 is also inactive, the arrested fork fragments into DNA double strand breaks. Foci containing PCNA, Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, and gamma-H2Ax can then be detected, along with chromosomal rearrangement and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges. The recruitment of recombination components to the arrested forks represents the ultimate failure of replication machinery to relieve the arrested state and bypass the damage. The resulting chromosomal instability in surviving cells will contribute to malignant transformation.

  18. Effect of Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 on the replication of Penicillium marneffei in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Xi, Liyan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ma, Tuan; Ren, Hong; Ji, Guangquan

    2015-05-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a human pathogen which persists in macrophages and threatens the immunocompromised patients. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we evaluated the effect of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) on cytokine expression, phagosomal maturation and multiplication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-stimulated human macrophages. P. marneffei induced the rapid phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Using the specific inhibitor of JNK1/2 (SP600125), we found that the inhibition of JNK1/2 suppressed P. marneffei-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-10 production. In addition, the presence of SP600125 increased phagosomal acidification and maturation and decreased intracellular replication. These data suggest that JNK1/2 may play an important role in promoting the replication of P. marneffei. Our findings further indicate that the pathogen through the JNK1/2 pathway may attenuate the immune response and macrophage antifungal function.

  19. Effect of CD4 gene expression on adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, J; Shi, L; Ginsberg, H S

    1994-11-01

    The gene encoding the CD4 receptor was introduced into KB cells to establish the KBT4 cell line, a cell line susceptible to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Adenovirus replication was found to be significantly less in these cells than in the parental KB cells. Similar decreased adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication occurred in HeLaT4 cells compared with the original HeLa cells. The presence of CD4 did not alter the cell surface population of KB cell adenovirus receptors, since viral adsorption was similar in the two cell lines. Moreover, addition of soluble CD4 did not reduce viral replication in either KB or KBT4 infected cells. Uncoating of viral DNA was also unchanged in KBT4 cells compared with the parental KB cells. In contrast, migration to or entrance of viral DNA into nuclei and synthesis of early viral RNAs was delayed and reduced in KBT4 cells. These effects were more pronounced for Ad7 than for Ad5. The yields of infectious viruses were the same in both cell lines, however, after transfection of naked viral DNAs to initiate infection. These results imply that the expression of the CD4 gene in KBT4 cells interfered with passage of uncoated virus across endosomal vesicles and/or transfer of uncoated core viral DNA into the nucleus.

  20. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  1. Spatio-temporal regulation of the human licensing factor Cdc6 in replication and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza M; Berg, Elke; Christensen, Morten O; Linka, René M; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Boege, Fritz; Mielke, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, the thousands of replication origins of mammalian genomes must only initiate replication once per cell cycle. This is achieved by a strict temporal separation of ongoing replication in S phase, and the formation of pre-replicative complexes in the preceding G1 phase, which "licenses" each origin competent for replication. The contribution of the loading factor Cdc6 to the timing of the licensing process remained however elusive due to seemingly contradictory findings concerning stabilization, degradation and nuclear export of Cdc6. Using fluorescently tagged Cdc6 (Cdc6-YFP) expressed in living cycling cells, we demonstrate here that Cdc6-YFP is stable and chromatin-associated during mitosis and G1 phase. It undergoes rapid proteasomal degradation during S phase initiation followed by active export to the cytosol during S and G2 phases. Biochemical fractionation abolishes this nuclear exclusion, causing aberrant chromatin association of Cdc6-YFP and, likely, endogenous Cdc6, too. In addition, we demonstrate association of Cdc6 with centrosomes in late G2 and during mitosis. These results show that multiple Cdc6-regulatory mechanisms coexist but are tightly controlled in a cell cycle-specific manner.

  2. Ts...sT transformation on $AdS_{5}\\times S^{5}$ background

    CERN Document Server

    Rashkov, R C; Yang, Y; Yang, Yi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider a simple generalization of Lunin and Maldacena procedure of generating new string backgrounds based on TsT-transformations. We study multi-shift $Ts... sT$ transformations applied to backgrounds with at least two U(1) isometries. We prove that the string currents in any two backgrounds related by Ts...sT-transformations are equal. Performing this procedure to the $AdS_{5}\\times S^{5}$ we find a new background and study some properties of the semiclassical strings.

  3. Quantum fluctuations of rotating strings in AdS_5 \\times S^5

    CERN Document Server

    Fuji, H; Fuji, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    We discuss quantum fluctuations of a class of rotating strings in AdS_5 \\times S^5. In particular, we develop a systematic method to compute the one-loop sigma-model effective actions in closed forms as expansions for large spins. As examples, we explicitly evaluate the leading terms for the constant radii strings in the SO(6) sector with two equal spins, the SU(2) sector, and the SL(2) sector. We also obtain the leading quantum corrections to the space-time energy for these sectors.

  4. The kinematical AdS5 × S5 Neumann coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajnok, Zoltan; Janik, Romuald A.

    2016-02-01

    For the case of two particles a solution of the string field theory vertex axioms can be factorized into a standard form factor and a kinematical piece which includes the dependence on the size of the third string. In this paper we construct an exact solution of the kinematical axioms for AdS 5 × S 5 which includes all order wrapping corrections w.r.t. the size of the third string. This solution is expressed in terms of elliptic Gamma functions and ordinary elliptic functions. The solution is valid at any coupling and we analyze its weak coupling, pp-wave and large L limit.

  5. Symmetry operators of Killing spinors and superalgebras in AdS_5

    OpenAIRE

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    We construct the first-order symmetry operators of Killing spinor equation in terms of odd Killing-Yano forms. By modifying the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of Killing-Yano forms, we show that the symmetry operators of Killing spinors close into an algebra in AdS_5 spacetime. Since the symmetry operator algebra of Killing spinors corresponds to a Jacobi identity in extended Killing superalgebras, we investigate the possible extensions of Killing superalgebras to include higher-degree Killing-Ya...

  6. In vitro CRISPR-Cas9-mediated efficient Ad5 vector modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lichun; Gong, Mengmeng; Zhang, Pumin

    2016-05-27

    The CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system has been widely used in multiple cells and organisms. Here we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 based in vitro large DNA vector editing system, using the Ad5-based vector as an example. We demonstrate use of this system to generate targeted mutations, in-frame gene deletion, and gene replacement. This in vitro CRISPR editing system exhibits high efficiency and accuracy. We believe this system can be applied in a variety of experimental settings.

  7. Inhibition of cellular activation of retroviral replication by CD8+ T cells derived from non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J D; Bednarik, D P; Folks, T M; Jehuda-Cohen, T; Villinger, F; Sell, K W; Ansari, A A

    1993-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells inhibit viral replication at the level of cellular activation, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line (FEc1) from a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-seropositive sooty mangabey monkey was transfected with a human CD4 gene and shown to be replication-competent for HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Utilizing a dual-chamber culture system, it was found that inhibition of viral replication can be mediated by a soluble factor. The FEc1 cell line was transiently transfected with an LTR-driven CAT reporter gene. It was found that autologous CD8+ T cells markedly inhibited CAT activity. Furthermore, co-transfection of the FEc1 cell line with an LTR-driven tat plasmid and LTR-CAT was able to quantitatively mitigate the suppressive effect. Thus, this inhibition appears to be directed at cellular mechanisms of viral transcription. Control transfections with an LTR-driven CAT plasmid with a mutation at the NFkB binding site yielded no CAT activity, suggesting that most viral replication as measured by CAT activity is dependent, to a large extent, upon cellularly derived NFkB binding proteins.

  8. Human coronavirus EMC does not require the SARS-coronavirus receptor and maintains broad replicative capability in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcel A; Raj, V Stalin; Muth, Doreen; Meyer, Benjamin; Kallies, Stephan; Smits, Saskia L; Wollny, Robert; Bestebroer, Theo M; Specht, Sabine; Suliman, Tasnim; Zimmermann, Katrin; Binger, Tabea; Eckerle, Isabella; Tschapka, Marco; Zaki, Ali M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Haagmans, Bart L; Drosten, Christian

    2012-12-11

    A new human coronavirus (hCoV-EMC) has emerged very recently in the Middle East. The clinical presentation resembled that of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as encountered during the epidemic in 2002/2003. In both cases, acute renal failure was observed in humans. HCoV-EMC is a member of the same virus genus as SARS-CoV but constitutes a sister species. Here we investigated whether it might utilize angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV receptor. Knowledge of the receptor is highly critical because the restriction of the SARS receptor to deep compartments of the human respiratory tract limited the spread of SARS. In baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, lentiviral transduction of human ACE2 (hACE2) conferred permissiveness and replication for SARS-CoV but not for hCoV-EMC. Monkey and human kidney cells (LLC-MK2, Vero, and 769-P) and swine kidney cells were permissive for both viruses, but only SARS-CoV infection could be blocked by anti-hACE2 antibody and could be neutralized by preincubation of virus with soluble ACE2. Our data show that ACE2 is neither necessary nor sufficient for hCoV-EMC replication. Moreover, hCoV-EMC, but not SARS-CoV, replicated in cell lines from Rousettus, Rhinolophus, Pipistrellus, Myotis, and Carollia bats, representing four major chiropteran families from both suborders. As human CoV normally cannot replicate in bat cells from different families, this suggests that hCoV-EMC might use a receptor molecule that is conserved in bats, pigs, and humans, implicating a low barrier against cross-host transmission. IMPORTANCE A new human coronavirus (hCoV) emerged recently in the Middle East. The disease resembled SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), causing a fatal epidemic in 2002/2003. Coronaviruses have a reservoir in bats and because this novel virus is related to SARS-CoV, we investigated whether it might replicate in bat cells and use the same receptor (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]). This knowledge is

  9. Permissiveness of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines for hepatitis C virus entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Koutsoudakis, George; Boix, Loreto; López-Oliva, Juan Manuel; Caro-Pérez, Noelia; Fernández-Carrillo, Carlos; González, Patricia; Gastaminza, Pablo; Bruix, Jordi; Forns, Xavier; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofía

    2017-07-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a globally prevalent pathogen and is associated with high death rates and morbidity. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV research has been impeded by the lack of a robust infectious cell culture system and thus in vitro studies on diverse genetic backgrounds are hampered because of the limited number of hepatoma cell lines which are able to support different aspects of the HCV life cycle. In the current study, we sought to expand the limited number of permissive cells capable of supporting the diverse phases of the HCV life cycle. Initially, we screened a panel of new hepatoma-derived cell lines, designated BCLC-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -9 and -10 cells, for their ability to express essential HCV receptors and subsequently to support HCV entry by using the well-characterized HCV pseudoparticle system (HCVpp). Apart from BCLC-9, all BCLC cell lines were permissive for HCVpp infection. Next, BCLC cells were subjected to short- and long-term HCV RNA replication studies using HCV subgenomic replicons. Interestingly, only BCLC-1, -5 and -9 cells, supported short-term HCV RNA replication, but the latter were excluded from further studies since they were refractory for HCV entry. BCLC-1, -5 were able to support long-term HCV replication too; yet BCLC-5 cells supported the highest long-term HCV RNA replication levels. Furthermore, cured BCLC-5 clones from HCV subgenomic replicon, showed increased permissiveness for HCV RNA replication. Strikingly, we were unable to detect endogenous BCLC-5 miR122 expression - an important HCV host factor- and as expected, the exogenous expression of miR122 in BCLC-5 cells increased their permissiveness for HCV RNA replication. However, this cell line was unable to produce HCV infectious particles despite ectopic expression of apolipoprotein E, which in other hepatoma cell lines has been shown to be sufficient to enable the HCV secretion process, suggesting a lack of other host cellular factor(s) and/or the presence of

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' disease agent reduces HIV-1 replication in human placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappa Stella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several factors determine the risk of HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT, such as coinfections in placentas from HIV-1 positive mothers with other pathogens. Chagas' disease is one of the most endemic zoonoses in Latin America, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The purpose of the study was to determine whether T. cruzi modifies HIV infection of the placenta at the tissue or cellular level. Results Simple and double infections were carried out on a placental histoculture system (chorionic villi isolated from term placentas from HIV and Chagas negative mothers and on the choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi (VD lethal strain, either purified from mouse blood or from Vero cell cultures, 24 h-supernatants of blood and cellular trypomastigotes, and the VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 reporter virus were used for the coinfections. Viral transduction was evaluated by quantification of luciferase activity. Coinfection with whole trypomastigotes, either from mouse blood or from cell cultures, decreased viral pseudotype luciferase activity in placental histocultures. Similar results were obtained from BeWo cells. Supernatants of stimulated histocultures were used for the simultaneous determination of 29 cytokines and chemokines with the Luminex technology. In histocultures infected with trypomastigotes, as well as in coinfected tissues, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10 and MCP-1 production was significantly lower than in controls or HIV-1 transducted tissue. A similar decrease was observed in histocultures treated with 24 h-supernatants of blood trypomastigotes, but not in coinfected tissues. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that the presence of an intracellular pathogen, such as T. cruzi, is able to impair HIV-1 transduction in an in vitro system of human placental histoculture. Direct effects of the parasite on cellular structures as well as on cellular/viral proteins essential for HIV-1 replication might influence

  11. The BRCT domain from the large subunit of human Replication Factor C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with characterization of DNA binding by the BRCT domain of the large subunit of RFC. Replication Factor C (RFC) is a five protein complex involved in initiating and regulating new DNA synthesis. The first half of the thesis describes region of the RFC and stru

  12. Fidelity of DNA Replication in Normal and Malignant Human Breast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A vatit"Y Of DNA synthesis and the typt of DNA replica~tion Products " celular prca including DNA rsplicatlon. DNA repsair. R~NA formed in experiments...Sicrturn thlarida wsMi SocletylMai yland Division . cnd the University of Maryland rDesigntld FIG.4. 1w ffet o a angeof cmu;, tloideResearch

  13. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human monocyte-derived macrophages by parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Andreani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p99% being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (approximately 90% for BaL and approximately 85% for VSV-G infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01. By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05. Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a approximately 60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in macrophages, a major cell target for both pathogens.

  14. RecQL4 is required for the association of Mcm10 and Ctf4 with replication origins in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jun-Sub; Park, Soon-Young; Cho, Won-Ho; Bae, Sung-Ho; Hurwitz, Jerard; Lee, Joon-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Though RecQL4 was shown to be essential for the initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells, its role in initiation is poorly understood. Here, we show that RecQL4 is required for the origin binding of Mcm10 and Ctf4, and their physical interactions and association with replication origins are controlled by the concerted action of both CDK and DDK activities. Although RecQL4-dependent binding of Mcm10 and Ctf4 to chromatin can occur in the absence of pre-replicative complex, their association with replication origins requires the presence of the pre-replicative complex and CDK and DDK activities. Their association with replication origins and physical interactions are also targets of the DNA damage checkpoint pathways which prevent initiation of DNA replication at replication origins. Taken together, the RecQL4-dependent association of Mcm10 and Ctf4 with replication origins appears to be the first important step controlled by S phase promoting kinases and checkpoint pathways for the initiation of DNA replication in human cells.

  15. Gap-directed translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site on circular DNA templates by a human replication complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Villani

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ε (pol ε is believed to be the leading strand replicase in eukaryotes whereas pols λ and β are thought to be mainly involved in re-synthesis steps of DNA repair. DNA elongation by the human pol ε is halted by an abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site. We have previously reported that human pols λ, β and η can perform translesion synthesis (TLS of an AP site in the presence of pol ε. In the case of pol λ and β, this TLS requires the presence of a gap downstream from the product synthetized by the ε replicase. However, since these studies were conducted exclusively with a linear DNA template, we decided to test whether the structure of the template could influence the capacity of the pols ε, λ, β and η to perform TLS of an AP site. Therefore, we have investigated the replication of damaged "minicircle" DNA templates. In addition, replication of circular DNA requires, beyond DNA pols, the processivity clamp PCNA, the clamp loader replication factor C (RFC, and the accessory proteins replication protein A (RPA. Finally we have compared the capacity of unmodified versus monoubiquitinated PCNA in sustaining TLS by pols λ and η on a circular template. Our results indicate that in vitro gap-directed TLS synthesis by pols λ and β in the presence of pol ε, RPA and PCNA is unaffected by the structure of the DNA template. Moreover, monoubiquitination of PCNA does not affect TLS by pol λ while it appears to slightly stimulate TLS by pol η.

  16. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  17. Human papillomavirus E6E7-mediated adenovirus cell killing: selectivity of mutant adenovirus replication in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, C; Noya, F; Alemany, R; Chow, L T; Curiel, D T

    2001-08-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses are being investigated as potential anticancer agents. Exclusive virus replication in cancer cells has been proposed as a safety trait to be considered in the design of oncolytic adenoviruses. From this perspective, we have investigated several adenovirus mutants for their potential to conditionally replicate and promote the killing of cells expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which are present in a high percentage of anogenital cancers. For this purpose, we have employed an organotypic model of human stratified squamous epithelium derived from primary keratinocytes that have been engineered to express HPV-18 oncoproteins stably. We show that, whereas wild-type adenovirus promotes a widespread cytopathic effect in all infected cells, E1A- and E1A/E1B-deleted adenoviruses cause no deleterious effect regardless of the coexpression of HPV18 E6E7. An adenovirus deleted in the CR2 domain of E1A, necessary for binding to the pRB family of pocket proteins, shows no selectivity of replication as it efficiently kills all normal and E6E7-expressing keratinocytes. Finally, an adenovirus mutant deleted in the CR1 and CR2 domains of E1A exhibits preferential replication and cell killing in HPV E6E7-expressing cultures. We conclude that the organotypic keratinocyte culture represents a distinct model to evaluate adenovirus selectivity and that, based on this model, further modifications of the adenovirus genome are required to restrict adenovirus replication to tumor cells.

  18. Localized AdS_{5}×S^{5} Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Óscar J C; Santos, Jorge E; Way, Benson

    2016-10-07

    According to heuristic arguments, global AdS_{5}×S^{5} black holes are expected to undergo a phase transition in the microcanonical ensemble. At high energies, one expects black holes that respect the symmetries of the S^{5}; at low energies, one expects "localized" black holes that appear pointlike on the S^{5}. According to anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence, N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on a 3-sphere should therefore exhibit spontaneous R-symmetry breaking at strong coupling. In this Letter, we numerically construct these localized black holes. We extrapolate the location of this phase transition, and compute the expectation value of the broken scalar operator with lowest conformal dimension. Via the correspondence, these results offer quantitative predictions for N=4 SYM theory.

  19. Localized AdS5×S5 Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Óscar J. C.; Santos, Jorge E.; Way, Benson

    2016-10-01

    According to heuristic arguments, global AdS5×S5 black holes are expected to undergo a phase transition in the microcanonical ensemble. At high energies, one expects black holes that respect the symmetries of the S5; at low energies, one expects "localized" black holes that appear pointlike on the S5. According to anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence, N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on a 3-sphere should therefore exhibit spontaneous R -symmetry breaking at strong coupling. In this Letter, we numerically construct these localized black holes. We extrapolate the location of this phase transition, and compute the expectation value of the broken scalar operator with lowest conformal dimension. Via the correspondence, these results offer quantitative predictions for N =4 SYM theory.

  20. Resurgence of the dressing phase for AdS5 × S5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Dorigoni, Daniele; Savin, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the resummation of the strong coupling asymptotic expansion of the dressing phase of the AdS5 × S5 superstring. The dressing phase proposed by Beisert, Eden and Staudacher can be recovered from a modified Borel-Ecalle resummation of this asymptotic expansion only by completing it with new, non-perturbative and exponentially suppressed terms that can be organized into different sectors labelled by an instanton-like number. We compute the contribution to the dressing phase coming from the sum over all the instanton sectors and show that it satisfies the homogeneous crossing symmetry equation. We comment on the semiclassical origin of the non-perturbative terms from the world-sheet theory point of view even though their precise explanation remains still quite mysterious.

  1. The Cardy limit of the topologically twisted index and black strings in AdS$_5$

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the topologically twisted index of a general four-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=1$ gauge theory in the "high-temperature" limit. The index is the partition function for $\\mathcal{N}=1$ theories on $S^2 \\times T^2$, with a partial topological twist along $S^2$, in the presence of background magnetic fluxes and fugacities for the global symmetries. We show that the logarithm of the index is proportional to the conformal anomaly coefficient of the two-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(0,2)$ SCFTs obtained from the compactification on $S^2$. We also present a universal formula for extracting the index from the four-dimensional conformal anomaly coefficient and its derivatives. Our results can be applied to BPS black strings in type IIB backgrounds AdS$_5 \\times \\text{SE}_5$, where SE$_5$ are five-dimensional Sasaki-Einstein spaces.

  2. Thermodynamics of R-charged Black Holes in AdS(5) From Effective Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, S S; Gubser, Steven S.; Heckman, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the thermodynamics of certain near-extremal black holes in asymptotically flat space can be lifted to an effective string description created from the intersection of D-branes. In this paper we present evidence that the semiclassical thermodynamics of near-extremal R-charged black holes in AdS(5)xS(5) is described in a similar manner by effective strings created from the intersection of giant gravitons on the S(5). We also present a free fermion description of the supersymmetric limit of the one-charge black hole, and we give a crude catalog of the microstates of the two and three-charge black holes in terms of operators in the dual conformal field theory.

  3. Resurgence of the dressing phase for ${\\rm AdS}_5\\times {\\rm S}^5$

    CERN Document Server

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Savin, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the resummation of the strong coupling asymptotic expansion of the dressing phase of the ${\\rm AdS}_5\\times {\\rm S}^5$ superstring. The dressing phase proposed by Beisert, Eden and Staudacher can be recovered from a modified Borel-Ecalle resummation of this asymptotic expansion only by completing it with new, non-perturbative and exponentially suppressed terms that can be organized into different sectors labelled by an instanton-like number. We compute the contribution to the dressing phase coming from the sum over all the instanton sectors and show that it satisfies the homogeneous crossing symmetry equation. We comment on the semiclassical origin of the non-perturbative terms from the world-sheet theory point of view even though their precise explanation remains still quite mysterious.

  4. AdS$_5$ vacua from type IIB supergravity on $T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We study maximally supersymmetric Anti-de Sitter backgrounds in consistent N=2 truncations of type IIB supergravity compactified on the Sasaki-Einstein manifold $T^{1,1}$. In particular, we focus on truncations that contain fields coming from the nontrivial second and third cohomology forms on $T^{1,1}$. These give rise to N=2 supergravity coupled to two vector- and two hypermultiplets (Betti-vector truncation) or one vector- and three hypermultiplets (Betti-hyper truncation), respectively. We find that both truncations admit AdS$_5$ backgrounds with the gauge group always being broken but containing at least an $U(1)_R$ factor. Moreover, in both cases we show that the moduli space of AdS vacua is nontrivial and of maximal dimension. Finally, we explicitly compute the metrics on these moduli spaces.

  5. Minimal surfaces in q-deformed AdS5xS5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study minimal surfaces in q-deformed AdS5×S5. For this purpose, it is convenient to introduce a coordinate system which describes the spacetime only inside the singularity surface and treat the singularity surface as the holographic screen. In particular, we consider minimal surfaces whose boundary shapes are 1) a straight line and 2) a circle. In the q → 1 limit, the solutions correspond to a 1/2 BPS straight line Wilson loop and a 1/2 BPS circular one, respectively. A remarkable point is that the classical Euclidean actions have no linear divergence unlike the original ones. This finiteness indicates that the q-deformation may be regarded as a UV regularization.

  6. A Crossing-Symmetric Phase for $AdS_{5} x S^{5}$ Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Beisert, N; López, E; Beisert, Niklas; Hernandez, Rafael; Lopez, Esperanza

    2006-01-01

    We propose an all-order perturbative expression for the dressing phase of the AdS_5 x S^5 string S-matrix at strong coupling. Moreover, we are able to sum up large parts of this expression. This allows us to start the investigation of the analytic structure of the phase at finite coupling revealing a few surprising features. The phase obeys all known constraints including the crossing relation and it matches with the known physical data at strong coupling. In particular, we recover the bound states of giant magnons recently found by Hofman and Maldacena as poles of the scattering matrix. At weak coupling our proposal seems to differ with gauge theory. A possible solution to this disagreement is the inclusion of additional pieces in the phase not contributing to crossing, which we also study.

  7. MiRNA profile associated with replicative senescence, extended cell culture, and ectopic telomerase expression in human foreskin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N Bonifacio

    Full Text Available Senescence is a highly regulated process that limits cellular replication by enforcing a G1 arrest in response to various stimuli. Replicative senescence occurs in response to telomeric DNA erosion, and telomerase expression can offset replicative senescence leading to immortalization of many human cells. Limited data exists regarding changes of microRNA (miRNA expression during senescence in human cells and no reports correlate telomerase expression with regulation of senescence-related miRNAs. We used miRNA microarrays to provide a detailed account of miRNA profiles for early passage and senescent human foreskin (BJ fibroblasts as well as early and late passage immortalized fibroblasts (BJ-hTERT that stably express the human telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit hTERT. Selected miRNAs that were differentially expressed in senescence were assayed for expression in quiescent cells to identify miRNAs that are specifically associated with senescence-associated growth arrest. From this group of senescence-associated miRNAs, we confirmed the ability of miR-143 to induce growth arrest after ectopic expression in young fibroblasts. Remarkably, miR-143 failed to induce growth arrest in BJ-hTERT cells. Importantly, the comparison of late passage immortalized fibroblasts to senescent wild type fibroblasts reveals that miR-146a, a miRNA with a validated role in regulating the senescence associated secretory pathway, is also regulated during extended cell culture independently of senescence. The discovery that miRNA expression is impacted by expression of ectopic hTERT as well as extended passaging in immortalized fibroblasts contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the connections between telomerase expression, senescence and processes of cellular aging.

  8. A dual-targeting approach to inhibit Brucella abortus replication in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and an etiological agent of the zoonotic disease known as brucellosis. Brucellosis can be challenging to treat with conventional antibiotic therapies and, in some cases, may develop into a debilitating and life-threatening chronic illness. We used multiple independent assays of in vitro metabolism and intracellular replication to screen a library of 480 known bioactive compounds for novel B. abortus anti-infectives. Eighteen non-cytotoxi...

  9. HIVed, a knowledgebase for differentially expressed human genes and proteins during HIV infection, replication and latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Ramarathinam, Sri H.; Revote, Jerico; Khoury, Georges; Song, Jiangning; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the altered gene expression level and identifying differentially expressed genes/proteins during HIV infection, replication and latency is fundamental for broadening our understanding of the mechanisms of HIV infection and T-cell dysfunction. Such studies are crucial for developing effective strategies for virus eradication from the body. Inspired by the availability and enrichment of gene expression data during HIV infection, replication and latency, in this study, we proposed a novel compendium termed HIVed (HIV expression database; http://hivlatency.erc.monash.edu/) that harbours comprehensive functional annotations of proteins, whose genes have been shown to be dysregulated during HIV infection, replication and latency using different experimental designs and measurements. We manually curated a variety of third-party databases for structural and functional annotations of the protein entries in HIVed. With the goal of benefiting HIV related research, we collected a number of biological annotations for all the entries in HIVed besides their expression profile, including basic protein information, Gene Ontology terms, secondary structure, HIV-1 interaction and pathway information. We hope this comprehensive protein-centric knowledgebase can bridge the gap between the understanding of differentially expressed genes and the functions of their protein products, facilitating the generation of novel hypotheses and treatment strategies to fight against the HIV pandemic. PMID:28358052

  10. The host ubiquitin-dependent segregase VCP/p97 is required for the onset of human cytomegalovirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Tang Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus major immediate early proteins IE1 and IE2 are critical drivers of virus replication and are considered pivotal in determining the balance between productive and latent infection. IE1 and IE2 are derived from the same primary transcript by alternative splicing and regulation of their expression likely involves a complex interplay between cellular and viral factors. Here we show that knockdown of the host ubiquitin-dependent segregase VCP/p97, results in loss of IE2 expression, subsequent suppression of early and late gene expression and, ultimately, failure in virus replication. RNAseq analysis showed increased levels of IE1 splicing, with a corresponding decrease in IE2 splicing following VCP knockdown. Global analysis of viral transcription showed the expression of a subset of viral genes is not reduced despite the loss of IE2 expression, including UL112/113. Furthermore, Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that VCP strongly colocalised with the viral replication compartments in the nucleus. Finally, we show that NMS-873, a small molecule inhibitor of VCP, is a potent HCMV antiviral with potential as a novel host targeting therapeutic for HCMV infection.

  11. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Ameliorates Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms and Improves Replicative Senescence-Associated Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shy Cian Khor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During aging, oxidative stress affects the normal function of satellite cells, with consequent regeneration defects that lead to sarcopenia. This study aimed to evaluate tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF modulation in reestablishing the oxidative status of myoblasts during replicative senescence and to compare the effects of TRF with other antioxidants (α-tocopherol (ATF and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. Primary human myoblasts were cultured to young, presenescent, and senescent phases. The cells were treated with antioxidants for 24 h, followed by the assessment of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression and activities, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione. Our data showed that replicative senescence increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in myoblasts. Treatment with TRF significantly diminished ROS production and decreased lipid peroxidation in senescent myoblasts. Moreover, the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD2, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1 was modulated by TRF treatment, with increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione peroxidase in senescent myoblasts. In comparison to ATF and NAC, TRF was more efficient in heightening the antioxidant capacity and reducing free radical insults. These results suggested that TRF is able to ameliorate antioxidant defense mechanisms and improves replicative senescence-associated oxidative stress in myoblasts.

  12. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  13. Infectious Progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) Influenza Virus Replicated in and Released from Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Huang, Tao; Yu, Feiyuan; Liu, Xingmu; Zhao, Conghui; Chen, Xueling; Kelvin, David J; Gu, Jiang

    2015-12-07

    Various reports have indicated that a number of viruses could infect neutrophils, but the multiplication of viruses in neutrophils was abortive. Based on our previous finding that avian influenza viral RNA and proteins were present in the nucleus of infected human neutrophils in vivo, we investigated the possibility of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viral synthesis in infected neutrophils and possible release of infectious progeny from host cells. In this study we found that human neutrophils in vitro without detectable level of sialic acid expression could be infected by this virus strain. We also show that the infected neutrophils can not only synthesize 2009 A (H1N1) viral mRNA and proteins, but also produce infectious progeny. These findings suggest that infectious progeny of 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus could be replicated in and released from human neutrophils with possible clinical implications.

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 expressing nonoverlapping tax and rex genes replicates and immortalizes primary human T lymphocytes but fails to replicate and persist in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Ihab; Yamamoto, Brenda; Phipps, Andrew; Green, Patrick L

    2005-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus associated primarily with adult T-cell leukemia and neurological disease. HTLV-1 encodes the positive trans-regulatory proteins Tax and Rex, both of which are essential for viral replication. Tax activates transcription initiation from the viral long terminal repeat and modulates the transcription or activity of a number of cellular genes. Rex regulates gene expression posttranscriptionally by facilitating the cytoplasmic expression of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. Tax and Rex mutants have been identified that have defective activities or impaired biochemical properties associated with their function. To ultimately determine the contribution of specific protein activities on viral replication and cellular transformation of primary T cells, mutants need to be characterized in the context of an infectious molecular clone. Since the tax and rex genes are in partially overlapping reading frames, mutation in one gene frequently disrupts the other, confounding interpretation of mutational analyses in the context of the virus. Here we generated and characterized a unique proviral clone (H1IT) in which the tax and rex genes were separated by expressing Tax from an internal ribosome entry site. We showed that H1IT expresses both functional Tax and Rex. In short- and long-term coculture assays, H1IT was competent to infect and immortalize primary human T cells similar to wild-type HTLV-1. In contrast, H1IT failed to efficiently replicate and persist in inoculated rabbits, thus emphasizing the importance of temporal and quantitative regulation of specific mRNA for viral survival in vivo.

  15. Sublingual administration of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine confirms Toll-like receptor agonist activity in the oral cavity and elicits improved mucosal and systemic cell-mediated responses against HIV antigens despite preexisting Ad5 immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appledorn, Daniel M; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS continue to devastate populations worldwide. Recent studies suggest that vaccines that induce beneficial immune responses in the mucosal compartment may improve the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors remain a promising platform for the development of effective vaccines. In an effort to improve the efficacy of Ad5-based vaccines, even in the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity, we evaluated the potential for an Ad5-based HIV vaccine to induce antigen-specific immune responses following sublingual (s.l.) administration, a route not previously tested in regard to Ad-based vaccines. s.l. vaccination with an Ad5-based HIV-Gag vaccine resulted in a significant induction of Gag-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both the systemic and the mucosal compartment. We also show that s.l. immunization not only avoided preexisting Ad5 immunity but also elicited a broad repertoire of antigen-specific CTL clones. Additionally, we confirm for the first time that oral delivery of a vaccine expressing a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist can stimulate innate immune responses through induction of cytokines and chemokines and activation of NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in vivo. These results positively correlated with improved antigen-specific CTL responses. These results could be achieved both in Ad5-naïve mice and in mice with preexisting immunity to Ad5. The simplicity of the s.l. vaccination regimen coupled with augmentation of TLR-dependent pathways active in the oral cavity makes s.l. delivery a promising method for HIV vaccine development specifically, as well as for many other vaccine applications in general.

  16. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target.

  17. Utilization of replication-competent XMRV reporter-viruses reveals severe viral restriction in primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Martina Stürzel

    Full Text Available The gammaretrovirus termed xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was described to be isolated from prostate cancer tissue biopsies and from blood of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. However, many studies failed to detect XMRV and to verify these disease associations. Data suggesting the contamination of specimens in particular by PCR-based methods and recent reports demonstrating XMRV generation via recombination of two murine leukemia virus precursors raised serious doubts about XMRV being a genuine human pathogen. To elucidate cell tropism of XMRV, we generated replication competent XMRV reporter viruses encoding a green fluorescent protein or a secretable luciferase as tools to analyze virus infection of human cell lines or primary human cells. Transfection of proviral DNAs into LNCaP prostate cancer cells resulted in readily detectably reporter gene expression and production of progeny virus. Inoculation of known XMRV susceptible target cells revealed that these virions were infectious and expressed the reporter gene, allowing for a fast and highly sensitive quantification of XMRV infection. Both reporter viruses were capable of establishing a spreading infection in LNCaP and Raji B cells and could be easily passaged. However, after inoculation of primary human blood cells such as CD4 T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells, infection rates were very low, and a spreading infection was never established. In line with these results we found that supernatants derived from these XMRV infected primary cell types did not contain infectious virus. Thus, although XMRV efficiently replicated in some human cell lines, all tested primary cells were largely refractory to XMRV infection and did not support viral spread. Our results provide further evidence that XMRV is not a human pathogen.

  18. Replication of avian, human and swine influenza viruses in porcine respiratory explants and association with sialic acid distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauwynck Hans J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout the history of human influenza pandemics, pigs have been considered the most likely "mixing vessel" for reassortment between human and avian influenza viruses (AIVs. However, the replication efficiencies of influenza viruses from various hosts, as well as the expression of sialic acid (Sia receptor variants in the entire porcine respiratory tract have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we established porcine nasal, tracheal, bronchial and lung explants, which cover the entire porcine respiratory tract with maximal similarity to the in vivo situation. Subsequently, we assessed virus yields of three porcine, two human and six AIVs in these explants. Since our results on virus replication were in disagreement with the previously reported presence of putative avian virus receptors in the trachea, we additionally studied the distribution of sialic acid receptors by means of lectin histochemistry. Human (Siaα2-6Gal and avian virus receptors (Siaα2-3Gal were identified with Sambucus Nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins respectively. Results Compared to swine and human influenza viruses, replication of the AIVs was limited in all cultures but most strikingly in nasal and tracheal explants. Results of virus titrations were confirmed by quantification of infected cells using immunohistochemistry. By lectin histochemistry we found moderate to abundant expression of the human-like virus receptors in all explant systems but minimal binding of the lectins that identify avian-like receptors, especially in the nasal, tracheal and bronchial epithelium. Conclusions The species barrier that restricts the transmission of influenza viruses from one host to another remains preserved in our porcine respiratory explants. Therefore this system offers a valuable alternative to study virus and/or host properties required for adaptation or reassortment of influenza viruses. Our results indicate that, based on the expression of Sia

  19. In vitro replication of plasmids containing human ribosomal gene sequences: origin localization and dependence on an aprotinin-binding cytosolic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Fresa, K L; Sylvester, J; Gonzalez, I; Cohen, S

    1993-11-01

    We previously investigated the role of an aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of DNA replication in isolated quiescent nuclei. In the present study, we have used a cell-free DNA replication system to test the ability of plasmid vectors which contain sequences from the human ribosomal RNA gene to serve as replicative templates in vitro when exposed to ADR-containing preparations. Significant dTTP incorporation was seen using DNA from either a 7-kb sequence in the 5' spacer region (CHE) or a 7-kb sequence which begins near the end of the 28S coding region and extends into the 3' spacer region (ADBB), while sequences from other regions of the rRNA gene mediated little or no dTTP incorporation. The characteristics of plasmid-directed dTTP incorporation indicate that most incorporation is due to DNA replication and not repair or damage-initiated processes. To conclusively demonstrate origin-dependent replication in the plasmid system and to further map replication origins, an approach was developed using ddGTP to restrict the length of daughter strands followed by hybridization of these replication products to restriction fragments spanning the putative origin region. This approach allowed us to identify replication origin activity apart from parent strand repair or synthesis initiated at random damaged sites. One of the origins was localized to a 1375-bp fragment within the 5' spacer region, and this fragment contains sequences homologous to those found in other replication origins.

  20. A Detailed Discussion of Superfield Supergravity Prepotential Perturbations in the Superspace of the $AdS_5/CFT_4$ Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Ovalle, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of the issue of supergravity perturbations around the flat five dimensional superspace required for manifest superspace formulations of the supergravity side of the AdS_{5}/CFT_{4} Correspondence.

  1. Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA-1 (ADAR1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in human alveolar macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Weiden

    Full Text Available While exploring the effects of aerosol IFN-γ treatment in HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected patients, we observed A to G mutations in HIV-1 envelope sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of aerosol IFN-γ-treated patients and induction of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1 in the BAL cells. IFN-γ induced ADAR1 expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM but not T cells. ADAR1 siRNA knockdown induced HIV-1 expression in BAL cells of four HIV-1 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Similar results were obtained in MDM that were HIV-1 infected in vitro. Over-expression of ADAR1 in transformed macrophages inhibited HIV-1 viral replication but not viral transcription measured by nuclear run-on, suggesting that ADAR1 acts post-transcriptionally. The A to G hyper-mutation pattern observed in ADAR1 over-expressing cells in vitro was similar to that found in the lungs of HIV-1 infected patients treated with aerosol IFN-γ suggesting the model accurately represented alveolar macrophages. Together, these results indicate that ADAR1 restricts HIV-1 replication post-transcriptionally in macrophages harboring HIV-1 provirus. ADAR1 may therefore contribute to viral latency in macrophages.

  2. Pairwise growth competition assay for determining the replication fitness of human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocheewa, Siriphan; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn C; Liu, Yi; Swain, J Victor; McClure, Jan; Rao, Ushnal; Maust, Brandon; Deng, Wenjie; Sunshine, Justine E; Kim, Moon; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I

    2015-05-04

    In vitro fitness assays are essential tools for determining viral replication fitness for viruses such as HIV-1. Various measurements have been used to extrapolate viral replication fitness, ranging from the number of viral particles per infectious unit, growth rate in cell culture, and relative fitness derived from multiple-cycle growth competition assays. Growth competition assays provide a particularly sensitive measurement of fitness since the viruses are competing for cellular targets under identical growth conditions. There are several experimental factors to consider when conducting growth competition assays, including the multiplicity of infection (MOI), sampling times, and viral detection and fitness calculation methods. Each factor can affect the end result and hence must be considered carefully during the experimental design. The protocol presented here includes steps from constructing a new recombinant HIV-1 clone to performing growth competition assays and analyzing the experimental results. This protocol utilizes experimental parameter values previously shown to yield consistent and robust results. Alternatives are discussed, as some parameters need to be adjusted according to the cell type and viruses being studied. The protocol contains two alternative viral detection methods to provide flexibility as the availability of instruments, reagents and expertise varies between laboratories.

  3. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  4. 1-O-hexadecyloxypropyl cidofovir (CMX001) effectively inhibits polyomavirus BK replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen; Gosert, Rainer; Bernhoff, Eva; Finstad, Solrun; Hirsch, Hans H

    2010-11-01

    Antiviral drugs for treating polyomavirus BK (BKV) replication in polyomavirus-associated nephropathy or hemorrhagic cystitis are of considerable clinical interest. Unlike cidofovir, the lipid conjugate 1-O-hexadecyloxypropyl cidofovir (CMX001) is orally available and has not caused detectable nephrotoxicity in rodent models or human studies to date. Primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells were infected with BKV-Dunlop, and CMX001 was added 2 h postinfection (hpi). The intracellular and extracellular BKV DNA load was determined by quantitative PCR. Viral gene expression was examined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. We also examined host cell viability, proliferation, metabolic activity, and DNA replication. The titration of CMX001 identified 0.31 μM as the 90% effective concentration (EC(90)) for reducing the extracellular BKV load at 72 hpi. BKV large T antigen mRNA and protein expression was unaffected at 24 hpi, but the intracellular BKV genome was reduced by 90% at 48 hpi. Late gene expression was reduced by 70 and 90% at 48 and 72 hpi, respectively. Comparisons of CMX001 and cidofovir EC(90)s from 24 to 96 hpi demonstrated that CMX001 had a more rapid and enduring effect on BKV DNA and infectious progeny at 96 hpi than cidofovir. CMX001 at 0.31 μM had little effect on overall cell metabolism but reduced bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and host cell proliferation by 20 to 30%, while BKV infection increased cell proliferation in both rapidly dividing and near-confluent cultures. We conclude that CMX001 inhibits BKV replication with a longer-lasting effect than cidofovir at 400× lower levels, with fewer side effects on relevant host cells in vitro.

  5. Finite temperature effective action, AdS_5 black holes, and 1/N expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís; Liu, H; Wadia, S; Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Gomez, Cesar; Liu, Hong; Wadia, Spenta

    2005-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological matrix model to study string theory in AdS_5 \\times S_5 in the canonical ensemble. The model reproduces all the known qualitative features of the theory. In particular, it gives a simple effective potential description of Euclidean black hole nucleation and the tunnelling between thermal AdS and the big black hole. It also has some interesting predictions. We find that there exists a critical temperature at which the Euclidean small black hole undergoes a Gross-Witten phase transition. We identify the phase transition with the Horowitz-Polchinski point where the black hole horizon size becomes comparable to the string scale. The appearance of the Hagedorn divergence of thermal AdS is due to the merger of saddle points corresponding to the Euclidean small black hole and thermal AdS. The merger can be described in terms of a cusp (A_3) catastrophe and divergences at the perturbative string level are smoothed out at finite string coupling using standard techniques of catastrophe the...

  6. Interpolating solution from AdS$_5$ to hyperscaling violating Lifshitz space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Parijat

    2014-01-01

    We construct two interpolating solutions in type II string theory which interpolate between an AdS$_5$ in the UV and a hyperscaling violating three (spatial) dimensional Lifshitz space-time in the IR. The first solution is non-supersymmetric and is obtained from a known intersecting non-supersymmetric D3-brane with chargeless D0-brane solution of type IIB string theory, by restricting some parameters characterizing the solution and going to a new coordinate. In the IR the dilaton is non-constant in general and the metric is three (spatial) dimensional hyperscaling violating Lifshitz with dynamical critical exponent $z=(3+3\\gamma)/(3-\\gamma)$ and hyperscaling violation exponent $\\theta = 12/(3-\\gamma)$, where $\\gamma$ is a real parameter and can take continuous values from $-1$ to $+1$. At the two extreme values, i.e., for $\\gamma = \\pm 1$, the dilaton is constant. The second solution is supersymmetric and is obtained from the known F-D2 bound state solution of type IIA string theory by zooming into a particul...

  7. Supercoset construction of Yang-Baxter deformed AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Kyono, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring with the classical Yang-Baxter equation. We make a general argument on the supercoset construction and present the master formula to describe the dilaton in terms of classical $r$-matrices. The supercoset construction is explicitly performed for some classical $r$-matrices and the full backgrounds including the Ramond-Ramond (R-R) sector and dilaton are derived. Within the class of abelian $r$-matrices, the perfect agreement is shown for well-known examples including gravity duals of non-commutative gauge theories, $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes. It would be remarkable that the supercoset construction works well, even if the resulting backgrounds are not maximally supersymmetric. In particular, three-parameter $\\gamma$-deformations of S$^5$ and Schr\\"odinger spacetimes do not preserve any supersymmetries. As for non-abelian $r$-matrices, we will focus upon a specific example. The resulting backgroun...

  8. An Integrable Deformation of the AdS5 x S5 Superstring

    CERN Document Server

    Hollowood, Timothy J; Schmidtt, David

    2014-01-01

    The S-matrix on the world-sheet theory of the string in AdS5 x S5 has previously been shown to admit a deformation where the symmetry algebra is replaced by the associated quantum group. The case where q is real has been identified as a particular deformation of the Green-Schwarz sigma model. An interpretation of the case with q a root of unity has, until now, been lacking. We show that the Green-Schwarz sigma model admits a discrete deformation which can be viewed as a rather simple deformation of the F/F gauged WZW model, where F=PSU(2,2|4). The deformation parameter q is then a k-th root of unity where k is the level. The deformed theory has the same equations-of-motion as the Green-Schwarz sigma model but has a different symplectic structure. We show that the resulting theory is integrable and has just the right amount of kappa-symmetries that appear as a remnant of the fermionic part of the original gauge symmetry. This points to the existence of a fully consistent deformed string background.

  9. Cosmological Solutions on Compactified AdS_5 with a Thermal Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Rothstein, I Z

    2001-01-01

    This paper is an investigation of the effects of a thermal bulk fluid in brane world models compactified on AdS_5. Our primary purpose is to study how such a fluid changes the bulk dynamics and to compare these effects with those generated by matter localized to the branes. We find an exact cosmological solution for a thermally excited massless bulk field, as well as perturbative solutions with matter on the brane and in the bulk. We then perturb around these solutions to find solutions for a massive bulk mode in the limit where the bulk mass (m_B) is small compared to the AdS curvature scale and T< m_B. We find that without a stabilizing potential there are no physical solutions for a thermal bulk fluid. We then include a stabilizing potential and calculate the shift in the radion as well as the time dependence of the weak scale as a function of the bulk mass. It is shown that, as opposed to a brane fluid, the bulk fluid contribution to the bulk dynamics is controlled by the bulk mass.

  10. Puzzles of η-deformed AdS5 × S5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Borsato, Riccardo; Frolov, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    We derive the part of the Lagrangian for the sigma model on the η-deformed AdS5 × S5 space which is quadratic in fermions and has the full dependence on bosons. We then show that there exists a field redefinition which brings the corresponding La-grangian to the standard form of type IIB Green-Schwarz superstring. Reading off the corresponding RR couplings, we observe that they fail to satisfy the supergravity equations of motion, despite the presence of κ-symmetry. However, in a special scaling limit our solution reproduces the supergravity background found by Maldacena and Russo. Further, using the fermionic Lagrangian, we compute a number of new matrix elements of the tree level world-sheet scattering matrix. We then show that after a unitary transformation on the basis of two-particle states which is not one-particle factorisable, the corresponding T-matrix factorises into two equivalent parts. Each part satisfies the classical Yang-Baxter equation and coincides with the large tension limit of the q-deformed S-matrix.

  11. Puzzles of eta-deformed AdS_5 x S^5

    CERN Document Server

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Frolov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We derive the part of the Lagrangian for the sigma model on the eta-deformed AdS_5 x S^5 space which is quadratic in fermions and has the full dependence on bosons. We then show that there exists a field redefinition which brings the corresponding Lagrangian to the standard form of type IIB Green-Schwarz superstring. Reading off the corresponding RR couplings, we observe that they fail to satisfy the supergravity equations of motion, despite the presence of kappa-symmetry. However, in a special scaling limit our solution reproduces the supergravity background found by Maldacena and Russo. Further, using the fermionic Lagrangian, we compute a number of new matrix elements of the tree level world-sheet scattering matrix. We then show that after a unitary transformation on the basis of two-particle states which is not one-particle factorisable, the corresponding T-matrix factorises into two equivalent parts. Each part satisfies the classical Yang-Baxter equation and coincides with the large tension limit of the ...

  12. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Liao, WeiMing; Sheng, PuYi; Fu, Ming; He, AiShan; Huang, Gang

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: 61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t x log2/logNt - logN0" was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the 61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, PhADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  13. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Interplay between human high mobility group protein 1 and replication protein A on psoralen-cross-linked DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Madhava C; Christensen, Jesper; Vasquez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    Human high mobility group box (HMGB) 1 and -2 proteins are highly conserved and abundant chromosomal proteins that regulate chromatin structure and DNA metabolism. HMGB proteins bind preferentially to DNA that is bent or underwound and to DNA damaged by agents such as cisplatin, UVC radiation......, and benzo[a]pyrenediol epoxide (BPDE). Binding of HMGB1 to DNA adducts is thought to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER), leading to cell death, but the biological roles of these proteins remain obscure. We have used psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct a psoralen-DNA...... interstrand cross-link (ICL) to a specific site to determine the effect of HMGB proteins on recognition of these lesions. Our results reveal that human HMGB1 (but not HMGB2) binds with high affinity and specificity to psoralen ICLs, and interacts with the essential NER protein, replication protein A (RPA...

  15. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie;

    2010-01-01

    damage signalling in low- and high-grade human gliomas, and analyze the sources of such endogenous genotoxic stress. Based on analyses of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines, normal astrocytes and clinical specimens from grade II astrocytomas (n=41) and grade IV GBM (n=60), we conclude......, initially limiting cell proliferation (low Ki-67 index) and selecting for mutations of p53 and likely other genes that allow escape (higher Ki-67 index) from the checkpoint and facilitate tumor progression. Overall, these results support the potential role of the DDR machinery as a barrier to gliomagenesis...... and indicate that replication stress, rather than oxidative stress, fuels the DNA damage signalling in early stages of astrocytoma development....

  16. Genome-wide mapping of human DNA-replication origins: levels of transcription at ORC1 sites regulate origin selection and replication timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Gaetano Ivan; Cittaro, Davide; Piccioni, Rossana; Luzi, Lucilla; Banfi, Stefania; Segalla, Simona; Cesaroni, Matteo; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Giacca, Mauro; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome-wide mapping of ORC1 binding sites in mammals, by chromatin immunoprecipitation and parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). ORC1 binding sites in HeLa cells were validated as active DNA replication origins (ORIs) using Repli-seq, a method that allows identification of ORI-containing regions by parallel sequencing of temporally ordered replicating DNA. ORC1 sites were universally associated with transcription start sites (TSSs) of coding or noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Transcription levels at the ORC1 sites directly correlated with replication timing, suggesting the existence of two classes of ORIs: those associated with moderate/high transcription levels (≥1 RNA copy/cell), firing in early S and mapping to the TSSs of coding RNAs; and those associated with low transcription levels (<1 RNA copy/cell), firing throughout the entire S and mapping to TSSs of ncRNAs. These findings are compatible with a scenario whereby TSS expression levels influence the efficiency of ORC1 recruitment at G(1) and the probability of firing during S.

  17. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  18. Analysis of in vitro replicated human hepatitis C virus (HCV for the determination of genotypes and quasispecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelyapov Nickolas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolation and self-replication of infectious HCV has been a difficult task. However, this is needed for the purposes of developing rational drugs and for the analysis of the natural virus. Our recent report of an in vitro system for the isolation of human HCV from infected patients and their replication in tissue culture addresses this challenge. At California Institute of Molecular Medicine several isolates of HCV, called CIMM-HCV, were grown for over three years in cell culture. This is a report of the analysis of CIMM-HCV isolates for subtypes and quasispecies using a 269 bp segment of the 5'UTR. HCV RNA from three patients and eleven CIMM-HCV were analyzed for this purpose. All isolates were essentially identical. Isolates of HCV from one patient were serially transmitted into fresh cells up to eight times and the progeny viruses from each transmission were compared to each other and also to the primary isolates from the patient's serum. Some isolates were also transmitted to different cell types, while others were cultured continuously without retransmission for over three years. We noted minor sequence changes when HCV was cultured for extended periods of time. HCV in T-cells and non-committed lymphoid cells showed a few differences when compared to isolates obtained from immortalized B-cells. These viruses maintained close similarity despite repeated transmissions and passage of time. There were no subtypes or quasispecies noted in CIMM-HCV.

  19. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA metabolism, including replication, recombination and repair, substantiated by its interactions with PCNA, DNA helicases BLM and WRN, and several DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We investigated the sub-nuclear localization of hEXO1 during S......-phase progression and in response to laser-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We show that hEXO1 and PCNA co-localize in replication foci. This apparent interaction is sustained throughout S-phase. We also demonstrate that hEXO1 is rapidly recruited to DNA DSBs. We have identified a PCNA interacting protein...... (PIP-box) region on hEXO1 located in its COOH-terminal ((788)QIKLNELW(795)). This motif is essential for PCNA binding and co-localization during S-phase. Recruitment of hEXO1 to DNA DSB sites is dependent on the MMR protein hMLH1. We show that two distinct hMLH1 interaction regions of hEXO1 (residues...

  20. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Hélène

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. Results The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. Conclusion The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains.

  1. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    (CGA)) was detected in cell lines of human, monkey and mouse origin. The UCG codon is the most rarely used codon in human genes. The cloned human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene encodes an 85 nucleotide, intron-less tRNA, contains a consensus split intragenic promoter and is located at region p21.3-22.2 on chromosome 6......We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The tRNA(Ser....... The integrity and functionality of the cloned tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene was verified by in vitro transcription analysis in HeLa nuclear extracts....

  2. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, E.; Hamel, Rodolphe; Neyret, A.; Ekchariyawat, P.; Molès, J.P.; Simmons, G; Chazal, N; Desprès, P; Missé, Dorothée; Briant, L

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enh...

  3. Efficient Inhibition of HIV Replication in the Gastrointestinal and Female Reproductive Tracts of Humanized BLT Mice by EFdA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shanmugasundaram

    Full Text Available The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA in preclinical development exhibits improved safety and antiviral activity profiles with minimal drug resistance compared to approved NRTIs. However, the systemic antiviral efficacy of EFdA has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT humanized mice to investigate the systemic effect of EFdA treatment on HIV replication and CD4+ T cell depletion in the peripheral blood (PB and tissues. In particular, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the female reproductive tract (FRT and gastrointestinal (GI tract, major sites of transmission, viral replication, and CD4+ T cell depletion and where some current antiretroviral drugs have a sub-optimal effect.EFdA treatment resulted in reduction of HIV-RNA in PB to undetectable levels in the majority of treated mice by 3 weeks post-treatment. HIV-RNA levels in cervicovaginal lavage of EFdA-treated BLT mice also declined to undetectable levels demonstrating strong penetration of EFdA into the FRT. Our results also demonstrate a strong systemic suppression of HIV replication in all tissues analyzed. In particular, we observed more than a 2-log difference in HIV-RNA levels in the GI tract and FRT of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. In addition, HIV-RNA was also significantly lower in the lymph nodes, liver, lung, spleen of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. Furthermore, EFdA treatment prevented the depletion of CD4+ T cells in the PB, mucosal tissues and lymphoid tissues.Our findings indicate that EFdA is highly effective in controlling viral replication and preserving CD4+ T cells in particular with high efficiency in the GI and FRT tract. Thus, EFdA represents a strong potential candidate for further development as a part of antiretroviral therapy regimens.

  4. Aedes Aegypti saliva enhances chikungunya virus replication in human skin fibroblasts via inhibition of the type I interferon signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Diop, Fodé; Hamel, Rodolphe; Talignani, Loïc; Ferraris, Pauline; Cornelie, Sylvie; Liegeois, Florian; Thomas, Frédéric; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2017-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) transmission occurs through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito which injects virus-containing saliva into the skin of the human host during blood feeding. In the present study, we have determined the effect of Aedes aegypti saliva on CHIKV replication in human skin fibroblasts, a major cell type for viral entry, which mimics the events that occur during natural transmission. A significant increase in the expression of viral transcripts and infectious viral particles was observed in fibroblasts infected with CHIKV in the presence of saliva, as compared with those infected with virus alone. CHIKV-infected human fibroblasts were found to express significantly increased levels of various type I IFN-responsive genes, as demonstrated by specific PCR array analysis. In contrast, the expression of these genes was markedly decreased in cells infected with CHIKV in the presence of mosquito saliva. Moreover, Western blotting analysis revealed that STAT2 and its phosphorylated form were down-regulated in the presence of mosquito saliva. Our data demonstrate for the first time the significance of Aedes aegypti saliva in promoting CHIKV infection via down-regulation of several type I IFN-responsive genes in infected human skin fibroblasts via the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul;

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  6. Interaction of RECQ4 and MCM10 is important for efficient DNA replication origin firing in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliszczak, Maciej; Sedlackova, Hana; Pitchai, Ganesha P

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly coordinated process that is initiated at multiple replication origins in eukaryotes. These origins are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which subsequently recruits the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase in a Cdt1/Cdc6-dependent manner. In budding yeast, two esse...

  7. A Note on Vectorial AdS$_5$/CFT$_4$ Duality for Spin-$j$ Boundary Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bae, Jin-Beom; Lal, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    The vectorial holographic correspondences between higher-spin theories in AdS$_5$ and free vector models on the boundary are extended to the cases where the latter is described by free massless spin-$j$ field. The dual higher-spin theory in the bulk does not include gravity and can only be defined on rigid AdS$_5$ background with $S^4$ boundary. We discuss various properties of these rather special higher-spin theories and calculate their one-loop free energies. We show that the result is proportional to the same quantity for spin-$j$ doubleton treated as if it is a AdS$_5$ field. Finally, we consider even more special case where the boundary theory itself is given by an infinite tower of massless higher-spin fields.

  8. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lötzerich Mark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2 detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens

  9. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Lei; LIAO WeiMing; SHENG PuYi; FU Ming; HE AiShan; HUANG Gang

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering, hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21-40years old, 41-60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45,CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell,and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro.The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t log2/logNt - logN0 "was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=-0.002, P<0.05). These findings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  10. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2) detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV) B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens for different serotypes

  11. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell’s replication activity and the donor’s age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21―40 years old, 41―60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula “ log2T D = t logN t ? logN 0” was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, P<0.05). These find- ings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger dona- tors, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  12. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  13. Immunological data from cancer patients treated with Ad5/3-E2F-Δ24-GMCSF suggests utility for tumor immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Otto; Parviainen, Suvi; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan; Kankainen, Matti; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Oksanen, Minna; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Kairemo, Kalevi; Partanen, Kaarina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-02-28

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate in tumor cells can be used for treatment of cancer. Accumulating data suggests that virus induced oncolysis can enhance anti-tumor immunity and break immune tolerance. To capitalize on the immunogenic nature of oncolysis, we generated a quadruple modified oncolytic adenovirus expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF). Ad5/3-E2F-Δ24-GMCSF (CGTG-602) was engineered to contain a tumor specific E2F1 promoter driving an E1 gene deleted at the retinoblastoma protein binding site ("Δ24"). The fiber features a knob from serotype 3 for enhanced gene delivery to tumor cells. The virus was tested preclinically in vitro and in vivo and then 13 patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapies were treated. Treatments were well tolerated and frequent tumor- and adenovirus-specific T-cell immune responses were seen. Overall, with regard to tumor marker or radiological responses, signs of antitumor efficacy were seen in 9/12 evaluable patients (75%). The radiological disease control rate with positron emission tomography was 83% while the response rate (including minor responses) was 50%. Tumor biopsies indicated accumulation of immunological cells, especially T-cells, to tumors after treatment. RNA expression analyses of tumors indicated immunological activation and metabolic changes secondary to virus replication.

  14. DNA Replication Licensing and Progenitor Numbers Are Increased by Progesterone in Normal Human Breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, J. Dinny; Mote, Patricia A.; Salagame, Usha; van Dijk, Jessica H.; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Huschtscha, Lily I.; Reddel, Roger R.; Clarke, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    Proliferation in the nonpregnant human breast is highest in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when serum progesterone levels are high, and exposure to progesterone analogues in hormone replacement therapy is known to elevate breast cancer risk, yet the proliferative effects of progesterone in

  15. A whole-genome RNA interference screen for human cell factors affecting myxoma virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferi, Wondimagegnehu M; Dodd, Kristopher; Maranchuk, Rob; Favis, Nicole; Evans, David H

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) provides an important model for investigating host-pathogen interactions. Recent studies have also highlighted how mutations in transformed human cells can expand the host range of this rabbit virus. Although virus growth depends upon interactions between virus and host proteins, the nature of these interactions is poorly understood. To address this matter, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for genes affecting MYXV growth in human MDA-MB-231 cells. By using siRNAs targeting the whole human genome (21,585 genes), a subset of human phosphatases and kinases (986 genes), and also a custom siRNA library targeting selected statistically significant genes ("hits") and nonsignificant genes ("nonhits") of the whole human genome screens (88 genes), we identified 711 siRNA pools that promoted MYXV growth and 333 that were inhibitory. Another 32 siRNA pools (mostly targeting the proteasome) were toxic. The overall overlap in the results was about 25% for the hits and 75% for the nonhits. These pro- and antiviral genes can be clustered into pathways and related groups, including well-established inflammatory and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, as well as clusters relating to β-catenin and the Wnt signaling cascade, the cell cycle, and cellular metabolism. The validity of a subset of these hits was independently confirmed. For example, treating cells with siRNAs that might stabilize cells in G(1), or inhibit passage into S phase, stimulated MYXV growth, and these effects were reproduced by trapping cells at the G(1)/S boundary with an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6. By using 2-deoxy-D-glucose and plasmids carrying the gene for phosphofructokinase, we also confirmed that infection is favored by aerobic glycolytic metabolism. These studies provide insights into how the growth state and structure of cells affect MYXV growth and how these factors might be manipulated to advantage in oncolytic virus therapy.

  16. DNA replication timing is maintained genome-wide in primary human myoblasts independent of D4Z4 contraction in FSH muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Pope

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4 at 4q35.2 from 11-100 copies to 1-10 copies. The extent to which D4Z4 contraction at 4q35.2 affects overall 4q35.2 chromatin organization remains unclear. Because DNA replication timing is highly predictive of long-range chromatin interactions, we generated genome-wide replication-timing profiles for FSHD and control myogenic precursor cells. We compared non-immortalized myoblasts from four FSHD patients and three control individuals to each other and to a variety of other human cell types. This study also represents the first genome-wide comparison of replication timing profiles in non-immortalized human cell cultures. Myoblasts from both control and FSHD individuals all shared a myoblast-specific replication profile. In contrast, male and female individuals were readily distinguished by monoallelic differences in replication timing at DXZ4 and other regions across the X chromosome affected by X inactivation. We conclude that replication timing is a robust cell-type specific feature that is unaffected by FSHD-related D4Z4 contraction.

  17. Chaos in classical string dynamics in $\\hat{\\gamma}$ deformed $AdS_5 \\times T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Kamal L

    2016-01-01

    We consider a circular string in $\\hat{\\gamma}$ deformed $AdS_5 \\times T^{1,1}$ which is localized in the center of $AdS_5$ and winds around the two circles of deformed $T^{1,1}$. We observe chaos in the phase space of the circular string implying non-integrability of string dynamics. The chaotic behaviour in phase space is controlled by energy as well as the deforming parameter $\\hat{\\gamma}$. We further show that the point like object exhibits non-chaotic behaviour. Finally we calculate the Lyapunov exponent for both extended and point like object in support of our first result.

  18. Human parvovirus B19 DNA replication induces a DNA damage response that is dispensable for cell cycle arrest at phase G2/M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sai; Luo, Yong; Cheng, Fang; Huang, Qinfeng; Shen, Weiran; Kleiboeker, Steve; Tisdale, John F; Liu, Zhengwen; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-10-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection is highly restricted to human erythroid progenitor cells, in which it induces a DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR signaling is mainly mediated by the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related) pathway, which promotes replication of the viral genome; however, the exact mechanisms employed by B19V to take advantage of the DDR for virus replication remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the initiators of the DDR and the role of the DDR in cell cycle arrest during B19V infection. We examined the role of individual viral proteins, which were delivered by lentiviruses, in triggering a DDR in ex vivo-expanded primary human erythroid progenitor cells and the role of DNA replication of the B19V double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome in a human megakaryoblastoid cell line, UT7/Epo-S1 (S1). All the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions. The results showed that none of the viral proteins induced phosphorylation of H2AX or replication protein A32 (RPA32), both hallmarks of a DDR. However, replication of the B19V dsDNA genome was capable of inducing the DDR. Moreover, the DDR per se did not arrest the cell cycle at the G(2)/M phase in cells with replicating B19V dsDNA genomes. Instead, the B19V nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein was the key factor in disrupting the cell cycle via a putative transactivation domain operating through a p53-independent pathway. Taken together, the results suggest that the replication of the B19V genome is largely responsible for triggering a DDR, which does not perturb cell cycle progression at G(2)/M significantly, during B19V infection.

  19. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  20. Simian virus 40 DNA replication correlates with expression of a particular subclass of T antigen in a human glial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deminie, C A; Norkin, L C

    1990-08-01

    Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to identify simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen expression and viral DNA replication in individual cells of infected semipermissive human cell lines. SV40 infection aborts before T-antigen expression in many cells of each of the human cell lines examined. In all but one of the human cell lines, most of the T-antigen-producing cells replicated viral DNA. However, in the A172 line of human glial cells only a small percentage of the T-antigen-expressing cells replicated viral DNA. Since different structural and functional classes of T antigen can be recognized with anti-T monoclonal antibodies, we examined infected A172 cells with a panel of 10 anti-T monoclonal antibodies to determine whether viral DNA replication might correlate with the expression of a particular epitope of T antigen. One anti-T monoclonal antibody, PAb 100, did specifically recognize that subset of A172 cells which replicated SV40 DNA. The percentage of PAb 100-reactive A172 cells was dramatically increased by the DNA synthesis inhibitors hydroxyurea and aphidicolin. Removal of the hydroxyurea was followed by an increase in the percentage of cells replicating viral DNA corresponding to the increased percentage reactive with PAb 100. The pattern of SV40 infection in A172 cells was not altered by infection with viable viral mutants containing lesions in the small t protein, the agnoprotein, or the enhancer region. Finally, in situ hybridization was used to show that the percentage of human cells expressing T antigen was similar to the percentage transcribing early SV40 mRNA. Thus, the block to T-antigen expression in human cells is at a stage prior to transcription of early SV40 mRNA.

  1. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role of the prot......In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of genome instability, which is suggested to drive tumorigenesis and possibly aging, our data will facilitate future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  2. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis.

  3. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guili Wang; Gaowei Ren; Xin Cui; Yanpin Ma; Ying Qi; Yujing Huang; Zhongyang Liu; Zhengrong Sun; Qiang Ruan

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns. Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer in HCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis.

  4. DNA Sequences Proximal to Human Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Breakpoints Prevalent in Human Disease Form G-quadruplexes, a Class of DNA Structures Inefficiently Unwound by the Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharti, S.K.; Sommers, J.A.; Zhou, J.; Kaplan, D.L.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Mergny, J.L.; Brosh, R.M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective

  5. A generalization of the Lax pair for the pure spinor superstring in AdS5 x S5

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We show that the Lax pair of the pure spinor superstring in AdS5xS5 admits a generalization where the generators of the superconformal algebra are replaced by the generators of some infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra.

  6. Rigid Holography and Six-Dimensional N=(2,0) Theories on AdS_5 times S^1

    CERN Document Server

    Aharony, Ofer; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Field theories on anti-de Sitter (AdS) space can be studied by realizing them as low-energy limits of AdS vacua of string/M theory. In an appropriate limit, the field theories decouple from the rest of string/M theory. Since these vacua are dual to conformal field theories (CFTs), this relates some of the observables of these field theories on AdS to a subsector of the dual CFTs. We exemplify this `rigid holography' by studying in detail the 6d N=(2,0) A_{K-1} superconformal field theory (SCFT) on AdS_5xS^1, with equal radii for AdS_5 and for S^1. We choose specific boundary conditions preserving sixteen supercharges that arise when this theory is embedded into Type IIB string theory on AdS_5xS^5/Z_K. On R^{4,1}xS^1, this 6d theory has a 5(K-1)-dimensional moduli space, with unbroken 5d SU(K) gauge symmetry at (and only at) the origin. On AdS_5xS^1, the theory has a 2(K-1)-dimensional `moduli space' of supersymmetric configurations. We argue that in this case the SU(K) gauge symmetry is unbroken everywhere in...

  7. The pathology of severe dengue in multiple organs of human fatal cases: histopathology, ultrastructure and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago F Póvoa

    Full Text Available Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively. These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3, and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization, with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes

  8. Natural suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication is mediated by transitional memory CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, M Scott; Johnson, Carl; Teque, Fernando; Fujimura, Sue; Levy, Jay A

    2011-02-01

    HIV replication is suppressed in vitro by a CD8(+) cell noncytotoxic antiviral response (CNAR). This activity directly correlates with an asymptomatic clinical state. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotype of CD8(+) cell subsets having strong CNAR activity. CD8(+) cell subset frequencies and CNAR levels were measured for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected individuals and three groups of HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals: asymptomatic individuals with low-level viremia (vHIV), antiretroviral-drug-treated subjects with undetectable virus levels (TxHIV), and therapy-naïve aviremic elite controllers (EC). CD8(+) cells from the vHIV individuals exhibited the highest HIV-suppressing activity and had elevated frequencies of CD45RA(-) CD27(+) and PD-1(+) (CD279(+)) cells. Functional assessments of CD8(+) cells sorted into distinct subsets established that maximal CNAR activity was mediated by CD45RA(-) CCR7(-) CD27(+) and PD-1(+) CD8(+) cells. T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire profiles of CD8(+) cell subsets having strong CNAR activity exhibited increased perturbations in comparison to those of inactive subsets. Together, these studies suggest that CNAR is driven by HIV replication and that this antiviral activity is associated with oligoclonally expanded activated CD8(+) cells expressing PD-1 and having a transitional memory cell phenotype. The findings better describe the identity of CD8(+) cells showing CNAR and should facilitate the evaluation of this important immune response in studies of HIV pathogenesis, resistance to infection, and vaccine development.

  9. Critical role of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 accessory proteins in viral replication and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Björn; Lairmore, Michael D

    2002-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with a diverse range of lymphoproliferative and neurodegenerative diseases, yet pathogenic mechanisms induced by the virus remain obscure. This complex retrovirus contains typical structural and enzymatic genes but also unique regulatory and accessory genes in four open reading frames (ORFs) of the pX region of the viral genome (pX ORFs I to IV). The regulatory proteins encoded by pX ORFs III and IV, Tax and Rex, respectively, have been extensively characterized. In contrast the contribution of the four accessory proteins p12(I), p27(I), p13(II), and p30(II), encoded by pX ORFs I and II, to viral replication and pathogenesis remained unclear. Proviral clones that are mutated in either pX ORF I or II, while fully competent in cell culture, are severely limited in their replicative capacity in a rabbit model. Emerging evidence indicates that the HTLV-1 accessory proteins are critical for establishment of viral infectivity, enhance T-lymphocyte activation, and potentially alter gene transcription and mitochondrial function. HTLV-1 pX ORF I expression is critical to the viral infectivity in resting primary lymphocytes, suggesting a role for p12(I) in lymphocyte activation. The endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi localizing p12(I), encoded from pX ORF I, activates NFAT, a key T-cell transcription factor, through calcium-mediated signaling pathways and may lower the threshold of lymphocyte activation via the JAK/STAT pathway. In contrast p30(II) localizes to the nucleus and represses viral promoter activity, but may regulate cellular gene expression through p300/CBP or related coactivators of transcription. p13(II) targets mitochondrial proteins, where it alters the organelle morphology and may influence energy metabolism. Collectively, studies of the molecular functions of the HTLV-1 accessory proteins provide insight into strategies used by retroviruses that are associated with lymphoproliferative

  10. PTB Binds to the 3’ Untranslated Region of the Human Astrovirus Type 8: A Possible Role in Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3′UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3′UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3′UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3′UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3′UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3′UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3′UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  11. The pathology of severe dengue in multiple organs of human fatal cases: histopathology, ultrastructure and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Tiago F; Alves, Ada M B; Oliveira, Carlos A B; Nuovo, Gerard J; Chagas, Vera L A; Paes, Marciano V

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively). These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3), and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization), with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes/macrophages and

  12. The Pathology of Severe Dengue in Multiple Organs of Human Fatal Cases: Histopathology, Ultrastructure and Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Tiago F.; Alves, Ada M. B.; Oliveira, Carlos A. B.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Chagas, Vera L. A.; Paes, Marciano V.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a public health problem, with several gaps in understanding its pathogenesis. Studies based on human fatal cases are extremely important and may clarify some of these gaps. In this work, we analyzed lesions in different organs of four dengue fatal cases, occurred in Brazil. Tissues were prepared for visualization in optical and electron microscopy, with damages quantification. As expected, we observed in all studied organ lesions characteristic of severe dengue, such as hemorrhage and edema, although other injuries were also detected. Cases presented necrotic areas in the liver and diffuse macro and microsteatosis, which were more accentuated in case 1, who also had obesity. The lung was the most affected organ, with hyaline membrane formation associated with mononuclear infiltrates in patients with pre-existing diseases such as diabetes and obesity (cases 1 and 2, respectively). These cases had also extensive acute tubular necrosis in the kidney. Infection induced destruction of cardiac fibers in most cases, with absence of nucleus and loss of striations, suggesting myocarditis. Spleens revealed significant destruction of the germinal centers and atrophy of lymphoid follicles, which may be associated to decrease of T cell number. Circulatory disturbs were reinforced by the presence of megakaryocytes in alveolar spaces, thrombus formation in glomerular capillaries and loss of endothelium in several tissues. Besides histopathological and ultrastructural observations, virus replication were investigated by detection of dengue antigens, especially the non-structural 3 protein (NS3), and confirmed by the presence of virus RNA negative strand (in situ hybridization), with second staining for identification of some cells. Results showed that dengue had broader tropism comparing to what was described before in literature, replicating in hepatocytes, type II pneumocytes and cardiac fibers, as well as in resident and circulating monocytes/macrophages and

  13. Trefoil factor 3 stimulates human and rodent pancreatic islet beta-cell replication with retention of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueger, Patrick T; Schisler, Jonathan C; Lu, Danhong; Babu, Daniella A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2008-05-01

    Both major forms of diabetes involve a decline in beta-cell mass, mediated by autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetes and by increased rates of apoptosis secondary to metabolic stress in type 2 diabetes. Methods for controlled expansion of beta-cell mass are currently not available but would have great potential utility for treatment of these diseases. In the current study, we demonstrate that overexpression of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) in rat pancreatic islets results in a 4- to 5-fold increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, with full retention of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This increase was almost exclusively due to stimulation of beta-cell replication, as demonstrated by studies of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and co-immunofluorescence analysis with anti-bromodeoxyuridine and antiinsulin or antiglucagon antibodies. The proliferative effect of TFF3 required the presence of serum or 0.5 ng/ml epidermal growth factor. The ability of TFF3 overexpression to stimulate proliferation of rat islets in serum was abolished by the addition of epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist AG1478. Furthermore, TFF3-induced increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation in rat islets cultured in serum was blocked by overexpression of a dominant-negative Akt protein or treatment with triciribine, an Akt inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of TFF3 also caused a doubling of [3H]thymidine incorporation in human islets. In summary, our findings reveal a novel TFF3-mediated pathway for stimulation of beta-cell replication that could ultimately be exploited for expansion or preservation of islet beta-cell mass.

  14. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  15. Replication and long-term persistence of bovine and human strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis within Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Manuela; Bull, Tim J; Evans, Hugh; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; McMinn, Liz; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger; Hermon-Taylor, John

    2006-01-01

    Free-living protists are ubiquitous in the environment and form a potential reservoir for the persistence of animal and human pathogens. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the cause of Johne's disease, a systemic infection accompanied by chronic inflammation of the intestine that affects many animals, including primates. Most humans with Crohn's disease are infected with this chronic enteric pathogen. Subclinical infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in domestic livestock. Infected animals excrete large numbers of robust organisms into the environment, but little is known about their ability to replicate and persist in protists. In the present study we fed laboratory cultures of Acanthamoeba polyphaga with bovine and human strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Real-time PCR showed that the numbers of the pathogens fell over the first 4 to 8 days and recovered by 12 to 16 days. Encystment of the amoebic cultures after 4 weeks resulted in a 2-log reduction in the level of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which returned to the original level by 24 weeks. Extracts of resection samples of human gut from 39 patients undergoing abdominal surgery were fed to cultures of A. polyphaga. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detected by nested IS900 PCR with amplicon sequencing and visualized by IS900 in situ hybridization and auramine-rhodamine staining was found in cultures derived from 13 of the patients and was still present in the cultures after almost 4 years of incubation. Control cultures were negative. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis has the potential for long-term persistence in environmental protists.

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by a dual CCR5/CXCR4 antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt;

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 microM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5...... at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca(2+) flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did...

  17. Small hydrophobic protein of human metapneumovirus does not affect virus replication and host gene expression in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda de Graaf

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV encodes a small hydrophobic (SH protein of unknown function. HMPV from which the SH open reading frame was deleted (HMPVΔSH was viable and displayed similar replication kinetics, cytopathic effect and plaque size compared with wild type HMPV in several cell-lines. In addition, no differences were observed in infection efficiency or cell-to-cell spreading in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HPBEC cultured at an air-liquid interphase. Host gene expression was analyzed in A549 cells infected with HMPV or HMPVΔSH using microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS based techniques at multiple time points post infection. Only minor differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression levels. A possible function of HMPV SH as apoptosis blocker, as proposed for several members of the family Paramyxoviridae, was rejected based on this analysis. So far, a clear phenotype of HMPV SH deletion mutants in vitro at the virus and host levels is absent.

  18. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  19. Differential bacterial survival, replication, and apoptosis-inducing ability of Salmonella serovars within human and murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwan, W R; Huang, X Z; Hu, L; Kopecko, D J

    2000-03-01

    Salmonella serovars are associated with human diseases that range from mild gastroenteritis to host-disseminated enteric fever. Human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi can lead to typhoid fever, but this serovar does not typically cause disease in mice or other animals. In contrast, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, which are usually linked to localized gastroenteritis in humans and some animal species, elicit a systemic infection in mice. To better understand these observations, multiple strains of each of several chosen serovars of Salmonella were tested for the ability in the nonopsonized state to enter, survive, and replicate within human macrophage cells (U937 and elutriated primary cells) compared with murine macrophage cells (J774A.1 and primary peritoneal cells); in addition, death of the infected macrophages was monitored. The serovar Typhimurium strains all demonstrated enhanced survival within J774A.1 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with the significant, almost 100-fold declines in viable counts noted for serovar Typhi strains. Viable counts for serovar Enteritidis either matched the level of serovar Typhi (J774A. 1 macrophages) or were comparable to counts for serovar Typhimurium (murine peritoneal macrophages). Apoptosis was significantly higher in J774A.1 cells infected with serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 compared to serovar Typhi strain Ty2. On the other hand, serovar Typhi survived at a level up to 100-fold higher in elutriated human macrophages and 2- to 3-fold higher in U937 cells compared to the serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis strains tested. Despite the differential multiplication of serovar Typhi during infection of U937 cells, serovar Typhi caused significantly less apoptosis than infections with serovar Typhimurium. These observations indicate variability in intramacrophage survival and host cytotoxicity among the various serovars and are the first to show differences in

  20. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  1. Previous heat shock treatment inhibits Mayaro virus replication in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgilio, P L; Godinho-Netto, M C; Carvalho Mda, G

    1997-01-01

    Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were submitted to mild or severe heat shock (42 degrees C or 44 degrees C) for 1 h, while another group of cells was double-heat-shocked (submitted to 42 degrees C for 1 h, returned to 37 degrees C for 3 h, then exposed to 44 degrees C for 1 h). After each heat treatment, the cells were infected with Mayaro virus for 24 h and incubated at 37 degrees C. The results showed that the double-heat-shocked thermotolerant cells exhibited a 10(4)-fold virus titre inhibition, despite the recovery of protein synthesis and original morphology 24 h post-infection. In contrast, cells submitted to mild or severe heat shock exhibited weaker inhibition of Mayaro virus titre (10(2)-fold). The mildly heat-shocked cells also presented a full recovery in protein synthesis, which was not observed in severely heat-shocked cells. These results indicate that exposure of A549 cells to a mild or to a double heat shock treatment before Mayaro virus infection induces an antiviral state.

  2. Evolution of Phenotypic Drug Susceptibility and Viral Replication Capacity during Long-Term Virologic Failure of Protease Inhibitor Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Jason D.; Wrin, Terri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Segal, Mark R.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2002-01-01

    Continued use of antiretroviral therapy despite the emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with the durable maintenance of plasma HIV RNA levels below pretherapy levels. The factors that may account for this partial control of viral replication were assessed in a longitudinal observational study of 20 HIV-infected adults who remained on a stable protease inhibitor-based regimen despite ongoing viral replication (plasma HIV RNA levels consistently >500 copies/ml). Longitudinal plasma samples (n = 248) were assayed for drug susceptibility and viral replication capacity (measured by using a single-cycle recombinant-virus assay). The initial treatment-mediated decrease in plasma viremia was directly proportional to the reduction in replicative capacity (P = 0.01). Early virologic rebound was associated the emergence of a virus population exhibiting increased protease inhibitor phenotypic resistance, while replicative capacity remained low. During long-term virologic failure, plasma HIV RNA levels often remained stable or increased slowly, while phenotypic resistance continued to increase and replicative capacity decreased slowly. The emergence of primary genotypic mutations within protease (particularly V82A, I84V, and L90M) was temporally associated with increasing phenotypic resistance and decreasing replicative capacity, while the emergence of secondary mutations within protease was associated with more-gradual changes in both phenotypic resistance and replicative capacity. We conclude that HIV may be constrained in its ability to become both highly resistant and highly fit and that this may contribute to the continued partial suppression of plasma HIV RNA levels that is observed in some patients with drug-resistant viremia. PMID:12368352

  3. Intramuscular delivery of adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing humanized protective antigen induces rapid protection against anthrax that may bypass intranasally originated preexisting adenovirus immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shipo; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ying; Song, Xiaohong; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Ju; Chen, Jianqin; Yin, Ying; Xu, Junjie; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective anthrax vaccine that can induce a rapid and sustained immune response is a priority for the prevention of bioterrorism-associated anthrax infection. Here, we developed a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5-based vaccine expressing the humanized protective antigen (Ad5-PAopt). A single intramuscular injection of Ad5-PAopt resulted in rapid and robust humoral and cellular immune responses in Fisher 344 rats. Animals intramuscularly inoculated with a single dose of 10⁸ infectious units of Ad5-PAopt achieved 100% protection from challenge with 10 times the 50% lethal dose (LD₅₀) of anthrax lethal toxin 7 days after vaccination. Although preexisting intranasally induced immunity to Ad5 slightly weakened the humoral and cellular immune responses to Ad5-PAopt via intramuscular inoculation, 100% protection was achieved 15 days after vaccination in Fisher 344 rats. The protective efficacy conferred by intramuscular vaccination in the presence of preexisting intranasally induced immunity was significantly better than that of intranasal delivery of Ad5-PAopt and intramuscular injection with recombinant PA and aluminum adjuvant without preexisting immunity. As natural Ad5 infection often occurs via the mucosal route, the work here largely illuminates that intramuscular inoculation with Ad5-PAopt can overcome the negative effects of immunity induced by prior adenovirus infection and represents an efficient approach for protecting against emerging anthrax.

  4. Requirement of the N-terminal residues of human cytomegalovirus UL112-113 proteins for viral growth and oriLyt-dependent DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Eui; Park, Mi Young; Kang, Kyeong Jin; Han, Tae Hee; Lee, Chan Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The UL112-113 region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encodes four phosphoproteins of 34, 43, 50, and 84 kDa that promote viral DNA replication. Co-transfection assays have demonstrated that self-interaction of these proteins via the shared N-termini is necessary for their intranuclear distribution as foci and for the efficient relocation of a viral DNA polymerase processivity factor (UL44) to the viral replication sites. However, the requirement of UL112-113 N-terminal residues for viral growth and DNA replication has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of deletion of the N-terminal regions of UL112-113 proteins on viral growth and oriLyt-dependent DNA replication. A deletion of the entire UL112 region or the region encoding the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues from the HCMV (Towne strain) bacmid impaired viral growth in bacmid-transfected human fibroblast cells, indicating their requirement for viral growth. In co-immunoprecipitation assays using the genomic gene expressing the four UL112-113 proteins together, the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues were found to be necessary for stable expression of UL112-113 proteins and their self-interaction. These residues were also required for efficient binding to and relocation of UL44, but not for interaction with IE2, an origin-binding transcription factor. In co-transfection/replication assays, replication of the oriLyt-containing plasmid was promoted by expression of intact UL112-113 proteins, but not by the expression of 25-amino-acid residue-deleted proteins. Our results demonstrate that the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues of UL112-113 proteins that mediate self-interaction contribute to viral growth by promoting their binding to UL44 and the initiation of oriLyt-dependent DNA replication.

  5. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörmann, Xenia [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Lesch, Markus [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Steinbeis Innovation gGmbH, Center for Systems Biomedicine, Falkensee (Germany); Welke, Robert-William [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Sieben, Christian [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Geissner, Andreas [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Brinkmann, Volker [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Kastner, Markus [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Karner, Andreas [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Linz (Austria); Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Anish, Chakkumkal [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Seeberger, Peter H. [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Andreas [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); and others

    2016-05-15

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA{sub 1} D130E, HA{sub 2} I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  6. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  7. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  8. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by a Dual CCR5/CXCR4 Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; De Clercq, Erik; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Rosenkilde, Mette; Schwartz, Thue W.; Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 μM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5- or CXCR4-transfected cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and monocytes/macrophages. AMD3451 also inhibited R5, R5/X4, and X4 HIV-1 primary clinical isolates in PBMCs (IC50, 1.8 to 7.3 μM). A PCR-based viral entry assay revealed that AMD3451 blocks R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca2+ signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca2+ flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca2+ signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca2+ signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 μM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca2+ flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4 but not that induced by CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, and CCL7. The CXCL12- and CCL3-induced chemotaxis was also dose-dependently inhibited by AMD3451. Furthermore, AMD3451 inhibited CXCL12- and CCL3L1-induced endocytosis in CXCR4- and CCR5-transfected cells. AMD3451, in contrast to the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, did not inhibit but enhanced the binding of several anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies (such as clone 12G5) at the cell surface, pointing to a different interaction with CXCR4. AMD3451 is the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agent with selective HIV coreceptor, CCR5 and CXCR4, interaction. PMID:15542651

  9. The spatiotemporal program of DNA replication is associated with specific combinations of chromatin marks in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Picard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of mammalian genomes is under the control of a spatiotemporal program that orchestrates the positioning and the timing of firing of replication origins. The molecular mechanisms coordinating the activation of about [Formula: see text] predicted origins remain poorly understood, partly due to the intrinsic rarity of replication bubbles, making it difficult to purify short nascent strands (SNS. The precise identification of origins based on the high-throughput sequencing of SNS constitutes a new methodological challenge. We propose a new statistical method with a controlled resolution, adapted to the detection of replication origins from SNS data. We detected an average of 80,000 replication origins in different cell lines. To evaluate the consistency between different protocols, we compared SNS detections with bubble trapping detections. This comparison demonstrated a good agreement between genome-wide methods, with 65% of SNS-detected origins validated by bubble trapping, and 44% of bubble trapping origins validated by SNS origins, when compared at the same resolution. We investigated the interplay between the spatial and the temporal programs of replication at fine scales. We show that most of the origins detected in regions replicated in early S phase are shared by all the cell lines investigated whereas cell-type-specific origins tend to be replicated in late S phase. We shed a new light on the key role of CpG islands, by showing that 80% of the origins associated with CGIs are constitutive. Our results further show that at least 76% of CGIs are origins of replication. The analysis of associations with chromatin marks at different timing of cell division revealed new potential epigenetic regulators driving the spatiotemporal activity of replication origins. We highlight the potential role of H4K20me1 and H3K27me3, the coupling of which is correlated with increased efficiency of replication origins, clearly identifying those

  10. Comparison of the effects of the synthetic pyrethroid Metofluthrin and phenobarbital on CYP2B form induction and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Yamada, Tomoya; Deguchi, Yoshihito; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Isobe, Naohiko; Lake, Brian G; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-05

    High doses of Metofluthrin (MTF) have been shown to produce liver tumours in rats by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor leading to liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms and increased cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MTF with those of the known rodent liver tumour promoter phenobarbital (PB) on the induction CYP2B forms and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Treatment with 50 microM MTF and 50 microM PB for 72 h increased CYP2B1 mRNA levels in male Wistar rat hepatocytes and CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Replicative DNA synthesis was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine over the last 24 h of a 48 h treatment period. Treatment with 10-1000 microM MTF and 100-500 microM PB resulted in significant increases in replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. While replicative DNA synthesis was increased in human hepatocytes treated with 5-50 ng/ml epidermal growth factor or 5-100 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor, treatment with MTF and PB had no effect. These results demonstrate that while both MTF and PB induce CYP2B forms in both species, MTF and PB only induced replicative DNA synthesis in rat and not in human hepatocytes. These results provide further evidence that the MOA for MTF-induced rat liver tumour formation is similar to that of PB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B form inducers and that the key event of increased cell proliferation would not occur in human liver.

  11. Conserved retinoblastoma protein-binding motif in human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase minimally impacts viral replication but affects susceptibility to maribavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Sunwen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The UL97 kinase has been shown to phosphorylate and inactivate the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and has three consensus Rb-binding motifs that might contribute to this activity. Recombinant viruses containing mutations in the Rb-binding motifs generally replicated well in human foreskin fibroblasts with only a slight delay in replication kinetics. Their susceptibility to the specific UL97 kinase inhibitor, maribavir, was also examined. Mutation of the amino terminal motif, which is involved in the inactivation of Rb, also renders the virus hypersensitive to the drug and suggests that the motif may play a role in its mechanism of action.

  12. Structural basis of error-prone replication and stalling at a thymine base by human DNA polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirouac, Kevin N.; Ling, Hong; (UWO)

    2009-06-30

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol iota) is a unique member of Y-family polymerases, which preferentially misincorporates nucleotides opposite thymines (T) and halts replication at T bases. The structural basis of the high error rates remains elusive. We present three crystal structures of pol complexed with DNA containing a thymine base, paired with correct or incorrect incoming nucleotides. A narrowed active site supports a pyrimidine to pyrimidine mismatch and excludes Watson-Crick base pairing by pol. The template thymine remains in an anti conformation irrespective of incoming nucleotides. Incoming ddATP adopts a syn conformation with reduced base stacking, whereas incorrect dGTP and dTTP maintain anti conformations with normal base stacking. Further stabilization of dGTP by H-bonding with Gln59 of the finger domain explains the preferential T to G mismatch. A template 'U-turn' is stabilized by pol and the methyl group of the thymine template, revealing the structural basis of T stalling. Our structural and domain-swapping experiments indicate that the finger domain is responsible for pol's high error rates on pyrimidines and determines the incorporation specificity.

  13. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitty, Chris G; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E; Jolly, Douglas J; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals.

  14. Initiation points for cellular deoxyribonucleic acid replication in human lymphoid cells converted by Epstein-Barr virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, A.; Shlomai, Z.; Ben-Bassat, H.

    1981-08-01

    Replicon size was estimated in two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoma lines, BJAB and Ramos, and four EBV-positive lines derived from the former ones by infection (conversion) with two viral strains, B95-8 and P3HR-1. Logarithmic cultures were pulse-labeled with (/sup -3/H)thymidine, and the deoxyribonucleic acid was spread on microscopic slides and autoradiographed by the method of Huberman and Riggs. Three of the four EBV-converted cell lines, BJAB/B95-8, Ra/B95-8, and Ra/HRIK, were found to have significantly shorter replicons (41, 21, 54% shorter, respectively), i.e., more initiation points, than their EBV-negative parents. BJAB/HRIK had replicons which were only slightly shorter (11%) than those of BJAB. However, analysis of track length demonstrated that extensive track fusion occurred during the labeling of BJAB/HRIK, implying that its true average replicon size is shorter than the observed value. The results indicate that in analogy to simian virus 40, EBV activates new initiation points for cellular DNA replication in EBV-transformed cells.

  15. Ebola Virus Replication and Disease Without Immunopathology in Mice Expressing Transgenes to Support Human Myeloid and Lymphoid Cell Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; Lavender, Kerry J; Martellaro, Cynthia; Carmody, Aaron; Kurth, Andreas; Keck, James G; Saturday, Greg; Scott, Dana P; Nichol, Stuart T; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2016-10-15

    The study of Ebola virus (EBOV) pathogenesis in vivo has been limited to nonhuman primate models or use of an adapted virus to cause disease in rodent models. Herein we describe wild-type EBOV (Makona variant) infection of mice engrafted with human hematopoietic CD34(+) stem cells (Hu-NSG™-SGM3 mice; hereafter referred to as SGM3 HuMice). SGM3 HuMice support increased development of myeloid immune cells, which are primary EBOV targets. In SGM3 HuMice, EBOV replicated to high levels, and disease was observed following either intraperitoneal or intramuscular inoculation. Despite the high levels of viral antigen and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, the characteristic histopathology of Ebola virus disease was not observed, and this absence of severe immunopathology may have contributed to the recovery and survival of some of the animals. Future investigations into the underlying mechanisms of the atypical disease presentation in SGM3 HuMice will provide additional insights into the immunopathogenesis of severe EBOV disease. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Understanding of visual attention by adult humans (Homo sapiens): a partial replication of Povinelli, Bierschwale, and Cech (1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Emily; Murphy, Mary; Pitt, Rebecca; Rivers, Angela; Leavens, David A

    2008-11-01

    Povinelli, Bierschwale, and Cech (1999) reported that when tested on a visual attention task, the behavior of juvenile chimpanzees did not support a high-level understanding of visual attention. This study replicates their research using adult humans and aims to investigate the validity of their experimental design. Participants were trained to respond to pointing cues given by an experimenter, and then tested on their ability to locate hidden objects from visual cues. Povinelli et al.'s assertion that the generalization of pointing to gaze is indicative of a high-level framework was not supported by our findings: Training improved performance only on initial probe trials when the experimenter's gaze was not directed at the baited cup. Furthermore, participants performed above chance on such trials, the same result exhibited by chimpanzees and used as evidence by Povinelli et al. to support a low-level framework. These findings, together with the high performance of participants in an incongruent condition, in which the experimenter pointed to or gazed at an unbaited container, challenge the validity of their experimental design. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. On classical Yang-Baxter based deformations of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring

    CERN Document Server

    van Tongeren, Stijn J

    2015-01-01

    Interesting deformations of AdS_5 x S^5 such as the gravity dual of noncommutative SYM and Sch\\"odinger spacetimes have recently been shown to be integrable. We clarify questions regarding the reality and integrability properties of the associated construction based on R matrices that solve the classical Yang-Baxter equation, and present an overview of manifestly real R matrices associated to the various deformations. We also discuss when these R matrices should correspond to TsT transformations, which not all do, and briefly analyze the symmetries preserved by these deformations, for example finding Schr\\"odinger superalgebras that were previously obtained as subalgebras of psu(2,2|4). Our results contain a (singular) generalization of an apparently non-TsT deformation of AdS_5 x S^5, whose status as a string background is an interesting open question.

  18. A search for AdS5 X S2 IIB supergravity solutions dual to N = 2 SCFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Colgáin, Eoin Ó

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic search for Type IIB supergravity solutions whose spacetimes include AdS5 and S2 factors, which would be candidate duals to N = 2 four-dimensional Superconformal field theories. The candidate solutions encode the SU(2) R-symmetry geometrically on the S2 and an additional Killing vector generates the U(1) R-symmetry. By analysing the Killing spinor equations we show that no such solutions exist. This suggests that, if Type IIB backgrounds dual to N = 2 SCFTs exist, the SU(2) R-symmetry is realised non-geometrically. Finally, we also show that, in the context of both N = 1 and N = 2 Type IIB backgrounds with an AdS5 factor, the only candidate U(1) R-symmetry Killing vector directions are the ones that appear for generic values of the Killing spinors; no further Killing vectors exist for special values of the Killing spinors.

  19. Flat Currents and Solutions of the Green-Schwarz Superstring on AdS5×S5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Xia; WU Sheng; XIE Xiao-Ning; XIONG Chuan-Hua; YUE Rui-Hong; SHI Kang-Jie

    2007-01-01

    We show that for the Green-Schwarz superstring on AdS5×S5, the Cartan 1-forms associated with the flat currents given by Bena, Polchinski and Roiban [Phys. Rev. D 69 (2004) 046002] also satisfy equations of motion and the Virasoro constraint. Thus one can generate a series of classical solutions with a spectrum parameter from the existing one, and these solutions have the same infinite set of classically conserved quantities.

  20. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  1. Homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations as non-abelian duals of the AdS 5 σ-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, B.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose that the Yang-Baxter deformation of the symmetric space σ-model parameterized by an r-matrix solving the homogeneous (classical) Yang-Baxter equation is equivalent to the non-abelian dual of the undeformed model with respect to a subgroup determined by the structure of the r-matrix. We explicitly demonstrate this on numerous examples in the case of the {{AdS}}5 σ-model. The same should also be true for the full {{AdS}}5× {S}5 supercoset model, providing an explanation for and generalizing several recent observations relating homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations based on non-abelian r-matrices to the undeformed {{AdS}}5× {S}5 model by a combination of T-dualities and nonlinear coordinate redefinitions. This also includes the special case of deformations based on abelian r-matrices, which correspond to TsT transformations: they are equivalent to non-abelian duals of the original model with respect to a central extension of abelian subalgebras.

  2. Chaotic strings in a near Penrose limit of AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Yuhma; Kyono, Hideki; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2015-01-01

    We study chaotic motions of a classical string in a near Penrose limit of AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$. It is known that chaotic solutions appear on $R\\times T^{1,1}$, depending on initial conditions. It may be interesting to ask whether the chaos persists even in Penrose limits or not. In this paper, we show that sub-leading corrections in a Penrose limit provide an unstable speratrix, so that chaotic motions are generated as a consequence of collapsed Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) tori. Our analysis is based on deriving a reduced system composed of two degrees of freedom by supposing a winding string ansatz. Then we provide a support for the existence of chaos by computing Poincar\\'e sections. In comparison to the AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$ case, we argue that no chaos lives in a near Penrose limit of AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ as expected from the classical integrability of the parent system.

  3. Homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations as non-abelian duals of the AdS_5 sigma-model

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the Yang-Baxter deformation of the symmetric space sigma-model parameterized by an r-matrix solving the homogeneous (classical) Yang-Baxter equation is equivalent to the non-abelian dual of the undeformed model with respect to a subgroup determined by the structure of the r-matrix. We explicitly demonstrate this on numerous examples in the case of the AdS_5 sigma-model. The same should also be true for the full AdS_5 x S^5 supercoset model, providing an explanation for and generalizing several recent observations relating homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations based on non-abelian r-matrices to the undeformed AdS_5 x S^5 model by a combination of T-dualities and non-linear coordinate redefinitions. This also includes the special case of deformations based on abelian r-matrices, which correspond to TsT transformations: they are equivalent to non-abelian duals of the original model with respect to a central extension of abelian subalgebras.

  4. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    brain and grade II astrocytomas, despite the degree of DDR activation was higher in grade II tumors. Markers indicative of ongoing DNA replication stress (Chk1 activation, Rad17 phosphorylation, replication protein A foci and single-stranded DNA) were present in GBM cells under high- or low...... and indicate that replication stress, rather than oxidative stress, fuels the DNA damage signalling in early stages of astrocytoma development.......Malignant gliomas, the deadliest of brain neoplasms, show rampant genetic instability and resistance to genotoxic therapies, implicating potentially aberrant DNA damage response (DDR) in glioma pathogenesis and treatment failure. Here, we report on gross, aberrant constitutive activation of DNA...

  5. Acute inactivation of the replicative helicase in human cells triggers MCM8-9-dependent DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Nishimura, Kohei; Minocherhomji, Sheroy

    2017-01-01

    (DSBs). Remarkably, these cells maintain some DNA synthesis in the absence of MCM2, and this requires the MCM8-9 complex, a paralog of the MCM2-7 replicative helicase. We show that MCM8-9 functions in a homologous recombination-based pathway downstream from RAD51, which is promoted by DSB induction....... This RAD51/MCM8-9 axis is distinct from the recently described RAD52-dependent DNA synthesis pathway that operates in early mitosis at common fragile sites. We propose that stalled replication forks can be restarted in S phase via homologous recombination using MCM8-9 as an alternative replicative helicase....

  6. A motif unique to the human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is important for nucleic acid binding, ATP hydrolysis, RNA/DNA unwinding and HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Garbelli

    Full Text Available DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication.

  7. A motif unique to the human DEAD-box protein DDX3 is important for nucleic acid binding, ATP hydrolysis, RNA/DNA unwinding and HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelli, Anna; Beermann, Sandra; Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-05-12

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication.

  8. Gap-filling and bypass at the replication fork are both active mechanisms for tolerance of low-dose ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinet, Annabel; Vessoni, Alexandre T; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Menck, Carlos F M; Stary, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) or can be tolerated by specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, such as Polη. TLS may act at stalled replication forks or through an S-phase independent gap-filling mechanism. After UVC irradiation, Polη-deficient (XP-V) human cells were arrested in early S-phase and exhibited both single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and prolonged replication fork stalling, as detected by DNA fiber assay. In contrast, NER deficiency in XP-C cells caused no apparent defect in S-phase progression despite the accumulation of ssDNA and a G2-phase arrest. These data indicate that while Polη is essential for DNA synthesis at ongoing damaged replication forks, NER deficiency might unmask the involvement of tolerance pathway through a gap-filling mechanism. ATR knock down by siRNA or caffeine addition provoked increased cell death in both XP-V and XP-C cells exposed to low-dose of UVC, underscoring the involvement of ATR/Chk1 pathway in both DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. We generated a unique human cell line deficient in XPC and Polη proteins, which exhibited both S- and G2-phase arrest after UVC irradiation, consistent with both single deficiencies. In these XP-C/Polη(KD) cells, UVC-induced replicative intermediates may collapse into double-strand breaks, leading to cell death. In conclusion, both TLS at stalled replication forks and gap-filling are active mechanisms for the tolerance of UVC-induced DNA damage in human cells and the preference for one or another pathway depends on the cellular genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Transbodies to HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibit Viral Replication and Restore Host Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittavisutthikul, Surasak; Seesuay, Watee; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Srimanote, Potjanee; Werner, Rolf G.; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective direct acting anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agent is still needed. In this study, human single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) that bound to HCV NS3/4A protein were produced by phage display technology. The engineered scFvs were linked to nonaarginines (R9) for making them cell penetrable. HCV-RNA-transfected Huh7 cells treated with the transbodies produced from four different transformed E. coli clones had reduced HCV-RNA inside the cells and in the cell spent media, as well as fewer HCV foci in the cell monolayer compared to the transfected cells in culture medium alone. The transbodies-treated transfected cells also had up-expression of the genes coding for the host innate immune response, including TRIF, TRAF3, IRF3, IL-28B, and IFN-β. Computerized homology modeling and intermolecular docking predicted that the effective transbodies interacted with several critical residues of the NS3/4A protease, including those that form catalytic triads, oxyanion loop, and S1 and S6 pockets, as well as a zinc-binding site. Although insight into molecular mechanisms of the transbodies need further laboratory investigation, it can be deduced from the current data that the transbodies blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activities, leading to the HCV replication inhibition and restoration of the virally suppressed host innate immunity. The engineered antibodies should be tested further for treatment of HCV infection either alone, in combination with current therapeutics, or in a mixture with their cognates specific to other HCV proteins. PMID:27617013

  10. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope confers higher rates of replicative fitness to perinatally transmitted viruses than to nontransmitted viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaohong; West, John T; Zhang, Hong; Shea, Danielle M; M'soka, Tendai J; Wood, Charles

    2008-12-01

    Selection of a minor viral genotype during perinatal transmission of human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been observed, but there is a lack of information on the correlation of the restrictive transmission with biological properties of the virus, such as replicative fitness. Recombinant viruses expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein or the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent (DsRed2) protein carrying the V1 to V5 regions of env from seven mother-infant pairs (MIPs) infected by subtype C HIV-1 were constructed, and competition assays were carried out to compare the fitness between the transmitted and nontransmitted viruses. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the frequency of infected cells, and the replicative fitness was determined based on a calculation that takes into account replication of competing viruses in a single infection versus dual infections. Transmitted viruses from five MIPs with the mothers chronically infected showed a restrictive env genotype, and all the recombinant viruses carrying the infants' Env had higher replicative fitness than those carrying the Env from the mothers. This growth fitness is lineage specific and can be observed only within the same MIP. In contrast, in two MIPs where the mothers had undergone recent acute infection, the viral Env sequences were similar between the mothers and infants and showed no further restriction in quasispecies during perinatal transmission. The recombinant viruses carrying the Env from the infants' viruses also showed replication fitness similar to those carrying the mothers' Env proteins. Our results suggest that newly transmitted viruses from chronically infected mothers have been selected to have higher replicative fitness to favor transmission, and this advantage is conferred by the V1 to V5 region of Env of the transmitted viruses. This finding has important implications for vaccine design or development of strategies to prevent HIV-1 transmission.

  11. RNA interference-mediated targeting of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early or early gene products inhibits viral replication with differential effects on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, E; Stadler, Bradford M; Debatis, Michelle; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2012-05-01

    Viral drug toxicity, resistance, and an increasing immunosuppressed population warrant continued research into new avenues for limiting diseases associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In this study, a small interfering RNA (siRNA), siX3, was designed to target coding sequences within shared exon 3 of UL123 and UL122 transcripts encoding IE1 and IE2 immediate-early proteins of HCMV. Pretreatment of cells with siX3 reduced the levels of viral protein expression, DNA replication, and progeny virus production compared to control siRNA. Two siRNAs against UL54 and overlapping transcripts (UL55-57) were compared to siX3 in HCMV infection and were also found to be effective at inhibiting HCMV replication. Further investigation into the effects of the siRNAs on viral replication showed that pretreatment with each of the siRNAs resulted in an inhibition in the formation of mature replication compartments. The ability of these siRNAs to prevent or reduce certain cytopathic effects associated with HCMV infection was also examined. Infected cells pretreated with siX3, but not siUL54, retained promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in cellular PML bodies, an essential component of this host intrinsic antiviral defense. DNA damage response proteins, which are localized in nuclear viral replication compartments, were reduced in the siX3- and siUL54-treated cells. siX3, but not siUL54, prevented DNA damage response signaling early after infection. Therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated by treating cells with siRNAs after HCMV replication had commenced. Together, these findings suggest that siRNAs targeting exon 3 of the major IE genes or the UL54-57 transcripts be further studied for their potential development into anti-HCMV therapeutics.

  12. Evaluation of a multiple-cycle, recombinant virus, growth competition assay that uses flow cytometry to measure replication efficiency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Carrie; Wang, Jiong; Jin, Xia; Planelles, Vicente; An, Dong Sung; Tallo, Amanda; Huang, Yangxin; Wu, Hulin; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication efficiency or fitness, as measured in cell culture, has been postulated to correlate with clinical outcome of HIV infection, although this is still controversial. One limitation is the lack of high-throughput assays that can measure replication efficiency over multiple rounds of replication. We have developed a multiple-cycle growth competition assay to measure HIV-1 replication efficiency that uses flow cytometry to determine the relative proportions of test and reference viruses, each of which expresses a different reporter gene in place of nef. The reporter genes are expressed on the surface of infected cells and are detected by commercially available fluorescence-labeled antibodies. This method is less labor-intensive than those that require isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. The two reporter gene products are detected with similar specificity and sensitivity, and the proportion of infected cells in culture correlates with the amount of viral p24 antigen produced in the culture supernatant. HIV replication efficiencies of six different drug-resistant site-directed mutants were reproducibly quantified and were similar to those obtained with a growth competition assay in which the relative proportion of each variant was measured by sequence analysis, indicating that recombination between the pol and reporter genes was negligible. This assay also reproducibly quantified the relative fitness conferred by protease and reverse transcriptase sequences containing multiple drug resistance mutations, amplified from patient plasma. This flow cytometry-based growth competition assay offers advantages over current assays for HIV replication efficiency and should prove useful for the evaluation of patient samples in clinical trials.

  13. Finite-size giant magnons on η-deformed AdS5×S5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Ahn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider strings moving in the Rt×Sη3 subspace of the η-deformed AdS5×S5 and obtain a class of solutions depending on several parameters. They are characterized by the string energy and two angular momenta. Finite-size dyonic giant magnon belongs to this class of solutions. Further on, we restrict ourselves to the case of giant magnon with one nonzero angular momentum, and obtain the leading finite-size correction to the dispersion relation.

  14. Bound States of the q-Deformed AdS5 x S5 Superstring S-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, Ben; Miramontes, J Luis

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of the q deformation of the S-matrix for excitations on the string world sheet in AdS5 x S5 is continued. We argue that due to the lack of Lorentz invariance the situation is more subtle than in a relativistic theory in that the nature of bound states depends on their momentum. At low enough momentum |p|1. This subtlety fixes a problem involving the consistency of crossing symmetry with the relativistic limit found in earlier work. With mirror kinematics, obtained after a double Wick rotation, the bound state structure is simpler and there are no marginally unstable bound states.

  15. Finite-size effect of \\eta-deformed AdS_5 x S^5 at strong coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Changrim

    2016-01-01

    We compute Luscher corrections for a giant magnon in the \\eta-deformed (AdS_5\\times S^5)_{\\eta} using the su(2|2)_q-invariant S-matrix at strong coupling and compare with the finite-size effect of the corresponding string state, derived previously. We find that these two results match and confirm that the su(2|2)_q-invariant S-matrix is describing world-sheet excitations of the \\eta-deformed background.

  16. Efficient replication of genotype 3a and 4a hepatitis C virus replicons in human hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C, the quest for pan-genotype, effective, and well-tolerated inhibitors continues. To facilitate these efforts, it is desirable to have in vitro replication systems for all major HCV genotypes. However, cell culture replication systems exist...... for only genotypes 1a, 1b, and 2a. In this study, we generated G418-selectable subgenomic replicons for prototype strains of genotypes 3a (S52) and 4a (ED43). Production of G418-resistant colonies by S52 and ED43 in Huh-7.5 cells required the amino acid substitutions S2210I and R2882G, respectively, cell...... culture adaptive mutations originally reported for genotype 1b replicons. RNA replication was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and detection of viral protein. Sequencing of multiple independent replicon clones revealed the presence of additional nonsynonymous mutations. Interestingly...

  17. c-ETS transcription factors play an essential role in the licensing of human MCM4 origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Kaveri; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-11-01

    In metazoans, DNA replication is a highly regulated and ordered process that occurs during the S phase of cell cycle. It begins with the licensing of origins of replication usually found in close proximity of actively transcribing genes owing perhaps to a profound influence of transcription factors on the epigenetic signatures and architecture of chromatin. Here we show that ETS transcription factors are novel regulators of MCM4 origin, whose binding sites are localized between two divergently transcribing MCM4 and PRKDC genes. c-ETS1 and c-ETS2 were recruited to the MCM4 origin respectively during the S and G1 phases of cell cycle. c-ETS2 binding was facilitated by an active chromatin distinguished by acetylated histone H3 orchestrated by histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and followed by HBO1 mediated histone H4 acetylation. Interestingly, c-ETS2 overexpression led to increased BrdU incorporation in the S phase cells while its down-regulation by RNA interference compromised the loading of pre-replicative complex at the origin. Conversely, the recruitment of c-ETS1 at the origin coincided with histone H3 methylation signature characteristic of closed chromatin conformation. As expected, enforced expression of c-ETS1 severely compromised DNA replication whereas its down-regulation enhanced DNA replication as evident from increased BrdU incorporation. Thus, c-ETS transcription factors appear to be key regulators of MCM4 origin where c-ETS2 seems to promote DNA replication whereas c-ETS1 functions as a negative regulator. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Perturbative and non-perturbative approaches to the quantum AdS5xS5 superstring

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Ryan

    This dissertation spans perturbative to non-perturbative approaches of testing and using integrability of the IIB superstring in the AdS5xS 5 background. The integrability-based solution of string theories related to AdS n/CFTn-1 dualities relies on the worldsheet S matrix. In chapter 2 we use generalized unitarity to construct the terms with logarithmic dependence on external momenta at one- and two-loop order in the worldsheet S matrix for strings in a general integrable worldsheet theory. We also discuss aspects of calculations as it extends to higher orders. The S-matrix elements are expressed as sums of integrals with coefficients given in terms of tree-level worldsheet four-point scattering amplitudes. Off-diagonal one-loop rational functions, not determined by two-dimensional unitarity cuts, are fixed by symmetry considerations. They play an important role in the determination of the two-loop logarithmic contributions. We illustrate the general analysis by computing the logarithmic terms in the one- and two-loop four-particle S-matrix elements in the massive worldsheet sectors of string theory in AdS5xS5, AdS4xCP 3, AdS3xS3xS3xS 1 and AdS3xS3xT4. We explore the structure of the S matrices and provide explicit evidence for the absence of higher-order logarithms and for the exponentiation of the one-loop dressing phase. In chapter 3 we will construct the full coset space of AdS5xS5 SO4,1xSO 5 in terms of a Gross-Neveu model. After this non-perturbative transformation we have shown the theory to be UV finite at 1 loop and furthermore that it exhibits some non-local integrals of motion through a Lax connection. The integrability of string theory in AdS5xS 5 and of the dilatation operator of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory has been used to propose an exact solution to the spectral problem in these theories. Weak coupling perturbation theory both in gauge theory and on the worldsheet has been extensively used to verify this solution. In chapter 4 we demonstrate numerical lattice monte carlo worldsheet methods for finding the spectrum of the AdS5xS5 superstring at finite values of the coupling constant and illustrate them by recovering, within numerical errors, the predictions of the BES equation for the universal scaling function. This is the first finite-coupling calculation in this theory which uses finite field theory methods.

  19. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  20. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  1. Inhibition of human Chk1 causes increased initiation of DNA replication, phosphorylation of ATR targets, and DNA breakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syljuåsen, Randi G; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg

    2005-01-01

    by increased amounts of nonextractable RPA protein, formation of single-stranded DNA, and induction of DNA strand breaks. Moreover, these responses were prevented by siRNA-mediated downregulation of Cdk2 or the replication initiation protein Cdc45, or by addition of the CDK inhibitor roscovitine. We propose...

  2. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4 Promotes Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication by Suppressing Autophagy in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqiang; Zhu, Naiwei; Chen, Shenglin; Zhao, Ping; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shiying; Tang, Hailin; Zhu, Yongzhe; Qi, Zhongtian

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. Since JEV is a neurotropic virus, it is important to identify key molecules that mediate JEV infection in neuronal cells and to investigate their underlying mechanisms. In this study, the critical role of Nedd4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is highly expressed in the central nervous system, was examined in JEV propagation. In SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells, Nedd4 was up-regulated in response to JEV infection. Moreover, down-regulation of Nedd4 resulted in a significant decrease in JEV replication without alterations in virus attachment and internalization or in JEV pseudotyped virus infection, suggesting that Nedd4 participates in the replication but not in the entry stage of JEV infection. Further functional analysis showed that Nedd4 attenuated JEV-induced autophagy, which negatively regulates virus replication during infection. These results suggest that Nedd4 facilitates the replication of JEV by suppressing virus-induced autophagy. Taken together, our results indicate that Nedd4 plays a crucial role in JEV infection of neuronal cells, which provides a potential target for the development of novel treatment to combat JEV infection. PMID:28349961

  3. Microarray analysis of E-box binding-related gene expression in young and replicatively senescent human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semov, Alexandre; Marcotte, Richard; Semova, Natalie; Ye, Xiangyun; Wang, Eugenia

    2002-03-01

    An E-box (CACGTG) designer microarray was developed to monitor a group of genes whose expressions share a particular regulatory mode. Sensitivity and specificity of microarray hybridization, as well as variability of microarray data, were evaluated. This designer microarray was used to generate expression profiles of E-box binding-related genes in WI-38 fibroblast cultures at three different growth states: low-passage replicating, low-passage contact-inhibited quiescent, and replicatively senescent. Microarray gene screening reveals that quiescent and senescent cells, in comparison with replicating ones, are characterized by downregulation of Pam, a protein associated with c-Myc, and upregulation of Mad family genes, Max dimerization proteins. Moreover, quiescence and senescence can be distinguished by increased expression of Irlb, c-Myc transcription factor, and Miz-1, c-Myc-interacting Zn finger protein 1, only in the former state. Senescence is characterized by downregulation of Id4, inhibitor of DNA binding 4, and Mitf, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, in comparison with young replicating and quiescent states. Differential expression of genes detected by microarray hybridization was independently confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. Alterations in the expression of E-box-binding transcription factors and c-Myc-binding proteins demonstrate the importance of these genes in establishing the contact-inhibited quiescent or senescent phenotypes.

  4. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  5. Combination of small interfering RNAs mediates greater inhibition of human hepatitis B virus replication and antigen expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; XU Ze-feng; YE Jing-jia; YAO Hang-ping; ZHENG Shu; DING Jia-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the inhibitory effect mediated by combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting different sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcripts on the viral replication and antigen expression in vitro. Methods: (1) Seven siRNAs targeting surface (S), polymerase (P) or precore (PreC) region ofHBV genome were designed and chemically synthesized.(2) HBV-producing HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with or without siRNAs for 72 h. (3) HBsAg and HBeAg in the cell culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. (4) Intracellular viral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction). (5) HBV viral mRNA was reverse transcribed and quantified by real-time PCR. (6) The change of cell cycle and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Our data demonstrated that synthetic small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting S and PreC gene could efficiently and specifically inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression. The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg and the replication of HBV could be specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by siRNAs.Furthermore, our results showed that the combination of siRNAs targeting various regions could inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression in a more efficient way than the use of single siRNA at the same final concentration. No apoptotic change was observed in the cell after siRNA treatment. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that siRNAs exerted robust and specific inhibition on HBV replication and antigen expression in a cell culture system and combination of siRNAs targeting different regions exhibited more potency.

  6. Role of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in regulating replication of Penicillium marneffei in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Li, Xiqing; Lu, Sha; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Liang, Yuheng; Xi, Liyan

    2014-05-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a human pathogen which persists in macrophages and threatens the immunocompromised patients. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) pathways in cytokine expression, phagosome-lysosome fusion and replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages. Analysis of both ERK1/2 and p38 showed rapid phosphorylation in response to P. marneffei. Using specific inhibitors of p38 (SB203580) and MAP kinase kinase-1 (PD98059), we found that ERK1/2 and p38 were essential for P. marneffei-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production, whereas p38, but not that of ERK, was essential for IL-10 production. Furthermore, the presence of PD98059 always decreased phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular multiplication of P. marneffei, whereas the use of SB203580 always increased phagosomal acidification and maturation and decreased intracellular replication. These data suggest that a proper balance of between ERK1/2 and p38 may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei. Our findings further indicate a novel therapeutic avenue for treating P. marneffei by stimulating ERK1/2 or activating ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms.

  7. CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 suppresses replication of CCR5-tropic HIV-1 in human lymphoid tissue by selective induction of CC-chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinori; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen, Silvia; Kiselyeva, Yana; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Margolis, Leonid

    2004-02-01

    In infected individuals, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exist as a "swarm" of quasi species compartmentalized in tissues where individual viral variants may interact locally. We have used human lymphoid tissue, where the critical events of HIV disease occur, to study local interactions in model HIV-1 binary swarms ex vivo. We infected tissue blocks with binary mixtures consisting either of CCR5-dependent and CXCR4-dependent variants or of 2 dual-tropic HIV-1 variants, of which one is skewed to utilization of CXCR4 and the other of CCR5. HIV-1 variants that use CXCR4 suppress replication of CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants, whereas CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants do not affect replication of CXCR4-dependent HIV-1. CC-chemokines that inhibit replication of CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants were up-regulated by CXCR4-dependent HIV-1, thus possibly contributing to this suppression. Tissue-specific chemokine/cytokine network modulations triggered by individual HIV-1 variants may be an important mechanism of local interactions among HIV-1 quasi species in infected tissue.

  8. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is involved in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Maohua; You, Hong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) (type 2) is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393), overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81). Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91), a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication) and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5) or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper). The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects). Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg) yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold). Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  9. DNA Sequences Proximal to Human Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Breakpoints Prevalent in Human Disease Form G-quadruplexes, a Class of DNA Structures Inefficiently Unwound by the Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharti, S.K.; Sommers, J.A.; Zhou, J.; Kaplan, D.L.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Mergny, J.L.; Brosh, R.M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective mit

  10. Cidofovir and brincidofovir reduce the pathology caused by systemic infection with human type 5 adenovirus in immunosuppressed Syrian hamsters, while ribavirin is largely ineffective in this model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Ann E; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Ying, Baoling; Buller, R Mark L; Wold, William S M; Toth, Karoly

    2014-12-01

    There are no drugs approved specifically to treat disseminated adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans. Cidofovir is active against Ad in cell culture, and it is used frequently in the clinic with disseminated infection in pediatric transplant patients; however, controlled clinical studies have not been conducted to prove the anti-Ad efficacy of cidofovir. Brincidofovir, a lipid-linked derivative of cidofovir, which has strong activity against Ad in cell culture and in animal models, is a promising new drug currently in clinical trials. Ribavirin, which has modest activity against some Ad types in cell culture, has been used in the clinic against disseminated Ad, but the efficacy of ribavirin is unknown. In the current study, we have examined the activity of cidofovir, brincidofovir, and ribavirin against disseminated Ad5 infection in the immunosuppressed Syrian hamster model. Hamsters are immunosuppressed by treatment with cyclophosphamide, then infected intravenously with Ad5, leading to disseminated Ad5 infection, especially in the liver. We found that cidofovir and brincidofovir have excellent activity against Ad5 pathology and replication in the liver, even when administered therapeutically starting at 3 days post-challenge with Ad5. Ribavirin did not have anti-Ad5 activity in our model. Our data support the use of cidofovir and brincidofovir in humans for the treatment of disseminated Ad infections in humans.

  11. Insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter to facilitate deep tissue imaging does not alter oncolytic or replication capability of a novel vaccinia virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittra Arjun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aimed to determine if insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS cDNA as a marker for non-invasive imaging of virotherapy alters the replication and oncolytic capability of a novel vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153. Methods GLV-1h153 was modified from parental vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 to carry hNIS via homologous recombination. GLV-1h153 was tested against human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 for replication via viral plaque assays and flow cytometry. Expression and transportation of hNIS in infected cells was evaluated using Westernblot and immunofluorescence. Intracellular uptake of radioiodide was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral cytotoxicity and tumor regression of treated PANC-1tumor xenografts in nude mice was also determined. Finally, tumor radiouptake in xenografts was assessed via positron emission tomography (PET utilizing carrier-free 124I radiotracer. Results GLV-1h153 infected, replicated within, and killed PANC-1 cells as efficiently as GLV-1h68. GLV-1h153 provided dose-dependent levels of hNIS expression in infected cells. Immunofluorescence detected transport of the protein to the cell membrane prior to cell lysis, enhancing hNIS-specific radiouptake (P In vivo, GLV-1h153 was as safe and effective as GLV-1h68 in regressing pancreatic cancer xenografts (P 124I-PET. Conclusion Insertion of the hNIS gene does not hinder replication or oncolytic capability of GLV-1h153, rendering this novel virus a promising new candidate for the noninvasive imaging and tracking of oncolytic viral therapy.

  12. Quantum dispersion relations for excitations of long folded spinning superstring in AdS_5 x S^5

    CERN Document Server

    Giombi, S; Roiban, R; Tseytlin, A A

    2010-01-01

    We use AdS_5 x S^5 superstring sigma model perturbation theory to compute the leading one-loop corrections to the dispersion relations of the excitations near a long spinning string in AdS. This investigation is partially motivated by the OPE-based approach to the computation of the expectation value of null polygonal Wilson loops suggested in arXiv:1006.2788. Our results are in partial agreement with the recent asymptotic Bethe ansatz computation in arXiv:1010.5237. In particular, we find that the heaviest AdS mode (absent in the ABA approach) is stable and has a corrected one-loop dispersion relation similar to the other massive modes. Its stability might hold also at the next-to-leading order as we suggest using a unitarity-based argument.

  13. Prolonged control of replication-competent dual- tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 following cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART during primary HIV-1 infection occasionally results in transient control of viral replication after treatment interruption, the vast majority of patients eventually experience a rebound in plasma viremia. Results Here we report a case of a patient who was started on HAART during symptomatic primary infection and who has subsequently maintained viral loads of + T cells. In addition, he does not have any known protective HLA alleles. Thus it is unlikely that he was destined to become a natural elite controller or suppressor. The mechanism of control of viral replication is unclear; he is infected with a CCR5/CXCR4 dual-tropic virus that is fully replication-competent in vitro. In addition, his spouse, who transmitted the virus to him, developed AIDS. The patient's CD4+ T cells are fully susceptible to HIV-1 infection, and he has low titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous and autologous HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, his CD8+ T cells do not have potent HIV suppressive activity. Conclusion This report suggests that some patients may be capable of controlling pathogenic HIV-1 isolates for extended periods of time after the cessation of HAART through a mechanism that is distinct from the potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL mediated suppression that has been reported in many elite suppressors.

  14. Targeting the human DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) RNA helicase as a novel strategy to inhibit viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelli, A; Radi, M; Falchi, F; Beermann, S; Zanoli, S; Manetti, F; Dietrich, U; Botta, M; Maga, G

    2011-01-01

    Compounds currently used for the treatment of HIV-1 Infections are targeted to viral proteins. However, the high intrinsic mutation and replication rates of HIV-1 often lead to the emergence of drug resistant strains and consequent therapeutic failure. On this basis, cellular cofactors represent attractive new targets for HIV-1 chemotherapy, since targeting a cellular factor that is required for viral replication should help to overcome the problem of viral resistance. We and others have recently reported the identification of compounds suppressing HIV-1 replication by targeting the cellular DEAD-box helicase DDX3. These results provide a proof-of-principle for the feasibility of blocking HIV-1 infection by rendering the host cell environment less favorable for the virus. The rationale for such an approach and its implications in potentially overcoming the problem of drug resistance related to drugs targeting viral proteins will be discussed in the context of the known cellular functions of the DEAD-box helicase DDX3.

  15. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pss Rao

    Full Text Available While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1 and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold and both ROS (>2 fold and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold, and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold. In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in

  16. Efficient expression and purification of human replication fork-stabilizing factor, Claspin, from mammalian cells: DNA-binding activity and novel protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Syuzi; Masai, Hisao

    2011-08-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins of a large size often poses problems of instability or low expression in bacterial or insect cells. Here, we established a method for a high-level expression of large-sized recombinant proteins in mammalian cells and subsequent purification of the full-length proteins. We applied this method to express human Claspin and Tim-Tipin complex, which play important roles in replication checkpoint responses as fork-stabilizing factors, and successfully purified them in functional forms in amount sufficient for enzymatic characterization. Purified Claspin behaves as a monomer and binds preferentially to fork-like DNA. Over-expression of tagged Claspin in mammalian cells facilitated the detection of its interacting factors. Claspin interacts with many factors involved in checkpoint regulation and replication fork machinery, including ATR, ATM, Chk1, Tim, MCM4, MCM10, Cdc45, DNA polymerases α, δ, ε and Cdc7 kinase. We will discuss the potential implication of these findings in architecture of replication fork. We will also discuss the advantage of this system for purification and characterization of those proteins that are large and have been difficult to deal with.

  17. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  18. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  19. Biochemical Characterization of the Human Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase: SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY, DNA BRANCH MIGRATION, AND ABILITY TO OVERCOME BLOCKADES TO DNA UNWINDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Irfan; Crouch, Jack D; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Sommers, Joshua A; Carney, Sean M; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Trakselis, Michael A; Brosh, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the c10orf2 gene encoding the human mitochondrial DNA replicative helicase Twinkle are linked to several rare genetic diseases characterized by mitochondrial defects. In this study, we have examined the catalytic activity of Twinkle helicase on model replication fork and DNA repair structures. Although Twinkle behaves as a traditional 5' to 3' helicase on conventional forked duplex substrates, the enzyme efficiently dissociates D-loop DNA substrates irrespective of whether it possesses a 5' or 3' single-stranded tailed invading strand. In contrast, we report for the first time that Twinkle branch-migrates an open-ended mobile three-stranded DNA structure with a strong 5' to 3' directionality preference. To determine how well Twinkle handles potential roadblocks to mtDNA replication, we tested the ability of the helicase to unwind substrates with site-specific oxidative DNA lesions or bound by the mitochondrial transcription factor A. Twinkle helicase is inhibited by DNA damage in a unique manner that is dependent on the type of oxidative lesion and the strand in which it resides. Novel single molecule FRET binding and unwinding assays show an interaction of the excluded strand with Twinkle as well as events corresponding to stepwise unwinding and annealing. TFAM inhibits Twinkle unwinding, suggesting other replisome proteins may be required for efficient removal. These studies shed new insight on the catalytic functions of Twinkle on the key DNA structures it would encounter during replication or possibly repair of the mitochondrial genome and how well it tolerates potential roadblocks to DNA unwinding.

  20. Class II integrase mutants with changes in putative nuclear localization signals are primarily blocked at a postnuclear entry step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Richard; Limón, Ana; Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan

    2004-12-01

    Integrase has been implicated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import. Integrase analyses, however, can be complicated by the pleiotropic nature of mutations: whereas class I mutants are integration defective, class II mutants display additional assembly and/or reverse transcription defects. We previously determined that HIV-1(V165A), originally reported as defective for nuclear import, was a class II mutant. Here we analyzed mutants containing changes in other putative nuclear localization signals, including (186)KRK(188)/(211)KELQKQITK(219) and Cys-130. Previous work established HIV-1(K186Q), HIV-1(Q214L/Q216L), and HIV-1(C130G) as replication defective, but phenotypic classification was unclear and nuclear import in nondividing cells was not addressed. Consistent with previous reports, most of the bipartite mutants studied here were replication defective. These mutants as well as HIV-1(V165A) synthesized reduced cDNA levels, but a normal fraction of mutant cDNA localized to dividing and nondividing cell nuclei. Somewhat surprisingly, recombinant class II mutant proteins were catalytically active, and class II Vpr-integrase fusion proteins efficiently complemented class I mutant virus. Since a class I Vpr-integrase mutant efficiently complemented class II mutant viruses under conditions in which class II Vpr-integrases failed to function, we conclude that classes I and II define two distinct complementation groups and suggest that class II mutants are primarily defective at a postnuclear entry step of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1(C130G) was also defective for reverse transcription, but Vpr-integrase(C130G) did not efficiently complement class I mutant HIV-1. Since HIV-1(C130A) grew like the wild type, we conclude that Cys-130 is not essential for replication and speculate that perturbation of integrase structure contributed to the pleiotropic HIV-1(C130G) phenotype.

  1. Determinants in HIV-1 Nef for enhancement of virus replication and depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Serkan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef critically contributes to AIDS in part by augmenting virus titers in infected individuals. Analyzing which of Nef's activities contribute to HIV pathogenesis has been hampered by the lack of a cell culture model in which Nef exerts pronounced effects on HIV replication. The human lymphoid aggregate culture (HLAC from tonsil maintains the cell populations and cytokine milieu found in vivo, supports a productive infection without exogenous stimulation, and Nef contributes to efficient HIV-1 replication as well as CD4+ T cell depletion in this experimental ex vivo-model. Results To identify determinants in Nef that mediate these activities, we infected HLAC with a panel of isogenic HIV-1NL4-3 strains that encode for well-characterized mutants of HIV-1SF2 Nef. Determination of HIV-1 replication revealed that enhancement of the virus spread by Nef is governed by a complex set of protein interaction surfaces. In contrast, increased CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion depended on only two protein interaction surfaces in Nef that mediate either downregulation of cell surface CD4 or interaction with the NAKC signalosome. Consistently, in HLAC from 9 out of 14 donors, Nef enhanced CD4+ T cell depletion in the absence of a significant effect on virus replication. Moreover, our results suggest that this Nef-dependent enhancement in depletion occurred predominately in uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Nef facilitates depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1-infected lymphoid tissue ex vivo by increasing the pool of productively infected cells and by sensitizing bystander cells for killing. This ability might contribute to Nef's pathogenic potential in vivo.

  2. A high-throughput chemical screen reveals that harmine-mediated inhibition of DYRK1A increases human pancreatic beta cell replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with a peak percentage (∼2%) engaged in the cell cycle in the first year of life. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication is barely detectable. Whereas beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts. Hence, there remains an urgent need for antidiabetic therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, using a high-throughput small-molecule screen (HTS), we find that analogs of the small molecule harmine function as a new class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds. We also define dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine and the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo-based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations suggest that harmine analogs may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing the potency and beta cell specificity of these compounds are important future challenges.

  3. Persistent hepatitis C virus RNA replication in haemophiliacs: role of co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambost, H; Gerolami, V; Halfon, P; Thuret, I; Michel, G; Sicardi, F; Rousseau, S; Perrimond, H; Cartouzou, G

    1995-11-01

    In order to evaluate the evolution of transfusional hepatitis C in haemophiliacs, we performed a retrospective study of ALT levels and HCV viraemia with a RNA PCR assay in 57 patients. We found that the vast majority of HCV-infected patients remained viraemic (43/57 = 75%) and higher ALT levels correlated with HCV viraemia. Although indicators of the transfusional viral load (age, severity of haemophilia) and HBV co-infection did not correlate with HCV RNA replication, HIV seropositivity was strongly associated with persistence of HCV viraemia (23/25 = 92% in HIV-positive versus 20/32 = 62% in HIV-negative patients), without any correlation with CD4 counts. Genotyping of HCV in the 43 viraemic patients shows more frequent genotype 1 in the HIV-seropositive group (14/23) than in the seronegative group (6/20). Our data emphasize that besides the role of the immunodeficiency status, the genotypes of HCV might be involved in the differences observed in terms of HCV RNA replication between the HIV-seropositive and seronegative haemophiliacs.

  4. The profile of lysosomal exoglycosidases in replicative and stress-induced senescence in early passage human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Knaś

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the profiles of the exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase, β glucuronidase and β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in fibroblast culture undergoing replicative and stress-induced senescence. Half of the cell culture was grown in normal conditions, without the stressor, and the other half of the cell was treated with 0.15 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. The activities of total N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase as well as β glucuronidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Marciniak et al. The activities of β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Chatteriee et al. with the modification by Zwierz et al. The activities of the exoglycosidases examined, with the exception of β glucuronidase, showed a significant increase between individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. On each day of the experiment, in the cell lysate of stressed fibroblasts, the activities of exoglycosidases were significantly higher compared to the non-stressed cells. There were very strong correlations between SA-β-GAL staining and b galactosidase activity on individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. Replicative and stress-induced senescence results in significant changes to the level of lysosomal exoglycosidases, and results in enhanced lysosomal degradative capacity.

  5. Precision calculation of 1/4-BPS Wilson loops in AdS$_5\\times S^5$

    CERN Document Server

    Forini, V; Griguolo, L; Seminara, D; Vescovi, E

    2015-01-01

    We study the strong coupling behaviour of $1/4$-BPS circular Wilson loops (a family of "latitudes") in ${\\cal N}=4$ Super Yang-Mills theory, computing the one-loop corrections to the relevant classical string solutions in AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$. Supersymmetric localization provides an exact result that, in the large 't Hooft coupling limit, should be reproduced by the sigma-model approach. To avoid ambiguities due to the absolute normalization of the string partition function, we compare the $ratio$ between the generic latitude and the maximal 1/2-BPS circle: Any measure-related ambiguity should simply cancel in this way. We use Gel'fand-Yaglom method to calculate the relevant functional determinants, that present some complications with respect to the standard circular case. After a careful numerical evaluation of our final expression we still find disagreement with the localization answer: The difference is encoded into a precise "remainder function". We comment on the possible origin and resolution of this dis...

  6. Y-system for form factors at strong coupling in AdS_5 and with multi-operator insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhiquan

    2013-01-01

    We study form factors in N=4 SYM at strong coupling in general kinematics and with multi-operator insertions by using gauge/string duality and integrability techniques. This generalizes the AdS_3 results of Maldacena and Zhiboedov in two non-trivial aspects. The first generalization to AdS_5 space was motivated by its potential connection to strong coupling Higgs-to-three-gluons amplitudes in QCD which was observed recently at week coupling. The second generalization to multi-operator insertions was motivated as a step towards applying on-shell techniques to compute correlation functions at strong coupling. In this picture, each operator is associated to a monodromy condition on the cusp solutions. We construct Y-systems for both cases. The Y-functions are related to the spacetime (cross) ratios. Their WKB approximations based on a rational function P(z) are also studied. We focus on the short operators, while the prescription is hopefully also applicable for more general operators.

  7. Precision calculation of 1/4-BPS Wilson loops in AdS5×S5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forini, V.; Puletti, V. Giangreco M.; Griguolo, L.; Seminara, D.; Vescovi, E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the strong coupling behaviour of 1/4-BPS circular Wilson loops (a family of "latitudes") in {N}=4 Super Yang-Mills theory, computing the one-loop corrections to the relevant classical string solutions in AdS5 ×S5. Supersymmetric localization provides an exact result that, in the large 't Hooft coupling limit, should be reproduced by the sigma-model approach. To avoid ambiguities due to the absolute normalization of the string partition function, we compare the ratio between the generic latitude and the maximal 1/2-BPS circle: any measure-related ambiguity should simply cancel in this way. We use the Gel'fand-Yaglom method with Dirichlet boundary conditions to calculate the relevant functional determinants, that present some complications with respect to the standard circular case. After a careful numerical evaluation of our final expression we still find disagreement with the localization answer: the difference is encoded into a precise "remainder function". We comment on the possible origin and resolution of this discordance.

  8. q-Deformation of the AdS5 x S5 Superstring S-matrix and its Relativistic Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Hoare, Ben; Miramontes, J Luis

    2011-01-01

    A set of four factorizable non-relativistic S-matrices for a multiplet of fundamental particles are defined based on the R-matrix of the quantum group deformation of the centrally extended superalgebra su(2|2). The S-matrices are a function of two independent couplings g and q=exp(i\\pi/k). The main result is to find the scalar factor, or dressing phase, which ensures that the unitarity and crossing equations are satisfied. For generic (g,k), the S-matrices are branched functions on a product of rapidity tori. In the limit k->infinity, one of them is identified with the S-matrix describing the magnon excitations on the string world sheet in AdS5 x S5, while another is the mirror S-matrix that is needed for the TBA. In the g->infinity limit, the rapidity torus degenerates, the branch points disappear and the S-matrices become meromorphic functions, as required by relativistic S-matrix theory. However, it is only the mirror S-matrix which satisfies the correct relativistic crossing equation. The mirror S-matrix ...

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in primary human monocytes by the IκB-αS32/36A repressor of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scala Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1, transcriptional regulation is required to develop novel inhibitors of viral replication. NF-κB transacting factors strongly enhance the HIV/SIV expression in both epithelial and lymphoid cells. Controversial results have been reported on the requirement of NF-κB factors in distinct cell reservoirs, such as CD4-positive T lymphocytes and monocytes. We have previously shown that IκB-αS32/36A, a proteolysis-resistant inhibitor of NF-κB, potently inhibits the growth of HIV-1 and SIVmac239 in cell cultures and in the SIV macaque model of AIDS. To further extend these observations, we have generated NL(AD8IκB-αS32/36A, a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 recombinant strain endowed to express IκB-αS32/36A. Results In this work, we show that infection with NL(AD8IκB-αS32/36A down-regulated the NF-κB DNA binding activity in cells. NL(AD8IκB-αS32/36A was also highly attenuated for replication in cultures of human primary monocytes. Conclusions These results point to a major requirement of NF-κB activation for the optimal replication of HIV-1 in monocytes and suggest that agents which interfere with NF-κB activity could counteract HIV-1 infection of monocytes-macrophages in vivo.

  10. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  11. T cell-based functional cDNA library screening identified SEC14-like 1a carboxy-terminal domain as a negative regulator of human immunodeficiency virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Emiko; Ichikawa, Reiko; Morikawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Komano, Jun

    2010-05-26

    Genome-wide screening of host factors that regulate HIV-1 replication has been attempted using numerous experimental approaches. However, there has been limited success using T cell-based cDNA library screening to identify genes that regulate HIV-1 replication. We have established a genetic screening strategy using the human T cell line MT-4 and a replication-competent HIV-1. With this system, we identified the C-terminal domain (CTD) of SEC14-like 1a (SEC14L1a) as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. Our T cell-based cDNA screening system provides an alternative tool for identifying novel regulators of HIV-1 replication.

  12. Primary T-cells from human CD4/CCR5-transgenic rats support all early steps of HIV-1 replication including integration, but display impaired viral gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Volker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies on HIV-1 pathogenesis and testing of antiviral strategies have been hampered by the lack of an immunocompetent small animal model that is highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Since native rodents are non-permissive, we developed transgenic rats that selectively express the HIV-1 receptor complex, hCD4 and hCCR5, on relevant target cells. These animals display a transient low-level plasma viremia after HIV-1YU-2 infection, demonstrating HIV-1 susceptibility in vivo. However, unlike macrophages, primary CD4 T-cells from double-transgenic animals fail to support viral spread ex vivo. To identify quantitative limitations or absolute blocks in this rodent species, we quantitatively assessed the efficiency of key steps in the early phase of the viral replication cycle in a side-by-side comparison in infected cell lines and primary T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5-transgenic rats and human donors. Results Levels of virus entry, HIV-1 cDNA synthesis, nuclear import, and integration into the host genome were shown to be remarkably similar in cell lines and, where technically accessible, in primary T-cells from both species. In contrast, a profound impairment at the level of early HIV gene expression was disclosed at the single-cell level in primary rat T-cells and most other rat-derived cells. Macrophages were a notable exception, possibly reflecting the unique transcriptional milieu in this evolutionarily conserved target cell of all lentiviruses. Importantly, transient trans-complementation by ex vivo nucleofection with the Tat-interacting protein Cyclin T1 of human origin markedly elevated HIV gene expression in primary rat T-cells. Conclusion This is the first study that has quantitatively determined the efficiency of consecutive steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle in infected primary HIV target cells from a candidate transgenic small animal and compared it to human cells. Unlike cells derived from mice or rabbits, rat

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced CXCR4 and chemokine expression leads to preferential X4 HIV-1 replication in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Tse, Doris B; Rochford, Gemma; Prabhakar, Savita; Hoshino, Satomi; Chitkara, Nishay; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Ching, Elbert; Raju, Bindu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N; Pine, Richard; Weiden, Michael

    2004-05-15

    Opportunistic infections such as pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) increase local HIV-1 replication and mutation. As AIDS progresses, alteration of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 sequence is associated with a shift in viral coreceptor use from CCR5 (CD195) to CXCR4 (CD184). To better understand the effect of HIV/TB coinfection, we screened transcripts from bronchoalveolar lavage cells with high density cDNA arrays and found that CXCR4 mRNA is increased in patients with TB. Surprisingly, CXCR4 was predominately expressed on alveolar macrophages (AM). Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of macrophages in vitro increased CXCR4 surface expression, whereas amelioration of disease reduced CXCR4 expression in vivo. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from TB patients had elevated levels of CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta), CCL5 (RANTES), and CX3CL1 (fractalkine), but not CXCL12 (stromal-derived factor-1alpha). We found that M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages in vitro increased viral entry and RT of CXCR4-using [corrected] HIV-1, but not of CCR5-using [corrected] HIV-1. Lastly, HIV-1 derived from the lung contains CD14, suggesting that they were produced in AM. Our results demonstrate that TB produces a permissive environment for replication of CXCR4-using virus by increasing CXCR4 expression in AM and for suppression of CCR5-using HIV-1 by increasing CC chemokine expression. These changes explain in part why TB accelerates the course of AIDS. CXCR4 inhibitors are a rational therapeutic approach in HIV/TB coinfection.

  14. Construction and Expression of Recombinant Adenovirus Vector Ad5-hTRX-EGFP%重组腺病毒载体Ad5-hTRX-EGFP的构建及其表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    扈江伟; 王军; 徐曼; 苏永锋; 孔维霞; 盛红霞; 张斌; 陈虎

    2012-01-01

    本研究旨在构建并制备人硫氧还蛋白(hTRX)和增强型绿色荧光蛋白(EGFP)基因腺病毒载体Ad-hTRX-EGFP,感染HEK293细胞,为基因治疗提供实验基础.设计含有Not Ⅰ和EcoR Ⅴ酶切位点的引物,PCR扩增hTRX,将扩增产物连接到带有EGFP标记的pDC316-mCMV穿梭质粒上,构建重组穿梭质粒pDC316-hTRX-EG-FP,利用Lipofectamine2000脂质体的方法将AdMax腺病毒包装系统的骨架质粒pBHG lox_E1,3Cre和穿梭质粒pDC316-hTRX-EGFP共转染入HEK293细胞,进行同源重组,得到腺病毒重组质粒pAd-hTRX-EGFP,并在其中包装扩增病毒,用氯化铯高速梯度离心、纯化病毒,测定病毒颗粒数及滴度.采用PCR方法对重组腺病毒进行鉴定,用流式细胞仪测定感染HEK293细胞的效率,Western blot方法验证细胞表达hTRX蛋白.结果显示,重组腺病毒质粒经PCR和Not Ⅰ、EcoR Ⅴ酶切鉴定,证实含有hTRX基因,测序结果和设计片段的序列一致.重组腺病毒载体构建成功,病毒滴度达5.558 × 1010pfu/ml.病毒成功感染HEK293细胞,MOI=100时,感染效率达92.25%.经Western blot方法验证表明,感染后的HEK293细胞高表达hTRX蛋白.结论:应用细胞内同源重组方法成功构建了含hTRX基因的重组腺病毒载体,制备获得高滴度的病毒,能高效感染HEK293细胞并表达目的蛋白,为后续研究奠定了基础.%This study was purposed to construct and prepare the recombinant adenovirus vector carrying human thioredoxin (hTRX) and enhanced green fluorescence protein ( EGFP), and transfect it into HEK293 cells,so as to lay a foundation for further gene therapy. The PCR-amplified products of hTRX with a pair of primers containing Not I and EcoR V restriction sites were subcloned into shuttle plasmid pDC316-mCMV. HEK293 cells were co-transfected with the constructed recombinant shuttle plasmid pDC316-hTRX-EGFP and large adenovirus-helper plasmid pBHGlox( delta) El, 3Cre in mediation of liposome. The obtained replication

  15. Differential Bacterial Survival, Replication, and Apoptosis-Inducing Ability of Salmonella Serovars within Human and Murine Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Schwan, William R.; Huang, Xiao-Zhe; Hu, Lan; Kopecko, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are associated with human diseases that range from mild gastroenteritis to host-disseminated enteric fever. Human infections by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi can lead to typhoid fever, but this serovar does not typically cause disease in mice or other animals. In contrast, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, which are usually linked to localized gastroenteritis in humans and some animal species, elicit a systemic infection in mice. To b...

  16. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  17. Human coronavirus EMC does not require the SARS-coronavirus receptor and maintains broad replicative capability in mammalian cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Müller (Marcel); V.S. Raj (V. Stalin); D. Muth; B. Meyer (Bernhard); S. Kallies (Stephan); S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Wollny (Robert); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); S. Specht (Sabine); T. Suliman (Tasnim); K. Zimmermann (Kathrin); T. Binger (Tabea); I. Eckerle; M. Tschapka (Marco); A.M. Zaki (Ali); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); C. Drosten (Christian)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA new human coronavirus (hCoV-EMC) has emerged very recently in the Middle East. The clinical presentation resembled that of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as encountered during the epidemic in 2002/2003. In both cases, acute renal failure was observed in humans. HCoV-EMC i

  18. The gap between research and practice: a replication study on the HR professionals' beliefs about effective human resource practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Karin; van Riemsdijk, Maarten; Groen, B.A.C.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002 Rynes, Colbert and Brown asked human resource (HR) professionals to what extent they agreed with various HR research findings. Responses from 959 American participants showed that there are large discrepancies between research findings and practitioners' beliefs about effective human

  19. The gap between research and practice: a replication study on the HR professionals' beliefs about effective human resource practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Karin; Riemsdijk, van Maarten; Groen, Bianca

    2008-01-01

    In 2002 Rynes, Colbert and Brown asked human resource (HR) professionals to what extent they agreed with various HR research findings. Responses from 959 American participants showed that there are large discrepancies between research findings and practitioners' beliefs about effective human resourc

  20. Apoptosis of human breast carcinoma cells in the presence of cis-platin and L-/D-PPMP: IV. Modulation of replication complexes and glycolipid: Glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick J; Ma, Rui; Tuteja, Narendra; Banerjee, Sipra; Basu, Subhash

    2006-05-01

    Apoptosis of human breast carcinoma cells (SKBR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-468) has been observed after treatment of these cells with anti-cancer drug cis-platin and glycosphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor L- and D-PPMP, respectively. These drugs initiated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as measured by phenotypic morphological changes, by binding of a fluorescent phophatidyl serine-specific dye (PSS-380) onto the outer leaflet of the cell membranes, and by activation of caspases, -3, -8, and -9. It was observed that in two hours very little apoptotic process had started but predominant biochemical changes occurred after 6 h. DNA degradation started after 24 hours of drug treatment. However, very little is known about the stability of the ';Replication Complexes'' during the apoptotic process. DNA helicases are motor proteins that catalyze the melting of genomic DNA during its replication, repair, and recombination processes. Previously, DNA helicase-III was characterized as a component of the replication complexes isolated from embryonic chicken brains as well as breast and colon carcinoma cells. Helicase activities were measured by a novel method (ROME assay), and DNA polymerase-alpha activities were determined by regular chain extension of the nicked ACT-DNA, by determining values obtained from +/- aphidicolin-treated incubation mixtures. In all three breast carcinoma cell lines, a common trend was observed: a decrease of activities of DNA polymerase-alpha and Helicase III. A sharp decrease of activities of the glycolipid sialyltransferases: SAT-2 (CMP-NeuAc; GD3 alpha2-8 sialyltransferase) and SAT-4 (CMP-NeuAc: GM1a alpha2-3 sialyltransferase) was observed in the apoptotic carcinoma cells treated with L-PPMP compared with cis-platin.

  1. Concurrence of replicative senescence and elevated expression of p16(INK4A) with subculture-induced but not calcium-induced differentiation in normal human oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G; Park, B S; Han, S E; Oh, J E; You, Y O; Baek, J H; Kim, G S; Min, B M

    2000-10-01

    Primary normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOKs) undergo differentiation in the presence of calcium concentrations higher than 0.15 mM in vitro, which is useful in investigating the mechanisms involved in the differentiation of epithelial cells. Serial subculture of NHOKs to the postmitotic stage also induces terminal differentiation. However, the detailed mechanisms of both differentiation processes remain substantially unknown. To investigate the molecular differences in these processes, NHOKs were induced to differentiate by exposure to 1.2 mM of calcium and by serial subculture to the postmitotic stage. To study whether the cells were induced to differentiate and to undergo replicative senescence, the amount of cellular involucrin and the expression of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal) were measured respectively. The expression of replicative senescence-associated genes and the activity of telomerase from the differentiated cells were also determined. Both calcium treatment and serial subculture to the postmitotic stage notably elevated the cellular involucrin. The percentage of SA-beta-gal-positive cells was significantly elevated by the continued subculture, but such changes were not observed in keratinocytes exposed to calcium. The concentration of cellular p16(INK4A) protein was progressively increased by the continued subculture but was not changed by calcium treatment. On the other hand, the concentrations of cellular p53 were similar in both differentiation processes. However, telomerase activity was lost in NHOKs that had undergone differentiation by both calcium treatment and serial subculture. The results indicate that calcium-induced differentiation of NHOKs has similar characteristics to their serial subculture-induced differentiation, but that the differentiation processes are not identical, because calcium-induced differentiation does not concur with either replicative senescence or the gradually increased concentration of p16

  2. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; Aguilar Briseño, José A; Upasani, Vinit; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2017-06-01

    Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV) currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that can proceed to more severe or debilitating symptoms. The growing overlap in the geographical distribution of these mosquito-borne infections has led to an upsurge in reported cases of DENV/CHIKV co-infections. Unfortunately, at present we have little understanding of consequences of the co-infections to the human host. The overall aim of this study was to define viral replication dynamics and the innate immune signature involved in concurrent DENV and CHIKV infections in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We demonstrate that concomitant infection resulted in a significant reduction of CHIKV progeny and moderate enhancement of DENV production. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of DENV on CHIKV infection occurred independently of DENV replication. Furthermore, changes in type I IFN, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and IP-10 production were observed during concomitant infections. Notably, co-infections led to a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, cytokines that are widely considered to play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of both viral diseases. In conclusion, our study reveals the interplay of DENV/CHIKV during concomitant infection and provides a framework to investigate viral interaction during co-infections.

  3. Suppression of chikungunya virus replication and differential innate responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells during co-infection with dengue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ruiz Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue and chikungunya are viral diseases transmitted to humans by infected Aedes spp. mosquitoes. With an estimated 390 million infected people per year dengue virus (DENV currently causes the most prevalent arboviral disease. During the last decade chikungunya virus (CHIKV has caused large outbreaks and has expanded its territory causing millions of cases in Asia, Africa and America. The viruses share a common mosquito vector and during the acute phase cause similar flu-like symptoms that can proceed to more severe or debilitating symptoms. The growing overlap in the geographical distribution of these mosquito-borne infections has led to an upsurge in reported cases of DENV/CHIKV co-infections. Unfortunately, at present we have little understanding of consequences of the co-infections to the human host. The overall aim of this study was to define viral replication dynamics and the innate immune signature involved in concurrent DENV and CHIKV infections in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. We demonstrate that concomitant infection resulted in a significant reduction of CHIKV progeny and moderate enhancement of DENV production. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of DENV on CHIKV infection occurred independently of DENV replication. Furthermore, changes in type I IFN, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and IP-10 production were observed during concomitant infections. Notably, co-infections led to a significant increase in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6, cytokines that are widely considered to play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of both viral diseases. In conclusion, our study reveals the interplay of DENV/CHIKV during concomitant infection and provides a framework to investigate viral interaction during co-infections.

  4. Vpu serine 52 dependent counteraction of tetherin is required for HIV-1 replication in macrophages, but not in ex vivo human lymphoid tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Anke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Vpu protein degrades CD4 and counteracts a restriction factor termed tetherin (CD317; Bst-2 to enhance virion release. It has been suggested that both functions can be genetically separated by mutation of a serine residue at position 52. However, recent data suggest that the S52 phosphorylation site is also important for the ability of Vpu to counteract tetherin. To clarify this issue, we performed a comprehensive analysis of HIV-1 with a mutated casein kinase-II phosphorylation site in Vpu in various cell lines, primary blood lymphocytes (PBL, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and ex vivo human lymphoid tissue (HLT. Results We show that mutation of serine 52 to alanine (S52A entirely disrupts Vpu-mediated degradation of CD4 and strongly impairs its ability to antagonize tetherin. Furthermore, casein-kinase II inhibitors blocked the ability of Vpu to degrade tetherin. Overall, Vpu S52A could only overcome low levels of tetherin, and its activity decreased in a manner dependent on the amount of transiently or endogenously expressed tetherin. As a consequence, the S52A Vpu mutant virus was unable to replicate in macrophages, which express high levels of this restriction factor. In contrast, HIV-1 Vpu S52A caused CD4+ T-cell depletion and spread efficiently in ex vivo human lymphoid tissue and PBL, most likely because these cells express comparably low levels of tetherin. Conclusion Our data explain why the effect of the S52A mutation in Vpu on virus release is cell-type dependent and suggest that a reduced ability of Vpu to counteract tetherin impairs HIV-1 replication in macrophages, but not in tissue CD4+ T cells.

  5. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines.We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests.Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06. The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48. Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was

  6. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunda; Follmann, Dean; Nason, Martha; Zhang, Lily; Huang, Ying; Mehrotra, Devan V; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Janes, Holly; Keefer, Michael C; Churchyard, Gavin; Robb, Merlin L; Fast, Patricia E; Duerr, Ann; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Kublin, James G; Robertson, Michael; Hammer, Scott M; Gray, Glenda E; Buchbinder, Susan P; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5)-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines. We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT) cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo) and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests. Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo) of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06). The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48). Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was concentrated in

  7. Identification of the DNA-Binding Domains of Human Replication Protein A That Recognize G-Quadruplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication protein A (RPA, a key player in DNA metabolism, has 6 single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA- binding domains (DBDs A-F. SELEX experiments with the DBDs-C, -D, and -E retrieve a 20-nt G-quadruplex forming sequence. Binding studies show that RPA-DE binds preferentially to the G-quadruplex DNA, a unique preference not observed with other RPA constructs. Circular dichroism experiments show that RPA-CDE-core can unfold the G-quadruplex while RPA-DE stabilizes it. Binding studies show that RPA-C binds pyrimidine- and purine-rich sequences similarly. This difference between RPA-C and RPA-DE binding was also indicated by the inability of RPA-CDE-core to unfold an oligonucleotide containing a TC-region 5′ to the G-quadruplex. Molecular modeling studies of RPA-DE and telomere-binding proteins Pot1 and Stn1 reveal structural similarities between the proteins and illuminate potential DNA-binding sites for RPA-DE and Stn1. These data indicate that DBDs of RPA have different ssDNA recognition properties.

  8. Flow cytometric analysis of the inhibition of human basophil activation by histamine high dilutions – a replication study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Wälchli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inhibition of human basophil activation by highly diluted histamine was reported to be a reliable experimental model to examine biological effects of high dilutions. However, independent replications did not always yield concordant results. Aims: We aimed at performing an independent replication of a former study [1] using rigorously controlled experimental conditions to minimise confounding factors. Materials and Methods: In 20 independent experiments, human basophils were treated with highly diluted histamine (15cH, 16cH, corresponding to 10-30-10-32 M prior to activation by fMLP (formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide. Controls were treated with analogously diluted water (15cH, 16cH. The dilutions were prepared freshly for each experiment in deionised water by successive steps of centesimal dilution and agitation (10 s vortex at high speed. Highly diluted samples were blinded and randomised. All samples were set in triplicates. Activated basophils were determined by flow cytometry using anti-CD203c. 20 independent systematic negative control (SNC experiments were carried out to investigate possible systematic errors. Results: No difference in basophil activation was observed between the highly diluted histamine samples and the highly diluted water controls. There was no evidence for a blood donor specificity of the results. The SNC experiments demonstrated the stability of the test system. Experimental variability within and between experiments was slightly reduced for the highly diluted histamine samples. Discussion: This study was designed as an independent reproduction of a former study [1]. Though we strictly adopted the experimental procedure described in [1], our results do not confirm the large inhibitory effects observed for histamine 15cH and 16cH. This lack of reproducibility might be due to minor differences in the experimental design, such as blinding and randomising of the samples, which we chose to

  9. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  10. Sources of synchronized induced Gamma-Band responses during a simple object recognition task: a replication study in human MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, T; Maess, B; Trujillo-Barreto, N J; Müller, M M

    2008-02-27

    Natural stimuli are compiled of numerous features, which are cortically represented in dispersed structures. Synchronized oscillations in the Gamma-Band (>30 Hz; induced Gamma-Band Responses, iGBRs), are regarded as a plausible mechanism to re-integrate these regions into a meaningful cortical object representation. Using electroencephalography (EEG) it was demonstrated that the generators of iGBRs can be localized to temporal, parietal, posterior, and frontal areas. The present magnetoencephalogram (MEG) study intended to replicate these findings in order contribute to the ongoing debate regarding the possible functional difference of high-frequency signals as measured by both techniques. During a standard object recognition task we found an augmentation of the iGBR after the presentation of meaningful as opposed to meaningless stimuli at approximately 160-440 ms after stimulus onset. This peak was localized to inferior temporal gyri, superior parietal lobules and the right middle frontal gyrus. Importantly, most of these brain structures were significantly phase-locked to each other. The implications of these results are twofold: (1) they present further evidence for the view that iGBRs signify neuronal activity in a broadly distributed network during object recognition. (2) MEG is well suited to detect induced high-frequency oscillations with a very similar morphology as revealed by EEG recordings, thereby eliminating known problems with electroencephalographical methods (e.g. reference confounds). In contrast to the iGBR, the localization of event-related fields (ERFs) and evoked Gamma-Band Response (eGBRs) revealed generators in focal visual areas, and thus, seem to mirror early sensory processing.

  11. The highly conserved aspartic acid residue between hypervariable regions 1 and 2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 is important for early stages of virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W K; Essex, M; Lee, T H

    1995-01-01

    Between hypervariable regions V1 and V2 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 lies a cluster of relatively conserved residues. The contribution of nine charged residues in this region to virus infectivity was evaluated by single-amino-acid substitutions in an infectious provirus clone. Three of the HIV-1 mutants studied had slower growth kinetics than the wild-type virus. The delay was most pronounced in a mutant with an alanine substituted for an aspartic acid residue at position 180. This aspartic acid is conserved by all HIV-1 isolates with known nucleotide sequences. Substitutions with three other residues at this position, including a negatively charged glutamic acid, all affected virus infectivity. The defect identified in these mutants suggests that this aspartic acid residue is involved in the early stages of HIV-1 replication. PMID:7983752

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase inhibitors efficiently suppress feline immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and provide a rationale to redesign antiretroviral treatment for feline AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciervo Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection has been hampered by the absence of a specific combination antiretroviral treatment (ART. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs are emerging as a promising new drug class for HIV-1 treatment, and we evaluated the possibility of inhibiting FIV replication using INSTIs. Methods Phylogenetic analysis of lentiviral integrase (IN sequences was carried out using the PAUP* software. A theoretical three-dimensional structure of the FIV IN catalytic core domain (CCD was obtained by homology modeling based on a crystal structure of HIV-1 IN CCD. The interaction of the transferred strand of viral DNA with the catalytic cavity of FIV IN was deduced from a crystal structure of a structurally similar transposase complexed with transposable DNA. Molecular docking simulations were conducted using a genetic algorithm (GOLD. Antiviral activity was tested in feline lymphoblastoid MBM cells acutely infected with the FIV Petaluma strain. Circular and total proviral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. Results The calculated INSTI-binding sites were found to be nearly identical in FIV and HIV-1 IN CCDs. The close similarity of primate and feline lentivirus IN CCDs was also supported by phylogenetic analysis. In line with these bioinformatic analyses, FIV replication was efficiently inhibited in acutely infected cell cultures by three investigational INSTIs, designed for HIV-1 and belonging to different classes. Of note, the naphthyridine carboxamide INSTI, L-870,810 displayed an EC50 in the low nanomolar range. Inhibition of FIV integration in situ was shown by real-time PCR experiments that revealed accumulation of circular forms of FIV DNA within cells treated with L-870,810. Conclusion We report a drug class (other than nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors that is capable of inhibiting FIV replication in vitro. The present study helped establish L-870,810, a compound

  13. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  14. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  15. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depl...

  16. Redox-dependent induction of antioxidant defenses by phenolic diterpenes confers stress tolerance in normal human skin fibroblasts: Insights on replicative senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina; Lima, Cristovao F

    2015-06-01

    Mild stress-induced hormesis represents a promising strategy for targeting the age-related accumulation of molecular damage and, therefore, for preventing diseases and achieving healthy aging. Fruits, vegetables, and spices contain a wide variety of hormetic phytochemicals, which may explain the beneficial health effects associated with the consumption of these dietary components. In the present study, the induction of cellular antioxidant defenses by the phenolic diterpenes carnosic acid (CA) and carnosol (CS) were studied in normal human skin fibroblasts, and insights into the aging process at the cellular level investigated. We observed that CA and CS induced several cytoprotective enzymes and antioxidant defenses in human fibroblasts, whose induction was dependent on the cellular redox state for CS and associated with Nrf2 signaling for both compounds. The stress response elicited by preincubation with CS conferred a cytoprotective action against a following oxidant challenge with tert-butyl hydroperoxide, confirming its hormetic effect. Preincubation of normal fibroblasts with CS also protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced premature senescence. Furthermore, cultivation of middle passage normal human skin fibroblasts in the presence of CS ameliorated the physiological state of cells during replicative senescence. Our results support the view that mild stress-induced antioxidant defenses by CS can confer stress tolerance in normal cells and may have important implications in the promotion of healthy aging.

  17. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic β cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic β cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of β cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair β cell proliferation and induce β cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive β cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive β cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor β or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected β cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored β cell proliferation, and improved β cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human β cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation. PMID:12060768

  18. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribas, A Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-20

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation.

  19. Comparative study of effects of bone marrow cell vs. Ad5-HGF administration via non infarct-related artery injection in myocardial infarction in swine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liansheng Wang; Jun Huang; Zhijian Yang; Wei Wang; Dongchao Ma; Shunlin Xu; Yuqing Zhang; Fang Zhou; Bo Chen; Kejiang Cao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of transplanting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) or adenovirus5-hepatocyte growth factor(Ad5-HGF) via non-infarct-related artery injection in swine myocardial infarction models. Methods :BMMSCs were obtained from swine bone marrow and expanded in vitro to a purity of >50%. A myocardial infarction(MI) was created by ligating the distal left anterior descending artery in swine. Either BM-MSCs (5 × 106/ml) or Ad5-HGF (4 × 109 pfu) were transfused via the right coronary artery (non-infarcted artery) four weeks after MI. Gate-controled cardiac perfusion imaging was performed at the end of four and seven weeks after LAD ligation, to evaluate heart function and cardiac perfusion. Morphologic and histologic characteristics of the hearts were also studied. Results: (1)The gate-controlled cardiac perfusion imaging showed that the improvement in LVEF was greater in both treatment groups than in control group at the 4th weeks. (2)In both treatment groups, capillary density was significantly higher than that of control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion:BM-MSCs or Ad5-HGF transplantation via non-infarcted artery administration can stimulate angiogenesis and improve heart function, but there was no difference in therapeutic efficacy between BM-MSCs and Ad5-HGF.

  20. Analysis of the cloverleaf element in a human rhinovirus type 14/poliovirus chimera: correlation of subdomain D structure, ternary protein complex formation and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Elizabeth; Xiang, Wenkai; Paul, Aniko; Wimmer, Eckard

    2003-08-01

    RNA genomes of enteroviruses and rhinoviruses contain a 5'-terminal structure, the cloverleaf (CL), which serves as signal in RNA synthesis. Substitution of the poliovirus [PV1(M)] CL with that of human rhinovirus type 2 (HRV2) was shown previously to produce a viable chimeric PV, whereas substitution with the HRV14 CL produced a null phenotype. Fittingly, the HRV14 CL failed to form a complex with PV-specific proteins 3CD(pro)-3AB or 3CD(pro)-PCBP2, considered essential for RNA synthesis. It was reported previously (Rohll et al., J Virol 68, 4384-4391, 1994) that the major determinant for the null phenotype of a PV/HRV14 chimera resides in subdomain Id of the HRV14 CL. Using a chimeric PV/HRV14 CL in the context of the PV genome, stem-loop Id of HRV14 CL was genetically dissected. It contains the sequence C(57)UAU(60)-G, the underlined nucleotides forming the loop that is shorter by 1 nt when compared to the corresponding PV structure (UUGC(60)GG). Insertion of a G nucleotide to form a tetra loop (C(57)UAU(60)GG(61)) did not rescue replication of the chimera. However, an additional mutation at position 60 (C(57)UAC(60)GG(61)) yielded a replicating genome. Only the mutant PV/HRV14 CL with the UAC(60)G tetra loop formed ternary complexes efficiently with either PV proteins 3CD(pro)-3AB or 3CD(pro)-PCBP2. Thus, in the context of PV RNA synthesis, the presence of a tetra loop in subdomain D of the CL per se is not sufficient for function. The sequence and, consequently, the structure of the tetra loop plays an essential role. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the function of the CL element and the function of the cis-acting replication element in the 3D(pol)-3CD(pro)-dependent uridylylation of VPg are not linked.

  1. Stimulation of the Replication of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and pp71-Deficient Human Cytomegalovirus by Epstein-Barr Virus Tegument Protein BNRF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongxu; Orr, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well established that several cellular proteins that are components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs, also known as ND10) have restrictive effects on herpesvirus infections that are countered by viral proteins that are either present in the virion particle or are expressed during the earliest stages of infection. For example, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (IE) protein ICP0 overcomes the restrictive effects of PML-NB components PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and ATRX while human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE protein IE1 targets PML and Sp100, and its tegument protein pp71 targets hDaxx and ATRX. The functions of these viral regulatory proteins are in part interchangeable; thus, both IE1 and pp71 stimulate the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, while ICP0 increases plaque formation by pp71-deficient HCMV. Here, we extend these studies by examining proteins that are expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report that EBV tegument protein BNRF1, discovered by other investigators to target the hDaxx/ATRX complex, increases the replication of both ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 and pp71-deficient HCMV. In addition, EBV protein EBNA-LP, which targets Sp100, also augments ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 replication. The combination of these two EBV regulatory proteins had a greater effect than each one individually. These findings reinforce the concept that disruption of the functions of PML-NB proteins is important for efficient herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE Whether a herpesvirus initiates a lytic infection in a host cell or establishes quiescence or latency is influenced by events that occur soon after the viral genome has entered the host cell nucleus. Certain cellular proteins respond in a restrictive manner to the invading pathogen's DNA, while viral functions are expressed that counteract the cell-mediated repression. One aspect of cellular restriction of herpesvirus infections is mediated by components of nuclear structures known as

  2. Structure and mechanism of error-free replication past the major benzo[a]pyrene adduct by human DNA polymerase κ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Vikash; Bian, Chuanbing; Xing, Guangxin; Ling, Hong

    2016-06-02

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) is a well-known and frequently encountered carcinogen which generates a bulky DNA adduct (+)-trans-10S-BP-N(2)-dG (BP-dG) in cells. DNA polymerase kappa (polκ) is the only known Y-family polymerase that bypasses BP-dG accurately and thus protects cells from genotoxic BP. Here, we report the structures of human polκ in complex with DNA containing either a normal guanine (G) base or a BP-dG adduct at the active site and a correct deoxycytidine. The structures and supporting biochemical data reveal a unique mechanism for accurate replication by translesion synthesis past the major bulky adduct. The active site of polκ opens at the minor groove side of the DNA substrate to accommodate the bulky BP-dG that is attached there. More importantly, polκ stabilizes the lesion DNA substrate in the same active conformation as for regular B-form DNA substrates and the bulky BPDE ring in a 5' end pointing conformation. The BP-dG adducted DNA substrate maintains a Watson-Crick (BP-dG:dC) base pair within the active site, governing correct nucleotide insertion opposite the bulky adduct. In addition, polκ's unique N-clasp domain supports the open conformation of the enzyme and the extended conformation of the single-stranded template to allow bypass of the bulky lesion. This work illustrates the first molecular mechanism for how a bulky major adduct is replicated accurately without strand misalignment and mis-insertion.

  3. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 Rex carboxy terminus is an inhibitory/stability domain that regulates Rex functional activity and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Kesic, Matthew; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2009-05-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) regulatory protein, Rex, functions to increase the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic gene products. The phosphorylation of two serine residues (S151 and S153) at the C terminus is important for the function of HTLV-2 Rex (Rex-2). The Rex-2 phosphomimetic double mutant (S151D, S153D) is locked in a functionally active conformation. Since rex and tax genes overlap, Rex S151D and S153D mutants were found to alter the Tax oncoprotein coding sequence and transactivation activities. Therefore, additional Rex-2 mutants including P152D, A157D, S151Term, and S158Term were generated and characterized ("Term" indicates termination codon). All Rex-2 mutants and wild-type (wt) Rex-2 localized predominantly to the nucleus/nucleolus, but in contrast to the detection of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of wt Rex-2 (p26 and p24), mutant proteins were detected as a single phosphoprotein species. We found that Rex P152D, A157D, and S158Term mutants are more functionally active than wt Rex-2 and that the Rex-2 C terminus and its specific phosphorylation state are required for stability and optimal expression. In the context of the provirus, the more active Rex mutants (A157D or S158Term) promoted increased viral protein production, increased viral infectious spread, and enhanced HTLV-2-mediated cellular proliferation. Moreover, these Rex mutant viruses replicated and persisted in inoculated rabbits despite higher antiviral antibody responses. Thus, we identified in Rex-2 a novel C-terminal inhibitory domain that regulates functional activity and is positively regulated through phosphorylation. The ability of this domain to modulate viral replication likely plays a key role in the infectious spread of the virus and in virus-induced cellular proliferation.

  4. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptophan, a major product of tryptophan degradation, is essential for optimal replication of human parainfluenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Barik, Sailen

    2017-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) exerts its antiviral effect by inducing a large family of cellular genes, named interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs). An intriguing member of this family is indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of the main branch of tryptophan (Trp) degradation, the kynurenine pathway. We recently showed that IDO strongly inhibits human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a significant respiratory pathogen. Here, we show that 5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HTP), the first product of an alternative branch of Trp degradation and a serotonin precursor, is essential to protect virus growth against IDO in cell culture. We also show that the apparent antiviral effect of IDO on PIV3 is not due to the generation of the kynurenine pathway metabolites, but rather due to the depletion of intracellular Trp by IDO, as a result of which this rare amino acid becomes unavailable for the alternative, proviral 5-HTP pathway.

  6. Oligoclonal CD8 lymphocytes from persons with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, J F; Chen, C H; Mohr, J R; Piglia, L; Oei, C; Ferrari, G; Greenberg, M L; Weinhold, K J

    1995-10-01

    CD8 lymphocytes from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients can suppress virus production from infected CD4 cells. Suppressive activity is separate and distinct from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) reactivities and is likely mediated by a soluble factor(s). The majority of HIV-1 suppression studies have been done in the context of bulk CD8 cell cultures. In this study, viral suppression was characterized by clonal populations of CD8 cells derived from HIV-1-infected patients. Most of the suppressive clones were devoid of detectable CTL reactivity against env-, gag-, pol-, and nef-expressing targets. Among the suppressive clones derived from an individual patient, a marked heterogeneity was evident with respect to phenotypic markers, cytokine production, and T cell receptor V beta expression. These results suggest that noncytolytic virus suppression is oligoclonal in nature. Clones provide tools for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of suppression and identifying the suppressive factor.

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yu

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin and microtubules (Nocodazole are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002 virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1 as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5, pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary

  8. Preventive Effects of Epigallocatechin-3-O-Gallate against Replicative Senescence Associated with p53 Acetylation in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wook Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the various pharmacological activities of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG including anticancer, and anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and so forth, relatively less attention has been paid to the antiaging effect of EGCG on primary cells. In this study, the preventive effects of EGCG against serial passage-induced senescence were investigated in primary cells including rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs, and human articular chondrocytes (HACs. The involvement of Sirt1 and acetylated p53 was examined as an underlying mechanism for the senescence preventive activity of EGCG in HDFs. All cells were employed with the initial passage number (PN between 3 and 7. For inducing senescence, the cells were serially passaged at the predetermined times and intervals in the absence or presence of EGCG (50 or 100 μM. Serial passage-induced senescence in RVSMCs and HACs was able to be significantly prevented at 50 μM EGCG, while in HDFs, 100 μM EGCG could significantly prevent senescence and recover their cell cycle progression close to the normal level. Furthermore, EGCG was found to prevent serial passage- and H2O2-induced senescence in HDFs by suppressing p53 acetylation, but the Sirt1 activity was unaffected. In addition, proliferating HDFs showed similar cellular uptake of FITC-conjugated EGCG into the cytoplasm with their senescent counterparts but different nuclear translocation of it from them, which would partly account for the differential responses to EGCG in proliferating versus senescent cells. Taking these results into consideration, it is suggested that EGCG may be exploited to craft strategies for the development of an antiaging or age-delaying agent.

  9. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  10. Some considerations on how the human brain must be arranged in order to make its replication in a thinking machine possible

    CERN Document Server

    Diamant, Emanuel

    2010-01-01

    For the most of my life, I have earned my living as a computer vision professional busy with image processing tasks and problems. In the computer vision community there is a widespread belief that artificial vision systems faithfully replicate human vision abilities or at least very closely mimic them. It was a great surprise to me when one day I have realized that computer and human vision have next to nothing in common. The former is occupied with extensive data processing, carrying out massive pixel-based calculations, while the latter is busy with meaningful information processing, concerned with smart objects-based manipulations. And the gap between the two is insurmountable. To resolve this confusion, I had had to return and revaluate first the vision phenomenon itself, define more carefully what visual information is and how to treat it properly. In this work I have not been, as it is usually accepted, biologically inspired . On the contrary, I have drawn my inspirations from a pure mathematical theory...

  11. Body Image and Anti-Fat Attitudes: An Experimental Study Using a Haptic Virtual Reality Environment to Replicate Human Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Line; Roy-Vaillancourt, Mélina; Chebbi, Brahim; Bouchard, Stéphane; Daoust, Michael; Dénommée, Jessica; Thorpe, Moriah

    2016-02-01

    It is well documented that anti-fat attitudes influence the interactions individuals have with overweight people. However, testing attitudes through self-report measures is challenging. In the present study, we explore the use of a haptic virtual reality environment to physically interact with overweight virtual human (VH). We verify the hypothesis that duration and strength of virtual touch vary according to the characteristics of VH in ways similar to those encountered from interaction with real people in anti-fat attitude studies. A group of 61 participants were randomly assigned to one of the experimental conditions involving giving a virtual hug to a female or a male VH of either normal or overweight. We found significant associations between body image satisfaction and anti-fat attitudes and sex differences on these measures. We also found a significant interaction effect of the sex of the participants, sex of the VH, and the body size of the VH. Female participants hugged longer the overweight female VH than overweight male VH. Male participants hugged longer the normal-weight VH than the overweight VH. We conclude that virtual touch is a promising method of measuring attitudes, emotion and social interactions.

  12. New Experimental Models of Diabetic Nephropathy in Mice Models of Type 2 Diabetes: Efforts to Replicate Human Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Soler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. The use of experimental models of DN has provided valuable information regarding many aspects of DN, including pathophysiology, progression, implicated genes, and new therapeutic strategies. A large number of mouse models of diabetes have been identified and their kidney disease was characterized to various degrees. Most experimental models of type 2 DN are helpful in studying early stages of DN, but these models have not been able to reproduce the characteristic features of more advanced DN in humans such as nodules in the glomerular tuft or glomerulosclerosis. The generation of new experimental models of DN created by crossing, knockdown, or knockin of genes continues to provide improved tools for studying DN. These models provide an opportunity to search for new mechanisms involving the development of DN, but their shortcomings should be recognized as well. Moreover, it is important to recognize that the genetic background has a substantial effect on the susceptibility to diabetes and kidney disease development in the various models of diabetes.

  13. Inactivation of p53 in Human Keratinocytes Leads to Squamous Differentiation and Shedding via Replication Stress and Mitotic Slippage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freije, Ana; Molinuevo, Rut; Ceballos, Laura; Cagigas, Marta; Alonso-Lecue, Pilar; Rodriguez, René; Menendez, Pablo; Aberdam, Daniel; De Diego, Ernesto; Gandarillas, Alberto

    2014-11-20

    Tumor suppressor p53 is a major cellular guardian of genome integrity, and its inactivation is the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer, rising up to 80% in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). By adapting the small hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology, we inactivated endogenous p53 in primary epithelial cells from the epidermis of human skin. We show that either loss of endogenous p53 or overexpression of a temperature-sensitive dominant-negative conformation triggers a self-protective differentiation response, resulting in cell stratification and expulsion. These effects follow DNA damage and exit from mitosis without cell division. p53 preserves the proliferative potential of the stem cell compartment and limits the power of proto-oncogene MYC to drive cell cycle stress and differentiation. The results provide insight into the role of p53 in self-renewal homeostasis and help explain why p53 mutations do not initiate skin cancer but increase the likelihood that cancer cells will appear.

  14. Inactivation of p53 in Human Keratinocytes Leads to Squamous Differentiation and Shedding via Replication Stress and Mitotic Slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Freije

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 is a major cellular guardian of genome integrity, and its inactivation is the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer, rising up to 80% in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. By adapting the small hairpin RNA (shRNA technology, we inactivated endogenous p53 in primary epithelial cells from the epidermis of human skin. We show that either loss of endogenous p53 or overexpression of a temperature-sensitive dominant-negative conformation triggers a self-protective differentiation response, resulting in cell stratification and expulsion. These effects follow DNA damage and exit from mitosis without cell division. p53 preserves the proliferative potential of the stem cell compartment and limits the power of proto-oncogene MYC to drive cell cycle stress and differentiation. The results provide insight into the role of p53 in self-renewal homeostasis and help explain why p53 mutations do not initiate skin cancer but increase the likelihood that cancer cells will appear.

  15. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies of [(biphenyloxy)propyl]isoxazole derivatives. Inhibitors of human rhinovirus 2 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'min, Victor E; Artemenko, Anatoly G; Muratov, Eugene N; Volineckaya, Ingrid L; Makarov, Vadim A; Riabova, Olga B; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2007-08-23

    The 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) in HeLa cells, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) against human rhinovirus 2 (HRV-2), and the selectivity index (SI = CC50/IC50) of [(biphenyloxy)propyl]isoxazole derivatives were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) based on simplex representation of molecular structure. Statistic characteristics for partial least-squares models are quite satisfactory (R2 = 0.838 - 0.918; Q2 = 0.695 - 0.87) for prediction of CC50, IC50, and SI values and permit the virtual screening and molecular design of new compounds with strong anti-HRV-2 activity. The quality of prognosis for designed compounds was additionally estimated by analysis of domain applicability for each QSAR model. A hypothesis to the effect that terminal benzene substituents must have negative electrostatic potential and definite length (approximately 5.5-5.6 A) to possess strong antiviral activity has been suggested. The quality of developed analysis, i.e., high level of antiviral action of three new designed compounds, has been confirmed experimentally.

  16. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:68-76.

  17. Integrable deformations of the AdS5×S5 superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation - Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-11-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S5 can be charactered by classical r-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as the gravity/CYBE correspondence. We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for β-deformations of the N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS5 × T1,1 as a generalization.

  18. Minimal Surfaces of the $AdS_5\\times S^5$ Superstring and the Symmetries of Super Wilson Loops at Strong Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Munkler, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Based on an extension of the holographic principle to superspace, we provide a strong-coupling description of smooth super Wilson loops in terms of minimal surfaces of the $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ superstring. We employ the classical integrability of the Green-Schwarz superstring on $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ to derive the superconformal and Yangian $Y[\\mathfrak{psu}(2,2|4)]$ Ward identities for the super Wilson loop, thus extending the strong coupling results obtained for the Maldacena-Wilson loop. In the course of the derivation, we determine the minimal surface solution up to third order in an expansion close to the conformal boundary.

  19. Integrable deformations of the AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ superstring and the classical Yang-Baxter equation -- Towards the gravity/CYBE correspondence --

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Based on the formulation of Yang-Baxter sigma models developed by Klimcik and Delduc-Magro-Vicedo, we explain that various deformations of type IIB superstring on AdS$_5\\times$S$^5$ can be characterized by classical $r$-matrices satisfying the classical Yang-Baxter equation (CYBE). The relation may be referred to as `the gravity/CYBE correspondence.' We present non-trivial examples of the correspondence including Lunin-Maldacena backgrounds for $\\beta$-deformations of the ${\\cal N} = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory and the gravity duals for non-commutative gauge theories. We also discuss non-integrable backgrounds such as AdS$_5\\times T^{1,1}$ as a generalization.

  20. Minimal surfaces of the {{AdS}}_{5}\\times {S}^{5} superstring and the symmetries of super Wilson loops at strong coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münkler, Hagen; Pollok, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Based on an extension of the holographic principle to superspace, we provide a strong-coupling description of smooth super Wilson loops in {N}=4 super Yang-Mills theory in terms of minimal surfaces of the {{AdS}}5× {S}5 superstring. We employ the classical integrability of the Green-Schwarz superstring on {{AdS}}5× {S}5 to derive the superconformal and Yangian Y[{psu}(2,2| 4)] Ward identities for the super Wilson loop, thus extending the strong coupling results obtained for the Maldacena-Wilson loop. In the course of the derivation, we determine the minimal surface solution up to third order in an expansion close to the conformal boundary.

  1. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. miRNA profiling of human naive CD4 T cells links miR-34c-5p to cell activation and HIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Andreia J; Andrade, Jorge; Foxall, Russell B; Matoso, Paula; Matos, Ana M; Soares, Rui S; Rocha, Cheila; Ramos, Christian G; Tendeiro, Rita; Serra-Caetano, Ana; Guerra-Assunção, José A; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Gonçalves, João; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Sousa, Ana E

    2017-02-01

    Cell activation is a vital step for T-cell memory/effector differentiation as well as for productive HIV infection. To identify novel regulators of this process, we used next-generation sequencing to profile changes in microRNA expression occurring in purified human naive CD4 T cells in response to TCR stimulation and/or HIV infection. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the transcriptional up-regulation of miR-34c-5p in response to TCR stimulation in naive CD4 T cells. The induction of this miR was further consistently found to be reduced by both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. Overexpression of miR-34c-5p led to changes in the expression of several genes involved in TCR signaling and cell activation, confirming its role as a novel regulator of naive CD4 T-cell activation. We additionally show that miR-34c-5p promotes HIV-1 replication, suggesting that its down-regulation during HIV infection may be part of an anti-viral host response. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Replication-Competent Rhabdoviruses with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coats and Green Fluorescent Protein: Entry by a pH-Independent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritz, Eli; Gerlach, Jennifer; Johnson, J. Erik; Rose, John K.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the gene encoding the single transmembrane glycoprotein (G) was deleted and replaced by an env-G hybrid gene encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein fused to the cytoplasmic domain of VSV G. An additional gene encoding a green fluorescent protein was added to permit rapid detection of infection. This novel surrogate virus infected and propagated on cells expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor CXCR4. Infection was blocked by SDF-1, the ligand for CXCR4, by antibody to CD4 and by HIV-neutralizing antibody. This virus, unlike VSV, entered cells by a pH-independent pathway and thus supports a pH-independent pathway of HIV entry. Additional recombinants carrying hybrid env-G genes derived from R5 or X4R5 HIV strains also showed the coreceptor specificities of the HIV strains from which they were derived. These surrogate viruses provide a simple and rapid assay for HIV-neutralizing antibodies as well as a rapid screen for molecules that would interfere with any stage of HIV binding or entry. The viruses might also be useful as HIV vaccines. Our results suggest wide applications of other surrogate viruses based on VSV. PMID:10400792

  4. Efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication using novel modified microRNA-30a targeting 3′-untranslated region transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEJATI, AHMAD; SHAHMAHMOODI, SHOHREH; AREFIAN, EHSAN; SHOJA, ZABIHOLLAH; MARASHI, SAYED-MAHDI; TABATABAIE, HAMIDEH; MOLLAEI-KANDELOUS, YAGHOUB; SOLEIMANI, MASOUD; NATEGH, RAKHSHANDEH

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy is currently considered to be a combinatorial anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) therapy. Although artificial polycistronic microRNAs (miRs) can reduce HIV-1 escape mutant variants, this approach may increase the risk of side effects. The present study aimed to optimize the efficiency of anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy in order to reduce the cell toxicity induced by multi-short hairpin RNA expression. An artificial miR-30a-3′-untranslated region (miR-3-UTR) obtained from a single RNA polymerase II was used to simultaneously target all viral transcripts. The results of the present study demonstrated that HIV-1 replication was significantly inhibited in the cells with the miR-3-UTR construct, suggesting that miR-3′-UTR may serve as a promising tool for RNAi-based gene therapy in the treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27168813

  5. Delayed persistence of giant-nucleated cells induced by X-ray and proton irradiation in the progeny of replicating normal human f ibroblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahwasi, A. A.; Jeynes, J. C.; Merchant, M. J.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-08-01

    Ionising radiation can induce giant-nucleated cells (GCs) in the progeny of irradiated populations, as demonstrated in various cellular systems. Most in vitro studies have utilised quiescent cancerous or normal cell lines but it is not clear whether radiation-induced GCs persist in the progeny of normal replicated cells. In the current work we show persistent induction of GCs in the progeny of normal human-diploid skin fibroblasts (AG1522). These cells were originally irradiated with a single equivalent clinical dose of 0.2, 1 or 2 Gy of either X-ray or proton irradiation and maintained in an active state for various post-irradiation incubation interval times before they were replated for GC analysis. The results demonstrate that the formation of GCs in the progeny of X-ray or proton irradiated cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner when measured 7 days after irradiation and this finding is in agreement with that reported for the AG1522 cells using other radiation qualities. For the 1 Gy X-ray doses it was found that the GC yield increased continually with time up to 21 days post-irradiation. These results can act as benchmark data for such work and may have important implications for studies aimed at evaluating the efficacy of radiation therapy and in determining the risk of delayed effects particularly when applying protons.

  6. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Islam T.M.; Ma, Eric J.; Meixell, Brandt; Hill, Nichola J.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Albrecht , Randy A.; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~ 12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  7. Recombinant subgroup B human respiratory syncytial virus expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein efficiently replicates in primary human cells and is virulent in cotton rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Lemon (Ken); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); M. Ludlow (Martin); L.J. Rennick (Linda); S. Yüksel (Selma); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. McQuaid (Stephen); B.K. Rima (Bert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHuman respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most important viral cause of severe respiratory tract disease in infants. Two subgroups (A and B) have been identified, which cocirculate during, or alternate between, yearly epidemics and cause indistinguishable disease. Existing in vitro

  8. Inhibitory effects of crude extracts from some edible Thai plants against replication of hepatitis B virus and human liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiyaput Wanwisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edible plants such as Cratoxylum formosum (Jack Dyer, Curcumin longa Lin, Momordica charantia Lin and Moringa oleifera Lam have long been believed in Thai culture to relieve ulcers and the symptoms of liver disease. However, little is known about their anti-liver cancer properties and antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities of crude extracts from these edible plants on human liver cancer cells. Methods Plant samples were prepared and extracted using buffer and hydro-alcoholic solvents. The MTT assay was performed to investigate the effects of the plant extracts on the cell viability of HepG2 cells. The inhibitory effect on replication of HBV was analysed by determining the level of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells with the DNA expression plasmid of the HBV genome using a quantitative real-time PCR. Results Buffer and hydroalcoholic extracts from C. formosum (leaf reduced cell viability of HepG2 cells and they also inhibited HBV cccDNA. Crude extracts from C. longa (bulb in both solvents did not have any cytotoxic effects on the HepG2 cells, but they significantly decreased the level of HBV cccDNA. Buffer extracts from the leaves of M. charantia and the fruits of M. oleifera showed to have anti-HBV activity and also a mild cytotoxicity effect on the HepG2 cells. In addition, leaves of M. Oleifera extracted by hydroalcoholic solvent drastically decreased the level of cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Conclusion Some crude extracts of edible plants contain compounds that demonstrate anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities.

  9. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sakurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad (rAd-GFP was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells.

  10. Broader utilization of origins of DNA replication in cancer cell lines along a 78 kb region of human chromosome 2q34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Manuel S; Hu, Lan; Lueders, John; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Human DNA replication depends on the activation of thousands of origins distributed within the genome. The actual distribution of origins is not known, nor whether this distribution is unique to a cell type, or if it changes with the proliferative state of the cell. In this study, we have employed a real-time PCR-based nascent strand DNA abundance assay, to determine the location of origins along a 78 kb region on Chr2q34. Preliminary studies using nascent DNA strands isolated from either HeLa and normal skin fibroblast cells showed that in both cell lines peaks of high origin activity mapped in similar locations. However, the overall origin profile in HeLa cells corresponded to broad origin activation zones, whereas in fibroblasts a more punctuated profile of origin activation was observed. To investigate the relevance of this differential origin profile, we compared the origin distribution profiles in breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, BT-474, and MCF-7, to their normal counterpart MCF-10A. In addition, the CRL7250 cell line was also used as a normal control. Our results validated our earlier observation and showed that the origin profile in normal cell lines exhibited a punctuated pattern, in contrast to broader zone profiles observed in the cancer cell lines. A quantitative analysis of origin peaks revealed that the number of activated origins in cancer cells is statistically larger than that obtained in normal cells, suggesting that the flexibility of origin usage is significantly increased in cancer cells compared to their normal counterparts.

  11. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  12. A deletion in the proximal untranslated pX region of human T-cell leukemia virus type II decreases viral replication but not infectivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerell, G L; Rovnak, J; Green, P L; Chen, I S

    1996-02-01

    The function of untranslated (UT) nucleotide sequences in the proximal portion of the pX region of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) family of retroviruses remains enigmatic. Previous studies have shown that these sequences are not necessary for the expression of viral proteins or for the induction, transmission, or maintenance of the transformed cell type in vitro. To determine the effect of the UT region in vivo, separate groups of rabbits were inoculated with lethally irradiated, stable clones of the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, 729, transfected with either a full-length wild-type HTLV-II clone (pH6neo) or a mutant clone containing a 324-bp deletion in the proximal UT portion of pX (pH6neo delta UT[6661-6984]), or nontransfected 729 cells. All rabbits inoculated with either wild-type or pX-deleted HTLV-II developed a similar profile and titer of serum antibodies against HTLV-II antigens, as determined by Western immunoblots, by 4 weeks postinoculation (PI). Antibody titers, as determined by enzyme immunoassay, were similar between the two groups of rabbits and increased over the 18-week period of study. All rabbits were killed at 18 weeks PI, and spleen, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBMC), bone marrow, and mesenteric lymph node were assayed for HTLV-II tax/rex sequences by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Virus was detected in all tissues tested from all rabbits inoculated with 729pH6neo cells containing wild-type HTLV-II, which contained between 1.4 and 0.3 mean copies of provirus per cell. In contrast, the distribution and number of provirus copies were more limited in rabbits inoculated with 729pH6neo delta UT(6661-6984) cells containing UT-deleted HTLV-II; in most tissues, there was a fivefold to sevenfold reduction in mean provirus copies per cell as compared with rabbits inoculated with wild-type HTLV-II. All rabbits inoculated with control 729 cells remained negative for HTLV-II infection, as determined by the same techniques. It was

  13. Structural insight into how the human helicase subunit MCM2 may act as a histone chaperone together with ASF1 at the replication fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richet, Nicolas; Liu, Danni; Legrand, Pierre; Velours, Christophe; Corpet, Armelle; Gaubert, Albane; Bakail, May; Moal-Raisin, Gwenaelle; Guerois, Raphael; Compper, Christel; Besle, Arthur; Guichard, Berengère; Almouzni, Genevieve; Ochsenbein, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    MCM2 is a subunit of the replicative helicase machinery shown to interact with histones H3 and H4 during the replication process through its N-terminal domain. During replication, this interaction has been proposed to assist disassembly and assembly of nucleosomes on DNA. However, how this interaction participates in crosstalk with histone chaperones at the replication fork remains to be elucidated. Here, we solved the crystal structure of the ternary complex between the histone-binding domain of Mcm2 and the histones H3-H4 at 2.9 Å resolution. Histones H3 and H4 assemble as a tetramer in the crystal structure, but MCM2 interacts only with a single molecule of H3-H4. The latter interaction exploits binding surfaces that contact either DNA or H2B when H3-H4 dimers are incorporated in the nucleosome core particle. Upon binding of the ternary complex with the histone chaperone ASF1, the histone tetramer dissociates and both MCM2 and ASF1 interact simultaneously with the histones forming a 1:1:1:1 heteromeric complex. Thermodynamic analysis of the quaternary complex together with structural modeling support that ASF1 and MCM2 could form a chaperoning module for histones H3 and H4 protecting them from promiscuous interactions. This suggests an additional function for MCM2 outside its helicase function as a proper histone chaperone connected to the replication pathway. PMID:25618846

  14. Expression of the p12 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1), Cdt1, cyclin A, PCNA and Ki-67 in relation to DNA replication in individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Sufang; Xu, Dazhong; Lee, Marietta Ywt; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Ernest Yc; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the p12 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ4) is degraded by CRL4(Cdt2) which regulates the licensing factor Cdt1 and p21(WAF1) during the G1 to S transition. Presently, we performed multiparameter laser scanning cytometric analyses of changes in levels of p12, Cdt1 and p21(WAF1), detected immunocytochemically in individual cells, vis-à-vis the initiation and completion of DNA replication. The latter was assessed by pulse-labeling A549 cells with the DNA precursor ethynyl-2'-deoxyribose (EdU). The loss of p12 preceded the initiation of DNA replication and essentially all cells incorporating EdU were p12 negative. Completion of DNA replication and transition to G2 phase coincided with the re-appearance and rapid rise of p12 levels. Similar to p12 a decline of p21(WAF1) and Cdt1 was seen at the end of G1 phase and all DNA replicating cells were p21(WAF1) and Cdt1 negative. The loss of p21(WAF1) preceded that of Cdt1 and p12 and the disappearance of the latter coincided with the onset of DNA replication. Loss of p12 leads to conversion of Pol δ4 to its trimeric form, Pol δ3, so that the results provide strong support to the notion that Pol δ3 is engaged in DNA replication during unperturbed progression through the S phase of cell cycle. Also assessed was a correlation between EdU incorporation, likely reflecting the rate of DNA replication in individual cells, and the level of expression of positive biomarkers of replication cyclin A, PCNA and Ki-67 in these cells. Of interest was the observation of stronger correlation between EdU incorporation and expression of PCNA (r = 0.73) than expression of cyclin A (r = 0.47) or Ki-67 (r = 0.47).

  15. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  16. The Lysine Residues within the Human Ribosomal Protein S17 Sequence Naturally Inserted into the Viral Nonstructural Protein of a Unique Strain of Hepatitis E Virus Are Important for Enhanced Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important but extremely understudied human pathogen. Due largely to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV, the molecular mechanisms of HEV replication and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently, a unique genotype 3 strain of HEV recovered from a chronically infected patient was adapted for growth in HepG2C3A human hepatoma cells. The adaptation of the Kernow C-1 P6 HEV to propagate in HepG2C3A cells selected for a rare virus recombinant that ...

  17. Completion of DNA replication in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Brian M; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2014-11-18

    The mechanism by which cells recognize and complete replicated regions at their precise doubling point must be remarkably efficient, occurring thousands of times per cell division along the chromosomes of humans. However, this process remains poorly understood. Here we show that, in Escherichia coli, the completion of replication involves an enzymatic system that effectively counts pairs and limits cellular replication to its doubling point by allowing converging replication forks to transiently continue through the doubling point before the excess, over-replicated regions are incised, resected, and joined. Completion requires RecBCD and involves several proteins associated with repairing double-strand breaks including, ExoI, SbcDC, and RecG. However, unlike double-strand break repair, completion occurs independently of homologous recombination and RecA. In some bacterial viruses, the completion mechanism is specifically targeted for inactivation to allow over-replication to occur during lytic replication. The results suggest that a primary cause of genomic instabilities in many double-strand-break-repair mutants arises from an impaired ability to complete replication, independent from DNA damage.

  18. The predominance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 circulating recombinant form 02 (CRF02_AG in West Central Africa may be related to its replicative fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butel Christelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRF02_AG is the predominant HIV strain circulating in West and West Central Africa. The aim of this study was to test whether this predominance is associated with a higher in vitro replicative fitness relative to parental subtype A and G viruses. Primary HIV-1 isolates (10 CRF02_AG, 5 subtype A and 5 subtype G were obtained from a well-described Cameroonian cohort. Growth competition experiments were carried out at equal multiplicity of infection in activated T cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MO-DC in parallel. Results Dual infection/competition experiments in activated T cells clearly indicated that CRF02_AG isolates had a significant replication advantage over the subtype A and subtype G viruses. The higher fitness of CRF02_AG was evident for isolates from patients with CD4+ T cell counts >200 cells/μL (non-AIDS or CD4+ T cell counts Conclusion We observed a higher ex vivo replicative fitness of CRF02_AG isolates compared to subtype A and G viruses from the same geographic region and showed that this was independent of the co-receptor tropism and irrespective of high or low CD4+ T cell count. This advantage in replicative fitness may contribute to the dominant spread of CRF02_AG over A and G subtypes in West and West Central Africa.

  19. Effect of polypurine tract (PPT) mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication: a virus with a completely randomized PPT retains low infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lesa R; Agresta, Beth E; Khan, Mahfuz B; Tang, Shixing; Levin, Judith G; Powell, Michael D

    2005-06-01

    We introduced polypurine tract (PPT) mutations, which we had previously tested in an in vitro assay, into the viral clone NL4-3KFSdelta nef. Each mutant was tested for single-round infectivity and virion production. All of the PPT mutations had an effect on replication; however, mutation of the 5' end appeared to have less of an effect on infectivity than mutation of the 3' end of the PPT sequence. Curiously, a mutation in which the entire PPT sequence was randomized (PPTSUB) retained 12% of the infectivity of the wild type (WT) in a multinuclear activation of galactosidase indicator assay. Supernatants from these infections contained viral particles, as evidenced by the presence of p24 antigen. Two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle junction analysis following PPTSUB infection revealed that the mutant could form a high percentage of normal junctions. Quantification of the 2-LTR circles using real-time PCR revealed that number of 2-LTR circles from cells infected with the PPTSUB mutant was 3.5 logs greater than 2-LTR circles from cells infected with WT virus. To determine whether the progeny virions from a PPTSUB infection could undergo further rounds of replication, we introduced the PPTSUB mutation into a replication-competent virus. Our results show that the mutant virus is able to replicate and that the infectivity of the progeny virions increases with each passage, quickly reverting to a WT PPT sequence. Together, these experiments confirm that the 3' end of the PPT is important for plus-strand priming and that a virus that completely lacks a PPT can replicate at a low level.

  20. Reverse transcriptase-PCR differential display analysis of meningococcal transcripts during infection of human cells: Up-regulation of priA and its role in intracellular replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alifano Pietro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro studies with cell line infection models are beginning to disclose the strategies that Neisseria meningitidis uses to survive and multiply inside the environment of the infected host cell. The goal of this study was to identify novel virulence determinants that are involved in this process using an in vitro infection system. Results By using reverse transcriptase-PCR differential display we have identified a set of meningococcal genes significantly up-regulated during residence of the bacteria in infected HeLa cells including genes involved in L-glutamate transport (gltT operon, citrate metabolism (gltA, disulfide bond formation (dsbC, two-partner secretion (hrpA-hrpB, capsulation (lipA, and DNA replication/repair (priA. The role of PriA, a protein that in Escherichia coli plays a central role in replication restart of collapsed or arrested DNA replication forks, has been investigated. priA inactivation resulted in a number of growth phenotypes that were fully complemented by supplying a functional copy of priA. The priA-defective mutant exhibited reduced viability during late logarithmic growth phase. This defect was more severe when it was incubated under oxygen-limiting conditions using nitrite as terminal electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration. When compared to wild type it was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and the nitric oxide generator sodium nitroprusside. The priA-defective strain was not affected in its ability to invade HeLa cells, but, noticeably, exhibited severely impaired intracellular replication and, at variance with wild type and complemented strains, it co-localized with lysosomal associated membrane protein 1. Conclusion In conclusion, our study i. demonstrates the efficacy of the experimental strategy that we describe for discovering novel virulence determinants of N. meningitidis and ii. provides evidence for a role of priA in preventing both oxidative and nitrosative injury, and in

  1. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  2. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  3. Heat kernels on cone of AdS2 and k-wound circular Wilson loop in AdS5 × S5 superstring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, R.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We compute the one-loop world-sheet correction to partition function of {{AdS}}5× {{{S}}}5 superstring that should be representing k-fundamental circular Wilson loop in planar limit. The 2d metric of the minimal surface ending on k-wound circle at the boundary is that of a cone of AdS2 with deficit 2π (1-k). We compute the determinants of 2d fluctuation operators by first constructing heat kernels of scalar and spinor Laplacians on the cone using the Sommerfeld formula. The final expression for the k-dependent part of the one-loop correction has simple integral representation but is different from earlier results.

  4. Heat kernels on cone of $AdS_2$ and $k$-wound circular Wilson loop in $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ superstring

    CERN Document Server

    Bergamin, R

    2015-01-01

    We compute the one-loop world-sheet correction to partition function of $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ superstring that should be representing $k$-fundamental circular Wilson loop in planar limit. The 2d metric of the minimal surface ending on $k$-wound circle at the boundary is that of a cone of $AdS_2$ with deficit $2\\pi (1-k)$. We compute determinants of 2d fluctuation operators by first constructing heat kernels of scalar and spinor Laplacians on the cone using the Sommerfeld formula. The final expression for the k-dependent part of the one-loop correction has simple integral representation but is different from earlier results.

  5. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  8. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  9. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  10. Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 recombination ex vivo provide evidence for coadaptation of distant sites, resulting in purifying selection for intersubtype recombinants during replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Kearney, Mary; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency recombination is a hallmark of HIV-1 replication. Recombination can occur between two members of the same subtype or between viruses from two different subtypes, generating intra- or intersubtype recombinants, respectively. Many intersubtype recombinants have been shown to circulate....../B) and between viruses with pol genes from subtype B or F (B/F). Recombination events generated during a single cycle of infection without selection pressure on pol gene function were analyzed by single-genome sequencing. We found that recombination occurred slightly ( approximately 30%) less frequently in B...... subtypes; these sites may be segregated by recombination events, causing the newly generated intersubtype recombinants to undergo purifying selection. Therefore, the ability of the recombinants to replicate is the major barrier for many of these viruses....

  11. Small-molecule inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by targeting the interaction between Vif and ElonginC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tao; Liu, Donglai; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiaodan; Wang, Jiawen; Lv, Mingyu; Huang, Wenlin; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2012-05-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein is essential for viral replication. Vif recruits cellular ElonginB/C-Cullin5 E3 ubiquitin ligase to target the host antiviral protein APOBEC3G (A3G) for proteasomal degradation. In the absence of Vif, A3G is packaged into budding HIV-1 virions and introduces multiple mutations in the newly synthesized minus-strand viral DNA to restrict virus replication. Thus, the A3G-Vif-E3 complex represents an attractive target for development of novel anti-HIV drugs. In this study, we identified a potent small molecular compound (VEC-5) by virtual screening and validated its anti-Vif activity through biochemical analysis. We show that VEC-5 inhibits virus replication only in A3G-positive cells. Treatment with VEC-5 increased cellular A3G levels when Vif was coexpressed and enhanced A3G incorporation into HIV-1 virions to reduce viral infectivity. Coimmunoprecipitation and computational analysis further attributed the anti-Vif activity of VEC-5 to the inhibition of Vif from direct binding to the ElonginC protein. These findings support the notion that suppressing Vif function can liberate A3G to carry out its antiviral activity and demonstrate that regulation of the Vif-ElonginC interaction is a novel target for small-molecule inhibitors of HIV-1.

  12. The organotypic multicellular spheroid is a relevant three-dimensional model to study adenovirus replication and penetration in human tumors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Dirven, Clemens M; Pherai, D Shareen; Kater, Mathijs; Van der Valk, Paul; Vogels, Ronald; Vandertop, W Peter; Pinedo, Herbert M; Curiel, David T; Gerritsen, Winald R

    2002-11-01

    The use of adenoviruses for gene transfer and as oncolytic agents is currently receiving widespread attention. As specific constraints to adenovirus distribution and spread cannot be studied in cell cultures, there is a need for an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model mimicking the in vivo biology of tumors. We studied the interactions between tumor and adenoviruses using multicellular spheroids grown from primary brain tumor material. Using beta-galactosidase and luciferase reporter genes expressed by replication-defective adenoviruses, we showed that infection was restricted to the first layer of cells. Using a replication-competent adenovirus expressing the luciferase gene, we showed that transgene expression in the spheroid was considerably enhanced and that viral spreading deep into the 3D structure took place. In addition, a tetrazolium salt-based metabolic assay could be used to compare the oncolytic activity of different concentrations of replication-competent adenoviruses. We can conclude that organotypic spheroids offer a versatile in vitro system for studying distribution, spread, and oncolysis by adenoviruses in a clinically relevant model.

  13. Human leukocyte test system. X. Higher sensitivity to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle of early as compared to late replicating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, B.; Obe, G.

    1976-12-29

    Leukocyte cultures were set up with x-irradiated whole blood (200 R). Cells starting with their DNA synthesis between 25 and 35 h after culture initiation (''early replicating cells'') were pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine ((3H)TdR). Mitoses were collected with colcemid in adjacent intervals from 36 up to 72 h after culture initiation. At fixation times of 50, 56, 62, and 72 h enough mitoses for a determination of the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric and ring chromosomes) were found. After that the preparations were processed for autoradiography. All mitoses analyzed for chromosomal aberrations were re-analyzed for labeling, and the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in labeled (= ''late replicating cells'') mitoses were compared. At all fixation times, higher frequencies of dicentric chromosomes were found in labeled as compared to unlabeled mitoses, indicating a higher sensitivity of early replicating cells to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle.

  14. Minichromosome replication in vitro: inhibition of re-replication by replicatively assembled nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krude, T; Knippers, R

    1994-08-19

    Single-stranded circular DNA, containing the SV40 origin sequence, was used as a template for complementary DNA strand synthesis in cytosolic extracts from HeLa cells. In the presence of the replication-dependent chromatin assembly factor CAF-1, defined numbers of nucleosomes were assembled during complementary DNA strand synthesis. These minichromosomes were then induced to semiconservatively replicate by the addition of the SV40 initiator protein T antigen (re-replication). The results indicate that re-replication of minichromosomes appears to be inhibited by two independent mechanisms. One acts at the initiation of minichromosome re-replication, and the other affects replicative chain elongation. To directly demonstrate the inhibitory effect of replicatively assembled nucleosomes, two types of minichromosomes were prepared: (i) post-replicative minichromosomes were assembled in a reaction coupled to replication as above; (ii) pre-replicative minichromosomes were assembled independently of replication on double-stranded DNA. Both types of minichromosomes were used as templates for DNA replication under identical conditions. Replicative fork movement was found to be impeded only on post-replicative minichromosome templates. In contrast, pre-replicative minichromosomes allowed one unconstrained replication cycle, but re-replication was inhibited due to a block in fork movement. Thus, replicatively assembled chromatin may have a profound influence on the re-replication of DNA.

  15. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  16. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  17. Detection of human parvovirus 4 viremia in the follow-up blood samples from seropositive individuals suggests the existence of persistent viral replication or reactivation of latent viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Lee, Kuang-Lun

    2015-06-19

    The transmission routes for human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in areas with high seroprevalence are not known. In the work described here, persistent PARV4 viral replication was investigated by conducting a longitudinal study. Ten healthcare workers each provided a blood sample at the beginning of the study (first sample) and 12 months later (second sample). The paired samples were tested for PARV4-positivity by immunoblotting analysis and nested polymerase chain reactions. IgG antibodies against PARV4 were detected in six participants, three of whom also had IgM antibodies against PARV4. The immunoblotting results did not vary over time. PARV4 DNA was detected in the first blood sample from one participant who had IgG antibodies against PARV4 and in the second blood samples from 2 participants who had IgG and IgM antibodies against PARV4. Detection of PARV4 DNA in the second blood samples from two seropositive participants suggests the existence of persistent PARV4 replication or reactivation of inactive virus in the tissues. The finding of persistent or intermittent PARV4 replication in individuals with past infections provides an important clue toward unraveling the non-parenteral transmission routes of PARV4 infection in areas where the virus is endemic.

  18. Targeted cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus coding for a fully human monoclonal antibody specific for CTLA-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, J D; Hemminki, O; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Bonetti, A; Guse, K; Escutenaire, S; Kanerva, A; Pesonen, S; Löskog, A; Cerullo, V; Hemminki, A

    2012-10-01

    Promising clinical results have been achieved with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as ipilimumab and tremelimumab that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, CD152). However, systemic administration of these agents also has the potential for severe immune-related adverse events. Thus, local production might allow higher concentrations at the target while reducing systemic side effects. We generated a transductionally and transcriptionally targeted oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 expressing complete human mAb specific for CTLA-4 and tested it in vitro, in vivo and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal donors and patients with advanced solid tumors. mAb expression was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Biological functionality was determined in a T-cell line and in PBMCs from cancer patients. T cells of patients, but not those of healthy donors, were activated by an anti-CTLA4mAb produced by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4. In addition to immunological effects, a direct anti-CTLA-4-mediated pro-apoptotic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Local production resulted in 43-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor versus plasma anti-CTLA4mAb concentration. Plasma levels in mice remained below what has been reported safe in humans. Replication-competent Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 resulted in 81-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor mAb levels as compared with a replication-deficient control. This is the first report of an oncolytic adenovirus producing a full-length human mAb. High mAb concentrations were seen at tumors with lower systemic levels. Stimulation of T cells of cancer patients by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 suggests feasibility of testing the approach in clinical trials.

  19. Investigating variation in replicability: A "Many Labs" replication project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.A.; Ratliff, K.A.; Vianello, M.; Adams, R.B.; Bahnik, S.; Bernstein, M.J.; Bocian, K.; Brandt, M.J.; Brooks, B.; Brumbaugh, C.C.; Cemalcilar, Z.; Chandler, J.; Cheong, W.; Davis, W.E.; Devos, T.; Eisner, M.; Frankowska, N.; Furrow, D.; Galliani, E.M.; Hasselman, F.W.; Hicks, J.A.; Hovermale, J.F.; Hunt, S.J.; Huntsinger, J.R.; IJzerman, H.; John, M.S.; Joy-Gaba, J.A.; Kappes, H.B.; Krueger, L.E.; Kurtz, J.; Levitan, C.A.; Mallett, R.K.; Morris, W.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Nier, J.A.; Packard, G.; Pilati, R.; Rutchick, A.M.; Schmidt, K.; Skorinko, J.L.M.; Smith, R.; Steiner, T.G.; Storbeck, J.; Van Swol, L.M.; Thompson, D.; Veer, A.E. van 't; Vaughn, L.A.; Vranka, M.; Wichman, A.L.; Woodzicka, J.A.; Nosek, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently.

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) replication and transcription factor activates the K9 (vIRF) gene through two distinct cis elements by a non-DNA-binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keiji; Ishikawa, Kayo; Nishimura, Ken; Sakakibara, Shuhei; Do, Eunju; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2002-12-01

    The replication and transcription activator (RTA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8, a homologue of Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 or Rta, is a strong transactivator and inducer of lytic replication. RTA acting alone can induce lytic replication of KSHV in infected cell lines that originated from primary effusion lymphomas, leading to virus production. During the lytic replication process, RTA activates many kinds of genes, including polyadenylated nuclear RNA, K8, K9 (vIRF), ORF57, and so on. We focused here on the mechanism of how RTA upregulates the K9 (vIRF) promoter and identified two independent cis-acting elements in the K9 (vIRF) promoter that responded to RTA. These elements were finally confined to the sequence 5'-TCTGGGACAGTC-3' in responsive element (RE) I-2B and the sequence 5'-GTACTTAAAATA-3' in RE IIC-2, both of which did not share sequence homology. Multiple factors bound specifically with these elements, and their binding was correlated with the RTA-responsive activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with nuclear extract from infected cells and the N-terminal part of RTA expressed in Escherichia coli, however, did not show that RTA interacted directly with these elements, in contrast to the RTA responsive elements in the PAN/K12 promoter region, the ORF57/K8 promoter region. Thus, it was likely that RTA could transactivate several kinds of unique cis elements without directly binding to the responsive elements, probably through cooperation with other DNA-binding factors.

  1. Combination of small interfering RNA and lamivudine on inhibition of human B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Qiu Li; Wei-Zhen Xu; Jing-Xia Wang; Wen-Wei Deng; Di Li; Hong-Xi Gu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe the inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and expression by combination of siRNA and lamivudine in HepG2.2.15 cells.METHODS: Recombinant plasmid psil-HBV was constructed and transfected into HepG2.2.15 cells. The transfected cells were cultured in lamivudine-containing medium (0.05 μmol/L) and harvested at 48, 72 and 96 h. The concentration of HBeAg and HBsAg was determined using ELISA. HBV DMA replication was examined by realtime PCR and the level of HBV mRNA was measured by RT-PCR.RESULTS: In HepG2.2.15 cells treated with combination of siRNA and lamivudine, the secretion of HBeAg and HBsAg into the supernatant was found to be inhibited by 91.80% and 82.40% (2.89 ± 0.48 vs 11.73±0.38,P<0.05;4.59±0.57 vs 16.25±O.48,P<0.05) at 96 h,respectively;the number of HBV DNA copies within culture medium was also significantly decreased at 96 h (1.04±0.26 vs 8.35±0.33,P<0.05).Moreover,mRNA concentration in HepG2.2.15 cells treated with combination of siRNA and lamivudine was obviously lower compared to those treated either with siRNA or lamivudine (19.44±0.17 vs 33.27±0.21 or 79.9±0.13,P<O.05).CONCLUSION:Combination of siRNA and lamivudine is more effective in inhibiting HBV replication as compared to the single use of siRNA or lamivudine in HepG2.2.15 cells.

  2. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  3. Natural killer cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are an important source of CC-chemokines and suppress HIV-1 entry and replication in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), which are the natural ligands of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5, inhibit replication of MT-2- negative strains of HIV-1 by interfering with the ability of these strains to utilize CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry in CD4(+) cells. The present study investigates the capacity of natural killer (NK) cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals to produce CC-chemokines...

  4. TGF-β and iron differently alter HBV replication in human hepatocytes through TGF-β/BMP signaling and cellular microRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun O Park

    Full Text Available The nature of host-virus interactions in hepatitis B virus infection is incompletely understood. Since soluble factors, e.g., cytokines and metals, may exacerbate liver injury in chronic hepatitis, we considered that defining the effects of receptor-mediated signaling upon viral replication will be significant. Consequently, we studied effects of iron or TGF-β-induced TGF-β/BMP signaling in the HepG2 2.2.15 cell model of hepatitis B virus replication. We found iron and TGF-β increased hepcidin mRNA expression or TGF-β receptor kinase activity, respectively, which indicated that 2.2.15 cells responded appropriately to these substances. However, iron increased but TGF-β decreased hepatitis B virus mRNA and DNA expression. TGF-β induced expression at the mRNA level of multiple TGF-β/BMP pathway genes. This change was not observed in iron-treated cells. On the other hand, presence of SMAD proteins in iron or TGF-β-treated cells, including of SMAD4, did confirm convergence of TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways under these conditions. Since transcription factors in TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways could not have directly targeted hepatitis B virus itself, we studied whether iron or TGF-β exerted their effects through alternative mechanisms, such as by involvement of antiviral cellular microRNAs. We discovered cellular microRNA expression profiles were significantly different in iron or TGF-β-treated cells compared with untreated control cells. In many cases, exposure to iron or TGF-β changed microRNA expression in opposite directions. Introduction in cells of sequences representing such differentially expressed microRNAs, e.g., hsa-miR-125a-5p and -151-5p, even reproduced effects on virus replication of iron- or TGF-β. We surmised that TGF-β/BMP pathway members, i.e., SMADs, likely governed iron or TGF-β-induced microRNA expression. Iron may have mediated Drosha/DGCR8/heme-mediated processing of microRNAs. In turn, cellular microRNAs regulated

  5. Bioequivalence evaluation of two brands of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 250/125 mg combination tablets in healthy human volunteers: use of replicate design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, Nasir M; Al-Ghazawi, Ahmad; Najib, Naji M

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply a replicate design approach to a bioequivalence study of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid combination following a 250/125 mg oral dose to 23 subjects, and to compare the analysis of individual bioequivalence with average bioequivalence. This was conducted as a 2-treatment 2-sequence 4-period crossover study. Average bioequivalence was shown, while the results from the individual bioequivalence approach had no success in showing bioequivalence. In conclusion, the individual bioequivalence approach is a strong statistical tool to test for intra-subject variances and also subject-by-formulation interaction variance compared with the average bioequivalence approach.

  6. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulk, M. S.; Urban, J. M.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (lambda-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent...... are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K...

  7. A Replicating Adenovirus Capsid Display Recombinant Elicits Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Karen, Kasey A.; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A.; Xie, Jane; Zavala,Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodie...

  8. A proposal of the gauge theory description of the small Schwarzschild black hole in AdS5 × S5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Masanori; Maltz, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    Based on 4d N = 4 SYM on {R}^1× {S}^3 , a gauge theory description of a small black hole in AdS5×S5 is proposed. The change of the number of dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the emission of the scalar fields' eigenvalues plays a crucial role in this description. By analyzing the microcanonical ensemble, the Hagedorn behavior of long strings at low energy is obtained. Modulo an assumption based on the AdS/CFT duality for a large black hole, the energy of the small ten-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole E ˜ 1 /( G 10,N T 7) is derived. A heuristic gauge theory argument supporting this assumption is also given. The same argument applied to the ABJM theory correctly reproduces the relation for the eleven-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole. One of the consequences of our proposal is that the small and large black holes are very similar when seen from the gauge theory point of view.

  9. Perturbative computation of string one-loop corrections to Wilson loop minimal surfaces in AdS 5 × S 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forini, V.; Tseytlin, A. A.; Vescovi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We revisit the computation of the 1-loop string correction to the "latitude" minimal surface in AdS 5 × S 5 representing 1/4 BPS Wilson loop in planar N=4 SYM theory previously addressed in arXiv:1512.00841 and arXiv:1601.04708. We resolve the problem of matching with the subleading term in the strong coupling expansion of the exact gauge theory result (derived previously from localization) using a different method to compute determinants of 2d string fluctuation operators. We apply perturbation theory in a small parameter (angle of the latitude) corresponding to an expansion near the AdS 2 minimal surface representing 1/2 BPS circular Wilson loop. This allows us to compute the corrections to the heat kernels and zeta-functions of the operators in terms of the known heat kernels on AdS 2. We apply the same method also to two other examples of Wilson loop surfaces: generalized cusp and k-wound circle.

  10. Scale invariance of the eta-deformed AdS5 x S5 superstring, T-duality and modified type II equations

    CERN Document Server

    Arutyunov, G; Hoare, B; Roiban, R; Tseytlin, A A

    2015-01-01

    We consider the ABF background underlying the eta-deformed AdS5 x S5 sigma model. This background fails to satisfy the standard IIB supergravity equations which indicates that the corresponding sigma model is not Weyl invariant, i.e. does not define a critical string theory in the usual sense. We argue that the ABF background should still correspond to UV finite theory on a flat 2d world-sheet, implying that the eta-deformed model is scale invariant. This property follows from the formal relation via T-duality between the eta-deformed model and the one defined by an exact type IIB supergravity solution that has 6 isometries albeit broken by a linear dilaton. We find that the ABF background satisfies candidate type IIB scale invariance conditions which for the R-R field strengths are of the second order in derivatives. Surprisingly, we also find that the this background obeys an interesting modification of the standard IIB supergravity equations that are first order in derivatives of R-R fields. These modified...

  11. Blackhole/String Transition for the Small Schwarzschild Blackhole of $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ and Critical Unitary Matrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís; Marino, M; Wadia, S R; Alvarez-Gaume, Luis; Basu, Pallab; Marino, Marcos; Wadia, Spenta R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the blackhole-string transition of the small Schwarzschild blackhole of $AdS_5 \\times S^5$ using the AdS/CFT correspondence at finite temperature. The finite temperature gauge theory effective action, at weak {\\it and} strong coupling, can be expressed entirely in terms of constant Polyakov lines which are $SU (N)$ matrices. In showing this we have taken into account that there are no Nambu-Goto modes associated with the fact that the 10 dimensional blackhole solution sits at a point in $S^5$. We show that the phase of the gauge theory in which the eigenvalue spectrum has a gap corresponds to supergravity saddle points in the bulk theory. We identify the third order $N = \\infty$ phase transition with the blackhole-string transition. This singularity can be resolved using a double scaling limit in the transition region where the large N expansion is organized in terms of powers of $N^{-2/3}$. The $N = \\infty$ transition now becomes a smooth crossover in terms of a renormalized string c...

  12. p53/E1b58kDa complex regulates adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, P J; Hall, A R; Myers, C J; Braithwaite, A W

    1997-10-27

    We have explored a role for the adenovirus (Ad5) E1b58kDa/p53 protein complex in adenovirus replication. This was done by using virus mutants containing different defects in the E1b58kDa gene and cell lines that express either a wild-type p53 protein or a mutant p53 protein. We find that infection of wild-type p53-containing cells with wild-type Ad5 causes a shutoff of p53 and alpha-actin protein synthesis by distinct mechanisms, but neither occurs in mutant p53 cells. Our data also indicate that the shutoff is dependent on formation of the p53/E1b complex and may also involve another virus protein, E4ORF6. Following from these observations we asked whether failure to form the complex resulted in impaired adenovirus replication. Our experiments showed that neither wild-type Ad5 nor the E1b mutant dl338 could replicate in cells expressing a mutant p53 protein, but that wild-type adenovirus replicated well in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the interaction between p53 and the E1b58kDa protein is necessary for efficient adenovirus replication. This is the first time such a direct link between the complex and virus replication has been demonstrated. These data raise serious questions about the usefulness of E1b-defective viruses in tumor therapy.

  13. Effect of human activated NRAS on replication of delNS1 H5N1 influenza virus in MDCK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Wei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RAS, coded by ras proto-oncogenes, played an important role in signal transmission to regulate cell growth and differentiation. Host activation of RAS was significant for IFN-sensitive vaccinia virus (delE3L or attenuate influenza virus in unallowable cells. Results Huamn NRAS gene was activated by mutating in codon 61. Then the activation of NRAS was detected by western blot in MDCK cells. The delNS1 H5N1 influenza virus with deletion of NS1 eIF4GI binding domain was weak multiplication in MDCK cells. And the replication of delNS1 virus and expression of IFN-beta and IRF-3 were detected by Real-time PCR in MDCK cells infected with delNS1 virus. It was found that the delNS1 virus had a significant increase in MDCK cells when the NRAS was activated, and yet, expression of IRF-3 and IFN-beta were restrained. Conclusions The study demonstrated that activated NRAS played an important part for delNS1 virus replication in MDCK cells. Activated NRAS might be down-regulating the expression of antiviral cellular factors in delNS1 virus infected cells.

  14. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  15. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  16. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication re

  17. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...

  18. Scale invariance of the η-deformed AdS5×S5 superstring, T-duality and modified type II equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arutyunov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the ABF background underlying the η-deformed AdS5×S5 sigma model. This background fails to satisfy the standard IIB supergravity equations which indicates that the corresponding sigma model is not Weyl invariant, i.e. does not define a critical string theory in the usual sense. We argue that the ABF background should still define a UV finite theory on a flat 2d world-sheet implying that the η-deformed model is scale invariant. This property follows from the formal relation via T-duality between the η-deformed model and the one defined by an exact type IIB supergravity solution that has 6 isometries albeit broken by a linear dilaton. We find that the ABF background satisfies candidate type IIB scale invariance conditions which for the R–R field strengths are of the second order in derivatives. Surprisingly, we also find that the ABF background obeys an interesting modification of the standard IIB supergravity equations that are first order in derivatives of R–R fields. These modified equations explicitly depend on Killing vectors of the ABF background and, although not universal, they imply the universal scale invariance conditions. Moreover, we show that it is precisely the non-isometric dilaton of the T-dual solution that leads, after T-duality, to modification of type II equations from their standard form. We conjecture that the modified equations should follow from κ-symmetry of the η-deformed model. All our observations apply also to η-deformations of AdS3×S3×T4and AdS2×S2×T6models.

  19. Scale invariance of the η-deformed AdS5 × S5 superstring, T-duality and modified type II equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, G.; Frolov, S.; Hoare, B.; Roiban, R.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We consider the ABF background underlying the η-deformed AdS5 ×S5 sigma model. This background fails to satisfy the standard IIB supergravity equations which indicates that the corresponding sigma model is not Weyl invariant, i.e. does not define a critical string theory in the usual sense. We argue that the ABF background should still define a UV finite theory on a flat 2d world-sheet implying that the η-deformed model is scale invariant. This property follows from the formal relation via T-duality between the η-deformed model and the one defined by an exact type IIB supergravity solution that has 6 isometries albeit broken by a linear dilaton. We find that the ABF background satisfies candidate type IIB scale invariance conditions which for the R-R field strengths are of the second order in derivatives. Surprisingly, we also find that the ABF background obeys an interesting modification of the standard IIB supergravity equations that are first order in derivatives of R-R fields. These modified equations explicitly depend on Killing vectors of the ABF background and, although not universal, they imply the universal scale invariance conditions. Moreover, we show that it is precisely the non-isometric dilaton of the T-dual solution that leads, after T-duality, to modification of type II equations from their standard form. We conjecture that the modified equations should follow from κ-symmetry of the η-deformed model. All our observations apply also to η-deformations of AdS3 ×S3 ×T4and AdS2 ×S2 ×T6models.

  20. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Andres Fonseca

    Full Text Available A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity

  1. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA geno