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Sample records for hughston clinic knee

  1. Structure and properties of Hughston's stochastic extension of the Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, Stephen L.; Horwitz, Lawrence P.

    2000-01-01

    Hughston has recently proposed a stochastic extension of the Schroedinger equation, expressed as a stochastic differential equation on projective Hilbert space. We derive new projective Hilbert space identities, which we use to give a general proof that Hughston's equation leads to state vector collapse to energy eigenstates, with collapse probabilities given by the quantum mechanical probabilities computed from the initial state. We discuss the relation of Hughston's equation to earlier work on norm-preserving stochastic equations, and show that Hughston's equation can be written as a manifestly unitary stochastic evolution equation for the pure state density matrix. We discuss the behavior of systems constructed as direct products of independent subsystems, and briefly address the question of whether an energy-based approach, such as Hughston's, suffices to give an objective interpretation of the measurement process in quantum mechanics. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. Novel magnetic resonance imaging evaluation for valgus instability of the knee caused by medial collateral ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuma, Hisanori; Abe, Nobuhiro; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Uchida, Youichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    Instability of the knee after the medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is usually assessed with the manual valgus stress test, even though, in recent years, it has become possible to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the assessment of the damage of the ligament. The valgus instability of 24 patients (12 isolated injuries and 12 multiple ligament injuries) who suffered MCL injury between 1993 and 1998 was evaluated with the Hughston and Eilers classification, which involves radiographic assessment under manual valgus stress to the injured knees. We developed a novel system for classifying the degree of injury to the MCL by calculating the percentage of injured area based on MRI and investigated the relationship between this novel MRI classification and the magnitude of valgus instability by the Hughston and Eilers classification. There was a significant correlation between the 2 classifications (p=0.0006). On the other hand, the results using other MRI based classification systems, such as the Mink and Deutsch classification and the Petermann classification, were not correlated with the findings by the Hughston and Eilers classification in these cases (p>0.05). Since MRI is capable of assessing the injured ligament in clinical practice, this novel classification system would be useful for evaluating the stability of the knee and choosing an appropriate treatment following MCL injury. (author)

  3. Clinical practice guidelines for rest orthosis, knee sleeves, and unloading knee braces in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Bendaya, Samy; Faucher, Marc; Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Ribinik, Patricia; Revel, Michel; Rannou, François

    2009-12-01

    To develop clinical practice guidelines concerning the use of bracing--rest orthosis, knee sleeves and unloading knee braces--for knee osteoarthritis. The French Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Society (SOFMER) methodology, associating a systematic literature review, collection of everyday clinical practice, and external review by multidisciplinary expert panel, was used. Few high-level studies of bracing for knee osteoarthritis were found. No evidence exists for the effectiveness of rest orthosis. Evidence for knee sleeves suggests that they decrease pain in knee osteoarthritis, and their use is associated with subjective improvement. These actions do not appear to depend on a local thermal effect. The effectiveness of knee sleeves for disability is not demonstrated for knee osteoarthritis. Short- and mid-term follow-up indicates that valgus knee bracing decreases pain and disability in medial knee osteoarthritis, appears to be more effective than knee sleeves, and improves quality of life, knee proprioception, quadriceps strength, and gait symmetry, and decreases compressive loads in the medial femoro-tibial compartment. However, results of response to valgus knee bracing remain inconsistent; discomfort and side effects can result. Thrombophlebitis of the lower limbs has been reported with the braces. Braces, whatever kind, are infrequently prescribed in clinical practice for osteoarthritis of the lower limbs. Modest evidence exists for the effectiveness of bracing--rest orthosis, knee sleeves and unloading knee braces--for knee osteoarthritis, with only low level recommendations for its use. Braces are prescribed infrequently in French clinical practice for osteoarthritis of the knee. Randomized clinical trials concerning bracing in knee osteoarthritis are still necessary.

  4. Clinically assessed mediolateral knee motion: impact on gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigat...... if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position....

  5. Gait adaptations in patients with chronic posterior instability of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, D M; Morrissey, M C; Crookenden, R; Ireland, J; Beacon, J P

    2002-03-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to assess gait in individuals with a long history of posterior knee instability. Descriptive study. There are few studies in the literature concerning evaluation of the biomechanics of the knee in patients with knee posterior instability. Nine individuals with posterior knee instability and a matched control group of uninjured subjects were tested in regards to knee kinematics and kinetics while walking and ascending and descending stairs. The mean follow up time for the individuals with posterior instability was 11.1 years. Individual satisfaction with the knee was measured by having participants complete the Flandry (also known as Hughston Clinic) self-assessment questionnaire. It was found that patients with knee posterior instability who indicated a higher level of satisfaction on the Flandry score walked in a manner that demonstrated greater peak knee extensor torque during stance phase, while less satisfied patients with knee posterior instability demonstrated lower peak knee extensor torque. There was a significant correlation between the self-assessment score and the peak knee extensor torque during level walking (P=0.003). During stair ascent and descent, patients with posterior instability averaged lower knee extensor torque and power than the control subjects, but those differences were only statistically significant in power while descending stairs (P=0.048). Individuals with chronic knee posterior instability modify their gait, and the adaptation can be predicted based upon the individuals self-assessment of their knee using the Flandry questionnaire. These data suggest that gait retraining may be a valuable addition to the traditional muscle strengthening programs, which are commonly used during conservative management of knee posterior instability.

  6. [Clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wang, Long; Su, Weiping; Hu, Yihe

    2016-09-28

    To investigate the clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity.
 A total of 15 patients received total knee arthroplasty for correcting mild (10°-15°) to moderate (15°-30°) valgus knee between January 2011 and February 2014 in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University. We adopted a stable prosthesis surgery through patellar medial approach, osteophytes cleaning, conventional osteotomy, a selective soft tissue release and balance technical correcting of knee valgus deformity. Then conventional anticoagulation and symptomatic rehabilitation was utilized. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray was conducted in patients with measuring femor-tibial angle (FTA) and inspecting the prosthesis position. FTA, visual analog scale (VAS) standard, and parallel knee scoring system (KSS) were used to evaluate the clinical effect.
 Fifteen patients were followed up for 14 to 36 (22.40±11.88) months. The hospitalization time was 7-13 (7.73±1.58) d; operative time was 58-110 (81.8±16.85) min, the dominant blood loss was 140-600 (337.30±143.65) mL. Two cases had knee extension hysteresis, and the knee activity recovered after exercise. Leg power lines were normal. Three postoperative cases suffered anterior knee pain. They were subjected to celecoxib analgesic treatment and the pain gradually eased after 3 months. One postoperative case showed incision discharge and swelling, which was healed after change of dressing. During follow-up, review of X-ray film does not show prosthesis loose, subsidence and other complications. The knee valgus angle (8.1±1.8)°, knee motion range (107.33±9.61)°, KSS knee score (74.7±14.5, 75.3±2.7) and pain score (2.5±0.9) were significantly better than the preoperative (Pclinical and function KSS scores showed that the improvement rate was 80%. 
 Total knee arthroplasty is an effective way to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with

  7. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of knee laxity using a robotic testing device: a comparison to the manual clinical knee examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, T P; Stinton, S K; Siebold, R; Freedberg, H I; Jacobs, C A; Hutton, W C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect knee laxity data using a robotic testing device. The data collected were then compared to the results obtained from manual clinical examination. Two human cadavers were studied. A medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear was simulated in the left knee of cadaver 1, and a posterolateral corner (PLC) injury was simulated in the right knee of cadaver 2. Contralateral knees were left intact. Five blinded examiners carried out manual clinical examination on the knees. Laxity grades and a diagnosis were recorded. Using a robotic knee device which can measure knee laxity in three planes of motion: anterior-posterior, internal-external tibia rotation, and varus-valgus, quantitative data were obtained to document tibial motion relative to the femur. One of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the MCL injury. Robotic testing showed a 1.7° larger valgus angle, 3° greater tibial internal rotation, and lower endpoint stiffness (11.1 vs. 24.6 Nm/°) in the MCL-injured knee during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee and 4.9 mm greater medial tibial translation during rotational testing. Two of the five examiners correctly diagnosed the PLC injury, while the other examiners diagnosed an MCL tear. The PLC-injured knee demonstrated 4.1 mm more lateral tibial translation and 2.2 mm more posterior tibial translation during varus-valgus testing when compared to the intact knee. The robotic testing device was able to provide objective numerical data that reflected differences between the injured knees and the uninjured knees in both cadavers. The examiners that performed the manual clinical examination on the cadaver knees proved to be poor at diagnosing the injuries. Robotic testing could act as an adjunct to the manual clinical examination by supplying numbers that could improve diagnosis of knee injury. Level II.

  9. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of modular knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, P.; Mammeri, M.; Villers, P.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-five modular total knee replacements, 54 of them unicompartmental, have been reviewed. The average follow-up was three years. The major indication for operation was pain. A precise preoperative radiographic evaluation and a technique for a positioning the components are described. This had led to a significant improvement in the clinical and radiographic results in 67 out of 95 knees which were operated on. The modifications concern the orientation of the tibial cut, the placing of the femoral components and the correction of axial deviation. The main causes of the 13% of failures in our series were either errors in positioning the components or a preoperative diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Unicompartmental replacement gave similar results in both valgus and varus knees, and the morbidity was lower than in the bicompartmental replacements. The best results were obtained in osteoarthristic knees in elderly patients and in posttraumatic osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and Economic Burden of Revision Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is indicated for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA when conservative measures are unsuccessful. High tibial osteotomy (HTO, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA are surgical options intended to relieve knee OA pain and dysfunction. The choice of surgical intervention is dependent on several factors such as disease location, patient age, comorbidities, and activity levels. Regardless of surgical treatment, complications such as infection, loosening or lysis, periprosthetic fracture, and postoperative pain are known risks and are indications for revision surgery. The clinical and economic implications for revision surgery are underappreciated. Over 55,000 revision surgeries were performed in 2010 in the US, with 48% of these revisions in patients under 65 years. Total costs associated with each revision TKA surgery have been estimated to be in excess of $49,000. The current annual economic burden of revision knee OA surgery is $2.7 billion for hospital charges alone. By 2030, assuming a 5-fold increase in the number of revision procedures, this economic burden will exceed $13 billion annually. It is appealing to envision a therapy that could delay or obviate the need for arthroplasty. From an actuarial standpoint, this would have the theoretical downstream effect of substantially reducing the number of revision procedures. Although no known therapies currently meet these criteria, such a breakthrough would have a tremendous impact in lessening the clinical and economic burden of knee OA revision surgery.

  11. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patien...

  12. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, W.J.; Saifuddin, A.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  13. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, W.J. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  14. Medial vs lateral unicompartmental knee arthrroplasty: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Andrea; Condello, Vincenzo; Madonna, Vincenzo; Bonomo, M; Zorzi, Claudio

    2017-06-07

    Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) is a common procedure for the management of isolated osteoarthritis. UKA is considered less invasive compared to total knee arthroplasty, associated with less operative time, blood loss and faster recovery. Isolated lateral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon clinical problem, with an incidence about ten times lower than the medial compartment. In fact, lateral UKA are about 5-10% of the total amount of the UKAs. In addition, it's historically considered more challenging and with poorer results. The aim of this paper was to compare current indications, modes of failure, survivorship and clinical results of medial and lateral UKA by a narrative review of the latest literature.

  15. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  16. [Surgical technique and clinical results of total knee arthroplasty in treating endstage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingshan; Weng, Xisheng; Lin, Jin; Jin, Jin; Qian, Wenwei

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the surgical technique and the clinical results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in treating end-stage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity. Between November 1998 and October 2010, 64 patients (72 knees) with end-stage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity underwent TKA by a medial parapatellar approach. Of the 64 patients, 18 were male and 46 were female with an average age of 62.5 years (range, 23-82 years), including 44 cases (49 knees) of osteoarthritis, 17 cases (20 knees) of rheumatoid arthritis, 2 cases (2 knees) of haemophilic arthritis, and 1 case (1 knee) of post-traumatic arthritis. Bilateral knees were involved in 8 cases, and single knee in 56 cases. The flexion and extension range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint was (82.2 +/- 28.7) degrees; the femur-tibia angle (FTA) was (18.0 +/- 5.8) degrees; according to Knee Society Score (KSS) criterion, the preoperative clinical score was 31.2 +/- 10.1 and functional score was 37.3 +/- 9.0. According to Krackow's classification, there were 65 knees of type I and 7 knees of type II. By medial parapatellar approach, conventional osteotomy and Ranawat soft tissue release were performed in all cases. Prosthesis of preserved posterior cruciate ligament were used in 7 cases (7 knees), posterior stabilize prosthesis in 54 cases (60 knees), constrained prosthesis in 4 cases (5 knees). Incisions healed by first intention in all cases. Peroneal nerve palsy occurred in 1 patient with haemophilic arthritis, severe valgus deformity (FTA was 41 degrees), and flexion contracture (20 degrees), which was cured after 1 year of conservative treatment. Revison surgery was performed in 1 case of deep infection at 2 years after surgery. All the patients were followed up 4.9 years on average (range, 1-13 years). At last follow-up, the FTA was (7.0 +/- 2.5) degrees, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (t = 15.502, P = 0.000). The KSS clinical score was 83.0 +/- 6

  17. Comparison between clinical grading and navigation data of knee laxity in ACL-deficient knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Yuji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latest version of the navigation system for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has the supplementary ability to assess knee stability before and after ACL reconstruction. In this study, we compared navigation data between clinical grades in ACL-deficient knees and also analyzed correlation between clinical grading and navigation data. Methods 150 ACL deficient knees that received primary ACL reconstruction using an image-free navigation system were included. For clinical evaluation, the Lachman, anterior drawer, and pivot shift tests were performed under general anesthesia and were graded by an examiner. For the assessment of knee stability using the navigation system, manual tests were performed again before ACL reconstruction. Navigation data were recorded as anteroposterior (AP displacement of the tibia for the Lachman and anterior drawer tests, and both AP displacement and tibial rotation for the pivot shift test. Results Navigation data of each clinical grade were as follows; Lachman test grade 1+: 10.0 mm, grade 2+: 13.2 ± 3.1 mm, grade 3+: 14.5 ± 3.3 mm, anterior drawer test grade 1+: 6.8 ± 1.4 mm, grade 2+: 7.4 ± 1.8 mm, grade 3+: 9.1 ± 2.3 mm, pivot shift test grade 1+: 3.9 ± 1.8 mm/21.5° ± 7.8°, grade 2+: 4.8 ± 2.1 mm/21.8° ± 7.1°, and grade 3+: 6.0 ± 3.2 mm/21.1° ± 7.1°. There were positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in the Lachman, and anterior drawer tests. Although positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in pivot shift test were found, there were no correlations between clinical grading and tibial rotation in pivot shift test. Conclusions In response to AP force, the navigation system can provide the surgeon with correct objective data for knee laxity in ACL deficient knees. During the pivot shift test, physicians may grade according to the displacement of the tibia, rather than rotation.

  18. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Nassif, Jeffrey M.; Pietrzak, William S.

    2015-01-01

    While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based dif...

  19. Knee osteoarthrosis secondary to ochronosis -clinical case,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Maria da Silva Martins Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disease in which a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase causes an accumulation of homogentisic acid. Ochronosis consists of excessive deposition of homogentisic acid in the connective tissue and presents as a chestnut brown or black pigmentation. With aging, the accumulation of pigments from homogentisic acid in the joints causes osteoarthrosis. There is no specific treatment for the disease and the approach is symptomatic. Arthroplasty is the solution for severe cases of osteoarthrosis caused by this pathological condition and presents results comparable to those from patients with primary osteoarthrosis. Here, the case of a 67-year-old patient who underwent several arthroplasty procedures because of osteoarthrosis caused by this rare pathological condition is presented. The last surgical intervention consisted of total right knee arthroplasty.

  20. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

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    Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Jiangjun; Yuan, Wanqing; Wang, Yuanhe; Ha, Chengzhi; Liu, Lun; Li, Qicai; Yang, Xu; Sun, Kang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA). From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees) were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA) from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter. Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees) were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS) were significantly different (p clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer-term follow-up studies should be performed in these patients.

  1. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqi Tian

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA.From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter.Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS were significantly different (p < 0.05 from pre and post-operative evaluations. The survival rate was 99.1% at 73 months, and the revision rate was 0.9%.The midterm clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer

  2. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  3. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alexandra da Costa Pinheiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  4. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Jeffrey M; Pietrzak, William S

    2015-01-01

    While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based differences exist. We retrospectively compared the performance of the high-flex Vanguard knee (Biomet, Warsaw, IN) in 716 male and 1,069 female knees. Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 98.5% at 5.6-5.7 years for both genders. After 2 years, mean improvements in Knee Society Knee and Function scores for men and women (50.9 versus 46.3; 26.5 versus 23.1) and corresponding SF-12 Mental and Physical scores (0.2 versus 2.2; 13.7 versus 12.2) were similar with differences not clinically relevant. Postoperative motion gains as a function of preoperative motion level were virtually identical in men and women. This further confirms the suitability of unisex total knee prostheses for both men and women.

  5. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Nassif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based differences exist. We retrospectively compared the performance of the high-flex Vanguard knee (Biomet, Warsaw, IN in 716 male and 1,069 female knees. Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 98.5% at 5.6–5.7 years for both genders. After 2 years, mean improvements in Knee Society Knee and Function scores for men and women (50.9 versus 46.3; 26.5 versus 23.1 and corresponding SF-12 Mental and Physical scores (0.2 versus 2.2; 13.7 versus 12.2 were similar with differences not clinically relevant. Postoperative motion gains as a function of preoperative motion level were virtually identical in men and women. This further confirms the suitability of unisex total knee prostheses for both men and women.

  6. Below knee angioplasty in elderly patients: Predictors of major adverse clinical outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2011-03-01

    To determine predictors of clinical outcome following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in elderly patients with below knee atherosclerotic lesions causing intermittent claudication (IC) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI).

  7. The prognostic value of the clinical ACR classification criteria of knee osteoarthritis for persisting knee complaints and increase of disability in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prognostic value of the clinical American College of Rheumatism (ACR) classification criteria of knee osteoarthritis (OA) on persisting knee complaints and increase of disability in adult patients with knee pain in general practice after 1-year follow-up. Methods: Patients

  8. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  9. MR appearance of autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: correlation with the knee features and clinical outcome

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    Takahashi, Tomoki [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Kumamoto University, Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan); Tins, Bernhard; McCall, Iain W.; Ashton, Karen [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Richardson, James B. [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Takagi, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Kumamoto Aging Research Institute, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    To relate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) in the knee in the 1st postoperative year with other knee features on MRI and with clinical outcome. Forty-nine examinations were performed in 49 patients at 1 year after ACI in the knee. Forty-one preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were also available. The grafts were assessed for smoothness, thickness in comparison with that of adjacent cartilage, signal intensity, integration to underlying bone and adjacent cartilage, and congruity of subchondral bone. Presence of overgrowth and bone marrow appearance beneath the graft were also assessed. Presence of osteophyte formation, further cartilage defects, appearance of the cruciate ligaments and the menisci were also recorded. An overall graft score was constructed, using the graft appearances. This was correlated with the knee features and the Lysholm score, a clinical self-assessment score. The data were analysed by a Kruskal-Wallis H test followed by a Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction as post-hoc test. Of 49 grafts, 32 (65%) demonstrated complete defect filling 1 year postoperatively. General overgrowth was seen in eight grafts (16%), and partial overgrowth in 13 grafts (26%). Bone marrow change underneath the graft was seen; oedema was seen in 23 grafts (47%), cysts in six grafts (12%) and sclerosis in two grafts (4%). Mean graft score was 8.7 (of maximal 12) (95% CI 8.0-9.5). Knees without osteophyte formation or additional other cartilage defects (other than the graft site) had a significantly higher graft score than knees with multiple osteophytes (P=0.0057) or multiple further cartilage defects (P=0.014). At 1 year follow-up improvement in the clinical scores was not significantly different for any subgroup. (orig.)

  10. Validation of a prediction model that allows direct comparison of the Oxford Knee Score and American Knee Society clinical rating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maempel, J F; Clement, N D; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. [Clinical factors and findings in knee arthroscopy of patients with knee arthrosis candidates for conversion to total replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Calvo, R; Villalón, I; Tuca, M J; Vaisman, A; Valdés, M

    2013-01-01

    To identify those clinical characteristic and arthroscopic findings in patients with knee arthrosis that are associated with worsening of the disease and subsequent total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted on 78 consecutive patients (88 knees) who underwent knee arthroscopy for arthrosis. The study included 44 women and 34 men, with a mean age of 58.9 years (range: 37-78 years). After a mean follow-up of 50.4 months (range: 12-96 months), those patients who progressed towards TKA were identified. A logistic regression model was applied to recognise the factors associated with deterioration of the arthrosis, with consequent progression towards a TKA. Twenty-four out of the 88 knees progressed towards a TKA (27.3%) within a mean time of 13.5 months after arthroscopy (range: 13-29 months). The clinical characteristics that showed a significant association with poor progression of the arthrosis were: female gender (0.02) and Ahlbäck 2 (P=.04). Arthroscopic finding that proved significant correlation with worsening of the arthrosis towards TKA were: meniscal tears of the posterior horn (P=.02), meniscectomies above 60% (P=.03), and 2nd degree chondral lesions in loading areas of the medial femoral condyle (P=.02). The variables associated with a greater chance of progressing towards a TKA after a knee arthroscopy due to arthrosis in this study were, female gender, grade 2 radiographic arthrosis, posterior horn meniscal lesions, meniscectomies over 60%, and chondral lesions in loading area of the medial femoral condyle. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical and biomechanical assessment of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Lisa; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Ensini, Andrea; Catani, Fabio; Giannini, Sandro

    2006-07-01

    Currently there is a limited understanding of the factors influencing range of motion by comparing patellar resurfacing vs non-resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty during activities of daily living. A recent meta-analysis of patellar replacement confirms better outcome with patella resurfacing; however, the result can be influenced by many other factors, such as: component design, surgeon experience, and technical aspects of the surgery. This study compares the biomechanics of the knee in patients after total knee arthroplasty with and without patellar resurfacing during stair climbing. Forty-seven patients with total knee arthroplasty were assessed at the mean follow-up of 24 months. In all of them a posterior stabilised fixed bearing prosthesis (Optetrak PS, Exactech) was implanted. Twenty-six patients were treated without patellar resurfacing and 21 with patellar resurfacing. Clinical evaluations were performed using the International Knee Society and the Hospital for Special Surgery scores. Ten patients with patellar resurfacing and 10 patients without patellar resurfacing were also studied with motion analysis during stair climbing; 10 healthy subjects were studied for statistical comparison. Clinical passive knee flexion, International Knee Society Function and Hospital for Special Surgery scores were significantly higher in the patellar resurfacing group. During stair climbing, active knee joint range of motion during the stance phase was greater in patients with patellar resurfacing. The maximum adduction moment was significantly higher in the group without patellar resurfacing. Patients with patellar resurfacing demonstrated better clinical scores, and kinematic and kinetic data while ascending stairs.

  13. Comparison of clinical outcomes between total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the knee: a retrospective analysis of preoperative and postoperative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Akira; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-28

    Excellent results have recently been reported for both total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), but there have been few reports about which has a better long-term outcome. The preoperative and postoperative results of TKA and UKA for osteoarthritis of the knee were thus compared. The results of 48 patients who underwent TKA and 25 patients who underwent UKA were evaluated based on clinical scores and survivorship in the middle long-term period. Preoperative, latest postoperative, and changes in the femoro-tibial angle (FTA), range of motion (ROM), Japanese Orthopedic Association score (JOA score), and Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) were compared. The patients' mean age was 73 years. The mean follow-up period was 9 years (TKA: mean, 10.5 years; range, 7-12 years; UKA: mean, 9 years; range, 6-11 years). Preoperative FTA and ROM were significantly higher in the UKA group than in the TKA group. Total changes in all scores were similar among the two groups, as were changes in scores for all JOA and JKOM domains. The cumulative revision rate was higher for UKA than for TKA (7 versus 4%). Kaplan-Meier survivorship at 10 years was 84% for UKA and 92% for TKA. This clinical study found no significant differences between TKA and UKA, except in long-term survivorship.

  14. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig J. Della Vale

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A user- friendly reference for decision making in complicated cases of knee arthroplasty desingned in a question and answers format composed of articles containing current concepts and preferences of experts in total knee replacement surgery, enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a casual advice by Craig J. Della Vale, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of knee arthroplasty, the editor and the contributors have aimed providing straightforward and brief answers, evidence-based advices, their preference and opinions containing current concepts for unanswered questions about complicated cases in total knee replacement surgery which are often controversial and not addressed clearly in traditional knee arthroplasty references. FEATURES There are 49 subjects each written by a different expert designed in 4 sections in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected including indications, unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee, patient with vascular problems, donating blood, bilateral arthroplasty, patellar resurfacing, range of motion, bearing surface, contraindications, teaching class for patients prior surgery. The second section is about intraoperative questions including skin incision, patella femoral maltracking, femoral component rotation, tibial component rotation, lateral release, femoral component sizing, flexion instability, varus deformity, and valgus deformity, tightness in extension, iatrogenic MCL injury, antibiotic-loaded cement, and perioperative pain. The third section subjects postoperative questions including wound drainage, preventing tromboembolic events, vascular complications, foot drop, manipulation under anesthesia, patella fractures, supracondylar femur fractures, acute extensor mechanism disruptions. In the fourth

  15. Long-term clinical evaluation of the automatic stance-phase lock-controlled prosthetic knee joint in young adults with unilateral above-knee amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrysek, Jan; Wright, F Virginia; Rotter, Karin; Garcia, Daniela; Valdebenito, Rebeca; Mitchell, Carlos Alvarez; Rozbaczylo, Claudio; Cubillos, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the automatic stance-phase lock (ASPL) knee mechanism against participants' existing weight-activated braking (WAB) prosthetic knee joint. This prospective crossover study involved 10 young adults with an above-knee amputation. Primary measurements consisted of tests of walking speeds and capacity. Heart rate was measured during the six-minute walk test and the Physiological Cost Index (PCI) which was calculated from heart rate estimated energy expenditure. Activity was measured with a pedometer. User function and quality of life were assessed using the Lower Limb Function Questionnaire (LLFQ) and Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ). Long-term follow-up over 12 months were completed. Walking speeds were the same for WAB and APSL knees. Energy expenditure (PCI) was lower for the ASPL knees (p = 0.007). Step counts were the same for both knees, and questionnaires indicated ASPL knee preference attributed primarily to knee stability and improved walking, while limitations included terminal impact noise. Nine of 10 participants chose to keep using the ASPL knee as part of the long-term follow-up. Potential benefits of the ASPL knee were identified in this study by functional measures, questionnaires and user feedback, but not changes in activity or the PEQ.

  16. Clinical And Radiological Assessment Of Deferiprone Related Knee Arthropathy In Children With P-Thalassemia Major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtar, G.M.; Tantawy, A.A.; Abdelmaksoud, A.A.; Shams, M.A.; Tantawy, W.; Sakr, H.; Nassar, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate deferiprone related knee arthropathy in patients with fi-thalassemia major undergoing chelation therapy with deferiprone (LI). Materials and Methods. This study included 40 patients with β- thalassemia major on deferiprone; their ages ranged from 8 to 18 years with a mean age of 12.6 ± 3 years. Forty age and sex matched patients on desferal served as controls. Patients were subjected to clinical knee joint examination using the modified hemophilia joint health score (JHS), bilateral knee joint X-ray and bilateral knee joint ultrasound. Twenty patients of the deferiprone group with positive knee joint ultrasound findings were subjected to knee MRI. Data collected included age, sex, transfusion index, chelation history (dose, duration, and adverse effects), history of splenectomy and symptoms of knee or other joints arthropathy. Weight, height, BMI and Tanner staging of the patients were recorded. Laboratory investigations included CBC, ALT, serum ferritin, viral hepatitis markers (B,C) and echocardiography. Results: Among deferiprone group; 25 patients (62.5%) had knee symptoms while; 93.3% of the asymptomatic patients had evidence of knee joint affection by JHS compared to 17 symptomatic patients (42.5%) among desferal group (ρ> 0.05). Among deferiprone group 7 patients (17.5%) had symptoms of other joints arthropathy. Knee symptoms were more prevalent with longer duration of deferiprone therapy (ρ<0.05), knee joint effusion in US (ρ< 0.05) and Higher platelet count (ρ<0.05), while in desferal group it was related to poor compliance (ρ< 0.01) and higher serum ferritin levels (ρ=<0.01). JHS ranged from 0-33 with 39 (97.5%) affected patients. JHS was positively correlated to age, weight, height, BMI, Tanner staging and platelet count (ρ<0.01), and negatively correlated to transfusion index (ρ<0.01) with no significant correlation to ultrasound or MRI findings. JHS was higher among splenectomized patients in both groups (ρ<0.01). No

  17. Total hip and knee joint replacement: perioperative clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira Almeida de Piano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the profile of patients undergoing hip and knee replacement during two years, and to compare the data obtained with the literature. Methods: A total of 323 medical records were reviewed to analyze the perioperative data of patients submitted to hip and knee replacement. Results: Osteoarthritis was the main indication for both procedures and male patients were heavier than females (p < 0.05. Hypertension was the prevalent disease among patients. Blood loss was more frequent in knee surgery than in the hip. Conclusions: The profile of patients undergoing total arthroplasty improved substantially over the past decade due to shorter hospital stay, lower risk of thromboembolic events and no infection as compared to previous reports.

  18. CKS knee prosthesis: biomechanics and clinical results in 42 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, E; Verni, E; Del Prete, G; Stulberg, S D

    1996-01-01

    From 1991 to 1993 a total of 42 CKS prostheses were implanted for the following reasons: osteoarthrosis (34 cases), rheumatoid arthritis (7 cases) tibial necrosis (1 case). At follow-up obtained after 17 to 41 months the results were: excellent or good: 41; the only poor result was probably related to excessive tension of the posterior cruciate ligament. 94% of the patients reported complete regression of pain, 85% was capable of going up and down stairs without support. Mean joint flexion was 105 degrees. Radiologically the anatomical axis of the knee had a mean valgus of anatomical axis of the knee had a mean valgus of 6 degrees. The prosthetic components were always cemented. The posterior cruciate ligament was removed in 7 knees, so that the prosthesis with "posterior stability" was used. The patella was never prosthetized. One patient complained of peri-patellar pain two months after surgery which then regressed completely.

  19. Clinical descriptors for the recognition of central sensitization pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lluch, Enrique; Nijs, Jo; Courtney, Carol A

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite growing awareness of the contribution of central pain mechanisms to knee osteoarthritis pain in a subgroup of patients, routine evaluation of central sensitization is yet to be incorporated into clinical practice. AIM: The objective of this perspective is to design a set...... of clinical descriptors for the recognition of central sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis that can be implemented in clinical practice. METHODS: A narrative review of original research papers was conducted by nine clinicians and researchers from seven different countries to reach agreement...... hyperalgesia, hypoesthesia and reduced vibration sense. CONCLUSIONS: This article describes a set of clinically relevant descriptors that might indicate the presence of central sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis in clinical practice. Although based on research data, the descriptors proposed...

  20. The Clinical Study on Bee Venom Acupuncture Treatment on Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Jeong a

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study is performed for the purpose of examining into the efficacy of the Bee Venom Acupuncture Treatment for Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint Methods : We investitigated 25 cases of patients with Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint from 1st June 2005 to 13th July 2005. The 25 patients were taken Bee Venom Acupuncture over three times irregularly. Treatment efficiency was monitored through VAS (Visual Analog Scale and improvement degree of the grade of clinical symptoms Conclusion : We brought to the conclusion that the Bee Venom Acupuncture has possibility to be efficient to cure the Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint patients. So we suggest the possibility to use this new remedy for the Osteoarthritis of Knee Joint

  1. Clinical outcome of increased flexion gap after total knee arthroplasty. Can controlled gap imbalance improve knee flexion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailidis, P; Kuster, M S; Jost, B; Giesinger, K; Behrend, H

    2017-06-01

    Increased range of motion (ROM) while maintaining joint stability is the goal of modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A biomechanical study has shown that small increases in flexion gap result in decreased tibiofemoral force beyond 90° flexion. The purpose of this paper was to investigate clinical implications of controlled increased flexion gap. Four hundred and four TKAs were allocated into one of two groups and analysed retrospectively. In the first group (n = 352), flexion gap exceeded extension gap by 2.5 mm, while in the second group (n = 52) flexion gap was equal to the extension gap. The procedures were performed from 2008 to 2012. The patients were reviewed 12 months postoperatively. Objective clinical results were assessed for ROM, mediolateral and sagittal stability. Patient-reported outcome measures were the WOMAC score and the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS-12). After categorizing postoperative flexion into three groups (poor < 90°, satisfactory 91°-119°, good ≥ 120°) significantly more patients in group 1 achieved satisfactory or good ROM (p = 0.006). Group 1 also showed a significantly higher mean FJS-12 (group 1: 73, group 2: 61, p = 0.02). The mean WOMAC score was 11 in the first and 14 in the second group (n.s.). Increase in flexion gap did not influence knee stability. The clinical relevance of this study is that a controlled flexion gap increase of 2.5 mm may have a positive effect on postoperative flexion and patient satisfaction after TKA. Neither knee stability in the coronal and sagittal planes nor complications were influenced by a controlled increase in flexion gap. III.

  2. Clinical results of Hi-tech Knee II total knee arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid athritis: 5- to 12-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Hajime

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common form of treatment to relieve pain and improve function in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Good clinical outcomes have been reported with a variety of TKA prostheses. The cementless Hi-Tech Knee II cruciate-retaining (CR-type prosthesis, which has 6 fins at the anterior of the femoral component, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL retention, flat-on-flat surface component geometry, all-polyethylene patella, strong initial fixation by the center screw of the tibial base plate, 10 layers of titanium alloy fiber mesh, and direct compression molded ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE, is appropriate for TKA in the Japanese knee. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical results of primary TKA in RA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis. Materials and methods We performed 32 consecutive primary TKAs using cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis in 31 RA patients. The average follow-up period was 8 years 3 months. Clinical evaluations were performed according to the American Knee Society (KS system, knee score, function score, radiographic evaluation, and complications. Results The mean postoperative maximum flexion angle was 115.6°, and the KS knee score and function score improved to 88 and 70 after surgery, respectively. Complications, such as infection, occurred in 1 patient and revision surgery was performed. There were no cases of loosening in this cohort, and prosthesis survival rate was 96.9% at 12 years postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that TKA using the cementless Hi-Tech Knee II CR-type prosthesis is a very effective form of treatment in RA patients at 5 to 12 years postoperatively. Further long-term follow-up studies are required to determine the ultimate utility of this type of prosthesis.

  3. Effects of Motor Learning on Clinical Isokinetic Test Performance in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Messias Rodrigues-da-Silva

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze the effects of motor learning on knee extension-flexion isokinetic performance in knee osteoarthritis patients. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-six middle-aged and older sedentary individuals (111 women, 64.3±9.9 years with knee osteoarthritis (130 patients with bilateral and who had never performed isokinetic testing underwent two bilateral knee extension-flexion (concentric-concentric isokinetic evaluations (5 repetitions at 60°/sec. The tests were first performed on the dominant leg with 2 min of recovery between test, and following a standardized warm-up that included 3 submaximal isokinetic repetitions. The same procedure was repeated on the non-dominant leg. The peak torque, peak torque adjusted for the body weight, total work, coefficient of variation and agonist/antagonist ratio were compared between tests. RESULTS: Patients showed significant improvements in test 2 compared to test 1, including higher levels of peak torque, peak torque adjusted for body weight and total work, as well as lower coefficients of variation. The agonist/antagonist relationship did not significantly change between tests. No significant differences were found between the right and left legs for all variables. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that performing two tests with a short recovery (2 min between them could be used to reduce motor learning effects on clinical isokinetic testing of the knee joint in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  4. The structure and functioning of Dynastab DK - K fixator (knee joint) and its usefullness in clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deszczyński, J; Karpiński, J; Deszczyńska, H

    1999-12-30

    The autor describes following stages of research on external fixator Dynastab DK - K (knee joint) with in - built artificial joint enabling physiological range of movement of the knee and the use of the device in functional treatment of articular fractures of the knee. The final clinical prototype of the device was developed according to the results of the experiments with anatomical preparations of knee joints in which the trajectory of the physiological movement of the knee was stated. These observations were used to construct mechanical joint with the range of movement adequate to this of the healthy knee. The positive and negative aspects in DK - K fixator are also described. The fixator was appled in 6 difficult cases of articular fractures of knee with good results.

  5. How well do radiographic, clinical and self-reported diagnoses of knee osteoarthritis agree? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Camille; Clynes, Michael; Syddall, Holly; Jagannath, Darshan; Litwic, Anna; van der Pas, Suzan; Cooper, Cyrus; Dennison, Elaine M; Edwards, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have often used a radiographic definition. However, the clinical syndrome of OA is influenced by a broad range of factors in addition to the structural changes required for radiographic OA. Hence more recently several studies have adopted a clinical or self-reported approach to OA diagnosis rather than a radiographic approach. The aim of this study was to investigate agreement between radiographic OA and the clinical and self-reported diagnoses of OA. Data were available for 199 men and 196 women in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), UK. Participants completed a questionnaire detailing self-reported OA. Clinical OA was defined based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Knee radiographs were taken and graded for overall Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) score. The mean (standard deviation (SD)) age of study participants was 75.2 (2.6) years and almost identical proportions of men and women. The prevalence of knee OA differed depending on the method employed for diagnosis; 21% of the study participants self-reported knee OA, 18% of the participants had clinical knee OA and 42% of the participants had radiographic OA. Of those 72 study participants with a self-reported diagnosis of knee OA 52 (72%) had a radiographic diagnosis of knee OA, while 66% (39 out of 59) of study participants with clinical knee OA had a diagnosis of radiographic knee OA. However 58% of those participants diagnosed with radiographic OA did not have either self-reported knee OA or a diagnosis of clinical OA. Therefore in comparison with the radiographic definition of OA, both the clinical and self-report definitions had high specificity (91.5% & 91.5% respectively) and low sensitivity (24.5% and 32.7% respectively). There is modest agreement between the radiographic, clinical and self-report methods of diagnosis of knee OA.

  6. Inter-Observer and Intra-Observer Reliability of Clinical Assessments in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricar, Nasimah; Callaghan, Michael J; Parkes, Matthew J; Felson, David T; O’Neill, Terence W

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical examination of the knee is subject to measurement error. The aim of this analysis was to determine inter- and intra-observer reliability of commonly used clinical tests in patients with knee osteoarthritis(OA). Methods We studied subjects with symptomatic knee OA who were participants in an open-label clinical trial of intra-articular steroid therapy. Following standardisation of the clinical test procedures, two clinicians assessed 25 subjects independently at the same visit, and the same clinician assessed 88 subjects over an interval period of 2–10 weeks; in both cases prior to the steroid intervention. Clinical examination included assessment of bony enlargement, crepitus, quadriceps wasting, knee effusion, joint-line and anserine tenderness and knee range of movement(ROM). Intra-class correlation coefficients(ICC), estimated kappa(κ), weighted kappa(κω) and Bland and Altman plots were used to determine inter- and intra-observer levels of agreement. Results Using Landis and Koch criteria, inter-observer kappa scores were moderate for patellofemoral joint(κ=0.53) and anserine tenderness(κ=0.48); good for bony enlargement(κ=0.66), quadriceps wasting(κ=0.78), crepitus(κ=0.78), medial tibiofemoral joint tenderness(κ=0.76), and effusion assessed by ballottement(κ=0.73) and bulge sign(κω =0.78); and excellent for lateral tibiofemoral joint tenderness(κ=1.00), flexion(ICC=0.97) and extension(ICC=0.87) ROM. Intra-observer kappa scores were moderate for lateral tibiofemoral joint tenderness(κ=0.60), good for crepitus(κ=0.78), effusion assessed by ballottement test(κ=0.77), patellofemoral joint(κ=0.66), medial tibiofemoral joint(κ=0.64) and anserine(κ=0.73) tenderness and excellent for effusion assessed by bulge sign(κω =0.83), bony enlargement(κ=0.98), quadriceps wasting(κ=0.83), flexion(ICC=0.99) and extension(ICC=0.96) ROM. Conclusion Among individuals with symptomatic knee OA, the reliability of clinical examination of the

  7. Knee Ligament Injury and the Clinical Application of Tissue Engineering Techniques: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Thomas C; Mafi, Reza; Mafi, Pouya; Khan, Wasim S

    2018-02-23

    The incidence of knee ligament injury is increasing and represents a significant cost to healthcare providers. Current interventions include tissue grafts, suture repair and non-surgical management. These techniques have demonstrated good patient outcomes but have been associated graft rejection, infection, long term immobilization and reduced joint function. The limitations of traditional management strategies have prompted research into tissue engineering of knee ligaments. This paper aims to evaluate whether tissue engineering of knee ligaments offers a viable alternative in the clinical management of knee ligament injuries. A search of existing literature was performed using OVID Medline, Embase, AMED, PubMed and Google Scholar, and a manual review of citations identified within these papers. Silk, polymer and extracellular matrix based scaffolds can all improve graft healing and collagen production. Fibroblasts and stem cells demonstrate compatibility with scaffolds, and have been shown to increase organized collagen production. These effects can be augmented using growth factors and extracellular matrix derivatives. Animal studies have shown tissue engineered ligaments can provide the biomechanical characteristics required for effective treatment of knee ligament injuries. There is a growing clinical demand for a tissue engineered alternative to traditional management strategies. Currently, there is limited consensus regarding material selection for use in tissue engineered ligaments. Further research is required to optimize tissue engineered ligament production before clinical application. Controlled clinical trials comparing the use of tissue engineered ligaments and traditional management in patients with knee ligament injury could determine whether they can provide a cost-effective alternative. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Gender difference in symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis in the Knee Clinical Assessment – CAS(K: A prospective study in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Rachel C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent study of adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain found an excess of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (knee ROA in symptomatic males compared to females. This was independent of age, BMI and other clinical signs and symptoms. Since this finding contradicts many previous studies, our objective was to explore four possible explanations for this gender difference: X-ray views, selection, occupation and non-articular conditions. Methods A community-based prospective study. 819 adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain in the previous 12 months were recruited by postal questionnaires to a research clinic involving plain radiography (weight-bearing posteroanterior semiflexed, supine skyline and lateral views, clinical interview and physical examination. Any knee ROA, ROA severity, tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis (TJOA and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PJOA were defined using all three radiographic views. Occupational class was derived from current or last job title. Proportions of each gender with symptomatic knee ROA were expressed as percentages, stratified by age; differences between genders were expressed as percentage differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 745 symptomatic participants were eligible and had complete X-ray data. Males had a higher occurrence (77% of any knee ROA than females (61%. In 50–64 year olds, the excess in men was mild knee OA (particularly PJOA; in ≥65 year olds, the excess was both mild and moderate/severe knee OA (particularly combined TJOA/PJOA. This male excess persisted when using the posteroanterior view only (64% vs. 52%. The lowest level of participation in the clinic was symptomatic females aged 65+. Within each occupational class there were more males with symptomatic knee ROA than females. In those aged 50–64 years, non-articular conditions were equally common in both genders although, in those aged 65+, they occurred more frequently in symptomatic

  9. Clinical assessment of effusion in knee osteoarthritis—A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricar, Nasimah; Callaghan, Michael J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Felson, David T.; O׳Neill, Terence W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this systematic review was to determine the validity and inter- and intra-observer reliability of the assessment of knee joint effusion in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, EMBASE, and AMED were searched from their inception to February 2015. Articles were included according to a priori defined criteria: samples containing participants with knee OA; prospective evaluation of clinical tests and assessments of knee effusion that included reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of these tests. Results A total of 10 publications were reviewed. Eight of these considered reliability and four on validity of clinical assessments against ultrasound effusion. It was not possible to undertake a meta-analysis of reliability or validity because of differences in study designs and the clinical tests. Intra-observer kappa agreement for visible swelling ranged from 0.37 (suprapatellar) to 1.0 (prepatellar); for bulge sign 0.47 and balloon sign 0.37. Inter-observer kappa agreement for visible swelling ranged from −0.02 (prepatellar) to 0.65 (infrapatellar), the balloon sign −0.11 to 0.82, patellar tap −0.02 to 0.75 and bulge sign kappa −0.04 to 0.14 or reliability coefficient 0.97. Reliability and diagnostic accuracy tended to be better in experienced observers. Very few data looked at performance of individual clinical tests with sensitivity ranging 18.2–85.7% and specificity 35.3–93.3%, both higher with larger effusions. Conclusion The majority of unstandardized clinical tests to assess joint effusion in knee OA had relatively low intra- and inter-observer reliability. There is some evidence experience improved reliability and diagnostic accuracy of tests. Currently there is insufficient evidence to recommend any particular test in clinical practice. PMID:26581486

  10. Clinical outcome after treatment of infected primary total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive cases of infected primary total knee arthroplasties were treated at our institution from 1989 through 2000. Eleven patients had debridement and irrigation performed within 2 months of index arthroplasty or hematogenous spread; only one infection was eradicated. Twenty......-five patients had their prostheses removed; 17 had two-stage revision arthroplasty, following which infection was eradicated in 15; one had a permanent spacer, 7 had arthrodesis (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) and 2 had a femur amputation (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) at follow......-up of mean 24 months. Infections were cured equally well with revision arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Among the 15 patients who ended up with revision arthroplasty, 11 had a better range of motion compared to the index arthroplasty, but 8 had daily pain. We present our treatment protocol, which eradicated 15...

  11. Midterm Clinical and Radiographic Results of Mobile-Bearing Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Raymond H; Martin, J Ryan; Dennis, Douglas A; Yang, Charlie C; Jennings, Jason M; Lee, Gwo-Chin

    2017-06-01

    Constrained implants are frequently required in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and are associated with an increase in aseptic component loosening and damage or wear to the constraining mechanisms, compared with primary TKA. The purpose of the following study was to evaluate the midterm clinical and radiographic results including the incidence of bearing complications in a group of patients undergoing revision TKA using mobile-bearing revision TKA implants. We retrospectively reviewed 316 consecutive mobile-bearing revision TKAs performed at 2 centers between 2006 and 2010. There were 183 women and 133 men with a mean age of 66 years. The patients were evaluated clinically using the Knee Society scores. A radiographic analysis was performed. Bearing specific complications (ie, instability or dislocation) were recorded. Patients were followed-up for a minimum of 24 months and a median of 59.88 months (range 24-121.2). The average Knee Society knee score and function scores increased from 40.8 and 47.9 points preoperatively to 80 points and 70.3 points, respectively (P bearing complications were observed. Revision TKA using mobile-bearing revision components demonstrated favorable midterm clinical and radiographic results with no occurrence of bearing instability or dislocation. Longer follow-up is required to evaluate for potential advantages of mobile-bearings over fixed-bearing revision components in terms of polyethylene wear reduction, reduced stress transmission across fixation interfaces, and reduced stress on the polyethylene post. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Outcome of Medial Pivot Compared With Press-Fit Condylar Sigma Cruciate-Retaining Mobile-Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term clinical results, radiographic results, range of knee motion, patient satisfaction, and the survival rate of Medial-Pivot posterior cruciate-substituting, knee prosthesis and a press-fit condylar (PFC) Sigma cruciate-retaining mobile-bearing knee prosthesis in the same patients. One hundred eighty-two patients received Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis in one knee and a PFC Sigma knee prosthesis in the contralateral knee. The minimum duration of follow-up was 11 years (range, 11-12.6 years). The knees with a Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis had significantly worse results than those with a PFC Sigma knee prosthesis at the final follow-up with regard to the mean postoperative Knee Society knee scores (90 compared with 95 points), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score (25 compared with 18 points), and range of knee motion (117° compared with 128°). Patients were more satisfied with PFC Sigma knee prosthesis (93%) than with Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis (75%). Complication rates were significantly higher in the Medial-Pivot knee group (26%) than those in the PFC Sigma knee group (6.5%). Radiographic results and survival rates (99% compared with 99.5%) were similar between the 2 groups. Although the long-term fixation and survival rate of both Medial-Pivot and PFC Sigma prostheses were similar, we observed a worse knee score, worse range of knee motion, and patient satisfaction was less in the Medial-Pivot knee group than in the PFC Sigma knee group. Furthermore, complication rate was also higher in the Medial-Pivot knee group than the other group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  14. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T. B.; Lemmens, J. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected. Two intervention

  15. Use of Kinesiology Taping in Rehabilitation after Knee Arthroplasty: a Randomised Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Czekierda, Weronika; Woźniak, Kamil; Hadamus, Anna; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2017-10-31

    Proprioception and body balance after knee arthroplasty have a considerable impact on restoration of joint function and a normal gait pattern. Kinesiology Taping (KT) is a method that may be able to influence these factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of KT application on sensorimotor efficiency, balance and gait in patients undergoing rehabili-ta--tion after knee replacement surgery. The study involved 120 male and female patients (mean age was 69 years) after total knee repla-cement. The patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Experimental Group (n=51) and Control Group (n=60). Both groups underwent standard rehabilitation lasting 20 days. In addition, the Experimental Group received KT applications. Treat-ment outcomes were assessed based on tests evaluating balance, joint position sense and functional gait performance, conducted both before and after the therapy. Statistically significant improvements were noted across all the parameters assessed in the Experimental Group (p<0.005). Significant improvements were also seen in the Control Group (p<0.005), but, in percentage terms, the improvement was higher in the Experimental Group. The only exception was the right/left foot load distribution, whose symmetry improved proportionally in both groups. 1. Patients after knee replacement surgery have considerable proprioception deficits, impaired body balance and reduced functional performance, which may increase the risk of falls in this group of patients. 2. Both standard physiotherapy and combination therapy with Kinesiology Taping (modified by the present authors) used in patients after knee arthroplasty may considerably improve the level of proprioception, body balance and overall functional performance. 3. The technique of dynamic taping proposed in this paper may optimise standard physiotherapy used in patients after knee arthroplasty and increase its clinical efficacy. Further studies are required.

  16. Comparison of reliability and responsiveness of patient-reported clinical outcome measures in knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Valerie J; Piva, Sara R; Irrgang, James J; Crossley, Chad; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2012-08-01

    Secondary analysis, pretreatment-posttreatment observational study. To compare the reliability and responsiveness of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Knee Outcome Survey activities of daily living subscale (KOS-ADL), and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The WOMAC is the current standard in patient-reported measures of function in patients with knee OA. The KOS-ADL and LEFS were designed for potential use in patients with knee OA. If the KOS-ADL and LEFS are to be considered viable alternatives to the WOMAC for measuring patient-reported function in individuals with knee OA, they should have measurement properties comparable to the WOMAC. It would also be important to determine whether either of these instruments may be superior to the WOMAC in terms of reliability or responsiveness in this population. Data from 168 subjects with knee OA, who participated in a rehabilitation program, were used in the analyses. Reliability and responsiveness of each outcome measure were estimated at follow-ups of 2, 6, and 12 months. Reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1) for subjects who were unchanged in status from baseline at each follow-up time, based on a global rating of change score. To examine responsiveness, the standard error of the measurement, minimal detectable change, minimal clinically important difference, and the Guyatt responsiveness index were calculated for each outcome measure at each follow-up time. All 3 outcome measures demonstrated reasonable reliability and responsiveness to change. Reliability and responsiveness tended to decrease somewhat with increasing follow-up time. There were no substantial differences between outcome measures for reliability or any of the 3 measures of responsiveness at any follow-up time. The results do not indicate that one outcome measure is more reliable or responsive than

  17. Clinical gait evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Yancheng; Yan, Songhua; Cao, Guanglei; Wang, Shasha; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2017-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common osteoarthritis in lower limbs, and gait measurement is important to evaluate walking function of KOA patients before and after treatment. The third generation Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA3) is a portable gait analysis system to evaluate gaits. This study is to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of IDEEA3 for gait measurement of KOA patients. Meanwhile, gait differences between KOA patients and healthy subjects are examined. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited for measurement comparison of gait cycle (GC), cadence, step length, velocity and step counts between a motion analysis system and a high-speed camera (GoPro Hero3). Twenty-three KOA patients were recruited for measurement comparison of former five parameters between GoPro Hero3 and IDEEA3. Paired t-test, Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were used for data analysis. All p-values of paired t-tests for GC, cadence, step length and velocity were greater than 0.05 while all CCC and ICC results were above 0.95. The measurements of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts by motion analysis system are highly consistent with the measurements by GoPro Hero3. The measurements of former parameters by GoPro Hero3 are not statistically different from the measurements by IDEEA3. IDEEA3 can be effectively used for the measurement of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts in KOA patients. The KOA patients walk with longer GC, lower cadence, shorter step length and slower speed compared with healthy subjects in natural speed with flat shoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematic clinical evidence review of NASHA (Durolane hyaluronic acid for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighton R

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ross Leighton,1 Jane Fitzpatrick,2,3 Helen Smith,4 Daniela Crandall,4 Carl R Flannery,4 Thierry Conrozier5 1Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Sports Medicine Professionals Pty Ltd, Richmond, VIC, Australia; 3University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 4Bioventus LLC, Durham, NC, USA; 5Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Nord Franche-Comte, Belfort, France Background: Pain and limitations in joint mobility associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA are clinically challenging to manage, and advanced progression of disease can often lead to total knee arthroplasty. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA, also referred to as viscosupplementation, is a non-surgical treatment approach for OA, the effectiveness of which may depend on the HA composition, and the length of time over which it resides in the joint. One of the available options for such therapies includes NASHA (Durolane HA, a non-animal, biofermentation-derived product, which is manufactured using a process that stabilizes the HA molecules to slow down their rate of degradation and produce a unique formulation with a terminal half-life of ~1 month. The objectives of the current review were to assess, in patients with OA of the knee, the efficacy and safety of intra-articular treatment with NASHA relative to control (saline injections, other HA products, and other injectables (corticosteroids, platelet-rich plasma, mesenchymal stem cells.Methods: This systematic evidence review examines patient outcomes following NASHA treatment as described in published data from studies conducted in subjects with knee OA. A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses-compliant literature search strategy yielded 11 eligible clinical studies with a variety of comparator arms. Outcomes assessed at various time points following intra-articular treatment included measures of pain, function, quality of life, and incidence of treatment

  19. Does cruciate retention primary total knee arthroplasty affect proprioception, strength and clinical outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, Pieter-Jan T K; Parys, Roel; Tampere, Thomas; Linden, Patrick; Van den Daelen, Luc; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    It remains unclear what the contribution of the PCL is in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of the PCL in TKA in relationship to clinical outcome, strength and proprioception. Two arthroplasty designs were compared: a posterior cruciate-substituting (PS) and a posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA. A retrospective analysis was performed of 27 CR and 18 PS implants with a minimum of 1 year in vivo. Both groups were compared in terms of clinical outcome (range of motion, visual analogue scale for pain, Hospital for Special Surgery Knee Scoring system, Lysholm score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), strength (Biodex System 3 Dynamometer(®)) and proprioception (balance and postural control using the Balance Master system(®)). Each design was also compared to the non-operated contralateral side in terms of strength and proprioception. There were no significant differences between both designs in terms of clinical outcome and strength. In terms of proprioception, only the rhythmic weight test at slow and moderate speed shifting from left to right was significant in favour of the CR design. None of the unilateral stance tests showed any significant difference between both designs. There was no difference in terms of strength and proprioception between the operated side and the non-operated side. Retaining the PCL in TKA does not result in an improved performance in terms of clinical outcome and proprioception and does not show any difference in muscle strength. III.

  20. Correlations between commonly used clinical outcome scales and patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sae Kwang; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Sung Ju; Chang, Chong Bum; Seong, Sang Cheol; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2010-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is becoming increasingly important as a crucial outcome measure for total knee arthroplasty. We aimed to determine how well commonly used clinical outcome scales correlate with patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty. In particular, we sought to determine whether patient satisfaction correlates better with absolute postoperative scores or preoperative to 12-month postoperative changes. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using 4 grades (enthusiastic, satisfied, noncommittal, and disappointed) for 438 replaced knees that were followed for longer than 1 year. Outcomes scales used the American Knee Society, Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scales, and Short Form-36 scores. Correlation analyses were performed to investigate the relation between patient satisfaction and the 2 different aspects of the outcome scales: postoperative scores evaluated at latest follow-ups and preoperative to postoperative changes. The Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scales function score was most strongly correlated with satisfaction (correlation coefficient=0.45). Absolute postoperative scores were better correlated with satisfaction than the preoperative to postoperative changes for all scales. Level IV (retrospective case series). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Knee Cartilage Repair: A Focus on Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daichi; Li, Xinning; Murakami, Akira M; Roemer, Frank W; Trattnig, Siegfried; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this review article are (a) to describe the principles of morphologic and compositional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques relevant for the imaging of knee cartilage repair surgery and their application to longitudinal studies and (b) to illustrate the clinical relevance of pre- and postsurgical MRI with correlation to intraoperative images. First, MRI sequences that can be applied for imaging of cartilage repair tissue in the knee are described, focusing on comparison of 2D and 3D fast spin echo and gradient recalled echo sequences. Imaging features of cartilage repair tissue are then discussed, including conventional (morphologic) MRI and compositional MRI techniques. More specifically, imaging techniques for specific cartilage repair surgery techniques as described above, as well as MRI-based semiquantitative scoring systems for the knee cartilage repair tissue-MR Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue and Cartilage Repair OA Knee Score-are explained. Then, currently available surgical techniques are reviewed, including marrow stimulation, osteochondral autograft, osteochondral allograft, particulate cartilage allograft, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and others. Finally, ongoing research efforts and future direction of cartilage repair tissue imaging are discussed.

  2. [Clinical evaluation of the ceramic femoral component used for reconstruction of total knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrík, P; Landor, I; Denk, F

    2008-12-01

    The study evaluates mid-term results of total knee replacement with a zirconia ceramic (ZrO2) femoral component. The evaluated group comprised 20 knees in 19 patients (4 men and 15 women). In one patient the replacement was performed bilaterally. Two patients had in the contralateral knee the same type of prosthesis with a femoral chrome-cobalt component.The mean age at the time of operation was 65.2 years (range, 38-81 years).The primary indication was 14 times osteoarthritis and 5 times rheumatoid arthritis. The average follow-up period was 6.5 years (range, 2.1-8.5 years). Patients included in the study regardless of age, body mass and the basic diagnosis, agreed with the use of the ceramic femoral component. The evaluation covered a range of motion, mechanical axis, joint stability, pain, swelling, ability to walk on level ground and on stairs, subjective satisfaction (EULAR Knee Chart). Radiograph were assessed at one year intervals in two projections to identify the incidence of radiolucency around the implant. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used and compared with the survival curve in identical chrome-cobalt implants. At he final follow-up, 14 knees were evaluated, because 3 patients died without any connection with the implant, in one case the tibial component migrated due to necrosis of the tibial condyle in a patient with RA and two implants had to be revised and replaced due to polyethylene wear. No infection or negative tissue reaction was recorded in the evaluated group. The average flexion range was 109 degrees. All knees were stable and without swelling, in two cases there occurred slight femoropatellar pain. Twelve patients were fully satisfied, 2 patients were satisfied with a certain reservation. The differences in the course of the survival curves of chrome-cobalt and ceramic implants were statistically insignificant. Although the use of zirconia ceramics in vitro reduces the amount of polyethylene wear, the clinical outcomes of total knee

  3. Clinical value of SPECT/CT for evaluation of patients with painful knees after total knee arthroplasty- a new dimension of diagnostics?

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Konala, Praveen; Iranpour, Farhad; Kerner, Anna; Rasch, Helmut; Friederich, Niklaus F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical value of hybrid SPECT/CT for the assessment of patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Twenty-three painful knees in patients following primary TKA were assessed using Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT. Rotational, sagittal and coronal position of the TKA was assessed on 3D-CT reconstructions. The level of the SPECT-tracer uptake (0-10) and its anatomical distribution was mapped using a validated localization sch...

  4. Below knee angioplasty in elderly patients: predictors of major adverse clinical outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To determine predictors of clinical outcome following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in elderly patients with below knee atherosclerotic lesions causing intermittent claudication (IC) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over 7.5 years, 76 patients (CLI 72%, n = 55) underwent below knee PTA. The composite end-point of interest was major adverse clinical outcome (MACO) of the treated limb at follow-up which was defined as clinical failure, need for subsequent endovascular or surgical revascularization or amputation. Actuarial freedom from MACO was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: IC was improved in 95% at mean 3.4 years (range 0.5-108 months). Successful limb salvage and ulcer healing were seen in 73% with CLI. Most failures were in the CLI group (27% CLI vs. 5% IC), with an amputation rate of 16% for CLI vs. 5% for IC and persistent ulceration in 24% of CLI. Significant independent predictors of MACO were ulceration (hazard ratio 4.02, 95% CI = 1.55-10.38) and family history of atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 2.53, 95% CI = 1.1-5.92). CONCLUSION: Primary below knee PTA is a feasible therapeutic option in this elderly population. Limb ulceration and family history of atherosclerosis may be independent predictors of adverse outcome.

  5. Below knee angioplasty in elderly patients: Predictors of major adverse clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, Aoife N.; Khalidi, Karim; Leong, Sum [Department of Academic Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Wang, Tim T. [Department of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology, Imperial College London, St. Mary' s Hospital, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Ayyoub, Alaa S.; McGrath, Frank P. [Department of Academic Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Athanasiou, Thanos [Department of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology, Imperial College London, St. Mary' s Hospital, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Department of Academic Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont Road, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2011-03-15

    Aim: To determine predictors of clinical outcome following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in elderly patients with below knee atherosclerotic lesions causing intermittent claudication (IC) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI). Materials and methods: Over 7.5 years, 76 patients (CLI 72%, n = 55) underwent below knee PTA. The composite end-point of interest was major adverse clinical outcome (MACO) of the treated limb at follow-up which was defined as clinical failure, need for subsequent endovascular or surgical revascularization or amputation. Actuarial freedom from MACO was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: IC was improved in 95% at mean 3.4 years (range 0.5-108 months). Successful limb salvage and ulcer healing were seen in 73% with CLI. Most failures were in the CLI group (27% CLI vs. 5% IC), with an amputation rate of 16% for CLI vs. 5% for IC and persistent ulceration in 24% of CLI. Significant independent predictors of MACO were ulceration (hazard ratio 4.02, 95% CI = 1.55-10.38) and family history of atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 2.53, 95% CI = 1.1-5.92). Conclusion: Primary below knee PTA is a feasible therapeutic option in this elderly population. Limb ulceration and family history of atherosclerosis may be independent predictors of adverse outcome.

  6. Below knee angioplasty in elderly patients: Predictors of major adverse clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, Aoife N.; Khalidi, Karim; Leong, Sum; Wang, Tim T.; Ayyoub, Alaa S.; McGrath, Frank P.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Lee, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine predictors of clinical outcome following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in elderly patients with below knee atherosclerotic lesions causing intermittent claudication (IC) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI). Materials and methods: Over 7.5 years, 76 patients (CLI 72%, n = 55) underwent below knee PTA. The composite end-point of interest was major adverse clinical outcome (MACO) of the treated limb at follow-up which was defined as clinical failure, need for subsequent endovascular or surgical revascularization or amputation. Actuarial freedom from MACO was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: IC was improved in 95% at mean 3.4 years (range 0.5-108 months). Successful limb salvage and ulcer healing were seen in 73% with CLI. Most failures were in the CLI group (27% CLI vs. 5% IC), with an amputation rate of 16% for CLI vs. 5% for IC and persistent ulceration in 24% of CLI. Significant independent predictors of MACO were ulceration (hazard ratio 4.02, 95% CI = 1.55-10.38) and family history of atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 2.53, 95% CI = 1.1-5.92). Conclusion: Primary below knee PTA is a feasible therapeutic option in this elderly population. Limb ulceration and family history of atherosclerosis may be independent predictors of adverse outcome.

  7. Clinical value of SPECT/CT for evaluation of patients with painful knees after total knee arthroplasty- a new dimension of diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical value of hybrid SPECT/CT for the assessment of patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Methods Twenty-three painful knees in patients following primary TKA were assessed using Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT. Rotational, sagittal and coronal position of the TKA was assessed on 3D-CT reconstructions. The level of the SPECT-tracer uptake (0-10 and its anatomical distribution was mapped using a validated localization scheme. Univariate analysis (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney, Spearmean`s-rho test, p Results SPECT/CT imaging changed the suspected diagnosis and the proposed treatment in 19/23 (83% knees. Progression of patellofemoral OA (n = 11, loosening of the tibial (n = 3 and loosening of the femoral component (n = 2 were identified as the leading causes of pain after TKA. Patients with externally rotated tibial trays showed higher tracer uptake in the medial patellar facet (p = 0.049 and in the femur (p = 0.051. Patients with knee pain due to patellofemoral OA showed significantly higher tracer uptake in the patella than others (p Conclusions SPECT/CT was very helpful in establishing the diagnosis and guiding subsequent management in patients with painful knees after TKA, particularly in patients with patellofemoral problems and malpositioned or loose TKA.

  8. The MR diagnosis and clinical significance of bone contusion of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Yang Jun; Shao Kangwei; Zhu Caisong; Zhu Ying; Zhai Lulan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI in the diagnosis of the bone contusion of the knee .joint and its clinical significance. Methods: Using special coil for knee joint, coronal, sagittal, axial and oblique sagittal plane scanning with fast spin-echo sequence(T 1 WI, T 2 WI, PDWI + FS) was performed on knee joint in 205 patients in three days after injury. According the distributing bone marrow edema and injury mechanism, bone contusion were classified five types as pivot shift injury, clip injury, dashboard injury, hyperextension injury and lateral patellar dislocation. Results: One hundred and forty-five cases of the 205 patients were found bone marrow edema without fracture on X-ray films. Among them, pivot shift injury was found in 43 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 30 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 12 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 8 cases; clip injury in 53 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 10 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 15 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 38 cases; dashboard injury 40 cases accompanied with posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 16 cases, hyperextension injury. 9 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 2 cases, posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 3 cases. No lateral patellar dislocation was found. Forty-eight of 145 patients had undergone arthroscopy, 43 cases (89.6%) of them were in accordance with Mill diagnosis. Bone contusion were defined as geographic regions of abnormal signal intensity, that is, low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted images and high signal intensity in PD-weighted or T 2 -weigeted images with fat saturation. Conclusion: MRI can accurately display the location and area of bone contusion of the knee joint as well as its adjunctive structure injury and deduce their injury mechanism. MRI should be used routinely for knee trauma. (authors)

  9. [First clinical experiences with a new cementless knee endoprosthesis for the dog].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, A; Bonin, T; Hach, V

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the clinical application and first experiences of a newly developed cementless knee endoprosthesis for dogs. The GenuSys knee-endoprosthesis was implanted in 23 knees of 22 dogs with severe gonarthritis and a history of pain. Their body weight ranged from 28 to 55 kg, their age between 5 and 12 years. This knee implant for dogs is a cementless "mobile bearing prosthesis". An additional fixation with one screw is necessary in the femoral component. Currently, there are four standard sizes of the prosthesis available. At the end of the study, 16 of 22 controlled patients (72.7%) were fully weightbearing on the operated limb or only showed a discreet lameness. We observed no complications in 12 cases (54.5%). In 10 cases problems in the course of healing were detected and made or would have made reoperation necessary. The complications noted were subluxation (n = 6, 27.3%), wound infection (n = 3, 13.6%) and a serious decrease in the range of motion (n = 1, 4.5%). Four of these 10 patients (40%) were subsequently healed through surgery. The remaining six dogs (27.3%) were euthanized or underwent arthrodesis of the leg. Sixteen of 22 dogs (72.2%) showed much better weightbearing and an increased quality of life after endoprosthesis of the knee. Although the complication rate was high, we expect better results in the future due to improvements in the equipment and surgical procedure. A definitive conclusion can only be made based on the results of a long-term study.

  10. The importance of bony impingement in restricting flexion after total knee arthroplasty: computer simulation model with clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Colwell, Clifford W; Fukagawa, Shingo; Matsuda, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2012-10-01

    We constructed patient-specific models from computed tomography data after total knee arthroplasty to predict knee flexion based on implant-bone impingement. The maximum flexion before impingement between the femur and the tibial insert was computed using a musculoskeletal modeling program (KneeSIM; LifeModeler, Inc, San Clemente, California) during a weight-bearing deep knee bend. Postoperative flexion was measured in a clinical cohort of 21 knees (low-flex group: 6 knees with 125° of flexion at 2 years). Average predicted flexion angles were within 2° of clinical measurements for the high-flex group. In the low-flex group, 4 cases had impingement involving the bone cut at the posterior condyle, and the average predicted knee flexion was 102° compared with 93° measured clinically. These results indicate that the level of the distal femoral resection should be carefully planned and that exposed bone proximal to the tips of the posterior condyles of the femoral component should be removed if there is risk of impingement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Identification of Influential Factors in Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Prevalence among Referals to Orthopedic Clinics in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Ebrahim Mousavi

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of the study was to investigate the major factors influencing knee osteoarthritis and to estimate its prevalence. Materials & Methods: This article is the outcome of an Ex Post Facto study on the files of 176 patients complaining of knee pain who referred to orthopedic clinics in Tehran within the period of 10 months from 1998 November to 1999 August. The selection of the files was implemented randomly. Results: The prevalence of osteoarthritis in "only left knee" cases turned out to be 22.9%, in "only right knee" cases 39.4%, and in "both knees" cases 37.6%. The gender variable showed a significant effect on the prevalence of this condition (p<0.002 so that the prevalence in males is higher than that in females although the prevalence is higher in urban than in rural areas, this difference is not significant indicating that location does not influence this condition (p<1471. Other results showed that there is a significant positive go-togetherness between age and the prevalence of the condition (p<0.00l. There is also a significant positive correlation between occupations demanding physical labor and the prevalence of the condition. From factors aggravating pain in both "only right knee and both knees" cases, the highest effect belongs to sitting with entirely bent knees, and the lowest has to do with short distance walking, whereas in the case of "only left knee" cases long distance walking has the highest and rest the lowest effect on pain increase in all the three groups. Full rest leads to 40% decrease in pain, while sitting on a chair has the lowest effect on the relief of the pain, but in "only left knee" cases extending the lower extremities in sitting has the lowest effect on pain relief. Physical factors including apparent joint deformity in standing position, knee range of motion and meniscus laceration have a significant effects on this condition. Conclusion: Furthermore factors noticed through radiological

  12. CLINICAL AND SONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF SYNOVITIS ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS DURING THERAPY

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    A. V. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory process in the synovial membrane (SM, which may be a main cause of chronic pain in many patients, is one of the most significant components in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA.Objective: to study the time course of clinical and sonographic changes in patients with knee OA who used different symptomatic slow-acting agents, such as chondroitin sulfate (CS, glucosamine sulfate (GS, and diacerein, during an 18-month follow-up period in general clinical practice.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 86 knee OA patients who took CS and/or GS in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and/or paracetamol in an outpatient setting for 12 months. Clinical and ultrasound (US studies of the affected knee joints (KJ were performed at the study inclusion and 12 and 18 months after follow-up initiation. The signs of active synovitis were considered to be increased synovial thickness of up to at least 3 mm and articular fluid accumulation, as evidenced by KJ US study. After 12 months, 36 patients in whom the clinical and sonographic signs of active synovitis persisted were divided into two groups: 1 19 patients took diacerein instead of CS/GS for the following 6 months; 2 17 patients in whom the treatment regimen remained unchanged.Results and discussion. 60.4% of the patients with knee OA were observed to have the sonographic signs of active synovitis, which were weakly correlated with the sizes of osteophytes and the thickness of the hyaline cartilage (r < 0.37. The rate of synovitis decreased to 41.9% during 12-month CS/GS therapy. The patients with persistent sonographically active synovitis had higher visual analogue scale and WOMAC pain scores (p < 0.05, as well as high C-reactive protein levels. They needed the more frequent and longer intake of NSAIDs and paracetamol. During the following 6 months, there was a reduction in the signs of active synovitis, as evidenced by US study, in 78

  13. MRI diagnosis of knee joint injury: the clinical application with a report of 35 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Quan; Tang Ni; Wu Xiaoyong; Zhao Ping; Guan Huanwen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the MRI findings of knee joint injury and the pathalogical basis and clinical significance. Methods: MR images of the knee joint injury were investigated in 35 cases. Results: In 23 cases of meniscus damage, lesions were nodular, linear or radioactive fissure with hyperintense signal within the dark meniscus, extending to or beneath the articular cartilage surface. In 9 cases of cruciate ligament injury, the disorder was a hyperintense shadow which was hyperintense on T 1 WI and hypointense on T 2 WI within the stripe-like, hypointense ligament, accompanying with the alteration of the ligament, which was in a wave shape or discontinued. Dislocation of the tibia was also revealed. In 5 cases of the bilateral collateral ligament damage. The involved thickened ligament had increased signal and blurred edge. In 4 cases of obscure bone fracture, the lesion was located in the metaphysic, manifested a hypo-intense shadow on T 1 WI, diverse on T 2 WI. Conclusion: MRI plays an important role in the diagnosis of the injury of menicus, ligament, and the obscure fracture of knee joint, and provides detailed information for the clinical management. (authors)

  14. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

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    Ojala, Risto; Kerimaa, Pekka; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco-Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oulu (Finland); Lakovaara, Martti [Oulu Deaconess Institute, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Oulu (Finland)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treatment. Ten OCD lesions of the knee unresponsive to conservative management were treated with MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling to reduce symptoms and promote ossification of the lesion. All lesions were located in distal femoral condyles. Only stable OCD lesions were included (preprocedural MRI grade I or II). Five lesions were of juvenile type and five lesions were of adult type OCD. All the patients had severe limitation of activity due to the OCD-related pain. By using a 0.23 T open MRI scanner and spinal anesthesia, percutaneous retrograde drilling of the OCD lesions was performed (3 mm cylindrical drill, one to three channels). Optical tracking and MRI imaging were used to guide instruments during the procedure. Mean postprocedural clinical follow-up time was 3 years. Eight patients had a post-procedural follow-up MRI within 1 year. All the OCD lesions were located and drilled using the 0.23 T open MRI scanner without procedural complications. All the patients had pain relief, mean visual analog score (VAS) declined from 6 to 2. Follow-up MRI showed ossification in all lesions. Eight patients could return to normal physical activity with no or minor effect on function (Hughston score 3-4). Treatment failed in two cases where the continuation of symptoms led to arthroscopy and transchondral fixation. MR-guided retrograde OCD lesion drilling is an accurate, feasible, and effective cartilage-sparing techique in OCD management. (orig.)

  15. MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojala, Risto; Kerimaa, Pekka; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco-Sequeiros, Roberto; Lakovaara, Martti; Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) treatment. Ten OCD lesions of the knee unresponsive to conservative management were treated with MRI-guided percutaneous retrograde drilling to reduce symptoms and promote ossification of the lesion. All lesions were located in distal femoral condyles. Only stable OCD lesions were included (preprocedural MRI grade I or II). Five lesions were of juvenile type and five lesions were of adult type OCD. All the patients had severe limitation of activity due to the OCD-related pain. By using a 0.23 T open MRI scanner and spinal anesthesia, percutaneous retrograde drilling of the OCD lesions was performed (3 mm cylindrical drill, one to three channels). Optical tracking and MRI imaging were used to guide instruments during the procedure. Mean postprocedural clinical follow-up time was 3 years. Eight patients had a post-procedural follow-up MRI within 1 year. All the OCD lesions were located and drilled using the 0.23 T open MRI scanner without procedural complications. All the patients had pain relief, mean visual analog score (VAS) declined from 6 to 2. Follow-up MRI showed ossification in all lesions. Eight patients could return to normal physical activity with no or minor effect on function (Hughston score 3-4). Treatment failed in two cases where the continuation of symptoms led to arthroscopy and transchondral fixation. MR-guided retrograde OCD lesion drilling is an accurate, feasible, and effective cartilage-sparing techique in OCD management. (orig.)

  16. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN KNEE MENISCI AND LIGAMENTOUS INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of clinical diagnosis compared to MRI findings in ligamentous and meniscal injuries with respect to arthroscopic confirmation as a gold standard. METHODS 485 patients with knee injuries were prospectively assessed by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging and correlated after therapeutic arthroscopy. The overall accuracy, clinically productive values of sensitivity and specificity was derived. The actual value of the test with respect to positive predictive and negative predictive value was also derived, taking arthroscopic findings as confirmatory. The overall partial and total agreement among the clinical, MRI and arthroscopy was documented. RESULTS The overall accuracy for clinical examination was 85, 92, 100 and 100 and accuracy for MRI was 90, 97, 97 and 97 for detecting medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, ACL and PCL tears respectively. Clinically lateral meniscus tears are difficult to diagnose clinically with negative predictive value (90 whereas ACL injuries do not need MRI for diagnosis as evident by a high negative predictive value (100 of clinical examination. Total agreement with the clinical findings confirmed by arthroscopy was 64.40% which was relatively high as compared to total agreement of MRI findings which was only 31.50%. We found similar total agreement versus total disagreement of both clinical and MRI to be only 2.74% indicating very high accuracy in clinical diagnosis of meniscal and ligamentous injuries combined. CONCLUSION The clinical evaluation alone is sufficient to diagnose meniscal and ACL/PCL pathologies and MRI should be considered only as a powerful negative diagnostic tool. The arthroscopy decision should not be heavily dependent on MRI for ligamentous injuries but reverse is true for meniscal lesions. MR evaluation functions as a powerful negative diagnostic tool to rule out doubtful and complex knee injuries.

  17. Knee dislocations: a magnetic resonance imaging study correlated with clinical and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Kimmie L. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, HB6, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parker, Richard D. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Our objectives were to determine retrospectively the prevalence, patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, combination of torn ligaments, associated intra-articular and extra-articular injuries, fractures, bone bruises, femoral-tibial alignment and neurovascular complications of knee dislocations as evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. From 17,698 consecutive knee examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 6-year period, 20 patients with knee dislocations were identified. The medical records of these patients were subsequently reviewed for relevant clinical history, management and operative findings. The prevalence of knee dislocations was 0.11% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.06-0.16]. There were 16 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 15 years to 76 years (mean 31 years). Fifteen patients had low-velocity injuries (75%), of which 11 were amateur sports related and four were from falls. Four patients (20%) had suffered high-velocity trauma (motor vehicle accidents). One patient had no history available. Anatomic alignment was present at imaging in 16 patients (80%). Eighteen patients had three-ligament tears, two had four-ligament tears. The four-ligament tears occurred with low-velocity injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were torn in every patient; the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was torn in 50%, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in 60%. Intra-articular injuries included meniscal tears (five in four patients), fractures (eight in seven patients), bone bruises (15 patients), and patellar retinaculum tears (eight partial, two complete). The most common extra-articular injury was a complete biceps femoris tendon tear (five, 25%). There were two popliteal tendon tears and one iliotibial band tear. One patient had received a vascular injury following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and had been treated prior to undergoing MRI. Bone bruises

  18. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF ANTERIOR C RUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURIES OF KNEE JOINT

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    Paragjyoti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Anterior C ruciate L igament (ACL tear is a common sports injury of the knee. There are a lot of controversies related to the management of this injury and more than 2000 papers have been published on the various aspects of the topic. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the ACL with autogenous graft material is widely used nowadays. The two most commonly used grafts are the central one - third of the patellar ligament (bone - tendon - bone, BTB and the hamstring tendon ( S emitendinosus - gracilis, STG construct but the former graft leads to increased donor site morbidity & hurdles in postoperative rehab & pain. The aim of the study is to study the Arthroscopic management of anterior cruciate ligament injury of knee joint using quadrupled hamstring graft. METHOD: The study was carried out on 30 cases of anterior cruciate ligament injury of knee joint attending the OPD and emergency of department of Orthopaedics, Silchar Medical College & Hospital who met the inclusion criteria. An informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to participation in the study. All the patients were examined in detail and worked up to obtain pre - anaesthetic clearance. X - rays and MRI were done routinely in all the cases. Clinical and radiological parameters were recorded. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadrupled hamstring graft was done in all the patients. Concomitant meniscal inju ries were treated according to the merit of the injury. Patients were followed up at regular intervals and outcome variables were assessed and recorded. RESULTS: Results of our study clearly showed that arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using quadrupled hamstring graft is a safe, effective and reproducible procedure in restoring knee function with minimal donor site morbidity. At follow up evaluation, all patients had good outcomes in terms of clinical stability, range of motion and general symptoms. CONCLUSION: From the results in this study

  19. Treatment of pain associated to knee osteoarthritis in the elderly: a randomized double-blind clinical trial with lysine clonixinate

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Fânia Cristina; Souza,Polianna Mara Rodrigues de; Toniolo Neto,João; Atallah,Álvaro Nagib

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthropathy and one of the major causes of chronic pain in the elderly population, which may lead to major functional incapacity of these individuals. Aiming at treating pain of elderly patients with knee OA, we have used lysine clonixinate (LC) and have evaluated its effectiveness METHOD: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 109 elderly patients with knee OA-related pain. Participants were distribut...

  20. Assessment of clinical practice guideline methodology for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with intra-articular hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Roy D; Schemitsch, Emil; Bedi, Asheesh

    2015-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are of increasing importance in the decision making for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Inconsistent recommendations regarding the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis have led to confusion among treating physicians. Literature search to identify clinical practice guidelines that provide recommendations regarding the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid treatment for knee osteoarthritis was conducted. Included guidelines were appraised using the AGREE II instrument. Guideline development methodologies, how the results were assessed, the recommendation formation, and work group composition were summarized. Overall, 10 clinical practice guidelines were identified that met our inclusion criteria. AGREE II domain scores were variable across the included guidelines. The methodology utilized across the guidelines was heterogeneous regarding the evidence inclusion criteria, analysis of evidence results, formulation of clinical practice recommendations, and work group composition. The recommendations provided by the guidelines for intra-articular hyaluronic acid treatment for knee osteoarthritis are highly inconsistent as a result of the variability in guideline methodology. Overall, 30% of the included guidelines recommended against the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, while 30% deemed the treatment an appropriate intervention under certain scenarios. The remaining 40% of the guidelines provided either an uncertain recommendation or no recommendation at all, based on the high variability in reviewed evidence regarding efficacy and trial quality. There is a need for a standard "appropriate methodology" that is agreed upon for osteoarthritis clinical practice guidelines in order to prevent the development of conflicting recommendations for intra-articular hyaluronic acid treatment for knee osteoarthritis, and to assure that treating physicians who

  1. Formal Physical Therapy May Not Be Necessary After Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Yale A; Darrith, Brian; Lonner, Jess H; Culvern, Chris; Crizer, Meredith; Della Valle, Craig J

    2018-02-21

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to compare formal outpatient physical therapy (PT) and unsupervised home exercises after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Fifty-two patients were randomized to 6 weeks of outpatient PT or an unsupervised home exercise program after UKA. The primary outcome was change in range of motion at 6 weeks with secondary outcomes including total arc of motion, Knee Society Score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Jr, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Veterans Rands-12 score. Twenty-five patients received outpatient PT, 22 patients the self-directed exercise program, while 3 patients deviated from the protocol, 1 patient withdrew, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up. There was no difference in the change of range of motion (P = .43) or total arc of motion at 6 weeks (P = .17) between the groups and likewise no significant differences were found in any of the secondary outcomes. Two patients who crossed over from the unsupervised home exercise program to formal outpatient PT within the first 2 weeks postoperatively required a manipulation under anesthesia. Our results suggest self-directed exercises may be appropriate for most patients following UKA. However, there is a subset of patients who may benefit from formal PT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical management of the acutely locked knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, Eugene G.; Nasser, Khalid N.; Dawson, Stewart; Goh, Leslie A.

    2002-01-01

    To explore prospectively the hypothesis that MRI of the acutely locked knee can alter surgical decision-making.Design and patients. The study group comprised patients with a clinical diagnosis of knee locking requiring arthroscopy. The decision to carry out arthroscopy was made by an experienced consultant orthopaedic surgeon specialising in trauma and recorded in the patient's notes prior to MRI. Preoperative MRI was carried out using a 1.5 T system. The management was altered from surgical to conservative treatment in 20 (48%) patients on the basis of the MR findings. Arthroscopy was limited to patients with an MR diagnosis of a mechanical block, usually a displaced meniscal tear or loose body. Both patient groups were followed clinically until symptoms resolved.Results. Forty-two patients were entered into the study. MRI identified a mechanical cause for locking in 22 patients (21 avulsion meniscal tears and 1 loose body). All were confirmed at arthroscopy. Twenty patients were changed from operative to non-operative treatment on the basis of the MRI findings. One patient in this group required a delayed arthroscopy for an impinging anterior cruciate ligament stump. The sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of MRI in identifying patients who require arthroscopy was therefore 96%/100%/98% respectively.Conclusion. MRI can successfully segregate patients with a clinical diagnosis of mechanical locking into those who have a true mechanical block and those who can be treated conservatively. MRI should precede arthroscopy in this clinical setting. (orig.)

  3. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: retrospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of 83 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Danilo; Iacono, Francesco; Russo, Alessandro; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Bignozzi, Simone; Bragonzoni, Laura; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-06-01

    We performed a retrospective clinical and radiographic evaluation of 83 nonconsecutive patients operated in our institute between February 1996 and March 2003 with a mean follow-up of 60 months to assess the efficiency of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) performed with a minimally invasive technique. The aim of this study was to correlate the clinical outcome with the pre- and post-operative alignment and with implant positioning on coronal and sagittal plane. Eighty-three nonconsecutive patients (60 males, 23 females) underwent cemented UKR (De Puy Preservation Uni with all-poly tibial component), for both medial OA (80 patients) and AVN of the medial femoral condyle (3 patients). All patients were available at final follow-up evaluation, and they all presented an evident varus alignment at pre-operative clinical and radiographic evaluation. At radiographic measurement, we considered a knee with femoro-tibial angle (FTA) > 175 degrees as varus knee, 170 degrees FTA FTA 90 degrees for valgus knee and a TPA clinical result presented a mean varus deformity of 7.2 degrees (3.6 degrees-10.8 degrees) pre-operatively. According to literature, we demonstrated that a small amount of undercorrection with a small amount of residual varus deformity of 3 degrees-5 degrees is the goal to be reached in order to avoid both rapid degeneration of the nonreplaced compartment and the premature loosening of the replaced compartment. We performed a mean axial correction of 5 degrees (SD 3.9 degrees), leaving a mean axial varus deformity of 2.2 degrees in the excellent group. In our series, the group with excellent results also showed a post-operative PTS of 7 degrees (2.4 degrees-11.6 degrees), while mean pre-operative PTS was 6.5 degrees (2.7 degrees-10.3 degrees). In this study, results have shown that minimally invasive UKR producing a small amount of varus undercorrection in selected patients with medial tibio-femoral osteoarthritis or moderate avascular necrosis of the

  4. The Impact of Osseous Malalignment and Realignment Procedures in Knee Ligament Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Thomas; Paul, Jochen; Pape, Dietrich; Hirschmann, Michael T; Imhoff, Andreas B; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Feucht, Matthias J

    2017-03-01

    Failure rates of knee ligament surgery may be high, and the impact of osseous alignment on surgical outcome remains controversial. Basic science studies have demonstrated that osseous malalignment can negatively affect ligament strain and that realignment procedures may improve knee joint stability. The purpose of this review was to summarize the clinical evidence concerning the impact of osseous malalignment and realignment procedures in knee ligament surgery. The hypotheses were that lower extremity malalignment would be an important contributor to knee ligament surgery failure and that realignment surgery would contribute to increased knee stability and improved outcome in select cases. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. According to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, a systematic electronic search of the PubMed database was performed in November 2015 to identify clinical studies investigating (A) the influence of osseous alignment on postoperative stability and/or failure rates after knee ligament surgery and (B) the impact of osseous realignment procedures in unstable knees with or without additional knee ligament surgery on postoperative knee function and stability. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence and the Coleman Methodological Score (CMS). Of the 1466 potentially relevant articles, 28 studies fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Average study quality was poor (CMS, 40). For part A, studies showed increased rerupture rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in patients with increased tibial slope. Concerning the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)/posterolateral corner (PLC)/lateral collateral ligament (LCL), varus malalignment was considered a significant risk factor for failure. For part B, studies showed decreased anterior tibial translation after slope-decreasing high tibial

  5. Tibial internal rotation negatively affects clinical outcomes in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Ascione, Francesco; Rossini, Marco; Braile, Adriano; Corona, Katia; Vasso, Michele; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2017-12-15

    The aim of this systematic review is to analyze the effect of tibial rotational alignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on clinical outcomes and assess the eventual cut-off values for tibial TKA rotation leading to poor outcomes. A detailed and systematic search from 1997 to 2017 of the Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane Reviews, and the Google Scholar databases was performed using the keyword terms "total knee arthroplasty", "total knee replacement", "tibial alignment", "tibial malalignement", "tibial rotation", "rotational error", "axis", "angle", "tibial malrotation", "clinical outcome", in several combinations. The modified Coleman scoring methodology (mCMS) was used. All the primary TKAs studies analyzing correlation between clinical results and tibial rotation were included. Five articles met the inclusion criteria. A total of 333 arthroplasties were included in this review; 139 had tibial component malalignment, while 194 were in control groups. The mean age of patients was 67.3 (SD 0.57) years. The mean average postoperative follow-up delay was 34.7 months (range 21-70). The mean mCMS score was 59.2 points indicating good methodological quality in the included studies. Functional outcomes were assessed through KSS, OKS, KOOS and VAS, negatively related to tibial internal rotation. Our review confirmed that excessive internal rotation of the tibial TKA component represents a significant risk factor for pain and inferior functional outcomes after TKA (> 10° of internal rotation demonstrated the common value), since external rotation does not affect the results. However, a universal precise cut-off value has not been found in the available literature and there remains a debate about CT rotation assessment and surgical intra-operative landmarks. III.

  6. Characteristics and clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic profile of ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, L; Galasso, O; Urzino, A; Saccà, S; Falcone, D; Palleria, C; Longo, P; Corigliano, A; Terracciano, R; Savino, R; Gasparini, G; De Sarro, G; Southworth, S R

    2012-12-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 inhibitor used to treat pain conditions and inflammation. Limited data have been published concerning the pharmacokinetic profile and clinical effects of ibuprofen in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). In this paper we compared the pharmacokinetic and clinical profile of ibuprofen (at a dosage of from 800 mg/day to 1800 mg/day) administered in patients affected by severe knee OA. Ibuprofen was administered for 7 days to patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroplasty due to OA. After 7 days, the ibuprofen concentration in plasma and synovial fluid was measured through both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), while clinical effects were evaluated through both visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) scores. The Naranjo scale and the WHO causality assessment scale were used for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The severity of ADRs was assessed by the modified Hartwig and Siegel scale. Ibuprofen showed a dose-dependent diffusion in both plasma and synovial fluid, which was related to the reduction of pain intensity and improvement of health status, without the development of ADRs. Ibuprofen at higher dosages can be expected to provide better control of OA symptoms as a result of higher tissue distribution.

  7. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Results: Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. Conclusions: High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project

  8. PRELIMINARY CLINICAL RESULTS WITH LIPOASPIRATE STROMAL VASCULAR CELL FRACTION IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ya. Shevela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of clinical application of autologous stromal-vascular fraction (SVF cells in patients with degenerative osteoarthritis (OA of the knee, grade II and III (Kellgren–Lawrence scale.We recruited six patients with knee OA (3 men and 3 women; median age 64 years with mean disease duration of 7 years. All the patients were administered a single intra-articular injection of autologous nucleated SVF cells at an average dose of 16.8±0.9 × 106 per joint (a total of 11 joints. The patients did not experience any serious side effects (allergic, toxic or inflammatory related to the knee injection. Patient surveys at 1 month after SVF administration revealed a decrease in the severity of pain, as measured by a visual analog scale (VAS and a specialized 100-point scale KOOS (subscale "pain" (p < 0.05 on both scales. Moreover, the patients reported improvement in the joint functions and quality of life related to affected joints on a KOOS scale (p < 0.05. These positive clinical changes persisted during 6 month follow up. Significant improvements were noted in ultrasound findings, with increased thickness of the cartilage layer at 3 months (in 73% of cases and at 6 months (in 82%. Our pilot study demonstrated the safety and tolerability of intra-articular injection of autologous SVF cells in patients with moderate to severe OA. The results obtained also indicate a significant antiinflammatory effect of autologous adipose tissue SVF cells, which is manifested at the early stages of cell therapy. Our further investigations will be focused on exploring the SVF stimulatory effects on regeneration of damaged joints.

  9. Knee Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation: Long-term MR findings and clinical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetta, Cecilia; Busacca, Maurizio; Moio, Antonio; Rinaldi, Raffaella; Delcogliano, Marco; Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Marcacci, Maurilio; Albisinni, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated long-term magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Knee Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation (OAT)-Mosaicplasty and correlated MRI findings and clinical outcome. Twenty-four patients (mean age 29.9 ± 8.7, 70.8% male) undergoing arthroscopic OAT between 1997 and 2000 were prospectively enrolled. The International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS)/International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores and Tegner scores were employed for clinical evaluation. The magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) was utilized for description and assessment of the repair tissue. Median follow up was 113 months (interquartile range [IQR] 106-122). MRI showed good survival of grafted cartilage in 62.5% of patients. The integration of the graft was complete in 75% of cases, while the repaired tissue was intact in 62.5% and had an homogeneous structure in 70.8%. The MOCART score significantly correlated with objective and subjective scores (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002). Contrastingly, overall MOCART showed no correlation with the Tegner score. MRI revealed to be a powerful tool for non-invasive long-term assessment of OAT.

  10. Impact of Clinical Practice Guidelines on Use of Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid and Corticosteroid Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Nicholas A; DeMik, David E; Glass, Natalie A; Burnett, Robert A; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2018-05-16

    The efficacy of corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid injections for knee osteoarthritis has been questioned. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) clinical practice guidelines on the use of these injections in the United States and determine if utilization differed by provider specialty. Patients with knee osteoarthritis were identified within the Humana database from 2007 to 2015, and the percentage of patients receiving a knee injection relative to the number of patients having an encounter for knee osteoarthritis was calculated and was trended for the study period. The impact of each edition of the AAOS clinical practice guidelines on injection use was evaluated with segmented regression analysis. Injection trends were also analyzed relative to the specialty of the provider performing the injection. Of 1,065,175 patients with knee osteoarthritis, 405,101 (38.0%) received a corticosteroid injection and 137,005 (12.9%) received a hyaluronic acid injection. The rate of increase in hyaluronic acid use, per 100 patients with knee osteoarthritis, decreased from 0.15 to 0.07 injection per quarter year (p = 0.02) after the first clinical practice guideline, and the increase changed to a decrease at a rate of -0.12 injection per quarter (p guideline. After the first clinical practice guideline, the rate of increase in utilization of corticosteroids, per 100 patients with knee osteoarthritis, significantly lessened to 0.12 injection per quarter (p guideline, corticosteroid injection use plateaued (p = 0.72). The trend in use of hyaluronic acid injections by orthopaedic surgeons and pain specialists decreased with time following the second-edition clinical practice guideline but did not change for primary care physicians or nonoperative musculoskeletal providers. Subtle but significant changes in hyaluronic acid and corticosteroid injections occurred following the publication of both clinical practice

  11. Indications for and clinical procedures resulting from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in older patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marc-Etienne; Vézina, François; Carrier, Nathalie; Masetto, Ariel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the indications for and clinical procedures resulting from knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older patients. Design We retrospectively analyzed 215 medical records of patients 50 years of age and older who had undergone a unilateral knee MRI in 2009. Setting Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Participants Patients 50 years of age and older who underwent a knee MRI in 2009. Main outcome measures The main outcome measure was an invasive procedure in the same knee that underwent an MRI. Medical charts were reviewed up to 2014 for patient characteristics, MRI indication, ordering physician specialty, radiography before MRI, MRI findings, and clinical procedures resulting from the MRI. Results The patients’ mean (SD) age was 60.6 (7.5) years. The main MRI indications were meniscopathy (148 [68.8%]) and chronic pain (92 [42.8%]). The main MRI findings were osteoarthritis (OA) (185 [86.0%]) and meniscal lesions (170 [79.1%]). Only 82 (38.1%) patients had a plain radiograph in the 24 months preceding the MRI, usually without a standing anteroposterior view. Findings on pre-MRI radiography (n = 201) demonstrated OA in 144 (71.6%) patients. Overall, 87 (40.5%) patients were seen by an orthopedic surgeon and 27 (31.0%) of these patients underwent an invasive intervention. Among the 81 patients with moderate to severe OA on MRI, 36 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of moderate to severe OA and only 3 (3.7%) underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Conclusion Our study reproduces the known association between OA and degenerative meniscal changes in older patients. We have found a surprising underuse of the standing anteroposterior view on radiography. Most patients in our cohort could have been appropriately diagnosed and treated based on such radiographic information, as demonstrated by pre-MRI findings, thus avoiding the MRI and subsequent evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. Meniscectomy was rarely performed

  12. Development of computer tablet software for clinical quantification of lateral knee compartment translation during the pivot shift test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Rahnemai-Azar, Amir Ata; Wolf, Megan; Araki, Daisuke; Hoshino, Yuichi; Araujo, Paulo; Debski, Richard E; Irrgang, James J; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The pivot shift test is a commonly used clinical examination by orthopedic surgeons to evaluate knee function following injury. However, the test can only be graded subjectively by the examiner. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop software for a computer tablet to quantify anterior translation of the lateral knee compartment during the pivot shift test. Based on the simple image analysis method, software for a computer tablet was developed with the following primary design constraint - the software should be easy to use in a clinical setting and it should not slow down an outpatient visit. Translation of the lateral compartment of the intact knee was 2.0 ± 0.2 mm and for the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee was 8.9 ± 0.9 mm (p software provides reliable, objective, and quantitative data on translation of the lateral knee compartment during the pivot shift test and meets the design constraints posed by the clinical setting.

  13. INFLUENCE OF RESIDUAL VARUS DEFORMITY ON CLINICAL, FUNCTIONAL, RADIOLOGICAL AND DYNAMOMETRIC OUTCOMES OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Zinoviev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study – to evaluate the influence of residual varus deformity of the lower leg on clinical, functional and dynamometric outcomes of TKR.Material and methods. In the period from September 2014 till May 2015 951 total knee replacement surgeries were performed in Ural clinical and rehabilitation center in 933 patients with initial varus deformity of lower limb. However, in 52 cases (5.5% residual varus deformity of >3° persisted. The main group included 36 patients with mean residual varus deformity of lower leg of 3.9°±0.74° (from 3.1° to 5.6°, the control group included 34 patients with neutral mechanic axis of the lower leg. Evaluation of treatment outcomes was performed on average 14.2±1.8 months after the procedure using functional assessment of the patients according to KSS (Knee Society Score, subjective assessment of life quality (SF36, as well as evaluation of the static-dynamic function of the lower leg on diagnostic and treatment complex Biodex Systems 4 Quick Set and assessment of stability of components fixation by F.C. Ewald scale in modification of O.A. Kudinov et al.Results. Functional assessment of the patients according to KSS (Knee Society Score for the main group was 84.0±4.6, in control group – 82.2±4.1 points (p>0.05. Subjective assessment of life quality (SF36 in the main group was 162.6±6.4 points, in control group – 164.3±8.1 points (p>0.05. In terms of flexion and extension of lower leg there were no significant differences between two groups when assessing static and dynamic function by treatment and diagnostic complex «Biodex Systems 4 Quick Set» on average in 14.2±1.8 months after procedure: neither isometric nor isokinetic parameters in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p>0.05. Based on X-rays evaluation there were no abnormalities in components fixation in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences identified in KSS and SF36 scales

  14. Clinical and radiological analysis on the double contrast arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol, Chang Hyo; Lee, Suck Hong; Moon, Tae Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author has performed double contrast arthrography of knee in 96 cases at Busan National University Hospital for about 4 years from May 1976 to April 1980. The 31 cases of them were analyzed both clinically and radiographycally with the background of definite diagnosis confirmed by operation. The results are as follows. 1. Of the 31 cases, 25 cases were male (80.6%), and 6 cases were female (19.4%). Male exceeded female in ratio of 5 : 1. 2. 22 cases (70.1%) were distributed from 15 to 26 years of age. 3. The left knee joint was a more prevalent site. The ratio of left to right was 16 : 14. One case was bilateral. 4. In 17 cases (45.2%) of the 31 cases, there was a positive history of trauma. 14 cases had no specific history (54.8%). 5. The operative findings showed lateral meniscus lesion in 25 cases (80.6%): medical meniscus lesion in 2 cases (6.5%); discoid meniscus in 2 cases (6.5%); lateral menisectomy in 1 cases (3.2%); and lateral meniscus lesion with medial collateral ligament tearing in 1 case (3.2%). 6. In 25 cases of the 31 cases, the radiologic abnormal findings corresponded to the operative findings. 5 cases revealed somewhat different features with the operative findings. One case which showed no abnormal roentgenographic findings was found to have abnormality at operation. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of arthrography was 96.8%

  15. Predictors of clinical outcome in total hip and knee replacement : a methodological appraisal of implants and patient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, Johan Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied both implants and patient and surgeon factors as predictors of clinical outcome after total hip and knee replacement. Additionally, we studied a number of methodological aspects of orthopaedic research, such as competing risks in estimating the probability of revision

  16. How well do radiographic, clinical and self-reported diagnoses of knee osteoarthritis agree? Findings from the Hertfordshire cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, C.; Clynes, M.; Syddall, H.; Jagannath, D.; Litwic, A.; van der Pas, S.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.M.; Edwards, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiological studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have often used a radiographic definition. However, the clinical syndrome of OA is influenced by a broad range of factors in addition to the structural changes required for radiographic OA. Hence more recently several studies have

  17. Positive and negative affect dimensions in chronic knee osteoarthritis: effects on clinical and laboratory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, Patrick H; Quartana, Phillip J; Smith, Michael T

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated whether daily and laboratory assessed pain differs as a function of the temporal stability and valence of affect in individuals with chronic knee osteoarthritis (KOA). One hundred fifty-one men and women with KOA completed 14 days of electronic diaries assessing positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and clinical pain. A subset of participants (n =79) engaged in quantitative sensory testing (QST). State PA and NA were assessed prior to administration of stimuli that induced suprathreshold pain and temporal summation. Multilevel modeling and multiple regression evaluated associations of affect and pain as a function of valence (i.e., positive versus negative) and stability (i.e., stable versus state). In the diary, stable NA (B = -.63, standard error [SE] = .13, p affect-pain processes in the field may reflect individual differences in central pain facilitation.

  18. The treatment and prevention of knee osteoarthritis: a tool for clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of disability, which will increase further with longer lifetime and higher average weight of the population. OBJECTIVE: To review a hierarchy of interventions for OA in clinical practice, and compare it with the Strength of Recommendation (SOR......) proposed by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI). METHODS: Search for relevant randomized controlled trials in databases, as well as published systematic reviews and meta-analyses. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Preventive measures are few and uncertain; however, basic therapy includes reduction...... in weight in the obese and exercises to keep in shape; this is in accordance with the OARSI guidelines (OARSI, 100% consensus) emphasizing the need for obese individuals with knee OA to lose weight (OARSI, SOR = 96%). There are indications of an effect of some nutraceuticals, though further studies...

  19. Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee: clinical and MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.G.; Cho, W.H.; Kim, B.H.; Choi, J.A.; Lee, N.J.; Chung, K.B.; Choi, Y.S.; Cho, S.B.; Lim, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present clinical and MR imaging features of intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee. Retrospective review of 1685 consecutive medical records and MR examinations of the knee performed at three imaging centers allowed identification of 20 patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age 35 years), in whom evidence of intra-articular ganglion cyst was seen. Of the 20 ganglion cysts, 5 were found in the infrapatellar fat pad, 10 arose from the posterior cruciate ligament, and 5 from the anterior cruciate ligament. Three of five patients with ganglion cyst in the infrapatellar fat pad had a palpable mass. In 7 of 15 patients with ganglion cyst in the intercondylar notch, exacerbation of pain occurred in a squatting position. On four MR arthrographies, ganglion cysts were an intra-articular round, lobulated, low signal intensity lesion. Five cases of fat-suppressed contrast-enhanced T1-weighted SE images demonstrated peripheral thin rim enhancement. The clinical presentation of intra-articular ganglion cyst is varied according to its intra-articular location. The MR appearance of intra-articular ganglion cyst is characteristic and usually associated with the cruciate ligament or the infrapatellar fat pad. Magnetic resonance arthrography has no definite advantage over conventional MR in the evaluation of the lesion. For intra-articular ganglion cyst in the infrapatellar fat pad, fat-suppressed contrast-enhanced MR imaging could be useful, because a thin, rim-enhancing feature of intra-articular ganglion cyst allows it to be distinguished from synovial hemangioma and synovial sarcoma. (orig.)

  20. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  1. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  2. Inter- and intrarater reliability of two proprioception tests using clinical applicable measurement tools in subjects with and without knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Lluch, Enrique; Struyf, Thomas; Peeters, Greta; Van Oosterwijck, Sophie; Tuynman, Joanna; Rufai, Salim; Struyf, Filip

    2018-06-01

    The therapeutic value of proprioceptive-based exercises in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) management warrants investigation of proprioceptive testing methods easily accessible in clinical practice. To estimate inter- and intrarater reliability of the knee joint position sense (KJPS) test and knee force sense (KFS) test in subjects with and without KOA. Cross-sectional test-retest design. Two blinded raters performed independently repeated measures of the KJPS and KFS test, using an analogue inclinometer and handheld dynamometer, respectively, in eight KOA patients (12 symptomatic knees) and 26 healthy controls (52 asymptomatic knees). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs; model 2,1), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change with 95% confidence bounds (MDC 95 ) were calculated. For KJPS, results showed good to excellent test-retest agreement (ICCs 0.70-0.95 in KOA patients; ICCs 0.65-0.85 in healthy controls). A 2° measurement error (SEM 1°) was reported when measuring KJPS in multiple test positions and calculating mean repositioning error. Testing KOA patients pre and post therapy a repositioning error larger than 4° (MDC 95 ) is needed to consider true change. Measuring KFS using handheld dynamometry showed poor to fair interrater and poor to excellent intrarater reliability in subjects with and without KOA. Measuring KJPS in multiple test positions using an analogue inclinometer and calculating mean repositioning error is reliable and can be used in clinical practice. We do not recommend the use of the KFS test to clinicians. Further research is required to establish diagnostic accuracy and validity of our KJPS test in larger knee pain populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Meniscectomy versus meniscal repair: 10 years radiological and clinical results in vertical lesions in stable knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C; Dalmay, F; Ehkirch, F P; Cucurulo, T; Laporte, C; Le Henaff, G; Potel, J F; Pujol, N; Rochcongar, G; Salledechou, E; Seil, R; Gunepin, F-X; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2015-12-01

    Surgical management of meniscal lesion consists of either a meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Although repair offers immediate recovery after surgery, it is also associated with higher rates of revision. A meniscectomy, on the other hand is known to be associated with an early onset of osteoarthritis. The present study compared clinical and radiological results at 10 years between meniscectomy and meniscal repair in isolated vertical lesion in an otherwise stable knee. The hypothesis was that repair shows functional and radiological benefit over meniscectomy. A multi-centric retrospective comparative study of 32 patients (24 male, 8 female). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years (range, 10-13 years). There were 10 meniscal repairs (group R) and 22 meniscectomies (group M), in 17 right and 15 left knees. Mean age at surgery was 33.45±12.3 years (range, 9-47 years). There were 28 medial and 4 lateral meniscal lesions; 26 were in the red-red zone and 6 in red-white zone. Functional score: KOOS score was significantly higher in group R than M on almost all parameters: 98±4.69 versus 77.38±21.97 for symptoms (P=0.0043), 96.89±7.20 versus 78.57±18.9 for pain (P=0.0052), 99.89±0.33 versus 80.88±19.6 for daily life activities (P=0.0002), 96.11±9.83 versus 54.05±32.85 for sport and leisure (P=0.0005), but 91±16.87 versus 68.15±37.7 for quality of life (P=0.1048). Radiology score: in group R, 7 patients had no features of osteoarthritis, and 2 had grade 1 osteoarthritis. In group M, 5 patients had grade 1 osteoarthritis, 10 grade 2, 3 grade 3 and 3 grade 4. Mean quantitative score was 0 (mean, 0.22±0.44) in-group R and 2 (mean, 2.19±0.98) in group M (P<0.0001). At more than 10year's follow-up, functional scores were significantly better with meniscal repair than meniscectomy on all parameters of the KOOS scale except quality of life. Functional and radiological scores correlated closely. These results show that meniscal repair for vertical lesions in stable knees

  4. Clinical Outcomes and Risks of Single-stage Bilateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty via Oxford Phase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis often affects the joint bilaterally, and the single-stage (SS unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA is advantageous in terms of a single anesthesia administration, a short hospital stay, lower medical costs, and enhanced patient convenience. However, the complication risk of SS UKA continues to be debated. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and functional recovery of SS and two-stage (TS UKA. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2013, we compared a series of 36 SS UKA with 45 TS UKA for osteoarthritis. The mean age was 65.4 years (range: 55-75 years. The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m 2 (range: 22-29 kg/m 2 . The pre- and post-operative Oxford Knee Scores (OKSs, complications, operative times, tourniquet times, the amount of drainage, and hemoglobin (Hb were evaluated. The Chi-square test, Fisher′s exact test, and paired and grouped t-tests were used in this study. Results: The mean follow-up was 50 months. No complications of death, fat embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and prosthetic infection were reported. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a shorter cumulative anesthesia time (113.5 vs. 133.0 min, P 0.05. At the final follow-up, the mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 (P 0.05. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a faster recovery. Conclusions: The single-staged UKA offers the benefits of a single anesthesia administration, reduced total anesthetic time, decreased overall rehabilitation time, and absence of an increase in perioperative mortality or complications compared with the TS bilateral UKA.

  5. Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) for osteoarthritis of the knee: 5-year clinical and radiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Ko; Yonekura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Takashi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Goji

    2017-03-01

    Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) is a type of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for advanced medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) with subluxated lateral joint. We report the concept, the current surgical technique with a locking plate, and the short-term clinical and radiological results of this procedure. 11 knees with medial OA and a widened lateral joint were treated by TCVO (KL stage III: 6, IV: 5). In this procedure, by the L-shaped osteotomy from the medial side of the proximal tibia to the intercondylar eminence and the valgus correction, lateralization of the mechanical axis and reduction of the subluxated lateral joint are obtained with early postoperative weight-bearing. Before, 6 months, 1, and 5 years after the operation, a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), alignment of the lower extremity, and congruency and stability of the femorotibial joint were investigated. The VAS improved from an average of 73 mm to 13 mm, and the total WOMAC score from 52 to 14 before to 5 years after the operation, respectively. The mechanical axis changed from 1 to 60%, and the FTA changed from 186° to 171°. The joint line convergence angle (JLCA) changed from 6° to 1°, and the angle difference of JLCA between varus and valgus stress improved from 8° to 4° after the procedure. Improvements in pain and activities of daily living were observed by TCVO along with valgus correction of the lower extremity and stabilization of the femorotibial joint.

  6. Can computer assistance improve the clinical and functional scores in total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vaquero, Daniel; Suarez-Vazquez, Abelardo; Iglesias-Fernandez, Susana

    2011-12-01

    Surgical navigation in TKA facilitates better alignment; however, it is unclear whether improved alignment alters clinical evolution and midterm and long-term complication rates. We determined the alignment differences between patients with standard, manual, jig-based TKAs and patients with navigation-based TKAs, and whether any differences would modify function, implant survival, and/or complications. We retrospectively reviewed 97 patients (100 TKAs) undergoing TKAs for minimal preoperative deformities. Fifty TKAs were performed with an image-free surgical navigation system and the other 50 with a standard technique. We compared femoral angle (FA), tibial angle (TA), and femorotibial angle (FTA) and determined whether any differences altered clinical or functional scores, as measured by the Knee Society Score (KSS), or complications. Seventy-three patients (75 TKAs) had a minimum followup of 8 years (mean, 8.3 years; range, 8-9.1 years). All patients included in the surgical navigation group had a FTA between 177° and 182º. We found no differences in the KSS or implant survival between the two groups and no differences in complication rates, although more complications occurred in the standard technique group (seven compared with two in the surgical navigation group). In the midterm, we found no difference in functional and clinical scores or implant survival between TKAs performed with and without the assistance of a navigation system. Level II, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines online for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Migration and clinical outcome of mobile-bearing versus fixed-bearing single-radius total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hamersveld, Koen T; Marang-Van De Mheen, Perla J; Van Der Heide, Huub J L; Van Der Linden-Van Der Zwaag, Henrica M J; Valstar, Edward R; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2018-04-01

    Background and purpose - Mobile-bearing total knee prostheses (TKPs) were developed in the 1970s in an attempt to increase function and improve implant longevity. However, modern fixed-bearing designs like the single-radius TKP may provide similar advantages. We compared tibial component migration measured with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and clinical outcome of otherwise similarly designed cemented fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing single-radius TKPs. Patients and methods - RSA measurements and clinical scores were assessed in 46 randomized patients at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and annually thereafter up to 6 years postoperatively. A linear mixed-effects model was used to analyze the repeated measurements. Results - Both groups showed comparable migration (p = 0.3), with a mean migration at 6-year follow-up of 0.90 mm (95% CI 0.49-1.41) for the fixed-bearing group compared with 1.22 mm (95% CI 0.75-1.80) for the mobile-bearing group. Clinical outcomes were similar between groups. 1 fixed-bearing knee was revised for aseptic loosening after 6 years and 2 knees (1 in each group) were revised for late infection. 2 knees (1 in each group) were suspected for loosening due to excessive migration. Another mobile-bearing knee was revised after an insert dislocation due to failure of the locking mechanism 6 weeks postoperatively, after which study inclusion was preliminary terminated. Interpretation - Fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing single-radius TKPs showed similar migration. The latter may, however, expose patients to more complex surgical techniques and risks such as insert dislocations inherent to this rotating-platform design.

  8. Medial Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty Improves Patellofemoral Congruence: a Possible Mechanistic Explanation for Poor Association Between Patellofemoral Degeneration and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Ran; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Khamaisy, Saker; Nawabi, Danyal H; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Pearle, Andrew D

    2015-11-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of medial fixed bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) on postoperative patellofemoral joint (PFJ) congruence and analyze the relationship of preoperative PFJ degeneration on clinical outcome. We retrospectively reviewed 110 patients (113 knees) who underwent medial UKA. Radiographs were evaluated to ascertain PFJ degenerative changes and congruence. Clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. The postoperative absolute patellar congruence angle (10.05 ± 10.28) was significantly improved compared with the preoperative value (14.23 ± 11.22) (P = 0.0038). No correlation was found between preoperative PFJ congruence or degeneration severity, and WOMAC scores at two-year follow up. Pre-operative PFJ congruence and degenerative changes do not affect UKA clinical outcomes. This finding may be explained by the post-op PFJ congruence improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cemented total knee replacement in 24 dogs: surgical technique, clinical results, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Matthew J; Leone, Kendall A; Lamonte, Kimberly; Townsend, Katy L; Mann, Kenneth A

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the performance of cemented total knee replacement (TKR) in dogs. Preclinical research study. Skeletally mature, male Hounds (25-30 kg; n=24) with no preexisting joint pathology. Dogs had unilateral cemented TKR and were evaluated at 6, 12, 26, or 52 weeks (6 dogs/time point) by radiography, bone density analysis, visual gait assessment, and direct measurement of thigh circumference and stifle joint range of motion as indicators of functional recovery. At study end, the stability of the cemented tibial component was determined by destructive mechanical testing. Joint stability was excellent in 16 dogs (67%) and good in 8 dogs. None of the tibial components had evidence of migration or periprosthetic osteolysis whereas 1 femoral component was loose at 52 weeks. There was an early and significant decrease in tibial bone density, likely because of disuse of the operated limb. Dogs returned to full activity by 12 weeks. The tibial cement-bone interface maintained its strength over 52 weeks. Cement provides stable fixation of the tibial component in canine TKR. Cemented TKR yields adequate clinical function and stifle joint excursion in the dog. Clinical studies are needed to determine the long-term fate of cemented TKR implants, to assess the influence of implant design on implant fixation and wear, and to obtain objective functional data.

  10. Knee Osteoarthritis Injection Choices: Platelet- Rich Plasma (PRP versus Hyaluronic Acid (A one-year randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Raeissadat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA is the most common articular disease. Different methods are used to alleviate the symptoms of patients with knee OA, including analgesics, physical therapy, exercise prescription, and intra-articular injections (glucocorticoids, hyaluronic acid [HA], etc. New studies have focused on modern therapeutic methods that stimulate cartilage healing process and improve the damage, including the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a complex of growth factors. Due to the high incidence of OA and its consequences, we decided to study the long-term effect of intraarticular injection of PRP and HA on clinical outcome and quality of life of patients with knee OA. Method This non-placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial involved 160 patients affected by knee OA, grade 1–4 of Kellgren–Lawrence scale. In the PRP group ( n = 87, two intra-articular injections at 4-week interval were applied, and in the HA group ( n = 73, three doses of intra-articular injection at 1-week interval were applied. All patients were prospectively evaluated before and at 12 months after the treatment by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC and SF-36 questionnaires. The results were analyzed using SPSS 16.1 software (RCT code: IRCT2014012113442N5. Results At the 12-month follow-up, WOMAC pain score and bodily pain significantly improved in both groups; however, better results were determined in the PRP group compared to the HA group ( P < 0.001. Other WOMAC and SF-36 parameters improved only in the PRP group. More improvement (but not statistically significant was achieved in patients with grade 2 OA in both the groups. Conclusion This study suggests that PRP injection is more efficacious than HA injection in reducing symptoms and improving quality of life and is a therapeutic option in select patients with knee OA who have not responded to conventional treatment.

  11. Kinesiotape and quadriceps strengthening with elastic band in women with knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Ballesteros, Saúl; Espinosa-Morales, Rolando; Clark-Peralta, Patricia; Gómez-Pineda, Ascención Guadalupe; Guadarrama-Becerril, Jaime Horacio

    2018-04-07

    The beneficial effects of exercise in the treatment of Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee have been verified in several studies. Kinesiotaping (KT) has been popularized due to its reducing local pressure and increasing circulation, resulting in decreased pain. Determine the clinical effectiveness of strengthening therapy with KT in women with knee OA for pain reduction. Thirty two women with knee OA, aged 50-70 years, with overweight or obesity grade I, who were randomized into two groups: one with exercise and KT, and the other, with exercise and placebo technique. Both groups performed stretching and quadriceps strengthening exercise with the elastic band 3 days weekly for 6 weeks. Measurement of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale was taken as primary outcome. Stiffness and functionality of the same index and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain intensity were measured. At the end of the study, there were no significant differences between the groups. Both groups had a difference of 2.7 points with respect to the baseline measurement, change percentage of 32.2% and 31.1% for placebo and experimental respectively (p=0.2). KT plus quadriceps strengthening exercise does not offer advantages for improvement of pain compared with quadriceps strengthening exercise alone in knee OA. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Espaola de Reumatologa y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatologa. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Knee Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Knee Injuries What's in ... can do to protect them. What's in a Knee? The knee is a joint , actually the largest ...

  13. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  14. Treatment with 4Jointz reduces knee pain over 12 weeks of treatment in patients with clinical knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslett, L L; Quinn, S J; Darian-Smith, E; Kwok, M; Fedorova, T; Körner, H; Steels, E; March, L; Jones, G

    2012-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of thrice daily topical 4Jointz utilizing Acteev technology (a combination of a standardized comfrey extract and a pharmaceutical grade tannic acid, 3.5 g/day) on osteoarthritic knee pain, markers of inflammation and cartilage breakdown over 12 weeks. Adults aged 50-80 years (n = 133) with clinical knee OA were randomised to receive 4Jointz or placebo in addition to existing medications. Pain and function were measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale at baseline, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Inflammation was measured analysing IL-6 expression and CTX-2 presence as representative for cartilage breakdown using ELISA, at baseline and 12 weeks. Pain scores significantly reduced in the group who received 4Jointz compared to the group who received placebo after 12 weeks using both the VAS (-9.9 mm, P = 0.034) and the KOOS pain scale (+5.7, P = 0.047). Changes in IL-6 and CTX-2 were not significant (-0.04, P = 0.5; -0.01, P = 0.68). Post-hoc analyses suggested that treatment may be most effective in women (VAS -16.8 mm, P = 0.008) and those with milder radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) (VAS -16.1 mm, P = 0.009). Rates of adverse events were similar in both groups, excepting local rash that was more common amongst participants receiving 4Jointz (21% vs 1.6%, IRR 13.2, P = 0.013), but only 26% (n = 4) of participants with rashes discontinued treatment. There were no changes in systemic blood results. Topical treatment using 4Jointz reduced pain but had no effect on inflammation or cartilage breakdown over 12 weeks of treatment. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials registry ACTRN12610000877088. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and cost effectiveness-related aspects of retransfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Bartłomiej; Dutka, Julian; Dutka, Lukasz; Maleta, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand for blood products forces the rationalisation of management and conservation of blood. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility of retransfusion of blood conservation and the cost-effectiveness of this procedure when employed in Total Hip Replacement and Total Knee Arthroplasty. This prospective cohort study involved two groups of patients. Group I comprised 50 patients who underwent blood retransfusion and in several cases had supplementary allogeneic transfusion. Group II, a control group, consisted of 50 patients who did not receive retransfusion. The retransfusion in Group I enabled the recovery of a mean amount of 364.5 ml (± 52.7) of blood in THR patients and 403.8 ml (± 110.7) in TKA patients. Demand for allogeneic blood transfusions in Group I versus Group II was 46% lower in THR patients and 42% lower in TKA patients. The blood recovered for retransfusion is biologically valuable with regard to cellular elements and plasma chemistries. In the costs evaluation, the total savings in Group I were 5,000 PLN. Retransfusion of recuperated blood from postoperative drainage tubing is a simple and safe method that provides clinical and cost-effectiveness advantages.

  16. Influence of weight loss on the clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis of the knee-joints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Vladimirovna Solov'eva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity consistently associated with the development of a number of chronic diseases, leading to a decrease in quality of life, disability and death. The article examines the connection between obesity and disease of the musculoskeletal system, describes the mechanisms by means of which obesity leads to the development of osteoarthritis. It is evident that reduction of body mass can slow the progression of osteoporosis. The own experience of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of obesity with the use of orlistat in 50 obese patients with osteoarthritis of the knee II–III stage is presented. Treatment has resulted in a decrease in body weight, waist circumference, accompanied by a decrease in symptoms osteoarthritis among all the patients. Our results showed that the addition of orlistat to standard osteoarthritis scheme leads to significant reduction in weight and reduction of clinical manifestations of osteoarthritis. According to the above, the drugs that have impact on weight loss, should be included in the treatment regimen of patients with osteoarthritis and obesity.

  17. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef; Hernandez Filho, Guinel; Dirim, Berna; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald; Haghigi, Parvitz

    2012-01-01

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  18. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hernandez Filho, Guinel [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dirim, Berna [Izmir Atatuerk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karsiyaka, izmir (Turkey); Wangwinyuvirat, Mani [Rajavithi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); Haghigi, Parvitz [University of California, San Diego, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  19. Degenerative joint disease on MRI and physical activity: a clinical study of the knee joint in 320 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.F.; Rauber, K.; Damian, M.S.; Rau, W.S.; Basad, E.

    1999-01-01

    We examined 320 patients with MRI and arthroscopy after an acute trauma to evaluate MRI in diagnosis of degenerative joint disease of the knee in relation to sports activity and clinical data. Lesions of cartilage and menisci on MRI were registered by two radiologists in consensus without knowledge of arthroscopy. Arthroscopy demonstrated grade-1 to grade-4 lesions of cartilage on 729 of 1920 joint surfaces of 320 knees, and MRI diagnosed 14 % of grade-1, 32 % of grade-2, 94 % of grade-3, and 100 % of grade-4 lesions. Arthroscopy explored 1280 meniscal areas and showed degenerations in 10 %, tears in 11.4 %, and complex lesions in 9.2 %. Magnetic resonance imaging was in agreement with arthroscopy in 81 % showing more degenerations but less tears of menisci than arthroscopy. Using a global system for grading the total damage of the knee joint into none, mild, moderate, or severe changes, agreement between arthroscopy and MRI was found in 82 %. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy showed coherently that degree of degenerative joint changes was significantly correlated to patient age or previous knee trauma. Patients over 40 years had moderate to severe changes on MRI in 45 % and patients under 30 years in only 22 %. Knee joints with a history of trauma without complete structural or functional reconstitution showed marked changes on MRI in 57 %, whereas stable joints without such alterations had degenerative changes in only 26 %. There was no correlation of degenerative disease to gender, weight, type, frequency, and intensity of sports activity. Therefore, MRI is an effective non-invasive imaging method for exact localization and quantification of chronic joint changes of cartilage and menisci that recommends MRI for monitoring in sports medicine. (orig.) (orig.)

  20. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  1. Posterolateral Corner Reconstruction using the Anatomical Two-Tailed Graft Technique: Clinical Outcomes in the Multiligament Injured Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Sanders, Thomas L; Johnson, Nick R; Wu, Isabella T; Krych, Aaron J; Stuart, Michael J; Levy, Bruce A

    2018-02-14

    Injury to the posterolateral corner (PLC) of the knee can lead to both varus and rotational instability. Multiple PLC reconstruction techniques have been described, including one-tailed graft (fibula-based constructs) or two-tailed graft (combined fibula- and tibia-based constructs). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of anatomical two-tailed graft reconstruction of the PLC in the setting of multiligament knee injuries (MKLIs) with grade III varus instability. Patients were identified through a prospective MLKI database between 2004 and 2013. Patients who received fibular collateral ligament and PLC reconstructions using a two-tailed graft and had a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Patients were assessed for clinical laxity grade, range of motion, and functional outcomes using Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Twenty patients (16 male, 4 female) with a mean age of 30.7 (range: 16-52) and a mean follow-up of 52.2 months (range: 24-93 months) were included. Knee dislocation (KD) grades included: 4 KD-1, 10 KD 3-L, 5 KD-4, and 1 KD-5. No patients had isolated PLC injuries. Mean IKDC and Lysholm score were 73.1 ± 25.8 and 78 ± 26, respectively. Mean range of motion was -1.1 to 122.8. In full extension, two patients (10%) had grade 1 laxity to varus stress. In 30 degrees of knee flexion, five (25%) patients had grade 1 laxity, and two (10%) had grade 2 laxity. Anatomical two-tailed PLC reconstruction can reliably restore varus stability when performed on patients with MLKIs and type C posterolateral instability with hyperextension external rotation recurvatum deformity. Satisfactory functional outcome scores were achieved in the majority of patients. This study supports the use of an anatomical two-tailed PLC reconstruction in the multiligament injured knee. The level of evidence is IV, case series. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Clinical and radiological outcomes after management of traumatic knee dislocation by open single stage complete reconstruction/repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorez Lukas G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to analyze the clinical and radiological long-term outcomes of surgically treated traumatic knee dislocations and determine prognostic factors for outcome. Methods Retrospective consecutive series of patients treated surgically for traumatic knee dislocation with reconstruction/refixation of the anterior (ACL and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL and primary complete repair of collaterals and posteromedial and posteromedial corner structures. 68 patients were evaluated clinically (IKDC score, SF36 health survey, Lysholm score, Knee Society score, Tegner score, visual analogue scale - VAS pain and satisfaction, Cooper test and radiologically (weight bearing and stress radiographs with a mean follow up of 12 ± 8 years. Instrumented anterior-posterior translation was measured (Rolimeter, KT-1000. Pearson correlation and stepwise regression analysis was used. Results 82% of patients (n = 56 returned to their previous work. At final follow-up 6 patients (9% suffered from pain VAS > 3. The mean side-to-side difference of anterior/posterior translation (KT-1000, 134N was 1.6 ± 1.6 mm and 2.6 ± 1.4 mm. Valgus and varus stress testing in 30° flexion was 40 days were significantly associated with worse outcome (p Conclusions Early complete reconstruction can achieve good functional results and patient satisfaction with overall restoration of sports and working capacity. Negative predictive factors for outcome were injury pattern, type of surgical procedure and timing of surgery.

  3. Outpatient rehabilitation care process factors and clinical outcomes among patients discharged home following unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Gerard P; Fritz, Julie M; Houck, L T C Kevin M; Hunter, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    Research examining care process variables and their relationship to clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty has focused primarily on inpatient variables. Care process factors related to outpatient rehabilitation have not been adequately examined. We conducted a retrospective review of 321 patients evaluating outpatient care process variables including use of continuous passive motion, home health physical therapy, number of days from inpatient discharge to beginning outpatient physical therapy, and aspects of outpatient physical therapy (number of visits, length of stay) as possible predictors of pain and disability outcomes of outpatient physical therapy. Only the number of days between inpatient discharge and outpatient physical therapy predicted better outcomes, suggesting that this may be a target for improving outcomes after total knee arthroplasty for patients discharged directly home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical high-resolution mapping of the proteoglycan-bound water fraction in articular cartilage of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Reiter, David A; Sexton, Kyle W; Bergeron, Christopher M; Zukley, Linda M; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    We applied our recently introduced Bayesian analytic method to achieve clinically-feasible in-vivo mapping of the proteoglycan water fraction (PgWF) of human knee cartilage with improved spatial resolution and stability as compared to existing methods. Multicomponent driven equilibrium single-pulse observation of T 1 and T 2 (mcDESPOT) datasets were acquired from the knees of two healthy young subjects and one older subject with previous knee injury. Each dataset was processed using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis incorporating a two-component tissue model. We assessed the performance and reproducibility of BMC and of the conventional analysis of stochastic region contraction (SRC) in the estimation of PgWF. Stability of the BMC analysis of PgWF was tested by comparing independent high-resolution (HR) datasets from each of the two young subjects. Unlike SRC, the BMC-derived maps from the two HR datasets were essentially identical. Furthermore, SRC maps showed substantial random variation in estimated PgWF, and mean values that differed from those obtained using BMC. In addition, PgWF maps derived from conventional low-resolution (LR) datasets exhibited partial volume and magnetic susceptibility effects. These artifacts were absent in HR PgWF images. Finally, our analysis showed regional variation in PgWF estimates, and substantially higher values in the younger subjects as compared to the older subject. BMC-mcDESPOT permits HR in-vivo mapping of PgWF in human knee cartilage in a clinically-feasible acquisition time. HR mapping reduces the impact of partial volume and magnetic susceptibility artifacts compared to LR mapping. Finally, BMC-mcDESPOT demonstrated excellent reproducibility in the determination of PgWF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Clinical outcomes after cell-seeded autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee: when can success or failure be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Jan M; Bode, Gerrit; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Mathias; Schmal, Hagen; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been associated with satisfying results. Still, it remains unclear when success or failure after ACI can be estimated. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cell-seeded collagen matrix-supported ACI (ACI-Cs) for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee at 36 months and to determine a time point after ACI-Cs at which success or failure can be estimated. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 80 patients with isolated full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee joint treated with ACI-Cs were prospectively assessed before surgery as well as postoperatively by use of the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Lysholm knee score. Preoperative IKDC and Lysholm scores increased from 49.6 and 59.5, respectively, to 79.1 and 83.5, respectively, at 36 months. Only half the patients (46.6%) with poor IKDC scores (ie, <70) at 6 months postoperatively showed continued poor or fair scores at 36 months' follow-up. The probability of poor scores at 36 months after surgery further increased to 0.61 and 0.81, respectively, when scores were persistent at 12 and 24 months. All 3 patients (100%) with good IKDC scores (ie, 81-90) at 6 months after surgery showed constant or even improved scores at 36 months' follow-up. Ninety-one percent of patients with good and excellent scores at 12 months and 83% of patients with good and excellent scores at 24 months (a total of 23 and 37 patients, respectively) were able to maintain these scores at 36 months' follow-up. Similar results were obtained for the Lysholm score. With regard to the improvements in functional outcomes after ACI-Cs at 36 months after surgery, the technique described here appears to lead to satisfying and stable clinical results. This study helps the treating physician to predict the likeliness of further clinical improvements or constant unsatisfactory results after ACI. In patients with good/excellent scores shortly after surgery

  6. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. Singer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief.

  7. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo [Oita Medical Univ., Hazama (Japan); Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  8. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo; Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T 1 weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  9. Temporal summation of pain as a prospective predictor of clinical pain severity in adults aged 45 years and above with knee osteoarthritis: ethnic differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Burel R.; Bulls, Hailey W.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Schmidt, Jessica; King, Christopher D.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Redden, David T.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Enhanced pain facilitation is reportedly an important contributor to the clinical pain experiences of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Ethnic differences in the prevalence and severity of knee OA in addition to associated pain are also well documented. Temporal summation (TS) of pain is a widely applicable quantitative sensory testing method that invokes neural mechanisms related to pain facilitatory processes. This study tested whether TS of pain, an index of pain facilitation, differentially predicts the clinical pain experiences of African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with symptomatic knee OA. Methods A total of 225 study participants underwent assessment of TS of mechanical and heat pain stimuli applied to their most symptomatic knee and their ipsilateral hand (mechanical) or forearm (heat). Using telephone-based surveys, participants subsequently reported their average and worst clinical pain severity across four consecutive weeks following assessment of TS. Results In predicting future clinical pain, ethnicity interacted with TS of mechanical pain (but not heat pain), such that TS of mechanical pain at the knee significantly predicted greater clinical ratings of average (b = .02, p = .016) and worst (b = .02, p = .044) clinical pain for non-Hispanic Whites but not African Americans (p’s > .30). Conclusions These results reveal the importance of considering ethnicity when examining pain facilitation and the clinical pain of individuals with symptomatic knee OA. The results of this study are discussed in terms of ethnic differences in the predictors of clinical pain experiences among African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with knee OA. PMID:24804882

  10. Weight satisfaction, management strategies and health beliefs in knee osteoarthritis patients attending an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekram, A R M S; Cicuttini, F M; Teichtahl, A J; Crammond, B R; Lombard, C B; Liew, S M; Urquhart, D M; Wluka, A E

    2016-04-01

    Although weight control is important in managing knee osteoarthritis (OA), it is difficult to achieve. Understanding beliefs regarding weight management in people with knee OA may improve weight control. To examine differences in bodyweight satisfaction, weight management strategies and weight-related health-beliefs in obese, overweight and normal weight people with knee OA. The beliefs and attitudes to weight in 102 people with symptomatic knee OA were ascertained. Participants were classified as being obese, overweight or of normal weight. Although obese and overweight participants were less satisfied with their bodyweight, they were more likely to want to lose weight and to report dieting compared with normal weight participants(P weight gain in the past 6 months (P weight participants (P = 0.04). When asked about their own weight gain, obese participants more frequently believed genetic and metabolic factors to be important than normal and overweight participants (P = 0.01). While 51 (53%) believed that increasing activity was more important than dietary change to avoid weight gain, this was more commonly believed by obese and overweight participants (P weight, obese people with symptomatic knee OA more commonly reported weight gain. Overweight and obese participants attributed weight gain to non-modifiable factors but believed physical activity is more important than dietary change in weight management. Thus, education regarding the importance of diet as compared with non-modifiable factors and physical activity may improve weight management in obese people with knee OA. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. The effect of tourniquet use on fixation quality in cemented total knee arthroplasty a prospective randomized clinical controlled RSA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molt, Mats; Harsten, Andreas; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören

    2014-03-01

    A concern that arises with any change in technique is whether it affects the long-term implant stability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early migration, measured by radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and the functional outcome of the Triathlon™ cemented knee prosthesis, operated on with or without a tourniquet. During the last decades RSA has emerged as a way to assess prosthetic fixation and long time prognosis. The method has been used extensively in both hip and knee arthroplasty. This was a single centre prospective study including 60 patients randomized into two groups operated on either with or without tourniquet. RSA investigation was done within 2-3 days postoperatively after full weight bearing, and then at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years postoperatively. There were no differences between the groups regarding the translation along or rotation around the three coordinal axes, or in maximum total point motion (MTPM). At 2 years the mean MTPM (SD) was 0.71 mm (0.64) for the tourniquet-group and 0.53 mm (0.21) for the non-tourniquet-group. The tibial tray of the Triathlon™ cemented knee prosthesis showed similar early stability whether operated on with or without tourniquet. Level I. Article focus: A safety study for total knee replacement operated on with or without perioperative tourniquet regarding the prosthetic fixation. Strengths and limitations: Strength of this study is that it is a randomized prospective trial using an objective measuring tool. The sample size of 25-30 patients is reportedly sufficient for the screening of implants using RSA (1-3). Clinical trials NCT01604382, Ethics Committee approval D-nr: 144/20085. © 2013.

  12. Knee effusion after total knee replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, H. U.

    1993-01-01

    The various causes of effusions in artificial knees can be divided into four groups: implant related, technique related, interface problems, and infection. Diagnosis can be made from the patient's history and a clinical examination. Treatment is usually surgical revision.

  13. The Warwick patellofemoral arthroplasty trial: a randomised clinical trial of total knee arthroplasty versus patellofemoral arthroplasty in patients with severe arthritis of the patellofemoral joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odumenya Michelle

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe arthritis of the knee is a disabling condition, with over 50,000 knee replacements performed each year in the UK. Isolated patellofemoral joint arthritis occurs in over 10% of these patients with the treatment options being patellofemoral arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. Whilst many surgeons believe total knee arthroplasty is the 'gold standard' treatment for severe knee arthritis, patellofemoral arthroplasty has certain potential advantages. Primarily, because this operation allows the patient to keep the majority of their own knee joint; preserving bone-stock and the patients' own ligaments. Patellofemoral arthroplasty has also been recognised as a less 'invasive' operation than primary total knee arthroplasty, facilitating a more rapid recovery. There are currently no published results of randomised clinical trials comparing the two arthroplasty techniques. The primary objective of the current study is to assess whether there is a difference in functional knee scores and quality of life outcome assessments at one year post-operation between patellofemoral arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The secondary objective is to assess the complication rates for both procedures. Methods/design Patients who are deemed suitable, by an Orthopaedic Consultant, for patellofemoral arthroplasty and medically fit for surgery are eligible to take part in this trial. The consenting patients will be randomised in a 1:1 allocation to a total knee or patellofemoral arthroplasty. The randomisation sequence will be computer generated and administered by a central independent randomisation service. Following consent, all participants will have their knee function, quality of life and physical activity level assessed through questionnaires. The assigned surgery will then be performed using the preferred technique and implant of the operating surgeon. The first post-operative assessments will take place at six weeks, followed by

  14. Clinical, nociceptive and psychological profiling to predict acute pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, I E; Kehlet, H; Petersen, M A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-operative identification of high-pain responders for acute pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) could lead to targeted analgesic trials and individualized analgesic strategies to improve recovery and potentially reduce the risk of persistent post-surgical pain. The aim...

  15. Menopause is associated with articular cartilage degeneration: a clinical study of knee joint in 860 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chao; Xiang, Guangheng; Weng, Qiaoyou; Chen, Zhaojie; Chen, Deheng; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Di; Zhou, Bin; He, Dengwei; Chen, Hongliang

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between menopause and severity of knee joint cartilage degeneration using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system, with six cartilage surfaces, the medial and lateral femoral condyle, the femoral trochlea, the medial and lateral tibia plateau, and the patella. The study cohort comprised 860 healthy women (age 36-83 y), and 5,160 cartilage surfaces were analyzed. Age, weight, height, age at natural menopause, and years since menopause (YSM) were obtained. Cartilage degeneration was assessed using a magnetic resonance imaging-based six-level grading system. After removing the age, height, and weight effects, postmenopausal women had more severe cartilage degeneration than pre- and perimenopausal women (P  0.05). No significant difference was observed in lateral tibia plateau and lateral femoral condyle in postmenopausal women. Menopause is associated with cartilage degeneration of knee joint. After menopause, cartilage showed progressive severe degeneration that occurred in the first 25 YSM, suggesting estrogen deficiency might be a risk factor of cartilage degeneration of the knee joint. Further studies are needed to investigate whether age or menopause plays a more important role in the progression of cartilage degeneration in the knee joint.

  16. No clinical benefit of titanium nitride coating in cementless mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Brohet, R.M.; van Royen, B.J.; Nolte, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Titanium nitride (TiN) coating of cobalt–chromium–molybdenum (CoCrMo) implants has shown to improve the biomechanical properties of the implant surface and to reduce adhesive wear in vitro. It is yet unknown whether TiN coating of total knee prosthesis (TKP) affects the postoperative

  17. Clinical and MRI outcome of an osteochondral scaffold plug for the treatment of cartilage lesions in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhollander, Aad; Verdonk, Peter; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Verdonk, Rene; Victor, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Conflicting clinical outcomes have been reported recently with the use of an osteochondral scaffold plugs for cartilage repair in the knee. In this study, twenty patients were consecutively treated for their cartilage lesions with the synthetic plug technique. These patients were prospectively clinically evaluated with a mean follow-up of 34.15 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for morphologic analysis of the cartilage repair. The patients included in this study showed a significant gradual clinical improvement after the osteochondral scaffold plug. However, this clinical improvement was not confirmed by the MRI findings of this cohort study. Subchondral bone changes were seen in all patients on MRI and deficient filling of the defect was noticed in in 30.7% of the cases at 24 months of follow-up. There was no evidence found to support osteoconductive bone ingrowth. Therefore, the use of this type of osteochondral scaffold plug in osteochondral repair is questionable. Level of evidence: IV.

  18. Evaluation of outcome measures for use in clinical practice for adults with musculoskeletal conditions of the knee: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Tracey E; Dawson, Lesley J; Syme, Grant; Duncan, Louise; Reid, Judith

    2012-04-01

    This systematic review reported on the clinimetric properties of outcome measures for use in clinical practice for adults with musculoskeletal conditions of the knee. A systematic search was performed in Medline, EMBASE, Cinahl and AMED to identify studies examining the clinimetric properties of outcome measures for adults undergoing conservative treatment of ligament injuries, meniscal lesions, patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis of the knee. Outcomes measures taking less than 20 min to administer and requiring minimal equipment and space were included. Pairs of authors used a checklist to record the characteristics of the outcome measures, their reported clinimetric properties and the demographics of the study populations. The OMERACT filters of 'truth' and 'discrimination' were applied to the data for each outcome measure by an expert panel. Forty-seven studies were included evaluating 37 outcome measures. Ten outcome measures had adequate supporting evidence for 'truth' and 'discrimination': AAOS, AKPS, goniometer measurement, IKDC, KOOS, LEFS, Lysholm, Tegner, WOMAC and WOMET. However none of the outcome measures had been comprehensively tested across all clinimetric properties. Despite the widespread use of some outcome measures in clinical practice and primary research, data on the clinimetric properties were available for only 37 and of these only 10 had adequate supporting evidence for use in this population. However, before a core set of outcome measures can be recommended use in clinical practice, for adults with musculoskeletal conditions of the knee, consensus should be obtained on 'feasibility' in terms of burden on the clinician and the participant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... debridement; Meniscus repair; Lateral release; Knee surgery; Meniscus - arthroscopy; Collateral ligament - arthroscopy ... pain relief (anesthesia) may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Local anesthesia. Your knee may be numbed ...

  20. Clinical and ultrasonographic features associated to response to intraarticular corticosteroid injection. A one year follow up prospective cohort study in knee osteoarthritis patient with joint effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo, Carlos; García-Manrique, María; Navarro, Noemí; Caixàs, Assumpta; Larrosa, Marta; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Intraarticular injection is used for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but there is not a well defined profile of patient who could get more benefit from it. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of pain relief at one year after corticosteroids intraarticular injection and to identify clinical factors associated to response in patients with knee osteoarthritis with joint effusion. Methods One-year prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA with joint effusion confirmed by ultrasound. An intraarticular injection was performed following a clinical protocol. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, clinical severity, ultrasound parameters and radiological severity were collected. Response regarding pain and presence of synovial fluid on ultrasound at one month and at one year were evaluated. Clinical responder were consider in subjects with enough improvement to carry out normal daily activities with pain VASeffusion. PMID:29351562

  1. Clinical benefit and cost effectiveness of total knee arthroplasty in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krummenauer F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is an effective, but also cost-intensive health care procedure for the elderly. Furthermore, bearing demographic changes in Western Europe in mind, TKA-associated financial investment for health care insurers will increase notably and thereby catalyze discussions on ressource allocation to Orthopedic surgery. To derive a quantitative rationale for such discussions within Western Europe's health care systems, a prospective assessment of both the benefit of TKA from a patient's perspective as well as its cost effectiveness from a health care insurer's perspective was implemented. Methods A prospective cost effectiveness trial recruited a total of 65 patients (60% females, who underwent TKA in 2006; median age of patients was 66 years (interquartile range 61 - 74 years. Before and three months after surgery patients were interviewed by means of the EuroQol-5D and the WOMAC questionnaires to assess their individual benefit due to TKA and the subsequent inpatient rehabilitation. Both questionnaires' benefit estimates were transformed into the number of gained quality adjusted life years [QALYs]. Total direct cost estimates for the overall care were based on German DRG and rehabilitation cost rates [€]. The primary clinical endpoint of the investigation was the individual number of QALYs gained by TKA based on the WOMAC interview; the primary health economic endpoint was the marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER relating the costs to the associated gain in quality of life [€/QALY]. Results Total direct costs for the overall procedure were estimed 9549 € in median. The WOMAC based interview revealed an overall gain of 4.59 QALYs (interquartile range 2.39 - 6.21 QALYs, resulting in marginal costs of 1795 €/QALY (1488 - 3288 €/QALY. The corresponding EuroQol based estimates were 2.93 QALYs (1.75 - 5.59 QALYs and 3063 €/QALY (1613 - 5291 €/QALY. Logistic regression modelling identified the

  2. Arthroscopic Transplantation of Synovial Stem Cells Improves Clinical Outcomes in Knees With Cartilage Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Horie, Masafumi; Koga, Hideyuki

    2015-07-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is one possible strategy to achieve articular cartilage repair. We previously reported that synovial MSCs were highly proliferative and able to undergo chondrogenesis. We also found that placing a suspension of synovial MSCs on a cartilage defect for 10 minutes promoted cartilage repair in rabbit and pig models. However, the in vivo efficacy of this approach has not been tested clinically. We asked whether transplantation of synovial MSCs improves (1) MRI features, (2) histologic features, and (3) clinical evaluation scores in patients with cartilage defects in the knee? Patients with a symptomatic single cartilage lesion of the femoral condyle were indicated for inclusion in our study, and between April 2008 and April 2011, 10 patients were enrolled in this study. All patients completed followups of 3 years or more. The average followup period was 52 months (range, 37-80 months). Synovial MSCs were expanded with 10% autologous human serum for 14 days after digestion. For transplantation, the patient was positioned so that the cartilage defect was facing upward, and synovial MSC suspension was placed on the cartilage defect with a syringe under arthroscopic control. The defect with the applied suspension then was held in the upward position for 10 minutes. Five patients underwent concomitant ACL reconstructions, among whom two had meniscus suturing performed simultaneously. For MRI quantification, the cartilage defect was scored from 0 to 5. Second-look arthroscopy was performed for four patients and biopsy specimens were evaluated histologically. Clinical outcome was assessed using the Lysholm score and Tegner Activity Level Scale at final followup. Comparisons of MRI and Lysholm scores before and after treatment for each patient were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. MRI score (median ± 95% CI) was 1.0 ± 0.3 before and 5.0 ± 0.7 after, and increased after treatment in each patient (p = 0.005). Second

  3. A comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Fisher, J; Jennings, L M

    2018-02-01

    A more robust pre-clinical wear simulation framework is required in order to simulate wider and higher ranges of activities, observed in different patient populations such as younger more active patients. Such a framework will help to understand and address the reported higher failure rates for younger and more active patients (National_Joint_Registry, 2016). The current study has developed and validated a comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework for pre-clinical wear simulation of total knee replacements (TKR). The input mechanical (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) and wear parameters of the moderately cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearing material were independently measured from experimental studies under realistic test conditions, similar to the loading conditions found in the total knee replacements. The wear predictions from the computational wear simulation were validated against the direct experimental wear measurements for size 3 Sigma curved total knee replacements (DePuy, UK) in an independent experimental wear simulation study under three different daily activities; walking, deep squat, and stairs ascending kinematic conditions. The measured compressive mechanical properties of the moderately cross-linked UHMWPE material were more than 20% lower than that reported in the literature under tensile test conditions. The pin-on-plate wear coefficient of moderately cross-linked UHMWPE was significantly dependant of the contact stress and the degree of cross-shear at the articulating surfaces. The computational wear predictions for the TKR from the current framework were consistent and in a good agreement with the independent full TKR experimental wear simulation measurements, with 0.94 coefficient of determination of the framework. In addition, the comprehensive combined experimental and computational framework was able to explain the complex experimental wear trends from the three different daily

  4. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) for patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized open-label active-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Sadrneshin, Sara; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah; Ashraf, Alireza

    2018-02-01

    Green tea is known as a dietary supplement and a novel functional food worldwide. Since there are increasing preclinical evidence about efficacy of green tea for treating osteoarthritis, this study has aimed at assessing its efficacy and safety for patients with knee osteoarthritis. This is a randomized open-label active-controlled clinical trial. As many as fifty adults with osteoarthritis of knee were randomly allocated to receive the green tea extract (in dosage form of tablet) plus diclofenac tablet as "intervention group"; or: diclofenac tablet alone as "control group" for a period of four weeks. Patients were assessed at the beginning of intervention, and then 4 weeks later, in terms of pain score via visual analogue scale (VAS), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire's total score in addition to its 3 sub-scores. Furthermore, they were asked about any adverse effects during intervention period. Mean differences of VAS pain, total WOMAC, and WOMAC physical function scores in green tea group showed a significant reduction, compared with the control group (P = 0.038, P = 0.006, and P = 0.004, respectively). However, No significant differences between the two groups were observed, regarding mean differences of WOMAC pain and stiffness scores of the enrolled patients (P = 0.163, and P = 0.150, respectively). Additionally, only 1 patient reported gastric upset [in control group]. It seems that green tea extract might well be considered as an adjunctive treatment both for control of pain and for the betterment of knee joint physical function in adults with osteoarthritis. However, further studies of longer duration and larger sample size are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical investigation compared with the effects of the bee-venom Acupuncture on knee joint with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wu-Hao

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is designed to find out the effects of the Bee-Venom Acupuncture on knee joint with osteoarthritis. Methods: We are investigated that outpatients suffer from knee joint pain deciphered at the division of Acupuncture in Jaseng oriental medicine hospital from the 13, July 1999 to unti111, November 2000. We make an estimated of the score from both before or after its treatment about 70 cases of diagnostic patient with the osteoarthritis of knee joints by biochemical method and X-RAY analysis, we observed in the progress of symptoms. Results: These results found that sex distinction with a disease caused much more female than male at the ratio of I to 5.36 in the proportion of males to females, jobs is mainly ranked with a housewife and approximately 82.9% of cases before our hospital have ever treated at the other clinics or hospitals. On the hand, the distribution interval of a case history is mainly followed by disease in below 6 month, interval of the period-treatment is mainly gone within 3 month and frequency of treatment is examined into II to 15 times, more than 16 times and below 10 times, respectively. We are estimated with the score of functional barrier from both before or after its treatment against osteoarthritis' patients and produced in the usefulness from the totally point of fields except the aid-device after its treatment In summary, these results demonstrated that Bee Venom, Acupuncture enhanced more than 82.9% to the improvement of treatment and p<0.05 considered to be statistically significant. Conclusion: These results suggest that Bee-venom Acupuncture may be playa role in the significant usefulness and have need of actively application for the clinical trials against osteoarthritis' patients.

  6. Telephone Coaching to Enhance a Home-Based Physical Activity Program for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Campbell, Penny K; Egerton, Thorlene; Metcalf, Ben; Kasza, Jessica; Forbes, Andrew; Bills, Caroline; Gale, Janette; Harris, Anthony; Kolt, Gregory S; Bunker, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; Brand, Caroline A; Hinman, Rana S

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether simultaneous telephone coaching improves the clinical effectiveness of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 168 inactive adults ages ≥50 years with knee pain on a numeric rating scale ≥4 (NRS; range 0-10) and knee OA were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to a physiotherapy (PT) and coaching group (n = 84) or PT-only (n = 84) group. All participants received five 30-minute consultations with a physiotherapist over 6 months for education, home exercise, and physical activity advice. PT+coaching participants also received 6-12 telephone coaching sessions by clinicians trained in behavioral-change support for exercise and physical activity. Primary outcomes were pain (NRS) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC; score range 0-68]) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were these same measures at 12 and 18 months, as well as physical activity, exercise adherence, other pain and function measures, and quality of life. Analyses were intent-to-treat with multiple imputation for missing data. A total of 142 (85%), 136 (81%), and 128 (76%) participants completed 6-, 12-, and 18-month measurements, respectively. The change in NRS pain (mean difference 0.4 unit [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -0.4, 1.3]) and in WOMAC function (1.8 [95% CI -1.9, 5.5]) did not differ between groups at 6 months, with both groups showing clinically relevant improvements. Some secondary outcomes related to physical activity and exercise behavior favored PT+coaching at 6 months but generally not at 12 or 18 months. There were no between-group differences in most other outcomes. The addition of simultaneous telephone coaching did not augment the pain and function benefits of a physiotherapist-prescribed home-based physical activity program. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Telephone follow-up by nurse following total knee arthroplasty - protocol for a randomized clinical trial (NCT01771315)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szöts, Kirsten; Konradsen, Hanne; Solgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    to the orthopaedic outpatient clinic during the rehabilitation period. METHOD/DESIGN: The design is a randomized un-blinded parallel group clinical trial conducted at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gentofte Hospital, the Capital Region of Denmark. In total, 116 patients will be allocated by an external...... are structured by key subjects relevant to assess the health status according to the VIPS-model (the Swedish acronym for the concepts Well-being, Integrity, Prevention and Safety). The content of the consultations can vary according to the patients´ individual situations and needs. All consultations...... of life, general self-efficacy and the number of acute visits to the orthopaedic outpatient clinic. DISCUSSION: The result of this trial is expected to provide new knowledge to support the development of targeted and effective follow-up after total knee arthroplasty in order to improve the patients...

  8. Long-term clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of an 8-week multimodal knee osteoarthritis management program incorporating intra-articular sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan® injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1 Michael J Sloniewsky,2 Thomas E Gibbons,3 Janice G Johnston,4 Kent D Vosler,4 Saad Nasir5 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, 2RMG Holding, Inc., Florence, 3Doctors Care, PA, Columbia, SC, 4Arrowhead Health Centers, Glendale, AZ, 5Fidia Pharma USA Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Given the poor long-term effectiveness of focused nonsurgical knee osteoarthritis (OA treatments, alternative therapies are needed for patients who have unsuccessfully exhausted nonsurgical options.Methods: A telephone interview was conducted in patients who participated in a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program (mean follow-up: 3.7 years, range: 2.7–4.9 years. The program consisted of five intra-articular knee injections of sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan®, with each injection given 1 week apart, structured physical therapy, knee bracing, and patient education. Clinical outcomes included knee pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC subscores, current medication use, and history of total knee arthroplasty. Base-case, subgroup, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the treatment program with comparisons made to historical literature controls undergoing usual care. Results: A total of 218 patients (54% provided long-term follow-up data. Knee pain severity decreased 60% and WOMAC subscores decreased 33%–42% compared to baseline (all p<0.001. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 22.8% (81/356 of knees during follow-up. The treatment program was highly cost-effective compared to usual care with a base-case ICER of $6,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Results of subgroup analyses, one-way deterministic sensitivity analyses, and second-order probabilistic sensitivity analyses resulted in ICERs ranging from $3,996 to $10,493 per QALY. The percentage of simulations with an ICER below willingness

  9. Clinical research on abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Chang-rong; Fan, Li; Fu, Wen-bin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To probe the therapeutic effect of abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture on knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: PEMS3.1 software was used. The 105 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided into an abdominal acupuncture group, a conventional acupuncture group...... and a combined group (abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture). For the abdominal acupuncture group, the abdominal acupuncture was performed at Zhongwan (CV 12), Guanyuan (CV 4), Wailing (ST 26), Daheng (SP 15), Lower Rheumatism point and Qipang with needles retained for 30 minutes....... For the conventional acupuncture group, the acupuncture was practiced at Neixiyan (EX-LE4) and Dubi (ST 35) of the affected limb, Yanglingquan (GB 34), Liangqiu (ST 34), Xuehai (SP 10) and Xiyangguan (GB 33). For the combined group, both methods were applied. Treatment was given once a day, 6 times a week, for 4 weeks...

  10. The comparison of clinical features and quality of life after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Jung, Eun-Jung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to provide fundamental information for efficient management of patients after a total knee replacement (TKR) through the evaluation of changes of range of motion, pain, functional level, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] For a total of 63 knee osteoarthritis patients, VAS, KSKS, KSFS, HSS, WOMAC scores and quality of life were evaluated for functional levels at pre-operation, post-operation, six months after operation, and 12 months after operation. [Results] After the TKR operations, participants showed significant improvement in KSKS, KSFS, WOMAC, and SF-36 scores when compared to pre-operation. [Conclusion] After a TKR operation, ROM, and pain management, along with a therapeutic program for improvement of function, should be conducted 6 months after the operation.

  11. Clinical application of skeletal scintigraphy and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) to osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Muneshige

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal scintigraphy and QCT were performed to determine changes of subchondral bone tissues in osteoarthritis of the knee and findings were compared with plain X-ray findings, knee pain and femoro-tibial angle. Results on blood pool study were especially related to pain. Results in delayed study using single photon emission computed tomography revealed hign uptake on the medial side of the femur and tibia parallel to plain X-ray and pain. The QCT value was slightly decreased as osteoarthritic changes progressed without a significant change. In addition, delayed study in cases with previous surgical intervention by high tibial osteotomy revealed a lower uptake on the medial side of the femur and tibia. When skeletal scintigraphy accurately reflects blood flow through the subchondral bone tissues and is closely related to morbidity and pain, this modality is valuable in analysis of signs and symptoms as well as postoperative outcome. (author)

  12. Efficient imaging of the knee. A update for everyday clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeurer, J.

    2004-01-01

    This is a systematic, precise and clear introduction to the current state of knowledge on diseases of the knee. All available imaging techniques, their indications and diagnostic value are presented. While newcomers will get a systematic introduction, experienced diagnostic experts will find occasion to remember and enhance their knowledge. Each chapter ends with a systematic summary. Keywords at the top of each page enable fast access to the issue of interest. (orig.)

  13. Effect of Weight Losing on the Improving Clinical Statement of Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Alireza; Rad, Zahra Abbaspour; Sajedi, Behnam; Heydari, Amir Hossein; Akbarieh, Samira; Jafari, Behzad

    2017-11-01

    Osteoarthritis causes severe pain and disability in joints, one of the most prevalent involved joints is the knee joint. There are several therapeutics ways to control pain and disability, but almost none of them are definite treatment. In this article, we tried to reveal the effect of weight loss on improving symptoms of knee osteoarthritis as an effective and permanent therapeutic approach. We chose 62 patients with grade 1-2 (mild to moderate) knee osteoarthritis and divided them equally into case and control groups. Patients should not had used NSAIDs at least for 6 months before study initiation. Symptoms severity was measured by WOMAC and VAS questionnaires before and after 3 months follow up. Weight and BMI were recorded too. Case group was suggested to have weight loss diet of less fat and carbohydrates and control group did not have any limitation. Comparison of variables' average of case and control groups was not logistically meaningful at the initiation and after the end of the study. But there was a meaningful correlation between variables' changes and lifestyle change in both groups, especially in WOMAC and VAS scores. All variables in case group had statistically meaningful differences between their amounts at the beginning and after the end of the study, on the contrary of the control group. In the comparison of our study with similar studies in the world. We deduced that weight loss can improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis even in short time weight loss diet (3 months). ZUMS.REC.1394.94. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Patients' views on the use of an Option Grid for knee osteoarthritis in physiotherapy clinical encounters: An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Katharine; Firth, Jill; Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Brain, Katherine; Marrin, Katy; Nye, Alan; Wood, Fiona

    2017-12-01

    Patient decision support tools have been developed as a means of providing accurate and accessible information in order for patients to make informed decisions about their care. Option Grids ™ are a type of decision support tool specifically designed to be used during clinical encounters. To explore patients' views of the Option Grid encounter tool used in clinical consultations with physiotherapists, in comparison with usual care, within a patient population who are likely to be disadvantaged by age and low health literacy. Semi-structured interviews with 72 patients (36 who had been given an Option Grid in their consultation and 36 who had not). Thematic analysis explored patients' understanding of treatment options, perceptions of involvement, and readability and utility of the Option Grid. Interviews suggested that the Option Grid facilitated more detailed discussion about the risks and benefits of a wider range of treatment options for osteoarthritis of the knee. Participants indicated that the Option Grid was clear and aided their understanding of a structured progression of the options as their condition advanced, although it was not clear whether the Option Grid facilitated greater engagement in shared decision making. The Option Grid for osteoarthritis of the knee was well received by patient participants who reported that it helped them to understand their options, and made the notion of choice explicit. Use of Option Grids should be considered within routine consultations. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Indications for and clinical procedures resulting from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in older patients: Are we choosing wisely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marc-Etienne; Vézina, François; Carrier, Nathalie; Masetto, Ariel

    2018-03-01

    To analyze the indications for and clinical procedures resulting from knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older patients. We retrospectively analyzed 215 medical records of patients 50 years of age and older who had undergone a unilateral knee MRI in 2009. Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Patients 50 years of age and older who underwent a knee MRI in 2009. The main outcome measure was an invasive procedure in the same knee that underwent an MRI. Medical charts were reviewed up to 2014 for patient characteristics, MRI indication, ordering physician specialty, radiography before MRI, MRI findings, and clinical procedures resulting from the MRI. The patients' mean (SD) age was 60.6 (7.5) years. The main MRI indications were meniscopathy (148 [68.8%]) and chronic pain (92 [42.8%]). The main MRI findings were osteoarthritis (OA) (185 [86.0%]) and meniscal lesions (170 [79.1%]). Only 82 (38.1%) patients had a plain radiograph in the 24 months preceding the MRI, usually without a standing anteroposterior view. Findings on pre-MRI radiography (n = 201) demonstrated OA in 144 (71.6%) patients. Overall, 87 (40.5%) patients were seen by an orthopedic surgeon and 27 (31.0%) of these patients underwent an invasive intervention. Among the 81 patients with moderate to severe OA on MRI, 36 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of moderate to severe OA and only 3 (3.7%) underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Our study reproduces the known association between OA and degenerative meniscal changes in older patients. We have found a surprising underuse of the standing anteroposterior view on radiography. Most patients in our cohort could have been appropriately diagnosed and treated based on such radiographic information, as demonstrated by pre-MRI findings, thus avoiding the MRI and subsequent evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. Meniscectomy was rarely performed, particularly in patients with advanced OA. Educational and pragmatic measures must be emphasized

  16. Condyle-Specific Matching Does Not Improve Midterm Clinical Outcomes of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dean; Jones, Kristofer J; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pais, Mollyann D; Rodeo, Scott A; Williams, Riley J

    2017-10-04

    Condyle-specific matching for osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) pairs donor and recipient condyles in an attempt to minimize articular incongruity. While the majority of cartilage defects are located on the medial femoral condyle, lateral femoral condyles are more commonly available as a graft source. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of patients treated with non-orthotopic (lateral-to-medial condyle or medial-to-lateral condyle) OCA with those treated with traditional orthotopic (medial-to-medial condyle or lateral-to-lateral condyle) OCA. We hypothesized that clinical outcomes would be similar between groups at midterm follow-up. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data on patients treated with OCA from 2000 to 2014 was conducted. Seventy-seven patients with a full-thickness cartilage defect of a femoral condyle were treated with either orthotopic (n = 50) or non-orthotopic (n = 27) OCA. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was required for analysis. Patients in each group were matched according to sex, age, and total chondral defect size. Reoperations and patient responses to validated outcome measures were reviewed. Failure was defined as any revision cartilage procedure or conversion to knee arthroplasty. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.0 years (range, 2 to 16 years). The orthotopic and non-orthotopic OCA groups were comparable in terms of demographics, the mean number of prior ipsilateral knee operations, and the percentage of concomitant procedures at baseline. Reoperation (p = 0.427) and failure (p = 0.917) rates did not differ significantly between groups. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in the Short Form-36 (SF-36) physical functioning and pain, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Knee Outcome Survey-Activities of Daily Living (KOS-ADL) scores compared with baseline (p OCA and those treated with non-orthotopic OCA, suggesting that condyle-specific matching may not be

  17. THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF CARMOLIS GEL IN THE COMBINATION THERAPY OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Denisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. Knee OA is particularly frequently encountered among all forms of OA, the prevalence of knee OA being about 25% in the general population. Despite multiple guidelines for the management of knee OA, which have been prepared by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR, and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI, many problems of its treatment policy remain to be solved. The same holds true for not only the symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of chondroprotectors, but also topical therapy options.Objective: to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Carmolis gel in patients with knee OA.Subjects and methods.The trial included 280 patients with knee OA (a study group consisted of 190 patents; a control group comprised 90 patients. The mean age was 58.3±9.3 years in the study group and 59±10.5 years in the control group. The disease duration was 10.3±5.5 and 10.1±4.1 years, respectively. Carmolis gel was applied to the region of the most painful knee joint up to 4–5 times daily, followed by massage of this skin area. The treatment cycle lasted for 2 weeks. No therapy was performed in the control patients. The clinical efficacy was determined by the changes in joint pains at rest or on movement and palpation, according to a visual analogue scale (VAS, WOMAC questionnaire, the synovitis intensity (assessed by ultrasonography, patient and physician global assessments of disease activity (Likert scale, and the possibility of reducing the daily dosage of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The onset the therapeutic effect of the gel and the duration of its action were recorded.Results and discussion. The topical application of Carmolis gel caused a statistically significant reduction in joint pain at rest and on movement from 57.7±6.8 to 12±1.8 mm (р < 0.01 and from 52±5.3 to 17±2.7 mm

  18. Intra-articular morphine versus bupivacaine for knee motion among patients with osteoarthritis: randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bellini Gazi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Osteoarthritis causes pain and disability in a high percentage of elderly people. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of intra-articular morphine and bupivacaine on the joint flexion and extension angles of patients with knee osteoarthritis. DESIGN AND SETTING: A randomized double-blind study was performed at a pain clinic of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with pain for more than three months, of intensity greater than three on a numerical scale (zero to 10, were included. G1 patients received 1 mg (1 ml of morphine diluted in 9 ml of saline, intra-articularly, and G2 patients received 25 mg (10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine without epinephrine. Pain was assessed on a numerical scale and knee flexion and extension angles were measured after administration of the drugs at rest and during movement. The total amount of analgesic supplementation using 500 mg doses of paracetamol was also determined. RESULTS: No significant difference in pain intensity was observed between G1 and G2. Significant decreases in pain at rest and during movement and significant increases in mean flexion and extension angles were observed in both groups, with no significant difference between the two groups. The mean total amount of paracetamol used over a seven-day period was 3578 mg in G1 and 5333 mg in G2 (P = 0.2355; Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION: The analgesic effects of 1 mg of morphine and 25 mg of 0.25% bupivacaine were similar among patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  19. Short-term Clinical Course of Knee Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Feasibility Study Using Electronic Methods of Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael S; Kamper, Steven J; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Broderick, Carolyn; McKay, Damien; Henschke, Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders, such as knee pain, are common in children and adolescents, but there is a lack of high quality research that evaluates the clinical course of these conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a prospective study of children and adolescents with knee pain using electronic methods of data collection. Children and adolescents with knee pain that presented to primary care physiotherapy clinics were enrolled and followed-up on a weekly basis via short messaging service (SMS) until their knee pain had recovered (i.e. two consecutive weeks of no pain). Feasibility was assessed in terms of recruitment, retention and response rates to SMS and an online questionnaire. Baseline and 6-month follow-up measures included pain, disability, physical function, physical activity and health related quality of life. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the median time to knee pain recovery. Thirty participants (mean age 13.0 ± 2.2 years, 53% boys) were recruited over 26 months. The overall response rate to weekly SMS follow-up was 71.3% (809 received/1135 sent). One third of participants stopped responding to SMS prior to recovery, and these participants typically had a much lower response rate during the time they remained in the study. At 6-month follow-up, 80% of the cohort completed the final online questionnaire, and 29% of participants still reported current knee pain (≥1/10 VAS). The median time for knee pain recovery was 8 weeks (95%CI: 5, 10). Electronic data collection alone seems insufficient to track pain recovery in young people and may need to be supplemented with more traditional data collection methods. Researchers should consider further measures to address slow recruitment rates and high attrition when designing large prospective studies of children and adolescents in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Attitudes and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Referred to Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Knee Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related causes of knee pain which can induce disability, disablement and reduced quality of life. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine attitudes and self-care behaviors of knee osteoarthritis patients referred to three Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 235 patients referred to Health Care Centers of Yazd who were selected randomly. In order to glean the study data, a researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized probing into demographic variables as well as patients' attitudes and self-care behaviors. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved, as well. The study data were analyzed applying SPSS software (ver. 18 via T-Test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient at 0.05 of the significant level. Results: The participants' mean age and Mean BMI were reported 54.90±9.15 and 28.8±4.61, respectively. Mean score of patients' attitude toward self-care was 47.4±3.95 out of 55 and the mean score of their self-care behaviors was 43.11±5.75 out of 60, which the both scores were at a moderate level. Furthermore, a positive significant correlation was detected between attitude and self-care behaviors (p=0.01. Within different self-care behaviors, participants' attitude towards the positive effect of using crutches while walking was at the lowest level. Meanwhile, according to the patients' attitude, using crutches was demonstrated to have the least performance within the self-care behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, the attitude level can cause an increase in the patients' self-care behaviors. Moreover, since the participants' attitude towards such behaviors as using crutches, using pool and weight loss were at a low level, interventional programs are recommended to emphasize the mentioned issues. Keywords: Attitude; Knee osteoarthritis; Performance; Self

  1. Clinical efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe () in treating osteoarthritis of knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qing-wen; Xu, Yuan; Jin, Di-er; Yan, Xiao-ping

    2009-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Gubitong Recipe (, GBT) in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee joint. Ninety patients with knee osteoarthritis were equally assigned, according to a randomizing digital table, to the treatment group and the control group. The treatment group was treated with GBT Decoction one dose every day and the control group with glucosamine sulfate 500 mg thrice a day, respectively, for eight successive weeks. Besides, diclofenac sodium could be given as supplementary dugs with the dosage used recorded if necessary. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, an index reflecting the degree of joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction) in patients was assessed before and after treatment, and the patients' symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) as well. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), blood C-reactive protein (CRP), blood and urinary routine tests, liver and kidney function examination, and the adverse reaction that occurred during the treatment period were observed. WOMAC index and integral VAS value were lowered in both groups after treatment, showing significant statistical difference as compared with before treatment (P<0.05), but the decrement of WOMAC index in the treatment group was more significant than that in the control group (P<0.05). ESR and CRP levels remained unchanged in all patients, and the proportion and mean dosage of diclofenac sodium used were similar in the two groups. No evident adverse reaction occurred during the treatment period. GBT is an effective and safe recipe for the treatment of osteoarthritis of knee joint, which could alleviate the joint pain, stiffness, and dysfunction.

  2. Preliminary clinical report of flexible videoarthroscopy in diagnostic knee and hip arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaicha, Samy; Dora, Claudio; Puskas, Gabor J; Koch, Peter P; Wirth, Stephan H; Meyer, Dominik C

    2012-01-01

    Compared to rigid arthroscopic optics, a flexible camera system offers theoretically significant advantages: It has the potential to adapt to the naturally curved surface of joints, to move within the joint without stress to the cartilage or capsule and thereby to reduce the number of portals needed. Former studies evaluated flexible fiberoptic systems which were insufficient regarding image resolution. This is the first report on a new flexible videoendoscope with the so called "chip-on-the-tip" technology used in human joints. With a plasma sterilized 3.9 diameter flexible video endoscopy system (Visera ENF V, OLYMPUS) commonly used in diagnostic rhino-laryngoscopy, we performed preliminary testing in cadaveric knee joints. After successful feasibility testing we utilized the tool in two qualitative diagnostic knee and five hip arthroscopies in combination with conventional rigid 30° and 70° arthroscopes (STORZ). Qualitative evaluation showed superior visualisation of the posterior aspects of the knee joint as insertion of the posterior medial and lateral meniscal horn, tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament and the posterolateral capsulo-ligamentous corner with acceptable image resolution and clarity compared to the rigid arthroscope. In the hip, it was possible to pass around the femoral neck, avoiding additional portals. There seemed to be virtually no risk for cartilage damage at all. Difficulties of the system were scope handling, navigation and orientation within the joint as well as potential damage to the tool itself. This is to our knowledge the first report on flexible videoarthroscopy. Some of the expectations were met, such as to reach virtually every corner the joint with minimal risk for the cartilage or other joint structures and with acceptable image quality. However, there are many significant disadvantages which question the routine use of such a videoendoscopic system with its present technical features. © 2012 – IOS Press and

  3. The knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, J.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of infection is difficult on the basis of radiographs. A clinical history suggestive of infection, such as excessive prolonged pain, drainage, fever, or a postoperative hematoma, is helpful in assessment. Radiographs may reveal periosteal new bone formation in long-standing cases of infection. Aspiration of the knee may or may not be helpful. Differential Tc-99m and gallium bone scans may be a useful adjunct in difficult cases. The gallium scan should show increased uptake relative to the Tc-99m scan to be considered positive. Bone scanning is not a useful criterion by itself for assessment of loosening

  4. The Clinical Utility and Diagnostic Performance of MRI for Identification of Early and Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current diagnostic strategies for detection of structural articular cartilage abnormalities, the earliest structural signs of osteoarthritis, often do not capture the condition until it is too far advanced for the most potential benefit of non-invasive interventions. Purpose Systematically review the literature relative to the following questions: (1) Is MRI a valid, sensitive, specific, accurate and reliable instrument to identify knee articular cartilage abnormalities compared to arthroscopy? (2) Is MRI a sensitive tool that can be utilized to identify early cartilage degeneration? Study Design Systematic Review Methods A systematic search was performed in November 2010 using PubMed MEDLINE (from 1966), CINAHL (from 1982), SPORTDiscus (from 1985), and SCOPUS (from 1996) databases. Results Fourteen level I and 13 level II studies were identified that met inclusion criteria and provided information related to diagnostic performance of MRI compared to arthroscopic evaluation. The diagnostic performance of MRI demonstrated a large range of sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies. The sensitivity for identifying articular cartilage abnormalities in the knee joint was reported between 26–96%. Specificity and accuracy was reported between 50–100% and 49–94%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying early osteoarthritis were reported between 0–86%, 48–95%, and 5–94%, respectively. As a result of inconsistencies between imaging techniques and methodological shortcomings of many of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed and it was difficult to fully synthesize the information to state firm conclusions about the diagnostic performance of MRI. Conclusions There is evidence in some MRI protocols that MRI is a relatively valid, sensitive, specific, accurate, and reliable clinical tool for identifying articular cartilage degeneration. Due to heterogeneity of MRI sequences it is not possible to make definitive

  5. EULAR recommendations for the management of knee osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutic Trials (ESCISIT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendleton, A.; Arden, N.; Dougados, M.; Doherty, M.; Bannwarth, B.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Cluzeau, F.; Cooper, C.; Dieppe, P. A.; Günther, K. P.; Hauselmann, H. J.; Herrero-Beaumont, G.; Kaklamanis, P. M.; Leeb, B.; Lequesne, M.; Lohmander, S.; Mazieres, B.; Mola, E. M.; Pavelka, K.; Serni, U.; Swoboda, B.; Verbruggen, A. A.; Weseloh, G.; Zimmermann-Gorska, I.

    2000-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease encountered throughout Europe. A task force for the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Trials met in 1998 to determine the methodological and logistical approach required for the development of evidence based guidelines for treatment of knee

  6. Treatment outcomes of a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)-guided pharmacological pain management strategy in symptomatic knee and hip osteoarthritis in daily clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.F.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Broeder, A. den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the results of a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)-guided pharmacological pain management strategy in symptomatic knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) in daily clinical practice. METHODS: In this observational cohort study, standardised conservative treatment was offered to patients

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy and Performance of All-Poly Tibial Freedom® Total Knee System for Treating Osteoarthritis Patients: Three-Year Follow Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avatar; Singh, Kanwar Kulwinder

    2017-09-01

    Advancement in technology in terms of design and building materials has made Total Knee Replacement (TKR) a highly effective, safe, and predictable orthopedic procedure. To review the clinical outcomes for efficacy and performance of Freedom Total Knee System for the management of Osteoarthritis (OA), at a minimum of three years follow up. For this retrospective, post-marketing study, clinical data of patients treated with Freedom Total Knee System was retrieved from the clinical records after approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee . All the patients above the age of 18 years who completed at least three years after TKR were observed for the study purpose. Patients treated for OA were included while the patients who received the implant for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and traumatic injury were excluded. Factors such as aseptic loosening, implant failure, and need for revision surgery were observed to evaluate implant performance. Cases were recruited for clinical assessment of primary efficacy endpoint in terms of post-surgery maximun range of motion. Secondary efficacy endpoint was to determine the clinical and social quality of life as per the American Knee Society Score (AKSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and stiffness scores. A total of 158 patients who had 191 TKR were observed for performance. The mean age of the patients was 67.67 years; mean BMI was 28.97±3.33, and the group comprised of 43% men and 57% women. Telephonic follow up at three years of 158 patients identified that none of them required revision surgery or had aseptic loosening suggesting excellent performance. Final clinical follow up at three years was available for only 35 patients (41 knee implants). The range of motion significantly improved from preoperative 104°±5.67° (range, 85°-119°) to 119.8°±11.05° (98°-123°) at follow-up (ppain, and improved functionality.

  8. A randomised clinical trial of the efficacy of drop squats or leg extension/leg curl exercises to treat clinically diagnosed jumper's knee in athletes: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, L; Taunton, J; Clement, D; Smith, C; Khan, K

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To compare the therapeutic effect of two different exercise protocols in athletes with jumper's knee. Methods—Randomised clinical trial comparing a 12 week programme of either drop squat exercises or leg extension/leg curl exercises. Measurement was performed at baseline and after six and 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain (visual analogue scale 1–10) and return to sport. Secondary outcome measures included quadriceps and hamstring moment of force using a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/second. Differences in pain response between the drop squat and leg extension/curl treatment groups were assessed by 2 (group) x 3 (time) analysis of variance. Two by two contingency tables were used to test differences in rates of return to sport. Analysis of variance (2 (injured versus non-injured leg) x 2 (group) x 3 (time)) was also used to determine differences for secondary outcome measures. Results—Over the 12 week intervention, pain diminished by 2.3 points (36%) in the leg extension/curl group and 3.2 points (57%) in the squat group. There was a significant main effect of both exercise protocols on pain (psquat group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks, but five of those subjects still had low level pain. Six of nine of the leg extension/curl group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks and four patients had low level pain. There was no significant difference between groups in numbers returning to sporting activity. There were no differences in the change in quadriceps or hamstring muscle moment of force between groups. Conclusions—Progressive drop squats and leg extension/curl exercises can reduce the pain of jumper's knee in a 12 week period and permit a high proportion of patients to return to sport. Not all patients, however, return to sport by that time. Key Words: knee; patellar tendon; tendinopathy; tendinosis; eccentric strengthening; strength training PMID:11157465

  9. Haemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRT. Clinical and radiological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Kunze, V.; Hamann, M.; Eickhoff, H.; Koch, W.; Oldenburg, J.; Reiser, M.

    1994-01-01

    17 patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint were studied with static and dynamic MRT before and after i.v. bolus injection of Gadolinium-DTPA (0,1 mmol/kg body weight). After contrast enhancement, synovial proliferations exhibited an increase of signal intensity (SI) of FFE and SE images of 47.7% and 37.4% respectively, whereas muscle and fatty tissue, tendons, bone marrow and joint effusion revealed only minor increase in SI. The gradient of signal intensity (ratio SI/time) of pannus was 39,6% min. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI studies delineate and quantify the synovial proliferations in hemophilic arthropathy. Dynamic studies in hemophilic arthropathy do not provide qualitative assessment of the inflammatory process. (orig.) [de

  10. Will a single periarticular lidocaine-corticosteroid injection improve the clinical efficacy of intraarticular hyaluronic acid treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Cemil; Altay, Mehmet Akif; Altay, Nuray; Kalender, Ali Murat; Öztürk, İbrahim Avşin

    2016-11-01

    A local injection of corticosteroid-lidocaine into the periarticular soft tissue structures is used commonly for rapid pain relief. It is hypothesized that knee pain associated with knee osteoarthritis would be relieved quickly and effectively in patients receiving intraarticular hyaluronic acid combined with a periarticular lidocaine-corticosteroid injection. To test this hypothesis, the clinical effect of the combined treatment with hyaluronic acid injection alone in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis as compared in this prospective single-blinded randomized trial. This study included 70 patients. Group 1 (n = 35) received intraarticular hyaluronic acid injections only, whereas group 2 (n = 35) received intraarticular hyaluronic acid injections combined with a single local injection of corticosteroid-lidocaine. Injections were administered to the most painful areas of the anterior or posterior medial condyle of the femur or tibia. The outcome was measured by independent assessors (blinded to treatment) using a linear VAS pain scale and WOMAC and HSS knee scores. Assessments were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 26, and 52 weeks. During the first 3 weeks, group 2 patients showed significantly better all scores than did group 1 patients (p hyaluronic acid alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis and can be considered a useful adjunctive treatment modality. This combined method may provide early return to patient's daily activity. Therapeutic study, Level I.

  11. Intra-articular hyaluronan is without clinical effect in knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of 337 patients followed for 1 year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anette; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Simonsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the long-term efficacy and safety of five intra-articular injections with hyaluronan in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: A multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind study of 337 patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for knee...... osteoarthritis (clinical and laboratory) and with a Lequesne algofunctional index score (LFI) of 10 or greater. Patients received a hyaluronan product (sodium hyaluronate; Hyalgan) (n=167) or saline (n=170) intra-articularly weekly for 5 weeks and were followed up to 1 year. Time to recurrence was the primary...... the ACR criteria for osteoarthritis of the knee with moderate to severe disease activity (LFI > or = 10), five intra-articular injections of hyaluronan did not improve pain, function, paracetamol consumption or other efficacy parameters 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the treatment....

  12. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the ... is out of alignment, activities like running or biking can wear down the cartilage of the kneecap ( ...

  13. Composition of The Knee Index, a novel three-dimensional biomechanical index for knee joint load, in subjects with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Andriacchi, Tom; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    Background Knee joint load is an important factor associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. To provide an overall understanding of knee joint loading, the Knee Index (KI) has been developed to include moments from all three planes (frontal, sagittal and transversal). However, before KI...... index of joint load for the knee, in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Methods The contribution of frontal, sagittal and transversal plane knee moments to KI was investigated in 24 subjects (13 women, age: 58 ± 7.6 years, BMI: 27.1 ± 3.0) with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee...... kinematics (i.e. the knee adduction moment), and secondarily the sagittal plane kinematics (i.e. the knee flexion moment). This holds promise for using KI in clinical trials since both frontal and sagittal knee joint moments have been suggested to be associated with the knee osteoarthritis disease...

  14. Clinical benefit of intra-articular saline as a comparator in clinical trials of knee osteoarthritis treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altman, Roy D; Devji, Tahira; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    August 14th, 2014. Two reviewers assessed the eligibility of potential reports and the risk of bias of included trials. We analyzed short (≤3 months) and long-term (6-12 months) pain reduction of the saline arm of included trials using standardized mean differences (SMDs; estimated assuming a null effect...... in the meta-analysis. Based on data with moderate inconsistency IA saline was found to significantly improve short-term knee pain in 32 studies involving 1705 patients (SMD = -0.68; 95% CI: -0.78 to -0.57; P ... with saline in 19 studies involving 1445 patients (SMD = -0.61; 95% CI: -0.76 to -0.45; P

  15. Biophysical stimulation improves clinical results of matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of chondral lesions of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collarile, Marco; Sambri, Andrea; Lullini, Giada; Cadossi, Matteo; Zorzi, Claudio

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on clinical outcome in patients who underwent arthroscopic matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) for chondral lesions of the knee. Thirty patients affected by grade III and IV International Cartilage Repair Society chondral lesions of the knee underwent MACI. After surgery, patients were randomly assigned to either experimental group (PEMFs 4 h per day for 60 days) or control group . Clinical outcome was evaluated through International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Visual Analog Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36) and EuroQoL before surgery and 1, 2, 6, and 60 months postoperative. Mean size of chondral lesion was 2.4 ± 0.6 cm 2 in the PEMFs group and 2.5 ± 0.5 cm 2 in the control one. No differences were found between groups at baseline. IKDC score increased in both groups till 6 months, but afterward improvement was observed only in the experimental group with a significant difference between groups at 60 months (p = 0.001). A significant difference between groups was recorded at 60 months for SF-36 (p = 0.006) and EuroQol (p = 0.020). A significant pain reduction was observed in the experimental group at 1-, 2- and 60-month follow-up. Biophysical stimulation with PEMFs improves clinical outcome after arthroscopic MACI for chondral lesions of the knee in the short- and long-term follow-up. Biophysical stimulation should be considered as an effective tool in order to ameliorate clinical results of regenerative medicine. The use of PEMFs represents an innovative therapeutic approach for the survival of cartilage-engineered constructs and consequently the success of orthopaedic surgery. II.

  16. Bone marrow abnormality associated with painful osteoarthritis of the knee. A cross-sectional study of magnetic resonance imaging findings with the radiographic stage and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Mitsuaki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Takazawa, Yuji; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kim, Song-Gon; Seto, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow abnormalities (BMAs) are frequently found in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Some reports have suggested BMA was correlated with the X-ray stage of OA and also with knee pain, but the reports depended on two-dimensional images without considering the spatial expansion of BMAs. To determine whether three-dimensional expansion of a BMA with MRI in patient with medial-type OA of the knee is correlated with the radiographic stage of OA and clinical findings using a semi-quantitative method. Cross-sectional study. This study enrolled 238 patients with medial-type OA. Radiography and MRI of the knee were taken in all participants. X-rays were graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) grade (1-4). T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI images were used to score the size of the BMA according to the whole-organ MRI score (WORMS). A new scoring system defined as the spatial BMA score (s-score), which specifically addressed the spatial expansion of BMAs, was examined to assess the size of the BMA. BMA frequency was examined in subdivisions of the articular surfaces of the knee according to the X-ray stages of the K/L grade and the correlation of the s-score to the clinical findings. BMA frequency in the medial femorotibial joint (MFTJ; 74%) was significantly higher than in the lateral femorotibial joint (LFTJ; 14%) and patellofemoral joint (PFJ; 14%; P<0.01). The s-score of the MFTJ was strongly correlated with the X-ray stage assessed by the K/L grade. The s-score of the MFTJ was also correlated with the clinical findings. The frequency and spatial expansion of BMAs in the MFTJ are strongly correlated with the X-ray stage of medial-type OA as well as the clinical findings. (author)

  17. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patellofemoral syndrome; Chondromalacia patella; Runner's knee; Patellar tendinitis; Jumper's knee ... kneecap (patella) sits over the front of your knee joint. As you bend or straighten your knee, ...

  18. Comparison of Clinical Results and Injury Risk of Posterior Tibial Cortex Between Attune and Press Fit Condylar Sigma Knee Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Jun; Park, Cheol Hee; Liang, Hu; Kang, Se Gu; Park, Jong Jun; Bae, Dae Kyung

    2018-02-01

    We compared clinical and radiographic results after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using Attune and Press Fit Condylar Sigma, and investigated whether use of the current prosthesis increased injury risk to the tibial cortex in Asian patients. We also assessed whether a preoperative posterior tibial slope angle (PSA) is associated with the injury when using the current prosthesis. The 300 TKAs with Attune (group A) were compared to the 300 TKAs with Press Fit Condylar Sigma (group B). Demographics were not different, except follow-up periods (24.8 vs 33.3 months, P Universities Index and range of motion were compared. A minimum distance between tibial component stem and posterior tibial cortex (mDSC) was compared. The correlation between preoperative PSA and mDSC was analyzed in group A. The postoperative Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index and range of motion of group A were better than those of group B (17.7 vs 18.8, P = .004; 131.4° vs 129.0°, P = .008). The mDSC was shorter in group A (6.3 vs 7.0 mm, P < .001), which made up a higher proportion of the high-risk group for posterior tibial cortical injury with an mDSC of <4 mm (20.0% vs 10.7%, P = .002). A negative correlation was found between the preoperative PSA and mDSC in group A (r = -0.205, P < .001). The TKA using the current prosthesis provided more satisfactory results than the TKA using the previous prosthesis. However, the injury risk to the posterior tibial cortex increased in the knees with a large PSA when using the current prosthesis for Asian patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mid-Treatment Sleep Duration Predicts Clinically Significant Knee Osteoarthritis Pain reduction at 6 months: Effects From a Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwen, Jessica K; Smith, Michael T; Finan, Patrick H

    2017-02-01

    To determine the relative influence of sleep continuity (sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, total sleep time [TST], and wake after sleep onset) on clinical pain outcomes within a trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for patients with comorbid knee osteoarthritis and insomnia. Secondary analyses were performed on data from 74 patients with comorbid insomnia and knee osteoarthritis who completed a randomized clinical trial of 8-session multicomponent CBT-I versus an active behavioral desensitization control condition (BD), including a 6-month follow-up assessment. Data used herein include daily diaries of sleep parameters, actigraphy data, and self-report questionnaires administered at specific time points. Patients who reported at least 30% improvement in self-reported pain from baseline to 6-month follow-up were considered responders (N = 31). Pain responders and nonresponders did not differ significantly at baseline across any sleep continuity measures. At mid-treatment, only TST predicted pain response via t tests and logistic regression, whereas other measures of sleep continuity were nonsignificant. Recursive partitioning analyses identified a minimum cut-point of 382 min of TST achieved at mid-treatment in order to best predict pain improvements 6-month posttreatment. Actigraphy results followed the same pattern as daily diary-based results. Clinically significant pain reductions in response to both CBT-I and BD were optimally predicted by achieving approximately 6.5 hr sleep duration by mid-treatment. Thus, tailoring interventions to increase TST early in treatment may be an effective strategy to promote long-term pain reductions. More comprehensive research on components of behavioral sleep medicine treatments that contribute to pain response is warranted. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms.

  1. Effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil on pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ahmad; Mahmodi, Mohammad Azim; Nobakht, Zohre

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil on pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. In this single-blinded, randomized clinical trial, 90 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who referred to the outpatient rheumatology clinics affiliated with Birjand University of Medical Sciences were selected through convenience sampling method. They were randomly assigned to three groups: intervention (aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil), placebo (massage with almond oil) and control (without massage). The patients were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the intervention, 1 week, and 4 weeks after the intervention in terms of pain via visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed in SPSS (version 16) using the repeated measure ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and chi-squared test. Pain severity of the patients in the intervention group was significantly different immediately and 1 week after the intervention compared with their initial status (p Aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil was found effective in relieving pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, further studies are needed to confirm findings of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical trial of {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in the treatment of rheumatoid knee synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Yoo, D. H.; Bae, S. C.; Lee, I. H.; Jung, S. S.; Jun, J. B.; Kim, T. H.; Kim, S. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The untreated, chronic synovial inflammation leads to pannus formation and eventual destruction of the articular cartilage. In cases where medical therapy was unsuccessful, surgical of radiation synovectomy over surgical synovectomy are (1) greater destruction of diseased synovium, (2) reduced Potential for blood clots and infection, (3) no requirement for anesthesia, and (4) less costly and less time consuming. Recently KAERI developed Dy-165 HMA, which was characterized by the absence of iron and a higher concentration of dysprosium. And then more recently KAERI also developed {sup 16H}o-CHICO, which was characterized by relatively longer half-life (26.8 hr), more biological due to organic nature of chitosan, more even spatial distribution due to colloidal solution, and more absorbable to synovium than Dy-165 HMA. These long-term follow-up results indicate that the {sup 166}Ho-CHICO is an effective and safe agent for radiation synovectomy for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as the other chronic arthritides. But further large scaled and controlled study are required. 16 refs. (Author)

  3. Return to work after total hip and knee arthroplasty: results from a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, C; Leichtenberg, C S; Tordoir, R L; Holtslag, M J; Verdegaal, S H M; Kroon, H M; Nelissen, R G H H; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure return to work and duration until return to work in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). This prospective study included patients under 65 years of age, undergoing THA or TKA, who provided information on their work status preoperatively (paid work yes/no and working hours) and 1 year thereafter (paid work yes/no, working hours and time until return to work). Seventy-one THA and 64 TKA patients had a paid job preoperatively. The employment rates 1 year postoperatively were 64/71 (90 %) after THA and 53/64 (83 %) after TKA. Of those who returned to work, 9/64 (14 %) of THA patients and 10/53 (19 %) of TKA patients worked less hours than preoperatively [mean decrease of 16 (SD 11.5) and 14 (SD 13.0) hours, respectively]. The mean time to return to work was 12.5 (SD 7.6) and 12.9 (SD 8.0) weeks in THA and TKA, respectively. The majority of working patients who underwent THA or TKA returned to work, after approximately 12 weeks. A considerable proportion of the patients returning to work worked less hours than preoperatively. More research into patients who do not return or decrease their working hours is needed.

  4. Patients Unicondylar Knee Replacement vs. Total Knee Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Hedra Eskander

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyse the clinical effectiveness of total knee replacement (TKR) compared to unicondylar knee replacement (UKR) on patients. In terms of survival rates, revision rates and postoperative complications. The keywords used were: knee arthroplasty. Nearly three thousand articles were found on 25 August 2016. Of those, only twenty-five were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. Compared with those who have TKR, ...

  5. A comparison of two manual physical therapy approaches and electrotherapy modalities for patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized three arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya Mutlu, Ebru; Ercin, Ersin; Razak Ozdıncler, Arzu; Ones, Nadir

    2018-08-01

    A broad spectrum of physical therapy exercise programs provides symptom relief and functional benefit for patients with knee OA. Manual physical therapy, including tailored exercise programs provide relatively higher level benefit that persists to one year. It is currently unknown if there are important differences in the effects of different manual physical therapy techniques for patients with knee OA and there are virtually no studies comparing manual physical therapy and electrotherapy modalities. The aim of the study was to compare long-term results between three treatment groups (mobilization with movements [MWMs], passive joint mobilization [PJM], and electrotherapy) to determine which treatment is most effective in patients with knee OA. A single-blind randomized clinical trial with parallel design was conducted in patients with knee OA. Seventy-two consecutive patients (mean age 56.11 ± 6.80 years) with bilateral knee OA were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: MWMs, PJM, and electrotherapy. All groups performed an exercise program and received 12 sessions. The primary outcome measures of the functional assessment were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) and Aggregated Locomotor Function (ALF) test scores. The secondary outcome measures were pain level, measured using a pressure algometer and a visual analogue scale (VAS), range of motion (ROM), measured using a digital goniometer, and muscle strength, evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. Patients were assessed before treatment, after treatment and after 1 year of follow-up. Patients receiving the manual physical therapy interventions consisting of either MWM or PJM demonstrated a greater decrease in VAS scores at rest, during functional activities, and during the night compared to those in the electrotherapy group from baseline to after the treatment (p < 0.05). This improvement continued at the 1-year follow-up (p < 0.05). The MWMs and PJM

  6. Prevalence of knee pain and knee OA in southern Sweden and the proportion that seeks medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Engström, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of frequent knee pain in radiographic, symptomatic and clinically defined knee OA in middle-aged and elderly patients and the proportion that seeks medical care. METHODS: In 2007 a random sample of 10 000 56- to 84-year-old residents...... of Malmö, Sweden, were questioned about knee pain. We classified subjects reporting knee pain with a duration of at least 4 weeks as having frequent knee pain. A random sample of 1300 individuals with frequent knee pain and 650 without were invited for assessment by the ACR clinical knee OA criteria...... and for bilateral weight-bearing knee radiography. We considered a Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2 as radiographic knee OA and that in combination with frequent knee pain as symptomatic knee OA. By linkage with the Skåne Healthcare Register, we determined the proportion of subjects that had consulted for knee OA or pain...

  7. Hospital Discharge Information After Elective Total hip or knee Joint Replacement Surgery: A clinical Audit of preferences among general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Briggs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe demand for elective joint replacement (EJR surgery for degenerative joint disease continues to rise in Australia, and relative to earlier practices, patients are discharged back to the care of their general practitioner (GP and other community-based providers after a shorter hospital stay and potentially greater post-operative acuity. In order to coordinate safe and effective post-operative care, GPs rely on accurate, timely and clinically-informative information from hospitals when their patients are discharged. The aim of this project was to undertake an audit with GPs regarding their preferences about the components of information provided in discharge summaries for patients undergoing EJR surgery for the hip or knee. GPs in a defined catchment area were invited to respond to an online audit instrument, developed by an interdisciplinary group of clinicians with knowledge of orthopaedic surgery practices. The 15-item instrument required respondents to rank the importance of components of discharge information developed by the clinician working group, using a three-point rating scale. Fifty-three GPs and nine GP registrars responded to the audit invitation (11.0% response rate. All discharge information options were ranked as ‘essential’ by a proportion of respondents, ranging from 14.8–88.5%. Essential information requested by the respondents included early post-operative actions required by the GP, medications prescribed, post-operative complications encountered and noting of any allergies. Non-essential information related to the prosthesis used. The provision of clinical guidelines was largely rated as ‘useful’ information (47.5–56.7%. GPs require a range of clinical information to safely and effectively care for their patients after discharge from hospital for EJR surgery. Implementation of changes to processes used to create discharge summaries will require engagement and collaboration between clinical staff

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with 4-strand hamstring autograft and accelerated rehabilitation: a 10-year prospective study on clinical results, knee osteoarthritis and its predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Rob P A; du Mée, Arthur W F; van Valkenburg, Juliette; Sala, Harm A G M; Tseng, Carroll M

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of long-term clinical and radiological outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with special attention to knee osteoarthritis and its predictors. A prospective, consecutive case series of 100 patients. Arthroscopic transtibial ACL reconstruction was performed using 4-strand hamstring tendon autografts with a standardized accelerated rehabilitation protocol. Analysis was performed preoperatively and 10 years postoperatively. Clinical examination included Lysholm and Tegner scores, IKDC, KT-1000 testing (MEDmetric Co., San Diego, CA, USA) and leg circumference measurements. Radiological evaluation included AP weight bearing, lateral knee, Rosenberg and sky view X-rays. Radiological classifications were according to Ahlbäck and Kellgren & Lawrence. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. RESULTS CLINICAL OUTCOME: A significant improvement (p test, IKDC score and one-leg hop test. A pivot shift phenomenon (glide) was still present in 43 (50%) patients and correlated with lower levels of activity (p test. Transtibial ACL reconstruction with 4-strand hamstring autograft and accelerated rehabilitation restored anteroposterior knee stability. Clinical parameters and patient satisfaction improved significantly. At 10-year follow-up, radiological signs of OA were present in 53.5 % of the subjects. Risk factors for OA were meniscectomy prior to or at the time of ACL reconstruction and chondral lesions at the time of ACL reconstruction. II.

  9. Is magnetic resonance imaging reliable in predicting clinical outcome after articular cartilage repair of the knee?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T.S.; Welsch, G.H.; Brittberg, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While MRI can provide a detailed morphological evaluation after articular cartilage repair, its additional value in determining clinical outcome has yet to be determined. Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between MRI and clinical outcome after cartilage repair and to identify

  10. Comparison of efficacy of mulligan's mobilization with movement with maitland mobilization along with conventional therapy in the patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniqa Kiran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the outcome and efficacy of Mulligan's mobilization with movement (MWM with Maitland mobilization along with conventional therapy in the patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial study was performed at the Department of Physiotherapy, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Sixty-two patients were selected for the study. MWM was introduced in half of the patients and Maitland mobilizations in the second half for 2 weeks. The goniometry, visual analog scale (VAS, knee range of motion (ROM, and Western Ontario McMaster OA (WOMAC Index for knee OA were the assessment tools used to assess all patients before and after 2 weeks of intervention. Paired sample t-test was used for analysis of results. Results: The mean pre- and postdifferences in MWM group were 4.06 ± 0.99, 10.19 ± 3.87, and 19.41 ± 7.58 for VAS, ROM flexion, and WOMAC Index, respectively, while the pre- and postmean difference values for Maitland mobilization group were 3.355 ± 1.05, 10.19 ± 5.5, and 12.28 ± 7.029 for VAS, ROM flexion, and WOMAC Index, respectively. The mean differences of both treatment interventions individually were significant and showed that both were clinically effective in treating the patients of knee OA. Conclusion: It was concluded that patients in both groups showed improvement in pain, ROM, and functions.

  11. Early self-managed focal sensorimotor rehabilitative training enhances functional mobility and sensorimotor function in patients following total knee replacement: a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutzouri, Maria; Gleeson, Nigel; Coutts, Fiona; Tsepis, Elias; John, Gliatis

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effects of early self-managed focal sensorimotor training compared to functional exercise training after total knee replacement on functional mobility and sensorimotor function. A single-blind controlled clinical trial. University Hospital of Rion, Greece. A total of 52 participants following total knee replacement. The primary outcome was the Timed Up and Go Test and the secondary outcomes were balance, joint position error, the Knee Outcome Survey Activities of Daily Living Scale, and pain. Patients were assessed on three separate occasions (presurgery, 8 weeks post surgery, and 14 weeks post surgery). Participants were randomized to either focal sensorimotor exercise training (experimental group) or functional exercise training (control group). Both groups received a 12-week home-based programme prescribed for 3-5 sessions/week (35-45 minutes). Consistently greater improvements ( F 2,98  = 4.3 to 24.8; P effect size range of 1.3-6.5. Overall, the magnitude of improvements in functional mobility and sensorimotor function endorses using focal sensorimotor training as an effective mode of rehabilitation following knee replacement.

  12. A Double-Blind, Active-Controlled Clinical Trial of Sodium Bicarbonate and Calcium Gluconate in the Treatment of Bilateral Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Caamaño

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of intra-articular injections of sodium bicarbonate with a single (SBCG1 or double dose (SBCG2 of calcium gluconate administered monthly compared with methylprednisolone (MP for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: A 3-month, randomized, double-blind clinical trial with patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA. The outcome variables were the Western Ontario-McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and the Lequesne functional index. Results: After 3 months, all treatments significantly improved in overall WOMAC and Lequesne scores. Mean changes (95% confidence interval in WOMAC total score and the Lequesne index, respectively, for SBCG1 (−12.5 [−14.3, −10.7]; −9.0 [−11.4, −6.7] and SBCG2 (−12.3 [−14.3, −10.4]; −8.9 [−10.4, −7.4] were significantly greater than for MP (−5.0 [−7.2, −2.8]; −3.2 [−4.9, −1.5] ( P  < .001. Conclusions: Intra-articular injections of sodium bicarbonate and calcium gluconate are useful for short-term relief of OA symptoms in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis. Both treatments are more effective than MP injections in the reduction of knee OA symptoms. Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00977444

  13. Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship of press-fit condylar sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses in the same patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik; Kulkarni, Sourabh S; Kim, Yoon-Hong

    2014-10-01

    We are aware of no study that has compared press-fit condylar Sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses in the same patients after more than ten years of follow-up. The purpose of the current study was to compare these two implants with respect to the functional and radiographic results, prevalence of osteolysis, and overall revision rates at a mean of 12.1 years of follow-up. The study consisted of a consecutive series of 444 patients (mean age [and standard deviation], 66.5 ± 7.4 years) who underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty, with one side treated immediately after the other. All of the patients received a press-fit condylar Sigma mobile-bearing prosthesis on one side and a press-fit condylar Sigma fixed-bearing prosthesis on the contralateral side. The minimum duration of follow-up was ten years (mean, 12.1 years; range, ten to thirteen years). At the time of each follow-up visit, the patients were assessed clinically and radiographically. Postoperative total knee scores (95 and 94 points), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (19 and 18 points), University of California, Los Angeles activity score (both prostheses, 5 points), range of motion (129° ± 6.3° and 127° ± 6.8°), and radiographic findings did not differ significantly between the press-fit condylar Sigma mobile and fixed-bearing designs at the final follow-up. The prevalence of aseptic loosening (1.4% and 1.8%) did not differ significantly between the mobile and fixed-bearing implant designs. No knee in either group had osteolysis. The estimated survival rate with revision as the end point was 98.2% (95% confidence interval, 91% to 99%) and 97.5% (95% confidence interval, 91% to 99%) at 12.1 years for the mobile and fixed-bearing implant groups, respectively. The results of the present long-term clinical study suggest that excellent clinical and radiographic results were achieved with both the press-fit condylar Sigma mobile and

  14. Clinical and ultrasonographic features associated to response to intraarticular corticosteroid injection. A one year follow up prospective cohort study in knee osteoarthritis patient with joint effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Joan; Orellana, Cristóbal; Galisteo, Carlos; García-Manrique, María; Navarro, Noemí; Caixàs, Assumpta; Larrosa, Marta; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Intraarticular injection is used for pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but there is not a well defined profile of patient who could get more benefit from it. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of pain relief at one year after corticosteroids intraarticular injection and to identify clinical factors associated to response in patients with knee osteoarthritis with joint effusion. One-year prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA with joint effusion confirmed by ultrasound. An intraarticular injection was performed following a clinical protocol. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, clinical severity, ultrasound parameters and radiological severity were collected. Response regarding pain and presence of synovial fluid on ultrasound at one month and at one year were evaluated. Clinical responder were consider in subjects with enough improvement to carry out normal daily activities with pain VAS<40mm. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included.A significant number of patients (61.4%) improved pain at one year following the protocol established in this study. Pain and ultrasound synovial fluid at one month appeared to predict the response at one year. The Lequesne index and the percentage of body fat were independently associated to pain at one year while the Lequesne index and ultrasound synovial hypertrophy were independently related to the presence of synovial fluid at one year. The status regarding pain or ultrasound synovial fluid at one month after an intraarticular joint injection appeared to predict the status at one year in patients with knee osteoarthritis and synovial effusion.

  15. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good range of motion in your knee. The ligaments in your knee are stable. However, most people with knee arthritis have a surgery called a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Knee replacement is most often done in people age 60 ...

  16. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee KidsHealth / For Teens / Jumper's Knee What's in this ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  17. Supporting shared decision making using an Option Grid for osteoarthritis of the knee in an interface musculoskeletal clinic: A stepped wedge trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwyn, Glyn; Pickles, Tim; Edwards, Adrian; Kinsey, Katharine; Brain, Kate; Newcombe, Robert G; Firth, Jill; Marrin, Katy; Nye, Alan; Wood, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether introducing tools, specifically designed for use in clinical encounters, namely Option Grids, into a clinical practice setting leads to higher levels of shared decision making. A stepped wedge trial design where 6 physiotherapists at an interface clinic in Oldham, UK, were sequentially instructed in how to use an Option Grid for osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients with suspected or confirmed osteoarthritis of the knee were recruited, six per clinician prior to instruction, and six per clinician afterwards. We measured shared decision making, patient knowledge, and readiness to decide. A total of 72 patients were recruited; 36 were allocated to the intervention group. There was an 8.4 point (95% CI 4.4 to 12.2) increase in the Observer OPTION score (range 0-100) in the intervention group. The mean gain in knowledge was 0.9 points (score range 0-5, 95% CI, 0.3 to 1.5). There was no increase in encounter duration. Shared decision making increased when clinicians used the knee osteoarthritis Option Grid. Tools designed to support collaboration and deliberation about treatment options lead to increased levels of shared decision making. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Intra-articular ozone or hyaluronic acid injection: Which one is superior in patients with knee osteoarthritis? A 6-month randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Forogh, Bijan; Hassan Abadi, Porya; Moridnia, Mahsa; Rahimi Dehgolan, Shahram

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease, imposing a great burden through pain and decreased function. There are many therapeutic modalities including non-pharmacologic choices and oral, topical, and intra-articular medications. New studies have shown promising results for ozone application in knee OA. Our aim was to compare the effects of ozone therapy versus hyaluronic acid (HA) intra-articular injection in knee OA patients. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, a total of 174 patients with more than 3 months of chronic pain or swelling in the knee joints along with consistent imaging findings were enrolled and randomly allocated into two groups of HA and ozone, which were planned to undergo 3 weekly injections of HA (Hyalgan®) and 10 mL of a 30 μg/mL ozone solution, respectively. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the last injection for pain, stiffness, and function using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Results No major adverse events were detected in this study. Total WOMAC score decreased from 40.8±9.8 to 20.4±4.9 (p<0.01) in the ozone group and from 38.5±7.9 to 17.1±4.2 (p<0.01) in the HA group. A similar trend was observed in pain improvement according to VAS. Pain, stiffness, and function significantly improved in both the groups, but no between-group difference was found. Conclusion Although both ozone and HA can be effectively used for improving function and reducing pain in selected knee OA patients, neither of the two showed any superiority at 6-month follow-up. PMID:29379312

  19. Effects of Taping on Pain and Functional Outcome of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Randomized Single-blind Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Taheri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the effects of knee taping in combination with exercise and medical treatment on functional outcome and pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Materials and Methods: In a randomized single-blinded clinical trial, 36 patients with knee OA were randomly assigned to two study groups. Both groups received exercise and medical therapy for 6 weeks. In addition, the first group (20 patients received taping in the first 3 weeks. Pain severity (assessed by visual analog scaling, weekly amount of analgesics consumption, timed get up and go test (TUG, and step tests were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks after the treatment and were further compared between two study groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups in pain severity score (P = 0.228, step test score (P = 0.771, TUG test score (P = 0.821 and weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.873 at baseline. After 3 weeks, weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.006, pain severity (P < 0.001 was significantly lower in taping group whereas step test score (P = 0.006 was significantly higher in the taping group. After 6 weeks, patients in taping group had significantly lower pain severity (P = 0.011 and higher step test score (P = 0.042. However, there was no significant difference in TUG test score (P = 0.443 and weekly amount of analgesics consumption (P = 0.270 between two groups. Conclusion: Therapeutic knee taping may be an effective method for short-term management of pain and disability in patients with knee OA.

  20. Early rehabilitation after total knee replacement surgery: a multicenter, noninferiority, randomized clinical trial comparing a home exercise program with usual outpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Annie S Y; Nairn, Lillias; Harmer, Alison R; Crosbie, Jack; March, Lyn; Parker, David; Crawford, Ross; Fransen, Marlene

    2015-02-01

    To determine, at 6 weeks postsurgery, if a monitored home exercise program (HEP) is not inferior to usual care rehabilitation for patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for osteoarthritis. We conducted a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients ages 45-75 years were allocated at the time of hospital discharge to usual care rehabilitation (n = 196) or the HEP (n = 194). Outcomes assessed 6 weeks after surgery included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function subscales, knee range of motion, and the 50-foot walk time. The upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) mean difference favoring usual care was used to determine noninferiority. At 6 weeks after surgery there were no significant differences between usual care and HEP, respectively, for pain (7.4 and 7.2; 95% CI mean difference [MD] -0.7, 0.9), physical function (22.5 and 22.4; 95% CI MD -2.5, 2.6), knee flexion (96° and 97°; 95% CI MD -4°, 2°), knee extension (-7° and -6°; 95% CI MD -2°, 1°), or the 50-foot walk time (12.9 and 12.9 seconds; 95% CI MD -0.8, 0.7 seconds). At 6 weeks, 18 patients (9%) allocated to usual care and 11 (6%) to the HEP did not achieve 80° knee flexion. There was no difference between the treatment allocations in the number of hospital readmissions. The HEP was not inferior to usual care as an early rehabilitation protocol after primary TKR. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Retention of the posterior cruciate ligament versus the posterior stabilized design in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-Scheek Inge

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic design for the use in primary total knee arthroplasty has evolved into designs that preserve the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL and those in which the ligament is routinely sacrificed (posterior stabilized. In patients with a functional PCL the decision which design is chosen depends largely on the favour and training of the surgeon. The objective of this study is to determine whether the patient's perceived outcome and speed of recovery differs between a posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients who are admitted for primary unilateral TKA due to primary osteoarthrosis are included when the following inclusion criteria are met: non-fixed fixed varus or valgus deformity less than 10 degrees, age between 55 and 85 years, body mass index less than 35 kg/m2 and ASA score (American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II. Patients are randomized in 2 groups. Patients in the posterior cruciate retaining group will receive a prosthesis with a posterior cut-out for the posterior cruciate ligament and relatively flat topography. In patients allocated to the posterior stabilized group, in which the posterior cruciate ligament is excised, the design may substitute for this function by an intercondylar tibial prominence that articulates with the femur in flexion. Measurements will take place preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. At all measurement points patient's perceived outcome will be assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life (SF-36 and physician reported functional status and range of motion as determined with the Knee Society Clinical Rating System (KSS. Discussion In the current practice both posterior cruciate retaining and posterior stabilized designs

  2. A prospective cohort study of the clinical presentation of non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: spine and knee symptoms as clinical presentation of hip osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauzeur, Jean-Philippe; Malaise, Michel; de Maertelaer, Viviane

    2016-07-01

    To study the clinical presentation of femoral head osteonecrosis (ONFH). Publications dedicated to this aspect of ONFH are rare. Our aim was to systematically collect and describe the clinical data. A prospective survey was conducted in a cohort of ONFH recruited from a dedicated clinic for osteonecrosis. The history of symptoms, medical management, and physical findings were obtained from 88 patients suffering from 125 ONFH. Subgroups were formed: bilateral versus unilateral ONFH, radiological stages 1-2 (pre-fractured) versus fractured stage 3 versus stage 4. ONFH was bilateral in 63 %, especially in corticosteroid users and in sickle-cell cases. These patients were younger but had similar BMIs compared to the unilateral cases. The pain was mechanical in 79 % of hips and inflammatory in 21 %. Acute pain at the onset was present in 55 % of hips. The localization of this pain was variable, including in the groin, the buttocks, or diffused in the lower limbs. A limp was present in 50 % of the patients, only when one hip was painful. The physical examination of the hip was normal in 31 %, especially in stages 1-2 (55 %). The diagnosis delay was 12 months, with inadequate medical management in 51 % of patients. In ONFH cases, no typical clinical pattern was found. The clinical presentation was very variable, sometimes having spine or knee symptoms with a normal physical examination of the hip. ONFH should be systematically suspected in cases of onset of pain in the pelvis, buttocks, groin, and lower limbs.

  3. [CLINICAL STUDIES ON EFFECT OF ARTHROSCOPIC INTERCONDYLAR FOSSA ANGIOPLASTY ON ABILITY OF NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingmin; Wang, Haijiao; Wu, Jiang; Li, Dongchao; Li, Yuhong

    2015-08-01

    To study the effect of arthroscopic intercondylar fossa angioplasty on the ability of neuromuscular control of the knee joint in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Between June 2012 and March 2013, 20 elderly patients with KOA and in accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent arthroscopic intercondylar fossa angioplasty (operation group), and 20 healthy elderly people served as control group. There was no significant difference in age, height, weight, and body mass index between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The proprioception capability (using passive regeneration test at measurement angles of 15, 30, and 60°) and quadriceps mobilization [including maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), central activation ratio (CAR), and activation deficit (AD)] were measured to avaluate the neuromuscular control of the knee; the Lysholm score was used to evaluate knee function. The above indexes were measured to assess the knee neuromuscular control and recovery of joint function in patients of operation group at 3, 6, and 9 months after operation. Compared with the control group, MVC, CAR, and Lysholm scores were significantly decreased, and the AD and passive knee angle difference were significantly increased in operation group (P 0.05). Arthroscopic intercondylar fossa angioplasty can relieve ACL pressure, abrasion, and impact, which will recover the ability of neuromuscular control, increase proprioception and quadriceps mobilization capacity, and improve the joint function.

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Gap Balancing vs Measured Resection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Involving 2259 Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxiang; Luo, Xiaomin; Wang, Peng; Sun, Han; Wang, Kun; Sun, Xiaoliang

    2018-03-17

    The argument on the clinical effects between gap balancing (GB) and measured resection (MR) in total knee arthroplasty remains to be resolved. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to investigate which technique in total knee arthroplasty has better clinical effect. A total of 20 studies involving 2259 cases were included in the meta-analysis. The primary outcome measure was Knee Society Score (KSS), whereas the secondary outcomes included other function assessment systems (eg, range of motion, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index), radiological outcomes (eg, femoral component rotation, total outliers), revision rate, complications (eg, infection, loosening, instability), and surgical time. The GB technique was associated with statistically significant increases in the primary outcomes of KSS-function in 1 year. However, a mean difference of 2.12 points was below the minimal clinically important difference of 6 points. No differences were found in the analyses of KSS-knee and KSS-function in any other follow-up periods. Secondary outcome assessments showed significant decreased surgical time (mean difference, 16.18; P < .00001) for MR. Although statistically significant difference in favor of GB was identified in total outliers (risk ratio, 1.72, P = .0004), the 2 techniques were comparable in range of motion, Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index, femoral component rotation, complications, and revision rate. We conclude that both techniques can result in equivalent results when done properly, and each surgeon must understand the strengths and weaknesses of each technique. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex moderates the effects of positive and negative affect on clinical pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Traci J; Richards, Jessica M; Finan, Patrick H; Smith, Michael T

    2017-07-01

    Sex differences in clinical pain severity and response to experimental pain are commonly reported, with women generally showing greater vulnerability. Affect, including state (a single rating) and stable (average daily ratings over two weeks) positive affect and negative affect has also been found to impact pain sensitivity and severity, and research suggests that affect may modulate pain differentially as a function of sex. The current study aimed to examine sex as a moderator of the relationships between affect and pain-related outcomes among participants with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). One hundred and seventy-nine participants (59 men) with KOA completed electronic diaries assessing clinical pain, positive affect, and negative affect. A subset of participants (n=120) underwent quantitative sensory testing, from which a single index of central sensitization to pain was derived. We used multiple regression models to test for the interactive effects of sex and affect (positive versus negative and stable versus state) on pain-related outcomes. We used mixed effects models to test for the moderating effects of sex on the relationships between state affect and pain over time. Sex differences in affect and pain were identified, with men reporting significantly higher stable positive affect and lower central sensitization to pain indexed by quantitative sensory testing, as well as marginally lower KOA-specific clinical pain compared to women. Moreover, there was an interaction between stable positive affect and sex on KOA-specific clinical pain and average daily non-specific pain ratings. Post hoc analyses revealed that men showed trends towards an inverse relationship between stable positive affect and pain outcomes, while women showed no relationship between positive affect and pain. There was also a significant interaction between sex and stable negative affect and sex on KOA-specific pain such that men showed a significantly stronger positive relationship between

  6. Quadriceps Strength in Patients With Isolated Cartilage Defects of the Knee: Results of Isokinetic Strength Measurements and Their Correlation With Clinical and Functional Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmüller, Anja; Andres, Tasja; Schoch, Wolfgang; Baur, Heiner; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have found a significant deficit of maximum quadriceps strength after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) of the knee. However, it is unclear whether muscular strength deficits in patients with cartilage damage exist prior to operative treatment. To isokinetically test maximum quadriceps muscle strength and quantify the impact of possible strength deficits on functional and clinical test results. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. To identify clinically relevant muscular strength deficits, 24 patients (5 females, 19 males; mean age, 34.5 years; body mass index, 25.9 kg/m 2 ) with isolated cartilage defects (mean onset, 5.05 years; SD, 7.8 years) in the knee joint underwent isokinetic strength measurements. Maximal quadriceps strength was recorded in 3 different testing modes: pure concentric contraction (flexors and extensors alternating work; con1), concentric-eccentric (only the extensors work concentrically and eccentrically; con2), and eccentric contraction in the alternating mode (ecc). Results were compared for functional performance (single-leg hop test), pain scales (visual analog scale [VAS], numeric rating scale [NRS]), self-reported questionnaires (International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC], Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scale [KOOS]), and defect size (cm 2 ). Compared with the uninjured leg, significantly lower quadriceps strength was detected in the injured leg in all isokinetic working modes (con1 difference, 27.76 N·m [SD 17.47; P = .003]; con2 difference, 21.45 N·m [SD, 18.45; P =.025]; ecc difference, 29.48 N·m [SD, 21.51; P = .001]), with the largest deficits found for eccentric muscle performance. Moderate negative correlations were observed for the subjective pain scales NRS and VAS. The results of the IKDC and KOOS questionnaires showed low, nonsignificant correlations with findings in the isokinetic measurement. Moreover, defect sizes (mean, 3.13 cm 2 ) were of no importance regarding the

  7. Clinical value of SPECT/CT in the painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA): a prospective study in a consecutive series of 100 TKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, Michael T. [Kantonsspital Baselland (Bruderholz, Liestal, Laufen), Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Amsler, Felix [Amsler Consulting, Basel (Switzerland); Rasch, Helmut [Kantonsspital Baselland, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT is considered as beneficial in unhappy patients with pain, stiffness or swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to identify typical patterns of bone tracer uptake (BTU), distribution and intensity values in patients after TKA. The above findings were correlated with the type and fixation of TKA, the time from TKA and intraoperative findings at revision surgery. A total of 100 knees of 84 consecutive patients (mean age ± SD 70 ± 11 years) after TKA with persistent knee pain were prospectively included. All patients underwent clinical examination, standardized radiographs and {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxymethane diphosphonate (HDP) SPECT/CT as part of a routine diagnostic algorithm. The diagnosis before and after SPECT/CT and final treatment were recorded. TKA component position was determined on 3-D reconstructed images. Intensity and anatomical distribution of BTU was determined. Maximum intensity values were recorded as well as ratios in relation to the proximal midshaft of the femur. Univariate analyses (chi-square test, Pearson's correlation and t test for independent samples) were performed (p < 0.05). SPECT/CT changed the clinical diagnosis and final treatment in 85/100 (85 %) knees. Intraoperative findings confirmed the preoperative SPECT/CT diagnosis in 32/33 knees (97 %). TKA loosening as well as progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) was correctly diagnosed in 100 % of knees. Typical patterns of BTU for specific pathologies were identified. Loose femoral TKA components significantly correlated with increased BTU at the lateral femoral regions (p < 0.05). Loose tibial TKA components significantly correlated with increased BTU at all tibial regions (p < 0.05) and around the tibial peg (p > 0.01). The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT in patients after TKA have been proven. Typical pathology-related BTU patterns were identified, which will improve reporting

  8. Clinical value of SPECT/CT in the painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA): a prospective study in a consecutive series of 100 TKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, Michael T.; Amsler, Felix; Rasch, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Bone single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT is considered as beneficial in unhappy patients with pain, stiffness or swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to identify typical patterns of bone tracer uptake (BTU), distribution and intensity values in patients after TKA. The above findings were correlated with the type and fixation of TKA, the time from TKA and intraoperative findings at revision surgery. A total of 100 knees of 84 consecutive patients (mean age ± SD 70 ± 11 years) after TKA with persistent knee pain were prospectively included. All patients underwent clinical examination, standardized radiographs and 99m Tc-hydroxymethane diphosphonate (HDP) SPECT/CT as part of a routine diagnostic algorithm. The diagnosis before and after SPECT/CT and final treatment were recorded. TKA component position was determined on 3-D reconstructed images. Intensity and anatomical distribution of BTU was determined. Maximum intensity values were recorded as well as ratios in relation to the proximal midshaft of the femur. Univariate analyses (chi-square test, Pearson's correlation and t test for independent samples) were performed (p < 0.05). SPECT/CT changed the clinical diagnosis and final treatment in 85/100 (85 %) knees. Intraoperative findings confirmed the preoperative SPECT/CT diagnosis in 32/33 knees (97 %). TKA loosening as well as progression of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) was correctly diagnosed in 100 % of knees. Typical patterns of BTU for specific pathologies were identified. Loose femoral TKA components significantly correlated with increased BTU at the lateral femoral regions (p < 0.05). Loose tibial TKA components significantly correlated with increased BTU at all tibial regions (p < 0.05) and around the tibial peg (p > 0.01). The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT in patients after TKA have been proven. Typical pathology-related BTU patterns were identified, which will improve reporting quality

  9. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  10. The necessity of clinical application of tibial reduction for detection of underestimated posterolateral rotatory instability in combined posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner deficient knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Jun; Park, Yong-Beom; Ko, Young-Bong; Kim, Seong-Hwan; Kwon, Hyeok-Bin; Yu, Dong-Seok; Jung, Young-Bok

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of tibial reduction during dial test for clinical detection of underestimated posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) in combined posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-posterolateral corner (PLC) deficient knee in terms of external rotation laxity and clinical outcomes. Twenty-one patients who classified as grade I PLRI using dial test with subluxated tibia, but classified as grade II with tibial reduction evaluated retrospectively. The mean follow-up was 39.3 months (range 24-61 months). Each patient was evaluated by the following variables: posterior translation and varus laxity on radiograph, KT-1000 arthrometer, dial test (reduced and subluxated position), International Knee Documentation Committee, Orthopädische Arbeitsgruppe Knie scoring system and Tegner activity scale. There were significant improvements in posterior tibial translation (8.6 ± 2.0 to 2.1 ± 1.0 mm; P application of reduction of posteriorly subluxated tibia during the dial test was essential for an appropriate treatment of underestimated PLRI in combined PCL-PLC deficient knee. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  11. MR imaging of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as gold standard: assessment of methodological quality of clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, Florence; Berg, Bruno C. vande

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the methodological quality of articles addressing the value of MR imaging of the knee cartilage with arthroscopy as a standard. Relevant papers were selected after Medline review (MEDLINE database search including the terms ''cartilage'' ''knee'', ''MR'' and ''arthroscopy''). Two observers reviewed independently 29 selected articles to determine how each study had met 15 individual standards that had been previously developed to assess the methodological quality of clinical investigations. The following criteria were met in variable percentage of articles including adequate definition of purpose (100%), statistical analysis (90%), avoidance of verification bias (86%), patient population description (83%), reference standard (79%), review bias (79%), study design (66%), inclusion criteria (41%) and method of analysis (41.5%), avoidance of diagnostic-review bias (24%), exclusion criteria (21%), indeterminate examination results (17%), analysis criteria (14%), interobserver reliability (14%) and intraobserver reliability (7%). The assessment of the methodological quality of clinical investigations addressing the value of MR imaging in the evaluation of the articular cartilage of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference demonstrated that several standards were rarely met in the literature. Efforts should be made to rely on clearly defined lesion criteria and to determine reliability of the observations. (orig.)

  12. No difference between fixed- and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty in activities of daily living and pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego Costa; Debieux, Pedro; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moises

    2017-06-01

    Until now, there are no definitive conclusions regarding functional differences related to middle- and long-term everyday activities and patient pain following implantation of mobile- and fixed-platform tibial prostheses. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are middle-term differences in knee function and pain in patients undergoing fixed- and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: the first group received TKA implantation with a fixed tibial platform (group A); the second group received TKA with a mobile tibial platform (group B). Patients were followed up (2 years), and their symptoms and limitations in daily living activities were evaluated using the Knee Outcome Survey-Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS), in addition to pain evaluation assessed using the pain visual analogue scale (VAS). There were no significant differences in function and symptoms in the ADLS and VAS between the study groups. The type of platform used in TKA (fixed vs. mobile) does not change the symptoms, function or pain of patients 2 years post-surgery. Although mobile TKAs may have better short-term results, at medium- and long-term follow-up they do not present important clinical differences compared with fixed-platform TKAs. This information is important so that surgeons can choose the most suitable implant for each patient. Randomized clinical trial, Level I.

  13. Intra-articular hyaluronan is without clinical effect in knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of 337 patients followed for 1 year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anette; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Simonsen, Lars Ole

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the long-term efficacy and safety of five intra-articular injections with hyaluronan in knee osteoarthritis. Methods A multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind study of 337 patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for knee...... osteoarthritis (clinical and laboratory) and with a Lequesne algofunctional index score (LFI) of 10 or greater. Patients received a hyaluronan product (sodium hyaluronate; Hyalgan) (n= 167) or saline (n= 170) intra-articularly weekly for 5 weeks and were followed up to 1 year. Time to recurrence was the primary...... efficacy parameter. LFI, pain on walking 50 m based on visual analogue scale (VAS pain 50 m), paracetamol consumption, patients' global assessment, Nottingham health profile, joint effusion and number of responders were secondary efficacy parameters. The efficacy parameters were analysed by intention...

  14. A randomized clinical trial evaluating plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret) versus hyaluronic acid in the short-term treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mikel; Fiz, Nicolás; Azofra, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime; Aduriz Recalde, Enmanuel; Garcia Gutierrez, Antonio; Albillos, Javier; Gárate, Ramón; Aguirre, Jose Javier; Padilla, Sabino; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    This multicenter, double-blind clinical trial evaluated and compared the efficacy and safety of PRGF-Endoret (BTI Biotechnology Institute, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain), an autologous biological therapy for regenerative purposes, versus hyaluronic acid (HA) as a short-term treatment for knee pain from osteoarthritis. We randomly assigned 176 patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis to receive infiltrations with PRGF-Endoret or with HA (3 injections on a weekly basis). The primary outcome measure was a 50% decrease in knee pain from baseline to week 24. As secondary outcomes, we also assessed pain, stiffness, and physical function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index; the rate of response using the criteria of the Outcome Measures for Rheumatology Committee and Osteoarthritis Research Society International Standing Committee for Clinical Trials Response Criteria Initiative (OMERACT-OARSI); and safety. The mean age of the patients was 59.8 years, and 52% were women. Compared with the rate of response to HA, the rate of response to PRGF-Endoret was 14.1 percentage points higher (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 27.6; P = .044). Regarding the secondary outcome measures, the rate of response to PRGF-Endoret was higher in all cases, although no significant differences were reached. Adverse events were mild and evenly distributed between the groups. Plasma rich in growth factors showed superior short-term results when compared with HA in a randomized controlled trial, with a comparable safety profile, in alleviating symptoms of mild to moderate osteoarthritis of the knee. Level I, randomized controlled multicenter trial. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Achieving Minimum Clinically Important Difference in Oxford Knee Score and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary Is Less Likely with Single-Radius Compared with Multiradius Total Knee Arthroplasty in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wu Chean; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Allen, John Carson; Chong, Hwei Chi; Tan, Hwee Chye Andrew

    2018-04-10

    Single-radius (SR) and multiradius (MR) total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) have produced similar outcomes, albeit most studies originate from Western nations. There are known knee kinematic differences between Western and Asian patients after TKA. The aim of this study is to compare the short-term patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) of SR-TKA versus MR-TKA in Asians. Registry data of 133 SR-TKA versus 363 MR-TKA by a single surgeon were analyzed. Preoperative and 2-year postoperative range of motion (ROM) and PROMs were compared with Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression model was used to evaluate the odds of SR-TKA or MR-TKA achieving the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) of studied outcomes. Patients in both groups had similar age (65.7 ± 7.6 vs. 65.8 ± 8.2 years; p  = 0.317), gender proportion (71% females vs. 79% females; p  = 0.119), and ethnic distribution (80% Chinese vs. 84% Chinese; p  = 0.258). Preoperatively, there were no statistically significant differences between both groups for ROM, Knee Society Score (KSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Short Form (SF)-36 scores. At 2 years, all outcomes were statistically similar or failed to achieve a difference of MCID. Controlling for all preoperative variables, SR-TKA has significantly lower odds of achieving MCID for OKS (odds ratio [OR]: 0.275, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.114-0.663; p  = 0.004) and SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) (OR: 0.547; 95% CI: 0.316-0.946; p  = 0.031) compared with MR-TKA. In conclusion, there are no significant differences in the absolute PROMs between SR-TKA and MR-TKA at 2 years following TKA in Asians. However, SR-TKA has significantly lower odds of achieving the MCID for OKS and SF-36 PCS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Effect of Genotype-Guided Warfarin Dosing on Clinical Events and Anticoagulation Control Among Patients Undergoing Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: The GIFT Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Brian F; Bass, Anne R; Lin, Hannah; Woller, Scott C; Stevens, Scott M; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Li, Juan; Rodríguez, Tomás; Miller, J Philip; McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Pendleton, Robert C; Jaffer, Amir K; King, Cristi R; Whipple, Brandi DeVore; Porche-Sorbet, Rhonda; Napoli, Lynnae; Merritt, Kerri; Thompson, Anna M; Hyun, Gina; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Hollomon, Wesley; Barrack, Robert L; Nunley, Ryan M; Moskowitz, Gerard; Dávila-Román, Victor; Eby, Charles S

    2017-09-26

    Warfarin use accounts for more medication-related emergency department visits among older patients than any other drug. Whether genotype-guided warfarin dosing can prevent these adverse events is unknown. To determine whether genotype-guided dosing improves the safety of warfarin initiation. The randomized clinical Genetic Informatics Trial (GIFT) of Warfarin to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis included patients aged 65 years or older initiating warfarin for elective hip or knee arthroplasty and was conducted at 6 US medical centers. Enrollment began in April 2011 and follow-up concluded in October 2016. Patients were genotyped for the following polymorphisms: VKORC1-1639G>A, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, and CYP4F2 V433M. In a 2 × 2 factorial design, patients were randomized to genotype-guided (n = 831) or clinically guided (n = 819) warfarin dosing on days 1 through 11 of therapy and to a target international normalized ratio (INR) of either 1.8 or 2.5. The recommended doses of warfarin were open label, but the patients and clinicians were blinded to study group assignment. The primary end point was the composite of major bleeding, INR of 4 or greater, venous thromboembolism, or death. Patients underwent a screening lower-extremity duplex ultrasound approximately 1 month after arthroplasty. Among 1650 randomized patients (mean age, 72.1 years [SD, 5.4 years]; 63.6% women; 91.0% white), 1597 (96.8%) received at least 1 dose of warfarin therapy and completed the trial (n = 808 in genotype-guided group vs n = 789 in clinically guided group). A total of 87 patients (10.8%) in the genotype-guided group vs 116 patients (14.7%) in the clinically guided warfarin dosing group met at least 1 of the end points (absolute difference, 3.9% [95% CI, 0.7%-7.2%], P = .02; relative rate [RR], 0.73 [95% CI, 0.56-0.95]). The numbers of individual events in the genotype-guided group vs the clinically guided group were 2 vs 8 for major bleeding (RR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0

  17. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part three: aerobic exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Mizusaki Imoto, Aline; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Álvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective aerobic exercise programs and provide clinicians and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with strengthening exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, or D-) was used, based on statistical significance ( P osteoarthritis within a 12-week period. An aerobic exercise program demonstrated significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B), physical function (Grade B) and quality of life (Grade C+). Aerobic exercise in combination with strengthening exercises showed significant improvement for pain relief (3 Grade A) and physical function (2 Grade A, 2 Grade B). A short-term aerobic exercise program with/without muscle strengthening exercises is promising for reducing pain, improving physical function and quality of life for individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Implications of Pneumonia Following Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Daniel D; Saltzman, Bryan M; Sershon, Robert A; Darrith, Brian; Okroj, Kamil T; Della Valle, Craig J

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical implications of pneumonia following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program was used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing TJA. Independent risk factors for the development of pneumonia within 30 days of TJA were identified using multivariate regression. Mortality and readmission rates were compared between patients who did and did not develop pneumonia. Multivariate regression was used to adjust for all demographic, comorbidity, and procedural characteristics. In total, 171,200 patients met inclusion criteria, of whom 66,493 (38.8%) underwent THA and 104,707 (61.2%) underwent TKA. Of the 171,200 patients, 590 developed pneumonia, yielding a rate of 0.34% (95% confidence interval = 0.32%-0.37%). Independent risk factors for pneumonia were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, greater age (most notably ≥80 years), dyspnea on exertion, dependent functional status, lower body mass index, hypertension, current smoker status, and male sex. The subset of patients who developed pneumonia following discharge had a higher readmission rate (82.1% vs 3.4%, adjusted relative risk [RR] = 16.6, P pneumonia. Pneumonia is a serious complication following TJA that occurs in approximately 1 in 300 patients. Approximately 4 in 5 patients who develop pneumonia are subsequently readmitted, and approximately 1 in 25 die. Given the serious implications of this complication, evidence-based pneumonia prevention programs including oral hygiene with chlorhexidine, sitting upright for meals, elevation of the head of the bed to at least 30°, aggressive incentive spirometry, and early ambulation should be considered for patients at greatest risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effect of Ginger (Zingiber Officinale Powder Supplement on Pain in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: a Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nadjarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is limited evidence that ginger (Zingiber Officinale powder consumption is effective to relieve the pain and inflammation due to special phytichemicals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ginger powder supplementation in pain improvement in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: This double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 120 outpatients with knee osteoarthritis of moderate pain. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: receiving ginger powder supplement and placebo. Ginger and placebo groups received two identical capsules per day for 12 weeks. Each capsule contained 500 mg ginger powder or starch. Pain severity was measured by VAS (Visual Analog Scale at first and after 3 months. A responder was defined as a reduction in pain of > 1.5 cm on a visual analog scale (VAS. Results: Before intervention, there was no significant difference between the two groups in severity of pain. However, after ginger supplementation, pain score decreased in ginger group. After 12 weeks, Pain reduction was more significant in ginger group than placebo. Response to intervention was 88% and 14% in ginger and placebo groups, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between both groups in response to intervention (p<0.001. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that ginger powder supplementation was effective in reducing pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis, therefore it is recommended as a safe supplement for these patients

  20. A comparison of Kneipp hydrotherapy with conventional physiotherapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: protocol of a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Tobias

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing age of the population, especially in the western world, means that the prevalence of osteoarthritis is also increasing, with corresponding socioeconomic consequences. Although there is no curative intervention at present, in accordance with US and European guidelines, pharmacotherapeutic and non-pharmacological approaches aim at pain control and the reduction of functional restriction. It has been established that hydrotherapy for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee joint using serial cold and warm water stimulation not only improves the range of movement but also reduces pain significantly and increases quality of life over a period of up to three months. Weight reduction is important for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. In addition, conventional physiotherapy and exercise therapy have both been shown, at a high level of evidence, to be cost-effective and to have long-term benefits for pain relief, movement in the affected joint, and patient quality of life. Methods/design The study design consists of a prospective randomised controlled three-armed clinical trial, which will be carried out at a specialist clinic for integrative medicine, to investigate the clinical effects of hydrotherapy on osteoarthritis of the knee or hip joint, in comparison with conventional physiotherapy. One hundred and eighty patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of hip or knee will be randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: hydrotherapy, physiotherapy, and both physiotherapy and hydrotherapy of the affected joint. In the first group, patients will receive Kneipp hydrotherapy daily, with water applied in the form of alternate cold and warm thigh affusions (alternating cold and warm water stimulation is particularly relevant to the knee and hip regions. Patients in the second group will receive physiotherapy of the hip or knee joint three times a week. Patients in the physiotherapy-hydrotherapy combination

  1. A comparison of Kneipp hydrotherapy with conventional physiotherapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: protocol of a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schencking, Martin; Otto, Adriane; Deutsch, Tobias; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2009-08-19

    The increasing age of the population, especially in the western world, means that the prevalence of osteoarthritis is also increasing, with corresponding socioeconomic consequences. Although there is no curative intervention at present, in accordance with US and European guidelines, pharmacotherapeutic and non-pharmacological approaches aim at pain control and the reduction of functional restriction.It has been established that hydrotherapy for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee joint using serial cold and warm water stimulation not only improves the range of movement but also reduces pain significantly and increases quality of life over a period of up to three months. Weight reduction is important for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. In addition, conventional physiotherapy and exercise therapy have both been shown, at a high level of evidence, to be cost-effective and to have long-term benefits for pain relief, movement in the affected joint, and patient quality of life. The study design consists of a prospective randomised controlled three-armed clinical trial, which will be carried out at a specialist clinic for integrative medicine, to investigate the clinical effects of hydrotherapy on osteoarthritis of the knee or hip joint, in comparison with conventional physiotherapy.One hundred and eighty patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of hip or knee will be randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: hydrotherapy, physiotherapy, and both physiotherapy and hydrotherapy of the affected joint. In the first group, patients will receive Kneipp hydrotherapy daily, with water applied in the form of alternate cold and warm thigh affusions (alternating cold and warm water stimulation is particularly relevant to the knee and hip regions).Patients in the second group will receive physiotherapy of the hip or knee joint three times a week. Patients in the physiotherapy-hydrotherapy combination group will receive both joint-specific physiotherapy

  2. Routine clinical knee MR reports: comparison of diagnostic performance at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for assessment of the articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, Jacob C.; Rhodes, Jeffrey A.; Shah, Nehal; Gaviola, Glenn C.; Smith, Stacy E. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gomoll, Andreas H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Cartilage Repair Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Accurate assessment of knee articular cartilage is clinically important. Although 3.0 Tesla (T) MRI is reported to offer improved diagnostic performance, literature regarding the clinical impact of MRI field strength is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of clinical MRI reports for assessment of cartilage at 1.5 and 3.0 T in comparison to arthroscopy. This IRB-approved retrospective study consisted of 300 consecutive knees in 297 patients who had routine clinical MRI and arthroscopy. Descriptions of cartilage from MRI reports of 165 knees at 1.5 T and 135 at 3.0 T were compared with arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade of the arthroscopic grading were calculated for each articular surface at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Agreement between MRI and arthroscopy was calculated with the weighted-kappa statistic. Significance testing was performed utilizing the z-test after bootstrapping to obtain the standard error. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade were 61.4%, 82.7%, 62.2%, and 77.5% at 1.5 T and 61.8%, 80.6%, 59.5%, and 75.6% at 3.0 T, respectively. The weighted kappa statistic was 0.56 at 1.5 T and 0.55 at 3.0 T. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these parameters between 1.5 and 3.0 T. Factors potentially contributing to the lack of diagnostic advantage of 3.0 T MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Short-term efficacy of calcium fructoborate on subjects with knee discomfort: a comparative, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzkowski Z

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zbigniew Pietrzkowski,1 Michael J Phelan,2 Robert Keller,3 Cynthia Shu,1 Ruby Argumedo,1 Tania Reyes-Izquierdo11FutureCeuticals, Inc., Applied BioClinical Laboratory; 2Department of Statistics, School of Information and Computer Science, University of California at Irvine; 3NutraClinical Inc., Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Calcium fructoborate (CFB at a dose of 110 mg twice per day was previously reported to improve knee discomfort during the first 14 days of treatment. In this study, 60 participants with self-reported knee discomfort were randomized into two groups receiving CFB or placebo. Initial levels of knee discomfort were evaluated by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ scores at the beginning of the study and also at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Results showed that supplementation with CFB significantly improved knee discomfort in the study subjects; significant reductions of mean within-subject change in WOMAC and MPQ scores were observed for the CFB group compared to the placebo group at both 7 and 14 days after treatment. Estimated treatment differences for the MPQ score were -5.8 (P=0.0009 and -8.9 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Estimated differences for the WOMAC score were -5.3 (P=0.06 and -13.73 (P<0.0001 at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Negative values indicate greater reductions in reported discomfort. On both Day 7 and Day 14, the trend was toward greater improvement in the CFB group. The placebo group did not exhibit any change in the WOMAC and MPQ scores. In conclusion, supplementation with 110 mg CFB twice per day was associated with improving knee discomfort during the 2 weeks of intake.Keywords: CFB, joint discomfort, WOMAC score, McGill pain score

  4. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fracture of the kneecap or other bones. Iliotibial band syndrome . Injury to the thick band that runs from your hip to the outside ... of your knee pain. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if: You cannot bear ...

  5. Effectiveness of behavioral graded activity in patients with osteoarthritis of hip and/or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Köke, A.J.A.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of a behavioral graded activity program (BGA) compared with usual care (UC; exercise therapy and advice) according to the Dutch guidelines for physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. The BGA intervention is intended to

  6. Effectiveness of behavioral graded activity in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee: A randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Koke, A.J.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a behavioral graded activity program (BGA) compared with usual care (UC; exercise therapy and advice) according to the Dutch guidelines for physiotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. The BGA intervention is intended to

  7. Comparison of peri- and intraarticular analgesia with femoral nerve block after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftdahl, Karen; Nikolajsen, Lone; Haraldsted, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    to receive continuous femoral nerve block (group F) or peri- and intraarticular infiltration and injection (group I). Group I received a solution of 300 mg ropivacaine, 30 mg ketorolac, and 0.5 mg epinephrine by infiltration of the knee at the end of surgery, and 2 postoperative injections...

  8. Timing of Surgery and Rehabilitation to Optimize Outcome for Patients with Multiple Ligament Knee Injuries: A Multicenter Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    contracture. Suboptimal outcomes for treatment of MLKIs include persistent pain , stiffness, residual instability and laxity, loss of motion and...a complete grade III injury of 2 or more ligaments) without a history of prior knee ligament reconstruction that do not have associated poly -trauma

  9. The effects of total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment on pain sensitization and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, S. T.; Roos, E. M.; Simonsen, O.

    2016-01-01

    (PPTs) at the knee (localized sensitization) and the lower leg (spreading sensitization), (2) peak pain intensity during the previous 24 h, (3) pain intensity after 30 min of walking, (4) pain location and pattern, (5) spreading of pain on a region-divided body chart and (6) the usage of pain medication...

  10. A protocol for developing a clinical practice guideline for intra-articular injection for treating knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Xing

    2018-01-01

    Ethics and dissemination: The protocol will provide us a roadmap to systematically develop evidence-based CPG for intra-articular injection for knee OA. The work will be disseminated electronically and in print. The guideline would be the first CPG that is developed primarily by orthopedic specialists in China and strictly based on systematic methodology.

  11. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  12. Minimum Performance on Clinical Tests of Physical Function to Predict Walking 6,000 Steps/Day in Knee Osteoarthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Hiral; Thoma, Louise M; Christiansen, Meredith B; Polakowski, Emily; Schmitt, Laura A; White, Daniel K

    2018-07-01

    Evidence of physical function difficulties, such as difficulty rising from a chair, may limit daily walking for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to identify minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function predictive to walking ≥6,000 steps/day. This benchmark is known to discriminate people with knee OA who develop functional limitation over time from those who do not. Using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, we quantified daily walking as average steps/day from an accelerometer (Actigraph GT1M) worn for ≥10 hours/day over 1 week. Physical function was quantified using 3 performance-based clinical tests: 5 times sit-to-stand test, walking speed (tested over 20 meters), and 400-meter walk test. To identify minimum performance thresholds for daily walking, we calculated physical function values corresponding to high specificity (80-95%) to predict walking ≥6,000 steps/day. Among 1,925 participants (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 9.1 years, mean ± SD body mass index 28.4 ± 4.8 kg/m 2 , and 55% female) with valid accelerometer data, 54.9% walked ≥6,000 steps/day. High specificity thresholds of physical function for walking ≥6,000 steps/day ranged 11.4-14.0 seconds on the 5 times sit-to-stand test, 1.13-1.26 meters/second for walking speed, or 315-349 seconds on the 400-meter walk test. Not meeting these minimum performance thresholds on clinical tests of physical function may indicate inadequate physical ability to walk ≥6,000 steps/day for people with knee OA. Rehabilitation may be indicated to address underlying impairments limiting physical function. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Unsatisfactory clinical outcomes of second-generation mobile bearing floating platform total knee arthroplasty: comparing outcomes with fixed bearing after five years minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2018-03-20

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze and compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes of fixed bearing ultracongruent (UC) insert total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and mobile bearing (MB) floating platform TKA using the navigation-assisted gap balancing technique with a minimum follow-up of five years. The study retrospectively enrolled 105 patients who received the UC type fixed bearing insert (group 1) and 95 patients who received the floating platform MB insert (group 2) during the period from August 2009 to June 2012. All surgery was performed using the navigation-assisted gap balancing technique. For strict assessment of gap measurements, the offset-type-force-controlled-spreader-system was used. Radiologic and clinical outcomes were assessed before operation and at the most recent follow-up using the Knee Society Score (KSS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score. For statistical analysis, paired sample t tests were used. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Although the radiologic alignments were satisfactory for both groups (99/105 [94%] cases were neutral for group 1 and 90/95 [94%] for group 2), the functional and total WOMAC scores were inferior in group 2 (p bearing exchange. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship rates for groups 1 and 2 at 77 months were 100.0 and 97.9%, respectively. Second-generation MB floating platform TKA cases did not have satisfactory outcomes. There were two cases of insert breakage, which required bearing exchange. Other patients who underwent surgery with second-generation MB floating platform were encouraged to avoid high knee flexion activities, resulting in lower clinical performance.

  14. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  15. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  16. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Benjakul Remedy Extract for Treating Primary Osteoarthritis of Knee Compared with Diclofenac: Double Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patamaporn Rachawat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of Benjakul (BJK extract for treating primary osteoarthritis (OA of the knee compared with diclofenac. Methods. A phase 2, double blind, randomized, and controlled study was conducted. The BJK group received 300 mg of BJK extract per day, while another group received 75 mg of diclofenac per day. All patients were followed up at 14 and 28 days. The changing of visual analogue scale (VAS for pain, 100-meter walking times, the modified Thai WOMAC index scores, and the global assessment were evaluated for efficacy. For safety issue, clinical signs and symptoms, complete physical examination, and renal and liver function were evaluated. Results. 39 and 38 patients for BJK extract group and diclofenac group were evaluated. For efficacy, all patients from both groups reported a decrease in the VAS pain score and 100-meter walking times but only the diclofenac group showed significant reduction of both measurements when compared with day 0. The modified Thai WOMAC scores of both groups were significantly reduced from baseline. However, all efficacy outcomes were not significantly different for both groups. For safety outcomes, the patients from both groups had no severe adverse events reported and only BJK had no toxicity in renal and liver functions. Conclusions. The BJK remedy extract showed equal clinical efficacy in relieving symptoms of OA knee when compared with diclofenac.

  17. Patient-Specific CT-Based Instrumentation versus Conventional Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study on Clinical Outcomes and In-Hospital Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kotela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a frequently performed procedure in orthopaedic surgery. Recently, patient-specific instrumentation was introduced to facilitate correct positioning of implants. The aim of this study was to compare the early clinical results of TKA performed with patient-specific CT-based instrumentation and conventional technique. A prospective, randomized controlled trial on 112 patients was performed between January 2011 and December 2011. A group of 112 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. The experimental group comprised 52 patients who received the Signature CT-based implant positioning system, and the control group consisted of 60 patients with conventional instrumentation. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the KSS scale, WOMAC scale, and VAS scales to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Specified in-hospital data were recorded. Patients were followed up for 12 months. At one year after surgery, there were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to clinical outcomes and in-hospital data, including operative time, blood loss, hospital length of stay, intraoperative observations, and postoperative complications. Further high-quality investigations of various patient-specific systems and longer follow-up may be helpful in assessing their utility for TKA.

  18. [Combined closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy with arthroscopy for varus knee and medial compartment osteoarthritis: clinical results at a minimum follow-up for five years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Song; Li, Zhi-Yao

    2013-09-01

    To study the results of closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy and arthroscopy for the treatment of medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. From October 2005 to June 2007, 25 patients met with our inclusion criteria. All the patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were treated with arthroscopy and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. There were 11 males and 14 females,with a mean age of 53 years old. The pre-operative HSS knee score was 67.6 +/- 2.8, FTA was (185.54 +/- 1.11) degrees, and aLPTA was (96.54 +/- 0.52) degrees in average. The patients were followed up and evaluated according to HSS knee score. The efficacy of the osteotomy was evaluated by FTA and aLPTA. All surgeries were successful without serious complication. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 5 to 7 years. The HSS was 85.5 +/- 3.7 at the 1st year and 80.3 +/- 5.4 at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two scores of before operation and the two after operation (t = -33.135, P = 0.000; t = -13.215, P = 0.000). The FTA was (173.65 +/- 0.92) degrees at the 1st year and (174.34 +/- 0.53) degrees at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two angles of before operation and after operation (t = 28.739, P = 0.000; t = 2.331, P = 0.048). The aLPTA was (87.32 +/- 0.33) degrees at the 1st year and (87.67 +/- 2.82) degrees at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two angles of before operation and after operation (t = 37.264, P = 0.000; t = 2.469, P = 0.039). Indication is important and good surgical technique is critical for good clinical outcome. A detailed plan before operation is essential for the operation. Arthroscopy is helpful for treating the intra-articular pathology. The osteoarthritis is still in progress but in a slow mode. The combined method of arthroscopy and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy is a reliable way for medial compartment osteoarthritis of the

  19. Association of knee pain and different definitions of knee osteoarthritis with health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Lamm, C.J.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: While the impact of knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been investigated in the literature, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of different definitions of OA on HRQoL. The main aim of this study was to measure and compare...... among references (neither knee pain nor OA) was 42 %. The participants with knee pain and OA had all HRQoL measures lower compared to those with knee pain but no OA. The ACR clinical definition of knee OA was associated with lower HRQoL than the definition based on radiographic knee OA (adjusted...

  20. A Systematic Review of Clinical Functional Outcomes After Medial Stabilized Versus Non-Medial Stabilized Total Knee Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Young

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Medial stabilized total knee joint replacement (TKJR construct is designed to closely replicate the kinematics of the knee. Little is known regarding comparison of clinical functional outcomes of patients utilising validated patient reported outcome measures (PROM after medial stabilized TKJR and other construct designs.PurposeTo perform a systematic review of the available literature related to the assessment of clinical functional outcomes following a TKJR employing a medial stabilized construct design.MethodsThe review was performed with a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA algorithm. The literature search was performed using variouscombinations of keywords. The statistical analysis was completed using Review Manager (RevMan, Version 5.3.ResultsIn the nineteen unique studies identified, there were 2,448 medial stabilized TKJRs implanted in 2,195 participants, there were 1,777 TKJRs with non-medial stabilized design constructs implanted in 1,734 subjects. The final mean Knee Society Score (KSS value in the medial stabilized group was 89.92 compared to 90.76 in the non-medial stabilized group, with the final KSS mean value difference between the two groups was statistically significant and favored the non-medial stabilized group (SMD 0.21; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.41; p = 004. The mean difference in the final WOMAC values between the two groups was also statistically significant and favored the medial stabilized group (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.47 to −0.07; p = 0.009. Moderate to high values (I2 of heterogeneity were observed during the statistical comparison of these functional outcomes.ConclusionBased on the small number of studies with appropriate statistical analysis, we are unable to reach a clear conclusion in the clinical performance of medial stabilized knee replacement construct.Level of EvidenceLevel II

  1. Do hip muscle weakness and dynamic knee valgus matter for the clinical evaluation and decision-making process in patients with patellofemoral pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    Patellofemoral pain is a very common musculoskeletal condition. In the last years, evidence regarding this disease increased exponentially. Although widely investigated, this problem still frustrates patients and clinicians for having an unfavorable prognosis. Some gaps still exist in the understanding and managing of patellofemoral pain. Numerous cross-sectional association studies show an association between gluteus muscular strength and dynamic knee valgus in patients with patellofemoral pain. In spite of this biological plausibility, many evidences challenge the direct relationship between these factors. Recent studies have concluded that women with patellofemoral pain show muscular weakness of the hip based on the cross-sectional studies, however prospective studies indicate that hip weakness cannot be considered a risk for development of patellofemoral pain. In addition, some clinical trials have demonstrated that strength training of the gluteal muscles promotes significant improvement in symptoms but not alter the kinematics of the patients with patellofemoral pain. These findings cast doubt on whether the cause of this condition is really being treated, whether all individuals suffering from patellofemoral pain present dynamic knee valgus or if this is a disturbance present in only a subgroup of patients and whether the strengthening of the hip musculature is an option to consider for prevention of patellofemoral pain. Certainly, more studies should be conducted to clarify the influence of mechanical patterns on this condition, but with the existing evidence so far, the importance given to these issues in the evaluation and clinical decision on treatment of these patients seems questionable. Therefore, this masterclass explores the understanding about patellofemoral pain, highlighting mainly the importance of muscular strength and dynamic knee valgus, as well as other possible factors that must be consider during the evaluation and the decision making in

  2. The Clinical usefulness of 99mTc HMPAO Leukocyte/99mTc phytate bone marrow scintigraphy for diagnosis of prosthetic knee infection: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung Pyo; Park, Ji Sun; Lee, Ah Young; Choi, Su Jung; Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun

    2012-01-01

    The preferred radionuclide imaging procedure for diagnosing prosthetic joint infection is combined radiolabeled leukocyte/ 99mT c sulfur colloid bone marrow scintigraphy, which has an accuracy of over 90%. Unfortunately, sulfur colloid is no longer available in South Korea. in this study, we evaluated the usefulness of 99mT c phytate, a substitute for 99mT c sulfur colloid, when combined with radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy in suspected prosthetic knee infections. Eleven patients (nine women, two men; mean age 72±6 years) with painful knee prostheses and a suspicion of infection underwent both 99mT c phytate bone marrow scintigraphy (BMS). The combined images were interpreted as positive for infection when radioactivity in the LS at the sits of clinical interest clearly exceeded that of the BMS (discordant); they were interpreted as negative when the increased activity in the LS was consistent with an increased activity in the BMS(concordant). The final diagnosis was made with microbiological or intraoperative findings and a clinical follow up of at least 12 months. Five of eleven patients were diagnosed as having an infected prosthesis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of the combined LS/BMS were 100%, 83%, 83%, 100% and 91%, respectively. We find that combined 99mT c HMPAO LS/ 99mT c phytate BMS shows comparable diagnostic performance to other studies utilizing sulfur colloid. Combined 99mT c HMPAO LS/ 99mT c phytate BMS is therefore expected to be an acceptable alternative to combined radiolabeled LS/ 99ms ulfur colloid BMS for diagnosing prosthetic knee infections

  3. Magnification bone scan of knees for knee pain evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Park, Chan H.; Yoon, Seok Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Knee pain is one of the common complaints of patients seen in our orthopedic clinic. Routine anterior and posterior views of whole body bone scan (WBBS) is often not sufficient in the evaluation of these patients. An ideal bone scan using pinhole collimator or single photon emission tomography (SPECT), however, is impractical and time consuming in busy nuclear medicine department with limited resources. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess limited bone scan of knees with magnification (LNSKM) for knee pain evaluation. Technical aspect of LBSKM and diagnostic efficacy are discussed on this poster. Adult patients with knee pain were reffered for LBSKM from an orthopedic surgen specializing knees. Four hundred fifteen LBSKMs were performed since 1999. patients were given 740 MBq (20mCi) Tc-99m MDP intravenously and 3 hours later LBSKM was performed using a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator and Siemens Orbitor camera. (Simens medical systems. Inc., Hoffman Estates, III., USA). Anterior view of the knees was taken for 5 min, without magnification and both lateral views of symptomatic knees were obtained with electronic magnification (1.25, upto 2.0) for 8 min each. Disease processes such as DJD, traumatic arthritis, P-F tendonitis, SONK, meniscus tear are detected and illustrated along with normal knee scan finding. We believe LBSKM may not be as good as SPECT or pinhole imaging of the knees in the evaluation of knee pain but superior to routine WBBS in the nuclear medicine department with limited resources of instrumentation and manpower

  4. Reliability and reference values of two clinical measurements of dynamic and static knee position in healthy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortqvist, Maria; Moström, Eva B; Roos, Ewa M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purposes of this study were to evaluate reliability of the Single-limb mini squat test (a dynamic measure of medio-lateral knee position) and the Quadriceps-angle (Q-angle) (a static measure of medio-lateral knee position), present paediatric reference values of the Q......-angle measurements was found. Reference values for the Q-angle (mean 13.5° (1.9)-15.3° (2.8)) varies with age and gender. No associations were found between dynamic and static measures. CONCLUSIONS: The Single-limb mini squat test showed a moderate reliability and the Q-angle showed a fair to moderate reliability......-angle, and evaluate the association between the tests. METHODS: Two hundred and forty-six healthy children (9-16 years) were included (intra/inter-rater reliability for Q-angle (n = 37/85) and for Single-limb mini squat test (n = 33/28)). Dynamic medio-lateral knee position was assessed by the Single-limb mini squat...

  5. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part two: strengthening exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Mizusaki Imoto, Aline; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Álvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective strengthening exercise programs and provide rehabilitation teams and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with strengthening exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+ or D-) was based on statistical significance ( p osteoarthritis management within a six-month period. Strengthening exercise programs demonstrated a significant improvement for pain relief (four Grade A, ten Grade B, two Grade C+), physical function (four Grade A, eight Grade B) and quality of life (three Grade B). Strengthening in combination with other types of exercises (coordination, balance, functional) showed a significant improvement in pain relief (three Grade A, 11 Grade B, eight Grade C+), physical function (two Grade A, four Grade B, three Grade C+) and quality of life (one Grade A, one Grade C+). There are a variety of choices for strengthening exercise programs with positive recommendations for healthcare professionals and knee osteoarthritis patients. There is a need to develop combined behavioral and muscle-strengthening strategies to improve long-term maintenance of regular strengthening exercise programs.

  6. Clinical evidence of traditional vs fast track recovery methodologies after total arthroplasty for osteoarthritic knee treatment. A retrospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorina, Sergio; Guglielmino, Claudia; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Ioppolo, Francesco; Massimino, Paolo; Leonardi, Pietro; Maci, Christian; Iannuzzi, Maurizio; Di Giunta, Angelo; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background During the last years, programs to enhance postoperative recovery and decrease morbidity after total knee arthroplasty, have been developed across a variety of surgical procedures and referred to as “Fast-Track Surgery”. In this study we aimed to find some answers in the management of osteoarthritic patients subjected to total knee arthroplasty, by using the Fast-Track methodology. To this purpose we evaluated parameters such as early mobilization of patients, better pain management, bleeding, possible complications, reduced hospitalization time, an overall improved recovery and patient satisfaction. Methods 132 patients were selected, of which, 95 treated with “Fast Track” method and 37 treated with traditional method (control group). All the patients were hospitalized and underwent the same rehabilitation program for the first three days after surgery. Results In both groups, the parameters of pain and deformity demonstrated the most rapid improvement, while those of function and movement were normalized as gradual and progressive improvement over the next 2 months. The different functional test used (Barthel, MRC, VAS) showed that the mean values were significantly greater in Fast Track group when compared to the control. Conclusion The results of the study confirm that the application of the Fast Track protocol in orthopaedics after total knee replacement results in rapid post-surgery recovery. Level of evidence IV. Case series, low-quality cohort or case-control studies. PMID:29387645

  7. Association of bone scintigraphic abnormalities with knee malalignment and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; McDaniel, G; Worrell, T W; Feng, S; Vail, T P; Varju, G; Coleman, R E

    2009-11-01

    The information content of knee bone scintigraphy was evaluated, including pattern, localisation and intensity of retention relative to radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis, knee alignment and knee symptoms. A total of 308 knees (159 subjects) with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis of at least one knee was assessed by late-phase (99m)Technetium methylene disphosphonate bone scintigraph, fixed-flexion knee radiograph, full limb radiograph for knee alignment and for self-reported knee symptom severity. Generalised linear models were used to control for within-subject correlation of knee data. The compartmental localisation (medial vs lateral) and intensity of knee bone scan retention were associated with the pattern (varus vs valgus) (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of knee malalignment and localisation and severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). Bone scan agent retention in the tibiofemoral, but not patellofemoral, compartment was associated with severity of knee symptoms (p<0.001) and persisted after adjusting for radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study describing a relationship between knee malalignment, joint symptom severity and compartment-specific abnormalities by bone scintigraphy. This work demonstrates that bone scintigraphy is a sensitive and quantitative indicator of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Used selectively, bone scintigraphy is a dynamic imaging modality that holds great promise as a clinical trial screening tool and outcome measure.

  8. Clinical efficacy and safety of glucosamine, chondroitin sulphate, their combination, celecoxib or placebo taken to treat osteoarthritis of the knee: 2-year results from GAIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitzke, Allen D; Shi, Helen; Finco, Martha F; Dunlop, Dorothy D; Harris, Crystal L; Singer, Nora G; Bradley, John D; Silver, David; Jackson, Christopher G; Lane, Nancy E; Oddis, Chester V; Wolfe, Fred; Lisse, Jeffrey; Furst, Daniel E; Bingham, Clifton O; Reda, Domenic J; Moskowitz, Roland W; Williams, H James; Clegg, Daniel O

    2010-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and functional limitation in older adults, yet longer-term studies of medical treatment of OA are limited. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate (CS), alone or in combination, as well as celecoxib and placebo on painful knee OA over 2 years. A 24-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, conducted at nine sites in the US ancillary to the Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial, enrolled 662 patients with knee OA who satisfied radiographic criteria (Kellgren/Lawrence grade 2 or 3 changes and baseline joint space width of at least 2 mm). This subset continued to receive their randomised treatment: glucosamine 500 mg three times daily, CS 400 mg three times daily, the combination of glucosamine and CS, celecoxib 200 mg daily, or placebo over 24 months. The primary outcome was a 20% reduction in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain over 24 months. Secondary outcomes included an Outcome Measures in Rheumatology/Osteoarthritis Research Society International response and change from baseline in WOMAC pain and function. Compared with placebo, the odds of achieving a 20% reduction in WOMAC pain were celecoxib: 1.21, glucosamine: 1.16, combination glucosamine/CS: 0.83 and CS alone: 0.69, and were not statistically significant. Over 2 years, no treatment achieved a clinically important difference in WOMAC pain or function as compared with placebo. However, glucosamine and celecoxib showed beneficial but not significant trends. Adverse reactions were similar among treatment groups and serious adverse events were rare for all treatments.

  9. Clinical efficacy and safety over two years use of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, their combination, celecoxib or placebo taken to treat osteoarthritis of the knee: a GAIT report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Helen; Finco, Martha F; Dunlop, Dorothy D; Harris, Crystal L; Singer, Nora G; Bradley, John D; Silver, David; Jackson, Christopher G; Lane, Nancy E; Oddis, Chester V; Wolfe, Fred; Lisse, Jeffrey; Furst, Daniel E; Bingham, Clifton O; Reda, Domenic J; Moskowitz, Roland W; Williams, H James; Clegg, Daniel O

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a major cause of pain and limited function in older adults. Longer-term studies of medical therapy of OA are uncommon. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (CS), alone or in combination, as well as celecoxib and placebo on painful knee OA over 24 months. Methods A 24-month, double-blind, placebo controlled study, conducted at 9 sites in the United States ancillary to the Glucosamine/Chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT), enrolled 662 patients with knee OA who satisfied radiographic criteria (Kellgren/ Lawrence [K/L] grade 2 or grade 3 changes and JSW of at least 2 mm at baseline). Patients who had been randomized to 1 of the 5 groups in GAIT continued to receive glucosamine 500 mg 3 times daily, CS 400 mg 3 times daily, the combination of glucosamine and CS, celecoxib 200 mg daily, or placebo over 24 months. The primary outcome measure was the number who reached a 20% reduction in WOMAC pain over 24 months. Secondary outcomes included reaching an OMERACT/OARSI response and change from baseline in WOMAC pain and function. Results The odds of achieving a 20%WOMAC were 1.21 for celecoxib, 1.16 for glucosamine, 0.83 for glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and 0.69 for chondroitin sulfate alone with widely overlapping confidence intervals for all treatments. Conclusions Over 2 years, no treatment achieved a clinically important difference in WOMAC Pain or Function as compared with placebo. However, glucosamine and celecoxib showed beneficial trends. Adverse reactions were not meaningfully different among treatment groups and serious adverse events were rare for all therapies. PMID:20525840

  10. Value of knee joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzsa, Gyoergy; Kiss Toth, Peter

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the literature and the analysis of 204 examinations, the method and clinical application of knee joint arthrography are reviewed. 50 out of the 54 operated cases were perfectly diagnosed. The double contrast knee joint arthrography can be applied to detect meniscus changes, popliteal cysts, synovial disorders and chondral defects. The effectiveness of arthrography and arthroscopy was compared and the introduction of the former in each county seat is suggested. (author)

  11. [Overuse injury syndromes of the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, M; Bojanić, I; Haspl, M

    2001-12-01

    Overuse injuries are frequent in the knee joint. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in all sports activities. Furthermore, the joint area has numerous attachment points for muscles and tendons and numerous bursae. Another reason is that the specific joint between the patella and femur (patellofemoral joint) constitutes a part of the knee joint. Speaking in general terms, all overuse injuries in the knee joint can be divided in four groups according to the aspect: anterior aspect--patellofemoral pain syndrome, patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee), Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding Larson Johanson disease, stress fracture of the patella, fat pad syndrome; medial aspect--plica syndrome, semimembranosus tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis (bursitis), breaststroker's knee, medial retinaculitis; lateral aspect--Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), Popliteal Tendinitis, Bicipital tendinitis; posterior aspect--fabellitis, medial gastrocnemius strain. There are numerous possible reasons for pain caused by overuse injuries around the knee joint, but two are the most frequent: patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee) and Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee). This paper gives a brief overview of overuse injuries of the knee joint including their definition, anatomy, aetiology, clinical symptoms and signs, and non-operative and surgical treatment.

  12. High volume acupuncture clinic (HVAC) for chronic knee pain--audit of a possible model for delivery of acupuncture in the National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, Saul; Cummings, Mike; Perrin, Chris; Ito, Rieko

    2008-03-01

    Recent research has established the efficacy, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of acupuncture for some forms of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, there are practical problems with delivery which currently prevent its large scale implementation in the National Health Service. We have developed a delivery model at our hospital, a 'high volume' acupuncture clinic (HVAC) in which patients are treated in a group setting for single conditions using standardised or semi-standardised electroacupuncture protocols by practitioners with basic training. We discuss our experiences using this model for chronic knee pain and present an outcome audit for the first 77 patients, demonstrating satisfactory initial (eight week) clinical results. Longer term (one year) data are currently being collected and the model should next be tested in primary care to confirm its feasibility.

  13. The Joint Clinic: Managing Excess Demand for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis Referrals Using a New Physiotherapy-Led Outpatient Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne-Jones, David P; Hutton, Liam R; Stout, Kirsten M; Abbott, J Haxby

    2018-04-01

    There are increasing problems with access to both outpatient assessment and joint replacement surgery for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. Data were collected on all patients seen at the Joint Clinic over a 2-year period with minimum 12-month follow-up. Patients were assessed by a nurse and a physiotherapist, baseline scores and demographic details collected, and an individualized personal care plan developed. Patients could be referred for a first specialist assessment (FSA) if their severity justified surgical assessment. Three hundred fifty-eight patients were seen at Joint Clinic, of whom 150 (44%) had hip and 189 (56%) had knee OA. The mean age was 67.4 years and there were 152 men (45%) and 187 women (55%). The mean baseline Oxford score was 19.8 (standard deviation 8.2). Fifty-four patients were referred directly to FSA (mean Oxford score 13.0, standard deviation 6.7) and 89 after a subsequent review. The scores of patients referred for FSA were significantly worse than those managed in the Joint Clinic (P < .001). Of the 143 referred for FSA, 115 underwent or were awaiting surgery, 18 were recommended surgery but scored below prioritization threshold, and 10 were not recommended surgery. The Oxford scores of the 194 patients managed non-operatively improved from 22.0 to 25.0 (P = .0013). This study shows that the Joint Clinic was effective as a triage tool with 93% of those referred for FSA being recommended surgery. This has freed up surgeon time to see only those patients most in need of surgical assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  15. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Randomized Clinical Trial of Periarticular Drug Injection used in combination Patient-Controlled Analgesia versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia Alone in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MN Sabran

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a prospective randomized clinical trial to compare use of a combination of periarticular drug injection with patient- controlled analgesia (PCA to PCA alone in post-total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Thirty patients who were admitted for unilateral total knee arthroplasty were selected randomly into an Injection group or a Standard group. The periarticular injection contained Ropivacaine, Ketorolac and Adrenaline, given intra-operatively. The mean amount of opioid used was 22.87 mmol/L in the Injection group as compared to 39.78 mmol/L in the Standard group (p = 0.026. The Injection group had lower pain score at rest and during exercise (p=0.021, p=0.041, respectively, as well as better return to function (p=0.026 and shorter hospital stay (6.1 days, Injection; 7.5 days, Standard, p=0.027. Overall, the group receiving periarticular drugs injection had less pain, less narcotic usage, earlier return to function, similar experience of adverse effects and shorter hospital stays.

  17. Comparing two low-energy diets for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms in obese patients: a pragmatic randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, B F; Christensen, R; Christensen, P; Leeds, A R; Boesen, M; Lohmander, L S; Astrup, A; Bliddal, H

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks. Eligible patients were obese [body mass index (BMI)>30 kg/m(2)]; >50 years old, with primary knee OA. Participants were randomized to either a very-low-energy diet (VLED) or a low-energy diet (LED) (415 kcal/day and 810 kcal/day, respectively), using commercially available formula foods - only for the first 8 weeks, managed by dieticians. The 8 weeks were followed by an additional 8-week period of a hypo-energetic diet consisting of normal food plus meal replacements (1200 kcal/day). The primary endpoint was the number of patients responding according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) responder criterion. The statistical analysis was based on a non-responder intention-to-treat (ITT) population (baseline observation carried forward). One hundred and ninety two patients (155 (80.7%) females) with a mean age 62.5 years [standard deviation (SD) 6.4; range 50-78 years]; average BMI 37.3 (SD 4.8) were included. At 16 weeks, similar proportions of the VLED and LED groups, 59 (61.5%), and 63 (65.6%) patients, respectively, met the OMERACT-OARSI responder criteria, with no statistical significant difference between the groups (P=0.55). Combining the groups the pooled estimate was 64% meeting the responder criteria [95% confidence interval (CI) 57%, 70%]. There was an overall reduction in pain, corresponding to an average pain reduction on the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 11.1 (95%CI 13.6, 8.5) in the combined groups. At week 16 weight loss in the combined groups was 12.8 kg (95%CI: 11.84-13.66; P or =10% body weight in both diet groups, with a pooled estimate of 74% (95%CI: 68-80%). No clinically significant differences were found between the 415 kcal/day and 810 kcal/day diets. A 16-week formula

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISOMETRIC THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH AND MINIMAL CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES (MCIDS) IN KNEE FUNCTION IN OSTEOARTHRITIS – DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between thigh muscle strength and clinically relevant differences in self-assessed lower limb function. Methods Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants (2651 women/1902 men) was related to Western Ontario McMasters Universities (WOMAC) physical function scores by linear regression. Further, groups of Male and female participant strata with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in WOMAC function scores (6/68) were compared across the full range of observed values, and to participants without functional deficits (WOMAC=0). The effect of WOMAC knee pain and body mass index on the above relationships was explored using stepwise regression. Results Per regression equations, a 3.7% reduction in extensor and a 4.0% reduction in flexor strength were associated with an MCID in WOMAC function in women, and a 3.6%/4.8% reduction in men. For strength divided by body weight, reductions were 5.2%/6.7% in women and 5.8%/6.7% in men. Comparing MCID strata across the full observed range of WOMAC function confirmed the above estimates and did not suggest non-linear relationships across the spectrum of observed values. WOMAC pain correlated strongly with WOMAC function, but extensor (and flexor) muscle strength contributed significant independent information. Conclusion Reductions of approximately 4% in isometric muscle strength and of 6% in strength/weight were related to a clinically relevant difference in WOMAC functional disability. Longitudinal studies will need to confirm these relationships within persons. Muscle extensor (and flexor) strength (per body weight) provided significant independent information in addition to pain in explaining variability in lower limb function. PMID:25303012

  19. Relationship between isometric thigh muscle strength and minimum clinically important differences in knee function in osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2015-04-01

    To determine the relationship between thigh muscle strength and clinically relevant differences in self-assessed lower leg function. Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength of 4,553 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants (2,651 women and 1,902 men) was related to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function scores by linear regression. Further, groups of male and female participant strata with minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs) in WOMAC function scores (6 of 68 units) were compared across the full range of observed values and to participants without functional deficits (WOMAC score 0). The effect of WOMAC knee pain and body mass index on the above relationships was explored using stepwise regression. Per regression equations, a 3.7% reduction in extensor strength and a 4.0% reduction in flexor strength were associated with an MCID in WOMAC function in women, and, respectively, a 3.6% and 4.8% reduction in men. For strength divided by body weight, reductions were 5.2% and 6.7%, respectively, in women and 5.8% and 6.7%, respectively, in men. Comparing MCID strata across the full observed range of WOMAC function confirmed the above estimates and did not suggest nonlinear relationships across the spectrum of observed values. WOMAC pain correlated strongly with WOMAC function, but extensor (and flexor) muscle strength contributed significant independent information. Reductions of approximately 4% in isometric muscle strength and of 6% in strength per body weight were related to a clinically relevant difference in WOMAC functional disability. Longitudinal studies will need to confirm these relationships within persons. Muscle extensor (and flexor) strength (per body weight) provided significant independent information in addition to pain in explaining variability in lower leg function. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Six weeks of continuous joint distraction appears sufficient for clinical benefit and cartilaginous tissue repair in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, J A D; van Heerwaarden, R J; Spruijt, S; Eckstein, F; Maschek, S; van Roermund, P M; Custers, R J H; van Spil, W E; Mastbergen, S C; Lafeber, F P J G

    2016-10-01

    Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a surgical joint-preserving treatment in which the knee joint is temporarily distracted by an external frame. It is associated with joint tissue repair and clinical improvement. Initially, patients were submitted to an eight-week distraction period, and currently patients are submitted to a six-week distraction period. This study evaluates whether a shorter distraction period influences the outcome. Both groups consisted of 20 patients. Clinical outcome was assessed by WOMAC questionnaires and VAS-pain. Cartilaginous tissue repair was assessed by radiographic joint space width (JSW) and MRI-observed cartilage thickness. Baseline data between both groups were comparable. Both groups showed an increase in total WOMAC score; 24±4 in the six-week group and 32±5 in the eight-week group (both p<0.001). Mean JSW increased 0.9±0.3mm in the six-week group and 1.1±0.3mm in the eight-week group (p=0.729 between groups). The increase in mean cartilage thickness on MRI was 0.6±0.2mm in the eight-week group and 0.4±0.1mm in the six-week group (p=0.277). A shorter distraction period does not influence short-term clinical and structural outcomes statistically significantly, although effect sizes tend to be smaller in six week KJD as compared to eight week KJD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pedicled Gastrocnemius Flap: Clinical Application in Limb Sparing Surgical Resection of Sarcoma Around the Knee Region and Popliteal Fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-SHERBINY, M.

    2008-01-01

    To highlight on the versatility of superiorly based pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap in the limb-sparing surgery for bone or soft tissue sarcoma around the knee and popliteal fossa. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 patients with localized bone or soft tissue sarcoma around the knee and popliteal fossa were treated with limb-salvage procedure. The study included 5 cases with bone sarcoma of the distal femur, 15 cases having bone sarcoma of proximal tibia and 10 cases having soft tissue sarcoma around the knee region and popliteal fossa. Routine preoperative staging studies were done for every patient and included local plain radiography, local MRI, isotopic bone scan and CT chest. Local MRA or angiography was done in selected cases. According to the Enneking staging system, 19 patients had stage IIB and 11 had stage IIA. Patients having bone sarcoma of the proximal tibia were subjected to wide resection, endo prosthetic reconstruction and reconstruction of the extensor mechanism by the medial gastrocnemius muscle flap. Patients having bone sarcoma of the distal femur were subjected to wide resection, endo prosthetic reconstruction and coverage of the prosthesis and re balance of the patellar tendon by the medial gas-trocnemius flap. Patients having soft tissue sarcoma were subjected to wide resection and soft tissue coverage with either medial or lateral myocutaneous gastrocnemius flap or muscle flap with grafting. Limb function was evaluated according to MSTS functional scores. Adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy was given according to nationally agreed protocols. Results: There were 18 males and 12 females with a mean age of 29 years at the time of surgery (range 11-44 years). The mean follow-up period was 52 months (range 25-72 months). Resection with a negative bony and soft tissue margins could be achieved in all cases. A total of 30 flaps were used and included medial gastrocnemius muscle flaps in 21 cases (15 cases had proximal tibia endoprothesis, 5

  2. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Huri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30∘–90∘ ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  3. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000199.htm Knee arthroscopy - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... surgery to treat problems in your knee (knee arthroscopy). You may have been checked for: Torn meniscus. ...

  4. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  5. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Knee Osteoarthritis Treated With an Autologous Protein Solution Injection: A 1-Year Pilot Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Elizaveta; Engebretsen, Lars; Verdonk, Peter; Nehrer, Stefan; Filardo, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. A novel blood derivative has been developed to concentrate both growth factors and antagonists of inflammatory cytokines, with promising preliminary findings in terms of safety profile and clinical improvement. To investigate if one intra-articular injection of autologous protein solution (APS) can reduce pain and improve function in patients affected by knee OA in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, saline-controlled study. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Forty-six patients with unilateral knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence 2 or 3) were randomized into the APS group (n = 31), which received a single ultrasound-guided injection of APS, and the saline (control) group (n = 15), which received a single saline injection. Patient-reported outcomes and adverse events were collected at 2 weeks and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months through visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Clinical Global Impression of Severity/Change (CGI-S/C), Patient Global Impression of Severity/Change (PGI-S/C), and Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) responder rate. Imaging evaluation was also performed with radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after treatment (12 months and 3 and 12 months, respectively). The safety profile was positive, with no significant differences in frequency and severity of adverse events between groups. The improvement from baseline to 2 weeks and to 1, 3, and 6 months was similar between treatments. At 12 months, improvement in WOMAC pain score was 65% in the APS group and 41% in the saline group ( P = .02). There were no significant differences in VAS pain improvement between groups. At 12 months, APS group showed improved SF-36 Bodily Pain

  7. How Do Physical Therapists Treat People with Knee Osteoarthritis, and What Drives Their Clinical Decisions? A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Gadotti, Inae Caroline; Colosi, Conner; Rylak, James; Wylie, Travis; Armijo-Olivo, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: It is unclear how physical therapists in Florida currently treat people with knee osteoarthritis and whether current best evidence is used in clinical decision making. Methods: We conducted a survey of physical therapists in Florida. We assessed the perceived effectiveness and actual use of physical therapy (PT) interventions and quantified the association between the actual use of interventions and different characteristics of physical therapists. Results: A total of 413 physical therapists completed the survey. Most respondents perceived therapeutic exercise (94%) and education (93%) as being effective or very effective. Interventions least perceived as effective or very effective were electrotherapy (28%), wedged insole (20%), and ultrasound (19%). Physical therapists who followed the principles of evidence-based practice were more likely to use therapeutic exercise (OR 3.89; 95% CI: 1.21, 12.54) and education (OR 3.63; 95% CI: 1.40, 9.43) and less likely to use ultrasound (OR 0.32; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.63) and electrotherapy (OR 0.32; 95% CI: 0.17, 0.58). Results also indicated that older physical therapists were more likely to use ultrasound (OR 3.57; 95% CI: 1.60, 7.96), electrotherapy (OR 2.53; 95% CI: 1.17, 5.47), kinesiology tape (OR 3.82; 95% CI: 1.59, 9.18), and ice (OR 1.95; 95% CI: 1.02, 3.73). Conclusions: In line with clinical guidelines, most physical therapists use therapeutic exercise and education to treat people with knee osteoarthritis. However, interventions that lack scientific support, such as electrotherapy and ultrasound, are still used. A modifiable therapist characteristic, adherence to evidence-based practice, is positively associated with the use of interventions supported by scientific evidence. PMID:28154442

  8. Guideline recommendations for post-acute postoperative physiotherapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty: are they used in daily clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W F; Nelissen, R G H H; Vlieland, T P M Vliet

    2014-09-01

    In a Dutch guideline on physiotherapy (PT) in hip and knee osteoarthritis, a number of recommendations on post-acute (i.e. after discharge from hospital) PT following total hip (THA) and total knee (TKA) arthroplasty were included. Little is known about the uptake of these recommendations in daily clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which the guideline recommendations regarding post-acute PT after THA and TKA are followed in daily clinical practice. An online pilot survey on the delivery of post-acute, postoperative PT was sent to a random sample of 957 Dutch physiotherapists. The survey included questions on the application of recommended, neither recommended nor advised against, and advised against treatment modalities and various treatment modalities for which there were no formulated recommendations. A total of 219 physiotherapists completed the questionnaire, with a mean age of 40 years (standard deviation 12.6), 55% female and 95% working in primary care. The vast majority reported the use of the recommended exercise modalities (muscle strengthening exercises (96%), and functional exercises (99%). Continuous passive motion, which was neither recommended nor advised against, and electrical muscle stimulation, which was not recommended, were provided by 1%. Reported treatment modalities for which there were no formulated recommendations included patient education (99%), gait training (95%), active range of motion (ROM) exercises (93%), balance exercises (86%), passive ROM exercises (58%), aerobic exercises (50%), massage (18%) and cold therapy (11%). The vast majority of physiotherapists reported adhering to recommendations on post-acute postoperative PT in THA and TKA patients after discharge from hospital. Although yet to be confirmed in a larger nationwide survey, the relatively high frequency of use of many other treatment modalities, for which there were no formulated recommendations, suggests the need to extend

  9. Effect of Knee Extensor Strength on Incident Radiographic and Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis in Individuals with Meniscal Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Felson, David T; Segal, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    months. Separate binomial regression analyses with robust standard errors adjusted for age, history of knee surgery, physical activity level and clinic site were conducted for men and women. RESULTS: High knee extensor strength (normalized by allometric scaling) was associated with a reduced risk...... of radiographic knee OA in women (relative risk: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.94) but not in men (0.56; 0.27 to 1.16). High knee extensor strength did not protect against the development of symptomatic knee OA, either in women or in men. CONCLUSION: The results only partly confirm the hypothesis that high knee...

  10. Topical vs. intravenous administration of tranexamic acid in knee arthroplasty and prevalence of deep venous thrombosis: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Zekcer

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tranexamic acid (TXA is widely used in orthopedic surgery to reduce perioperative bleeding. Since TXA inhibits fibrinolysis, there is concern that it may increase the risk of thromboembolic events. Objectives To verify the prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT in patients receiving TXA during total knee arthroplasty and to compare topical with intravenous administration of the drug. Methods All patients admitted for total knee arthroplasty due to primary arthrosis between June and November of 2014 were recruited consecutively. Thirty patients were randomized to a “topical group” (1.5 g TXA diluted in 50ml saline sprayed over the area operated, before tourniquet release, 30 to an “intravenous group” (20mg/kg TXA in 100 ml of saline, given at the same time as anesthesia, and 30 to a control group (100 ml of saline, given at the same time as anesthesia. All patients had duplex ultrasound scans of the legs on the 15th postoperative day. Results Deep venous thrombosis events occurred in five of the 90 patients operated (one out of 30 in the topical group [3.3%], four out of 30 in the control group [13.3%], and zero in the intravenous group. All were confirmed by duplex ultrasound scans and all were asymptomatic. Prevalence rates of DVT were similar between groups (p = 0.112 for control vs. intravenous; p = 0.353 for control vs. topical; and p =1.000 for intravenous vs. topical, according to two-sided exact tests. Conclusions Both topical and intravenous administration of TXA are safe with regard to occurrence of DVT, since the number of DVT cases in patients given TXA was not different to the number in those given placebo.

  11. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (Pknee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hyperextended Knee: Cause of Serious Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Knee and lower leg. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 24, 2015. Brooks GP, et al. Treatment of knee injuries in the young athlete. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  13. Five-Year Follow-up of Knee Joint Distraction: Clinical Benefit and Cartilaginous Tissue Repair in an Open Uncontrolled Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, Jan-Ton A D; Wiegant, Karen; van Roermund, Peter M; Intema, Femke; Custers, Roel J H; Eckstein, Felix; van Laar, Jaap M; Mastbergen, Simon C; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2017-07-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may finally become inevitable. At a relatively young age, this comes with the risk of future revision surgery. Therefore, in these cases, joint preserving surgery such as knee joint distraction (KJD) is preferred. Here we present 5-year follow-up data of KJD. Design Patients ( n = 20; age cartilaginous tissue repair that provides a long-term tissue structure benefit as compared to natural progression. Level of evidence, II.

  14. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoor, N M; Zambon, S; Castell, M V; Cooper, C; Denkinger, M; Dennison, E M; Edwards, M H; Herbolsheimer, F; Maggi, S; Sánchez-Martinez, M; Pedersen, N L; Peter, R; Schaap, L A; Rijnhart, J J M; van der Pas, S; Deeg, D J H

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person's self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between countries; (3) To examine whether physical function is a mediator in the association between clinical OA and SRH. Baseline data of the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used, which includes pre-harmonized data from six European cohort studies (n = 2709). Clinical OA was defined according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. SRH was assessed using one question: How is your health in general? Physical function was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index and Australian/Canadian OA Hand Index. The prevalence of fair-to-poor SRH ranged from 19.8 % in the United Kingdom to 63.5 % in Italy. Although country differences in the strength of the associations were observed, clinical OA of the hip, knee and hand were significantly associated with fair-to-poor SRH in five out of six European countries. In most countries and at most sites, the association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH was partly or fully mediated by physical function. Clinical OA at different sites was related to fair-to-poor SRH in the general population. Most associations were (partly) mediated by physical functioning, indicating that deteriorating physical function in patients with OA should be a point of attention in patient care.

  15. Knee Deformities in Children With Down Syndrome: A Focus on Knee Malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque Orozco, Maria Del Pilar; Abousamra, Oussama; Chen, Brian Po-Jung; Rogers, Kenneth J; Sees, Julieanne P; Miller, Freeman

    Patellofemoral instability (PFI) has been the most reported knee abnormality in people with Down syndrome. Other reported knee abnormalities have been associated with PFI and different management approaches have been described with variable outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomic variations of the knee in children with Down syndrome. A comparison between knees with and without PFI was performed and our experience in treating knee abnormalities in Down syndrome was also reported. Records of all children with Down syndrome were reviewed. Two groups were identified (knees with and without PFI). Radiographic measurements included the mechanical and anatomic lateral distal femoral angles, medial proximal tibial angle, angle of depression of medial tibial plateau, lateral tibial translation, and distal femoral physis-joint angle. On the lateral view, Insall-Salvati and Blackburne-Peel ratios were measured. The sulcus angle was measured on the tangential view. Measurements were compared between the 2 groups (with and without PFI).Knees with PFI were divided into 3 subgroups based on their treatment (group A: surgical valgus correction, group B: surgical soft tissue procedures for PFI, and group C: conservative treatment). Preoperative radiographs were used for the surgical group and last available radiographs were used for the conservative group. Clinical and radiographic data were compared between the groups. For groups A and B, clinical and radiographic data were also compared between preoperative and last visits. Of the 581 children with Down syndrome, 5% (31 children: 22 females, 9 males) had PFI in 56 knees. Mean age at diagnosis was 11.5±3.5 years. Of the remaining 550 children, 75 children had radiographs for 130 knees. Knees with PFI had significantly more valgus and a larger distal femoral physis-joint angle. Depression of the medial tibial plateau and lateral tibial translation were noted in knees with PFI. Insall-Salvati ratio was higher

  16. Association of Obesity, Parity, and History of Knee Injury with Knee Osteoarthritis in Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Triyadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is the most joint disorder among elderly. There are a lot of risk factors of knee osteoarthritis. Obesity and high frequent of parity can increase the load on knee joint. Knee injury also decreases the stability of knee joint on bearing body load. This study was conducted to observe the association of obesity, parity ≥3 times and history of knee injury with the occurrence of knee osteoarthritis in female aged >50 years old. Methods: Case control design was chosen in this study. Female patients with age >50 years were recruited by consecutive sampling from rheumatology clinic at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Data were collected from August to September 2013. Minimal sample size was 60 samples calculated by rule of thumb formula. Obesity was measured by body mass index (BMI. Parity and history of knee injury were assessed by questionnaire. Those variables were analyzed by logistic regression method. Result: Obesity did not associate with knee osteoarthritis in this study, p=0.549 (odd ratio (OR 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.52–3.32. Parity was associated with knee osteoarthritis in this study p=0.001 (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.89–11.68. History of knee injury was associated with knee osteoarthritis in this study, p=0.001 (OR 6.19, 95% CI 2.01–18.99. Conclusions: Parity ≥3 times and history of knee injury were associated with the occurrence of knee osteoarthritis. Obesity was not associated with the occurrence of knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Knee joint stabilization therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Gerritsen, M; Voorneman, R E; Peter, W F; de Rooij, M; Romviel, S; Lems, W F; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether an exercise program, initially focusing on knee stabilization and subsequently on muscle strength and performance of daily activities is more effective than an exercise program focusing on muscle strength and performance of daily activities only, in reducing activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and instability of the knee joint. A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 159 knee OA patients with self-reported and/or biomechanically assessed knee instability, randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Both groups received a supervised exercise program for 12 weeks, consisting of muscle strengthening exercises and training of daily activities, but only in the experimental group specific knee joint stabilization training was provided. Outcome measures included activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index - WOMAC physical function, primary outcome), pain, global perceived effect and knee stability. Both treatment groups demonstrated large (∼20-40%) and clinically relevant reductions in activity limitations, pain and knee instability, which were sustained 6 months post-treatment. No differences in effectiveness between experimental and control treatment were found on WOMAC physical function (B (95% confidence interval - CI) = -0.01 (-2.58 to 2.57)) or secondary outcome measures, except for a higher global perceived effect in the experimental group (P = 0.04). Both exercise programs were highly effective in reducing activity limitations and pain and restoring knee stability in knee OA patients with instability of the knee. In knee OA patients suffering from knee instability, specific knee joint stabilization training, in addition to muscle strengthening and functional exercises, does not seem to have any additional value. Dutch Trial Register (NTR) registration number: NTR1475. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier

  18. Effect of Eucalyptus Oil Inhalation on Pain and Inflammatory Responses after Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Suk Jun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus oil has been reported effective in reducing pain, swelling, and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of eucalyptus oil inhalation on pain and inflammatory responses after total knee replacement (TKR surgery. Participants were randomized 1 : 1 to intervention group (eucalyptus inhalation group or control group (almond oil inhalation group. Patients inhaled eucalyptus or almond oil for 30 min of continuous passive motion (CPM on 3 consecutive days. Pain on a visual analog scale (VAS, blood pressure, heart rate, C-reactive protein (CRP concentration, and white blood cell (WBC count were measured before and after inhalation. Pain VAS on all three days (P<.001 and systolic (P<.05 and diastolic (P=.03 blood pressure on the second day were significantly lower in the group inhaling eucalyptus than that inhaling almond oil. Heart rate, CRP, and WBC, however, did not differ significantly in the two groups. In conclusion, inhalation of eucalyptus oil was effective in decreasing patient's pain and blood pressure following TKR, suggesting that eucalyptus oil inhalation may be a nursing intervention for the relief of pain after TKR.

  19. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  20. Expectations in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Burcu; Unver, Bayram; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to decrease pain and restore functional knee joint. Current hypotheses indicate higher knee flexion is required in terms of life style, culture and expectations in Eastern communities. Therefore, society-specific features related to life style and cultural habits are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the expectations of patients undergoing TKA. The study included 131 patients (18 male, 113 female; mean age: 66.2 ± 8.3 years) who underwent cemented TKA due to knee osteoarthritis. All patients were operated by the same surgeon using the same implant and surgical technique. Patients were evaluated using the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score, a 15-item clinical knee assessment questionnaire and the HSS knee arthroplasty expectation questionnaire. Mean HSS score for the right knee was 89.2 ± 10.5 and for the left knee was 89.6 ± 9.4. The two most expected outcomes were improvements in pain (99.2%) and gait (96.2%) and the two least expected outcomes were improvements in psychological well-being (22.9%) and communicative skills (35.1%). Expectations were not affected by education and working conditions. Patients' most expected outcomes were improvement in pain and restoration of function (gait, climbing stairs and no need of assistive devices), similar to Western and American communities.

  1. Attenuated synovial fluid ghrelin levels are linked with cartilage damage, meniscus injury, and clinical symptoms in patients with knee anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Chen, Liang-Hua; Ye, Yong-Liang; Yang, Guang-Gang; Mao, Zheng; Liu, Dan-Dan; Chen, Jun-Qi; Chen, Jing-Jie; Liu, Gang

    2016-12-01

    The meniscus injury and post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis (PTOA) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions often cause great burdens to patients. Ghrelin, a recently identified 28-amino-acid peptide, has been shown to inhibit inflammation and perform as a growth factor for chondrocyte. This study was aimed at investigating ghrelin concentration in synovial fluid and its association with the degree of meniscus injury, articular degeneration, and clinical severity in patients suffering from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. 61 ACL deficiency patients admitted to our hospital were drafted in the current study. The Noyes scale and Mankin scores were used to assess articular cartilage damage arthroscopically and histopathologically, respectively. The Lysholm scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores were utilized to evaluate the clinical severity. The radiological severity of meniscus injury was assessed by MR imaging. Serum and synovial fluid ghrelin levels were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cartilage degradation markers collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in addition to inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were also examined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated to assess the diagnostic value of ghrelin levels for the prediction of the MRI grading for meniscus injury by comparing with other biomarkers. SF ghrelin levels were positively related to Lysholm and IKDC scores. PTOA patients with grade 3 showed significantly decreased levels of ghrelin in SF compared with those with grade 2. The ghrelin levels in SF were negatively related to MRI signal grades for meniscus injury. SF ghrelin levels were also inversely associated with Noyes scale and Mankin scores, and levels of inflammation markers IL-6, TNF-α, and

  2. Effectiveness of diclofenac versus acetaminophen in primary care patients with knee osteoarthritis: [NTR1485], DIPA-Trial: Design of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P.J. Verkleij (Saskia ); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Osteoarthritis is the most frequent chronic joint disease which causes pain and disability of especially hip and knee. According to international guidelines and the Dutch general practitioners guidelines for non-traumatic knee symptoms, acetaminophen should be the pain

  3. Trapezoidal osteochondral autologous plug singleblock graft for treating chondral lesions of the knee: clinical and functional medium-term results in an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Teruyuki Kawano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and functional results of autologous trapezoidal plug single-block grafts fixed with absorbable chondral darts in patients with osteochondral knee lesions of varying sizes. METHODS: Twenty-five patients underwent surgery from February 2000 to June 2008. Seventy-two percent of the patients were male, and the mean age was 29 years. RESULTS: The right side (56% and the medial condyle (92% were most affected. The lesions had an average area of 5.28 cm², and the mean follow-up was 59 months. All of the variables other than instability showed significant improvements (p<0.05, as shown by the increase in the mean Lysholm score from 55 points preoperatively to 92 points (p<0.001 postoperatively. There was no loosening or collapse of the osteochondral graft. All of the patients had patellofemoral crepitation and pain for an average of six months. CONCLUSION: Autologous trapezoidal plug single-block grafts are a therapeutic option for defects of varying sizes and provide good clinical results and low morbidity at the donor site in the medium term.

  4. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  5. Intra-articular platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections for treating knee pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee in the Japanese population: a phase I and IIa clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yu; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Kanamori, Akihiro; Aoto, Katsuya; Sugaya, Hisashi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2018-02-01

    Intra-articular platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection has been found to be effective for treating osteoarthritis in patients from Western countries; however, the safety and efficacy of PRP have not been sufficiently investigated in Japanese patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of intra-articular PRP injection in Japanese patients with knee osteoarthritis. PRP without white blood cells was prepared using a single-spin centrifuge (PRGF-Endoret; BTI Biotechnology Institute, Vitoria, Spain). A 6-mL PRP volume was injected in the knee joint three times at 1 week intervals. All patients were prospectively evaluated before intervention and at 1, 3, and 6 months after the treatment. Adverse events, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score, Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) score and Japanese Orthopedic Association score were evaluated. Ten patients (all women; average age, 60.6 years) were treated. Only minor adverse events after injection were noted, and symptoms resolved within 48 hours after the injection. The average VAS pain scores were 71.6 mm and 18.4 mm at baseline and the 6-month follow-up, respectively (P PRP injection likely represents a safe treatment option for Japanese patients with mild-to-moderate knee osteoarthritis, and has the potential to relieve pain for up to 6 months, but further study is needed to verify the efficacy.

  6. Barriers to implementing the "2008 Mexican Clinical Practice Guideline recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis" in primary healthcare practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola-Sanchez, Adalberto; Richardson, Julie; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris; Sánchez, José Guadalupe; González, Martha Alicia; Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Jiménez-Baez, María Valeria; Nolasco-Alonso, Nancy; Alvarado, Idolina; Rodríguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Wilson, Mike G

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the implementability of the "2008 Mexican Clinical Practice Guideline for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis at the primary level of care" within primary healthcare of three Mexican regions using the Guideline Implementability Appraisal methodology version 2 (GLIA.v2). Six family physicians, representing the South, North, and Central Mexico, and one Mexican physiatrist evaluated the 45 recommendations stated by the Mexican guideline. The GLIA.v2 methodology includes the execution of qualitative and semi-quantitative techniques. Reviewers' agreement was between moderate to near complete in most cases. Sixty-nine percent of the recommendations were considered difficult to implement within clinical practice. Eight recommendations did not have an appropriate format. Only 6 recommendations were judged as able to be consistently applied to clinical practice. Barriers related to the context of one or more institutions/regions were identified in 25 recommendations. These barriers are related to health providers/patients' beliefs, processes of care within each institution, and availability of some treatments recommended by the guideline. The guideline presented problems of conciseness and clarity that negatively affect its application within the Mexican primary healthcare context. We identified individual, organizational and system characteristics, which are common to the 3 institutions/regions studied and constitute barriers for implementing the guideline to clinical practice. It is recommended that the 2008-Mexican-CPG-OA be thoroughly revised and restructured to improve the clarity of the actions implied by each recommendation. We propose some strategies to accomplish this and to overcome some of the identified regional/institutional barriers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. A randomized clinical trial of a peri-operative behavioral intervention to improve physical activity adherence and functional outcomes following total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hua

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee replacement (TKR is a common and effective surgical procedure to relieve advanced knee arthritis that persists despite comprehensive medical treatment. Although TKR has excellent technical outcomes, significant variation in patient-reported functional improvement post-TKR exists. Evidence suggests that consistent post-TKR exercise and physical activity is associated with functional gain, and that this relationship is influenced by emotional health. The increasing use of TKR in the aging US population makes it critical to find strategies that maximize functional outcomes. Methods/Design This randomized clinical trial (RCT will test the efficacy of a theory-based telephone-delivered Patient Self-Management Support intervention that seeks to enhance adherence to independent exercise and activity among post- TKR patients. The intervention consists of 12 sessions, which begin prior to surgery and continue for approximately 9 weeks post-TKR. The intervention condition will be compared to a usual care control condition using a randomized design and a probabilistic sample of men and women. Assessments are conducted at baseline, eight weeks, and six- and twelve- months. The project is being conducted at a large healthcare system in Massachusetts. The study was designed to provide greater than 80% power for detecting a difference of 4 points in physical function (SF36/Physical Component Score between conditions (standard deviation of 10 at six months with secondary outcomes collected at one year, assuming a loss to follow up rate of no more than 15%. Discussion As TKR use expands, it is important to develop methods to identify patients at risk for sub-optimal functional outcome and to effectively intervene with the goal of optimizing functional outcomes. If shown efficacious, this peri-TKR intervention has the potential to change the paradigm for successful post-TKR care. We hypothesize that Patient Self-Management Support

  8. MR imaging findings in the follow-up of patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis and the correlation with clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Catherine M.; Link, Thomas M.; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Dunn, Timothy C.; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Ries, Michael D.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2006-01-01

    To assess the rate of cartilage loss, the change in bone marrow edema pattern and internal joint derangement at 1.5-T MRI in patients with knee osteoarthritis and to correlate these findings with the clinical Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthitis (WOMAC) score. Methods: Forty subjects (mean age 57.7±15 years; 16 females and 24 males) were recruited: 6 healthy volunteers (OA0), 17 patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA1) and 17 with severe osteoarthritis (OA2) based on the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. MR scans, radiographs and WOMAC scores were obtained at baseline, first follow-up (1.4±0.67 years; n=40) and second follow-up (2.4±0.4 years; n=26). Cartilage morphology, bone marrow edema (BME), meniscal and ligamentous pathology were assessed on MR images and quantified by two radiologists in consensus. Full-thickness cartilage lesions were observed in 12/17 OA2 at baseline, in 13/17 at the first follow-up and in 7/10 at the second follow-up. Cartilage loss was found in eight patients at the first follow-up and five at the second follow-up. BME was observed in 23/40 patients at baseline, in 22/40 at the first follow-up and in 12/26 at the second follow-up. Changes in BME were visualized in 19/22 and 4/13 patients at the first and second follow-up, respectively. Changes in WOMAC scores over time did not correlate significantly with the amount of cartilage loss and the change in BME (P>0.05). MRI is well suited to monitor the progression of OA in the longitudinal follow-up since it shows cartilage defects, BME and internal joint derangement, pathologies that are not visualized by radiographs. The lack of significant correlation between MRI findings and clinical findings is not unexpected, has been previously described and may in part be due to the fact that patients get more accustomed to their pain as the knee progressively degenerates. (orig.)

  9. MR imaging findings in the follow-up of patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis and the correlation with clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, Catherine M.; Link, Thomas M.; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Dunn, Timothy C.; Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ries, Michael D. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Majumdar, Sharmila [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    To assess the rate of cartilage loss, the change in bone marrow edema pattern and internal joint derangement at 1.5-T MRI in patients with knee osteoarthritis and to correlate these findings with the clinical Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthitis (WOMAC) score. Methods: Forty subjects (mean age 57.7{+-}15 years; 16 females and 24 males) were recruited: 6 healthy volunteers (OA0), 17 patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA1) and 17 with severe osteoarthritis (OA2) based on the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. MR scans, radiographs and WOMAC scores were obtained at baseline, first follow-up (1.4{+-}0.67 years; n=40) and second follow-up (2.4{+-}0.4 years; n=26). Cartilage morphology, bone marrow edema (BME), meniscal and ligamentous pathology were assessed on MR images and quantified by two radiologists in consensus. Full-thickness cartilage lesions were observed in 12/17 OA2 at baseline, in 13/17 at the first follow-up and in 7/10 at the second follow-up. Cartilage loss was found in eight patients at the first follow-up and five at the second follow-up. BME was observed in 23/40 patients at baseline, in 22/40 at the first follow-up and in 12/26 at the second follow-up. Changes in BME were visualized in 19/22 and 4/13 patients at the first and second follow-up, respectively. Changes in WOMAC scores over time did not correlate significantly with the amount of cartilage loss and the change in BME (P>0.05). MRI is well suited to monitor the progression of OA in the longitudinal follow-up since it shows cartilage defects, BME and internal joint derangement, pathologies that are not visualized by radiographs. The lack of significant correlation between MRI findings and clinical findings is not unexpected, has been previously described and may in part be due to the fact that patients get more accustomed to their pain as the knee progressively degenerates. (orig.)

  10. THE EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTEOARTHRITIS (ESCEO ALGORITHM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IS APPLICABLE TO RUSSIAN CLINICAL PRACTICE: A CONSENSUS STATEMENT OF LEADING RUSSIAN AND ESCEO OSTEOARTHRITIS EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Denisov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA, published in December 2014, provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. This current paper represents an assessment and endorsement of the algorithm by Russian experts in OA for use in Russian clinical practice, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA, in support of the clinicians’ individualized assessment of the patient. Medications recommended by the ESCEO algorithm are available in Russia. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOA is advised, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulphate (pCGS (Rottapharm/Meda and prescription chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only, due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs but without the systemic safety concerns. To be effective, topical NSAIDs must have high bioavailability, and among NSAIDs molecules like etofenamate have high absorption and bioavailability alongside evidence for accumulation in synovial tissues. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step 2 advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk: benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of weekly injections. As a last step before surgery, the slow

  11. Preoperative Pain Neuroscience Education Combined With Knee Joint Mobilization for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Enrique; Dueñas, Lirios; Falla, Deborah; Baert, Isabel; Meeus, Mira; Sánchez-Frutos, José; Nijs, Jo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to first compare the effects of a preoperative treatment combining pain neuroscience education (PNE) with knee joint mobilization versus biomedical education with knee joint mobilization on central sensitization (CS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis, both before and after surgery. Second, we wanted to compare the effects of both interventions on knee pain, disability, and psychosocial variables. Forty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis were allocated to receive 4 sessions of either PNE combined with knee joint mobilization or biomedical education with knee joint mobilization before surgery. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and quantitative sensory testing was performed at baseline, after treatment and at a 1 month follow-up (all before surgery), and at 3 months after surgery. Significant and clinically relevant differences before and after surgery were found after treatments for both knee pain and disability, and some measures of CS (ie, widespread hyperalgesia, CS inventory), with no significant between-group differences. Other indicators of CS (ie, conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) did not change over time following either treatment, and in some occasions the observed changes were not in the expected direction. Patients receiving PNE with knee joint mobilization achieved greater improvements in psychosocial variables (pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia) both before and after surgery. Preoperative PNE combined with knee joint mobilization did not produce any additional benefits over time for knee pain and disability, and CS measures compared with biomedical education with knee joint mobilization. Superior effects in the PNE with knee joint mobilization group were only observed for psychosocial variables related to pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia.

  12. Intra-Articular Injections of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial in the Context of the Spanish National Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañez-Heredia, Elvira; Irízar, Sofia; Huertas, Pedro J; Otero, Esperanza; Del Valle, Marta; Prat, Isidro; Díaz-Gallardo, Macarena S; Perán, Macarena; Marchal, Juan A; Hernandez-Lamas, María Del Carmen

    2016-07-02

    Intra-articular injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been established as a suitable treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Here, we present a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted in a public Hospital of the Spanish National Health Care System, to evaluate the efficacy of injecting autologous PRP versus hyaluronic acid (HA) in knee osteoarthritis. PRP was manufactured in Malaga's Regional Blood Center (Spain). Patients that met the eligibility criteria were randomized into a PRP group or a HA group. Pain and functional improvements were assessed pre- and post-treatment (three and six months follow-up) using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the Knee and Osteoarthritis Outcome System (KOOS) scale and the European Quality of Life scale (EUROQOL). Both groups presented pain reduction at six months. The VAS scores for the PRP group improved by at least 50% from their initial value, particularly at three months following the final infiltration, with results resembling those of the HA group at six months. PRP was more effective in patients with lower osteoarthritis grades. Both treatments improved pain in knee osteoarthritis patients without statistically significant differences between them. However, PRP injection was proved to improve pain three months after the final infiltration and to be more effective in lower osteoarthritis grades.

  13. Intra-articular injection of two different doses of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial (phase I/II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamo-Espinosa, José M; Mora, Gonzalo; Blanco, Juan F; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Nuñez-Córdoba, Jorge M; Sánchez-Echenique, Carmen; Bondía, José M; Aquerreta, Jesús Dámaso; Andreu, Enrique J; Ornilla, Enrique; Villarón, Eva M; Valentí-Azcárate, Andrés; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Valentí-Nin, Juan Ramón; Prósper, Felipe

    2016-08-26

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising option to treat knee osteoarthritis. Their safety and usefulness must be confirmed and the optimal dose established. We tested increasing doses of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in combination with hyaluronic acid in a randomized clinical trial. A phase I/II multicenter randomized clinical trial with active control was conducted. Thirty patients diagnosed with knee OA were randomly assigned to intraarticularly administered hyaluronic acid alone (control), or together with 10 × 10(6) or 100 × 10(6) cultured autologous BM-MSCs, and followed up for 12 months. Pain and function were assessed using VAS and WOMAC and by measuring the knee motion range. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging analyses were performed to analyze joint damage. No adverse effects were reported after BM-MSC administration or during follow-up. BM-MSC-administered patients improved according to VAS during all follow-up evaluations and median value (IQR) for control, low-dose and high-dose groups change from 5 (3, 7), 7 (5, 8) and 6 (4, 8) to 4 (3, 5), 2 (1, 3) and 2 (0,4) respectively at 12 months (low-dose vs control group p = 0.005 and high-dose vs control group p injection of in vitro expanded autologous BM-MSCs together with HA is a safe and feasible procedure that results in a clinical and functional improvement of knee OA, especially when 100 × 10(6) cells are administered. These results pave the way for a future phase III clinical trial. gov identifier NCT02123368. Nº EudraCT: 2009-017624-72.

  14. Exercise and self-management for people with chronic knee, hip or lower back pain: a cluster randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost-effectiveness. Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nicola; Cramp, Fiona; Palmer, Shea; Pollock, Jon; Hampson, Lisa; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Green, Colin; Jones, Louise; Phillips, Sonia; Johnson, Liz; Hurley, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain and osteoarthritis can significantly limit the functional independence of individuals, and given that 25% of the population experience these problems, the socioeconomic impact is immense. Exercise and self-management have proven benefits for these conditions, but most trials tailor interventions for specific joints. Epidemiological data demonstrates that many older people with degenerative joint problems experience pain and functional difficulty in other joints, seeking further healthcare input when these present. Managing multiple joint presentations simultaneously could potentially reduce the need for repeat visits to healthcare professionals as advice is frequently the same for differing site presentations. This single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial will determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an exercise and self-management intervention delivered to people over-50 with either hip, knee or lower back pain, compared to 'standard' GP care. A qualitative analysis will also establish the acceptability of the intervention. 352 people with chronic degenerative musculoskeletal pain of the hip, knee or lower back will be recruited from primary care. GP surgeries will be randomised to either the intervention or control arms. Participants in the intervention arm will receive a 6-week group exercise and self-management programme facilitated by a physiotherapist in primary care. Participants allocated to the control arm will continue under 'standard' GP care. The primary outcome measure is the Dysfunction Index of the Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA). Individual patient responses will be modelled using a mixed effects linear regression, allowing for the clustering effects. Resource use and related intervention costs will be estimated and broader resource use data will be collected using a version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory adapted for musculoskeletal relevance. In addition, a cost

  15. Wearable Vector Electrical Bioimpedance System to Assess Knee Joint Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersek, Sinan; Toreyin, Hakan; Teague, Caitlin N; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Jeong, Hyeon-Ki; Bavare, Miheer M; Wolkoff, Paul; Sawka, Michael N; Inan, Omer T

    2017-10-01

    We designed and validated a portable electrical bioimpedance (EBI) system to quantify knee joint health. Five separate experiments were performed to demonstrate the: 1) ability of the EBI system to assess knee injury and recovery; 2) interday variability of knee EBI measurements; 3) sensitivity of the system to small changes in interstitial fluid volume; 4) reducing the error of EBI measurements using acceleration signals; and 5) use of the system with dry electrodes integrated to a wearable knee wrap. 1) The absolute difference in resistance ( R) and reactance (X) from the left to the right knee was able to distinguish injured and healthy knees (p knee R was 2.5 Ω and for X was 1.2 Ω. 3) Local heating/cooling resulted in a significant decrease/increase in knee R (p knee R and X measured using the wet electrodes and the designed wearable knee wrap were highly correlated ( R 2 = 0.8 and 0.9, respectively). This study demonstrates the use of wearable EBI measurements in monitoring knee joint health. The proposed wearable system has the potential for assessing knee joint health outside the clinic/lab and help guide rehabilitation.

  16. Biochemical comparison of osteoarthritic knees with and without effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several symptom-relieving interventions have been shown to be efficacious among osteoarthritis (OA) patients with knee effusion; however, not every symptomatic knee OA patient has clinical effusion. Results may be over-generalized since it is unclear if effused knees represent a unique pathological condition or subset compared to knees without effusion. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if biochemical differences existed between OA knees with and without effusion. Methods The present cross-sectional study consisted of 22 volunteers (11 with knee effusion, 11 without knee effusion) with confirmed late-stage radiographic knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≥ 3). Synovial fluid samples were collected and analyzed using a custom multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine eight specific biomarker concentrations (e.g., catabolic, anabolic). Results Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and interleukin-10 were significantly higher in the knees with effusion than in the knees without effusion. Conclusions The biochemical differences that existed between knees with and without effusion provide support that OA subsets may exist, characterized by distinct biochemical characteristics and clinical findings (e.g., effusion). PMID:22122951

  17. Accurate intra-articular knee joint injection in the obese? 'Fat Chance!'-A clinical lesson and recommendations for secondary referral.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGarry, James G

    2011-04-12

    Abstract Corticosteroid joint injections are perceived as being an effective treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, with a very low risk of complications. While the procedure is often performed in secondary care by orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists (and trainees in either specialty), the role of general practitioners (GPs) in chronic disease management has long existed with joint injections also frequently performed in primary care. The perception that serious complications from corticosteroid knee joint injections are rare and that their benefits in treating symptomatic knee osteoarthritis significantly outweigh the risks has not been well addressed. We present a case of a 71-year-old obese female who presented to her general practitioner (GP) with worsening left knee pain and radiographic changes consistent with osteoarthritis. She was administered a corticosteroid joint injection, which gave minimal relief, and over the next few days resulted in worsening severe pain, erythema and swelling. She returned to the GP who commenced oral antibiotics and referred her to casualty. A large knee abscess was diagnosed and intravenous antibiotics were commenced. The patient was admitted under the orthopaedic surgeons with her treatment consisting of multiple surgical procedures over a prolonged duration. Although lengthy, her postoperative recovery was unremarkable. Based on this case report and our review of the literature, we highlight the potential complications associated with corticosteroid knee joint injections and suggest certain patients for whom we would recommend secondary referral before any intervention in primary care.

  18. [Rivaroxaban versus standard of care in venous thromboembolism prevention following hip or knee arthroplasty in daily clinical practice (Spanish data from the international study XAMOS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, J; Díaz de Rada, P; Lozano, L M; Martínez, J; Herrera, A

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban vs. standard treatment (ST) in the prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee replacement in daily clinical practice in Spain. A sub-analysis of the Spanish data in the XAMOS international observational study that included patients>18 years who received 10mg o.d. rivaroxaban or ST. up to 3 months after surgery. incidence of symptomatic/asymptomatic thromboembolic events, bleeding, mortality, and other adverse events; use of health resources and satisfaction after hospital discharge. Of the total 801 patients included, 410 received rivaroxaban and 391 ST (64.7% heparin, 24.0% fondaparinux, 11% dabigatran). The incidence of symptomatic thromboembolic events and major bleeding was similar in both groups (0.2% vs. 0.8% wit ST and 0.7% vs. 1.3% with ST [EMA criteria]/0.0% vs. 0.3% with ST [RECORD criteria]). The adverse events incidence associated with the drug was significantly higher rivaroxaban (overall: 4.4% vs. 0.8% with ST, P=.001; serious: 1.5% vs. 0.0% with ST, P=.03). The rivaroxaban used less health resources after discharge, and the majority considered the tolerability as «very good« and the treatment as «very comfortable». Rivaroxaban is at least as effective as ST in the prevention of venous thromboembolism prevention in daily clinical practice, with a similar incidence of haemorrhages. It provides greater satisfaction/comfort, and less health resources after discharge. These results should be interpreted taking into account the limitations inherent in observational studies. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention and management of knee osteoarthritis and knee cartilage injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Takumi; Nakamura, Kozo; Engebretsen, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Articular cartilage defects in the knee of young or active individuals remain a problem in orthopaedic practice. These defects have limited ability to heal and may progress to osteoarthritis. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis among athletes is higher than in the non-athletic population. The clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis are joint pain, limitation of range of motion and joint stiffness. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is confirmed by the symptoms and the radiological findings (narrowing joint space, osteophyte formation and subchondral sclerosis). There is no strong correlation between symptoms and radiographic findings. The aetiology of knee osteoarthritis is multifactorial. Excessive musculoskeletal loading (at work or in sports), high body mass index, previous knee injury, female gender and muscle weakness are well-known risk factors. The high-level athlete with a major knee injury has a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis. Cartilage injuries are frequently observed in young and middle-aged active athletes. Often this injury precedes osteoarthritis. Reducing risk factors can decrease the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. The prevention of knee injury, especially anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injury in sports, is important to avoid progression of knee osteoarthritis.

  20. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  1. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  2. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  3. Arthroscopic cartilage debridement by excimer laser in chondromalacia of the knee joint. A prospective randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunest, J; Löhnert, J

    1990-01-01

    A new operative technique in arthroscopic treatment of chondromalacia using ultraviolet laser systems is introduced. The postoperative results are evaluated in a prospective and randomized clinical trial. One hundred and forty patients stage II or III chondromalacia according to Outerbridge were randomly assigned to arthroscopic operation using either laser or mechanical instruments. After a 6-month follow-up period the clinical results were compared, guided by a specially designed modification of the Lysholm scoring scale. In the short-term follow-up laser surgery gave superior results in regard to reducing pain (P less than 0.05) and leading to a lower incidence of reactive synovitis (P less than 0.01). No difference was found in respect of disability and functional impairment. Our results lead to the conclusion that arthroscopic laser application seems to be a successful procedure in the treatment of degenerative cartilage disorders, providing precise ablation of tissue without significant thermal damage to the remaining cartilage.

  4. MR imaging of the posterolateral aspect of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Hideho; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshizako, Takeshi [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    The structures of the posterolateral aspect of the knee were evaluated with axial MR images. One hundred twelve knees of clinical cases without posterolateral injury were retrospectively reviewed, and 30 knees of 15 volunteers with no history of knee injury or pain were evaluated. The amount of joint effusion and visualization of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and popliteal tendon were classified according to three grades. The LCL and popliteal tendon were identified in 111 clinical cases (99%) and 28 volunteer knees (93%). Visualization of the LCL and popliteal tendon was facilitated in the presence of both joint effusion and fluid collection between the LCL and popliteal tendon. Fluid collection posterior to the femoral attachment of the popliteal tendon was seen in 79 clinical cases (71%) and 20 volunteer knees (67%). Based on cadaveric study, this was considered to be a potential fluid space for communication to the joint space. (author)

  5. MR imaging of the posterolateral aspect of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hideho; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The structures of the posterolateral aspect of the knee were evaluated with axial MR images. One hundred twelve knees of clinical cases without posterolateral injury were retrospectively reviewed, and 30 knees of 15 volunteers with no history of knee injury or pain were evaluated. The amount of joint effusion and visualization of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and popliteal tendon were classified according to three grades. The LCL and popliteal tendon were identified in 111 clinical cases (99%) and 28 volunteer knees (93%). Visualization of the LCL and popliteal tendon was facilitated in the presence of both joint effusion and fluid collection between the LCL and popliteal tendon. Fluid collection posterior to the femoral attachment of the popliteal tendon was seen in 79 clinical cases (71%) and 20 volunteer knees (67%). Based on cadaveric study, this was considered to be a potential fluid space for communication to the joint space. (author)

  6. Hydrotherapy versus conventional land-based exercise for the management of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana E; Valim, Valeria; Pessanha, Ana Paula C; Oliveira, Leda M; Myamoto, Samira; Jones, Anamaria; Natour, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrotherapy in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee compared with subjects with OA of the knee who performed land-based exercises. Sixty-four subjects with OA of the knee were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups that performed exercises for 18 weeks: a water-based exercise group and a land-based exercise group. The outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain in the previous week, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), pain during gait assessed by a VAS at rest and immediately following a 50-foot (15.24-m) walk test (50FWT), walking time measured at fast and comfortable paces during the 50FWT, and the Lequesne Index. Measurements were recorded by a blinded investigator at baseline and at 9 and 18 weeks after initiating the intervention. The 2 groups were homogenous regarding all parameters at baseline. Reductions in pain and improvements in WOMAC and Lequesne index scores were similar between groups. Pain before and after the 50FWT decreased significantly over time in both groups. However, the water-based exercise group experienced a significantly greater decrease in pain than the land-based exercise group before and after the 50FWT at the week-18 follow-up. Both water-based and land-based exercises reduced knee pain and increased knee function in participants with OA of the knee. Hydrotherapy was superior to land-based exercise in relieving pain before and after walking during the last follow-up. Water-based exercises are a suitable and effective alternative for the management of OA of the knee.

  7. Knee Arthrodesis After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. A total of 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed in Denmark from 1997 to 2013 were identified by linking the data using....... Differences in cumulative incidence were compared with the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 164 of the 165 arthrodeses were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of arthrodesis was 0.26% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 0.31%). The 5-year cumulative...

  8. The alignment of the knee joint in relationship to age and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study of an epidemiologi......INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in the axis of the knee joint in both radiologically osteoarthritic and non-osteoarthritic knees, on the basis of angles measurable in standardized clinical short knee radiographs, in a cross sectional study...

  9. Radiological imaging of osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wick, M.C.; Jaschke, W.; Klauser, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative age-related joint disease leading to typical degradation of articular cartilage with severe pain and limitation of joint motion. Although knee radiographs are widely considered as the gold standard for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis in clinical and scientific settings they increasingly have significant limitations in situations when resolution and assessment of cartilage is required. Analysis of osteoarthritis of the knee with conventional x-ray is associated with many technical limitations and is increasingly being replaced by high-quality assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or sonography both in the clinical routine and scientific studies. Novel imaging modalities such as MRI or ultrasound enable in vivo visualization of the quality of the cartilaginous structure and bone as well as all articular and periarticular tissue. Therefore, the limitations of radiographs in assessment of knee osteoarthritis could be overcome by these techniques. This review article aims to provide insights into the most important radiological features of knee osteoarthritis and systematic visualization with different imaging approaches. The demographic development in western industrialized countries predicts an increase of ageing-related osteoarthritis of the knee for the next decades. A systematic radiological evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis includes the assessment of the periarticular soft tissue, cartilaginous thickness, cartilage volume, possible cartilage defects, the macromodular network of hyaline cartilage, bone marrow edema, menisci and articular ligaments. Modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and sonography allow the limitations of conventional radiography to be overcome and to visualize the knee structures in great detail to quantitatively assess the severity of knee osteoarthritis. (orig.) [de

  10. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-05

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance on a Clinical Quadriceps Activation Battery Is Related to a Laboratory Measure of Activation and Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Michael; Struessel, Tamara; Paxton, Roger; Winters, Joshua; Baym, Carol; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relation between performance on a clinical quadriceps activation battery with (1) activation measured by doublet interpolation and (2) recovery of quadriceps strength and functional performance after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Planned secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. University research laboratory. Patients (N=162; mean age, 63±7y; 89 women) undergoing TKA. Patients were classified as high (quadriceps activation battery ≥4/6) or low (quadriceps activation battery ≤3/6) based on performance on the quadriceps activation battery measured 4 days after TKA. Differences between groups in activation and recovery at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after TKA were compared using a repeated-measures maximum likelihood model. The low quadriceps activation battery group demonstrated poorer quadriceps activation via doublet interpolation (P=.01), greater quadriceps strength loss (P=.01), and greater functional performance decline (all Pbattery group. Differences between low and high quadriceps activation battery groups on all measures did not persist at 3 and 12 months (all P>.05). Poor performance on the quadriceps activation battery early after TKA is related to poor quadriceps activation and poor recovery in the early postoperative period. Patients in the low quadriceps activation battery group took 3 months to recover to the same level as the high quadriceps activation battery group. The quadriceps activation battery may be useful in identifying individuals who need specific interventions to target activation deficits or different care pathways in the early postoperative period to speed recovery after TKA. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers for guideline adherence in knee osteoarthritis care: A qualitative study from the patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitaels, D.; Vankrunkelsven, P.; Desfosses, J.; Luyten, F.; Verschueren, S.; Assche, D. Van; Aertgeerts, B.; Hermens, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Guidelines for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are suboptimally implemented in clinical care. To improve guideline adherence, patients' perceived barriers and facilitators in current care were investigated. METHODS: Eleven patients with knee OA were extensively

  13. Adding a Vitamin D Supplement Likely Does Not Improve Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Vitamin D Supplement Likely Does Not Improve Knee Osteoarthritis By Colleen Labbe, M.S. | June 1, 2013 Vitamin D supplements likely do not improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to results from a clinical trial ...

  14. Neuromuscular Activity and Knee Kinematics in Adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS).......This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  15. MRI of the hyaline knee joint cartilage. Animal experimental and clinical studies; MRT des hyalinen Kniegelenkknorpels. Tierexperimentelle und klinische Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Prescher, A. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie; Nolte-Ernsting, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Buehne, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Scherer, K. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1994-02-01

    The value of MR imaging for the detection of hyaline cartilage lesions using 2-D spin-echo and 3-D gradient-echo imaging was evaluated in an animal experiment in 10 dogs and in a clinical study in 30 patients. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological and arthroscopy findings, respectively. Using MRI neither grade I nor grade II hyaline cartilage lesions were detectable. In the animal experiments 77% of grade III lesions and all the grade IV lesions were seen. However, in the clinical study only about the half of grade III and IV lesions were detected. 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging was superior to 2-D spin-echo imaging (p<0.001), while 3-D FLASH and 3-D FISP did not differ significantly in the detection rate (p<0.34). 3-D gradient-echo MR imaging seems to be the best method for the delineation of high grade cartilage lesions. However, early stages of cartilage degeneration are invisible even with this imaging modality. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Wertigkeit der MRT in der Erfassung von Knorpellaesionen mit 2-D-Spin-Echo- und 3-D-Grafienten-Echo-Sequenzen wurde in einer tierexperimentellen Untersuchung an 10 Hunden sowie in einer klinischen Studie an 30 Patienten ueberprueft. Die kernspintomographischen Ergebnisse wurden mit dem pathologisch-anatomischen Befund bzw. der Arthroskopie verglichen. MR-tomographisch konnten weder Grad-I- noch Grad-II-Knorpellaesionen erfasst werden. Die Erkennbarkeitsrate der Grad-III- und -IV-Laesionen lag fuer die tierexperimentellen Untersuchungen bei 77 bzw. 100%, waehrend klinisch nur etwa 50% dieser Veraenderungen erkannt werden konnten. Dabei waren die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen den 2-D-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen signifikant ueberlegen (p<0,001), waehrend sich die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen FISP und FLASH nicht voneinander unterschieden (p<0,34). Derzeit muessen die 3-D-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen als die beste Methode zur Erfassung hoehergradiger Knorpellaesionen angesehen werden. Fruehe Stadien der Knorpelschaedigung sind

  16. A method for performance comparison of polycentric knees and its application to the design of a knee for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, T S; Sujatha, S

    2017-08-01

    Polycentric knees for transfemoral prostheses have a variety of geometries, but a survey of literature shows that there are few ways of comparing their performance. Our objective was to present a method for performance comparison of polycentric knee geometries and design a new geometry. In this work, we define parameters to compare various commercially available prosthetic knees in terms of their stability, toe clearance, maximum flexion, and so on and optimize the parameters to obtain a new knee design. We use the defined parameters and optimization to design a new knee geometry that provides the greater stability and toe clearance necessary to navigate uneven terrain which is typically encountered in developing countries. Several commercial knees were compared based on the defined parameters to determine their suitability for uneven terrain. A new knee was designed based on optimization of these parameters. Preliminary user testing indicates that the new knee is very stable and easy to use. The methodology can be used for better knee selection and design of more customized knee geometries. Clinical relevance The method provides a tool to aid in the selection and design of polycentric knees for transfemoral prostheses.

  17. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  18. Analysis of the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Firsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012-2014 total 67 unicompartmental arthroplasty surgeries with use of Oxford knee meniscal bearing were performed. The surgeries were performed by a single surgeon. Minimally invasive approach was used. All patients were evaluated clinically, radiographically and with Oxford Knee score scale, Knee Society score scale and functional scale. Obtained data was processed with nonparametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results were processed using the statistical analysis application package SPSS, version 10.07. Analysis of of mid-term results showed that the average for Oxford Knee score increased from 16.4 (95% CI 9-23 to 41.3 (95% CI 29-47. Average for Knee Society score scale increased from 42.7 (95% CI 31-55 to 88.6 (95% CI 73-100. No occurrence of early postoperative complications have been reported. Statistically significant improvements of knee function in patients after unicompartmental arthroplasty have been observed. Unicompartmental arthroplasty currently can be considered as an advanced treatment option for medial knee joint pathology. Meniscal bearing cemented prostheses such as Oxford III are preferable.

  19. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sadigursky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  20. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Routine clinical knee MR reports: comparison of diagnostic performance at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for assessment of the articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Rhodes, Jeffrey A; Shah, Nehal; Gaviola, Glenn C; Gomoll, Andreas H; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-11-01

    Accurate assessment of knee articular cartilage is clinically important. Although 3.0 Tesla (T) MRI is reported to offer improved diagnostic performance, literature regarding the clinical impact of MRI field strength is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of clinical MRI reports for assessment of cartilage at 1.5 and 3.0 T in comparison to arthroscopy. This IRB-approved retrospective study consisted of 300 consecutive knees in 297 patients who had routine clinical MRI and arthroscopy. Descriptions of cartilage from MRI reports of 165 knees at 1.5 T and 135 at 3.0 T were compared with arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade of the arthroscopic grading were calculated for each articular surface at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Agreement between MRI and arthroscopy was calculated with the weighted-kappa statistic. Significance testing was performed utilizing the z-test after bootstrapping to obtain the standard error. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade were 61.4%, 82.7%, 62.2%, and 77.5% at 1.5 T and 61.8%, 80.6%, 59.5%, and 75.6% at 3.0 T, respectively. The weighted kappa statistic was 0.56 at 1.5 T and 0.55 at 3.0 T. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these parameters between 1.5 and 3.0 T. Factors potentially contributing to the lack of diagnostic advantage of 3.0 T MRI are discussed.

  2. Unusual lesions that distend the knee joint: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Luana T. Barros de, E-mail: luanatbl@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (HUPAA/UFAL), Maceio (Brazil). Hospital Universitario; Albuquerque Filho, Eolo Santana de; Batista, Laecio Leitao [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Moraes, Talita Peixoto de [Clinica Derbimagem, Recife, PE (Brazil); Pereira, Bruno Perez Guedes [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The high number of knee imaging exams at radiology clinics, together with the wide variety of knee disorders, calls for expanding the knowledge about the less common lesions seen in routine diagnostic practice. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to illustrate unusual lesions that distend the knee joint, selected by relevance and evaluated with multiple imaging modalities, including X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature. (author)

  3. Synovectomy of the knee with 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spooren, P.F.M.J.; Rasker, J.J.; Arens, R.P.J.H.; Ziekenhuis Ziekenzorg, Enschede

    1985-01-01

    In 33 patients with chronic arthritis of the knee, 48 knees were treated with an intra-articular injection of 5 mCi yttrium silicate 90 Y. There were 27 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 6 with osteoarthrosis (OA); the mean follow-up period was 33 months. At clinical investigation after 1 year, no signs of pain or swelling were found in 15 knees. In most cases, pain and swelling improved subjectively, with a mean duration of 11 months; in 20 knees, the improvement lasted more than 22 months. When radiographs showed severse destruction, 90 Y treatment was unsuccessful, but an important new finding was that most patients with mild or moderate radiological abormalities appeared to have a long-lasting improvement. The result did not correlate with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), haemoglobin or Rose titre at the time of injection or at follow up, suggesting that the result of the treatment is more dependent on local factors than on the disease activity. The results of 90 Y treatment in 6 OA knees with persistent swelling were promising regarding swelling, even in patients with moderate radiological abnormalities. The main side-effect was a sometimes painful swelling of the knee, which was always successfully treated with an intra-articular corticosteroid injection. In 90 Y-treated knees, the incidence of unstable joints was not significantly higher than in non-treated knees. In conclusion, 90 Y synovectomy may be a succesful treatment for patients older than 50 years with chronic arthritis of the knee due to RA and probably also OA, even when moderate radiological abnormalities are present. (orig.)

  4. [Guidelines for wise utilization of knee imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Eshed, Iris; Freedman, Yehuda; Beer, Yiftah; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kots, Yavvgeni; Adar, Eliyahu; Mann, Gideon

    2012-02-01

    The knee is a complex structure afflicted with diverse pathologies. Correct management of knee complaints demands wise utilization of imaging modalities, considering their accuracy in the specific clinical situation, the patient's safety and availability and financial issues. Some of these considerations are universal, while others are local, depending on medical and insurance systems. There is controversy and unclearness regarding the best imaging modality in different clinical situations. To develop clinical guidelines for utilizing knee imaging. Leading physicians in specialties associated with knee disease and imaging were invited to participate in a panel on the guidelines. Controversies were settled in the main panel or in sub-panels. The panel agreed on the principles in choosing from the various modalities, primarily medical accuracy, followed by patient safety, availability and cost. There was agreement that the physician is responsible to choose the most appropriate diagnostic tool, consulting, when necessary, on the advantages, limitations and risks of the various imaging modalities. A comprehensive table was compiled with the importance of the different imaging modalities in various clinical situations. For the first time, Israeli guidelines on wise utilization of knee imaging are presented. They take into consideration the clinical situations and also availability and financial issues specific to Israel. These guidelines will serve physicians of several disciplines and medical insurers to improve patient management efficiently.

  5. Retention of the posterior cruciate ligament versus the posterior stabilized design in total knee arthroplasty : a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, L.G.H.; Brouwer, R.W.; van den Akker-Scheek, I.; Bulstra, S.K.; van Raaij, J.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prosthetic design for the use in primary total knee arthroplasty has evolved into designs that preserve the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and those in which the ligament is routinely sacrificed (posterior stabilized). In patients with a functional PCL the decision which design is

  6. Migration and clinical outcome of mobile-bearing versus fixed-bearing single-radius total knee arthroplasty : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hamersveld, Koen T.; Marang-Van De Mheen, Perla J.; Van Der Heide, Huub J.L.; Van Der Linden-Van Der Zwaag, Henrica M.J.; Valstar, E.R.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose — Mobile-bearing total knee prostheses (TKPs) were developed in the 1970s in an attempt to increase function and improve implant longevity. However, modern fixed-bearing designs like the single-radius TKP may provide similar advantages. We compared tibial component

  7. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in knees with acute, traumatic extension deficit (the "locked knee"), and evaluated whether arthroscopy of knees with no mechanical pathology could be avoided by MRI evaluation. The study consisted...... of 50 patients who had an acute, traumatic extension deficit of the knee. All patients were submitted to MRI prior to arthroscopy. Following MRI and surgery, standardized forms were filled out, attempting to objectify the findings. The orthopaedic surgeon was not aware of the MRI result prior to surgery....... Evaluating MRI, all grade-3 meniscal lesions were considered able to cause a mechanical block as well as acute partial or total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-ruptures. ACL-ruptures with an old appearance were not considered able to cause locking. Assuming that arthroscopy was the gold standard...

  8. Dynamic knee alignment and collateral knee laxity and its variations in normal humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal eDeep

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of normal, arthritic and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non weight bearing position to standing weight bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees.

  9. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the STAR care pathway compared to usual care for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement: study protocol for a UK randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Bertram, Wendy; Beswick, Andrew D; Blom, Ashley W; Bruce, Julie; Burston, Amanda; Dennis, Jane; Garfield, Kirsty; Howells, Nicholas; Lane, Athene; McCabe, Candy; Moore, Andrew J; Noble, Sian; Peters, Tim J; Price, Andrew; Sanderson, Emily; Toms, Andrew D; Walsh, David A; White, Simon; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2018-02-21

    Approximately 20% of patients experience chronic pain after total knee replacement. There is little evidence for effective interventions for the management of this pain, and current healthcare provision is patchy and inconsistent. Given the complexity of this condition, multimodal and individualised interventions matched to pain characteristics are needed. We have undertaken a comprehensive programme of work to develop a care pathway for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement. This protocol describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of a complex intervention care pathway compared with usual care. This is a pragmatic two-armed, open, multi-centred randomised controlled trial conducted within secondary care in the UK. Patients will be screened at 2 months after total knee replacement and 381 patients with chronic pain at 3 months postoperatively will be recruited. Recruitment processes will be optimised through qualitative research during a 6-month internal pilot phase. Patients are randomised using a 2:1 intervention:control allocation ratio. All participants receive usual care as provided by their hospital. The intervention comprises an assessment clinic appointment at 3 months postoperatively with an Extended Scope Practitioner and up to six telephone follow-up calls over 12 months. In the assessment clinic, a standardised protocol is followed to identify potential underlying causes for the chronic pain and enable appropriate onward referrals to existing services for targeted and individualised treatment. Outcomes are assessed by questionnaires at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The co-primary outcomes are pain severity and pain interference assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory at 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes relate to resource use, function, neuropathic pain, mental well-being, use of pain medications, satisfaction with pain relief, pain frequency, capability

  10. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, Pjoint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Jumper's Knee (Patellar ... prevent continued damage to the knee. How the Knee Works To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  12. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  13. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Theodore T.

    2005-01-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty

  14. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  15. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...... surgeon seems to positively influence the rate of surgical complications and implant survival. The painful TKA knee should be thoroughly evaluated, but not revised except if a relevant indication can be established. The most frequent indications for revision are: aseptic loosening, instability, infection...

  16. Foreign body in the knee with no history of trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesudoss Prabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the knee joint are not uncommon. We report a case of sewing needle that migrated and embedded inside the knee with no history of trauma. Searching for any small foreign body in the knee joint is not easy in either open or arthroscopic procedures. In this case, the surgery was made by open method avoiding arthroscopy due to technical reasons. We emphasize careful history taking, clinical examination and, preferably, an open procedure for migrating tiny foreign bodies to facilitate accurate diagnosis, superior visualization and easier instrumentation to remove embedded foreign bodies in the knee.

  17. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Osborne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change in a measurement instrument for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis; the Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP). METHODS: The sample size was set to 20 persons, recruited from the outpatient osteoarthritis...... for intra-rater test (1.95). The three knee bend scores all had ICC above 0.50, showing fair-to-good reliability. None of the knee bend scores showed acceptable SEM and SDC. CONCLUSIONS: The reproducibility of the DAP pain score meets the demands for use in clinical practice and research. The total knee...

  18. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unkn......BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA......). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark...... TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01729520....

  19. Comparison of robot surgery modular and total knee arthroplasty kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Gokce; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Walker, Peter S; Karia, Raj

    2014-04-01

    The kinematics of seven knee specimens were measured from 0 to 120 degrees flexion using an up-and-down crouching machine. Motion was characterized by the positions of the centers of the lateral and medial femoral condyles in the anterior-posterior direction relative to a fixed tibia. A modular unicompartmental knee, trochlea flange, and patella resurfacing (multicompartmental knee [MCK] system) were implanted using a surgeon-interactive robot system that provided accurate surface matching. The MCK was tested, followed by standard cruciate retaining (CR) and posterior stabilized (PS) knees. The motion of the MCK was close to anatomic, especially on the medial side, in contrast to the CR and PS knees that showed abnormal motion features. Such a modular knee system, accurately inserted, has the potential for close to normal function in clinical application. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients.

  1. Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty aims at giving the patients the best available treatment at all times, being a dynamic entity. Fast-track combines evidence-based, clinical features with organizational optimization including a revision of traditions resulting in a streamlined pathway from...... on clinical and organizational aspects of fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty (I–IX). A detailed description of the fast-track set-up and its components is provided. Major results include identification of patient characteristics to predict length of stay and satisfaction with different aspects...... of the hospital stay (I); how to optimize analgesia by using a compression bandage in total knee arthroplasty (II); the clinical and organizational set-up facilitating or acting as barriers for early discharge (III); safety aspects following fast-track in the form of few readmissions in general (IV) and few...

  2. Gait Parameters and Functional Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Persona Knee System With Cruciate Retaining and Ultracongruent Knee Inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgopal, Ashok; Aggarwal, Kalpana; Khurana, Anshika; Rao, Arun; Vasdev, Attique; Pandit, Hemant

    2017-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a well-established treatment for managing end-stage symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Currently, different designs of prostheses are available with majority ensuring similar clinical outcomes. Altered surface geometry is introduced to strive toward gaining superior outcomes. We aimed to investigate any differences in functional outcomes between 2 different polyethylene designs namely the Persona CR (cruciate retaining) and Persona UC (ultracongruent) tibial inserts (Zimmer-Biomet, Warsaw, IN). This prospective single blind, single-surgeon randomized controlled trial reports on 105 patients, (66 female and 39 male), who underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty using the Persona knee system (Zimmer-Biomet) UC inserts in one side and CR inserts in the contralateral side. By a blind assessor, at regular time intervals patients were assessed in terms of function and gait. The functional knee scoring scales used were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Modified Knee Society Score. The gait parameters evaluated were foot pressure and step length. During the study period, no patient was lost to follow-up or underwent revision surgery for any cause. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores, Modified Knee Society Score, and knee range of motion of all 105 patients assessed preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years showed statistically better results (P < .05) for UC inserts. Gait analysis measuring foot pressures and step length, however, did not show any statistically significant differences at 2-year follow-up. Ultracongruent tibial inserts show significantly better functional outcomes as compared to CR inserts during a 2-year follow-up period. However, in this study these findings were not shown to be attributed to differences in gait parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Clinical usefulness of {sup 99mT}c HMPAO Leukocyte/{sup 99mT}c phytate bone marrow scintigraphy for diagnosis of prosthetic knee infection: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Pyo; Park, Ji Sun; Lee, Ah Young; Choi, Su Jung; Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun [Inje Univ., Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The preferred radionuclide imaging procedure for diagnosing prosthetic joint infection is combined radiolabeled leukocyte/{sup 99mT}c sulfur colloid bone marrow scintigraphy, which has an accuracy of over 90%. Unfortunately, sulfur colloid is no longer available in South Korea. in this study, we evaluated the usefulness of {sup 99mT}c phytate, a substitute for {sup 99mT}c sulfur colloid, when combined with radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy in suspected prosthetic knee infections. Eleven patients (nine women, two men; mean age 72{+-}6 years) with painful knee prostheses and a suspicion of infection underwent both {sup 99mT}c phytate bone marrow scintigraphy (BMS). The combined images were interpreted as positive for infection when radioactivity in the LS at the sits of clinical interest clearly exceeded that of the BMS (discordant); they were interpreted as negative when the increased activity in the LS was consistent with an increased activity in the BMS(concordant). The final diagnosis was made with microbiological or intraoperative findings and a clinical follow up of at least 12 months. Five of eleven patients were diagnosed as having an infected prosthesis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of the combined LS/BMS were 100%, 83%, 83%, 100% and 91%, respectively. We find that combined {sup 99mT}c HMPAO LS/{sup 99mT}c phytate BMS shows comparable diagnostic performance to other studies utilizing sulfur colloid. Combined {sup 99mT}c HMPAO LS/{sup 99mT}c phytate BMS is therefore expected to be an acceptable alternative to combined radiolabeled LS/{sup 99ms}ulfur colloid BMS for diagnosing prosthetic knee infections.

  4. SPECT/CT in patients with painful knee arthroplasty - what is the evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, Michael T.; Henckel, Johann; Rasch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    SPECT/CT is increasingly recognized as a promising imaging modality for the investigation of patients with a painful knee after knee arthroplasty. In this review article, we give an overview of the clinical value and current and future applications of SPECT/CT for patients with knee pain following joint arthroplasty. A detailed evidence-based literature review is performed and presented. (orig.)

  5. SPECT/CT in patients with painful knee arthroplasty - what is the evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, Michael T. [Kantonsspital Baselland-Bruderholz, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Henckel, Johann [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Rasch, Helmut [Kantonsspital Baselland-Bruderholz, Institute for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    SPECT/CT is increasingly recognized as a promising imaging modality for the investigation of patients with a painful knee after knee arthroplasty. In this review article, we give an overview of the clinical value and current and future applications of SPECT/CT for patients with knee pain following joint arthroplasty. A detailed evidence-based literature review is performed and presented. (orig.)

  6. Knee joint pain potentially due to bone alterations in a knee osteoarthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient's knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.

  7. Computed tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Byung Won; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Park, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae Hun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik; Kwon, Sae Hong

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of knee joint pathology has been mainly dependent on clinical manifestations and invasive procedures such as arthrography and arthroscopy etc. However, these procedures are invasive. Arthroscopy is performed under general anesthesia. Recently, with development of high resolution CT with thin slices and multiplanar reconstructions capability, CT could be used to verify the internal structures of knee joint in noninvasive or less invasive way. From June to December 1985, authors have experienced 19 cases of the knee joint CT. Among them, 13 cases were operated and confirmed. We concluded as follows. 1. The diagnostic accuracy of the knee CT was 100% in lateral meniscal tearing, 92.3% in medial mensical tearing, 92.3% in detachment of lateral collateral ligament, 92.3% in medial collateral ligament, 100% in tearing of cruciate ligaments. 2. CT could be considered as a primary diagnostic procedure in the knee pathology rather than more invasive arthroscopy or arthrography. 3. For the accurate diagnosis of knee joint pathology, CT, which can obtain thin slies, high resolution, multiplanar reconstructions, is indispensable.

  8. Standing Stability in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Being prevalent in the more than 40 years old persons, the knee osteoarthritis is one of the main factors in the function system failure mainly affecting their life. There is a type of instability in the persons with knee osteoarthritis, which is an increase in the domain and frequency of body pressure center. The aim of the present study was to compare the standing stability parameters in persons with knee osteoarthritis and healthy persons. Instrument & Methods: In this case-control, 15 patients with knee osteoarthritis referred to the physiotherapy clinic of the rehabilitation center and Al-Zahra hospital were studied in the muscle-skeletal research center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. The subjects were selected via stratified sampling method. As control group, 15 healthy persons were also studied in Isfahan. Total path length and the domain and frequency of pressure center in different directions were measured to assess the stability. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using descriptive statistics and paired T test. Findings: There were increases in the mean movement domain and the frequency of pressure center in the anterior-posterior and the internal-external directions, as well as in the total path proceeded by the pressure center in the internal-external direction, in the persons with knee osteoarthritis than the healthy persons (p0.05. Conclusion: Standing stability and balance in persons with knee osteoarthritis decreases compared to healthy persons.

  9. The volume of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziolis, Georg; Roehner, Eric; Windisch, Christoph; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Despite its clinical relevance, particularly in septic knee surgery, the volume of the human knee joint has not been established to date. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine knee joint volume and whether or not it is dependent on sex or body height. Sixty-one consecutive patients (joints) who were due to undergo endoprosthetic joint replacement were enrolled in this prospective study. During the operation, the joint volume was determined by injecting saline solution until a pressure of 200 mmHg was achieved in the joint. The average volume of all knee joints was 131 ± 53 (40-290) ml. The volume was not found to be dependent on sex, but it was dependent on the patients' height (R = 0.312, p = 0.014). This enabled an estimation of the joint volume according to V = 1.6 height - 135. The considerable inter-individual variance of the knee joint volume would suggest that it should be determined or at least estimated according to body height if the joint volume has consequences for the diagnostics or therapy of knee disorders.

  10. CLINICAL STUDY OF THE CHRONOLOGICAL CHANGES IN KNEE ALIGNMENT PATTERN IN NORMAL SOUTH-EAST NIGERIAN CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 0 AND 5 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezeuko V.C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to establish the chronological changes in knee alignment pattern in normal South-East Nigerian children aged between 0 and 5 years. A total number of 1450 subjects (680 males and 770 females were used for the study. The intercondylar/intermalleolar distances were measured using a vernier caliper with the subjects standing erect in anatomical position to determine straight knee, genu valgum and genu varum. The data was analysed with Microsoft Excel version 2007. The prevalence was presented as percentage (%.The result showed that the subjects have varum by the first year of life, prevalently genu valgum in type by the second year, valgum by the third year, neutral by the fourth and fifth year.

  11. [Knee disarticulation and through-knee amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    A knee disarticulation or a through-knee stump is superior compared to a transfemoral stump. The thigh muscles are all preserved, and the muscle balance remains undisturbed. The range of motion of the hip joint is not limited. The bulbous shape of the stump allows full weight bearing at the stump end and can easily be fitted with a prosthesis. An amputee with a bilateral knee disarticulation is able to walk "barefoot". A more distal amputation level, e.g., an ultra-short transtibial amputation, is not possible. Important alternative to transfemoral amputations. Possible for any etiology except for Buerger-Winiwarter's disease. New indications are infected and loosened total knee replacements. Preservation of the knee joint is possible. Knee disarticulation is a very atraumatic procedure, compared to transfemoral amputations. Neither bones nor muscles have to be severed, just skin, ligaments, vessels, and nerves. Even the meniscal cartilages may be left in place to act as axial shock absorbers. The cartilage of the femur is not resected, but only bevelled in case of osteoarthritis. There are no tendon attachments or myoplastic procedures necessary. The patella remains in place and is held in position only by the retinacula. Skin closure must be performed without the slightest tension, and if possible not in the weight-bearing area. Transcondylar amputations across the femoral condyles only are indicated when there are not sufficient soft tissues for wound closure of a knee disarticulation. Alternatives as the techniques of Gritti, Klaes, and Eigler, the shortening of the femur and the Sauerbruch's rotation plasty [14] are presented and discussed. The risk of decubital ulcers is rather high. Correct bandaging of the stump is, therefore, particularly important. Prosthetic fitting is possible 3-6 weeks after surgery. The type of prosthesis depends on the amputee's activity level. The superior performance of amputees with knee disarticulations in sports prove the

  12. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part one: introduction, and mind-body exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Imoto, Aline Mizusaki; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Gallardo, Inmaculada C Álvarez; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; Angelis, Gino De; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective mind-body exercise programs and provide clinicians and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning non-traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with mind-body exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, D-) was used, based on statistical significance ( P osteoarthritis. Hatha Yoga demonstrated significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B) and physical function (Grade C+). Tai Chi Qigong demonstrated significant improvement for quality of life (Grade B), pain relief (Grade C+) and physical function (Grade C+). Sun style Tai Chi gave significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B) and physical function (Grade B). Mind-body exercises are promising approaches to reduce pain, as well as to improve physical function and quality of life for individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

  13. Relationship between Widening and Position of the Tunnels and Clinical Results of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction to Knee Osteoarthritis: 30 Patients at a Minimum Follow-Up of 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Mejias, Juan Diego; Garcia-Gonzalez, Benjamin; Alcocer-Perez-España, Luis; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Berjano, Pedro

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the relationship between tunnel position and widening and long-term clinical results in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, a retrospective cohort of 30 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with double semitendinous plus double gracilis (SAC technique) with longer than 10-year follow-up was selected. CT scans in the first 3 months and at final follow-up was evaluated. Position, angle, and widening of tunnels including Nebelung criteria were recorded in all CT scans. Physical, KT-1000, and clinical evaluation were performed at final follow-up. Outcomes and knee arthritis severity were evaluated at final follow-up. Mean follow-up was 11.2 ± 1.2. At final follow-up, 85 and 57% of tibial and femoral tunnels, respectively, developed some degree of enlargement. Frontal tibial angle (mean) was 72°, sagittal tibial angle 63°, frontal femoral angle 47°, sagittal femoral angle 20°, and tunnels divergence angle 36°. Preoperatively, KT-1000 30L and Lachman test scores were 5.52 and 5.79 respectively. In the last follow-up, 30L and manual Lachman test scores were 0.97 and 1.13, respectively ( p  verticalization. Tibial tunnel dilation was associated with long-term degenerative changes but not with final knee instability. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. The influence of knee pain location on symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life in older adults with chronic knee pain: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Chen, Yi-Fan; Piva, Sara R.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Kwoh, C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether knee pain location can influence symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life in older adults with chronic knee pain. Methods A total of 2959 painful knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database were analyzed. Trained interviewers recorded patient-reported location of knee pain. Painful knees were divided into three groups of patellofemoral only pain, tibiofemoral only pain, and combined pain. Self-reported knee-specific symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life were assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Results The most common knee pain pattern was tibiofemoral only pain (62%), followed by patellofemoral only pain (23%) and combined pain (15%). The combined pain pattern was associated with greater odds of reporting pain, symptoms, sports or recreational activity limitations and lower knee-related quality of life compared to either isolated knee pain patterns, after adjusting for demographics and radiographic disease severity. Individual item analysis further revealed that patients with combined pain had greater odds of reporting difficulty with daily weightbearing activities that required knee bending compared to tibiofemoral or patellofemoral only pain patterns. Furthermore, symptoms, functional status, and knee-related quality of life were comparable between patients with patellofemoral and tibiofemoral only pain patterns, after adjusting for demographics and radiographic disease severity. Discussion Combined patellofemoral and tibiofemoral pain is associated with poorer clinical presentation compared to isolated knee pain from either location. Additionally, patellofemoral pain in isolation may be as important as tibiofemoral pain in causing symptoms and functional limitation in older adults with chronic knee pain. PMID:26308705

  15. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  16. Above and below knee femoropopliteal VIABAHN®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackles, Christopher; Rundback, John H; Herman, Kevin; David, Yitzchak; Barkarma, Ravit

    2015-04-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of VIABAHN® stent grafts deployed across the knee to those deployed above the knee. The placement of stent-grafts across the knee joint and extending into the distal popliteal artery has been avoided due to a perceived higher risk of stent fractures, restenosis, and thrombosis due to the unique hemodynamic forces in this region. A retrospective evaluation was conducted of 114 patients in 127 limbs. Patients were divided into two groups based on the location of the distal end of the deployed VIABAHN® stent: above knee (AK) (n=89) in which the VIABAHN® implant ended at or above the femoral condyles and below the knee (BK) (n=38) with extension of the graft into the below knee popliteal segment. Study end points were loss of primary, assisted, and secondary patency. One year primary, assisted, and secondary patency rates in the AK versus BK group were 67.7% vs. 47.2% (P=0.0092), 77.1% vs. 53.7% (P=0.0022), and 86.3% vs. 59.8% (P=0.0035), respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated an increased relative risk of a primary [RR=2.07 (P=0.001)], assisted [RR=2.34 (P=0.002)], or secondary events [RR=2.98 (P=0.002)] in patients when the stent was placed below the femoral condyles. Major amputations occurred in 10% of AK and 34% of BK patients (P=0.002). VIABAHN® stent grafts have a significantly lower clinical patency and higher rates of amputation when they extend across the knee joint. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biometric identification using knee X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior; Ling, Shari; Rahimi, Salim; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2009-01-01

    Identification of people often makes use of unique features of the face, fingerprints and retina. Beyond this, a similar identifying process can be applied to internal parts of the body that are not visible to the unaided eye. Here we show that knee X-rays can be used for the identification of individual persons. The image analysis method is based on the wnd-charm algorithm, which has been found effective for the diagnosis of clinical conditions of knee joints. Experimental results show that the rank-10 identification accuracy using a dataset of 425 individuals is ~56%, and the rank-1 accuracy is ~34%. The dataset contained knee X-rays taken several years apart from each other, showing that the identifiable features correspond to specific persons, rather than the present clinical condition of the joint.

  18. A new approach to knee joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarychta, P

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of this new approach dedicated to knee arthroplasty is to provide an automated method for determining the cutting planes of both the head of femur and the head of tibia in knee replacement surgery. This paper shows a new approach differing from standard procedures associated with manual determination of the mechanical axis of the lower extremity (during surgery) and replacing them with a procedure based on the imprints (with selected cutting planes) of the two heads of bones. Both these imprints have been performed on the basis of the toposcan of the lower limb (before surgery). This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested in clinical CT images of the lower limb in the coronal and transverse planes (61 studies) and in clinical MRI studies of the knee joint in coronal plane (107 studies). Correct results were obtained for about 90% cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  20. Soft tissue twisting injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, T.; Shapiro, M.

    2001-01-01

    Twisting injuries occur as a result of differential motion of different tissue types in injuries with some rotational force. These injuries are well described in brain injuries but, to our knowledge, have not been described in the musculoskeletal literature. We correlated the clinical examination and MR findings of 20 patients with twisting injuries of the soft tissues around the knee. Design and patients: We prospectively followed the clinical courses of 20 patients with knee injuries who had clinical histories and MR findings to suggest twisting injuries of the subcutaneous tissues. Patients with associated internal derangement of the knee (i.e., meniscal tears, ligamentous or bone injuries) were excluded from this study. MR findings to suggest twisting injuries included linear areas of abnormal dark signal on T1-weighted sequences and abnormal bright signal on T2-weighted or short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences and/or signal to suggest hemorrhage within the subcutaneous tissues. These MR criteria were adapted from those established for indirect musculotendinous junction injuries. Results: All 20 patients presented with considerable pain that suggested internal derangement on physical examination by the referring orthopedic surgeons. All presented with injuries associated with rotational force. The patients were placed on a course of protected weight-bearing of the affected extremity for 4 weeks. All patients had pain relief by clinical examination after this period of protected weight-bearing. Twisting injuries of the soft tissues can result in considerable pain that can be confused with internal derangement of the knee on physical examination. Soft tissue twisting injuries need to be recognized on MR examinations as they may be the cause of the patient's pain despite no MR evidence of internal derangement of the knee. The demonstration of soft tissue twisting injuries in a patient with severe knee pain but no documented internal derangement on MR

  1. Efficacy of Intra-articular Injection of a Newly Developed Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF) Versus Hyaluronic Acid on Pain and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Ahangar, Azadeh Gharooee; Abadi, Porya Hassan; Mojgani, Parviz; Ahangar, Omid Gharooi

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives: Knee osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of intra-articular injection of a newly developed plasma rich in growth factor (PRGF) versus hyaluronic acid (HA) on pain and function of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: In this single-blinded randomized clinical trial, patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of knee were assigned to receive 2 intra-articular injections of our newly developed PRGF in 3 weeks or 3 weekly injections of HA. Our primary outcome was the mean change from baseline until 2 and 6 months post intervention in scores of visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Lequesne index. We used analysis of variance for repeated-measures statistical test. Results: A total of 69 patients entered final analysis. The mean age of patients was 58.2 ± 7.41 years and 81.2% were women. In particular, total WOMAC index decreased from 42.9 ± 13.51 to 26.8 ± 13.45 and 24.4 ± 16.54 at 2 and 6 months in the newly developed PRGF group (within subjects P = .001), and from 38.8 ± 12.62 to 27.8 ± 11.01 and 27.4 ± 11.38 at 2 and 6 months in the HA group (within subjects P = .001), respectively (between subjects P = .631). There was no significant difference between PRGF and HA groups in patients’ satisfaction and minor complications of injection, whereas patients in HA group reported significantly lower injection-induced pain. Conclusions: In 6 months follow up, our newly developed PRGF and HA, both are effective options to decrease pain and improvement of function in patients with symptomatic mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. PMID:29051707

  2. Efficacy of Intra-articular Injection of a Newly Developed Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF) Versus Hyaluronic Acid on Pain and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Ahangar, Azadeh Gharooee; Abadi, Porya Hassan; Mojgani, Parviz; Ahangar, Omid Gharooi

    2017-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of intra-articular injection of a newly developed plasma rich in growth factor (PRGF) versus hyaluronic acid (HA) on pain and function of patients with knee osteoarthritis. In this single-blinded randomized clinical trial, patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of knee were assigned to receive 2 intra-articular injections of our newly developed PRGF in 3 weeks or 3 weekly injections of HA. Our primary outcome was the mean change from baseline until 2 and 6 months post intervention in scores of visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Lequesne index. We used analysis of variance for repeated-measures statistical test. A total of 69 patients entered final analysis. The mean age of patients was 58.2 ± 7.41 years and 81.2% were women. In particular, total WOMAC index decreased from 42.9 ± 13.51 to 26.8 ± 13.45 and 24.4 ± 16.54 at 2 and 6 months in the newly developed PRGF group (within subjects P  = .001), and from 38.8 ± 12.62 to 27.8 ± 11.01 and 27.4 ± 11.38 at 2 and 6 months in the HA group (within subjects P  = .001), respectively (between subjects P  = .631). There was no significant difference between PRGF and HA groups in patients' satisfaction and minor complications of injection, whereas patients in HA group reported significantly lower injection-induced pain. In 6 months follow up, our newly developed PRGF and HA, both are effective options to decrease pain and improvement of function in patients with symptomatic mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis.

  3. Efficacy of Intra-articular Injection of a Newly Developed Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF Versus Hyaluronic Acid on Pain and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Raeissadat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Knee osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of intra-articular injection of a newly developed plasma rich in growth factor (PRGF versus hyaluronic acid (HA on pain and function of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: In this single-blinded randomized clinical trial, patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of knee were assigned to receive 2 intra-articular injections of our newly developed PRGF in 3 weeks or 3 weekly injections of HA. Our primary outcome was the mean change from baseline until 2 and 6 months post intervention in scores of visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, and Lequesne index. We used analysis of variance for repeated-measures statistical test. Results: A total of 69 patients entered final analysis. The mean age of patients was 58.2 ± 7.41 years and 81.2% were women. In particular, total WOMAC index decreased from 42.9 ± 13.51 to 26.8 ± 13.45 and 24.4 ± 16.54 at 2 and 6 months in the newly developed PRGF group (within subjects P  = .001, and from 38.8 ± 12.62 to 27.8 ± 11.01 and 27.4 ± 11.38 at 2 and 6 months in the HA group (within subjects P  = .001, respectively (between subjects P  = .631. There was no significant difference between PRGF and HA groups in patients’ satisfaction and minor complications of injection, whereas patients in HA group reported significantly lower injection-induced pain. Conclusions: In 6 months follow up, our newly developed PRGF and HA, both are effective options to decrease pain and improvement of function in patients with symptomatic mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis.

  4. ESB Clinical Biomechanics Award 2008: Complete data of total knee replacement loading for level walking and stair climbing measured in vivo with a follow-up of 6-10 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinlein, Bernd; Kutzner, Ines; Graichen, Friedmar; Bender, Alwina; Rohlmann, Antonius; Halder, Andreas M; Beier, Alexander; Bergmann, Georg

    2009-05-01

    Detailed information about the loading of the knee joint is required for various investigations in total knee replacement. Up to now, gait analysis plus analytical musculo-skeletal models were used to calculate the forces and moments acting in the knee joint. Currently, all experimental and numerical pre-clinical tests rely on these indirect measurements which have limitations. The validation of these methods requires in vivo data; therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide in vivo loading data of the knee joint. A custom-made telemetric tibial tray was used to measure the three forces and three moments acting in the implant. This prosthesis was implanted into two subjects and measurements were obtained for a follow-up of 6 and 10 months, respectively. Subjects performed level walking and going up and down stairs using a self-selected comfortable speed. The subjects' activities were captured simultaneously with the load data on a digital video tape. Customized software enabled the display of all information in one video sequence. The highest mean values of the peak load components from the two subjects were as follows: during level walking the forces were 276%BW (percent body weight) in axial direction, 21%BW (medio-lateral), and 29%BW (antero-posterior). The moments were 1.8%BW*m in the sagittal plane, 4.3%BW*m (frontal plane) and 1.0%BW*m (transversal plane). During stair climbing the axial force increased to 306%BW, while the shear forces changed only slightly. The sagittal plane moment increased to 2.4%BW*m, while the frontal and transversal plane moments decreased slightly. Stair descending produced the highest forces of 352%BW (axial), 35%BW (medio-lateral), and 36%BW (antero-posterior). The sagittal and frontal plane moments increased to 2.8%BW*m and 4.6%BW*m, respectively, while the transversal plane moment changed only slightly. Using the data obtained, mechanical simulators can be programmed according to realistic load profiles. Furthermore

  5. Intra-articular Autologous Conditioned Plasma Injections Provide Safe and Efficacious Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis: An FDA-Sanctioned, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick A

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections have become an intriguing treatment option for osteoarthritis (OA), particularly OA of the knee. Despite the plethora of PRP-related citations, there is a paucity of high-level evidence that is comparable, cohort specific, dose controlled, injection protocol controlled, and double-blinded. To determine the safety and efficacy of leukocyte-poor PRP autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) for knee OA treatment through a feasibility trial regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. In accordance with FDA protocol, patient selection was based on strict inclusion/exclusion criteria; 114 patients were screened, and 30 were ultimately included in the study. These patients were randomized to receive either ACP (n = 15) or saline placebo (n = 15) for a series of 3 weekly injections. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores served as the primary efficacy outcome measure. Patients were followed for 1 year. No adverse events were reported for ACP administration. Furthermore, the results demonstrated no statistically significant difference in baseline WOMAC scores between the 2 groups. However, in the ACP group, WOMAC scores at 1 week were significantly decreased compared with baseline scores, and the scores for this group remained significantly lower throughout the study duration. At the study conclusion (12 months), subjects in the ACP group had improved their overall WOMAC scores by 78% from their baseline score, compared with 7% for the placebo group. ACP is safe and provides quantifiable benefits for pain relief and functional improvement with regard to knee OA. No adverse events were reported for ACP administration. After 1 year, WOMAC scores for the ACP subjects had improved by 78% from their baseline score, whereas scores for the placebo control group had improved by only 7%. Other joints affected with OA may also benefit from this

  6. Periosteal Electrical Dry Needling as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James; Butts, Raymond; Young, Ian; Mourad, Firas; Galante, Victoria; Bliton, Paul; Tanner, Michelle; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2018-05-28

    To compare the effects of adding electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program on pain, stiffness, function, and disability in individuals with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two hundred and forty-two participants (n=242) with painful knee OA were randomized to receive 6 weeks of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise (n=121) or manual therapy and exercise (n=121). The primary outcome was related-disability as assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index at 3 months. Individuals receiving the combination of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise experienced significantly greater improvements in related-disability (WOMAC: F=35.504; P0.82) for all outcome measures in favor of the electrical dry needling group at 3 months. The inclusion of electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program was more effective for improving pain, function and related-disability than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in individuals with painful knee OA. Therapy, Level 1b. Prospectively registered February 10, 2015 on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02373631)This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  7. A low-fat yoghurt supplemented with a rooster comb extract on muscle joint function in adults with mild knee pain: a randomized, double blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa-Maria; Martorell, Isabel; Giralt, Montserrat; Pedret, Anna; Taltavull, Núria; Romeu, Marta; Rodríguez, Àurea; Moriña, David; Lopez de Frutos, Victor; Montero, Manuel; Casajuana, Maria-Carmen; Pérez, Laura; Faba, Jenny; Bernal, Gloria; Astilleros, Anna; González, Roser; Puiggrós, Francesc; Arola, Lluís; Chetrit, Carlos; Martinez-Puig, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Preliminary results suggested that oral-administration of rooster comb extract (RCE) rich in hyaluronic acid (HA) was associated with improved muscle strength. Following these promising results, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE rich in HA on muscle function in adults with mild knee pain; a symptom of early osteoarthritis. Participants (n = 40) received low-fat yoghurt (125 mL d(-1)) supplemented with 80 mg d(-1) of RCE and the placebo group (n = 40) consumed the same yoghurt without the RCE, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel trial over 12 weeks. Using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 4), RCE consumption, compared to control, increased the affected knee peak torque, total work and mean power at 180° s(-1), at least 11% in men (p < 0.05) with no differences in women. No dietary differences were noted. These results suggest that long-term consumption of low-fat yoghurt supplemented with RCE could be a dietary tool to improve muscle strength in men, associated with possible clinical significance. However, further studies are needed to elucidate reasons for these sex difference responses observed, and may provide further insight into muscle function.

  8. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (pknee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  9. Arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in an otherwise normal knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheller, G; Sobau, C; Bülow, J U

    2001-01-01

    To determine the clinical, functional, and radiographic long-term results of patients who underwent arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in an otherwise normal knee. Type of Study: This was a retrospective case-control study....

  10. Clinical trial of {sup 165}Dy-HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in the treatment of Rheumatoid knee synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Yoo, D. H.; Bae, S. C.; Jun, J. B. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M.; Hong, S. W.; Lee, S. Y.; Cheon, D. G.; Kim, S. J. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The untreated, chronic synovial inflammation leads to pannus formation and eventual destruction of the articular cartilage. In cases where medical therapy was unsuccessful, surgical or radiation synovectomy is necessary especially in the knee joints. The advantages of radiation synovectomy over surgical synovectomy are (1) greater destruction of diseased synovium, (2) reduced potential for blood clots and infection, (3) no requirement for anesthesia, and (4) less costly and less time consuming. Recently KAERI developed Dy-165 HMA, which was characterized by the absence of iron and a higher concentration of dysprosium. And then more recently KAERI also developed {sup 166}Ho-CHICO, which was characterized by relatively longer half-life(26.8 hr), more biological due to organic nature of chitosan, more even spatial distribution due to colloidal solution and more absorbable to synovium than Dy-165 HMA. We studied to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiation synovectomy with Dy-165 HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in chronic rheumatoid synovitis with knee. The present study indicates that the Dy-165 HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO are an effective and safe agent for radiation synovectomy. But further large scaled long-term follow up study and controlled study with steroid only are required. 15 refs. (author)

  11. Synovial folds in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulated by arthroscopic insight into central abnormalities of the knee joint and by the large number of unexplained case of 'anterior knee pain', we have studied the synovia in more than 2000 contrast examinations of the joint. Surprisingly, and contrary to the views expressed in the literature, the clinically significant plica parapatellaris medialis was seen as frequently during pneumo-arthrography as during more complex procedures. Abnormalities in the synovial fold emerged as a discreet disease identified as the 'medial shelf syndrome' and should be included in the differential diagnosis of causes of pain round the lower end of the femur and patella. (orig.) [de

  12. Bone scan features in spontaneous knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattimo, A; Merlo, F; Bertelli, P; Burroni, L

    1992-01-01

    In 21 patients with "spontaneous" knee pain, 99mTc-MDP bone scan was found to be more sensitive than clinical and radiographic examination in detecting alterations of the joint components. These alterations were shown by increased radionuclide uptake in the compartments where pain was present, which was most commonly the medial femorotibial compartment, although the femoropatellar compartment was also frequently affected. The authors conclude that bone scan should be the first imaging study performed on the knee in order to establish if further tests are necessary.

  13. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make everyday tasks easier. Practice using a cane, walker , crutches , or a wheelchair correctly. On the ... ask your doctor Knee joint replacement - discharge Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Surgical ...

  14. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  15. Prevalent knee pain and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of knee pain in active athletes and to investigate potential associations to type, amount and duration of sports participation. MEASUREMENTS: 339 athletes gave information about occupation, sports activity and different features of knee pain, based...... on a self-filled questionnaire. MAIN RESULTS: The prevalence of knee pain within the preceding 12 months, constant or recurrent knee pain, absence from sport and absence from work due to knee pain, was 54%, 34%, 19% and 4%, respectively. Knee pain was positively associated with years of jogging...... and with weekly hours of participation in competitive gymnastics but negatively with weekly hours of tennis. Constant or recurrent knee pain was positively associated with years of swimming. Absence from sport due to knee pain was positively associated with weekly hours of soccer participation. CONCLUSIONS: Knee...

  16. The influence of below-knee compression garments on knee-joint proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Shashank; Driller, Matthew W; Masters, Rich S W

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of below-knee compression garments on proprioception accuracy under, information processing constraints designed to cause high or low conscious attention to the task. In a counterbalanced, single-blinded, crossover trial, 44 healthy participants (26 male/18 female) with a mean age of 22.7±6.9 years performed an active joint repositioning task using their nondominant and their dominant leg, with and without below-knee compression and with and without conducting a secondary task. Analysis of variance revealed no main effect of leg dominance and no interactions (p's>0.05). However, a main effect was evident for both compression (F 1, 43 =84.23, pknee proprioception under differential information processing constraints. We conclude that proprioception accuracy of the knee joint is significantly enhanced post application of below-knee compression garments and when a secondary task is conducted concurrently with active joint repositioning. The findings suggest that below-knee compression garments may improve proprioception of the knee, regardless of leg dominance, and that secondary tasks that direct attention away from proprioceptive judgments may also improve proprioception, regardless of the presence of compression. Clinical implications are discussed with respect to proprioception in modern.sports and rehabilitation settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Taking care of your new knee joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few ...

  18. [Research progress of three-dimensional digital model for repair and reconstruction of knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lu; Li, Yanlin; Hu, Meng

    2013-01-01

    To review recent advance in the application and research of three-dimensional digital knee model. The recent original articles about three-dimensional digital knee model were extensively reviewed and analyzed. The digital three-dimensional knee model can simulate the knee complex anatomical structure very well. Based on this, there are some developments of new software and techniques, and good clinical results are achieved. With the development of computer techniques and software, the knee repair and reconstruction procedure has been improved, the operation will be more simple and its accuracy will be further improved.

  19. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Wongsak, Siwadol; Uthadorn, Krisorn; Panpikoon, Tanapong; Jittorntam, Paisan; Aryurachai, Katcharin; Angchaisukisiri, Pantap; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj

    2015-01-01

    Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA) injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR). However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours). Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA) level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  20. Medium-term evaluation of total knee arthroplasty without patellar replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wanderley Vasconcelos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mid-term evaluate patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. METHODS: It was realized a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. In all patients clinical examination was done based on the protocol of the Knee Society Scoring System, which assessed pain, range of motion, stability, contraction, knee alignment and function, and radiological evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients were evaluated. Of these, 07 were operated only on left knee, 12 only on right knee and 17 were operated bilaterally, totaling 53 knees. Ages ranged from 26 to 84 years. Of the 53 knees evaluated, 33 (62.26% had no pain. The maximum flexion range of motion averaged 104.7°. No knee had difficulty in active extension. As to the alignment for anatomical axis twelve knees (22.64% showed deviation between 0° and 4° varus. Thirty-nine (75.49% knees showed pace without restriction and the femorotibial angle ranged between 3° varus and 13° valgus with an average of 5° valgus. The patellar index ranged from 0.2 to 1.1. CONCLUSION: Total knee arthroplasty whitout patellar resurfacing provides good results in mid-term evaluation.

  1. Civamide cream 0.075% in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a 12-week randomized controlled clinical trial with a longterm extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Thomas J; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Haselwood, Doug M; Ellison, William T; Ervin, John E; Gordon, Richard D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Archambault, W Tad; Sampson, Allan R; Fezatte, Heidi B; Phillips, Scott B; Bernstein, Joel E

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of civamide cream 0.075% for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We conducted a 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study with a 52-week open-label extension. Patients with OA of the knee received either civamide cream 0.075% or a lower dose of civamide cream, 0.01%, as the control. The 3 co-primary endpoints in the double-blind study were the time-weighted average (TWA) of change from baseline to Day 84 in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale, the WOMAC physical function subscale, and the Subject Global Evaluation (SGE). In the 52-week open-label extension study, the Osteoarthritis Pain Score and SGE were assessed. A total of 695 patients were randomized to receive civamide cream 0.075% (n = 351) or civamide cream 0.01% (control; n = 344) in the double-blind study. Significance in favor of civamide cream 0.075% was achieved for the TWA for all 3 co-primary efficacy variables: WOMAC pain (p = 0.009), WOMAC physical function (p < 0.001), and SGE (p = 0.008); and at Day 84 for these 3 variables (p = 0.013, p < 0.001, and p = 0.049, respectively). These analyses accounted for significant baseline-by-treatment interactions. In the 52-week open-label extension, efficacy was maintained. Civamide cream 0.075% was well tolerated throughout the studies. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of civamide cream for up to 1 year of continuous use. Civamide cream, with its lack of systemic absorption, does not have the potential for serious systemic toxicity, in contrast to several other OA treatments.

  2. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist XXX. Sonographic assessment of the painful knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenagh, G; Filippucci, E; Delle Sedie, A; Iagnocco, A; Scirè, C A; Riente, L; Montecucco, C; Valesini, G; Bombardieri, S; Grassi, W

    2010-01-01

    The knee joint is a frequent focus of attention for rheumatologists when assessing patients presenting to a clinic and may represent underlying intra-articular inflammatory pathology or involvement of the surrounding soft tissues. This study describes the correlation between clinical and ultrasound findings in patients presenting with a variety of rheumatic disorders and knee pain. US imaging provides for a sensitive and detailed identification of different intra- and peri-articular pathology responsible for knee pain.

  3. Ultrasonographic assessment of pes anserinus tendon and pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktas, Hasan; Dundar, Umit; Adar, Sevda; Solak, Ozlem; Ulasli, Alper Murat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic (US) findings of pes anserinus tendon and bursa in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with or without clinical pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome (PATBS). A total of 157 female patients with the diagnosis of knee OA on both knees (314 knees), and 30 age, and body mass index- matched healthy female controls without knee pain (60 knees), were included in the study. PATBS was clinically diagnosed. US evaluation parameters were the measurement of the thickness of pes anserinus tendon insertion region (PA) and examination of the morphologic intratendinous PA tissue characteristics and pes anserinus bursitis (PAB). Radiographic knee osteoarthritis graded I-IV according to Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) for each knee was recorded. Pain and functional status were assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). There were 183 PATBS (58.3%) clinical diagnoses among the 314 knees with OA. The mean thickness of PA in the patients with knee OA graded 1,2,3,4 with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the controls (p = 0.001). The mean thickness of PA in knees with OA KL graded 3 and 4 with/without PATBS, was greater than knees with OA KL graded 1 and 2 with/without PATBS (p < 0,05) (except knee OA KL graded 2 with PATBS versus knee OA KL graded 4 without PATBS).The knee OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 with PATBS had significantly more PAB and less loss of normal fibrillar echotexture of PA compared to controls and knees with OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). The VAS scores of knees with OA KL graded 3, 4 with PATBS were significantly greater than those of knees with OA KL graded 3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). PA thickness was significantly associated with the KL grade (r: 0.336, p:0.001) and PATBS (r: 0.371, p < 0.001). It is concluded that the mean thickness of PA in knees with OA with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the

  4. Pathology of the region of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-01-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis. (orig.) [de

  5. Pathology of the region of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-09-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis.

  6. A Survey On The Effects Of Iontophoresis Of Piroxicam Gel On Pain And Knee Muscles Strengthn Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar RezaSoltani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Knee osteoarthritis is the most common cause of disability in many societies. Therapeutic measures such as using anti-inflammation drugs and physiotherapy programs have been used to suppress knee pain and improve knee joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of iontophoresis of piroxicam gel, galvanic current with or without piroxicam gel on pain, functional ability and knee muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Method: This study was a clinical trial conducted in Akhtar hospital. Forty two female patients (mean age 58.52 years old with knee osteoarthritis participated in this study. The protocol was performed in Physiotherapy Clinic of Mazandaran Medical University, Mazandaran, Iran. All patients were randomly assigned to three groups. Iontophoresis of piroxicam gel was applied for group 1 (n=14, proxicam gel for group 2 (n=14 and galvanic current for group 3 (n=14. The procedure was carried out for 20-minutes, three times a week and for two following weeks. Knee pain and functional ability were estimated by knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS questioner and the strength of knee extensor and flexor muscles by an isometric device just before the first treatment and immediately after the last treatment times.Results: A significant decrease in pain and a significant increase in functional ability and the strength of knee extensor muscles were resulted in all studied groups (P < 0.05. According to ANOVA test, the level of the percentage difference which was computed for KOOS and knee muscle strength before and after treatments was significantly higher in group 1 than the other two (P < 0.01.Conclusion: Pain and knee functional ability were significantly improved in patients in all three methods. But iontophoresis of piroxicam gel appeared to be more effective in relieving pain and improving knee functional abilities than the

  7. Vitamin C Intakeand Risk Factors for Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Nadia Ayu Destiani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease of the knee joints characterized by progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage. In OA, which is influenced by several risk factors, free radicals are increased by local ischemia in the cartilage. As an exogenous antioxidant, vitamin C also plays an important role in collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis. This study was carried out to identify vitamin C intake as well as risk factors in knee OA. Methods: The study population was determined by non-probability sampling with convenient approach to knee OA patients at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in October–November 2013. Data were obtained through questionnaire interview about risk factors, severity index of OA and vitamin C intake profile. Data presentation was conducted by descriptive method. Results: There were 47 patients diagnosed with knee OA in the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic. The result showed that 7 patients (14.9% had low vitamin C intake for the last 3 months. There were 30 patients with family history of OA (63.8%. Thirty two patients (68.1% were passive smokers, 44 patients (93.6% had history of repeated use of knee joints and majority of respondents had obesity.  Conclusions: Most of the subjects have sufficient vitamin C intake and more than half have risk factors that may contribute to the incidence of knee OA.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1067

  8. MR imaging findings in early osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Zibis, Aristidis; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Roidis, Nikolaos

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To carry out a modern diagnostic survey among patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of early osteoarthritis of the knee. Materials and methods:A magnetic resonance imaging survey was performed on 70 patients (82 knees) with a mean age of 59 years. (range, 40-71 years) who had chronic knee pain, clinical diagnosis of early osteoarthritis of the knee and conventional knee radiographs classified as 1 and 2 on the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Results: A variety of different disorders was found; degenerative meniscal lesions with or without ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in 70.7% of the knees, osteonecrosis of the femoral and tibial condyles in 9.75%, osteophytes and degenerative articular cartilage lesions in 8.54%, transient osteoporosis in 2.44% and benign neoplasms and cysts in 6.1%. Conclusions: The existence of such a heterogenous group of disorders in these 'early osteoarthritic knees' may explain failures in treatment and it may justify a modern MRI imaging approach to proper diagnosis

  9. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Knee arthrography today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Kallenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The role of knee arthrography today is demonstrated and technical problems are discussed. Among a lot of variants the position of the patient and the choice of contrast media play a great part concerning the result of the examination. Mild complications occur in 0.25% of the examinations, severe and live threatening complications are extremely rare. Diagnosis of meniscal lesions is most important for knee arthrography; arthroscopy and arthrography are complementary examinations and not mutually exclusive, they achieve combined an accuracy of 97-98%. In the same way arthrography is able to evaluate the condropathy of the femoro-tibial joint, whereas accuracy of arthroscopy in the diagnosis of patellar chondropathy is much higher. There is a great reliability of arthrography regarding the evaluation of lesions of the capsule, but accuracy in lesions of the cruciate ligaments is low. Arthrography is very suitable for evaluation of Baker-cysts, since indications for almost occuring internal derangement of the knee are even available. Knee arthrography is a complex and safe procedure with very less discomfort for the patient; it has a central position in the evaluation of lesions of the knee. (orig.) [de

  11. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  12. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in persons with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  13. Keblish's lateral surgical approach enhances patellar tilt in valgus knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Tonelli Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of conventional medial and lateral approaches for total knee replacement in the valgus osteoarthritic knee. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 21 patients with valgus knee osteoarthritis were randomized to total knee replacement through medial or lateral approach. The primary outcome was radiographic patellar tilt. Secondary outcomes were visual analog scale of pain, postoperative levels of hemoglobin, and clinical aspect of the operative wound. RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups regarding other clinical variables. Mean lateral tilt of the patella was 3.1 degrees (SD ± 5.3 in the lateral approach group and 18 degrees (SD ± 10.2 in the medial approach group (p = 0.02. There were no differences regarding the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSION: Lateral approach provided better patellar tilt following total knee replacement in valgus osteoarthritic knee.

  14. Unilateral vs one stage bilateral total knee replacement in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A controversy exists regarding simultaneous or staged bilateral total knee replacement. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral and 50 undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively to compare the clinical, radiological results and complication rates. Eighty-four patients belonged to ASA category II or III preoperatively. The study included a high proportion of rheumatoid patients and osteoarthritis patients with severe deformities. Results: Bilateral group had greater blood loss and required more blood transfusion, but there was no difference in requirement of postoperative intensive care and the complication rates. Rheumatoid knees had lower pre and postoperative knee score and functional score as compared to osteoarthritic knees. Morbidity and mortality of one stage bilateral knee replacement was no greater than unilateral operation. Conclusion: Simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in younger patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis is safe and effective

  15. Efficacy of individualized Chinese herbal medication in osteoarthrosis of hip and knee: a double-blind, randomized-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Matthias; Steirer, Iva; Brinkhaus, Benno; Chen, Yun; Krist-Dungl, Claudia; Koschier, Alexandra; Gantschacher, Martina; Neumann, Kurt; Zauner-Dungl, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of individually designed herbal formulas according to the rules of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee. This was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with two parallel groups. This study was conducted at the University-centre in Gars am Kamp/Austria and was organized by the Institute of TCM and Complementary Medicine of the Danube University Krems /Austria. The study comprised female and male patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee aged between 45 and 75 years. Patients were randomized into a treatment with individualized, water-based herbal decoctions prepared in a standardized cooking process (Verum group) or to a treatment with nonspecific presumably ineffective, water-based herbal decoctions (Control group). The primary outcome was the comparison of change between the intervention groups in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities lower limb global index questionnaire (WOMAC global index) between baseline and week 20. Secondary outcomes included subscales of WOMAC for pain (A), stiffness (B), and functional impairment (C) and general quality of life in the form of the SF-36 questionnaire. Altogether, 102 patients were randomized in this trial. The demographic and medical baseline characteristics were comparable in the 2 groups. The change of the WOMAC global index and all three subscales was significant in both groups between week 20 and baseline (verum group, global WOMAC: at baseline 47 [SD ± 11.8] and at week 20: 24 (SD ± 18.3); change of mean 23; p > 0.001; control group; global WOMAC: at baseline: 48 (SD ± 14.7) and at week 20: 25 (SD ± 18.3); change of mean 23; p > 0.001). However, there was no significant difference (p = 0.783) between the treatment groups. There were significant changes in the subscales "physical functioning," "bodily pain," "vitality," "social-functioning," and "role-physical" of

  16. Bouncy knee in a semi-automatic knee lock prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, L D; Lord, M

    1986-04-01

    The Bouncy Knee concept has previously proved of value when fitted to stabilised knee units of active amputees. The stance phase flex-extend action afforded by a Bouncy Knee increased the symmetry of gait and also gave better tolerance to slopes and uneven ground. A bouncy function has now been incorporated into a knee of the semi-automatic knee lock design in a pilot laboratory trial involving six patients. These less active patients did not show consistent changes in symmetry of gait, but demonstrated an improved ability to walk on slopes and increased their walking range. Subjective response was positive, as noted in the previous trials.

  17. Does knee awareness differ between different knee arthroplasty prostheses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low knee awareness after Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) has become the ultimate goal in trying to achieve a natural feeling knee that meet patient expectations. To accommodate this manufacturers of TKAs have developed new prosthetic designs that potentially could give patients a more...... natural feeling knee during activities. The purpose af this study was to compare the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) of patients treated with a previous generation standard Cruciate Retaining (CR) TKA to the scores obtained by patients treated with a newer generation CR TKA...

  18. The dynamics of the pain system is intact in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Klokker, Louise; Ellegaard, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-12-29

    Background and aims Despite the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) it remains one of the most frequent knee disorders without a cure. Pain and disability are prominent clinical features of knee OA. Knee OA pain is typically localized but can also be referred to the thigh or lower leg. Widespread hyperalgesia has been found in knee OA patients. In addition, patients with hyperalgesia in the OA knee joint show increased pain summation scores upon repetitive stimulation of the OA knee suggesting the involvement of facilitated central mechanisms in knee OA. The dynamics of the pain system (i.e., the adaptive responses to pain) has been widely studied, but mainly from experiments on healthy subjects, whereas less is known about the dynamics of the pain system in chronic pain patients, where the pain system has been activated for a long time. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the nociceptive system quantitatively in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients before and after induction of experimental knee pain. Methods Ten knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients participated in this randomized crossover trial. Each subject was tested on two days separated by 1 week. The most affected knee was exposed to experimental pain or control, in a randomized sequence, by injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad and a control injection of isotonic saline. Pain areas were assessed by drawings on anatomical maps. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the knee, thigh, lower leg, and arm were assessed before, during, and after the experimental pain and control conditions. Likewise, temporal summation of pressure pain on the knee, thigh and lower leg muscles was assessed. Results Experimental knee pain decreased the PPTs at the knee (P system in individuals with knee OA can be affected even after many years of nociceptive input. This study indicates that the adaptability in the pain system is intact in patients with knee OA, which opens for opportunities to

  19. Haemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRT. Clinical and radiological correlation; Haemophile Arthropathie des Kniegelenkes. Gd-DTPA-verstaerkte MRT: klinische und roentgenologische Korrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Kunze, V. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Hamann, M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Eickhoff, H. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Krankenhaus Troisdorf (Germany); Koch, W. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Krankenhaus Troisdorf (Germany); Oldenburg, J. [Inst. fuer Experimentelle Haematologie und Transfusionsmedizin, Bonn (Germany); Reiser, M. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Steudel, A. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany)

    1994-02-01

    17 patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the knee joint were studied with static and dynamic MRT before and after i.v. bolus injection of Gadolinium-DTPA (0,1 mmol/kg body weight). After contrast enhancement, synovial proliferations exhibited an increase of signal intensity (SI) of FFE and SE images of 47.7% and 37.4% respectively, whereas muscle and fatty tissue, tendons, bone marrow and joint effusion revealed only minor increase in SI. The gradient of signal intensity (ratio SI/time) of pannus was 39,6% min. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI studies delineate and quantify the synovial proliferations in hemophilic arthropathy. Dynamic studies in hemophilic arthropathy do not provide qualitative assessment of the inflammatory process. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wurden 17 Patienten mit einer haemophilen Arthropathie der Kniegelenke mit der statischen und dynamischen MRT vor und nach i.v. Bolusgabe von Gadolinium-DTPA (0,1 mmol/kg KG) untersucht. Nach Kontrastmittelgabe konnte ein Anstieg der Signalintensitaet des Pannus von 37,4% auf SE- und von 47,7% auf FFE-Aufnahmen gemessen werden. Der Gradient des Signalintensitaetsanstieges (%/Zeit) lag fuer Pannus bei 39,6%/min. Die Kontrastmittelgabe steigerte die Abgrenzbarkeit des Pannus von Gelenkerguss und den Gelenkbinnenstrukturen. Begleitend durchgefuehrte klinische und roentgenologische Bewertungen des Schweregrades der Arthropathie korrelierten nicht mit dem Signalintensitaetsverhalten des Pannus nach Kontrastmittelgabe. (orig.)

  20. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR. However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Materials and Methods. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours. Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. Results. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p<0.05. Serum TXA level at time of clamp release was significantly different among groups with the highest level at 2 hour (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference of TXA level in drainage fluid, postoperative blood loss, blood transfusion, and postoperative complications (p<0.05.  Conclusions. Low-dose IA-TXA application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  1. Can the ICF osteoarthritis core set represent a future clinical tool in measuring functioning in persons with osteoarthritis undergoing hip and knee joint replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviar, Maria Jenelyn; Olver, John; Pallant, Julie F; Brand, Caroline; de Steiger, Richard; Pirpiris, Marinis; Bucknill, Andrew; Khan, Fary

    2012-11-01

    To determine the dimensionality, reliability, model fit, adequacy of the qualifier levels, response patterns across different factors, and targeting of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) osteoarthritis core set categories in people with osteoarthritis undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty. The osteoarthritis core set was rated in 316 persons with osteoarthritis who were either in the pre-operative or within one year post-operative stage. Rasch analyses were performed using the RUMM 2030 program. Twelve of the 13 body functions categories and 13 of the 19 activity and participation categories had good model fit. The qualifiers displayed disordered thresholds necessitating rescoring. There was uneven spread of ICF categories across the full range of the patients' scores indicating off--targeting. Subtest analysis of the reduced ICF categories of body functions and activity and participation showed that the two components could be integrated to form one measure. The results suggest that it is possible to measure functioning using a unidimensional construct based on ICF osteoarthritis core set categories of body functions and activity and participation in this population. However, omission of some categories and reduction in qualifier levels are necessary. Further studies are needed to determine whether better targeting is achieved, particularly during the pre-operative and during the sub-acute care period.

  2. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  3. [Trampoline accident with anterior knee dislocation caused popliteal artery disruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peter Heide; Høgh, Annette Langager

    2011-10-17

    Only a few reports describe the risk of neurovascular damage following knee dislocation while trampolining. A 16 year-old male in a trampoline accident, sustained multi-ligament damage and occlusion of the popliteal artery. The occlusion did not show clinically until 24 hours after the trauma. He underwent vascular surgery (short saphenous bypass). We recommend implementing algorithms, for the management of suspected knee dislocation and possible accompanying neurovascular injuries in all trauma centers.

  4. The use of synthetic ligaments in the design of an enhanced stability total knee joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Michael D; Greene, Brendan C; Pietrykowski, Luke W; Gambon, Taylor M; Bales, Caroline E; DesJardins, John D

    2018-03-01

    Current total knee replacement designs work to address clinically desired knee stability and range of motion through a balance of retained anatomy and added implant geometry. However, simplified implant geometries such as bearing surfaces, posts, and cams are often used to replace complex ligamentous constraints that are sacrificed during most total knee replacement procedures. This article evaluates a novel total knee replacement design that incorporates synthetic ligaments to enhance the stability of the total knee replacement system. It was hypothesized that by incorporating artificial cruciate ligaments into a total knee replacement design at specific locations and lengths, the stability of the total knee replacement could be significantly altered while maintaining active ranges of motion. The ligament attachment mechanisms used in the design were evaluated using a tensile test, and determined to have a safety factor of three with respect to expected ligamentous loading in vivo. Following initial computational modeling of possible ligament orientations, a physical prototype was constructed to verify the function of the design by performing anterior/posterior drawer tests under physiologic load. Synthetic ligament configurations were found to increase total knee replacement stability up to 94% compared to the no-ligament case, while maintaining total knee replacement flexion range of motion between 0° and 120°, indicating that a total knee replacement that incorporates synthetic ligaments with calibrated location and lengths should be able to significantly enhance and control the kinematic performance of a total knee replacement system.

  5. Isokinetic and isometric strength in osteoarthrosis of the knee. A comparative study with healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Balci, N; Sepici, V; Gener, F A

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic stability of the knee joint depends on the appropriate strength ratio of quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the maximum peak torque (MPT) and MPT ratios of hamstrings to quadriceps (H/Q) muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two groups of patients were included in the study. The first group consisted of 30 patients (Group A) with the clinical and radiologic findings of knee OA. The second group consisted of 30 patients (Group B) exhibiting knee joint pain without roentgenologic findings of knee OA. The findings of two patient groups were compared with each other and also with 30 healthy subjects (Group C). Isokinetic (at 60 degrees/s and at 180 degrees/s) and isometric (at 30 degrees and at 60 degrees of knee flexion) tests were performed by the rate-limiting isokinetic dynamometer system. Isokinetic and isometric MPT loss of knee flexors and extensors was found in both patient groups with respect to controls, but MPT ratios of H/Q muscles did not show a statistically significant difference compared with the control group. This may be related to the equal strength loss of knee flexors and knee extensors in patients with knee OA. It is concluded that strengthening exercises of hamstring muscles is as important as quadriceps strengthening in rehabilitation of knee OA.

  6. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  7. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, F Joseph; Huang, Ambrose J; Chang, Connie Y; Smith, Maximilian; Gill, Thomas J; Bredella, Miriam A; Torriani, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome.

  8. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Boston Sports Medicine and Research Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  9. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin; Gill, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  10. Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Juhl, C B; Roos, E M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine benefits and harms of arthroscopic knee surgery involving partial meniscectomy, debridement, or both for middle aged or older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain and physical function....... RESULTS: The search identified nine trials assessing the benefits of knee arthroscopic surgery in middle aged and older patients with knee pain and degenerative knee disease. The main analysis, combining the primary endpoints of the individual trials from three to 24 months postoperatively, showed a small...... included symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (4.13 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 9.60) events per 1000 procedures), pulmonary embolism, infection, and death. CONCLUSIONS: The small inconsequential benefit seen from interventions that include arthroscopy for the degenerative knee is limited in time...

  11. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  12. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System: an implantable joint-unloading prosthesis for treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford AG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Clifford,1 Stefan M Gabriel,1 Mary O’Connell,1 David Lowe,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block31Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in adults. Therapies intended to unload the medial knee compartment have yielded unsatisfactory results due to low patient compliance with conservative treatments and high complication rates with surgical options. There is no widely available joint-unloading treatment for medial knee OA that offers clinically important symptom alleviation, low complication risk, and high patient acceptance. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System (Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA is a first-of-its-kind, implantable, extra-articular, extra-capsular prosthesis intended to alleviate knee OA-related symptoms by reducing medial knee compartment loading while overcoming the limitations of traditional joint-unloading therapies. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated excellent prosthesis durability, substantial reductions in medial compartment and total joint loads, and clinically important improvements in OA-related pain and function. The purpose of this report is to describe the KineSpring System, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The KineSpring System has potential to bridge the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and irreversible surgical interventions for medial compartment knee OA.Keywords: KineSpring, knee, medial, osteoarthritis, prosthesis

  13. Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2018-05-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Surgical Management of Osteoarthritis of the Knee AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients under consideration for surgical treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the three treatments. The 864 patient scenarios and 3 treatments were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  14. Reverse Engineering Nature to Design Biomimetic Total Knee Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, Kartik Mangudi; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Rubash, Harry E; Malchau, Henrik; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Li, Guoan

    2015-10-01

    While contemporary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provides tremendous clinical benefits, the normal feel and function of the knee is not fully restored. To address this, a novel design process was developed to reverse engineer "biomimetic" articular surfaces that are compatible with normal soft-tissue envelope and kinematics of the knee. The biomimetic articular surface is created by moving the TKA femoral component along in vivo kinematics of normal knees and carving out the tibial articular surface from a rectangular tibial block. Here, we describe the biomimetic design process. In addition, we utilize geometric comparisons and kinematic simulations to show that; (1) tibial articular surfaces of conventional implants are fundamentally incompatible with normal knee motion, and (2) the anatomic geometry of the biomimetic surface contributes directly to restoration of normal knee kinematics. Such biomimetic implants may enable us to achieve the long sought after goal of a "normal" knee post-TKA surgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. MR imaging of meniscal subluxation in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Tratting, S.; Dobrocky, I.; Steiner, E.; Imhof, H.; Kukla, C.; Nehrer, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish diagnostic criteria for meniscal subluxation, and to determine whether there was any connection between meniscal subluxation and other common meniscal and knee-joint abnormalities. Material and Methods: The normal position of the meniscal body was assessed in 10 asymptomatic volunteers. MR signs of meniscal subluxation were evaluated retrospectively in 60 symptomatic patients with pain the knee, impaired mobility, and/or joint swelling who had no clear diagnosis after the evaluation of case history, clinical examination, and radiography. The criterion for subluxation of the meniscus was defined as a distance of ≥3 mm between the peripheral border of the meniscus and the edge of the tibial plateau. Results: In the volunteers, the mean distance form the medial meniscus to the edge of the tibial plateau was 0.07 mm, and that from the lateral meniscus was 0 mm. In 55 symptomatic patients without meniscal subluxation, the mean distance from the meniscus to the edge of the tribial plateau was 0.27 mm. Five patients (8%) had evidence of meniscal subluxation, 4 in the medial meniscus and one in the lateral meniscus. The most commonly associated knee abnormality was joint effusion in 5 knees and osteoarthritis in 2 knees. Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with painful knees. Meniscal subluxation was associated with other knee abnormalities such as joint effusion or osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  16. Knee osteoarthritis in traumatic knee symptoms in general practice: 6-year cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kastelein (Marlous); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); I.M. Koster (Ingrid); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAim: To identify degenerative knee abnormalities using MRI and radiography 6 years after knee trauma, their relation with persistent knee symptoms and baseline prognostic factors. Methods: Adults (18–65 years) with incident traumatic knee symptoms visiting their

  17. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  18. Knees Lifted High

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Knees Lifted High gives children fun ideas for active outdoor play.

  19. Knee injuries in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    swimming and basketball.1 In 2001 it was reported to have injury rates of 1 000 times ... knee injury in football are the age of the player, a previous injury and the ligamentous .... football is possible, although the success rates may vary from ...

  20. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns technical aspects of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in unicompartmental arthroplasty, particularly with the introduction of the minimally invasive technique. In the light of the excellent long-term results of the total

  1. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Nonarthroplasty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, John; Hunter, David; Irrgang, Jay; Jones, Morgan H.; Levy, Bruce; Marx, Robert; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Watters, William C.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.; Boyer, Kevin M.; Anderson, Sara; Andre, St. Justin St.; Sluka, Patrick; McGowan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The clinical practice guideline was explicitly developed to include only treatments less invasive than knee replacement (ie, arthroplasty). Patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee are to be encouraged to participate in self-management educational programs and to engage in self-care, as well as to lose weight and engage in exercise and quadriceps strengthening. The guideline recommends taping for short-term relief of pain as well as analgesics and intra-articular corticosteroids, but not glucosamine and/or chondroitin. Patients need not undergo needle lavage or arthroscopy with débridement or lavage. Patients may consider partial meniscectomy or loose body removal or realignment osteotomy, as conditions warrant. Use of a free-floating interpositional device should not be considered for symptomatic unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. Lateral heel wedges should not be prescribed for patients with symptomatic medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. The work group was unable either to recommend or not recommend the use of braces with either valgus- or varus-directing forces for patients with medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis; the use of acupuncture or of hyaluronic acid; or osteotomy of the tibial tubercle for isolated symptomatic patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:19726743

  2. Alterations in walking knee joint stiffness in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A; Gorman, Shannon; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Increased walking knee joint stiffness has been reported in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) as a compensatory strategy to improve knee joint stability. However, presence of episodic self-reported knee instability in a large subgroup of patients with knee OA may be a sign of inadequate walking knee joint stiffness. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in walking knee joint stiffness in patients with knee OA with and without self-reported instability and examine the relationship between walking knee joint stiffness with quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity, and varus knee malalignment. Overground biomechanical data at a self-selected gait velocity was collected for 35 individuals with knee OA without self-reported instability (stable group) and 17 individuals with knee OA and episodic self-reported instability (unstable group). Knee joint stiffness was calculated during the weight-acceptance phase of gait as the change in the external knee joint moment divided by the change in the knee flexion angle. The unstable group walked with lower knee joint stiffness (p=0.01), mainly due to smaller heel-contact knee flexion angles (pknee flexion excursions (pknee stable counterparts. No significant relationships were observed between walking knee joint stiffness and quadriceps strength, knee joint laxity or varus knee malalignment. Reduced walking knee joint stiffness appears to be associated with episodic knee instability and independent of quadriceps muscle weakness, knee joint laxity or varus malalignment. Further investigations of the temporal relationship between self-reported knee joint instability and walking knee joint stiffness are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations Between Knee Effusion-synovitis and Joint Structural Changes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Blizzard, Leigh; Antony, Benny; Han, Weiyu; Zhu, Zhaohua; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2017-11-01

    To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p effusion-synovitis score (p effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: β = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: β = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000495022.

  4. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    OpenAIRE

    Serhat Avcu; Ersan Altun; Ihsan Akpinar; Mehmet Deniz Bulut; Kemal Eresov; Tugrul Biren

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to exam...

  5. Radionuclide scanning after total knee replacement: correlation with pain and radiolucent lines. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, B R; Boeckstyns, M; Kjaer, L

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among Tc-99m radionuclide bone scan findings, pain, and radiolucent lines in 35 postsurgical knees. Our prospective study included bone scans, as well as radiographic and clinical examination three, seven, and 12 months after knee replacement surgery in 35...... and nonpainful knees, and the degree of isotope uptake did not correlate with the development of radiolucent lines around the prosthetic components....

  6. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made of...

  9. Mobility function of a prosthetic knee joint with an automatic stance phase lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Torres-Moreno, Ricardo; Heim, Winfried; Steinnagel, Bryan; Glasford, Shane

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for a prosthetic knee joint design that is technologically and functionally appropriate for use in developing countries. To develop and clinically evaluate a new type of stance phase controlled prosthetic knee joint that provides stance phase stability without inhibiting swing phase flexion. A crossover repeated measures study design comparing the new knee joint to the participant's conventional low- or high-end prosthetic knee joint. The new knee joint was fitted to fourteen individuals aged 15 to 67 years with unilateral lower limb amputations. Walk tests were performed to measure walking speed. Energy expenditure was estimated using the physiological cost index (PCI). Walking speeds with the new knee joint were on average 0.14 m/s faster than conventional low-end knees (p < 0.0001), but 0.07 m/s slower than conventional high-end prosthetic knees (p = 0.008). The PCI was similar across all three knee joint technologies (p = 0.276). Mobility function with the new knee joint, in terms of walking speed, was more closely matched to high-end than low-end prosthetic knee joints. Therefore, given its relatively simple design, the new stance phase control mechanism may offer a functional and cost effective solution for active transfemoral amputees. This paper describes a new type of prosthetic knee joint mechanism that is intended to be cost-effective while providing high-level stance phase function to active individuals with a transfemoral amputation. Initial clinical testing suggests that the new knee joint may have some functional advantages over existing technologies in this category.

  10. MR evaluation of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, K.M.; Gillogly, S.D.; Schaefer, R.A.; Yakes, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventy-five MR examinations were performed in 52 patients following ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autografts. MR imaging demonstrated a well-defined autograft in 63 of 70 clinically stable autografts. Of 5 clinically lax reconstructions, none appeared will defined on MR images. Compared with the clinical examination, MR imaging was 90.7% accurate. MR imaging demonstrated time-related healing of the patellar tendon donor site, with persistent thickening indicative of tendinitis. Positions of the femoral and tibial bone tunnels could be assessed. Knee joint effusions tended to resolve completely within 7 months after operations, with the presence and degree of effusion in the earlier postoperative interval being unrelated to the clinical outcome. Ancillary disorders in the knee, such as meniscal tears and osteochondral defects, could also be evaluated in this postoperative population

  11. Dynamic control of knee axial deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Malyshev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have evaluated the clinical examination of the patients with axial malalignments in the knee by the original method and device which was named varovalgometer. The measurements were conducted by tension of the cord through the spina iliaca anterior superior and the middle of the lower pole of patella. The deviation of the center of the ankle estimated by metal ruler which was positioned perpendicular to the lower leg axis on the level of the ankle joint line. The results of comparison of our method and computer navigation in 53 patients during the TKA show no statistically significant varieties but they differ by average 5° of valgus in clinical examination in comparison with mechanical axis which was identified by computer navigation. The dynamic control of axial malalignment can be used in clinical practice for estimation of the results of treatment of pathology with axial deformities in the knee; for the control of reduction and secondary displacement of the fractures around the knee; for assessment of instability; in planning of correctional osteotomies and intraoperative control of deformity correction; for estimation of Q angle in subluxation and recurrent dislocation of patella; in planning of TKA; during the growth of child it allows to assess the progression of deformity.

  12. Kinematic MR imaging of the knee for evaluating patellar tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellock, F.G.; Mink, J.H.; Fox, J.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique to evaluate patellar tracking uses MR imaging and a specially designed positioning device (MEDRAD). T1-weighted, axial plane imaging was performed on both knees at the following joint angles: 0 0 , 5 0 , 10 0 , 15 0 , 20 0 , 25 0 , and 30 0 . The total examination time was approximately 12 minutes. Images were viewed in a cine loop to produce a kinematic study that depicted the relationship of the patella to the trochlear groove during the different angles of knee flexion. To date, 102 subjects (204 knees) have been examined. Dislocation, subluxatino, lateral tilt, lateral and medial displacement of the patella, and normal patellar tracking could all be identified with this technique. Abnormal configurations of the patella and/or trochlear groove were also clearly demonstrated. In conclusion, kinematic MR imaging of the knee provided important clinical information concerning patellar tracking and other related abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint

  13. Criteria used when deciding on eligibility for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Ross, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical decision-making in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a complex process needing further clarification. The aim of this study was to compare TKA eligibility criteria considered most important by orthopedic surgeons (OSs) to characteristics of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA....... CONCLUSION: Radiographic severity and functional limitations were confirmed as drivers for TKA eligibility, while pain was not. Not responding to non-surgical treatment was not included in the decision-making, suggesting low uptake of clinical guidelines in clinical practice. This study highlights...

  14. Psychosocial determinants of outcomes in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Edelstein, David; Pak, Chong; Kallen, Michael A; Stanley, Melinda; Zhang, Hong; Robinson, Kausha C; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2011-10-01

    To identify potential psychosocial and educational barriers to clinical success following knee replacement. The authors evaluated 241 patients undergoing total knee replacement, preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. Outcomes included the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) scale and the Knee Society rating system (KSRS). Independent variables included: the medical outcome study-social support scale; depression, anxiety and stress scale; brief COPE inventory; health locus of control; arthritis self-efficacy scale and the life orientation test-revised. Multiple regression models evaluated associations of baseline demographic and psychosocial variables with outcomes at 6 months, controlling for body mass index, comorbidities and baseline outcome scores. Patients' mean age was 65 ± 9 years; 65% were women. Most patients improved outcomes after surgery. Several psychosocial variables were associated with outcomes. Regression analyses indicated lower education, less tangible support, depression, less problem-solving coping, more dysfunctional coping, lower internal locus of control were associated with worse WOMAC scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables for pain 0.07; for function, 0.14). Older age, lower education, depression and less problem-solving coping were associated with poorer total KSRS scores (R(2) contribution of psychosocial variables to total KSRS model 0.09). Psychosocial variables as a set contributed from 25% to 74% of total explained variance across the models tested. Patients' level of education, tangible support, depression, problem-solving coping, dysfunctional coping and internal locus of control were associated with pain and functional outcomes after knee replacement. The findings suggest that, in addition to medical management, perioperative psychosocial evaluation and intervention are crucial in enhancing knee replacement outcomes.

  15. Excellent Survival and Good Outcomes at 15 Years Using the Press-Fit Condylar Sigma Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, William M; Arthur, Calum H C; Wood, Alexander M; Clayton, Robert A E; Brenkel, Ivan J; Walmsley, Philip

    2018-03-27

    We report 15-year survival, clinical, and radiographic follow-up data for the Press-Fit Condylar Sigma total knee arthroplasty. Between October 1998 and October 1999, 235 consecutive TKAs were performed in 203 patients. Patients were reviewed at a specialist nurse-led clinic before surgery and at 5, 8-10, and 15 years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes, including Knee Society Score, were recorded prospectively at each clinic visit, and radiographs were obtained. Of our initial cohort, 99 patients (118 knees) were alive at 15 years, and 31 patients (34 knees) were lost to follow-up. Thirteen knees (5.5%) were revised; 5 (2.1%) for infection, 7 (3%) for instability, and 1 (0.4%) for aseptic loosening. Cumulative survival with the end point of revision for any reason was 92.3% at 15 years and with revision for aseptic failure as the end point was 94.4%. The mean Knee Society Score knee score was 77.4 (33-99) at 15 years, compared with 31.7 (2-62) preoperatively. Of 71 surviving knees for which X-rays were available, 12 (16.9%) had radiolucent lines and 1 (1.4%) demonstrated clear radiographic evidence of loosening. The Press-Fit Condylar Sigma total knee arthroplasty represents a durable, effective option for patients undergoing knee arthroplasty, with excellent survival and good clinical and radiographic outcomes at 15 years. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Total knee arthroplasty for severe valgus knee deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinhua; Wang, Min; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Yixin

    2014-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in severe valgus knees may prove challenging, and choice of implant depends on the severity of the valgus deformity and the extent of soft-tissue release. The purpose of this study was to review 8 to 11 years (mean, 10 years) follow-up results of primary TKA for varient-III valgus knee deformity with use of different type implants. Between January 2002 and January 2005, 20 women and 12 men, aged 47 to 63 (mean, 57.19 ± 6.08) years old, with varient-III valgus knees underwent primary TKA. Of the 32 patients, 37 knees had varient-III deformities. Pie crusting was carefully performed with small, multiple inside-out incisions, bone resection balanced the knee in lieu of soft tissue releases that were not used in the series. Cruciate-retaining knees (Gemini MKII, Link Company, Germany) were used in 13 knees, Genesis II (Simth & Nephew Company, USA) in 14 knees, and hinged knee (Endo-Model Company, Germany) in 10 knees. In five patients with bilateral variant-III TKAs, three patients underwent 1-stage bilateral procedures, and two underwent 2-stage procedures. All implants were cemented and the patella was not resurfaced. The Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score was assessed. Patients were followed up from 8 to 11 years. The mean HSS knee score were improved from 50.33 ± 11.60 to 90.06 ± 3.07 (P managed with rivaroxaban and thrombo-embolic deterrent stockings. There was no incidence of pulmonary embolism. Post-operative patient satisfaction was 80.7 ± 10.4 points in the groups. Prosthetic survival rate was 100% at mean 10 years postoperative. Not only hinged implants can be successfully used in variant-III valgus knees. As our results show, if proper ligament balancing techniques are used and proper ligament balance is attained, the knee may not require the use of a more constrained components. Our results also present alternative implant choices for severe knee deformities.

  17. Secondary Knee Osteoarthritis due to Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Treated with above the Knee Amputation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF-1 has a variety of associated orthopaedic manifestations that have been previously reported. We report a case of severe, grade 4 knee osteoarthritis (OA with recurrent subluxation and joint laxity due to multiple extra-articular neurofibromas ultimately treated with Above the Knee Amputation (AKA. Case Description. A 39-year-old man presented with multiple neurofibromas and lymphedema leading to degenerative changes of the knee. Conservative treatment failed due to the severity of the knee degeneration and patient discomfort. Likewise, arthroplasty was not possible due to poor bone quality and joint instability. Therefore, AKA was selected to relieve symptoms and provide functional improvement. six months after the procedure the patient has increased functional capacity for ambulation and activities of daily living, as well as significant decrease in pain and discomfort. Clinical Relevance. Extra-articular neurofibromas causing severe secondary OA in relatively young patients can be functionally improved with AKA and prosthetic device use.

  18. Knee ultrasound from research to real practice: a systematic literature review of adult knee ultrasound assessment feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltea, Alexandra; Berghea, Florian; Gudu, Tania; Ionescu, Ruxandra

    2016-12-05

    To identify and analyse existing data regarding knee ultrasound (US) feasibility in clinical practice. Material and methods: A systematic literature review was performed using the terms: ("knee") AND ("ultrasound" OR "ultrasonography") AND ("feasibility" OR "pilot" OR "proof of concept"). Feasibility studies regarding knee US or US aided maneuver involving knee joint, published during 2005-2015, were selected and evaluated against a complex framework constructed around mandatory key areas for feasibility studies: acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, adaptation, integration and expansion. One hundred and fifty-nine publications were identified, of which 9 were included in the final analysis: 6 dealt with the development and implementation of novel US scores, while the rest focused on implementing MSUS in clinical practice, evaluating the usefulness of articular cartilage US assessment and the feasibility of sonography for intra-articular knee injections, respectively. Six studies quantified feasibility as time spent for the evaluation, with only two addressing areassuch as acceptability, implementation and practicality, although none of these systematically assessed all feasibility domains. Knee US feasibility is still poorly addressed; the time required for US assessment is the main area addressed. This information gap should be properly addressed in future works, in order to ensure the right place for this technique.

  19. Total knee replacement with tibial tubercle osteotomy in rheumatoid patients with stiff knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed Salem; Nassar, Wael Ahmed Mohamed; Fayyad, Tamer Abdelmeguid Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a well-proven modality that can provide pain relief and restore mobility for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with advanced joint destruction. Patellar ligament avulsion, especially in presence of poor bone quality and knee stiffness, is one of the special considerations that must be addressed in this unique population of patients. This study aimed to determine the functional results in a series of rheumatoid patients with stiff knee and end-stage joint destruction who underwent tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA. Twenty-three knees in 20 patients (16 women; four men) at a mean age of 54 years with end-stage arthritis and knee stiffness due to RA were operated upon for TKA using tibial tubercle osteotomy as a step during the operation. Patients were reviewed clinically and radiographically with a minimum follow-up of two years. Complications were noted. Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was recorded pre-operatively and at six and 12 months postoperatively. Union occurred at the osteotomy site in 21 of 23 cases. One case had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There was no infection or periprosthetic fracture, and at last follow-up, no patient required revision. HSS score improved from 46 (15-60) pre-operatively to 85 (71-96) post-operatively. Tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA in patients with RA and stiff knee is technically demanding yet proved to be effective in improving post-operative range of movement and minimising the complication of patellar ligament avulsion.

  20. The effects of a muscle resistance program on the functional capacity, knee extensor muscle strength and plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha in pre-frail elderly women: a randomized crossover clinical trial--a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustosa, Lygia P; Coelho, Fernanda M; Silva, Juscelio P; Pereira, Daniele S; Parentoni, Adriana N; Dias, João M D; Dias, Rosangela C; Pereira, Leani S M

    2010-07-28

    With the increase in the elderly population, a growing number of chronic degenerative diseases and a greater dependency on caregivers have been observed. Elderly persons in states of frailty remain more susceptible to significant health complications. There is evidence of an inverse relationship between plasma levels of inflammatory mediators and levels of functionality and muscle strength, suggesting that muscle-strengthening measures can aid in inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study will be verified the effect of a muscle-strengthening program with load during a ten-week period in pre-frail elderly women with attention to the following outcomes: (1) plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), (2) functional capacity and (3) knee extensor muscle strength. The study design is a randomized crossover clinical trial evaluating 26 elderly women (regardless of their race and/or social condition) who are community residents, older than 65, and classified as pre-frail according to the criteria previously described by Fried et al. (2004). All subjects will be assessed using the Timed up and go and 10-Meter Walk Test functional tests. The plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha will be assessed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) with high sensitivity kits (QuantikineHS, R&D Systems Minneapolis, MN, U.S.). Knee extensor muscle strength will be assessed using the Byodex System 3 Pro(R) isokinetic dynamometer at angular speeds of 60 and 180 degrees/s. The intervention will consist of strengthening exercises of the lower extremities at 50 to 70% of 1RM (maximal resistance) three times per week for ten weeks. The volunteers will be randomized into two groups: group E, the intervention group, and group C, the control group that did not initiate any new activities during the initial study period (ten weeks). After the initial period, group C will begin the intervention and group E will maintain everyday activities without

  1. The effects of a muscle resistance program on the functional capacity, knee extensor muscle strength and plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in pre-frail elderly women: a randomized crossover clinical trial - a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias João MD

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increase in the elderly population, a growing number of chronic degenerative diseases and a greater dependency on caregivers have been observed. Elderly persons in states of frailty remain more susceptible to significant health complications. There is evidence of an inverse relationship between plasma levels of inflammatory mediators and levels of functionality and muscle strength, suggesting that muscle-strengthening measures can aid in inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study will be verified the effect of a muscle-strengthening program with load during a ten-week period in pre-frail elderly women with attention to the following outcomes: (1 plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, (2 functional capacity and (3 knee extensor muscle strength. Methods/Design The study design is a randomized crossover clinical trial evaluating 26 elderly women (regardless of their race and/or social condition who are community residents, older than 65, and classified as pre-frail according to the criteria previously described by Fried et al. (2004. All subjects will be assessed using the Timed up and go and 10-Meter Walk Test functional tests. The plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α will be assessed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with high sensitivity kits (Quantikine®HS, R&D Systems Minneapolis, MN, U.S.. Knee extensor muscle strength will be assessed using the Byodex System 3 Pro® isokinetic dynamometer at angular speeds of 60 and 180°/s. The intervention will consist of strengthening exercises of the lower extremities at 50 to 70% of 1RM (maximal resistance three times per week for ten weeks. The volunteers will be randomized into two groups: group E, the intervention group, and group C, the control group that did not initiate any new activities during the initial study period (ten weeks. After the initial period, group C will begin the intervention and group E will

  2. Bilateral custom-fit total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Nicolas; Chambat, Pierre; Murphy, Colin G; Fayard, Jean-Marie

    2014-09-01

    In limbs affected by poliomyelitis, total knee arthroplasty results in satisfactory pain relief. However, the risk of failure is high, especially if the preoperative quadriceps power is low. Therefore, treating osteoarthritis in the current patient represented a challenging procedure. A 66-year-old man presented with tricompartmental osteoarthritis of both knees, with valgus deformity of 14° on the left knee and 11° on the right knee. He walked with a bilateral knee recurvatum of 30° and a grade 1 quadriceps power. The authors treated both knees with cemented custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty with 30° of recurvatum in the tibial keel. Clinical scores showed good results 1 year postoperatively, especially on the subjective data of quality of life and function. At follow-up, radiographs showed good total knee arthroplasty positioning on the right side and a small mechanical loosening at the end of the tibial keel on the left side. Only 5 studies (Patterson and Insall; Moran; Giori and Lewallen; Jordan et al; and Tigani et al) have reported total knee arthroplasty results in patients with poliomyelitis. This study reports an original case of bilateral custom-fit hinged total knee arthroplasty in a patient with poliomyelitis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of this type of procedure in the literature. The key point is the degree of recurvatum that is needed to allow walking, avoiding excessive constraints on the implants that can lead to early mechanical failure. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Anteroposterior glide versus rotating platform low contact stress (LCS knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn-Jones Charles

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fifty thousand knee replacements are performed annually in the UK at an estimated cost of £150 million. Post-operative improvement depends on a number of factors including implant design and patient associated factors. To our knowledge there are no published study's comparing the results of AP glide and rotating platform designs of LCS knee arthroplasty. Therefore we feel that a study is required to investigate and compare the effects of two types of LCS total knee arthroplasty on joint proprioception and range of motion. Methods/Design Patients will be randomised to receive either a LCS AP glide or Rotating platform prosthesis. Clinical scores (Oxford knee score, American knee society score, EuroQol, range of motion and proprioception will be assessed prior to and at 3,6, 12 and 24 months after the operation. Proprioception will be assessed in terms of absolute error angle (mean difference between the target angle and the response angle. Knee angles will be measured in degrees using an electromagnetic tracking device, Polhemus 3Space Fastrak that detects positions of sensors placed on the test limb. Student's t-test will be used to compare the mean of two groups. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the best prosthesis to use for patients undergoing total knee replacement. This pragmatic randomised trial will test the null hypothesis that anteroposterior glide LCS knee arthroplasty does not result in better post operative knee motion and proprioception as compared to rotating platform LCS knee. Trial Registration ISRCTN52943804

  4. EFFICACY OF KINESIO-TAPING VERSUS PHONOPHORESIS ON KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Gaid Sedhom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common type of joint disease. Pain is the most common symptom of knee osteoarthritis. Also it characterized by sign, symptoms of inflammation, pain, stiffness and loss of mobility. This study was conducted to explore the efficacy of kinesio taping (KT versus Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel phonophoresis (PH on pain level, range of motion (ROM, and proprioceptive accuracy on mild to moderate knee OA patients. Methods: Forty females with knee OA from Outpatient Clinic of Physical Therapy Faculty participated in the study with mean age (49±5.82 years. They were randomly assigned into 2 equal groups. Group I: received Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH with pulsed ultrasound therapy and group II received KT. All patients received hot packs and selected exercise program for four weeks; three sessions per week. Visual analogue scale was used in assessment of pain level. Electronic digital goniometer was used in assessment of knee flexion ROM. Iso-kinetic daynamometer was used in assessment of knee proprioceptive accuracy. Results: There was a significant relieving of pain perception, increasing of knee flexion ROM and improving proprioceptive accuracy in knee joint post-study in both groups. But application of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH had significant relieve of knee pain than KT. Conclusion: Using of Aescin, Diethylamine Salicylate gel PH is more effective than KT application in reliving knee pain in knee osteoarthritic patients.

  5. Combined versus individual effects of a valgus knee brace and lateral wedge foot orthotic during stair use in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Rebecca; Birmingham, Trevor; Dombroski, Colin; Walsh, Robert; Giffin, J Robert

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the combined and individual biomechanical effects of a valgus knee brace and a lateral wedge foot orthotic during stair ascent and descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty-five patients with varus alignment and medial knee OA were prescribed a custom valgus knee brace and lateral wedge foot orthotic. Knee angles and moments in the frontal and sagittal planes were determined from 3D gait analysis completed under four randomized conditions: (1) control (no knee brace or foot orthotic), (2) knee brace, (3) foot orthotic, and (4) combined knee brace and foot orthotic. Additional measures included the vertical ground reaction force, trunk lean, toe out and gait speed. During the combined use of a knee brace and foot orthotic, significant decreases in the knee adduction angle (2.17, 95%CI: 0.50-3.84, p=0.013) and 2nd peak EKAM (0.35, 95%CI: 0.17-0.52, pstair descent; and significant increases in the EKFM were observed during stair ascent (0.54, 95%CI: 0.30-0.78, pstair descent compared to ascent, except for toe out. Findings suggest greater effects on gait when both knee brace and foot orthotic are used together, resulting in a more normal gait pattern. However, whether or not a true change in knee joint load can be inferred when using these orthoses remains unclear. Further research is required to determine the clinical importance of the observed changes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Arthroscopic-assisted Arthrodesis of the Knee Joint With the Ilizarov Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszczykowski, Michal; Niedzielski, Kryspin; Radek, Maciej; Fabis, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the knee joint is a mainly a salvage surgical procedure performed in cases of infected total knee arthroplasty, tumor, failed knee arthroplasty or posttraumatic complication.The authors report the case of 18-year-old male with posttraumatic complication of left knee because of motorbike accident 1 year before. He was treated immediately after the injury in the local Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. The examination in the day of admission to our department revealed deformation of the left knee, massive scar tissue adhesions to the proximal tibial bone and multidirectional instability of the knee. The plain radiographs showed complete lack of lateral compartment of the knee joint and patella. The patient complained of severe instability and pain of the knee and a consecutive loss of supporting function of his left limb. The authors decided to perform an arthroscopic-assisted fusion of the knee with Ilizarov external fixator because of massive scar tissue in the knee region and the prior knee infection.In the final follow-up after 54 months a complete bone fusion, good functional and clinical outcome were obtained.This case provides a significant contribution to the development and application of low-invasive techniques in large and extensive surgical procedures in orthopedics and traumatology. Moreover, in this case fixation of knee joint was crucial for providing good conditions for the regeneration of damaged peroneal nerve.

  7. Muscle area of knee O.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Onozawa, Toshihiro; Shibata, Minoru; Yamasita, Izumi; Kitsunai, Isamu; Asano, Akira

    1983-01-01

    The cross sectional area of the thigh muscles were studied by means of C.T. scan. Twelve normal knees, twelve primary knee O.A. knees, and six R.A. knees were examined. The cross sectional area of the Quadriceps femoris decreased significantly in the patient of the knee O.A. although flexors did not decrease. We discussed the etiology of the knee O.A. from this result. (author)

  8. The floating knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz Vives, Josep; Bel, Jean-Christophe; Capel Agundez, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Blake and McBryde established the concept of 'floating knee' to describe ipsilateral fractures of the femur and tibia.1This combination is much more than a bone lesion; the mechanism is usually a high-energy trauma in a patient with multiple injuries and a myriad of other lesions...... fixation when both fractures (femoral and tibial) are extra-articular.Plates are the 'standard of care' in cases with articular fractures.A combination of implants are required by 40% of floating knees.Associated ligamentous and meniscal lesions are common, but may be irrelevant in the case of an intra......-articular fracture which gives the worst prognosis for this type of lesion. Cite this article: Muñoz Vives K, Bel J-C, Capel Agundez A, Chana Rodríguez F, Palomo Traver J, Schultz-Larsen M, Tosounidis, T. The floating knee.EFORT Open Rev2016;1:375-382. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000042....

  9. Limited use of surgeon's advice on exercise for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryaa, Sofie; Ingelsrud, Lina H; Skou, Søren T

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) programme consists of patient education and supervised exercise therapy and adheres to clinical guidelines for knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to present the treatment choice and clinical results of patients...

  10. Patellar SPECT and planar imaging in orthopedic patients with knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehdashti, F.; Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Carrera, G.F.; Krasnow, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-five painful knees in 56 patients were independently evaluated clinically, radiographically, and scintigraphically. All patients had an established final diagnosis of osteoarthritis or other predisposing conditions. Results of patellar bone scintigraphy were abnormal in 66 of 85 knees; there were ten isolated findings and 12 cases of medial, nine of lateral, and 35 of triple compartment involvement. Four-quadrant patellar analysis identified nine instances of isolated lateal patellar facet syndrome. Single-photon emission CT was of significant value in localizing patellar abnormalities. Radiographic evaluation disclosed osteoarthritis in 27 of 66 scintigraphically abnormal knees. Patellar bone scintigraphy is more valuable than radiography for evaluating adult orthopedic patients with knee pain

  11. Impact of clinical osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and hand on self-rated health in six European countries: the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Schoor, N. M.; Zambon, S.; Castell, M. V.; Cooper, C.; Denkinger, M.; Dennison, E. M.; Edwards, M. H.; Herbolsheimer, F.; Maggi, S.; S?nchez-Martinez, M.; Pedersen, N. L.; Peter, R.; Schaap, L. A.; Rijnhart, J. J. M.; van der Pas, S.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeOsteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to be associated with decreased physical function, which may impact upon a person’s self-rated health (SRH). Only a few studies have examined the association between OA and SRH in the general population, but to date none have used a clinical definition of OA. The objectives are: (1) To examine the cross-sectional association between clinical OA and fair-to-poor SRH in the general population; (2) To examine whether this association differs between coun...

  12. Knee pain and swelling: An atypical presentation of metastatic colon cancer to the patella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Gasagranda, DO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee pain is a common reason for a patient to seek medical evaluation. Of the many causes of knee pain, malignancy is one of the least common. When malignancy is the etiology of the pain, it is usually due to a primary tumor of the osseous structures or soft tissues of the knee joint. Metastatic disease involving the knee joint is uncommon, with few cases reported in the literature. Of these reported cases, metastatic colon cancer is exceedingly rare. However, in a patient with new onset knee pain and the proper clinical history, metastatic disease should be considered as a potential explanation of symptoms. We report a case of knee pain and swelling due to metastatic colon cancer to the patella.

  13. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asim Ali; Jahangir, Umar; Urooj, Shaista

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6(th) day; 9-11(th) day and 14(th) day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration.