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Sample records for hudson river striped

  1. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Dunning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%. However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032 if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009 and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006— an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  2. Computer simulation model for the striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River. [Effects of entrainment and impingement at power plants on population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Van Winkle, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Rush, R.M.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-09-01

    This report presents a daily transient (tidal-averaged), longitudinally one-dimensional (cross-section-averaged) computer simulation model for the assessment of the entrainment and impingement impacts of power plant operations on young-of-the-year populations of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River.

  3. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 1. [Effects on striped bass population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Christensen, S. G.

    1977-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of power plant operation on the Hudson River was conducted. The study included thermal, biological, and air quality effects of existing and planned electrical generating stations. This section on thermal impacts presents a comprehensive mathematical modeling and computer simulation study of the effects of heat rejection from the plants. The overall study consisted of three major parts: near-field analysis; far-field analysis; and zone-matched near-field/far-field analysis. Near-field analyses were completed for Roseton, Danskammer, and Bowline Point Generating Stations, and near-field dilution ratios range from a low of about 2 for Bowline Point and 3 for Roseton to a maximum of 6 for both plants. The far-field analysis included a critical review of existing studies and a parametric review of operating plants. The maximum thermal load case, based on hypothetical 1974 river conditions, gives the daily maximum cross-section-averaged and 2-mile-segment-averaged water temperatures as 83.80/sup 0/F in the vicinity of the Indian Point Station and 83.25/sup 0/F in the vicinity of the Bowline Station. This maximum case will be significantly modified if cooling towers are used at certain units. A full analysis and discussion of these cases is presented. A study of the Hudson River striped bass population is divided into the following eight subsections: distribution of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles in the Hudson River; entrainment mortality factor; intake factor; impingement; effects of discharges; compensation; model estimates of percent reduction; and Hudson River striped bass stock.

  4. The Hudson River estuary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levinton, J.S; Waldman, J.R

    2006-01-01

    ... emphasis on important issues specific to the Hudson, such as the effect of power plants and high concentrations of PCBs. The chapters are written by specialists at a level that is accessible to students, teachers, and the interested layperson. The Hudson River Estuary is a unique scientifi c biography of a major estuary, with relevance to the s...

  5. Critique and sensitivity analysis of the compensation function used in the LMS Hudson River striped bass models. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 944

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Winkle, W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kauffman, G.

    1976-12-01

    The description and justification for the compensation function developed and used by Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers (LMS) (under contract to Consolidated Edison Company of New York) in their Hudson River striped bass models are presented. A sensitivity analysis of this compensation function is reported, based on computer runs with a modified version of the LMS completely mixed (spatially homogeneous) model. Two types of sensitivity analysis were performed: a parametric study involving at least five levels for each of the three parameters in the compensation function, and a study of the form of the compensation function itself, involving comparison of the LMS function with functions having no compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops. For the range of parameter values used in this study, estimates of percent reduction are least sensitive to changes in YS, the equilibrium standing crop, and most sensitive to changes in KXO, the minimum mortality rate coefficient. Eliminating compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops results in higher estimates of percent reduction. For all values of KXO and for values of YS and KX at and above the baseline values, eliminating compensation at standing crops less than the equilibrium standing crops results in a greater increase in percent reduction than eliminating compensation at standing crops greater than the equilibrium standing crops.

  6. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  7. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Grabs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  8. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  9. A River Summer on the Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Selleck, B.; Son, L.; Land, M.; Cronin, J.

    2006-12-01

    River Summer is a month-long faculty development program extending from the continental shelf off New York City to the headwaters of the Hudson in the Adirondack Mountains. During the program, faculty from the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities teach each other about the Hudson environment, using innovative methods of teaching and learning, with a focus on incorporation of hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Over four weeks, faculty from research universities, community colleges, liberal arts institutions, and middle and high schools work and live together, on board a research vessel or in a remote tent campsite, for several days at a time. Using the geology, hydrology, and landscape of the River as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding development of the Hudson within the context of its natural resources and cultural history. Participants conduct field sampling and analyses and consider issues through approaches that are common to many disciplines: scaling for problem solving; sampling and assessing bias and representation; observing and documenting; representing and depicting; interpretation and assessing relationships and causality; and evaluation. They also get a chance to experience, first-hand, the complexity and often open-ended nature of doing science. By allowing individuals, many of whom come from non-science disciplines, to experience these methods and processes in a safe learning environment, science is made more meaningful and accessible. The program's pedagogy is based on the principles of cognitive psychology and immersive field-, place- and inquiry-based learning. Field programs have been found to provide memorable, transformative experiences for undergraduate students, and our experience with River Summer 2005 and 2006 suggests they are equally effective with faculty. Evaluation shows that River Summer has a significant impact on its participants. Participants develop new

  10. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: RVRMILES (River Mile Marker Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for river miles along the Hudson River. Vector lines in this data set represent river mile markers. This data set...

  11. Computing the Water Quality Index: The Hudson River Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihich, Orlando

    1996-01-01

    Describes a science project at Booker T. Washington Middle School #54 (New York City) where seventh and eighth graders computed the Hudson River's water quality using ClarisWorks spreadsheets and MicroWorlds software. Students gained technology skills and public recognition, as well as scientific and environmental information. Includes sample…

  12. Pharmaceuticals and Wastewater Tracers Along the Lower Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    The behavior and fate of pharmaceutical residues in urbanized, coastal ecosystems is not well understood. In this study 16 highly prescribed pharmaceuticals were measured in the lower Hudson River and New York Harbor in order to elucidate factors and processes regulating their ...

  13. Determining the Sediment Budget of the Lower Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugue, R.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment is a major component of the Hudson River Estuary, constantly being resuspended and deposited. The Lower Hudson River is heavily dredged due to its use as a shipping lane for large vessels traversing through the harbor. A detailed sediment budget is key for management of the estuary including development, optimizing dredging, restoration, and mitigating future sea-level changes. However, it has been difficult to produce a detailed sediment budget due to the large amounts of data required to obtain a reputable value and account for spatial variability. Thus, previous budget estimates were based on approximations of input and output of material The Hudson River Benthic Mapping Project, which was funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, resulted in a comprehensive data set that includes a dense network of subbottom profiles and over 400 sediment cores from the Hudson River Estuary. Using industrial seismic interpretation software and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, we identified the thickness and distribution of 20th century sediment deposition by mapping the sediment layer with elevated levels of anthropogenic lead, which is a characteristic for sediment deposition since 1920/1930. This 20th century sediment are of special concern because of the high amounts of contaminants that were being introduced into the estuary during this time. By combining analysis of different sections of the estuary, we are able to quantify the amount of 20th century deposition between Poughkeepsie and the New York Harbor and demonstrate that a detailed sediment budget can be obtained. This analysis reveals that ~35,000,000 cubic meters of sediment has been deposited in the study area during the last 70-80 years, which corresponds to an annual deposition of 450,000 - 500,000 cubic meters. Following this analysis, we aim to obtain a sediment mass and compare our results with other estimates that were taken in the past.

  14. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  15. 33 CFR 165.162 - Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York. 165.162 Section 165.162 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.162 Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York. (a) Regulated area. The...

  16. The Hudson River Plume: Exploring Human Impact on the Coastal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Janice; Duncan, Ravit; Lichtenwalner, C. Sage; Dunbar, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The Hudson River Watershed contains a variety of geologic, topographic, climatic, and hydrologic features and a diversity of land-use patterns--making it an ideal model for studying human impact on the coastal environment. In this article, the authors present the Hudson River Plume (HRP), a problem-based online module that explores nonpoint-source…

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: REPTILES (Reptile Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for estuarine reptiles (turtles, terrapins) and amphibians (salamanders, frogs) for the Hudson River....

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for regional and state parks, historic sites, marine sanctuaries, and other managed areas for the Hudson River....

  19. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this...

  20. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: STAGING (Staging Site Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for staging sites along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent locations of possible staging areas...

  1. Hudson River Sub_Bottom Profile Data - Raw SEG-Y Files (*.sgy)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Data...

  2. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: SENSITIV (Sensitive Area Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for sensitive areas along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent sensitive areas. This data set...

  3. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set...

  4. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hudson River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Hudson River from 1942 to 2005. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  5. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  6. Sea-Level Rise Impacts on Hudson River Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, A.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2015-12-01

    The response of tidal marshes to increasing sea-level rise is uncertain. Tidal marshes can adapt to rising sea levels through vertical accretion and inland migration. Yet tidal marshes are vulnerable to submergence if the rate of sea-level rise exceeds the rate of accretion and if inland migration is limited by natural features or development. We studied how Piermont and Iona Island Marsh, two tidal marshes on the Hudson River, New York, would be affected by sea-level rise of 0.5m, 1m, and 1.5m by 2100. This study was based on the 2011-2012 Coastal New York LiDAR survey. Using GIS we mapped sea-level rise projections accounting for accretion rates and calculated the submerged area of the marsh. Based on the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve Vegetation 2005 dataset, we studied how elevation zones based on vegetation distributions would change. To evaluate the potential for inland migration, we assessed land cover around each marsh using the National Land Cover Database 2011 Land Cover dataset and examined the slope beyond the marsh boundaries. With an accretion rate of 0.29cm/year and 0.5m of sea-level rise by 2100, Piermont Marsh would be mostly unchanged. With 1.5m of sea-level rise, 86% of Piermont Marsh would be flooded. For Iona Island Marsh with an accretion rate of 0.78cm/year, sea-level rise of 0.5m by 2100 would result in a 4% expansion while 1.5m sea-level rise would cause inundation of 17% of the marsh. The results indicate that Piermont and Iona Island Marsh may be able to survive rates of sea-level rise such as 0.5m by 2100 through vertical accretion. At rates of sea-level rise like 1.5m by 2100, vertical accretion cannot match sea-level rise, submerging parts of the marshes. High elevations and steep slopes limit Piermont and Iona Island Marsh's ability to migrate inland. Understanding the impacts of sea-level rise on Piermont and Iona Island Marsh allows for long-term planning and could motivate marsh conservation programs.

  7. 77 FR 53769 - Safety Zone; Liberty to Freedom Swims, Liberty Island, Upper Bay and Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Liberty to Freedom Swims, Liberty Island... and the Lower Hudson River for the September 5, 2012 and September 15, 2012 Liberty to Freedom swim... Upper New York Bay and the Lower Hudson River, in the vicinity of Liberty Island, Jersey City, Manhattan...

  8. Using destination image to predict visitors' intention to revisit three Hudson River Valley, New York, communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy M. Schuster; Laura Sullivan; Duarte Morais; Diane Kuehn

    2009-01-01

    This analysis explores the differences in Affective and Cognitive Destination Image among three Hudson River Valley (New York) tourism communities. Multiple regressions were used with six dimensions of visitors' images to predict future intention to revisit. Two of the three regression models were significant. The only significantly contributing independent...

  9. 76 FR 8654 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... significant damage to propellers, rudders, and hull plating. The formation of ice on the Hudson River is... restrictions via marine broadcast, Local Notices to Mariners, and VTS New York. For the purpose of this rule... ADDRESSES. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting and...

  10. Sediment transport due to extreme events: The Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Lee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, David K.; Warner, John C.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Wall, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 produced intense precipitation and flooding in the U.S. Northeast, including the Hudson River watershed. Sediment input to the Hudson River was approximately 2.7 megaton, about 5 times the long-term annual average. Rather than the common assumption that sediment is predominantly trapped in the estuary, observations and model results indicate that approximately two thirds of the new sediment remained trapped in the tidal freshwater river more than 1 month after the storms and only about one fifth of the new sediment reached the saline estuary. High sediment concentrations were observed in the estuary, but the model results suggest that this was predominantly due to remobilization of bed sediment. Spatially localized deposits of new and remobilized sediment were consistent with longer term depositional records. The results indicate that tidal rivers can intercept (at least temporarily) delivery of terrigenous sediment to the marine environment during major flow events.

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in Hudson River water and treated drinking water at Waterford, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R.A.; Barnes, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Past discharge of PCBs into the Hudson River has resulted in contaminant concentrations of a few tenths of a microgram per liter in the water. Waterford is one of two large municipal users of the Hudson River for drinking-water supply. The treatment scheme at the Waterford plant, which processes approximately 1 million gallons per day, is similar to that of most conventional treatment plants except for the addition of powdered activated carbon during flocculation. Comparison of PCB concentrations in river water and intake water at the plant to concentrations in treated drinking-water samples indicates that purification processes remove 80 to 90 percent of the PCBs and that final concentrations seldom exceed 0.1 microgram per liter. No significant difference was noted between the removal efficiencies during periods of high river discharge, when PCBs are associated with suspended sediment, and low discharge, when PCBs are generally dissolved. (USGS)

  12. 77 FR 22525 - Safety Zone; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Guard patrol crafts. The events and locations are as follows: (1) The Iron Man Open Water Swim Clinics... Swim Clinics: within the waters of the Lower Hudson River in the vicinity of West 100th Street and West... in the final rule. Regulatory Analyses We developed this proposed rule after considering numerous...

  13. 78 FR 20559 - Safety Zones; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... ``SEARCH'' box and click ``SEARCH.'' Click on Open Docket Folder on the line associated with this... Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321-4370f), and... the Hudson River in the vicinity of Ulster Landing, bound by the following points: 42 00'03.7'' N, 073...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for the Hudson River, classified according to the Environmental...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: WETLANDS (Environmental Sensitivity Index Wetland Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing coastal wetland habitats for the Hudson River classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine mammals (seals) in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine mammal...

  17. Determining Sources and Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments with Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.; Chaky, D. A.; Simpson, H. J.; McHugh, C. M.; Shuster, E. L.; Bopp, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    Different sources of radioactive contamination contain characteristic and identifiable isotopic signatures, which can be used to study sediment transport. We focus on Pu-239, Pu-240, Np-237 and Cs-137, which are strongly bound to fine grained sediments. The Hudson River drainage basin has received contamination from at least three separate sources: 1) global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which contributed Pu, Np and Cs; 2) contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River Estuary ˜70km north of New York Harbor, where records document releases of Cs-137; 3) contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, where incomplete records document releases of Cs-137 but no mention is made of Pu or Np. Here we report measurements of Pu isotopes, Np-237 and Cs-137 for a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the drainage basin: 1) Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) Hudson River upstream of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. In addition, we present data from selected samples from two other lower Hudson River locations: One site located ˜30km downstream of IPNPP and another ˜30km upstream of IPNPP. By comparing the isotopic ratios Pu-240/Pu-239, Np-237/Pu-239, and Cs-137/Pu-239, measured in fluvial sediments to mean global fallout values, it is possible to identify and resolve different sources of non-fallout contamination. To date, isotopic data for sediments indicate non-fallout sources of Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137; Np-237, however, appears to originate from global fallout only. Mohawk River sediments downstream of KAPL exhibit enrichments in Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137 that are 7 to 20 times higher than levels expected from global fallout as indicated from Np-237. The elevated levels, non-fallout isotopic signatures

  18. Contaminants in striped bass from the flint and Apalachicola Rivers 1986-1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Five striped bass (Morone saxitilis), collected between April 1986 and May 1989 from the Flint River at Albany, Georgia, and the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee,...

  19. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Underwater intrusion detection is an ongoing security concern in port and harbor areas. Of particular interest is to detect SCUBA divers, unmanned underwater vehicles and small boats from their acoustic signature. A thorough understanding of the effects of the shallow water propagating medium on acoustic signals can help develop new technologies and improve the performance of existing acoustic based surveillance systems. The Hudson River Estuary provides us with such a shallow water medium to conduct research and improve our knowledge of shallow water acoustics. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary is highly affected by the temporal and spatial variability of salinity and temperature due to tides, freshwater inflows, winds etc. The primary goal of this research is to help develop methodologies to predict the formation of an acoustic field in the realistic environment of the lower Hudson River Estuary. Shallow water high-frequency acoustic propagation experiments were conducted in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. Channel Impulse Response (CIR) measurements were carried out in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz for distances up to 200 meters in a water depth of 8-10 meters which formed the basis for experimental Transmission Loss (TL). CIR data was also utilized to demonstrate multi-path propagation in shallow water. Acoustic propagation models based on Ray Theory and Parabolic Equation methods were implemented in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz and TL was estimated. The sound velocity profiles required as input by acoustic propagation models were calculated from in-situ measurements of temperature, salinity and depth. Surface reflection loss was obtained from CIR data and incorporated into the acoustic propagation models. Experimentally obtained TL was used to validate the acoustic model predictions. An outcome of this research is an operational acoustic transmission loss (TL) forecast system based on the existing, Stevens New York

  20. The floods of March 1936, part 2, Hudson River to Susquehanna River region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Nathan C.

    1937-01-01

    by white men, were broken many of them by wide margins. The peak of the Connecticut River at Hartford, Conn., was 8.6 feet higher than had been experienced since the settlement by white men, 300 years ago. The Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, Pa., was 3.5 feet higher than had been known in a period of record covering about 200 years. The Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pa., was 6.1 feet higher than had been known in the period beginning 1762. This volume presents many of the facts of these notable floods with respect to the New England rivers, for permanent record and for study and reference by engineers concerned with the building of highways, bridges, and industrial plants, planners of river development, and others. Similar volumes for the region from the Hudson River to the Susquehanna River and for the Potomac, James, and upper Ohio River Basins are presented in companion Water-Supply Papers 799 and 800 respectively. In this volume records of stage and discharge for the period Including the floods are presented for about 150 measurement stations; peak discharges with comparative data for other floods at more than 400 measurement points are summarized; crest stages along an aggregate length of stream channel of 2,820 miles are tabulated; and results of detailed studies of the rainfall and run-off and many other kinds of flood information are presented.

  1. Real-time Monitoring Network to Characterize Anthropogenic and Natural Events Affecting the Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. S.; Bonner, J. S.; Fuller, C.; Kirkey, W.; Ojo, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Hudson River watershed spans 34,700 km2 predominantly in New York State, including agricultural, wilderness, and urban areas. The Hudson River supports many activities including shipping, supplies water for municipal, commercial, and agricultural uses, and is an important recreational resource. As the population increases within this watershed, so does the anthropogenic impact on this natural system. To address the impacts of anthropogenic and natural activities on this ecosystem, the River and Estuary Observatory Network (REON) is being developed through a joint venture between the Beacon Institute, Clarkson University, General Electric Inc. and IBM Inc. to monitor New York's Hudson and Mohawk Rivers in real-time. REON uses four sensor platform types with multiple nodes within the network to capture environmentally relevant episodic events. Sensor platform types include: 1) fixed robotic vertical profiler (FRVP); 2) mobile robotic undulating platform (MRUP); 3) fixed acoustic Doppler current profiler (FADCP) and 4) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). The FRVP periodically generates a vertical profile with respect to water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, particle concentration and size distribution, and fluorescence. The MRUP utilizes an undulating tow-body tethered behind a research vessel to measure the same set of water parameters as the FRVP, but does so 'synchronically' over a highly-resolved spatial regime. The fixed ADCP provides continuous water current profiles. The AUV maps four-dimensional (time, latitude, longitude, depth) variation of water quality, water currents and bathymetry along a pre-determined transect route. REON data can be used to identify episodic events, both anthropogenic and natural, that impact the Hudson River. For example, a strong heat signature associated with cooling water discharge from the Indian Point nuclear power plant was detected with the MRUP. The FRVP monitoring platform at Beacon, NY, located in the

  2. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1982-02-01

    This report summarizes a series of analyses of the magnitude and biological significance of the impingement of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Station and other Hudson River power plants. Included in these analyses were evaluations of: (1) two independent lines of evidence relating to the magnitude of impingement impacts on the Hudson River white perch population; (2) the additional impact caused by entrainment of white perch; (3) data relating to density-dependent growth among young-of-the-year white perch; (4) the feasibility of performing population-level analyses of impingement impacts on the white perch populations of Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River; and (5) the feasibility of using simple food chain and food web models to evaluate community-level effects of impingement and entrainment. Estimated reductions in the abundances of the 1974 and 1975 white perch year classes, caused by impingement and entrainment, were high enough that the possibility of adverse long-term effects cannot be excluded.

  3. Low PCB concentrations observed in American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in six Hudson River tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limburg, K.E.; Machut, L.S.; Jeffers, P.; Schmidt, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed 73 eels, collected in 2004 and 2005 above the head of tide in six Hudson River tributaries, for total PCBs, length, weight, age, and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (??15N). Mean total PCB concentration (wet weight basis) was 0.23 ppm ?? 0.08 (standard error), with a range of 0.008 to 5.4 ppm. A majority of eels (84) had concentrations below 0.25 ppm, and only seven eels (10%) had concentrations exceeding 0.5 ppm. Those eels with higher PCB concentrations were ???12 yr; there was a weak correlation of PCB concentration with ??15N and also with weight. Compared to recent (2003) data from the mainstem of the Hudson River estuary, these results indicate that tributaries are generally much less contaminated with PCBs. We hypothesize that those tributary eels with high PCB concentrations were relatively recent immigrants from the mainstem. Given concern over the possible adverse effects of PCBs on eel reproduction, these tributaries may serve as refugia. Therefore, providing improved access to upland tributaries may be critically important to this species. ?? 2008 Northeastern Naturalist.

  4. Groundwater quality in the Upper Hudson River Basin, New York, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tia-Marie; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 20 production and domestic wells in the Upper Hudson River Basin (north of the Federal Dam at Troy, New York) in New York in August 2012 to characterize groundwater quality in the basin. The samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 148 physiochemical properties and constituents, including dissolved gases, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radionuclides, and indicator bacteria. The Upper Hudson River Basin covers 4,600 square miles in upstate New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts; the study area encompasses the 4,000 square miles that lie within New York. The basin is underlain by crystalline and sedimentary bedrock, including gneiss, shale, and slate; some sandstone and carbonate rocks are present locally. The bedrock in some areas is overlain by surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel. Eleven of the wells sampled in the Upper Hudson River Basin are completed in sand and gravel deposits, and nine are completed in bedrock. Groundwater in the Upper Hudson River Basin was typically neutral or slightly basic; the water typically was moderately hard. Bicarbonate, chloride, calcium, and sodium were the major ions with the greatest median concentrations; the dominant nutrient was nitrate. Methane was detected in 7 samples. Strontium, iron, barium, boron, and manganese were the trace elements with the highest median concentrations. Two pesticides, an herbicide degradate and an insecticide degredate, were detected in two samples at trace levels; seven VOCs, including chloroform, four solvents, and the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were detected in four samples. The greatest radon-222 activity, 2,900 picocuries per liter, was measured in a sample from a bedrock well; the median radon activity was higher in samples from bedrock wells than in samples from sand and gravel wells. Coliform bacteria were

  5. Beluga whale summer habitat associations in the Nelson River estuary, western Hudson Bay, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Smith

    Full Text Available To understand beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas estuarine use in the Nelson River estuary, southwest Hudson Bay, we recorded and examined beluga movements and habitat associations for the July through August period in 2002-2005. We compared locations of belugas fitted with satellite transmitters ("tags" (2002-2005 and aerial-surveyed (2003 and 2005 belugas for years of differing freshwater flow from the Nelson River which is influenced by hydroelectric activity. Using the beluga telemetry location data, we estimated an early August behavioral shift in beluga distribution patterns from local estuarine use to a progressively more migratory behavior away from the estuary. The timing of this shift in behavior was also apparent in results of beluga aerial surveys from the 1940s-1960s, despite environmental changes including later freeze-up and warming ocean temperatures. Overall, during the higher than average discharge ("wet" year of 2005, the three tagged belugas ranged farther from the Nelson River but not farther from the nearest shore along southwestern Hudson Bay, compared to the 10 tagged belugas tracked during the "dry" years of 2002-2004 with below average discharges. Aerial survey data for 2003 and 2005 display a similar dry vs. wet year shift in spatial patterns, with no significant change in overall density of belugas within the study area. In the Nelson estuary, proximity to the fresh-salt water mixing area may be more important than the shallow waters of the upper estuary. Killer whales (Orcinus orca were observed in the Churchill area (200 km northwest during each year of study, 2002-05, and belugas may benefit from the proximity to shallow estuary waters that provide protection from the larger-bodied predator. Study results contribute to an understanding of the influence of environmental variation on how and why belugas use estuaries although considerable uncertainties exist and additional research is required.

  6. Novel Method for Estimating Variations in Salinity and River Discharge in the Hudson Estuary Using Stable Isotopes of Leaf Waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanpour, B.; Nichols, J. E.; Isles, P. D.; Peteet, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding variations in the hydrological cycle of the Hudson Valley has important implications for water resources management, affecting millions of New Yorkers. Paleoclimatological records of hydrological variability from this region, however, are sparse, as the typical enivronments used for paleohydrological reconstruction do not exist. However, salt marshes are common features of the Hudson River, where the influence of tides is felt far upstream. To take advantage of these environments as recorders of paleohydrology, we present a new method for estimating annual river discharge using salt marsh sediments. We will be examining hydrogen isotopes of leaf waxes in vascular plants to estimate salinity, which will be calibrated to Hudson River discharge using United States Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow data. Freshwater flux from the Hudson Valley is proportional to the salinity at a particular location in the estuary. We estimate the relationship between the salinity and δD using a two-part mixing model where the salinity and δD of ocean water is 35 ppt and 0‰ VSMOW respectively, and the salinity and δD of continental water is 0 ppt and -55‰ (approximately annual average precipitation in the region). It has been shown that the δD of the leaf waxes of aquatic vegetation accurately reflect the δD of growth water. For our experiment, we collected common members of the generaTypha, Spartina, Phragmites, and Scirpus from salt marshes along the Hudson River, and the north and south shores of Long Island to calibrate the specific relationship between marsh plant leaf wax δD and marsh water δD. We compare the measured δD of these plant waxes to the δD of marsh water estimated from salinity measurements made at USGS gage stations near each collection location. We then used the new calibration to estimate late Holocene variations in marsh salinity and thus Hudson River discharge using fossil leaf waxes. This novel method will help us better understand

  7. Using Elemental Abundances and Petrophysical Properties to Trace Sediment Transport in the Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Kenna, T. C.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2016-12-01

    The IPCC predicts that the frequency and severity of storms worldwide will increase due to climate change, a growing concern for the highly populated coastal areas near the Hudson River estuary. Storms have the potential to change the river's sediment budget, and it is necessary to update the current understanding of the effect of storms on sediment dynamics. In 2011, Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene delivered over 2.7 million tons of sediment to the Hudson River including over 1.5 million tons from the Mohawk River, a freshwater tributary, in addition to record amounts contributed from other major tributaries. The goals of this project are to use sediment elemental compositions to trace the major tributaries contributing to this storm-deposited sediment and to determine where sediment is accumulating as a result of storm activity. Chemical analysis of over 800 archived sediment samples are compiled to provide a pre-storm background level. These samples are compared to newly deposited sediment and material from specific tributaries. Elemental abundances (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pb, and U) are measured using a field portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) unit and core scanning XRF unit. Bulk matrix density is measured using a pycnometer. The measurements are used to identify elemental signatures from tributary sediment and to trace the influence of specific tributaries on deposition through the river. Our results suggests measureable signatures in sediment from individual tributaries. The Mohawk River contributes high concentrations of Ca due to the calcite deposits in its watershed. XRF measurements also show the effect of human activity on sediment deposition; variations in Rb and Zr indicate changes in deposition due to dredging in Haverstraw Bay. The salt wedge front, where ocean and fresh water meets is evident in areas of below average matrix density. This project shows significant geochemical variability between sediment from different

  8. Groundwater quality in the Chemung River, Eastern Lake Ontario, and Lower Hudson River Basins, New York, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tia-Marie; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Reddy, James E.

    2015-11-10

    In a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, water samples were collected from 4 production wells and 4 domestic wells in the Chemung River Basin, 8 production wells and 7 domestic wells in the Eastern Lake Ontario Basin, and 12 production wells and 13 domestic wells in the Lower Hudson River Basin (south of the Federal Lock and Dam at Troy) in New York. All samples were collected in June, July, and August 2013 to characterize groundwater quality in these basins. The samples were collected and processed using standard USGS procedures and were analyzed for 148 physiochemical properties and constituents, including dissolved gases, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and indicator bacteria.

  9. Flow model of the Hudson River estuary from Albany to New Hamburg, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedfast, David A.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional transient-flow-simulation model was developed to represent a 76-mile reach of the tidal Hudson River between Albany and New Hamburg, N.Y. The river 's direction of flow reverses four times daily as a result of tidal influence, and this process produces complex current patterns and retards the rate at which the river can flush out pollutants. In the model, the reach studied is treated as two subreaches to incorporate differences in channel conditions and to simplify model calibration. This report provides all stage (water-level) and discharge data that were used to calibrate and verify the model and compares the model results with measured data. The model accurately simulated observed flows, but further calibration based upon additional prototype flow measurements would improve simulation of the flow magnitude and phasing of the tide reversal under low-flow conditions. The model can be used to calculate instantaneous stage, velocity, and discharge for any location in the reach and can also be used to calculate net volume flux between tide reversals. (USGS)

  10. Accumulation of PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on the Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Kathy R.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Nichols, John W.; Secord, Anne L.; McCarty, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were used as a sentinel species to monitor the contamination and bioavailability of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hudson River watershed. Several tree swallow nest box colonies around and downstream from Hudson Falls, NY, were studied. Tree swallow eggs, adults, and 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings were collected and analyzed for 103 PCB congeners. Emergent insects collected by net (primarily Odonata) or as a food bolus (primarily Diptera) taken from the mouths of adult tree swallows returning to the nest were analyzed in the same manner. Total PCB concentrations (wet weight) in eggs from two contaminated sites ranged from 9000 to 25 000 ng/g and accumulated to 32 000 and 96 000 ng/g in 15-day-old nestling at two contaminated sites. The congener patterns of PCBs in eggs, nestlings, and adults were compared to those found in emergent insects (Odonata and Diptera) using principal components analysis. The PCB patterns of the biota differed from that of Aroclor technical mixtures. PCB patterns in adult tree swallows were similar to those in eggs, while the patterns in dietary insects were similar to nestling tree swallows. Uptake rate constants were determined for tree swallow nestlings and compared between the two contaminated sites. The estimated PCB congener uptake rate constants were 0.008-0.02 d-1 based on uptake in nestlings until day 15 post-hatch. The rate constants were comparable between the two study areas and may be used to predict nestling contamination at other locations. Our studies confirm the utility of nestling tree swallows to evaluate localized PCB contamination.

  11. Effects of flow releases on macroinvertebrate assemblages in the Indian and Hudson Rivers in the Adirondack Mountains of Northern New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Smith, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of flow releases (daily during spring and four times weekly during summer) from a small impoundment on macroinvertebrate assemblages in the lower Indian River and upper Hudson River of northern New York were assessed during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Community indices, feeding guilds, dominant species and Bray—Curtis similarities at three sites on the Indian River, below a regulated impoundment, were compared with those at four control sites on the Cedar River, below a run-of-the-river impoundment of comparable size. The same indices at four less-likely affected sites on the Hudson River, below the mouth of the Indian River, were compared with those at an upstream control site on the Hudson River. Results show that the function and apparent health of macroinvertebrate communities were generally unaffected by atypical flow regimes and/or altered water quality at study reaches downstream from both dams in the Indian, Cedar and Hudson Rivers. The lentic nature of releases from both impoundments, however, produced significant changes in the structure of assemblages at Indian and Cedar River sites immediately downstream from both dams, moderate effects at two Indian River sites 2.4 and 4.0 km downstream from its dam, little or no effect at three Cedar River sites 7.2-34.2 km downstream from its dam, and no effect at any Hudson River site. Bray—Curtis similarities indicate that assemblages did not differ significantly among sites within similar impact categories. The paucity of scrapers at all Indian River sites, and the predominance of filter-feeding Simulium gouldingi and Pisidium compressum immediately below Abanakee dam, show that only minor differences in dominant species and trophic structure of macroinvertebrate communities occurred at affected sites in the Indian River compared to the Cedar River. Thus, flow releases had only a small, localized effect on macroinvertebrate communities in the Indian River.

  12. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Port of Albany weather/hydro by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2011-01-04 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0163364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163364 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Port of Albany weather/hydro, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  13. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Schodack Island hydro/weather by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2008-04-25 to 2017-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0163416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163416 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Schodack Island hydro/weather, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for the Hudson...

  15. Impact of AMD on water quality in critical watershed in the Hudson River drainage basin: Phillips Mine, Hudson Highlands, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, S.; Gates, A.; Szabo, Z.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    A sulfur and trace element enriched U-Th-laced tailings pile at the abandoned Phillips Mine in Garrison, New York, releases acid mine drainage (AMD, generally pH Copper Mine Brook (CMB) that drains into the Hudson River. The pyrrhotite-rich Phillips Mine is located in the Highlands region, a critical water source for the New York metro area. A conceptual model for derivation/dissolution, sequestration, transport and dilution of contaminants is proposed. The acidic water interacts with the tailings, leaching and dissolving the trace metals. AMD evaporation during dry periods concentrates solid phase trace metals and sulfate, forming melanterite (FeSO4.7H2O) on sulfide-rich tailings surfaces. Wet periods dissolve these concentrates/precipitates, releasing stored acidity and trace metals into the CMB. Sediments along CMB are enriched in iron hydroxides which act as sinks for metals, indicating progressive sequestration that correlates with dilution and sharp rise in pH when mine water mixes with tributaries. Seasonal variations in metal concentrations were partly attributable to dissolution of the efflorescent salts with their sorbed metals and additional metals from surging acidic seepage induced by precipitation.

  16. Ground-Water Quality in the Upper Hudson River Basin, New York, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 25 production and domestic wells in the Upper Hudson River Basin (north of the Federal Dam at Troy, N.Y.) from August through November 2007 to characterize the ground-water quality. The Upper Hudson River Basin covers 4,600 square miles in upstate New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts; the study area encompasses the 4,000 square miles that lie within New York. The basin is underlain by crystalline and sedimentary bedrock, including gneiss, shale, and slate; some sandstone and carbonate rocks are present locally. The bedrock in some areas is overlain by surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel. Of the 25 wells sampled, 13 were finished in sand and gravel deposits, and 12 were finished in bedrock. The samples were collected and processed by standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 225 physical properties and constituents, including major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and indicator bacteria. Water quality in the study area is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State drinking-water standards; these were: color (1 sample), pH (2 samples), sodium (5 samples), nitrate plus nitrite (2 samples), aluminum (3 samples), iron (1 sample), manganese (7 samples), radon-222 (11 samples), and bacteria (1 sample). Dissolved-oxygen concentrations in samples from wells finished in sand and gravel [median 5.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] were greater than those from wells finished in bedrock (median 0.4 mg/L). The pH of all samples was typically neutral or slightly basic (median 7.6); the median water temperature was 9.7 deg C. The ions with the highest concentrations were bicarbonate (median 123 mg/L) and calcium (median 33.9 mg/L). Ground water in the basin is generally soft to moderately hard (less than or equal to 120 mg/L as CaCO3) (median hardness 110 mg/L as CaCO3). Concentrations of

  17. Landscape controls on total and methyl Hg in the Upper Hudson River basin, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Brigham, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches are needed to better predict spatial variation in riverine Hg concentrations across heterogeneous landscapes that include mountains, wetlands, and open waters. We applied multivariate linear regression to determine the landscape factors and chemical variables that best account for the spatial variation of total Hg (THg) and methyl Hg (MeHg) concentrations in 27 sub-basins across the 493 km2 upper Hudson River basin in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. THg concentrations varied by sixfold, and those of MeHg by 40-fold in synoptic samples collected at low-to-moderate flow, during spring and summer of 2006 and 2008. Bivariate linear regression relations of THg and MeHg concentrations with either percent wetland area or DOC concentrations were significant but could account for only about 1/3 of the variation in these Hg forms in summer. In contrast, multivariate linear regression relations that included metrics of (1) hydrogeomorphology, (2) riparian/wetland area, and (3) open water, explained about 66% to >90% of spatial variation in each Hg form in spring and summer samples. These metrics reflect the influence of basin morphometry and riparian soils on Hg source and transport, and the role of open water as a Hg sink. Multivariate models based solely on these landscape metrics generally accounted for as much or more of the variation in Hg concentrations than models based on chemical and physical metrics, and show great promise for identifying waters with expected high Hg concentrations in the Adirondack region and similar glaciated riverine ecosystems.

  18. 78 FR 59231 - Regulated Navigation Area-Tappan Zee Bridge Construction Project, Hudson River; South Nyack and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Hudson River surrounding the Tappan Zee Bridge. This temporary interim rule allows the Coast Guard to enforce speed and wake restrictions and prohibit all vessel traffic through the RNA during bridge replacement operations, both planned and unforeseen, that could pose an imminent hazard to persons and vessels operating in the area. This rule is necessary to provide for the safety of life in the regulated area during the construction of the bridge.

  19. Effects of recreational flow releases on natural resources of the Indian and Hudson Rivers in the Central Adirondack Mountains, New York, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Mulvihill, C.I.; Ernst, A.G.; Boisvert, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Cornell University carried out a cooperative 2-year study from the fall of 2004 through the fall of 2006 to characterize the potential effects of recreational-flow releases from Lake Abanakee on natural resources in the Indian and Hudson Rivers. Researchers gathered baseline information on hydrology, temperature, habitat, nearshore wetlands, and macroinvertebrate and fish communities and assessed the behavior and thermoregulation of stocked brown trout in study reaches from both rivers and from a control river. The effects of recreational-flow releases (releases) were assessed by comparing data from affected reaches with data from the same reaches during nonrelease days, control reaches in a nearby run-of-the-river system (the Cedar River), and one reach in the Hudson River upstream from the confluence with the Indian River. A streamgage downstream from Lake Abanakee transmitted data by satellite from November 2004 to November 2006; these data were used as the basis for developing a rating curve that was used to estimate discharges for the study period. River habitat at most study reaches was delineated by using Global Positioning System and ArcMap software on a handheld computer, and wetlands were mapped by ground-based measurements of length, width, and areal density. River temperature in the Indian and Hudson Rivers was monitored continuously at eight sites during June through September of 2005 and 2006; temperature was mapped in 2005 by remote imaging made possible through collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology. Fish communities at all study reaches were surveyed and characterized through quantitative, nearshore electrofishing surveys. Macroinvertebrate communities in all study reaches were sampled using the traveling-kick method and characterized using standard indices. Radio telemetry was used to track the movement and persistence of

  20. Building sustainable communities using sense of place indicators in three Hudson River Valley, NY, tourism destinations: An application of the limits of acceptable change process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Sullivan; Rudy M. Schuster; Diane M. Kuehn; Cheryl S. Doble; Duarte. Morais

    2010-01-01

    This study explores whether measures of residents' sense of place can act as indicators in the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) process to facilitate tourism planning and management. Data on community attributes valued by residents and the associated values and meanings were collected through focus groups with 27 residents in three Hudson River Valley, New York,...

  1. Microstructure, CTD and ADCP data collected from R/V ONRUST in Hudson River Estuary during 6 short cruises from 1994-05-19 to 2001-05-01 (NCEI Accession 0146260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations of turbulent mixing, stratification and currents in the Hudson River Estuary made in 6 short cruises in 1994/1995 and 2001 were assembled. The lower...

  2. Use of an ADCP to compute suspended-sediment discharge in the tidal Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Gary R.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Litten, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can provide data needed for computation of suspended-sediment discharge in complex river systems, such as tidal rivers, in which conventional methods of collecting time-series data on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and water discharge are not feasible. Although ADCPs are not designed to measure SSC, ADCP data can be used as a surrogate under certain environmental conditions. However, the software for such computation is limited, and considerable post-processing is needed to correct and normalize ADCP data for this use. This report documents the sampling design and computational procedure used to calibrate ADCP measures of echo intensity to SSC and water velocity to discharge in the computation of suspended-sediment discharge at the study site on the Hudson River near Poughkeepsie, New York. The methods and procedures described may prove useful to others doing similar work in different locations; however, they are specific to this study site and may have limited applicability elsewhere.

  3. Organic matter compositions of rivers draining into Hudson Bay: Present-day trends and potential as recorders of future climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Pamela; Macdonald, Robie W.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou A.; Goñi, Miguel A.; Stern, Gary A.

    2017-07-01

    Concentrations and compositions of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) and aromatic compounds including lignin were analyzed in water samples from 17 rivers flowing into Hudson Bay, northern Canada. These rivers incorporate basins to the south with no permafrost to basins in the north with continuous permafrost, and dominant vegetation systems that include Boreal Forest, the Hudson Plains, Taiga Shield, and Tundra. Major latitudinal trends in organic carbon and lignin concentrations and compositions were evident, with both DOC and dissolved lignin concentrations dominating over their particulate counterparts and exhibiting significant correlations with total dissolved and suspended solids, respectively. The composition of lignin reaction products in terms of the syringyl, cinnamyl, and vanillyl compositions indicate mixed sources of vascular land plant-derived organic carbon, with woody gymnosperms contributions dominating in the southern river basins whereas nonwoody angiosperm sources were more important in the most northerly rivers. The composition of nonlignin aromatic compounds, which provides a tracer for nonvascular plant contributions, suggests stronger contributions from Sphagnum mosses to dissolved organic matter in rivers below the tree line, including those with large peat bogs in their basins. Acid/aldehyde ratios of the lignin products together with Δ14C data for DOC in selected rivers indicate that DOC has generally undergone greater alteration than POC. Interestingly, several northern rivers exhibited relatively old DOC according to the Δ14C data suggesting that either old DOC is being released from permafrost or old DOC survives river transport in these rivers.

  4. Ecological carryover effects associated with partial migration in white perch (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian K.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Secor, David H.

    2018-01-01

    Partial migration in complex life cycles allows environmental conditions experienced during one life-stage to interact with genetic thresholds and produce divergent spatial behaviors in the next stage. We evaluated partial migration over the entire life cycle of white perch, (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary, combining otolith microchemistry, population demographics and environmental data analysis. Ecological carryover effects were used as a framework to test how environmental variation during the larval period influenced migration behaviors and growth characteristics in subsequent life-stages. Two annual cohorts of juveniles were classified based on whether they persisted in natal habitats (freshwater resident contingent) or dispersed into non-natal habitats (brackish water migratory contingent) as juveniles. The migratory contingent tended to hatch earlier and experience cooler temperatures as larvae, while the availability of zooplankton prey during the larval period appeared to influence growth dynamics before and after metamorphosis. Juvenile migration behaviors were reversible but usually persisted into adulthood. As juveniles, the consequences of partial migration on growth appeared to be modified by river flow, as demonstrated by the influence of a large storm event on feeding conditions in one of the study years. Migratory adults grew faster and attained larger maximum sizes, but may also experience higher rates of mortality. The interplay uncovered between life-stage transitions, conditional migration behaviors and habitat productivity throughout the life cycle shapes white perch population dynamics and will likely play an important role in responses to long-term environmental change.

  5. Fall diel diet composition of American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in a tributary of the Hudson River, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldt, Emily M.; Abbett, Ross; Johnson, James H.; Dittman, Dawn E.; McKenna, James E.

    2013-01-01

    American eel (Anguilla rostrata), a once common species, is now in decline throughout much of its native range in North America. There is little information on the role of American eel in river food webs. A better understanding of the diet and ecological role of American eel will help in the conservation of this important species. During autumn 2009, eel and aquatic invertebrate samples were collected from Hannacroix Creek, a tributary of the Hudson River, in Albany and Greene counties, New York, USA. Eel diet was analyzed by the eel size and time period (day or night). A high proportion of eel stomachs were empty (73%). Eel diets varied among size classes and day and night feeding periods (p = 0.001). Diet overlap was significant between small and medium eels caught both during the day (α = 0.71) and at night (α = 0.84). Nocturnal diet and nocturnal invertebrate samples were similar (α = 0.65), indicating a preference for bottom feeding during the night. Mayfly nymphs were the major prey consumed in each period by all size classes. Among eels that fed, night-feeding eels had the greatest stomach weight (as a percent of total body weight). The swim-bladder parasite, Anguillicoloides crassus, was also observed in eels of all size classes with nearly 50% afflicted.

  6. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

  7. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA: effects on reproduction and offspring growth and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, Steven J; Kern, John; Remington, Richard E; Link, Jane E; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    The effects of feeding farm-raised mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the upper Hudson River (New York, USA) on adult reproductive performance and kit growth and mortality were evaluated. Diets contained 2.5 to 20% Hudson River fish, providing 0.72 to 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (4.8-38 pg toxic equivalents [TEQWHO 2005 ]/g feed). The percentage of stillborn kits per litter was significantly increased by dietary concentrations of 4.5 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) and greater. All offspring exposed to dietary concentrations of 4.5 and 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 and 38 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 10 weeks of age, and all offspring exposed to 1.5 and 2.8 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (10 and 18 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 31 weeks of age, leaving juveniles in the control and 0.72 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (0.41- and 4.8 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) groups only. The dietary concentration predicted to result in 20% kit mortality (LC20) at six weeks of age was 0.34 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (2.6 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed). The corresponding maternal hepatic concentration was 0.80 µg ∑PCBs/g liver, wet weight (13 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g liver, wet wt). Mink residing in the upper Hudson River would be expected to consume species of fish that contain an average of 4.0 µg ∑PCBs/g tissue. Thus, a daily diet composed of less than 10% Hudson River fish could provide a dietary concentration of ∑PCBs that resulted in 20% kit mortality in the present study. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  8. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.; Olsen, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

  9. A retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrologic event: a case study of Hurricane Irene and on the Hudson River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Ramaswamy, Venkatsundar; Georgas, Nickitas; Blumberg, Alan F.; Pullen, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the uncertainties in hourly streamflow ensemble forecasts for an extreme hydrological event using a hydrological model forced with short-range ensemble weather prediction models. A state-of-the art, automated, short-term hydrologic prediction framework was implemented using GIS and a regional scale hydrological model (HEC-HMS). The hydrologic framework was applied to the Hudson River basin ( ˜ 36 000 km2) in the United States using gridded precipitation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and was validated against streamflow observations from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). Finally, 21 precipitation ensemble members of the latest Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS/R) were forced into HEC-HMS to generate a retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrological event, Hurricane Irene. The work shows that ensemble stream discharge forecasts provide improved predictions and useful information about associated uncertainties, thus improving the assessment of risks when compared with deterministic forecasts. The uncertainties in weather inputs may result in false warnings and missed river flooding events, reducing the potential to effectively mitigate flood damage. The findings demonstrate how errors in the ensemble median streamflow forecast and time of peak, as well as the ensemble spread (uncertainty) are reduced 48 h pre-event by utilizing the ensemble framework. The methodology and implications of this work benefit efforts of short-term streamflow forecasts at regional scales, notably regarding the peak timing of an extreme hydrologic event when combined with a flood threshold exceedance diagram. Although the modeling framework was implemented on the Hudson River basin, it is flexible and applicable in other parts of the world where atmospheric reanalysis products and streamflow data are available.

  10. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA: effects on organ mass and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, Steven J; Kern, John; Remington, Richard E; Link, Jane E; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    The authors evaluated effects of feeding ranch mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the upper Hudson River (New York, USA) on adult and offspring organ mass and pathology. Diets contained 2.5 to 20% Hudson River fish, providing 0.72 to 6.1 µg ΣPCBs/g feed (4.8-38 pg toxic equivalents [TEQWHO 2005 ]/g feed). Absolute thyroid and adrenal gland masses were increased in adult females and 31-week-old juveniles, respectively, and absolute liver and heart masses were decreased in six-week-old kits exposed to dietary PCBs. Dietary concentrations of 0.72 µg ΣPCBs/g feed (4.8 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) and greater induced mandibular and maxillary squamous epithelial proliferation in adult animals. The dietary concentration of ΣPCBs predicted to result in 20% incidence of the jaw lesion (EC20) was 2.3 µg ΣPCBs/g feed (15 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed), and the hepatic concentration was 2.8 µg ΣPCBs/g liver (89 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g liver). The EC20 values were greater than the dietary and hepatic concentrations predicted to result in a 20% increase in kit mortality (LC20) at six weeks of age (0.34 µg ΣPCBs/g feed or 2.6 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed and 0.80 µg ΣPCBs/g liver or 13 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g liver). However, the EC20 values reflect exposure of adults to PCBs for approximately six months, and the LC20 values reflect exposure of offspring from conception onward. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  11. Individual-based model of young-of-the-year striped bass population dynamics. II. Factors affecting recruitment in the Potomac River, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H. (Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rutherford, E.S.; Houde, E.D. (Univ. of Maryland System, Solomons, MD (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An individual-based model of the population dynamics of young-of-the-year striped bass Morone saxatilis in the Potomac River, Maryland, was used to test the hypothesis that historically high recruitment variability can be explained by changes in environmental and biological factors that result in relatively small changes in growth and mortality rates of striped bass larvae. The four factors examined were (1) size distribution of female parents, (2) zooplankton prey density during the development of striped bass larvae, (3) density of completing larval white perch M. americana, and (4) temperature during larval development. Simulation results suggest that variations in female size and in prey for larvae alone could cause 10-fold variability in recruitment. But no single factor alone caused changes in vital rates of age-0 fish that could account for the 145-fold variability in the Potomac River index of juvenile recruitment. However, combined positive or negative effects of two or more factors resulted in more than a 150-fold simulated recruitment variability, suggesting that combinations of factors can account for the high observed annual variability in striped bass recruitment success. Higher cumulative mortality of feeding larvae and younger life stages than of juveniles was common to all simulations. supporting the contention that striped bass year-class strength is determined prior to metamorphosis. 76 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Modeling the effects of potential salinity shifts on the recovery of striped bass in the Savannah River estuary, Georgia-South Carolina, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.R.; Peterson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Increased salinity in spawning and nursery grounds in the Savannah River estuary was cited as the primary cause of a 97% decrease in adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and a concomitant 96% decrease in striped bass egg production. Restoration efforts focused on environmental remediation and stock enhancement have resulted in restored salinity patterns and increased egg and adult abundances. However, future water needs or harbor development may preclude further recovery by reducing freshwater inflow or increasing salinity intrusion. To assess the effect of potential changes in the salinity regime, we developed models relating discharge, tidal phase, and salinity to striped bass egg and early larval survival and re-cast these in a quantitative Bayesian belief network. The model indicated that a small upstream shift (???1.67 km) in the salinity regime would have the least impact on striped bass early life history survival, whereas shifts >1.67 km would have progressively larger impacts, with a 8.33-km shift potentially reducing our estimated survival probability by >28%. Such an impact could have cumulative and long-term detrimental effects on the recovery of the Savannah River striped bass population. The available salinity data were collected during average and low flows, so our model represents some typical and some extreme conditions during a striped bass spawning season. Our model is a relatively simplistic, "first-order" attempt at evaluating potential effects of changes in the Savannah River estuarine salinity regime and points to areas of concern and potential future research. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River Estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1977--30 November 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/,/sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. General distributions of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239/,/sup 240/Pu are similar in surface sediments and with depth in cores, but there are deviations from the fallout ratio due to (1) addition of reactor /sup 137/Cs and (2) loss of /sup 137/Cs from the particle phases at higher salinities. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly all sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 Km upstream of Indian Point and 70 Km south of the reactor. Accumulations of /sup 239/,/sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments are more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Depth profiles of radionuclides and variations of activities with particle size at low salinities in the Hudson indicate the importance of organic phases, including large flocculent particles greater than 180..mu.., in binding plutonium, and no evidence of significant chemical migration within the sediments. Measurements of water column fallout /sup 239/,/sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments.

  14. Tracklines of a multibeam survey of the Hudson Shelf Valley carried out in 2000 (polyline shapefile, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle...

  15. Bioenergetics-based modeling of individual PCB congeners in nestling tree swallows from two contaminated sites on the Upper Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, John W.; Echols, Kathy R.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Secord, Anne L.; McCarty, John P.

    2004-01-01

    A bioenergetics-based model was used to simulate the accumulation of total PCBs and 20 PCB congeners by nestling tree swallows at two contaminated sites on the Upper Hudson River, New York. PCB concentrations in birds were calculated as the sum of inherited residues and those acquired through consumption of contaminated insects. Close agreement between simulations and measured residues in 5-, 10-, and 15-day-old nestlings was obtained when PCB concentrations in the diet were set equal to those in food boli taken from adult birds. These simulations were further optimized by fitting the value of a dietary assimilation efficiency constant. Fitted constants for both sites were similar and averaged about 0.7. An evaluation of model performance for individual congeners provided no evidence of metabolic biotransformation. The results of this study are consistent with a companion effort in which principal components analysis was used to compare PCB congener patterns in insects and in tree swallow eggs, nestlings, and adults. Together, these studies establish a quantitative linkage between nestling tree swallows and the insects that they consume and provide strong support for the use of nestling swallows as a biomonitoring species for exposure assessment.

  16. Strontium isotope record of seasonal scale variations in sediment sources and accumulation in low-energy, subtidal areas of the lower Hudson River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Brabander, D.J.; Olsen, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr) profiles in sediment cores collected from two subtidal harbor slips in the lower Hudson River estuary in October 2001 exhibit regular patterns of variability with depth. Using additional evidence from sediment Ca/Sr ratios, 137Cs activity and Al, carbonate (CaCO3), and organic carbon (OCsed) concentration profiles, it can be shown that the observed variability reflects differences in the relative input and trapping of fine-grained sediment from seaward sources vs. landward sources linked to seasonal-scale changes in freshwater flow. During high flow conditions, the geochemical data indicate that most of the fine-grained sediments trapped in the estuary are newly eroded basin materials. During lower (base) flow conditions, a higher fraction of mature materials from seaward sources with higher carbonate content is trapped in the lower estuary. Results show that high-resolution, multi-geochemical tracer approaches utilizing strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) can distinguish sediment sources and constrain seasonal scale variations in sediment trapping and accumulation in dynamic estuarine environments. Low-energy, subtidal areas such as those in this study are important sinks for metastable, short-to-medium time scale sediment accumulation. These results also show that these same areas can serve as natural recorders of physical, chemical, and biological processes that affect particle and particle-associated material dynamics over seasonal-to-yearly time scales. ?? 2009.

  17. Multiproxy Analysis of Droughts, Landscape Changes, Sediment Dynamics, and Human Disturbances in Hudson River Marsh Peat, using Pollen, Spores, Macrofossils, LOI, and X- Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritrairat, S.; Kenna, T. C.; Peteet, D. M.; Pederson, D.

    2008-12-01

    to droughts/fires, 4) Titanium and potassium concentrations correlate with the changes in inorganic content, which is linked to changes in erosion/sediment supply to the site and organic carbon accumulation. We are in the process of analyzing the Piermont core at greater depths to identify other major droughts/fires and landscape changes using Zn, Ti, and K. So far we have observed major shifts prior to the Medieval Warm Period, suggesting other major droughts that need further investigation. We will also discuss the accuracy of using this method in samples from various Hudson River marshes versus one performed by an independent lab.

  18. Patterns of organic contaminants in eggs of an insectivorous, an omnivorous, and a piscivorous bird nesting on the Hudson River, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon), spotted sandpiper (Actitus macularia), and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs were collected in 2004 from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA. This area is one of the most polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated locations in North America. Multivariate analyses indicated among species differences in the concentration and composition of PCB congeners, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD), and dibenzofuran (PCDF, PCDD-F when combined with PCDDs) congeners, and chlorinated pesticides. Total PCB concentrations followed the typical food chain biomagnification paradigm of higher concentrations in piscivorous bird eggs and lower concentrations in eggs of species that feed at lower trophic levels. Concentrations in the insectivorous swallows (geometric mean=6.8μg/g wet wt) were approximately half the concentrations present in the piscivorous kingfisher (11.7μg/g) or omnivorous sandpiper (12.6μg/g). In contrast, PCB toxic equivalents (TEQs) were higher in swallows (1,790 pg/g wet wt) than in either kingfishers (776pg/g) or sandpipers (881pg/g). This difference can be mainly attributed to higher PCB77 concentrations in swallows relative to the other two species. Also contrary to the accepted food-chain paradigm, the sum of PCDD-F concentrations and the sum of their TEQs were higher in swallows than in either sandpipers or kingfishers. Metabolic pathway differences in the respective food chains of the three species probably accounted for the differences observed in PCB TEQ, total PCDD-F, and PCDD-F TEQ concentrations among species.

  19. Researcher Interview: Tom Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Hudson, M.D., President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, describes the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), which brings together cancer genomic data and research from across the world.

  20. GeoTIFF image of the backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Hudson Shelf Valley (12-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle...

  1. GeoTIFF image of shaded-relief bathymetry, colored by backscatter intensity, of the sea floor of the Hudson Shelf Valley (12-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle...

  2. Estimation of low-flow statistics at ungaged sites on streams in the Lower Hudson River Basin, New York, from data in geographic information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Allan D.; Freehafer, Douglas A.

    2017-08-02

    A variety of watershed properties available in 2015 from geographic information systems were tested in regression equations to estimate two commonly used statistical indices of the low flow of streams, namely the lowest flows averaged over 7 consecutive days that have a 1 in 10 and a 1 in 2 chance of not being exceeded in any given year (7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows). The equations were based on streamflow measurements in 51 watersheds in the Lower Hudson River Basin of New York during the years 1958–1978, when the number of streamflow measurement sites on unregulated streams was substantially greater than in subsequent years. These low-flow indices are chiefly a function of the area of surficial sand and gravel in the watershed; more precisely, 7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows both increase in proportion to the area of sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater, whereas 7-day, 2-year low flows also increase in proportion to the area of postglacial alluvium. Both low-flow statistics are also functions of mean annual runoff (a measure of net water input to the watershed from precipitation) and area of swamps and poorly drained soils in or adjacent to surficial sand and gravel (where groundwater recharge is unlikely and riparian water loss to evapotranspiration is substantial). Small but significant refinements in estimation accuracy resulted from the inclusion of two indices of stream geometry, channel slope and length, in the regression equations. Most of the regression analysis was undertaken with the ordinary least squares method, but four equations were replicated by using weighted least squares to provide a more realistic appraisal of the precision of low-flow estimates. The most accurate estimation equations tested in this study explain nearly 84 and 87 percent of the variation in 7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows, respectively, with standard errors of 0.032 and 0.050 cubic feet per second per square mile. The equations

  3. Coupled Pollen, Spore, and Macrofossil Hudson River Marsh Paleoecological Analysis with X-Ray Fluorescence Elemental Analysis to Study Estuarine Ecosystem Response to Anthropogenic and Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritrairat, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.; Kurdyla, D.; Guilderson, T.

    2007-12-01

    Stockport Flats (41.3N, 73.8W) and Tivoli North Bay (42.0N, 73.9W) are the two northernmost Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve freshwater tidal marshes in New York. Our paleoecological records based on pollen, spores, macrofossils, and loss-on-ignition (LOI) of marsh sediment cores at these two sites suggest significant local and regional anthropogenic changes and climatic variability, including the Medieval Warming Period. We implement the use of a field portable X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (Innov-X, USA) as an independent proxy to provide more information about chronology, watershed land-use changes, and estuarine processes. Over the last 200 years, there is a pronounced decrease in organic matter, a shift in vegetation, and an increase in invasive species such as Phragmites australis, Lythrum salicaria, and Typha angustifolia. Coupling of more traditional chronological measurements, such as Ambrosia pollen rise and radiometric dating (C-14, Cs-137, and Pb-210), with heavy metals profiles (Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn) using the XRF unit provides additional time horizon markers, as these metals have distinct peaks in the 1960s and toward the present. Dates from the XRF profiles near the top of the core help to confirm the timing and rate of vegetation changes, especially the spreading of the invasive species. Discrete metal peaks using the XRF help to quickly determine the degree of disturbances and resolution of the cores as analysis of Cs-137 profile is much slower. Sediment proxies, including Ca, K, Ti/S, and Fe/S increase while Sr and Zr decrease toward the top of the core, probably representing higher erosion from land-use changes concurrent with lithologic shifts, LOI decline, and invasive species expansion. Sulfur concentration increases many orders of magnitude especially in the Stockport core and may be a good proxy of salinity, an indicator of drought and seawater rise. This information is valuable to compare with the vegetation changes to

  4. Hudson 3 essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Meinholz, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide, packed with illustrations, that will help you become proficient with Hudson and able to utilize it how you want.If you are a Java developer or administrator who would to like automate some of the mundane work required to build and test software and improve software quality, this is the book for you. If you are a development manager or tester, you can also benefit from learning how Hudson works by gaining some insight into test results and historical trends.

  5. 33 CFR 151.2043 - Equivalent Reporting Methods for vessels other than those entering the Great Lakes or Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equivalent Reporting Methods for vessels other than those entering the Great Lakes or Hudson River after operating outside the EEZ or... entering the Great Lakes or Hudson River after operating outside the EEZ or Canadian equivalent. (a) For...

  6. Mercury concentrations in water and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) muscle tissue samples collected from the Ohio River, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Erich B; Spaeth, John P

    2011-04-01

    We report on long-term aqueous mercury (Hg) measurements collected at fixed locations along the Ohio River, offer insights into patterns of water and fish tissue Hg levels, and calculate site-specific bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) along an extensive longitudinal basis. We examined the relationship between total recoverable Hg concentrations in water and fish samples collected from 12 locations on the mainstem Ohio River. Water samples were collected on a bimonthly basis from each location over a 6-year period preceding the collection of fish tissue samples. This abundance of data enabled us to calculate the long-term average aqueous Hg concentrations and approximate the lifetime aqueous Hg exposure experienced by fish, enabling the calculation of appropriate BAFs. Hybrid striped bass (HSB; Morone saxatilis × M. chrysops) were collected from the Ohio River, composited (three fish), and analyzed for Hg in muscle tissue from each location. Concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 mg/kg and 41.7% of all samples collected were higher than the US Environmental Protection Agency regulatory threshold of 0.3 mg Hg/kg wet weight. Hg levels generally increased with fish weight, length, and age. However, Hg concentration in the water was the strongest predictor of tissue concentrations. We found that both water and tissue concentrations increased with drainage area, albeit at different rates. This discrepancy in spatial patterns revealed that the bioaccumulation rate of methylmercury might not be consistent throughout the Ohio River mainstem. BAFs calculated at each location supported this finding, as values decreased with increasing drainage area. Our study serves to fill critical, previously identified data gaps and provides decision-makers with the information necessary to develop more appropriate BAF development and risk-management strategies. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

  7. Mining pollution and the diet of the purple-striped Gudgeon Mogurnda Mogurnda Richardson (Eleotridae) in the Finniss River, Northern Territory, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffree, R.A.; Williams, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    During the dry season of 1974, collections of the purple-striped Gudgeon Mogurnda Mogurnda were taken from the Finniss River of the Northern Territory; during the wet season, this river receives acidic and metallic pollutants from the formerly mined area of Rum Jungle. The fish consumed a great variety of foods, with high abundances of dytiscidae, chironomidae, ceratopogonidae, trichoptera, odonata, copepoda, decapoda, and pisces. For no food was there a significant regression against habitat descriptors in both of the zones; this emphasizes that pollution effects are more complex than simply depressing or raising the abundances of the dietary species. Five foods were more abundant in the diets of the polluted zone, and three in those of the unpolluted zone. The dietary abundances of two foods, both crustacean, increased in the polluted zone, compared to the unpolluted zone, through the dry season. Two categories of foods: (1) those obtaining oxygen directly from the atmosphere or via a film or bubble of air; and (2) the converse set (aquatic respirers), were contrasted for their usefulness in distinguishing between the zones, by both hierarchical agglomerative and discriminant function analyses. One collection from the polluted zone was reclassified as unpolluted on the basis of its grouping behaviour. The relevance for pollution studies of dietary analysis of euryphagous fish, rather than sampling aquatic fauna directly, is discussed in terms of food substitution, switching, strategies for abundance and recovery by the fauna, and possible effects of the pollutants on the fish as an intervening collector. Downstream patterns of abundance of the invertebrate fauna in this study are broadly similar to those of other studies in which such chemically diverse metals as Pb, Zn, and Cu are the pollutants, but there are differences for some faunal components.

  8. Evaluation of rumble stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study were to: a) monitor the initial installations of rumble stripes and b) evaluate the results of rumble stripe installations. : Ten rural, two-lane road locations were selected by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet across t...

  9. Use of polychlorinated biphenyl and toxic equivalent concentrations in scat from mink(Neovison vison) fed fish from the upper Hudson River to predict dietary and hepatic concentrations and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, Steven J; Kern, John; Remington, Richard E; Link, Jane E

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate health effects associated with consumption of fish contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the upper Hudson River, farm-raised mink were fed diets containing fish collected from the river. Endpoints assessed included adult reproductive performance, offspring growth and mortality, and organ mass and pathology of adults and their offspring. Scat samples were collected from adult males at the time of necropsy and from adult females just prior to whelping. Scat samples were analyzed for PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). The present study provides the results of these analyses and compares ∑PCB and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations in scat with dietary and hepatic concentrations associated with effects reported previously. Dry weight concentrations of ∑PCBs and ∑TEQs in scat generally increased with dietary concentration and reflected corresponding increases in hepatic concentrations of ∑PCBs and ∑TEQs. Maternal concentrations of ∑PCBs in scat expressed on a dry, wet, and lipid weight basis predicted to result in 50% kit mortality (LC50) were 1.0, 0.30, and 12 μg ∑PCBs/g. Concentrations of ∑PCBs in scat expressed on a dry, wet, and lipid weight basis predicted to result in 50% incidence of a previously reported jaw lesion (EC50) were 1.7, 0.48, and 24 μg ∑PCBs/g in adult females and 2.5, 0.87, and 19 μg ∑PCBs/g in adult males. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:563-575. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. The Mississippi River Campaign 1862-1863: The Impact of Climate and Pathogens on Operational Art at the Port Hudson Siege

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    9. 2 where the United States Marines realized that “ malaria caused five times as many casualties as the Japanese,” or when the besieged...affected soldiers because some of these insects carried and transmitted infectious pathogens (like malaria and yellow fever), which caused severe...Climate; Miasma; Malaria ; DNBI; Climate; Pathogens; Mississippi River Campaign; Nathaniel Banks; Franklin Gardner; IPB; Operational Reach; Operational

  11. Collecting Representation Fees after "Hudson."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Richard J.; Knapp, Janet C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses "Hudson" decision and "impingement on First Amendment rights" of those in states where fees in lieu of dues may not be involuntarily withdrawn from nonunion members' checks. Reviews three areas not addressed: role of public employer, duty to exhaust mandated procedures by objecting employees before pursuing court…

  12. Spatial variability in organic material sinking export in the Hudson Bay system, Canada, during fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapoussière, Amandine; Michel, Christine; Gosselin, Michel; Poulin, Michel

    2009-05-01

    Spatial variations in the sinking export of organic material were assessed within the Hudson Bay system (i.e., Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait and Foxe Basin) during the second oceanographic expedition of ArcticNet, on board the CCGS Amundsen in early fall 2005. Sinking fluxes of particulate organic material were measured using short-term free-drifting particle interceptor traps deployed at 50, 100 and 150 m for 8-20 h at eight stations. Measurements of chlorophyll a (chl a), pheopigments (pheo), particulate organic carbon (POC), biogenic silica (BioSi), protists, fecal pellets and bacteria were performed on the collected material. In parallel, sea surface salinity and temperature were determined at 121 stations in the Hudson Bay system. Three hydrographic regions presenting different sedimentation patterns were identified based on average surface salinity and temperature. Hudson Strait was characterized by a marine signature, with high salinity (average=32.3) and low temperature (average=2.1 °C). Eastern Hudson Bay was strongly influenced by river runoff and showed the lowest average salinity (26.6) and highest average temperature (7.6 °C) of the three regions. Western Hudson Bay showed intermediate salinity (average=29.4) and temperature (average=4.4 °C). Sinking fluxes of total pigments (chl a+pheo: 3.37 mg m -2 d -1), diatom-associated carbon (19.8 mg m -2 d -1) and BioSi (50.2 mg m -2 d -1) at 50 m were highest in Hudson Strait. Eastern Hudson Bay showed higher sinking fluxes of total pigments (0.52 mg m -2 d -1), diatom-associated carbon (3.29 mg m -2 d -1) and BioSi (36.6 mg m -2 d -1) compared to western Hudson Bay (0.19, 0.05 and 7.76 mg m -2 d -1, respectively). POC sinking fluxes at 50 m were low and relatively uniform throughout the Hudson Bay system (50.0-76.8 mg C m -2 d -1), but spatial variations in the composition of the sinking organic material were observed. A large part (37-78%) of the total sinking POC was unidentifiable by microscopic observation

  13. Methylsulfone polychlorinated biphenyl and 2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene metabolites in beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence River estuary and western Hudson Bay, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letcher, R.J.; Norstrom, R.J.; Muir, D.C.G.; Sandau, C.D.; Koczanski, K.; Michaud, R.; De Guise, S.; Beland, P.

    2000-05-01

    Knowledge is limited regarding methylsulfone (MeSO{sub 2})-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and especially MeSo{sub 2}-2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE), metabolites in cetacean species. The authors hypothesized that the ability of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) to biotransform PCB and DDE compounds, and to form and degrade their MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE metabolites, is related to the capacity for xenobiotic metabolism. Adipose biopsies were collected from male and female beluga whale from distinct populations in the St. Lawrence River estuary (STL) and western Hudson Bay (WHB), Canada, which are contrasted by the exposure to different levels of cytochrome P450 enzyme-inducing, chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants. The PCBs, DDTs, DDEs, 28 MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 14 meta-para chlorine-unsubstituted PCBs, and four MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 4,4{prime}- and 2,4{prime}-DDE were determined. The mean concentrations of total ({Sigma}-) MeSO{sub 2}-PCB in male STL beluga (230 ng/g), and ratios of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB (0.05) and {Sigma}-precursor-PCB (0.17) were approximately twofold higher, whereas the {Sigma}-precursor-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB ratio was approximately twofold lower, than in male WHB beluga. Both populations had a low formation capacity for MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs with {le} six chlorines (<4% of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs). The congener patterns were dominated by trichloro- and tetrachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs, and tetrachloro- and pentachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs in WHB and STL animals, respectively. In addition to 2- and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, two unknown MeSO{sub 2}-2,4{prime}-DDEs were detected. The mean 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE concentration in STL beluga (1.2 ng/g) was much greater than in WHB animals. The concentrations of 4,4{prime}-DDE, and not 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, increased with age in male STL animals. The authors demonstrated that sulfone formation and clearance is related to metabolic capacity, and thus

  14. The surface heat budget of Hudson Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danielson, E.W

    1969-01-01

    ... which information the heat budget calculations are based. These data include surface air and sea temperatures, ice concentration, cloudiness, wind, atmospheric moisture, ice and water movement, and heat storage amounts within Hudson Bay waters...

  15. Hudson's History of Journalism Criticized by His Contemporaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, William J.

    1980-01-01

    An examination of book reviews of Frederic Hudson's "Journalism History in the United States from 1690 to 1872" that appeared following the book's publication in 1873 reveal sharp negative criticisms of the book that raise questions about Hudson's accuracy. (GT)

  16. On Measurements of the Tide at Churchill, Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Since the late 1990s the semi-diurnal tide at Churchill, on the western shore of Hudson Bay, has been decreasing in amplitude, with M(sub 2) amplitudes falling from approximately 154 cm in 1998 to 146 cm in 2012 and 142 cm in 2014. There has been a corresponding small increase in phase lag. Mean low water, decreasing throughout most of the twentieth century, has levelled off. Although the tidal changes could reflect merely a malfunctioning tide gauge, the fact that there are no other measurements in the region and the possibility that the tide is revealing important environmental changes calls for serious investigation. Satellite altimeter measurements of the tide in Hudson Bay are complicated by the seasonal ice cover; at most locations less than 40% of satellite passes return valid ocean heights and even those can be impacted by errors from sea ice. Because the combined TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2 time series is more than 23 years long, it is now possible to obtain sufficient data at crossover locations near Churchill to search for tidal changes. The satellites sense no changes in M(sub 2) that are comparable to the changes seen at the Churchill gauge. The changes appear to be localized to the harbour, or to the Churchill River, or to the gauge itself.

  17. Quantum random walks and their convergence to Evans–Hudson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum dynamical semigroup; Evans–Hudson flow; quantum random walk. 1. Introduction. The aim of this article is to investigate convergence of random walks on von Neumann algebra to Evans–Hudson flows. Here the random walks and Evans–Hudson flows are gene- ralizations of classical Markov chains and Markov ...

  18. Stripe delay filters

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov, Alexander V.; Ilchenko, Mykhailo Ye.; Trubarov, Igor V.; Pinchuk, Ludmila S.

    2016-01-01

    There are considered constructions of microsized stripe delay filters, which are realized on a basis of ceramic materials with high dielectric permittivity. Delay time of non-minimal phase filters is 7–12 ns at frequencies of 1900 MHz with relative bandwidth of 3.6–3.85%. Filters dimensions are comparable with ones used in portable communication devices. Dimensions of researched three-resonator filter at frequency of 1900 MHz are 8.4×5×2 mm with material dielectric permittivity εr = 92, and 5...

  19. Hudson Nyabuga Nyambaka and Janice Ryley

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GAROTENE IN DEHYDRATED DARK GREEN LEAF Y VEGETABLES. Hudson Nyabuga Nyambaka" and Janice Ryleyz. 'Depaitmem of Chemistry. Kenyatta University, PO. Box. 43844, Nairobi, Kenya. 'Procter Department of Food Science. University of Leeds. UK. (Received March 7. 2001: revised June 13. 2001) y. z n- CT ...

  20. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-12

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

  1. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  2. Comparison of highway striping materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate problems relating to the durability of pavement striping materials used by the Department. The research was limited to an evaluation of the durability and retroreflectance characteristics of selected paints, t...

  3. Recent changes in summer distribution and numbers of migratory caribou on the southern Hudson Bay coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth F. Abraham

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The status of migratory woodland caribou inhabiting the coastal region in southern Hudson Bay is dynamic. The Pen Islands Herd within that region was defined in the 1990s, but opportunistic observations between 1999 and 2007 suggested that its status had significantly changed since the late 1980s and early 1990s. We undertook systematic surveys from the Hayes River, MB, to the Lakitusaki River, ON, in 2008 and 2009 to determine current distribution and minimum numbers of woodland caribou on the southern Hudson Bay coast from the Hayes River, Manitoba, to the Lakitusaki River, Ontario. We documented a significant change in summer distribution during the historical peak aggregation period (7-15 July compared to the 1990s. In 2008 and 2009, respectively, we tallied 3529 and 3304 animals; however, fewer than 180 caribou were observed each year in the Pen Islands Herd’s former summer range where over 10 798 caribou were observed during a systematic survey in 1994. Over 80% of caribou were in the Cape Henrietta Maria area of Ontario. Calf proportions in herds varied from 8% of animals in the west to 20% in the east. Our 2008 and 2009 systematic surveys were focused on the immediate coast, but one exploratory flight inland suggested that more caribou may be inland than had been observed in the 1980s-1990s. The causes of change in the numbers and distribution in the coastal Hudson Bay Lowlands and the association of current caribou with the formerly large Pen Islands Herd may be difficult to determine because of gaps in monitoring, but satellite telemetry, genetic sampling, remote sensing, habitat analysis, and aboriginal knowledge are all being used to pursue answers.

  4. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  5. Testing the thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis for estuarine striped bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Secor, D.H.; Wingate, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    In many stratified coastal ecosystems, conceptual and bioenergetics models predict seasonal reduction in quality and quantity of fish habitat due to high temperatures and hypoxia. We tested these predictions using acoustic telemetry of 2 to 4 kg striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) and high-resolution spatial water quality sampling in the Patuxent River, a sub-estuary of the Chesapeake Bay, during 2008 and 2009. Striped bass avoided hypoxic (dissolved oxygen ≤2 mg·l−1) subpycnocline waters, but frequently occupied habitats with high temperatures (>25 °C) in the summer months, as cooler habitats were typically not available. Using traditional concepts of the seasonal thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze, most of the Patuxent estuary would beconsidered unsuitable habitat for adult striped bass during summer. Application of a bioenergetics model revealed that habitats selected by striped bass during summer would support positive growth rates assuming fish could feed at one-half ofmaximum consumption. Occupancy of the estuary during summer by striped bass in this study was likely facilitated by sufficient prey and innate tolerance of high temperatures by sub-adult fish of the size range that we tagged. Our results help extend the thermalniche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis to native populations of striped bass in semi-enclosed coastal systems. Tolerance of for supraoptimal temperatures in our study supports recent suggestions by others that the thermal-niche concept for striped bass should be revised to include warmer temperatures.

  6. Habitat Mapping Cruise - Hudson Canyon (HB0904, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives are to: 1) perform multibeam mapping of transitional and deepwater habitats in Hudson Canyon (off New Jersey) with the National Institute of Undersea...

  7. Distribution and relative abundance of caribou in the Hudson Plains Ecozone of Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey J. Magoun

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine past distribution and relative abundance of caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in the Hudson Plains Ecozone (HPE of Ontario, we reviewed past HPE-wide winter systematic aerial surveys, partial winter systematic surveys, summer photographic surveys, incidental observations of caribou, and other sources of information from the period 1950—2003. We conducted new HPE-wide aerial surveys in February 2003 and 2004 to evaluate current distribution patterns. From this information, we defined 9 core wintering areas in the HPE and differentiated between 3 catego¬ries of relative abundance. Wintering areas for the January—March period have changed relatively little over the past 45 years. Summer distribution of caribou along the Hudson Bay coast apparently shifted or expanded from the area west of the Severn River to the central and eastern portions of the coast since the 1980s, and caribou observations have become much more common in the area east of the Winisk River since 1998. Because major resource development activities in the HPE are proposed and some are imminent, we recommend additional caribou surveys to document current caribou population identity, size, and distribution, and research projects to better define caribou wintering areas, calving areas, and movement patterns in the HPE.

  8. Hudson River Sub-Bottom Profile Lines_r09272010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Subbottom Profiler Tracklines. Data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Fugro utilized the GeoAcoustics...

  9. Side-Scan-Sonar Lines for Hudson River, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Side Scan Sonar and Subbottom Profiler Tracklines. Data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Fugro utilized...

  10. Side-Scan-Sonar Points for Hudson River, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Side Scan Point Files. These points correspond to individual pings which produced hte side-scan-sonar backscatter imagery. Sonar data were collected November 6 to...

  11. 77 FR 22530 - Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... in blue. In the ``Document Type'' drop down menu select ``Proposed Rule'' and insert ``USCG-2012-0167..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that...

  12. Seasonal use of a New England estuary by foraging contingents of migratory striped bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Martha E.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Finn, John T.; Deegan, Linda A.; Muth, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Using acoustic telemetry on migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis in Plum Island Estuary (PIE), Massachusetts, we found that striped bass (335–634 mm total length) tagged in the spring and summer of 2005 (n = 14) and 2006 (n = 46) stayed in the estuary for an average of 66.0 d in 2005 and 72.2 d in 2006. Striped bass spent the most time in two specific reaches: middle Plum Island Sound and lower Rowley River. In both years, three different use-groups of striped bass were observed in PIE. Short-term visitors (n = 24) stayed in the estuary only briefly (range = 5–20 d). Two groups of seasonal residents stayed for more than 30 d, either in the Rowley River (n = 14) or in Plum Island Sound (n = 22). Within PIE, the two seasonal-resident use-groups may be foraging contingents that learn how to feed efficiently in specific parts of the estuary. These distinct within-estuary use patterns could have different implications for striped bass condition and prey impact.

  13. Pinning of holographic sliding stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Niko; Järvinen, Matti; Lippert, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    In a holographic probe-brane model exhibiting a spontaneously spatially modulated ground state, we introduce explicit sources of symmetry breaking in the form of ionic and antiferromagnetic lattices. For the first time in a holographic model, we demonstrate pinning, in which the translational Goldstone mode is lifted by the introduction of explicit sources of translational symmetry breaking. The numerically computed optical conductivity fits very well to a Drude-Lorentz model with a small residual metallicity, precisely matching analytic formulas for the DC conductivity. We also find an instability of the striped phase in the presence of a large-amplitude ionic lattice.

  14. Community-based observations on sustainable development in southern Hudson Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arragutainaq, L.; Fleming, B

    Inuit residents of the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay practice sustainable development over a wide region, and are heavily dependent on fish and wildlife for food. Large-scale hydroelectric developments on rivers emptying into Hudson Bay and James Bay threaten both the environment and the traditional economy and culture of those residents. The main focus of concern is the James Bay hydroelectric project, part 1 of which (La Grande) is now operational. In addition, hydroelectric projects in Manitoba and Ontario may also affect the region. The residents feel that the subdivision of each project into components, each subject to a separate environmental review and assessment, works in favor of the project proponents and does not address the issues of interest to those affected by the project. Neither does such a review process address questions related to the cumulative development of many projects over a long term. The Belcher Islands are remote from the territorial and national governments, neither of which seem to be giving the James Bay developments as much attention as seems necessary. The island community has identified its primary ecological concerns on part 2 of the James Bay project and presented them at a public hearing. These concerns include the long-term impacts of the project on the marine environment and the kinds of compensation, if any, for such impacts. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. 77 FR 32984 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Maine, Hudson Museum has... contact the University of Maine, Hudson Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  16. 77 FR 32990 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Maine, Hudson Museum, has... contact the University of Maine, Hudson Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes...

  17. Spatial Markov Semigroups Admit Hudson-Parthasarathy Dilations

    OpenAIRE

    Skeide, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many Markov semigroups dilations in the sense of Hudson and Parthasarathy, that is a dilation which is a cocycle perturbation of a noise, have been constructed with the help of quantum stochastic calculi. In these notes we show that every Markov semigroup on the algebra of all bounded operators on a separable Hilbert space that is spatial in the sense of Arveson, admits a Hudson-Parthasarathy dilation. In a sense, the opposite is also true. The proof is based on general results on the the...

  18. Quantum random walks and their convergence to Evans–Hudson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using coordinate-free basic operators on toy Fock spaces, quantum random walks are defined following the ideas of Attal and Pautrat. Extending the result for one dimensional noise, strong convergence of quantum random walks associated with bounded structure maps to Evans–Hudson flow is proved under suitable ...

  19. substitution line for resistance to stripe rust

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    2D) substitution line for resistance to stripe rust. MENGPING LEI, GUANGRONG LI, SUFEN ZHANG, CHENG LIU and ZUJUN YANG. ∗. School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology ...

  20. Comparison of highway striping materials : installation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This study has been undertaken to investigate problems relating to the durability of highway striping materials used by the Department The research is limited to an evaluation of the durability and retroreflectance characteristics of selected paints,...

  1. Guiding thermomagnetic avalanches with soft magnetic stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential for manipulating the ultrafast dynamics of thermomagnetic flux avalanches (TMA) in superconducting films with soft magnetic stripes deposited on the film. By tuning the in-plane magnetization of the stripes, we induce lines of strong magnetic potentials for Abrikosov vortices, resulting in guided slow motion of vortices along the stripe edges and preferential bursts of TMA along the stripes. Furthermore, we show that transversely polarized stripes can reduce the TMA size by diverting magnetic flux away from the major trunk of the TMA into interstripe gaps. Our data indicate that TMAs are launched from locations with enhanced vortex entry barrier, where flux accumulation followed by accelerated vortex discharge significantly reduces the threshold of the applied field ramping speed required for the creation of TMAs. Finally, vortex-antivortex annihilation at the moving front of an expanding TMA can account for the enhanced TMA activity in the receding branches of the sample's magnetization cycle and the preferred propagation of TMAs into maximum trapped flux regions.

  2. Guiding thermomagnetic avalanches with soft magnetic stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential for manipulating the ultrafast dynamics of thermomagnetic flux avalanches (TMA) in superconducting films with soft magnetic stripes deposited on the film. By tuning the in-plane magnetization of the stripes, we induce lines of strong magnetic potentials for Abrikosov vortices, resulting in guided slow motion of vortices along the stripe edges and preferential bursts of TMA along the stripes. Furthermore, we show that transversely polarized stripes can reduce the TMA size by diverting magnetic flux away from the major trunk of the TMA into interstripe gaps. Our data indicate that TMAs are launched from locations with enhanced vortex entry barrier, where flux accumulation followed by accelerated vortex discharge significantly reduces the threshold of the applied field ramping speed required for the creation of TMAs. Finally, vortex-antivortex annihilation at the moving front of an expanding TMA can account for the enhanced TMA activity in the receding branches of the sample's magnetization cycle and the preferred propagation of TMAs into maximum trapped flux regions.

  3. The IAC stripe82 legacy project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Javier; Fliri, Juergen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Our reduction puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy, resulting in an exquisite quality on extremely faint structures. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness, tidal galactic interactions, extremely faint dwarf galaxies, intra-cluster light or diffuse light from galactic dust. The imaging data is publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82/.

  4. Precambrian Processes, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and Cratonic Keels: Insights From Teleseismic Tomography in Northern Hudson Bay, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Gilligan, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth conditions in the Precambrian, and their effect upon the formation of cratons and orogenies from that era, are not fully understood. For example, the precise onset of modern plate tectonics remains ambiguous; it has been hypothesised to have begun anywhere from ~4.1Ga (Hopkins, 2008) to ~1Ga (Stern, 2005). Also, the exceptional depth to which fast wave-speed and geoid anomalies extend beneath some cratons points to the existence of thick "cratonic keels", the origin of which remains unexplained. To improve our understanding of the early Earth processes, geological evidence preserved within ancient plates that have remained largely unchanged since the Precambrian can be used. The rocks of northern Hudson Bay include Archean domains, the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), and lie atop one of the largest cratonic keels on Earth (Bastow et al., 2013), making this region an ideal laboratory for study of Precambrian processes. Here, we use seismological data recorded at Canadian POLARIS and Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) stations to perform a relative arrival-time study of northern Hudson Bay region and the THO. Waveforms are aligned using the adaptive stacking routine of Rawlinson et al. (2004), and inversions are produced using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) inversion code of Rawlinson et al. (2006). Our inversions provide an improved velocity model of the lithosphere and upper mantle of northern Canada, suggesting updated boundaries between lithospheric blocks at mantle depths and constituting new body-wave constraints on their structure. The results are used to address a number of outstanding questions regarding the processes that formed the THO and the Laurentian Keel of North America.

  5. DNA methylation profiles correlated to striped bass sperm fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa are used to fertilize in vitro the eggs of white bass (Morone chrysops) to produce the preferred hybrid for the striped bass aquaculture industry. Currently, only one source of domestic striped bass juveniles are available to growers that are not obtained ...

  6. PCBs in the Harlem River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent, toxic and bioaccumulated contaminants of great environmental concern. PCB is a tracer of wastewater, stormwater and CSOs inputs; PCBs contamination of fish is a main environmental concern for the Harlem River. PCBs in the Harlem River are from combined sewer overflows (CSOs), stormwater runoff, wastewater, as well as upper Hudson GE (General Electric at Fort Edward)'s release. PCBs affect human health mostly from contaminated fish consumption. Many research focused on PCBs in the Hudson River and New York/New Jersey Harbor. However, PCBs source, transport and environmental impact in the Harlem River-a natural straight that connects the Hudson River and the East River, had not been well studied. In this research, water sample were collected from the Harlem River and analyzed PCBs by HR GC/MS (High resolution gas chromatography mass spectrophotometer). Preliminary results showed that certain PCBs congeners in the water column. Results also indicated that nutrients (phosphorus and ammonia) as well as bacteria levels exceeded EPA standards: Total phosphorus-10μg/L, total nitrogen-0.38mg/L; E.Coli-126 MPN/100ml, Enterococcus- 104MPN/100ml, Fecal Coliform-200 MPN/100ml. This research is under process, and more results could give further detail in near future. This research will help improve water quality of the Harlem River, improve environmental health and raise environmental awareness.SO tank Nutrient and bacterial levels of selected sites in the Harlem RiverCSO: Combined Sewer OverflowWWTP: Waste Water Treatment Plant

  7. Audiogram of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Hagedoorn, M.; Au, W.W.L.; Haan, de D.

    2003-01-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivity of a striped dolphin was measured in a pool using standard psycho-acoustic techniques. The go/no-go response paradigm and up¿down staircase psychometric method were used. Auditory sensitivity was measured by using 12 narrow-band frequency-modulated signals having

  8. Breakup Behavior of a Capillary Bridge on a Hydrophobic Stripe Separating Two Hydrophilic Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Maximilian; Hardt, Steffen

    2017-11-01

    The breakup dynamics of a capillary bridge on a hydrophobic area between two liquid filaments occupying two parallel hydrophilic stripes is studied experimentally. In addition calculations with the finite-element software Surface Evolver are performed to obtain the corresponding stable minimal surfaces. Droplets of de-ionized water are placed on substrates with alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes of different width. Their volume decreases by evaporation. This results in a droplet shaped as the letter ``H'' covering two hydrophilic stripes separated by one hydrophobic stripe. The width of the capillary bridge d(t) on the hydrophobic stripe during the breakup process is observed using a high-speed camera mounted on a bright-field microscope. The results of the experiments and the numerical studies show that the critical width dcrit, indicating the point where the capillary bridge becomes unstable, mainly depends on the width ratio of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. It is found that the time derivative of d(t) first decreases after dcrit has been reached. The final breakup dynamics then follows a t 2 / 3 scaling. We kindly acknowledge the financial support by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the Collaborative Research Centre 1194 ``Interaction of Transport and Wetting Processes'', Project A02a.

  9. 78 FR 20169 - Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Hudson Yards Concrete...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Project in New York, New York AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA... Assessment for the Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Construction. SUMMARY: This notice advises the public that... coordination with Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for the construction of an underground concrete casing...

  10. Charge stripe structure in FeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Y., E-mail: yukik@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ichimura, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ishioka, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kurosawa, T. [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Oda, M. [Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yamaya, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Tanda, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    We report the STM study on a single-crystalline sample of FeTe at 7.8 K. FeTe is one of the iron-based superconductor. We measured the resistivity and the magnetization of FeTe. FeTe shows SDW transition at 58 K on these measurements. We study the electronic state of FeTe by using STM/STS for observing FeTe from a microscopic viewpoint. We observed the iron layer and the tellurium layer with atomic resolution. Moreover, we discover the charge stripe structure on STM/STS measurement. We find the charge stripe structure is caused by iron atoms from the analysis. The gap structure of 9 meV was observed in tunneling spectra. This gap size is consistent with the SDW gap which is expected from mean field theory with T{sub N}=58 K.

  11. Geysers from the Tiger Stripes of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Enceladus, the sixth-largest moon of Saturn, is a cold, icy world but its also remarkably active. Recent studies have charted over a hundred geysers venting gas and dust into space from Enceladus south polar region. New research addresses the question of how the moons extreme surface terrain influences the locations and behavior of these geysers.Active PlumesEnceladus orbiting within Saturns E ring. Enceladus plumes probably created this ring. [NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute]A decade ago, scientists discovered that Enceladus south polar region is home to a prominent set of four fractures known as the tiger stripes. This region was found to contain roughly 100 geyser jets, which form plumes of gas and dust venting into space at a combined rate of ~200 kilograms per second! These plumes are probably the source of the material in Saturns E ring, in which Enceladus orbits.Recently, Carolyn Porco (UC Berkeley and CICLOPS Space Science Institute) led a study that analyzed 6.5 years of Cassini data, surveying the locations and orientations of 101 geysers. The outcome was peculiar: the geysers are distributed along the tiger stripes, but their directions are not all pointing vertically from the surface (see the video below!).Now, Paul Helfenstein (Cornell University) has teamed up with Porco to examine whether the surface terrain surrounding the geysers affects where the jets erupt, what direction they point, and even when theyre active.Surface InfluenceHelfenstein and Porco demonstrate that the locations and behavior of the geysers are very likely influenced by Enceladus surface features in this region. In particular, they find:The spacing of the geyser jets on Enceladus is not random.The jets are roughly uniformly distributed along the three most active tiger stripes, spaced about 5 kilometers apart. This fixed spacing might be due to shear fractures produced by fault motion along the tiger stripes cutting across the stripes at regular intervals and providing

  12. Filarial dermatitis in a striped skunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, E K; Little, S E

    1997-10-01

    A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Kansas (USA) with severe diffuse dermatitis characterized by extensive alopecic areas, thickened skin, and multiple, scattered cutaneous abscesses on the dorsal aspect of the head, neck, and trunk was submitted for diagnostic evaluation. More than 50 nematodes identified as Filaria taxideae were found in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue. Histologic examination of the skin revealed multifocal pyogranulomatous inflammation with intralesional larvated nematode eggs, moderate orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and mild acanthosis. The lesions resemble those reported from badgers (Taxidea taxus) and a lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens) with dermatitis caused by Filaria taxideae. Although F. taxideae has been previously collected from skunks, this is the first report of filarid dermatitis caused by this nematode in a striped skunk.

  13. Classifying Variable Sources in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke Lindberg, Christina

    2018-01-01

    SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 is a well-documented and researched region of the sky that does not have all of its ~67,500 variable objects labeled. By collecting data and consulting different catalogs such as the Catalina Survey, we are able to slowly cross-match more objects and add classifications within the Stripe 82 catalog. Such matching is performed either by pairing SDSS identification numbers, or by converting and comparing the coordinates of every object within the Stripe 82 catalog to every object within the classified catalog, such as the Catalina Survey catalog. If matching is performed with converted coordinates, a follow-up check is performed to ascertain that the magnitudes of the paired objects are within a reasonable margin of error and that objects have not been mismatched. Once matches have been confirmed, the light curves of classified objects can then be used to determine features that most effectively separate the different types of variable objects in feature spaces. By classifying variable objects, we can construct a reference for subsequent large research surveys, such as LSST (the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), that could utilize SDSS data as a training set for its own classifications.

  14. 3D face recognition using isogeodesic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretti, Stefano; Del Bimbo, Alberto; Pala, Pietro

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to 3D face matching that shows high effectiveness in distinguishing facial differences between distinct individuals from differences induced by nonneutral expressions within the same individual. The approach takes into account geometrical information of the 3D face and encodes the relevant information into a compact representation in the form of a graph. Nodes of the graph represent equal width isogeodesic facial stripes. Arcs between pairs of nodes are labeled with descriptors, referred to as 3D Weighted Walkthroughs (3DWWs), that capture the mutual relative spatial displacement between all the pairs of points of the corresponding stripes. Face partitioning into isogeodesic stripes and 3DWWs together provide an approximate representation of local morphology of faces that exhibits smooth variations for changes induced by facial expressions. The graph-based representation permits very efficient matching for face recognition and is also suited to being employed for face identification in very large data sets with the support of appropriate index structures. The method obtained the best ranking at the SHREC 2008 contest for 3D face recognition. We present an extensive comparative evaluation of the performance with the FRGC v2.0 data set and the SHREC08 data set.

  15. Capillary instability on a hydrophilic stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Raymond L.; Lauga, Eric

    2009-07-01

    A recent experiment showed that cylindrical segments of water filling a hydrophilic stripe on an otherwise hydrophobic surface display a capillary instability when their volume is increased beyond the critical volume at which their apparent contact angle on the surface reaches 90° (Gau et al 1999 Science 283 46-9). Surprisingly, the fluid segments did not break up into droplets—as would be expected for a classical Rayleigh-Plateau instability—but instead displayed a long-wavelength instability where all excess fluid gathered in a single bulge along each stripe. We consider here the dynamics of the flow instability associated with this setup. We perform a linear stability analysis of the capillary flow problem in the inviscid limit. We first confirm previous work showing that all cylindrical segments are linearly unstable if (and only if) their apparent contact angle is larger than 90°. We then demonstrate that the most unstable wavenumber for the surface perturbation decreases to zero as the apparent contact angle of the fluid on the surface approaches 90°, allowing us to re-interpret the creation of bulges in the experiment as a zero-wavenumber capillary instability. A variation of the stability calculation is also considered for the case of a hydrophilic stripe located on a wedge-like geometry.

  16. Capillary instability on a hydrophilic stripe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speth, Raymond L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)], E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu

    2009-07-15

    A recent experiment showed that cylindrical segments of water filling a hydrophilic stripe on an otherwise hydrophobic surface display a capillary instability when their volume is increased beyond the critical volume at which their apparent contact angle on the surface reaches 90 deg. (Gau et al 1999 Science 283 46-9). Surprisingly, the fluid segments did not break up into droplets-as would be expected for a classical Rayleigh-Plateau instability-but instead displayed a long-wavelength instability where all excess fluid gathered in a single bulge along each stripe. We consider here the dynamics of the flow instability associated with this setup. We perform a linear stability analysis of the capillary flow problem in the inviscid limit. We first confirm previous work showing that all cylindrical segments are linearly unstable if (and only if) their apparent contact angle is larger than 90 deg. We then demonstrate that the most unstable wavenumber for the surface perturbation decreases to zero as the apparent contact angle of the fluid on the surface approaches 90 deg, allowing us to re-interpret the creation of bulges in the experiment as a zero-wavenumber capillary instability. A variation of the stability calculation is also considered for the case of a hydrophilic stripe located on a wedge-like geometry.

  17. River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morel Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The OECD report “Boosting Resilience through Innovative Risk Governance” examines the efforts of OECD countries to prevent or reduce future disaster impacts, and highlights several key areas where improvements can be made. International collaboration is insufficiently utilised to address shocks that have increasingly global consequences. Institutional design plays a significant role in facilitating or hampering the engagement and investments of governmental and non-governmental stakeholders in disaster risk prevention and mitigation. To inform the design of “better” institutions, the OECD proposes the application of a diagnostic framework that helps governments identify institutional shortcomings and take actions to improve them. The goal of the case study on the Rhone River is to conduct an analysis of the progress, achievements and existing challenges in designing and implementing disaster risk reduction strategies through the Rhone Plan from a comparative perspective across a set of selected countries of this study, like Austria and Switzerland, will inform how to improve institutional frameworks governing risk prevention and mitigation. The case study will be used to identify examples of successful practice taking into account their specific country contexts, and analyse their potential for policy transfer.

  18. 2012 FEMA Topographic Lidar: Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield Watersheds, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield project area. The entire survey area for Massachusetts is...

  19. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    Abstract. A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated wheat. Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcross- recombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a ...

  20. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcrossrecombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a wheat–Ae. caudata introgression line (IL) T291-2(pau16060) with wheat cv. PBW343 is reported here. Segregation of BC-RILs for stripe rust resistance depicted a single major ...

  1. Transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of area, the bread wheat producing regions of China comprise the largest area in the world that is constantly threatened by stripe rust epidemics. Consequently, it is important to exploit new adultplant resistance genes in breeding. This study reports the transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to ...

  2. Immersion in a Hudson Valley Tidal Marsh and Climate Research Community - Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A primary advantage of place-based research is the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that can be applied to a single locale, with a depth of continued study through time. Through the last decade, Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) has promoted scientific inquiry, mostly among groups under-represented in STEM fields, in Piermont Marsh, a federally protected marsh in the Hudson estuary. At the same time, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) scientists have become more involved, through mentoring by researchers, postdocs and graduate students, often paired with high school teachers. The sustained engagement of high school students in a natural environment, experiencing the Hudson River and its tidal cycles, protection of coastline, water quality improvement, native and invasive plant communities, is fundamental to their understanding of the importance of wetlands with their many ecosystem services. In addition, the Program has come to see "place" as inclusive of the Observatory itself. The students' work at Lamont expands their understanding of educational opportunities and career possibilities. Immersing students in a research atmosphere brings a level of serious inquiry and study to their lives and provides them with concrete contributions that they make to team efforts. Students select existing projects ranging from water quality to Phragmites removal, read papers weekly, take field measurements, produce lab results, and present their research at the end of six weeks. Ongoing results build from year to year in studies of fish populations, nutrients, and carbon sequestration, and the students have presented at professional scientific meetings. Through the Program students gain a sense of ownership over both their natural and the academic environments. Challenges include sustained funding of the program; segmenting the research for reproducible, robust results; fitting the projects to PIs' research goals, time

  3. Sediment Dynamics and Fate of Heavy Metals, Carbon, and Inorganic Matter in the Hudson Estuary, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritrairat, S.; Kenna, T. C.; Peteet, D. M.; Nguyen, K.; Perez, M.; Huang, Z.; Miller, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Hudson River Estuary is typical of a large, intensively used and modified estuary. Its watershed is an important resource for small communities along the river as well as large population centers such as the Metropolitan area of New York City. In addition to past industrial activities within the region that have resulted in many instances of environmental contamination, the estuary is at high risk for climatic and other anthropogenic changes. This study focuses on sediment dynamics and the fate of heavy metals, inorganic matter, and carbon in 27 sediment cores and 15 surface samples taken from wetlands and tributaries of the Hudson Estuary along a north-south transect from Troy, NY to New York harbor. Each site experiences different salinity, vegetation, landscape, and flow pattern. 1) We quantified and mapped the distribution of toxic heavy metals, including Pb, Cu, and Zn, in the estuary to examine the fate of these contaminants. Jamaica Bay and the East River sediments from New York City are the most contaminated with heavy metals among the sites analyzed. 2) We examined the sedimentation rate and sedimentation pattern, using pollution chronology along with radiometric methods. Sedimentation rates at 17 sites range from 0.26 - 2.63 cm/yr during the last century. Cores taken from high-energy or non-vegetated area are more likely to have a disturbed sedimentation pattern, and thus there is a higher risk of contaminant resuspension at those locations. 3) We quantified Ti and K concentration as a measure of the fluctuation of inorganic matter input and the fate of inorganic matter in the estuary. We quantified organic matter content with the Loss-on-Ignition (LOI) method at selected sites to identify carbon sequestration rate in the estuary. Inorganic matter content during the last century at most sites is significantly higher than that found prior to the European Settlements at the same location, suggesting increasing erosion and disturbances. However, more

  4. Negative permittivity in bubble and stripe phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, B.; Peng, Y.; Rosenow, B.; von Oppen, F.; Umansky, V.; von Klitzing, K.; Smet, J. H.

    2017-11-01

    The physics of itinerant electrons in condensed matter is by and large governed by repulsive Coulomb forces. However, attractive interactions may emerge and prevail in determining the ground state despite the pervasive Coulomb repulsion. A notable example is electron pairing and superconductivity. The interplay of attractive and repulsive interactions may also instigate spontaneous symmetry lowering and clustering of charges in geometric patterns even without net attraction. Both types of attractive interaction triggered physics--pairing and charge ordering--are at play in two-dimensional electron systems exposed to a quantizing magnetic field. The charge ordering has been concluded indirectly from transport behaviour. Here we report the observation of negative permittivity present solely when bubble and stripe phases form. In conjunction with a theoretical model, the negative permittivity provides evidence for the underlying attractive exchange-correlation energy which sufficiently countervails Coulomb repulsion at small distances to enable and mediate charge clustering.

  5. Rotational Electrophoresis of Striped Metallic Microrods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A; Meier, J A; Dougherty, G M; Santiago, J G

    2005-11-28

    Analytical models are developed for the translation and rotation of metallic rods in a uniform electric field. The limits of thin and thick electric double layers are considered. These models include the effect of stripes of different metals along the length of the particle. Modeling results are compared to experimental measurements for metallic rods. Experiments demonstrate the increased alignment of particles with increasing field strength and the increase in degree of alignment of thin versus thick electric double layers. The metal rods polarize in the applied field and align parallel to its direction due to torques on the polarized charge. The torque due to polarization has a second order dependence on the electric field strength. The particles are also shown to have an additional alignment torque component due to non-uniform densities along their length. The orientation distributions of dilute suspensions of particles are also shown to agree well with results predicted by a rotational convective-diffusion equation.

  6. Mercury and cortisol in Western Hudson Bay polar bear hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechshoft, T; Derocher, A E; Richardson, E; Mislan, P; Lunn, N J; Sonne, C; Dietz, R; Janz, D M; St Louis, V L

    2015-08-01

    Non-invasive methods of assessing animal health and life history are becoming increasingly popular in wildlife research; hair samples from polar bears (Ursus maritimus), are being used to study an ever broader range of anthropogenic and endocrine compounds. A number of contaminants are known to disrupt endocrine function in polar bears. However, the relationship between mercury and cortisol remains unknown, although mercury is an endocrine disruptor in other species. Here, we examine the relationship between concentrations of cortisol and total mercury (THg) analyzed in guard hair from 378 polar bears (184 females, 194 males) sampled in Western Hudson Bay, 2004-2012. The difference in mean cortisol concentration between female (0.8 ± 0.6 pg/mg) and male (0.7 ± 0.5 pg/mg) polar bears bordered on significance (p = 0.054). However, mean mercury concentration was significantly greater (p = 0.009) in females (4.7 ± 1.4 μg/g) than males (4.3 ± 1.2 μg/g). Hair cortisol in males was significantly influenced by mercury, age, and fatness, as well as interactions between mercury and year, mercury and fatness, and year and fatness (all: p polar bears.

  7. Dissipation of the striped pulsar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, B.; Philippov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Rapidly rotating neutron stars blow a relativistic, magnetized wind mainly composed of electron-positron pairs. The free expansion of the wind terminates far from the neutron star where a weakly magnetized pulsar wind nebula forms, implying efficient magnetic dissipation somewhere upstream. Aims: The wind current sheet that separates the two magnetic polarities is usually considered as the most natural place for magnetic dissipation via relativistic reconnection, but its efficiency remains an open question. Here, the goal of this work is to revisit this issue in light of the most recent progress in the understanding of reconnection and pulsar electrodynamics. Methods: We perform large two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique rotator to capture the multi-scale evolution of the wind. Our simulations are limited to the equatorial plane. Results: We find that the current sheet breaks up into a dynamical chain of magnetic islands separated by secondary thin current sheets. The sheet thickness increases linearly with radius while the Poynting flux decreases monotonically as reconnection proceeds. The radius of complete annihilation of the stripes is given by the plasma multiplicity parameter at the light cylinder. Current starvation within the sheets does not occur before complete dissipation as long as there is enough charges where the sheets form. Particles are efficiently heated up to a characteristic energy set by the magnetization parameter at the light cylinder. Energetic pulsed synchrotron emission peaks close to the light cylinder, and presents sub-pulse variability associated with the formation of plasmoids in the sheet. Conclusions: This study suggests that the striped component of the wind dissipates far before reaching the termination shock in isolated pulsars, even in very-high-multiplicity systems such as the Crab pulsar. Pulsars in binary systems may provide the best environments to study magnetic dissipation in the wind.

  8. The Bible and mission in faith perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the early China Inland Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigram, C.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis 'The Bible and Mission in Faith Perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the Early China Inland Mission' by Christopher E.M. Wigram analysis the hermeneutical assumptions that underlay Hudson Taylor's approach to biblical interpretation, and the significance of his approach for the mission which

  9. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Williams, Dewight [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Bian, Wen [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Stewart, Phoebe L. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Stubbs, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  10. Analysis of ATMS striping noise from its Earth scene observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengkun; Zou, Xiaolei; Weng, Fuzhong

    2013-12-01

    differences between brightness temperature observations and simulated observations based on numerical weather predictions, i.e., O-B, for Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) temperature sounding channels exhibit a clear striping pattern [Bormann et al., 2013]. We propose to first use the principal component analysis to isolate scan-dependent features such as the cross-track striping from the atmospheric signal and then to use an Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) to extract the striping noise in ATMS Earth scene brightness temperature observations for both temperature and water vapor sounding channels. It is shown that the Principal Component (PC) coefficient of the first PC mode, which mainly describes a scan-dependent feature of cross-track radiometer measurements, captures the striping noise. The EEMD is then applied to the PC coefficient to extract the first three high-frequency intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), which are denoted as the PC1/IMF3 noise. When the PC1/IMF3 noise is removed from the data, the striping noise is imperceptible in the global distribution of O-B for ATMS temperature sounding channels 1-16. Using the same method, it is demonstrated that the striping noise is also present in ATMS water vapor sounding channels 17-22. The magnitude of the ATMS striping noise is about ±0.3 K for the temperature sounding channels and ±1.0 K for the moisture sounding channels. The same technique is also applied to Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), AMSU-B, and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS). The striping noise is undetectable for AMSU-A but present in AMSU-B and MHS data.

  11. Audiogram of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Ronald A.; Hagedoorn, Monique; Au, Whitlow W. L.; de Haan, Dick

    2003-02-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivity of a striped dolphin was measured in a pool using standard psycho-acoustic techniques. The go/no-go response paradigm and up-down staircase psychometric method were used. Auditory sensitivity was measured by using 12 narrow-band frequency-modulated signals having center frequencies between 0.5 and 160 kHz. The 50% detection threshold was determined for each frequency. The resulting audiogram for this animal was U-shaped, with hearing capabilities from 0.5 to 160 kHz (8 13 oct). Maximum sensitivity (42 dB re 1 μPa) occurred at 64 kHz. The range of most sensitive hearing (defined as the frequency range with sensitivities within 10 dB of maximum sensitivity) was from 29 to 123 kHz (approximately 2 oct). The animal's hearing became less sensitive below 32 kHz and above 120 kHz. Sensitivity decreased by about 8 dB per octave below 1 kHz and fell sharply at a rate of about 390 dB per octave above 140 kHz.

  12. The Effects of Normal Metal Stripes on TES Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Nick; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Datesman, A. M.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Miniussi, A. R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the effects of size and geometry of normal metal features on the transition shapes and performance of transition-edge sensor microcalorimeters. The spectral resolution of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters is very sensitive to the specific dependencies of the resistance R in the superconducting transition on the current I, magnetic field B, and temperature T. In particular, it has been shown that transitions that are very steep in (R,T) space lead to a significant noise term, in excess of conventional expectations. This so-called unexplained noise is known to be reduced by the addition of normal metal stripes across the TES perpendicular to the direction of current flow. These normal metal stripes have been shown to drastically alter the oscillatory patterns seen in measurements of the critical current as a function of magnetic field. However, there are many remaining questions about the exact impact of the stripes on current distributions within the TES, the Fraunhofer pattern and, therefore, the shape of the R(I, B, T) surface. Through measurements of the resistance under DC bias of TES devices of various sizes, with different stripe patterns and dimensions, we will discuss how these stripes can affect the R(I, B, T) surface. In addition, using measurements and analysis of the noise spectra of various devices we will present how these changes to the stripe pattern may affect the performance of the TES. In particular, we will discuss strategies to reduce the presence of localized discontinuities in the derivative of R, associated with increased noise, while maintaining the globally low levels of unexplained noise currently achieved with conventional metal stripe patterns. Implementing these strategies is a path towards producing large arrays with highly uniform transitions and high spectral resolution. These large uniform arrays will be required for future x-ray astronomy applications, such as the X-IFU on ATHENA.

  13. Demography and population status of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Regher, Eric V; Servanty, Sabrina; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the demography and population status of the Western Hudson Bay (WH) polar bear subpopulation for the period 1984-2011, using live-recapture data from research studies and management actions, and dead-recovery data from polar bears harvested for subsistence purposes or removed during human-bear conflicts.

  14. Estimating the Economic Value of Narwhal and Beluga Hunts in Hudson Bay, Nunavut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoover, C.; Bailey, M.L.; Higdon, J.; Ferguson, S.H.; Sumaila, R.

    2013-01-01

    Hunting of narwhal (Monodon monoceros) and beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) in Hudson Bay is an important activity, providing food and income in northern communities, yet few studies detail the economic aspects of these hunts. We outline the uses of narwhal and beluga and estimate the revenues, costs,

  15. Experimental mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Kator, H.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis were infected intraperitoneally with approximately 105 Mycobacterium marinum, M. shottsii sp. nov., or M. gordonae. Infected fish were maintained in a flow-through freshwater system at 18 to 21??C, and were examined histologically and bacteriologically at 2, 4, 6, 8, 17, 26, 36 and 45 wk post-infection (p.i.). M. marinum caused acute peritonitis, followed by extensive granuloma development in the mesenteries, spleen and anterior kidney. Granulomas in these tissues underwent a temporal progression of distinct morphological stages, culminating in well-circumscribed lesions surrounded by normal or healing tissue. Mycobacteria were cultured in high numbers from splenic tissue at all times p.i. Standard Ziehl-Neelsen staining, however, did not demonstrate acid-fast rods in most early inflammatory foci and granulomas. Large numbers of acid-fast rods were present in granulomas beginning at 8 wk p.i. Between 26 and 45 wk p.i., reactivation of disease was observed in some fish, with disintegration of granulomas, renewed inflammation, and elevated splenic bacterial densities approaching 109 colony-forming units g-1. Infection with M. shottsii or M. gordonae did not produce severe pathology. Mild peritonitis was followed by granuloma formation in the mesenteries, but, with 1 exception, granulomas were not observed in the spleen or anterior kidney. M. shottsii and M. gordonae both established persistent infections in the spleen, but were present at densities at least 2 orders of magnitude less than M. marinum at all time points observed. Granulomas in the mesenteries of M. shottsii- and M. gordonae-infected fish resolved over time, and no reactivation of disease was observed.

  16. Expansion of the South China Sea basin: Constraints from magnetic anomaly stripes, sea floor topography, satellite gravity and submarine geothermics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The widely distributed E–W-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the central basin and the N–E-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the southwest sub-basin provide the most important evidence for Neogene expansion of the South China Sea. The expansion mechanism remains, however, controversial because of the lack of direct drilling data, non-systematic marine magnetic survey data, and irregular magnetic anomaly stripes with two obvious directions. For example, researchers have inferred different ages and episodes of expansion for the central basin and southwest sub-basin. Major controversy centers on the order of basinal expansion and the mechanism of expansion for the entire South China Sea basin. This study attempts to constrain these problems from a comprehensive analysis of the seafloor topography, magnetic anomaly stripes, regional aeromagnetic data, satellite gravity, and submarine geothermics. The mapped seafloor terrain shows that the central basin is a north-south rectangle that is relatively shallow with many seamounts, whereas the southwest sub-basin is wide in northeast, gradually narrows to the southwest, and is relatively deeper with fewer seamounts. Many magnetic anomaly stripes are present in the central basin with variable dimensions and directions that are dominantly EW-trending, followed by the NE-, NW- and NS-trending. Conversely such stripes are few in the southwest sub-basin and mainly NE-trending. Regional magnetic data suggest that the NW-trending Ailaoshan-Red River fault extends into the South China Sea, links with the central fault zone in the South China Sea, which extends further southward to Reed Tablemount. Satellite gravity data show that both the central basin and southwest sub-basin are composed of oceanic crust. The Changlong seamount is particularly visible in the southwest sub-basin and extends eastward to the Zhenbei seamount. Also a low gravity anomaly zone coincides with the central fault zone in the sub

  17. Revision of the Post-Glacial Explosive Eruption History of Hudson Volcano (Chile) Using Tephrostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowycz, S.; Fontijn, K.; Smith, V.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Mee, K.; Rawson, H. L.; Naranjo, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Hudson, a stratovolcano in the southern Andes, is recognised as the source of four large (>1 km3 of tephra) and tens of smaller explosive eruptions in the past 20 kyr, so is one of the most active volcanoes in the region. Analysis of its eruptive history is therefore particularly important for volcanic hazard assessment, investigating the tempo of volcanism, and tephrochronology in Patagonia. However, the characteristics and timing of all but the large eruptions of Hudson are currently poorly constrained. We present a revised post-glacial explosive eruption history of Hudson, from analysis of the matrix glass composition of tephra units in terrestrial sections and a thorough review of the tephrostratigraphy reported in ice, peat, soils, and lake and marine sediments. Most of the Hudson tephra units analysed have a similar glass composition to the others that they are closest to in age, but the narrow composition range we find for most units means that they are generally still distinguishable by careful glass composition analysis. We suggest that the wide composition range of tephra layers attributed to Hudson in a marine sediment core thus indicates that these layers are reworked deposits. Inconsistencies are found in the prior tephrostratigraphy from other sediment cores, emphasising the importance of detailed characterisation of tephra deposits to validate their correlation. From our compilation of published data, we refine eruption age estimates (using Bayesian analysis) and the isopachs and volume estimates for some of the large eruptions. The terrestrial sections analysed reveal previously unrecognised shifts in erupted magma composition, from silicic to mafic after the H2 eruption ( 3.9 cal ka BP), and then to intermediate compositions for the last 1 kyr. This temporal variation in eruptive behaviour is similar to that recently identified at other volcanoes in the southern Andes and suggested to be a response to deglaciation.

  18. Contemporary and preindustrial mass budgets of mercury in the Hudson Bay Marine System: the role of sediment recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Alexander; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Kuzyk, Zou Zou; Wang, Feiyue

    2008-11-15

    Based on extensive sampling of the rivers, troposphere, seawater and sediments, mercury (Hg) mass budgets are constructed for both contemporary and preindustrial times in the Hudson Bay Marine System (HBS) to probe sources and pathways of Hg and their responses to the projected climate change. The contemporary total Hg inventory in the HBS is estimated to be 98 t, about 1% of which is present in the biotic systems and the remainder in the abiotic systems. The total contemporary Hg influx and outflux, around 6.3 t/yr each, represent a 2-fold increase from the preindustrial fluxes. The most notable changes are in the atmospheric flux, which has gone from a nearly neutral (0.1 t/yr) to source term (1.5 t/yr), increased river inputs (which may also reflect increased atmospheric deposition to the HBS watershed) and in the sedimentary burial flux which has increased by 2.4 t/yr over preindustrial values, implying that much of the modern Hg loading entering this system is buried in the sediments. The capacity to drive increased Hg loading from the atmosphere to sediment burial may be supported by the resuspension of an extraordinarily large flux (120 Mt/yr) of shallow water glacigenic sediments uncontaminated by anthropogenic Hg, which could scavenge Hg from the water column before being transported to the deeper accumulative basins. Under the projected climate warming in the region, the rate of the sediment recycling pump will likely increase due to enhanced Hg scavenging by increasing biological productivity, and thus strengthen atmosphere-ocean Hg exchanges in the HBS.

  19. Structural compliance, misfit strain and stripe nanostructures in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Phillip

    2002-03-01

    Structural compliance is the ability of a crystal structure to accommodate variations in local atomic bond-lengths without incurring large strain energies. Based on local pair distribution function(pdf) measurements, we show that the structural compliance of cuprates is relatively small. In addition the pdf measurements indicate the presence of short and long Cu-O-Cu bonds in doped cuprate layers. We propose that short, highly doped, Cu-O-Cu bonds in stripes are subject to a tensile misfit strain, and we develop a model to describe the effect of this misfit strain on charge ordering in the copper oxygen planes of oxide materials. The typical length of strain-induced short stripes will be presented along with some of the low energy stripe nanostructures that can result. (Preprint is at Cond-Mat: 0108338)

  20. Effects of water velocity on activity of juvenile striped bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, R.R.; Griffith, J.S.; Coutant, C.C.

    1976-07-01

    The swimming activity of juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) 8 to 80 mm long was investigated in a test chamber simulating, on a small scale, a fixed-screen cooling water intake structure. As water velocity increased from 0 to 30 cm/sec area and distance traveled by juvenile bass 10 to 80 mm long decreased. However, as water velocity increased from 0 to 3 cm/sec the area and distance covered by larval bass increased. The presence of food increased the activity of larval bass, but decreased the activity of juveniles. Area ranged by striped bass at test velocities ranging from 0 to 30 cm/sec increased in proportion to body length. Juvenile striped bass tested at acclimation temperatures between 20 and 5/sup 0/C experienced a 30% reduction of activity. Activity was also reduced as temperature increased from 20 to 30/sup 0/C.

  1. Roadway striping productivity data analysis for INDOT Greenfield and Crawfordsville districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of the SPR3650 project is to provide an accurate overview of striping operation so that INDOT finds a way to : effectively save significant investment for purchasing new striping trucks in near future without compromising roadwa...

  2. Stable multidimensional soliton stripes in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhnyi, Valeriy A. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Perez-Garcia, Victor M., E-mail: victor.perezgarcia@uclm.es [Departamento de Matematicas, E. T. S. de Ingenieros Industriales, and Instituto de Matematica Aplicada a la Ciencia y la Ingenieria, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Soliton-stripes (multidimensional extensions of dark solitons) are constructed in multicomponent BECs. > A second component filling the core of the stripe leads to reduced instabilities while propagating in homogeneous media. > In the presence of a trap arbitrarily long-lived stripes can be constructed by increasing the core filling. - Abstract: We discuss how to construct stable multidimensional extensions of one-dimensional dark solitons, the so-called soliton stripes, in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates in the immiscible regime. We show how using a second component to fill the core of a dark soliton stripe leads to reduced instabilities while propagating in homogeneous media. We also discuss how in the presence of a trap arbitrarily long-lived dark soliton stripes can be constructed by increasing the filling of the dark stripe core. Numerical evidences of the robustness of the dark soliton stripes in collision scenarios are also provided.

  3. Distinguishing Patterns of Charge Order: Stripes or Checkerboards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.A.

    2010-04-06

    In two dimensions, quenched disorder always rounds transitions involving the breaking of spatial symmetries so, in practice, it can often be difficult to infer what form the symmetry breaking would take in the 'ideal,' zero disorder limit. We discuss methods of data analysis which can be useful for making such inferences, and apply them to the problem of determining whether the preferred order in the cuprates is 'stripes' or 'checkerboards.' In many cases we show that the experiments clearly indicate stripe order, while in others (where the observed correlation length is short), the answer is presently uncertain.

  4. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  5. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), floating aquatic vegetation (FAV), and rare/sensitive coastal...

  6. 33 CFR 207.50 - Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Authority of lockmaster. The lockmaster shall be charged with the immediate control and management of the... entering or leaving the lock. Masters and pilots will be held to a strict accountability in this matter...

  7. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: New York, Hudson River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  8. Short-term Dynamics and Retention of Triclosan in the Lower Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) is a antimicrobial agent present in a wide array of consumer based goods such as soaps, skin creams and dental care products. Triclosan is only partially removed by most wastewater treatment processes, with the remainder being ...

  9. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, passerine birds, and gulls and terns in the...

  10. 75 FR 38714 - Safety Zone; Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Display, Hudson River, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... extensive advertisement has allowed for public notification. Although the temporary safety zone will apply... Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden. Protection of Children We...

  11. 75 FR 39839 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River and Port of NY/NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ..., NY via Upper New York Bay and Buttermilk Channel. The enforcement times given in this discussion for... Meeting and No Overtaking zone will be established as the barges and bridge span transit Buttermilk... enforce, or otherwise determine compliance with, Federal regulations to the Small Business and Agriculture...

  12. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    [email protected] . If you have questions on viewing or submitting material to the docket, call Renee V... crafts, and other vessels operating near the event area. For the safety concerns noted, it is in the... any negative impact caused by the safety zone were received. 2. Impact on Small Entities The...

  13. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic ofHudson River to Lake Champlain, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  14. 75 FR 76943 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... also cause significant damage to propellers, rudders, and hull plating. The formation of ice on the... notify mariners of the location and thickness of the ice as well as any restrictions via marine broadcast... of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting and...

  15. 75 FR 8486 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River south of the Troy Locks, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... transiting vessels. Also, ice may also cause significant damage to propellers, rudders, and hull plating... ice as well as any restrictions via marine broadcast. Regulatory Analyses We developed this rule after... determination will be available in the docket. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety...

  16. H10938: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hudson River, New York and New Jersey, 1999-10-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries of all hardcopy cartographic products produced as part of the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  18. Side-Scan_Sonar backscatter tiles for Hudson River, NY (.xtf)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw XTF files. Sonar data were collected November 6 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Data Collection and Processing: The...

  19. Science, law, and Hudson River power plants: a case study in environmental impact assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnthouse, L. W; Barnthouse, Lawrence W

    1988-01-01

    Scientists spent more than 15 years studying the physical and chemical characteristics and biological productivity of the estuary and documenting the abundance, distribution, and life histories of the major fish species...

  20. 77 FR 46613 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... Jersey, approximate position 40 53'44.93'' N 073 56'11.79'' W, east to a point 515 yards offshore, approximate position 40 53'40.00'' N 073 55'53.00'' W, south to a position 242 yards offshore, approximate position 40 51'30.00'' N 073 57'09.00'' W, west to the south corner of Ross Dock, Fort Lee, New Jersey...

  1. H10937: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hudson River, New York and New Jersey, 1999-10-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 246 - Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors E... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS STARS AND STRIPES (S&S) NEWSPAPER AND BUSINESS OPERATIONS Pt. 246, App. E Appendix E to Part 246—Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors A. Organization and Management...

  3. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, P.D. E-mail: sparks@hmc.edu; Stern, N.P.; Snowden, D.S.; Kappus, B.A.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Harberger, S.S.; Fusello, A.M.; Eckert, J.C

    2004-05-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17 nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21{+-}0.02 up to 120 nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane.

  4. Monitoring quantity and quality of striped catfish pond effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.; Poelman, M.; Bosma, R.H.; Long, N.; Son, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    The production of striped catfish and other fish species in ponds has several possible impacts on the environment, one of which is caused by the discharge of pond waste water (effluent), which is enriched with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds as result of feeding and fish faeces. To restrict the

  5. Glassy spin dynamics in stripe ordered cuprate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, N. J. (Nicholas J.)

    2004-01-01

    The unusual glassy dynamics exhibited by the spin fluctuations in the stripe-ordered cuprates can be quantitatively measured by La nuclear magnetic resonance. We analyze the spin lattice relaxation data in the low temperature tetragonal structural phase of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and find that there is a distribution of local fluctuations times, with a Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence. Furthermore, the data are consistent with a stretched exponential form for the dynamical spin correlation function, typical of glassy systems. Several doped transition metal oxides exhibit unusual properties associated with heterogeneous charge order. Of particular interest are the cuprates, which become high temperature superconductors within a certain doping range. Charge stripe correlations may play a crucial role in the mechanism for the superconductivity, yet detailed information about the microscopic structure of the charge order as well as the dynamics of this stripes have remained elusive. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes the local, low energy spin and charge fluctuations at the nuclear sites, and provides important clues to charge-stripe dynamics.

  6. Distribution patterns of striped mullet Mugil cephalus in mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The density of juvenile mullet differed significantly among the creeks, but the spatial patterns within them were consistent with higher densities upstream in three of ... striped mullet vary among sites and creeks in response to refuge availability from turbid, shallow water and the accessibility of food from benthic microalgae.

  7. Intervertebral Disk Disease in 3 Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krauss, M.W.; Benato, L.; McDonnell, J.; Schoemaker, N.J.; Westerhof, I.; Bronson, E.; Gielen, I.; van Caelenberg, A.; Hellebuyck, T.; Meij, B.P.; de Decker, S.

    Objective To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in 3 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) with a history of paraparesis. Study Design Case series. Animals Skunks (n = 3) with paraparesis. Methods Neurologic examination revealed upper motor neuron disease (T2–L2) in 2 skunks

  8. leaf and stripe rust resistance among ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: Ethiopian grown wheat varieties and lines were studied to identify germplasm sources possessing resistance to leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina and stripe rust (P. striiformis). Sixty-four lines were included of which 38 were bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n=6x=42, AABBDD) and 26 durum wheat (T.

  9. Siim Nestor soovitab : Supreme 7aastane. White Stripes / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Kolmik Supreme tähistab oma 7. tegutsemisaastat 24. juunil Von Krahlis, kus toimub ka Krecki debüütalbumi "If You Live" (väljaandjaks ettevõte Umblu) esitlus. Detroidi blues-rock duo White Stripes esitleb oma uut albumit "Get Behind Me Satan" 29. juunil Tallinnas klubis Hollywood

  10. Anatomical studies of the gastrointestinal tract of the striped sand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the gross anatomical, morphometric features and histology of the gastrointestinal tract of the Striped Sand Snake (Psammophis sibilans). Ten snakes (five males and five females) were euthanized and dissected for the study. The gastrointestinal tract appeared as a straight tubular organ from oral ...

  11. The Legacy of Destructive Snow Goose Foraging on Supratidal Marsh Habitat in the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    OpenAIRE

    Koons, David

    2013-01-01

    Ecological succession and climate change are pushing tundra as well as Arctic and subarctic lowland plant communities toward increased woody vegetation cover. However, areas along the Hudson Bay Lowlands that are over-grazed by hyper-abundant lesser snow geese are experiencing drastic losses of grass, sedge, and woody cover. We assessed long-term changes in proportional ground cover and habitat patch characteristic at a subartic supratidal marsh that was largely vacated by breeding snow gee...

  12. Improving the quality of stripes in structured-light three-dimensional profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhaoshuai; Wang, Zhao; Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Gao, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    Measuring objects with high dynamic range (HDR) reflectivity by coded structured-light, captured stripes are usually seriously distorted by reflectivity, causing inaccurate measurement results. A stripe enhancement method is proposed to deal with the problem. The method is based on the correspondence between phase and intensity of the stripe. First, the phase map of the captured stripe pattern is retrieved by phase-shift algorithm and multiexposure method, where saturation and low contrast of the stripe are eliminated; then, the modulation of stripes is normalized to eliminate the influence of reflectivity; finally, the enhanced stripe is obtained by assembling the modulation and the phase map. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is efficient for objects with HDR reflectivity and achieves high accuracy.

  13. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lǎcǎtuşu, M.-E.; Rømer, A. T.; Bertelsen, M.; Boehm, M.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Grivel, J.-C.; Emery, S. B.; Udby, L.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-temperature superconductor, La2 CuO4 +y . We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2 -xSrx CuO4 (x =0.07 ) and La2 -xBax CuO4 (x =0.095 ).

  14. Megabenthic assemblages at the Hudson Canyon head (NW Atlantic margin): Habitat-faunal relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Gori, Andrea; Guida, Vincent G.; Gili, Josep-Maria

    2017-09-01

    The distribution of megabenthic communities at the head of Hudson Canyon and adjacent continental shelf was studied by means of underwater video transects and still photo imagery collected using a towed camera system. The goal was to explore the relationships between faunal distribution and physical seafloor conditions and to test the hypothesis that increased seafloor heterogeneity in the Hudson Canyon supports a larger diversity of benthic communities, compared with the adjacent continental shelf. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to identify benthic assemblages as defined in imagery. The BIO-ENV procedure and the Canonical Correspondence Analysis were carried out to elucidate species groupings in relation to terrain variables extracted from bathymetric data. Species accumulation curves were generated to evaluate species turn over in and out of Hudson Canyon. The results indicate that seafloor morphology is the main physical factor related to benthic community composition and distribution. Assemblages dominated by sponges, zoanthids and cup corals colonized the canyon margins and flanks, and were associated with coarse-grained sediments, while sea pen assemblages were observed along muddy seafloor within the thalweg. An assemblage dominated by sea stars occurred on the shelf, associated with a sandy seafloor. Some assemblages were exclusively observed in the canyon area, suggesting that the increased variability of seafloor composition, together with the oceanographic processes specific to the canyon area, enhance beta diversity. The colonization by benthic suspension feeders within the canyon, in contrast to shelf assemblages, mainly composed of carnivores and detritus feeders could be favored the intense hydrodynamics at the canyon head that increase the availability of suspended organic matter. From the perspective of management and conservation of marine resources, the results obtained support the relevance of Hudson Canyon as a biodiversity hotspot

  15. Striped patterns induced by delamination of drying colloidal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, F; Pauchard, L

    2015-02-04

    The drying of a dispersion of nanoparticles on a solid substrate can result in the formation of spontaneous well-ordered stripe patterns left on the substrate. The evaporation of solvent yields large stresses in the material which usually cause crack formation and delamination from the substrate. The formation of these stripes results from a balance between the drying stress which drives the delamination crack front propagation and the cohesive properties of the material. These solid residues arise behind the crack front and can be perpendicular or parallel to the front. It is then possible to inhibit these structures by modifying the cohesive properties of the material. This self-assembly into an ordered pattern can offer an efficient method to produce a patterned surface in a simple way.

  16. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ke; Li, Yang-fang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  17. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and...

  18. Paleozoic stratigraphy and petroleum reservoir potential in the Hudson Bay Basin, Northern Canada; re-evaluation of offshore well data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Kezhen; Dietrich, James; Dewing, Keith [Geological Survey of Canada, 3303 33St. NW, Calgary, AB, T2L 2A7 (Canada)], email: khu@nrcan.gc.ca; Zhang, Shunxin [Canada-Nunavut Geoscience Office, PO Box 2319, 626 Tumit Plaza, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0 (Canada); Asselin, Esther (Geological Survey of Canada (Canada))

    2011-07-01

    The Paleozoic Hudson Bay Basin underlies Hudson Bay and neighbouring land areas in northern Manitoba, Ontario and southern Nunavut. Upper Ordovician to Devonian strata, unconformably overlain by erosional remnants of Mesozoic strata, are part of the sedimentary succession. New stratigraphic correlations for the five offshore wells drilled in the Hudson Bay Basin give an understanding of basin depositional and erosional features, which include a major unconformity in Lower Devonian strata and a Lower Devonian evaporite section whose thickness is highly variable. Petrophysical analyses of the five wells, combined with core data, give valuable information on lithology and porosity, permeability, and water saturation in Paleozoic strata. The petrophysical data shows that many limestone, dolomite and sandstone units are sufficiently porous and permeable to form good quality reservoirs, and possible hydrocarbon-bearing zones are identified in some intervals. This new stratigraphic and reservoir framework will provide a basis for future studies on the Hudson Bay basin and the surrounding Hudson platform as a possible site for petroleum reservoirs.

  19. Numerical Investigation of Tunable Plasmonic Tweezers based on Graphene Stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Mohsen; Darbari, Sara; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-11-06

    We are proposing tunable plasmonic tweezers, consisting two parallel graphene stripes, which can be utilized to effectively trap and sort nanoparticles. We show that by electrostatically tuning the chemical potential of a graphene stripe by about 100 meV (equivalent to ΔV G ≈ 4.4 V), the plasmonic force can be switched efficiently, without a need to switch the laser intensity. This enables high speed and low power switching with a large number of switching cycles. By applying two independent and appropriate gate bias voltages to the stripes, the direction of the plasmonic force can be reversed, which leads to separation of nanoparticles that satisfy the trapping conditions. Numerical simulations show that the potential depths obtained for polystyrene nanoparticles of refractive index n = 1.5717 and radii r ≥ 50 nm is deeper than -10 k B T , confirming the ability of the proposed system to effectively separate such nanoparticles. This capability holds for smaller nanoparticles with larger refractive indices. Finally, performing thermal simulations, we have demonstrated that the heat induced by the illumination increases the fluid temperature by at most 9 °C, having negligible effect on the trapping mechanism. The proposed system opens up new possibilities in developing tunable on-chip manipulation devices, suitable for biological applications.

  20. Observing the fluctuating stripes in high-Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Nussinov, Z.; Mukhin, S.; Zaanen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Superfluids and superconductors have been around for a long time and their explanation in terms of the Bogoliubov theory for bosons and the BCS theory for fermions belong to the highlights of twentieth century physics. However, it appears that these theories are too primitive to address the high-Tc superconductivity found in copper oxides. These electron systems seem to behave more like a dense, strongly correlated liquid contrasting markedly with the conventional quantum gasses: these show strong dynamical correlations on mesoscopic length and time scales associated with stripes, a particular form of electron crystallization. Resting on the gauge theory of topological quantum melting in 2+1 dimensions relevant for the cuprates, we describe the limit which is exactly opposite to the gas limit: the superconductor with the maximum possible amount of transient translational order. We predict that in this "orderly limit" an extra collective mode appears, and this "massive shear photon" can be regarded as a universal fingerprint of the fluctuating stripes. This mode is visible in the electrodynamic response and the ramification of our theory is that electron energy loss spectroscopy can be employed to prove or disprove the existence of dynamical stripes in cuprate superconductors.

  1. Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coslovich, Giacomo; Huber, Bernhard; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Sasagawa, Takao; Hussain, Zahid; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; W. Schoenlein, Robert; A. Kaindl, Robert

    2013-08-30

    Self-organized electronically-ordered phases are a recurring feature in correlated materials, resulting in e.g. fluctuating charge stripes whose role in high-Tc superconductivity is under debate. However, the relevant cause-effect relations between real-space charge correlations and low-energy excitations remain hidden in time-averaged studies. Here, we reveal ultrafast charge localization and lattice vibrational coupling as dynamical precursors of stripe formation in the model compound La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, using ultrafast and equilibrium mid-infrared spectroscopy. The opening of a pseudogap at a crossover temperature T* far above long-range stripe formation establishes the onset of electronic localization which is accompanied by an enhanced Fano asymmetry of Ni-O stretch vibrations. Ultrafast excitation triggers a sub-picosecond dynamics exposing the synchronous modulation of electron-phonon coupling and charge localization. These results illuminate the role of localization in forming the pseudogap in nickelates, opening a path to understanding this mysterious phase in a broad class of complex oxides.

  2. NATURAL TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF A PRESTRESSED ORTHOTROPIC PLATE-STRIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorychev Oleg Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article represents a new outlook at the boundary-value problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous pre-stressed orthotropic plate-stripe. In the paper, the motion equation represents a new approximate hyperbolic equation (rather than a parabolic equation used in the majority of papers covering the same problem describing the vibration of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe. The proposed research is based on newly derived boundary conditions describing the pin-edge, rigid, and elastic (vertical types of fixing, as well as the boundary conditions applicable to the unfixed edge of the plate. The paper contemplates the application of the Laplace transformation and a non-standard representation of a homogeneous differential equation with fixed factors. The article proposes a detailed representation of the problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe if rigidly fixed at opposite sides; besides, the article also provides frequency equations (no conclusions describing the plate characterized by the following boundary conditions: rigid fixing at one side and pin-edge fixing at the opposite side; pin-edge fixing at one side and free (unfixed other side; rigid fixing at one side and elastic fixing at the other side. The results described in the article may be helpful if applied in the construction sector whenever flat structural elements are considered. Moreover, specialists in solid mechanics and theory of elasticity may benefit from the ideas proposed in the article.

  3. Sensitivity of juvenile striped bass to chemicals used in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Terry D.; Marking, Leif L.; Howe, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to restore anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) populations by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies over the past 20 years have concentrated on hatchery culture to supplement dwindling natural reproduction. Adult fish captured for artificial spawning are stressed by handling and crowding in rearing ponds and are often exposed to therapeutants, anesthetics, disinfectants, and herbicides used in fish culture. We determined the toxicity of 17 fishery chemicals (chloramine-T, erythromycin, formalin, Hyamine 3500, Roccal, malachite green, sulfamerazine, benzocaine, etomidate, Finquel (MS-222) , metomidate, quinaldine sulfate, chlorine, potassium permanganate, Aquazine, copper sulfate, and Rodeo) to striped bass fry (average weight = 1 g) in reconstituted water (total hardness 40 mg/L) at 12 degree C. The 96-h LC50's (concentration calculated to produce 50% mortality in a population) ranged from 0.129 mg/L for malachite green to 340 mg/L for erythromycin. We also determined the effects of selected levels of water temperature, hardness, and pH on the toxicity of chloramine-T, formalin, malachite green, and Roccal. There were no differences in toxicity for any of the chemicals at any water quality variable tested except for chloramine-T, which was about 25 times more toxic in soft, acid water than in soft, alkaline water. Our data show that the striped bass is as sensitive to fishery chemicals as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but is generally less resistant than bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

  4. The STRIPES Trial - Support to Rural India's Public Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbourne Diana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. Methods/Design The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. Discussion The study is designed to measure (i whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls

  5. Paleoproterozoic Collisional Structures in the Hudson Bay Lithosphere Constrained by Multi-Observable Probabilistic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Porritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleozoic Hudson Bay intracratonic basin conceals a Paleoproterozoic Himalayan-scale continental collision, the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), which marks an important milestone in the assembly of the Canadian Shield. The geometry of the THO is complex due to the double-indentor geometry of the collision between the Archean Superior and Western Churchill cratons. Seismic observations at regional scale show a thick, seismically fast lithospheric keel beneath the entire region; an intriguing feature of recent models is a 'curtain' of slightly lower wavespeeds trending NE-SW beneath the Bay, which may represent the remnants of more juvenile material trapped between the two Archean continental cores. The seismic models alone, however, cannot constrain the nature of this anomaly. We investigate the thermal and compositional structure of the Hudson Bay lithosphere using a multi-observable probabilistic inversion technique. This joint inversion uses Rayleigh wave phase velocity data from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient noise, geoid anomalies, surface elevation and heat flow to construct a pseudo-3D model of the crust and upper mantle. Initially a wide range of possible mantle compositions is permitted, and tests are carried out to ascertain whether the lithosphere is stratified with depth. Across the entire Hudson Bay region, low temperatures and a high degree of chemical depletion characterise the mantle lithosphere. Temperature anomalies within the lithosphere are modest, as may be expected from a tectonically-stable region. The base of the thermal lithosphere lies at depths of >250 km, reaching to ~300 km depth in the centre of the Bay. Lithospheric stratification, with a more-depleted upper layer, is best able to explain the geophysical data sets and surface observables. Some regions, where intermediate-period phase velocities are high, require stronger mid-lithospheric depletion. In addition, a narrow region of less-depleted material extends NE-SW across the Bay

  6. Precambrian Crustal Evolution of the Hudson Bay Region: Insights from Receiver Function Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Helffrich, G. R.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J.; Snyder, D. B.; Eaton, D. W.

    2009-12-01

    The processes that formed, thickened and thinned the early Earth's crust remain poorly known. The onset of modern plate tectonics, for example, could be as far back as the Hadean or as late as the Neoproterozoic. In many cratons, vertical processes are believed to have been dominant (dome-and-keel tectonics, e.g. Pilbara craton), while others are hypothesised to have formed by the progressive accretion of different terranes (e.g. Superior craton). The Hudson Bay region represents one of the largest areas of Precambrian geology on the planet, with ages spanning 2 billion years (3.9-1.8 Ga). The western Churchill province contains the predominantly Paleo- to Mesoarchean Rae domain and the Neoarchean Hearne domain, and is welded to the Superior craton by the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen, a Himalayan scale feature which extends for more than 4500 km along strike. The Churchill has received comparatively little scientific investigation due to its remote location and harsh climate. In order to test hypotheses on crustal formation and evolution during the Precambrian, teleseismic receiver functions have been analysed for more than 30 stations located on the key geological features in the vicinity of Hudson Bay. Across the entire Rae domain, a dominantly felsic crust with a sharp Moho is observed. Little evidence exists to interpret the vast extent of the felsic crust in terms of subduction related processes. Within the granite-greenstone terranes of the Hearne domain, a more intermediate bulk composition and complex Moho signature may be representative of an oceanic affinity for the crust, suggesting accretionary processes acted there. In the Quebec-Baffin Island region, bulk crustal Vp/Vs ratios are dominated by effects associated with the Trans-Hudson Orogen, and appear to map out the first-order shape of the indenting lower-plate. Correlation between terrane age and receiver function-derived crustal structure suggests that the crust in northern Canada was

  7. A morphology-stitching method to improve Landsat SLC-off images with stripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aghamohamadnia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stripes are artifacts in satellite images caused by various factors such as hardware defects. In some cases, these artifacts are introduced by some mitigating algorithms like Landsat SLC-off (Scan Line Corrector gap-filling methods of LLHM (Local Linear Histogram Matching and AWLHM (Adaptive Window Linear Histogram Matching, which leave stripes as a byproduct. To improve Landsat SLC-off images with stripes, we propose an algorithm involving some hypothetical stripe-crossing stitch lines using the mean pixel value of the stitch lines.

  8. Island End River, Chelsea, Massachusetts. Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment. Revised,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    carolinus Grubby Myoxocephalus aeneus Four- spined stickleback Apeltes quadracus White perch Morone americana Striped bass Morone saxatalis Cunner...provide land for urban development, reducing the river to its present size . Most of the reclaimed land to the northwest of the river is relatively flat and...River, would cause the size of any marina facilities to be extremely limited. PLAN FORMULATION RATIONALE The first step in the formulation of alternative

  9. Ash clouds stripes: mechanisms and implications for dispersion and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Antonio; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Barsotti, Sara; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2017-04-01

    Occasionally, volcanic clouds show horizontal structures (or stripes) oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. This phenomenon has been observed by satellite images and reported at several volcanoes worldwide (e.g., Klyuchevskaya in Kamchatka and Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland) and it was particularly evident at Mt. Etna during different eruptions in 2001 and 2006 where stripes 2 km to 5 km wide were documented and interpreted to be waves. A variety of possible forcing mechanisms exist, including mountain waves and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and create atmospheric waves either by heating or dynamic effects. The aim of this study is two-fold: first to analyze different driving mechanisms, and second to study how the waves affect dispersion and the detection of ash clouds. To this end, we use an Eulerian fully-compressible non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (WRF) at high resolution (200m x 200m) and initialized with an atmospheric sounding profile. The simulated wind field is then coupled (one way) with a Lagrangian particle model (LPAC) to simulate the transport of both passive tracers as well as particles with mass. Results are compared with MODIS satellite images. The Etna test cases show how high resolution weather data are critical to reproducing stripes structures in the plume. In ash cloud models, vertical diffusion is typically ignored and plumes are assumed to disperse only due to horizontal diffusion. Our results provide evidence that wave-like phenomena exert a significant control on aerosol and ash dispersal, by influencing vertical diffusion and particle settling velocity and consequently ash residence time in the atmosphere.

  10. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Murphy

    Full Text Available Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA. Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71% and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%, but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%. Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54% and mandated use of circle hooks (56%. Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts

  11. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinsten, A.; Navarrete, L; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Weber, T.C.; Leonte, M.; Kellermann, M.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D.L.; Scranton, M.L; Kessler, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern US Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady-state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6 – 24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest this methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. WE-EF-207-10: Striped Ratio Grids: A New Concept for Scatter Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a new method for estimating scatter in x-ray imaging. We propose the “striped ratio grid,” an anti-scatter grid with alternating stripes of high scatter rejection (attained, for example, by high grid ratio) and low scatter rejection. To minimize artifacts, stripes are oriented parallel to the direction of the ramp filter. Signal discontinuities at the boundaries between stripes provide information on local scatter content, although these discontinuities are contaminated by variation in primary radiation. Methods: We emulated a striped ratio grid by imaging phantoms with two sequential CT scans, one with and one without a conventional grid, and processed them together to mimic a striped ratio grid. Two phantoms were scanned with the emulated striped ratio grid and compared with a conventional anti-scatter grid and a fan-beam acquisition, which served as ground truth. A nonlinear image processing algorithm was developed to mitigate the problem of primary variation. Results: The emulated striped ratio grid reduced scatter more effectively than the conventional grid alone. Contrast is thereby improved in projection imaging. In CT imaging, cupping is markedly reduced. Artifacts introduced by the striped ratio grid appear to be minimal. Conclusion: Striped ratio grids could be a simple and effective evolution of conventional anti-scatter grids. Unlike several other approaches currently under investigation for scatter management, striped ratio grids require minimal computation, little new hardware (at least for systems which already use removable grids) and impose few assumptions on the nature of the object being scanned.

  13. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  14. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  15. Response to "Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Striped Nanoparticles".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Khac Ong

    Full Text Available Stirling et al., (10.1371/journal.pone.0108482 presented an analysis on some of our publications on the formation of stripe-like domains on mixed-ligand coated gold nanoparticles. The authors shed doubts on some of our results however no valid argument is provided against what we have shown since our first publication: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM images of striped nanoparticles show stripe-like domains that are independent of imaging parameters and in particular of imaging speed. We have consistently ruled out the presence of artifacts by comparing sets of images acquired at different tip speeds, finding invariance of the stipe-like domains. Stirling and co-workers incorrectly analyzed this key control, using a different microscope and imaging conditions that do not compare to ours. We show here data proving that our approach is rigorous. Furthermore, we never solely relied on image analysis to draw our conclusions; we have always used the chemical nature of the particles to assess the veracity of our images. Stirling et al. do not provide any justification for the spacing of the features that we find on nanoparticles: ~1 nm for mixed ligand particles and ~ 0.5 nm for homoligand particles. Hence our two central arguments remain unmodified: independence from imaging parameters and dependence on ligand shell chemical composition. The paper report observations on our STM images; none is a sufficient condition to prove that our images are artifacts. We thoroughly addressed issues related to STM artifacts throughout our microscopy work. Stirling et al. provide guidelines for what they consider good STM images of nanoparticles, such images are indeed present in our literature. They conclude that the evidences we provided to date are insufficient, this is a departure from one of the authors' previous article which concluded that our images were composed of artifacts. Given that four independent laboratories have reproduced our measurements and

  16. Unfolding of vortices into topological stripes in a multiferroic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Mostovoy, M; Han, M G; Horibe, Y; Aoki, T; Zhu, Y; Cheong, S-W

    2014-06-20

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO(3) (R=rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  17. De vluchtige olie van enkele chemotypen van mentha suaveolens EHRH. en van hybriden met mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hindrik

    1974-01-01

    De opvatting dat Mentha x piperita L. een bastaard zou zijn van Mentha spicata L. en Mentha aquatica L. werd nader besproken. Hierbij werd Mentha spicata beschouwd als een bastaard van Mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON en Mentha suaveolens EHRH. ... Zie: Samenvatting.

  18. Comparisons of egg quality traits, egg weight loss and hatchability between striped and normal duck eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Wang, B; Huang, Z; Fan, Y; Huang, C; Hou, Z

    2013-01-01

    1. The egg quality of striped and normal duck eggs was compared to determine why striped eggs show decreased hatchability. A total of 430 eggs, obtained from a Pekin duck breeder flock aged 50-65 wks, were used in three experiments. The eggs were weighed and assigned randomly to measure egg quality traits, egg weight (EW) loss and hatchability during incubation. 2. There were no significant differences between egg types in terms of egg shape index, eggshell strength and thickness, albumen height, Haugh unit, yolk colour, weight of the eggshell with or without membranes, calcium, phosphorus, copper and manganese contents in the eggshell (with the inner and outer membranes or without the inner membrane), albumen weight, dry matter of albumen, crude protein (CP) of thick albumen and pH of the thick albumen. 3. The weight of eggshells with membranes, weight of thick albumen and CP of thin albumen in striped eggs were lower than those in normal eggs. 4. The thin albumen in striped eggs was heavier than that in normal eggs. The pH of the thin albumin in striped egg was significantly higher than that in normal eggs. 5. There were no significant differences in EW loss during incubation or duckling weight between striped and normal eggs. However, the hatchability of striped eggs was lower. 6. The lower weight of the eggshell inner membrane and thick albumen, lower CP content and higher pH in the thin albumen of striped eggs might contribute to lower hatchability.

  19. QTL mapping of adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat line P9897

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a devastating fungal disease of common wheat. Wheat line P9897 showed adult-plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust for several years. To map resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL), F2:3 lines from a cross of P9897...

  20. Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in Pakistan. H Bux, M Ashraf, X Chen, S Mumtaz. Abstract. Virulence patterns of wheat stripe rust were studied under the field conditions across four environmentally different locations: Quaid-i-Azam University (Islamabad), Pirsabak ...

  1. Osmoregulatory effects of hypophysectomy and homologous prolactin replacement in hybrid striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Leslie F; McCormick, Stephen D; Madsen, Steffen S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and striped bass prolactin (sbPRL; Morone saxatilis) on plasma osmolality, electrolyte balance, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity were investigated in hypophysectomized (Hx), freshwater (FW)-acclimated, hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilis x Morone chrysops...

  2. Effect of stripe rust on the yield response of wheat to nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhesh Devadas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is the most important fertiliser element determining the productivity of wheat. N nutrition is known to affect the level of stripe rust infection, with higher N associated with increased disease severity. Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is a major yield-limiting disease of wheat in Australia. This paper describes experiments designed to investigate the agronomic response to the interaction of various levels of N application and stripe rust severity in wheat varieties differing in response. Experimental plots were established in crop seasons 2006 and 2007 on the Liverpool Plains of northern NSW, Australia. Yield, biomass, grain protein content (GPC and harvest index (HI data were recorded. Increased rates of N increased the severity of stripe rust during grain filling. N application also increased yield and GPC in all varieties in both years. Stripe rust reduced the yield of the rust-susceptible wheat varieties, and GPC and proportion of added N recovered in the grain were also reduced in one year but not the other. It was evident from our experiment that stripe rust caused yield loss accompanied by either no change or reduction in GPC, indicating that the total amount of N entering the grain was reduced by stripe rust. The effects of stripe rust on N yield are most likely associated with reduced uptake of N during grain filling.

  3. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  4. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wheat line CSP44, a selection from an Australian bread wheat cultivar Condor, has shown resistance to stripe rust in India since the last twenty years. Seedlings and adult plants of CSP44 showed susceptible infection types against stripe rust race 46S119 but displayed average terminal disease severity of 2.67 on adult ...

  5. Genetic analysis and location of gene for resistance to stripe rust in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Strubes Dickkopf is the sixth differential in the world set for wheat stripe (yellow) rust. It is very important to clarify its genetic character of resistance to stripe rust and to develop the molecular markers linked to resistance genes. The NIL Taichung 29*6/Strubes Dickkopf, which was obtained by Strubes Dickkopf as the gene ...

  6. Allelic variation at loci controlling stripe rust resistance in spring wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rusts have been one of the main yield limiting factors in wheat cultivation throughout the world. Three kinds of rust diseases that attack wheat crop are leaf (brown) rust, stripe (yellow) rust and stem (black) rust. Leaf rust is caused by Puccinia triticina f.sp. tritici; stripe rust is ...

  7. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lisa; Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Durey, Guillaume; Darmon, Alexandre; Haase, Martin F.; Li, Ningwei; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Kamien, Randall D.; Lopez-Leon, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD) state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau-de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  8. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau–de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  9. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt.

  10. Flipper development in the Mediterranean striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, N; Aguilar, A

    1996-08-01

    Studies of population biology are scarce in Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) mostly because of the lack of samples. Until now, studies of physical maturity, growth, and development of the flipper bones were not available for this species in the Mediterranean. The osteological features and metric characters of the pectoral limbs of Mediterranean striped dolphins were analyzed with radiological techniques. Measurements were made directly on the radiographic films. We found five carpal bones arranged in a proximal row of three and a distal row of two, although one or two additional osseous elements were occasionally observed. The phalangeal formula (excluding metacarpals) was established as 1-2:8-9-10:6-5-7:3-2:1-2. In metacarpals, epiphyseal ossification centers matured at the same time at both ends. As a general rule, the ossification of the epiphyses in the flipper bones showed a decreasing gradient in the proximodistal direction, confirming the pattern previously described in other species. Phalangeal epiphyses were not useful as indicators of skeletal maturity, and grading epiphyseal maturation of the distal radius and ulna is proposed as the more straight-forward and precise method for assessing bone maturation. In females, maturity of the flipper was achieved between 5 and 6 years of age and 160-175 cm of body length, whereas this maturation occurred between 8 and 9 years of age and 170-181 cm in length in males. Prediction of gender through examination of flipper structure was not feasible.

  11. Endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles have a characteristic striped bipolar surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1985-12-01

    Capillary endothelial cells have a large population of small (65-80 nm diameter in transmission electron microscopy) vesicles of which a large fraction is associated with the plasmalemma of the luminal and abluminal side. We studied the fine structure and distribution of these plasmalemmal vesicles by high resolution scanning electron microscopy in cultured endothelial cells obtained from bovine adrenal cortical capillaries. Cell monolayers were covered with polylysine-coated silicon chips, split in high potassium buffer, fixed in aldehyde mixtures, and then treated with OsO4 and thiocarbohydrazide. After critical point drying, the specimens were coated with a thin (less than 2 nm) continuous film of chromium. On the cytoplasmic aspect of the dorsal plasmalemmal fragments seen in such specimens, plasmalemmal vesicles appear as uniform vesicular protrusions approximately 70-90 nm in diameter, preferentially concentrated in distinct large fields in which they occur primarily as single units. Individual plasmalemmal vesicles exhibit a striped surface fine structure which consists of ridges approximately 10 nm in diameter, separated by furrows and oriented as meridians, often ending at two poles on opposite sides of the vesicles in a plane parallel to the plasmalemma. This striped surface structure is clearly distinct from the cage structure of coated pits found, at low surface density, on the same specimens. The cytoplasmic aspect of the plasmalemma proper is covered by a fibrillar infrastructure which does not extend over plasmalemmal vesicles but on which the latter appear to be anchored by fine filaments.

  12. Estimating the abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation with aerial surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Middel, Kevin R.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture–recapture studies indicate abundance was likely unchanged between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival occurred during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double-observer and distance sampling protocols. We surveyed small islands in James Bay and eastern Hudson Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark–recapture distance sampling and sight–resight models yielded an estimate of 860 (SE = 174) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (943; SE = 174) suggests that abundance is unlikely to have changed significantly since 1986. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture–recapture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given previous increases in duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  13. Estimating abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation using aerial surveys, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Middel, Kevin R.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture-recapture studies indicate that abundance remained stable between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival were documented during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double observer and distance sampling protocols. We also surveyed small islands in Hudson Bay and James Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark-recapture distance sampling and sightresight models yielded a model-averaged estimate of 868 (SE: 177) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (951; SE: 177) suggests that abundance has remained unchanged. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given the previous increases in the duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  14. Hudson Bay wood gasifier: Final technical report on a Renewables-Conservation Demonstration Program Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    With electricity generation in mind, the 0.25 MW British Columbia Research fluidized bed wood gasifier was scaled up into a 1.2 MW pilot plant at the Saskatchewan Forest Products plywood mill in Hudson Ray, Saskatchewan, with the commissioning of the unit being completed in 1979. Following the installation of a new airlock, grate and ash scraper and a program of preliminary runs, a 60-day period was completed, during which the suitability of the Hudson Bay wood gasification system for continous operation was evaluated. It was concluded that serious deficiencies exist in the available scale-up procedures and expertise. Areas requiring major changes include the feed system, to alleviate the back-leakage of product gases, and to prevent overheating in the combustion zone, the grate/ash removal system, and the mode of operation (fixed or fluidized bed). Because the gasifier was designed to run in the fluidized mode, and in fact operates as a fixed moving bed, problems have arisen with ash removal and overheating. The stack gas and the waste water effluents were found to pose no serious threat to the environment, and can be safely disposed of without producing pollution problems. The scrubber operated very well, producing a cool, clean gas which burned well in the diesel and in the Maxon burner. A comparison of wood gasification to diesel oil generation of electricity revealed that, over the next 15 years, wood gas will produce cheaper electricity than well diesel, when a free source of waste wood is available, such as the situation in which the plant is listed at the source of the waste wood, and is operated by the waste wood producer. 4 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Stripe noise removal of remote sensing images by total variation regularization and group sparsity constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing images have been used in many fields, such as urban planning, military, and environment monitoring, but corruption by stripe noise limits its subsequent applications. Most existing stripe noise removal (destriping methods aim to directly estimate the clear images from the stripe images without considering the intrinsic properties of stripe noise, which causes the image structure destroyed. In this paper, we propose a new destriping method from the perspective of image decomposition, which takes the intrinsic properties of stripe noise and image characteristics into full consideration. The proposed method integrates the unidirectional total variation (TV regularization, group sparsity regularization, and TV regularization together in an image decomposition framework. The first two terms are utilized to exploit the stripe noise properties by implementing statistical analysis, and the TV regularization is adopted to explore the spatial piecewise smooth structure of stripe-free image. Moreover, an efficient alternating minimization scheme is designed to solve the proposed model. Extensive experiments on simulated and real data demonstrate that our method outperforms several existing state-of-the-art destriping methods in terms of both quantitative and qualitative assessments.

  16. Stripe to slab confinement for the linearization of macromolecules in nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benková, Zuzana; Námer, Pavol; Cifra, Peter

    2015-03-21

    We investigated the recently suggested advantageous analysis of chain linearization experiments with macromolecules confined in a stripe-like channel (Huang and Battacharya, EPL, 2014, 106, 18004) using Monte Carlo simulations. The enhanced chain extension in a stripe, which is due to the significant excluded volume interactions between the monomers in two dimensions, weakens considerably on transition to an experimentally feasible slit-like channel. Based on the chain extension-confinement strength dependence and the structure factor behavior for a chain in a stripe, we infer the excluded volume regime (de Gennes regime) typical for two-dimensional systems. On widening of the stripe in a direction perpendicular to the stripe plane, i.e. on the transition to the slab geometry, the advantageous chain extension decreases and a Gaussian regime is observed for not very long semiflexible chains. The evidence for pseudo-ideality in confined chains is based on four indicators: the extension curves, variation of the extension with the persistence length P, estimated limits for the regimes in the investigated systems, and the structure factor behavior. The slab behavior can be observed when the two-dimensional stripe (originally of a one-monomer thickness) reaches a reduced thickness D larger than approximately D/P ≈ 0.2 in the third dimension. This maximum height of a slab at which the advantage of a stripe is retained is very low and has implications for DNA linearization experiments.

  17. Pathology of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) infected with Brucella ceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Barrientos, R; Morales, J-A; Hernández-Mora, G; Barquero-Calvo, E; Guzmán-Verri, C; Chaves-Olarte, E; Moreno, E

    2010-05-01

    Seventeen striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) displaying swimming disorders compatible with neurological syndromes were investigated for Brucella infection. Sixteen dolphins had meningoencephalomyelitis. Serum antibody against Brucella antigen was detected in all 14 animals tested and Brucella ceti was isolated from eight out of nine animals. Brucella antigen was detected in the brain by immunofluorescence, but not by immunohistochemical labelling. By contrast, Brucella antigen was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the trophoblast of animals with severe placentitis and in the mitral valve of animals with myocarditis. The microscopical lesions observed in the tissues of the infected dolphins were similar to those of chronic brucellosis in man. The severity of brucellosis in S. coeruleoalba indicates that this dolphin species is highly susceptible to infection by B. ceti. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Explanation of the nature of stripe magnetic anomalies without inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, Vjacheslav; Lygin, Ivan; Sokolova, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Several scientists of different branches express doubts on the validity of the Earth's geomagnetic field inversions hypothesis [Vine F.J., Matthews D.H, 1963]. Presently a lot of information allows to link the appearance of stripe magnetic anomalies of both signs with the spreading fracture structure (horizontal segmentation of intrusions and sills, breaks in the strong crust, vertical movements of blocks), remagnetization near the borders of the blocks, hydrothermal activity. Non-inversion mechanism of origin of linear stripe magnetic anomalies in the oceans could be explained as follows. Ascending asthenospheric flows have been enrich with volatile components, become thinner, pressure on the walls of the lithospheric plates grows and part them. When it approaches the surface: - horizontal tensile pressure grows, - lithostatic pressure in the vertical column of rocks decreases, - crust strong upper layer flakes away and begins to move horizontally. It is important that thin magmatic and magnetic layers (further layers) of the newly formed strong upper crust move away from the ridge axis. The structure of such layers forms by horizontal stresses and so consist of the hills and depressions sequences or updiped and downdiped blocks heaped each other. This layer is the main source of the magnetic field and cannot be approximated by a horizontal homogeneous plate as it proved before. In the mid-ocean ridges (MOR) the folding periods of layer depend on its thickness and rigidity and horizontal velocity of spreading. The higher velocity - the longer periods of roughness are and contrary. Same pattern is observed for the stripe magnetic anomalies distribution. The magnetic field of the MOR forms there due to young lava flows which get thermoremanent magnetization according the current direction of geomagnetic field. Partial destruction of the relief, overlaying and creation of the new shapes occur when new magma penetrates the moved magnetic layer. The process entails

  19. Diamagnetic vortex barrier stripes in underdoped BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagil, A.; Lamhot, Y.; Almoalem, A.; Kasahara, S.; Watashige, T.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Auslaender, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements on underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 (x =0.26 ) that show enhanced superconductivity along stripes parallel to twin boundaries. These stripes of enhanced diamagnetic response repel superconducting vortices and act as barriers for them to cross. The width of the stripes is hundreds of nanometers, on the scale of the penetration depth, well within the inherent spatial resolution of MFM and implying that the width is set by the interaction of the superconductor with the MFM's magnetic tip. Unlike similar stripes observed previously by scanning SQUID in the electron doped Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 , the stripes in the isovalently doped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 disappear gradually when we warm the sample towards the superconducting transition temperature. Moreover, we find that the stripes move well below the reported structural transition temperature in BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 and that they can be much denser than in the Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 study. When we cool in finite magnetic field we find that some vortices appear in the middle of stripes, suggesting that the stripes may have an inner structure, which we cannot resolve. Finally, we use both vortex decoration at higher magnetic field and deliberate vortex dragging by the MFM magnetic tip to obtain bounds on the strength of the interaction between the stripes and vortices. We find that this interaction is strong enough to play a significant role in determining the critical current in underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 .

  20. Study of combined filter based on wavelet transform to denoise stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongling; Jing, Chao; Zhang, Yimo

    2011-11-01

    Stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry, in which stripe distribution are correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects, are severely disturbed by noises, and so denoising stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry is necessary to extract useful stripe distribution information. Denoising methods and flow for stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are analyzed in this paper to get the stripe distribution correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects. The noises in the stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are comprised of speckle noise and other random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, so it's difficult to use familiar filters, such as mean-value filter, medium-value filter and adaptive filter, etc, to remove all noises in the stripe images. The combined filter composed of mean-value filter and wavelet filter is designed to denoise stripe images. The aim of mean-value filter is to remove random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, and then the wavelet filter, in which the Meyer wavelet is adopted, is designed to remove speckle noise in the stripe images. The final stripe distribution images after denoising and binarization are listed to prove the denoising validity of combined filter based on wavelet transform.

  1. Rogue wave and a pair of resonance stripe solitons to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoen; Chen, Yong

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a combination of stripe soliton and lump soliton is discussed to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation, in which such solution gives rise to two different excitation phenomena: fusion and fission. Particularly, a new combination of positive quadratic functions and hyperbolic functions is considered, and then a novel nonlinear phenomenon is explored. Via this method, a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons and rogue wave is studied. Rogue wave is triggered by the interaction between lump soliton and a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons. It is exciting that rogue wave must be attached to the stripe solitons from its appearing to disappearing. The whole progress is completely symmetry, the rogue wave starts itself from one stripe soliton and lose itself in another stripe soliton. The dynamic properties of the interaction between one stripe soliton and lump soliton, rogue wave are discussed by choosing appropriate parameters.

  2. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdés-Bango

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  3. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Bango, F.; Vélez, M.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Alameda, J. M.; Martín, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  4. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-03-26

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  5. An ovary transcriptome for all maturational stages of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis, a highly advanced perciform fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reading Benjamin J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The striped bass and its relatives (genus Morone are important fisheries and aquaculture species native to estuaries and rivers of the Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico in North America. To open avenues of gene expression research on reproduction and breeding of striped bass, we generated a collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from a complementary DNA (cDNA library representative of their ovarian transcriptome. Results Sequences of a total of 230,151 ESTs (51,259,448 bp were acquired by Roche 454 pyrosequencing of cDNA pooled from ovarian tissues obtained at all stages of oocyte growth, at ovulation (eggs, and during preovulatory atresia. Quality filtering of ESTs allowed assembly of 11,208 high-quality contigs ≥ 100 bp, including 2,984 contigs 500 bp or longer (average length 895 bp. Blastx comparisons revealed 5,482 gene orthologues (E-value -3, of which 4,120 (36.7% of total contigs were annotated with Gene Ontology terms (E-value -6. There were 5,726 remaining unknown unique sequences (51.1% of total contigs. All of the high-quality EST sequences are available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI Short Read Archive (GenBank: SRX007394. Informative contigs were considered to be abundant if they were assembled from groups of ESTs comprising ≥ 0.15% of the total short read sequences (≥ 345 reads/contig. Approximately 52.5% of these abundant contigs were predicted to have predominant ovary expression through digital differential display in silico comparisons to zebrafish (Danio rerio UniGene orthologues. Over 1,300 Gene Ontology terms from Biological Process classes of Reproduction, Reproductive process, and Developmental process were assigned to this collection of annotated contigs. Conclusions This first large reference sequence database available for the ecologically and economically important temperate basses (genus Morone provides a foundation for gene expression studies in these

  6. An ovary transcriptome for all maturational stages of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis), a highly advanced perciform fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Benjamin J; Chapman, Robert W; Schaff, Jennifer E; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Opperman, Charles H; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-02-21

    The striped bass and its relatives (genus Morone) are important fisheries and aquaculture species native to estuaries and rivers of the Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico in North America. To open avenues of gene expression research on reproduction and breeding of striped bass, we generated a collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a complementary DNA (cDNA) library representative of their ovarian transcriptome. Sequences of a total of 230,151 ESTs (51,259,448 bp) were acquired by Roche 454 pyrosequencing of cDNA pooled from ovarian tissues obtained at all stages of oocyte growth, at ovulation (eggs), and during preovulatory atresia. Quality filtering of ESTs allowed assembly of 11,208 high-quality contigs ≥ 100 bp, including 2,984 contigs 500 bp or longer (average length 895 bp). Blastx comparisons revealed 5,482 gene orthologues (E-value Read Archive (GenBank: SRX007394). Informative contigs were considered to be abundant if they were assembled from groups of ESTs comprising ≥ 0.15% of the total short read sequences (≥ 345 reads/contig). Approximately 52.5% of these abundant contigs were predicted to have predominant ovary expression through digital differential display in silico comparisons to zebrafish (Danio rerio) UniGene orthologues. Over 1,300 Gene Ontology terms from Biological Process classes of Reproduction, Reproductive process, and Developmental process were assigned to this collection of annotated contigs. This first large reference sequence database available for the ecologically and economically important temperate basses (genus Morone) provides a foundation for gene expression studies in these species. The predicted predominance of ovary gene expression and assignment of directly relevant Gene Ontology classes suggests a powerful utility of this dataset for analysis of ovarian gene expression related to fundamental questions of oogenesis. Additionally, a high definition Agilent 60-mer oligo ovary 'UniClone' microarray with 8 × 15

  7. What to eat now? Shifts in polar bear diet during the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Under current climate trends, spring ice breakup in Hudson Bay is advancing rapidly, leaving polar bears (Ursus maritimus) less time to hunt seals during the spring when they accumulate the majority of their annual fat reserves. For this reason, foods that polar bears consume during the ice-free season may become increasingly important in alleviating nutritional stress from lost seal hunting opportunities. Defining how the terrestrial diet might have changed since the onset of rapid climate c...

  8. Striped Marlin Hardparts and Gonads Collected by the PIRO Hawaii Longline Observer Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Compilation of all samples collected from striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) collected and brought to the Aiea Heights Research Facility by the PIRO Hawaii Longline...

  9. Genetic analysis and location of gene for resistance to stripe rust in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    yellow) rust. It is very important to clarify its genetic character of resistance to stripe rust and to develop the molecular markers linked to resistance genes. The NIL Taichung. 29*6/Strubes Dickkopf, which was obtained by ...

  10. Nonlocal Electron-Phonon Interaction as a Source of Dynamic Charge Stripes in the Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Falter

    2012-01-01

    small pockets with reduced doping. We argue that the incompressibility of the orbital and simultaneously the compressibility of the orbital in the pseudogap state seem to be required to nucleate dynamic stripes.

  11. Improving sustainability of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam through recirculation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to document improvements in sustainability indicators of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) production through the application of recirculation and waste treatment techniques. To be able to document improvements in sustainability, in each system

  12. Quantity and functionality of protein fractions in chicken breast fillets affected by white striping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2014-01-01

    ... features of chicken breast meat. During this study, a total of 12 pectoralis major muscles from both normal and white striped fillets were used to evaluate chemical composition, protein solubility...

  13. Yr32 for resistance to stripe (yellow) rust present in the wheat cultivar Carstens V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L.; Afshari, F.; Christiansen, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Stripe or yellow rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease in many wheat-growing regions of the world. A number of major genes providing resistance to stripe rust have been used in breeding, including one gene that is present in the differential tester...... Carstens V. The objective of this study was to locate and map a stripe rust resistance gene transferred from Carstens V to Avocet S and to use molecular tools to locate a number of genes segregating in the cross Savannah/Senat. One of the genes present in Senat was predicted to be a gene that is present...... in Carstens V. For this latter purpose, stripe rust response data from both seedling and field tests on a doubled haploid population consisting of 77 lines were compared to an available molecular map for the same lines using a non-parametric quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Results obtained in Denmark...

  14. Water contamination and environmental ecosystem in the Harlem River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrients, bacteria, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminates have degraded water quality of the Harlem River. The Harlem River is a natural straight connected to the Hudson River and the East River, and it has been used for navigation and boating. Water samples have been collected and analyzed from 2011 to 2013. Phosphorus, ammonia, turbidity, fecal coliform, E.Coli., and enterococcus all exceed regulated levels for New York City waters. There is only one wastewater treatment plant (Wards Island WWTP) that serves this river. Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) discharge raw sewage into the river during storms in spring and summer. Commercial fishing is banned, .however, individuals still fish. While some fishermen catch and release, it is likely some fish are consumed, creating concern for the environmental health of the community along the river. Storm water runoff, CSOs, and wastewater effluents are major pollutant sources of PCB 11 (3,3' dichlorobiphenyl), nutrient and bacteria. Nutrients, bacteria levels and their spatial/temporal variations were analyzed, and PCB analysis is underway. This data is a critical first step towards improving the water quality and environmental ecosystem in the Harlem River.

  15. Unusual sighting of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Kvarnerić, Northern Adriatic sea

    OpenAIRE

    Bearzi, Giovanni; Fortuna, Caterina Maria; Notabartolo di Sciara, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    An adult striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, was encountered east of the island of Lošinj on 6 May 1996, and observed from a small inflatable boat for 5 hours. The only cetacean species that has been consistently observed in the Northern Adriatic Sea in the last decades is the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus. Occasional reports of striped dolphins in the Central and Northern Adriatic Sea may simply reflect the occurrence of stray individuals, but the fact that such observations ...

  16. Propagation of dark stripe beams in nonlinear media: Snake instability and creation of optical vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.; Zozulya, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of (1+1) dimensional dark stripe beams in bulk media with a photorefractive nonlinear response. These beams, including solitary wave solutions, are shown to be unstable with respect to symmetry breaking and formation of structure along the initially homogeneous coordinate....... Experimental results show the complete sequence of events starting from self-focusing of the stripe, its bending due to the snake instability, and subsequent decay into a set of optical vortices....

  17. Are stripes beneficial? Dazzle camouflage influences perceived speed and hit rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina von Helversen

    Full Text Available In the animal kingdom, camouflage refers to patterns that help potential prey avoid detection. Mostly camouflage is thought of as helping prey blend in with their background. In contrast, disruptive or dazzle patterns protect moving targets and have been suggested as an evolutionary force in shaping the dorsal patterns of animals. Dazzle patterns, such as stripes and zigzags, are thought to reduce the probability with which moving prey will be captured by impairing predators' perception of speed. We investigated how different patterns of stripes (longitudinal-i.e., parallel to movement direction-and vertical-i.e., perpendicular to movement direction affect the probability with which humans can hit moving objects and if differences in hitting probability are caused by a misperception of speed. A first experiment showed that longitudinally striped objects were hit more often than unicolored objects. However, vertically striped objects did not differ from unicolored objects. A second study examining the link between perceived speed and hitting probability showed that longitudinally and vertically striped objects were both perceived as moving faster and were hit more often than unicolored objects. In sum, our results provide evidence that striped patterns disrupt the perception of speed, which in turn influences how often objects are hit. However, the magnitude and the direction of the effects depend on additional factors such as speed and the task setup.

  18. Dietary composition and spatial patterns of polar bear foraging on land in western Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-12-21

    Flexible foraging strategies, such as prey switching, omnivory and food mixing, are key to surviving in a labile and changing environment. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in western Hudson Bay are versatile predators that use all of these strategies as they seasonally exploit resources across trophic levels. Climate warming is reducing availability of their ice habitat, especially in spring when polar bears gain most of their annual fat reserves by consuming seal pups before coming ashore in summer. How polar bears combine these flexible foraging strategies to obtain and utilize terrestrial food will become increasingly important in compensating for energy deficits from lost seal hunting opportunities. We evaluated patterns in the composition of foods in scat to characterize the foraging behaviors that underpin the diet mixing and omnivory observed in polar bears on land in western Hudson Bay. Specifically, we measured diet richness, proportions of plant and animal foods, patterns in co-occurrence of foods, spatial composition and an index of temporal composition. Scats contained between 1 and 6 foods, with an average of 2.11 (SE = 0.04). Most scats (84.9%) contained at least one type of plant, but animals (35.4% of scats) and both plants and animals occurring together (34.4% of scats) were also common. Certain foods, such as Lyme grass seed heads (Leymus arenarius), berries and marine algae, were consumed in relatively higher proportions, sometimes to the exclusion of others, both where and when they occurred most abundantly. The predominance of localized vegetation in scats suggests little movement among habitat types between feeding sessions. Unlike the case for plants, no spatial patterns were found for animal remains, likely due the animals' more vagile and ubiquitous distribution. Our results suggest that polar bears are foraging opportunistically in a manner consistent with maximizing intake while minimizing energy expenditure associated with movement. The

  19. Dietary composition and spatial patterns of polar bear foraging on land in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Flexible foraging strategies, such as prey switching, omnivory and food mixing, are key to surviving in a labile and changing environment. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in western Hudson Bay are versatile predators that use all of these strategies as they seasonally exploit resources across trophic levels. Climate warming is reducing availability of their ice habitat, especially in spring when polar bears gain most of their annual fat reserves by consuming seal pups before coming ashore in summer. How polar bears combine these flexible foraging strategies to obtain and utilize terrestrial food will become increasingly important in compensating for energy deficits from lost seal hunting opportunities. We evaluated patterns in the composition of foods in scat to characterize the foraging behaviors that underpin the diet mixing and omnivory observed in polar bears on land in western Hudson Bay. Specifically, we measured diet richness, proportions of plant and animal foods, patterns in co-occurrence of foods, spatial composition and an index of temporal composition. Results Scats contained between 1 and 6 foods, with an average of 2.11 (SE = 0.04). Most scats (84.9%) contained at least one type of plant, but animals (35.4% of scats) and both plants and animals occurring together (34.4% of scats) were also common. Certain foods, such as Lyme grass seed heads (Leymus arenarius), berries and marine algae, were consumed in relatively higher proportions, sometimes to the exclusion of others, both where and when they occurred most abundantly. The predominance of localized vegetation in scats suggests little movement among habitat types between feeding sessions. Unlike the case for plants, no spatial patterns were found for animal remains, likely due the animals’ more vagile and ubiquitous distribution. Conclusions Our results suggest that polar bears are foraging opportunistically in a manner consistent with maximizing intake while minimizing energy

  20. The time varying structure of a river plume: Observations with an autonomous glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, R. J.; Glenn, S. M.; Gong, D.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2004 LaTTE (Lagrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment) pilot study we deployed a Slocum Autonomous glider on a 10-day mission to run repeated transects across the Hudson River Plume in the vicinity of Sandy Hook. The glider completed 13 cross-plume surveys during the mission with horizontal resolution of approximately 100 meters. Wind forcing was highly variable and fluctuated between upwelling and downwelling conditions at 1-2 day intervals. Tidal forcing decreased markedly from spring to neap tide conditions and river discharge averaged approximately 500 m3/s during the survey. The plume responded rapidly to the variable wind forcing. During upwelling conditions the plume thinned and extended over 30 km from shore, while during downwelling winds the plume thickened and was compressed at the shore. However, during both upwellling and downwelling conditions the plume remained detached from the bottom. The cross-sectional area of the plume also tended to vary with the wind forcing. However, a significant increase in the plume's area during the last half of the mission does not appear to be related to either wind forcing or river discharge. Instead, we suggest that the plumes structure could be impacted by spring neap variability which is known to control stratification and freshwater fluxes out of the Hudson River Estuary. This presentation will relate the structure of the plume to wind forcing, river flow and the spring/neap cycle.

  1. Structural lability of Barley stripe mosaic virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V Makarov

    Full Text Available Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed.

  2. Current Insights into Research on Rice stripe virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Kyong Cho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe virus (RSV is one of the most destructive viruses of rice, and greatly reduces rice production in China, Japan, and Korea, where mostly japonica cultivars of rice are grown. RSV is transmitted by the small brown plant-hopper (SBPH in a persistent and circulative-propagative manner. Several methods have been developed for detection of RSV, which is composed of four single-stranded RNAs that encode seven proteins. Genome sequence data and comparative phylogenetic analysis have been used to identify the origin and diversity of RSV isolates. Several rice varieties resistant to RSV have been selected and QTL analysis and fine mapping have been intensively performed to map RSV resistance loci or genes. RSV genes have been used to generate several genetically modified transgenic rice plants with RSV resistance. Recently, genome-wide transcriptome analyses and deep sequencing have been used to identify mRNAs and small RNAs involved in RSV infection; several rice host factors that interact with RSV proteins have also been identified. In this article, we review the current statues of RSV research and propose integrated approaches for the study of interactions among RSV, rice, and the SBPH.

  3. Strategies for Wheat Stripe Rust Pathogenicity Identified by Transcriptome Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Garnica

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst is a major constraint to wheat production worldwide. The molecular events that underlie Pst pathogenicity are largely unknown. Like all rusts, Pst creates a specialized cellular structure within host cells called the haustorium to obtain nutrients from wheat, and to secrete pathogenicity factors called effector proteins. We purified Pst haustoria and used next-generation sequencing platforms to assemble the haustorial transcriptome as well as the transcriptome of germinated spores. 12,282 transcripts were assembled from 454-pyrosequencing data and used as reference for digital gene expression analysis to compare the germinated uredinospores and haustoria transcriptomes based on Illumina RNAseq data. More than 400 genes encoding secreted proteins which constitute candidate effectors were identified from the haustorial transcriptome, with two thirds of these up-regulated in this tissue compared to germinated spores. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression patterns of 94 effector candidates. The analysis also revealed that spores rely mainly on stored energy reserves for growth and development, while haustoria take up host nutrients for massive energy production for biosynthetic pathways and the ultimate production of spores. Together, these studies substantially increase our knowledge of potential Pst effectors and provide new insights into the pathogenic strategies of this important organism.

  4. Ultrastructure of Mycobacterium marinum granuloma in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging epizootic of mycobacteriosis currently threatens striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Several species of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium marinum, species resembling M. avium, M. gordonae, M. peregrinum, M. scrofulaceum and M. terrae, and the new species M. shottsii have been isolated from diseased and healthy bass. In this study, we describe the ultrastructure of developing M. marinum granulomas in experimentally infected bass over a period of 45 wk. The primary host response to injected mycobacteria was formation of large macrophage aggregations containing phagocytosed bacilli, M. marinum were always contained within phagosomes. Close association of lysosomes with mycobacterial phagosomes, as well as the presence of electron-opaque material within phagosomes, suggested phagolysosomal fusion. Development of granulomas involved epithelioid transformation of macrophages, followed by appearance of central necrosis. Desmosomes were present between mature epithelioid cells. The necrotic core region of M. marinum granulomas was separated from overlying epithelioid cells by several layers of flattened, electron-opaque spindle-shaped cells. These cells appeared to be formed by compression of epithelioid cells and, aside from a flattened nucleus, did not possess recognizable organelles. Following the development of well-defined, paucibacillary granulomas, secondary disease was observed. Recrudescence was marked by bacterial replication followed by disruption of granuloma architecture, including loss of epithelioid and spindle cell layers. In advanced recrudescent lesions, normal tissue was replaced by macrophages, fibroblasts, and other inflammatory leukocytes. Large numbers of mycobacteria were observed, both intracellular and suspended in cellular debris.

  5. Striped lanthanum cobaltite films: how strain orders oxygen defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birenbaum, Axiel Yael; Biegalski, Michael D.; Qiao, Liang; Cooper, Valentino R.; Borisevich, Albina

    Oxygen-deficient metal cobalt oxides have been widely studied for solid oxide fuel cell cathode applications. In order to predict atomic-scale transport pathways, a thorough understanding of its defect properties is crucial. Previous studies, including Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), demonstrate lanthanum cobaltite, grown as thin films on [100]pc oriented perovskites, spontaneously order its oxygen vacancies. In this work, we investigate the behavior of LaCoO3 - δ thin films grown on SrTiO3 [111] surface to determine if orientation can be used to shape the anisotropy of oxygen transport. For these films, STEM studies reveal ordered vacancy arrangements. We do so by establishing the structural and electronic properties of LaCoO3 - δ on SrTiO3, using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We then treat how epitaxial strain leads to oxygen vacancies forming these distinctive stripe patterns. The impact of different substrates is addressed. In addition, this leads to an opportunity to discuss the effect of reduced symmetry in oxygen deficient compounds on cobalt oxide behavior compared to the ideal perovskite environment. Research was sponsored by the US DoE, Office of Science, BES, MSED, and used resources at NERSC and OLCF.

  6. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data, a peak in July–August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000.

  7. Magnitude and Seasonality of Wetland Methane Emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Heaps, C. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Worthy, D. E. J.; Kaplan, J. O.; Bey, I.; Drevet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May-July 2008, together with continuous 2004-2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL) and Alert (Arctic background). The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data), a peak in July-August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg/a, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000).

  8. Biotic disturbance in expanding subarctic forests along the eastern coast of Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccianiga, Marco; Payette, Serge; Filion, Louise

    2008-01-01

    * The past and present occurrence of insect disturbance on white spruce (Picea glauca) trees was evaluated at their northern range limit on the eastern coast of Hudson Bay, and its effects on tree growth and population dynamics studied. * Three sites were sampled along an altitudinal gradient. Ring-width chronologies and stem analysis were used to evaluate tree growth. The occurrence of holes in the bark, of resin pockets and blue-stain fungi, and ring-width evidence for growth releases were used to assess the impact of bark beetle. * The white spruce population was established at these sites in the 17th century. Since their establishment, the spruce trees have developed a tree growth form, except at the uppermost site, where severe growth suppression occurred in the 19th century. Bark beetle and blue-stain fungi occurred with different timing and intensity. Their highest occurrence, associated with high mortality rates, was at the lowest site in the late 20th century. In the uppermost sites, biotic disturbance has occurred since the 18th century, associated with evidence for mechanical disturbance. * The simultaneous arrival of white spruce in the area resulted in a synchronous onset of spruce beetle activity driven by tree ageing. Unfavourable climatic conditions affected tree growth severely in the most exposed sites.

  9. Stratigraphic evidence for late Quaternary dune activity near Hudson on the Piedmont of northern Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, S.L.; Maat, P. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Stabilized dune fields are common features near Hudson, on the Piedmont of northern Colorado. Exposures in dune and interdune sites expose a sequence of eolian sediments and paleosols that record a complex history of eolian activity during the late Quaternary. Radiocarbon and thermoluminescence age estimates on A horizons buried by eolian sand indicate that dunes were reactivated sometime between 7 and 9 ka. On the basis of morphology of surface soils, the dunes were most recently stabilized <3 ka. At present that are no data to indicate if there were multiple periods of dune movement and stabilization during the Holocene. The penultimate pre-Holocene dune-forming episode probably terminated ca. 13 ka and may be coincident with the Pinedale glaciation. The stratigraphy at interdune sites shows at least two eolian depositional events prior to the penultimate event; they were separated by periods of pedogenesis, one of which may have exceeded 40 ka. This analysis indicates that dunes in northern Colorado were active during both cold-arid and warn-arid periods in the late Quaternary.

  10. Environmental Factors Affecting Escherichia coli Concentrations in Striped Venus Clam (Chamelea gallina L.) Harvested in the North Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanelli, Giulia; Montanari, Chiara; Gardini, Aldo; Maffei, Mirko; Prioli, Chiara; Gardini, Fausto

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the microbiological quality of striped venus clams (Chamelea gallina L.) harvested in the north Adriatic Sea during an 8-year monitoring period. A total of 387 samples were analyzed to assess the presence of Escherichia coli. Environmental parameters (salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, seawater temperature, and freshwater outflow) were collected to find out a possible relationship between the E. coli counts and environmental factors. The results evidenced that the microbiological quality of the clams was good, with only about 5% of the samples not complying with European and Italian regulations for this product, that is, with E. coli counts higher than 230 most probable number (MPN) per 100 g of flesh and intravalvar liquid. Statistical analyses revealed a relationship between microbial contamination and the season and water temperature, probably due to the difference in the filtering activity of the mollusks. However, the main factor affecting the E. coli concentration in the clams turned out to be the flow rate of Marecchia, the major river that reaches the sea in the area of harvesting. In fact, a model fitted to evaluate the probability of finding a higher E. coli count in relation to the environmental parameters evidenced that it was an increase of the level of the Marecchia led to a higher probability of elevated E. coli contamination. This result could be explained by the higher supply of both nutrients and coliforms (including E. coli) when the river is higher and by the anthropogenic characteristics of the lands crossed by the river.

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for marinas, boat ramps, locks and dams, water intake sites, archaeological sites, U.S. Coast Guard stations,...

  12. Littoral‐zone influences on particulate organic matter composition along the freshwater‐tidal Hudson River, New York

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunsinger, Glendon B; Mitra, Siddhartha; Findlay, Stuart E. G; Fischer, David T

    2012-01-01

    ... 3‐fold increases in Λ 8 ‐lignin phenols indicative of relatively fresh plant matter. This prominent shift in POM composition suggests that WETAV areas supply compositionally unique organic matter along...

  13. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Near-infrared Mosaic of Hudson River to Lake Champlain, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  14. 77 FR 34285 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... ``Document Type'' drop down menu select ``Proposed Rule'' and insert ``USCG-2012-0223'' in the ``Keyword... close proximity to marine traffic pose significant risk to public safety and property. The combination... being hailed by a U.S. Coast Guard vessel by siren, radio, flashing light, or other means, the operator...

  15. Mass transfer coefficients for volatilization of polychlorinated biphenyls from the Hudson River, New York measured using micrometeorological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Andy L; Guo, Jia; Miskewitz, Robert J; McGillis, Wade R; Rodenburg, Lisa A

    2013-02-01

    Air-water exchange is an important process controlling the fate of many organic chemicals in the environment. Modeling this process is hampered by the lack of direct observations. Thus, the purpose of this work was to derive direct measurements of the mass transfer coefficients for air-water exchange (v(aw)) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that may be used to check the validity of values derived from tracer gas experiments. v(aw) values for PCBs were determined using previously published turbulent fluxes divided by the corresponding dissolved phase concentrations. The median v(aw) values for each homolog decreased with increasing molecular weight and ranged from 0.29 for hexachlorobiphenyls to 2.2 m d(-1) for monochlorobiphenyls with a propagated uncertainty of about 70%, lower than in previous studies. Due to relatively low wind speeds and possible sorption of PCBs to colloids, these numbers may be biased low. These field measurements of v(aw) differ by as much as a factor of 23 from predictions based on the widely-used Whitman two-film model. Therefore a new formulation for the calculation of v(aw) based on field measurements is needed. This study demonstrates that micrometeorological approaches are a viable option for the measurement of v(aw) for hydrophobic organics such as PCBs and should be used to generate enough field data on the air-water exchange of hydrophobic organics to allow the development of new predictive models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 77 FR 65929 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... Act . 2. Air: Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7401-7671(q) (Transportation Conformity). 3. Land: Section 4(f... [16 U.S.C. 470(f) et seq.]. 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964 [42 U.S.C. 2000(d)-2000(d...

  17. Néel coupling in Co/Cu/Co stripes with unidirectional interface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydenko, A.V., E-mail: avdavydenko@gmail.com [Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Pustovalov, E.V.; Ognev, A.V.; Kozlov, A.G.; Chebotkevich, L.A. [Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Han, X.F. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the influence of interlayer Néel coupling on the magnetization reversal processes in epitaxial Co(5 nm)/Cu(5 nm)/Co(5 nm) stripes by experimental methods and computer modeling. The stripes with a width of 900 and 1800 nm were formed on a step-bunched Si(111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy and focused ion beam etching. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with the easy axis of the magnetization along the steps is induced in the stripes by the steps of the Si(111) substrate. The stepped structure of the layers in the multilayered stripes reproduces the morphology of the Si(111) substrate. Néel coupling between the Co layers is realized due to the unidirectional roughness at the Co/Cu interfaces caused by the steps of the substrate. Interlayer Néel coupling at the interfaces overcomes antiparallel magnetostatic interaction realized through the sides of the Co layers in the trilayered stripes. We used a modified Néel model in the simulation of the magnetization reversal in the multilayered system with unidirectional interface roughness. The surface energy of Néel coupling was spatially varied against the direction of the magnetization relative to the step edge. The results of micromagnetic simulations of the Co/Cu/Co stripes with spatially non-uniform and averaged surface energies of interlayer Néel coupling are compared and discussed. - Highlights: • We investigated Co/Cu/Co stripes with unidirectional roughness at the interfaces. • Results obtained by MOKE and MFM are compared to micromagnetic simulations. • A modified Néel model was used in the micromagnetic simulation of the Co/Cu/Co system. • The surface energy of Néel coupling depends on the direction of the magnetization.

  18. Anechoic stripe size influences accuracy of FAST examination interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, O John; Gaddis, Gary

    2006-03-01

    Accurate and precise interpretations of Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) findings are important factors in managing trauma patients. The objectives were to analyze the influence of anechoic stripe (AS) size on interpretation accuracy by emergency physicians (EPs) and to assess the precision of FAST examination interpretation as a function of EP FAST experience. A prospective comparison study of FAST examination interpretation by 11 emergency medicine faculty (FAC), nine community attending EPs (ATT), and nine senior emergency medicine residents (RES) was conducted; these physicians were then divided into more experienced and less experienced cohorts to assess precision. Participants interpreted video recordings of the four standard views from five FAST examinations (20 total video clips); each examination contained views with various AS sizes. Accuracy of FAST examination interpretation was calculated for each group stratified by size of AS. Precision (reproducibility) of FAST examination interpretation was assessed by calculating kappa values. With large, moderate, or no AS, no significant differences in accuracy were found between groups. For small AS, significant differences in accuracy were found between the ATT and RES groups and between the combined FAC + ATT group and the RES group. Kappa was good to excellent when the nth and the (n + 1)th experienced physicians in the more experienced cohort were compared. kappa values reflected that the more experienced cohort was more precise than the less experienced cohort. AS size visible on FAST examinations and EP experience level with FAST examination interpretation exerted a significant influence on the interpretation accuracy of videotaped FAST examinations. In addition, precision was enhanced by increased EP experience with FAST.

  19. Development of a Spectrophotometric System to Detect White Striping Physiopathy in Whole Chicken Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traffano-Schiffo, Maria Victoria; Castro-Giraldez, Marta; Colom, Ricardo J.; Fito, Pedro J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high intensification of poultry production in recent years, white chicken breast striping is one of the most frequently seen myopathies. The aim of this research was to develop a spectrophotometry-based sensor to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken breast meat in whole chicken carcasses with skin. Experiments were carried out using normal and white striping breasts. In order to understand the mechanism involved in this physiopathy, the different tissues that conform each breast were analyzed. Permittivity in radiofrequency (40 Hz to 1 MHz) was measured using two different sensors; a sensor with two flat plates to analyze the whole breast with skin (NB or WSB), and a two needles with blunt-ended sensor to analyze the different surface tissues of the skinless breast. In the microwave range (500 MHz to 20 GHz), permittivity was measured as just was described for the two needles with blunt-ended sensor. Moreover, fatty acids composition was determined by calorimetry techniques from −40 °C to 50 °C at 5 °C/min after previously freeze-drying the samples, and pH, microstructure by Cryo-SEM and binocular loupe structure were also analyzed. The results showed that the white striping physiopathy consists of the partial breakdown of the pectoral muscle causing an increase in fatty acids, reducing the quality of the meat. It was possible to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken carcasses with skin using spectrophotometry of radiofrequency spectra. PMID:28471378

  20. Stripe artifact elimination based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform for light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhang, Liwen; Fang, Mengjie; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Stripe artifacts, caused by high-absorption or high-scattering structures in the illumination light path, are a common drawback in both unidirectional and multidirectional light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), significantly deteriorating image quality. To circumvent this problem, we present an effective multidirectional stripe remover (MDSR) method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), which can be used for both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. In MDSR, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) filter is designed in the NSCT domain to shrink the stripe components and eliminate the noise. Benefiting from the properties of being multiscale and multidirectional, MDSR succeeds in eliminating stripe artifacts in both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. To validate the method, MDSR has been tested on images from a custom-made unidirectional LSFM system and a commercial multidirectional LSFM system, clearly demonstrating that MDSR effectively removes most of the stripe artifacts. Moreover, we performed a comparative experiment with the variational stationary noise remover and the wavelet-FFT methods and quantitatively analyzed the results with a peak signal-to-noise ratio, showing an improved noise removal when using the MDSR method.

  1. Reconstruction of North American drainage basins and river discharge since the Last Glacial Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Wickert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last glacial cycle, ice sheets and the resultant glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA rearranged river systems. As these riverine threads that tied the ice sheets to the sea were stretched, severed, and restructured, they also shrank and swelled with the pulse of meltwater inputs and time-varying drainage basin areas, and sometimes delivered enough meltwater to the oceans in the right places to influence global climate. Here I present a general method to compute past river flow paths, drainage basin geometries, and river discharges, by combining models of past ice sheets, glacial isostatic adjustment, and climate. The result is a time series of synthetic paleohydrographs and drainage basin maps from the Last Glacial Maximum to present for nine major drainage basins – the Mississippi, Rio Grande, Colorado, Columbia, Mackenzie, Hudson Bay, Saint Lawrence, Hudson, and Susquehanna/Chesapeake Bay. These are based on five published reconstructions of the North American ice sheets. I compare these maps with drainage reconstructions and discharge histories based on a review of observational evidence, including river deposits and terraces, isotopic records, mineral provenance markers, glacial moraine histories, and evidence of ice stream and tunnel valley flow directions. The sharp boundaries of the reconstructed past drainage basins complement the flexurally smoothed GIA signal that is more often used to validate ice-sheet reconstructions, and provide a complementary framework to reduce nonuniqueness in model reconstructions of the North American ice-sheet complex.

  2. Shear-wave velocity of slope sediments near Hudson Canyon from analysis of ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. C.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Flores, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present new ambient noise data that help constrain the shear strength of marine sediments on the continental slope north of Hudson Canyon on the U.S. Atlantic margin. Sediment shear strength is a key parameter in models of potentially tsunamigenic, submarine slope failures, but shear strength is difficult to measure in situ and is expected to evolve in time with changes in pore pressure. The ambient noise data were recorded by 11 short-period, ocean-bottom seismometers and hydrophones deployed in a ~1 by 1.5 km array for ~6 months on the continental slope. These high frequency (~0.1 - 50 Hz), narrow-aperture data are expected to record noise propagating as interface waves and/or resonating in the upper ~500 m of sediment. Propagation of interface waves is controlled by the shear-wave velocity of the sediment, which we measure by calculating lag-times in cross-correlations of waveforms recorded by pairs of receivers. These measurements of shear-wave velocity will be used to constrain shear strength. The data also appear to record wind-generated noise resonating in layered sediment. We expect this resonance to also be sensitive to shear-wave velocity, and spectral analysis and modeling of harmonics may provide a second constraint on sediment shear strength. Both the correlogram- and spectral-based measurements can be made using hour- to day-long segments of data, enabling us to constrain temporal evolution of shear-wave velocity and potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., tidal and storm loading and submarine groundwater discharge) through the ~6 month deployment.

  3. Effects of earlier sea ice breakup on survival and population size of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, E.V.; Lunn, N.J.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2007-01-01

    Some of the most pronounced ecological responses to climatic warming are expected to occur in polar marine regions, where temperature increases have been the greatest and sea ice provides a sensitive mechanism by which climatic conditions affect sympagic (i.e., with ice) species. Population-level effects of climatic change, however, remain difficult to quantify. We used a flexible extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber capture-recapture models to estimate population size and survival for polar bears (Ursus maritimus), one of the most ice-dependent of Arctic marine mammals. We analyzed data for polar bears captured from 1984 to 2004 along the western coast of Hudson Bay and in the community of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. The Western Hudson Bay polar bear population declined from 1,194 (95% CI = 1,020-1,368) in 1987 to 935 (95% CI = 794-1,076) in 2004. Total apparent survival of prime-adult polar bears (5-19 yr) was stable for females (0.93; 95% CI = 0.91-0.94) and males (0.90; 95% CI = 0.88-0.91). Survival of juvenile, subadult, and senescent-adult polar bears was correlated with spring sea ice breakup date, which was variable among years and occurred approximately 3 weeks earlier in 2004 than in 1984. We propose that this correlation provides evidence for a causal association between earlier sea ice breakup (due to climatic warming) and decreased polar bear survival. It may also explain why Churchill, like other communities along the western coast of Hudson Bay, has experienced an increase in human-polar bear interactions in recent years. Earlier sea ice breakup may have resulted in a larger number of nutritionally stressed polar bears, which are encroaching on human habitations in search of supplemental food. Because western Hudson Bay is near the southern limit of the species' range, our findings may foreshadow the demographic responses and management challenges that more northerly polar bear populations will experience if climatic warming in the Arctic continues as

  4. An edge sensitive 3D measurement using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Changda; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Laser scanning is widely used in on-line industrial 3D inspection, cultural heritage conservation and reverse engineering. However, in the traditional laser scanning, the most widely-used approach is based on the projection of a single directional laser stripe over an object. Because the width of the laser stripe is physically difficult to compress enough to be fine at the edge of the object, the traditional measurement method is not accurate for edge measurements. This paper proposes an edge sensitive 3D measurement system which is fast and accurate, using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector. Scanning metal edge steps and complex surface edge with this system only require a single scanning to perform 3D reconstruction. So this scanning method has the advantages of high efficiency, high speed and edges with high precision.

  5. Striped states in a many-body system of tilted dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Langen, Tim; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-11-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the behavior of a strongly confined dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in the regime of quantum-mechanical stabilization by beyond-mean-field effects. Theoretically, we demonstrate that self-organized "striped" ground states are predicted in the framework of the extended Gross-Pitaevskii theory. Experimentally, by tilting the magnetic dipoles we show that self-organized striped states can be generated, likely in their metastable state. Matter-wave interference experiments with multiple stripes show that there is no long-range off-diagonal order (global phase coherence). We outline a parameter range where global phase coherence could be established, thus paving the way towards the observation of supersolid states in this system.

  6. A new species of striped Ichthyophis Fitzinger, 1826 (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae) from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Presswell, Bronwen; Sherratt, Emma; Papadopoulou, Anna; Gower, David J

    2014-04-02

    A new species of striped ichthyophiid caecilian, Ichthyophis multicolor sp. nov., is described on the basis of morphological and molecular data from a sample of 14 specimens from Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar. The new species resembles superficially the Indian I. tricolor Annandale, 1909 in having both a pale lateral stripe and an adjacent dark ventrolateral stripe contrasting with a paler venter. It differs from I. tricolor in having many more annuli, and in many details of cranial osteology, and molecular data indicate that it is more closely related to other Southeast Asian Ichthyophis than to those of South Asia. The caecilian fauna of Myanmar is exceptionally poorly known but is likely to include chikilids as well as multiple species of Ichthyophis.

  7. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Determination of the quality of stripe-marked and cracked eggs during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chi Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Stripe marks, which occasionally occur on the shell, do not cause breakage to the shell and shell membranes of eggs. This study investigated the quality of intact eggs (IEs, minor stripe-marked eggs (MEs, severe stripe-marked eggs (SEs, and cracked eggs (CEs during 3-week storage at 25°C. Methods Shell eggs were collected the day after being laid and were washed. Among them, eggs without any visual cracks or stripe marks on the shells were evaluated as IEs by the plant employees using candling in a darkened egg storage room; the remaining eggs exhibited some eggshell defects. At day 3, the eggs were further categorized into IEs, MEs, SEs, CEs, and broken eggs (BEs on the basis of the description given. Except BEs, which were discarded, the remaining eggs were stored at 25°C (approximate relative humidity 50% and then analyzed. Results Stripe marks were observed primarily within the first 3 days after washing. At day 3, CEs had significantly (p<0.05 lower Haugh unit values, but all eggs had grades AA or A, according to the United States Department of Agriculture standard. As storage time increased, differences in egg quality between groups were more obvious. IEs had the highest eggshell breaking strength. During storage, the total plate counts and pathogens, namely Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp., were not detectable in the internal content of IEs and SEs. Conclusion In conclusion, cracks degraded egg quality severely and minor stripe marks only slightly influenced the egg quality.

  9. Effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Petracci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available White striping defect (appearance of white striations parallel to muscle fiber on surface of breast is considered an emerging issue in chicken breast meat which is related to increasing growth rate of modern hybrid birds. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat. During three replications, a total of 108 Pectoralis major muscles representing three degrees of white striping (absence=normal; presence classified in 2 levels as moderate or severe were selected to determine proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid and collagen as well as sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein profile by sodium dodecyl sulphatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The results showed that both severe and moderate white-striped fillets had higher fat content (2.53 vs 1.46 vs 0.78%; P<0.001, lower protein level (20.9 vs 22.2 vs 22.9%; P<0.001, decreased quality of protein as proven by higher collagen content (1.30 vs 1.37 vs 1.43%; P<0.001, and different pattern on myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic fractions when compared to normal fillets. Moreover, severe white-striped fillets exhibited higher energy content (450.7 vs 421.1 kJ/100g; P<0.01 with respect to normal meat. In conclusion, there was a large worsening of nutritional value of chicken breast meat following occurrence of white striping and this might impair consumer attitude towards poultry meat.

  10. Quantity and functionality of protein fractions in chicken breast fillets affected by white striping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2014-08-01

    Recently, white striations parallel to muscle fibers direction have been observed on the surface of chicken breast, which could be ascribed to intensive growth selection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of white striping on chemical composition with special emphasis on myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions that are relevant to the processing features of chicken breast meat. During this study, a total of 12 pectoralis major muscles from both normal and white striped fillets were used to evaluate chemical composition, protein solubility (sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and total protein solubility), protein quantity (sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and stromal proteins), water holding capacity, and protein profile by SDS-PAGE analysis. White-striped fillets exhibited a higher percentage of moisture (75.4 vs. 73.8%; P content of protein (18.7 vs. 22.8%; P content and solubility as well as an increase in cooking loss (33.7 vs. 27.4%; P proteins corresponding to actin (42 kDa); LC1, slow-twitch light chain myosin (27.5 kDa); and LC3, fast-twitch light chain myosin (16 kDa), and almost all sarcoplasmic proteins were lower than normal. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that chicken breast meat with white striping defect had different chemical composition (more fat and less protein) and protein quality and quantity (low content of myofibrillar proteins and high content of stromal proteins) with respect to normal meat. Furthermore, white striped fillets had lower protein functionality (higher cooking loss). All the former changes indicate that white striping has great impact on quality characteristics of chicken breast meat. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-03-26

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor`s heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degrees}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams & Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  12. Embryonic developmental process governing the conspicuousness of body stripes and blue tail coloration in the lizard Plestiodon latiscutatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Takeo; Hasegawa, Masami

    2017-01-01

    The combination of body stripes and vivid blue tail color has independently evolved in different lizard families. To understand how and when lizards developed this coloration, we microscopically compared the embryonic development of pigment cells in two island populations of Plestiodon latiscutatus that exhibit either striped and blue tailed or inconspicuously striped and blue tailed juveniles, based on the newly determined 12 normal developmental stages of embryos from shortly after egg laying to just before hatching. We focus on the role of the melanophores in the body stripe and the role of iridophore morphotypes in the extent of blue tail coloration. The melanophore density in the black background region was higher in lizards with vivid stripes than in lizards with drab stripes. Iridophores started to fill the dermal space that was not yet occupied by melanophores, which resulted in a higher iridophore density in stripes than in the inter-stripe regions. We also discovered that iridophores with thin platelets reflecting blue structural coloration appeared at a specific region in the tail at stage 11. The position of the tail where iridophores emerged coincided with the boundary area separating anterior brown and green colored tail from posterior blue colored tail after hatching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  14. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  15. Hazard Assessment from Storm Tides and Rainfall on a Tidal River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, P.; Conticello, F.; Cioffi, F.; Hall, T.; Georgas, N.; Lall, U.; Blumberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on methods and results for a model-based flood hazard assessment we have conducted for the Hudson River from New York City to Troy/Albany at the head of tide. Our recent work showed that neglecting freshwater flows leads to underestimation of peak water levels at up-river sites and neglecting stratification (typical with two-dimensional modeling) leads to underestimation all along the Hudson. As a result, we use a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model and merge streamflows and storm tides from tropical and extratropical cyclones (TCs, ETCs), as well as wet extratropical cyclone (WETC) floods (e.g. freshets, rain-on-snow events). We validate the modeled flood levels and quantify error with comparisons to 76 historical events. A Bayesian statistical method is developed for tropical cyclone streamflows using historical data and consisting in the evaluation of (1) the peak discharge and its pdf as a function of TC characteristics, and (2) the temporal trend of the hydrograph as a function of temporal evolution of the cyclone track, its intensity and the response characteristics of the specific basin. A k-nearest-neighbors method is employed to determine the hydrograph shape. Out of sample validation tests demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Thus, the combined effects of storm surge and runoff produced by tropical cyclones hitting the New York area can be included in flood hazard assessment. Results for the upper Hudson (Albany) suggest a dominance of WETCs, for the lower Hudson (at New York Harbor) a case where ETCs are dominant for shorter return periods and TCs are more important for longer return periods (over 150 years), and for the middle-Hudson (Poughkeepsie) a mix of all three flood events types is important. However, a possible low-bias for TC flood levels is inferred from a lower importance in the assessment results, versus historical event top-20 lists, and this will be further evaluated as these preliminary methods and results are

  16. What to eat now? Shifts in polar bear diet during the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Under current climate trends, spring ice breakup in Hudson Bay is advancing rapidly, leaving polar bears (Ursus maritimus) less time to hunt seals during the spring when they accumulate the majority of their annual fat reserves. For this reason, foods that polar bears consume during the ice-free season may become increasingly important in alleviating nutritional stress from lost seal hunting opportunities. Defining how the terrestrial diet might have changed since the onset of rapid climate change is an important step in understanding how polar bears may be reacting to climate change. We characterized the current terrestrial diet of polar bears in western Hudson Bay by evaluating the contents of passively sampled scat and comparing it to a similar study conducted 40 years ago. While the two terrestrial diets broadly overlap, polar bears currently appear to be exploiting increasingly abundant resources such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) and newly available resources such as eggs. This opportunistic shift is similar to the diet mixing strategy common among other Arctic predators and bear species. We discuss whether the observed diet shift is solely a response to a nutritional stress or is an expression of plastic foraging behavior. PMID:24223286

  17. What to eat now? Shifts in polar bear diet during the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-09-01

    Under current climate trends, spring ice breakup in Hudson Bay is advancing rapidly, leaving polar bears (Ursus maritimus) less time to hunt seals during the spring when they accumulate the majority of their annual fat reserves. For this reason, foods that polar bears consume during the ice-free season may become increasingly important in alleviating nutritional stress from lost seal hunting opportunities. Defining how the terrestrial diet might have changed since the onset of rapid climate change is an important step in understanding how polar bears may be reacting to climate change. We characterized the current terrestrial diet of polar bears in western Hudson Bay by evaluating the contents of passively sampled scat and comparing it to a similar study conducted 40 years ago. While the two terrestrial diets broadly overlap, polar bears currently appear to be exploiting increasingly abundant resources such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) and newly available resources such as eggs. This opportunistic shift is similar to the diet mixing strategy common among other Arctic predators and bear species. We discuss whether the observed diet shift is solely a response to a nutritional stress or is an expression of plastic foraging behavior.

  18. High Resolution Audiomagnetotelluric Investigation of the Porosity at the Margin of the Hudson Bay Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, J. A.; Roberts, B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic exploration from 1968 to 1985 within the intracratonic Hudson Bay basin in northern Canada resulted in five dry wells drilled on a structural high in the central part of the basin (Hamblin, 2008). Recent work (Bertrand and Malo, 2012) has indicated successions at margins of the basin are well within the oil and gas "window". To test this conjecture a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out in the vicinity of Churchill, Manitoba, at the margin of the basin. The primary goal of the survey was to identify potential source or reservoir rocks in the Upper Ordovician section of the Palaeozoic strata. MT surveys have been utilized in the northeastern portion of the Williston basin and have successfully imaged lower Palaeozoic carbonate units (Gowan et al., 2009). The MT method provides information on the electrical conductivity of the subsurface though the measurement of the natural time-varying electric and magnetic fields at the surface. Due to the dependence of the depth of investigation of the fields on their frequency, an estimate of conductivity variation with depth can be attained. A total of 46 high frequency audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sites were collected, 38 along one approximately N-S corridor perpendicular to the coastline and 8 in a more E-W direction closer to the town of Churchill. Simultaneous collection of broadband MT data (BBMT) at a limited number of sites was done in order to calculate a response function over a wider range of frequencies at each AMT site. The combined AMT and BBMT MT data have been edited and processed to produce response functions at all sites, and 1-D modelling has provided resistivity vs. depth curves in the top 200 m of the basin. The 1-D models have been stitched together to create a continuous, approximately N-S resistivity section. In addition, the data have been input to a 3D inversion program and preliminary 3D resistivity and conductivity volumes have been generated along with an estimate of 3-D porosity

  19. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    areas of temperate zones (Johnson 1988). Yield losses can be considerable, ranging from about 40 per cent to com- plete destruction of the crop depending upon the growth stage at which the disease attacks. Using diverse genes for resistance against stripe rust disease is the most eco- nomical and environmentally safe ...

  20. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 87; Issue 2. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar Tonichi. Satinder Kaur U. K. Bansal Renu Khanna R. G. Saini. Research Note Volume 87 Issue 2 August 2008 pp 191-194 ...

  1. Spin-stripe phase in a frustrated zigzag spin-1/2 chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregelj, M.; Zorko, A.; Zaharko, O.; Nojiri, H.; Berger, H.; Chapon, L. C.; Arčon, D.

    2015-06-01

    Motifs of periodic modulations are encountered in a variety of natural systems, where at least two rival states are present. In strongly correlated electron systems, such behaviour has typically been associated with competition between short- and long-range interactions, for example, between exchange and dipole-dipole interactions in the case of ferromagnetic thin films. Here we show that spin-stripe textures may develop also in antiferromagnets, where long-range dipole-dipole magnetic interactions are absent. A comprehensive analysis of magnetic susceptibility, high-field magnetization, specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements unveils β-TeVO4 as a nearly perfect realization of a frustrated (zigzag) ferromagnetic spin-1/2 chain. Notably, a narrow spin-stripe phase develops at elevated magnetic fields due to weak frustrated short-range interchain exchange interactions, possibly assisted by the symmetry-allowed electric polarization. This concept provides an alternative route for the stripe formation in strongly correlated electron systems and may help understanding of other widespread, yet still elusive, stripe-related phenomena.

  2. Post-epizootic chronic dolphin morbillivirus infection in Mediterranean striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sara; Alba, Ana; Ganges, Llilianne; Vidal, Enric; Raga, Juan Antonio; Alegre, Ferrán; González, Beatriz; Medina, Pascual; Zorrilla, Irene; Martínez, Jorge; Marco, Alberto; Pérez, Mónica; Pérez, Blanca; Pérez de Vargas Mesas, Ana; Martínez Valverde, Rosa; Domingo, Mariano

    2011-10-06

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) has caused 2 epizootics with high mortality rates on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, in 1990 and 2006-07, mainly affecting striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba. Following the first epizootic unusual DMV infections affecting only the central nervous system of striped dolphins were found, with histological features similar to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis, the chronic latent localised infections caused by defective forms of measles virus and canine distemper virus, respectively. Between 2008 and 2010, monitoring by microscopic and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of 118 striped dolphins stranded along Catalonia, the Valencia Region and Andalusia showed similar localised DMV nervous system infections in 25.0, 28.6 and 27.4% of cases, respectively, with no significant differences among regions or sex. The body length of DMV-infected dolphins was statistically greater than that of non-infected dolphins (196.5 vs. 160.5 cm; p dolphins with positive IHC-DMV had positive PCR results. All 6 cases were positive with the 78 bp RT-PCR. These findings contraindicate the use of the 429 bp RT-PCR protocol based on the P gene to detect this specific form of DMV. DMV localised nervous infection constitutes the most relevant single cause of stranding and death in Mediterranean striped dolphins in the years following a DMV epizootic, and it might even overwhelm the effects of the epizootic itself, at least in 2007.

  3. Aerial Ultrasonic Source Using Stripe-Mode Transverse Vibrating Plate with Jutting Driving Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hikaru; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasonic sources using a stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate have been used as acoustic sources emitting intense acoustic waves in air. Because these sources are based on the resonance of transverse vibration, their electric-acoustic conversion rate is as high as 90%, which is a merit. In this study, a vibrating plate with a unique shape was developed to enhance the effectiveness of acoustic sources. It is called a stripe-mode transverse vibrating plate with a jutting driving point. The advantage of this plate shape is that the acoustic source does not interfere with the emission of acoustic waves since the driving point is outside the plate, and there is no need to distinguish between the front and back sides of the vibrating plate. The conditions effective for driving the stripe-mode transverse vibrating plate were clarified. That is, the length of the side parallel to the node lines of the plate is an odd number times the length between the nodes in the stripe mode, and the length of the side perpendicular is at least 6 times but not a multiple of 3 greater than or equal to 15 times, subtracted by 0.5 times, the length between the nodes. Moreover, the length between the driving point and the edge of the plate is a positive integer with a noninteger value of 0.9.

  4. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina (=P. recondita Rober- age ex Desmaz f. sp. tritici Eriks and E. Henn.) and stripe rust caused by P. striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici are the major foliar diseases of wheat, resulting in yield loss all over the world (Eversmeyer and Browder 1974; Kolmer 1996). The wheat cultivars become ...

  5. Variation in the timing of reproduction of the four-striped field mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the four-striped field mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrmann, 1784), to test the hypothesis that reproduction in a small, short-lived mammal will be opportunistic, characterized by temporal and spatial variation in the timing of events, and only be inhibited under harsh and predictable winter conditions. Field mice ...

  6. Molecular mapping of a stripe rust resistance gene in wheat line C51

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stripe rust, a major disease in areas where cool temperatures prevail, can strongly influence grain yield. To control this disease, breeders have incorporated seedling resistance genes from a variety of sources outside the primary wheat gene pool. The wheat line C51, introduced from the International Center for Agricultural ...

  7. 77 FR 40518 - Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River, Upper New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Federal Register. The NYC Triathlon Swim Clinic and the Iron Man Open Water Swim Clinics are scheduled to... Water Swim Clinics, Verrazano Bridge Swim, Rose Pitonof Swim, and Liberty to Freedom Swim. The sponsors... receive permission from the COTP to enter the regulated areas. D. Regulatory Analyses We developed this...

  8. National Dam Safety Program. Morris Lake Dam (NJ00306). Hudson River Basin, Tributary of Wallkill River, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    Water, operational procedures are the following: Chlorine and fluoride are added at the Gatehouse prior to the water entering the 12 and 16 inch water...operational procedures for the dam include daily recordings of water main flow, fluoridation and chlorination of water and periodic cleaning of the water...INC. 14𔃾J U go IA Ci C _6 0 I a 0 D10 C4- + + ii P bil B A DATE Jo3e NA~7~ M1W (MA o. CKD -T~ DATE 4176IAe~~SLAke IPAir SHEET NO. 3 O.. LANGAN

  9. VICS82: The VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 Near-infrared Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ross, N. P.; Wang, W.-H.; Hsieh, B.-C.; Leauthaud, A.; Bundy, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Comparat, J.; Caminha, G. B.; Hudelot, P.; Lin, L.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Mast, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 (VICS82) survey: a near-infrared (J+K s ) survey covering 150 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 to an average depth of J = 21.9 AB mag and K s = 21.4 AB mag (80% completeness limits; 5σ point-source depths are approximately 0.5 mag brighter). VICS82 contributes to the growing legacy of multiwavelength data in the Stripe 82 footprint. The addition of near-infrared photometry to the existing SDSS Stripe 82 coadd ugriz photometry reduces the scatter in stellar mass estimates to δ {log}({M}\\star )≈ 0.3 dex for galaxies with {M}\\star > {10}9 {M}⊙ at z≈ 0.5, and offers improvement compared to optical-only estimates out to z≈ 1, with stellar masses constrained within a factor of approximately 2.5. When combined with other multiwavelength imaging of the Stripe, including moderate-to-deep ultraviolet (GALEX), optical and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) coverage, as well as tens of thousands of spectroscopic redshifts, VICS82 gives access to approximately 0.5 Gpc3 of comoving volume. Some of the main science drivers of VICS82 include (a) measuring the stellar mass function of {L}\\star galaxies out to z˜ 1; (b) detecting intermediate-redshift quasars at 2≲ z≲ 3.5; (c) measuring the stellar mass function and baryon census of clusters of galaxies, and (d) performing cross-correlation experiments of cosmic microwave background lensing in the optical/near-infrared that link stellar mass to large-scale dark matter structure. Here we define and describe the survey, highlight some early science results, and present the first public data release, which includes an SDSS-matched catalog as well as the calibrated pixel data themselves.

  10. Mutual information of local field potentials distinguishes area-V2 stripe compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arun Parajuli, Anastasia Eriksson, Daniel J Felleman Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: Determining how information is represented by populations of neurons in different cortical areas is critical to our understanding of the brain mechanisms of visual perception. Recently, information-theoretical approaches have been applied to the analysis of spike trains of multiple neurons. However, other neurophysiological signals, such as local field potentials (LFPs, offer a different source of information worthy of investigating in this way. In this study, we investigate how the modular organization of area V2 of macaque monkeys impacts the information represented in LFPs. Materials and methods: LFPs were recorded from a 32-channel microelectrode array implanted in area V2 of an anesthetized macaque monkey. The electrode positions were recovered in histological tissue stained for cytochrome oxidase (CO to reveal the modular organization of V2. Visual stimuli consisted of a variety of moving gratings that differed in orientation, direction, spatial frequency, and chromatic content. Results: LFPs were separated into different frequency bands for analysis of mutual information as a function of stimulus type and CO-stripe location. High-γ-band LFPs revealed the highest information content across the electrode array. The distributions of total mutual information as well as mutual information due to correlations varied greatly by CO stripe. This analysis indicates that local correlations within each CO stripe generally reduce mutual information, whereas correlations between stripes greatly increase mutual information. Conclusion: The decomposition mutual information based on the power of different frequency bands of LFPs provides new insight into the impact of modular architecture on population coding in area V2. Unlike other cortical areas, such as V1, where mutual information based

  11. Estimating abundance of adult striped bass in reservoirs using mobile hydroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Degan, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys have proven valuable for estimating reservoir forage fish abundance but are more challenging for adult predators such as striped bass Morone saxatilis. Difficulties in assessing striped bass in reservoirs include their low density and the inability to distinguish species with hydroacoustic data alone. Despite these difficulties, mobile hydroacoustic surveys have potential to provide useful data for management because of the large sample volume compared to traditional methods such as gill netting and the ability to target specific areas where striped bass are aggregated. Hydroacoustic estimates of reservoir striped bass have been made using mobile surveys, with data analysis using a threshold for target strength in order to focus on striped bass-sized targets, and auxiliary sampling with nets to obtain species composition. We provide recommendations regarding survey design, based in part on simulations that provide insight on the level of effort that would be required to achieve reasonable estimates of abundance. Future surveys may be able to incorporate telemetry or other sonar techniques such as side-scan or multibeam in order to focus survey efforts on productive habitats (within lake and vertically). However, species apportionment will likely remain the main source of error, and we see no hydroacoustic system on the horizon that will identify fish by species at the spatial and temporal scale required for most reservoir surveys. In situations where species composition can be reliably assessed using traditional gears, abundance estimates from hydroacoustic methods should be useful to fishery managers interested in developing harvest regulations, assessing survival of stocked juveniles, identifying seasonal aggregations, and examining predator–prey balance.

  12. Diel behavior of adult striped bass using tailwater habitat as summer refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    General patterns of summer diel distribution and movement were identified for adult striped bass Morone saxatilis using tailwater habitat influenced by the diel operation cycle of a hydroelectric dam during the summers of 2003 and 2004. Striped bass distribution within the tailwater was similar during each diel-tracking event and across both summers. The majority of fish remained within the tailwater the entire summer; however, some made periodic excursions to and from the tailwater throughout the summer. Further, most striped bass were located within 0.5 km of Richard B. Russell Dam during all stages of operation on all occasions - probably because of the constant availability of optimal habitat during all three stages of operation on all diel-tracking events. The diel cycle of dam operation, which included pumped storage during each summer, did not degrade tailwater habitat below optimal conditions, according to summer habitat suitability index values for inland adult striped bass. Movement was significantly higher during hydroelectric generation operations than during no-generation and pumped storage periods in summer 2003; this difference was not apparent during summer 2004. Mean absolute movement peaked during hydroelectric generation on six of eight diel-tracking events. During both summers, movement was directed up-reservoir during no-generation and generation periods and down-reservoir during pumped storage. Mean total daily movement rates ranged from 0.59 to 4.04 km/d and were greater than those previously estimated from bimonthly sampling for this population. Total daily movement rate peaked during the first tracking event each summer and then declined as summer progressed. These findings suggest that hydroelectric discharges affect adult striped bass behavior, but the effects are not adverse as long as habitat is not degraded by hydroelectric facility operations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  13. Sustained eruptions on Enceladus explained by turbulent dissipation in tiger stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S; Rubin, Allan M

    2016-04-12

    Spacecraft observations suggest that the plumes of Saturn's moon Enceladus draw water from a subsurface ocean, but the sustainability of conduits linking ocean and surface is not understood. Observations show eruptions from "tiger stripe" fissures that are sustained (although tidally modulated) throughout each orbit, and since the 2005 discovery of the plumes. Peak plume flux lags peak tidal extension by ∼1 rad, suggestive of resonance. Here, we show that a model of the tiger stripes as tidally flexed slots that puncture the ice shell can simultaneously explain the persistence of the eruptions through the tidal cycle, the phase lag, and the total power output of the tiger stripe terrain, while suggesting that eruptions are maintained over geological timescales. The delay associated with flushing and refilling of O(1)-m-wide slots with ocean water causes erupted flux to lag tidal forcing and helps to buttress slots against closure, while tidally pumped in-slot flow leads to heating and mechanical disruption that staves off slot freezeout. Much narrower and much wider slots cannot be sustained. In the presence of long-lived slots, the 10(6)-y average power output of the tiger stripes is buffered by a feedback between ice melt-back and subsidence to O(10(10)) W, which is similar to observed power output, suggesting long-term stability. Turbulent dissipation makes testable predictions for the final flybys of Enceladus by Cassini Our model shows how open connections to an ocean can be reconciled with, and sustain, long-lived eruptions. Turbulent dissipation in long-lived slots helps maintain the ocean against freezing, maintains access by future Enceladus missions to ocean materials, and is plausibly the major energy source for tiger stripe activity.

  14. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study of magnetic stripe domains in a-GdFe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, J.; Peters, J. F.; Toulemonde, O. M.; Dhesi, S. S.; Brookes, N. B.; Goedkoop, J. B.

    2006-09-01

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) has been used to investigate the structure of magnetic stripe domain patterns in thin amorphous GdFe films. Under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field, the scattered intensity displays a smooth transition from a structure factor of correlated stripes to the form factor of isolated domains. We derive a quite general expression that relates the total scattered intensity of XRMS to the absolute value of the magnetization. Furthermore, we compare our results for the domain period with domain theory. We obtain good agreement for prealigned stripes, but disorder tends to lead to an overestimation of the period measured with XRMS.

  15. Detection, Occurrence, and Survey of Rice Stripe and Black-Streaked Dwarf Diseases in Zhejiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-mu ZHANG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The major viral diseases that occur on rice plants in Zhejiang Province, eastern China, are stripe and rice black-streaked dwarf diseases. Rice stripe disease is only caused by rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV, while rice black-streaked dwarf disease can be caused by rice black-streaked dwarf fijivirus (RBSDV and/or southern rice black-streaked dwarf fijivirus (SRBSDV. Here we review the characterization of these viruses, methods for their detection, and extensive surveys showing their occurrence and spread in the province.

  16. Drought as a Disturbance: Implications for Peatland Carbon Budgets in the Hudson Bay Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, R.; Abnizova, A.; Miller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon feedbacks are of particular importance in high latitudes, both because of large circumpolar peatland carbon pools and because climate warming is occurring more rapidly at these latitudes. Longer-term net ecosystem exchange will be influenced by the capacity of plant communities to respond to changing conditions. The nature of community change and the factors inducing change are examined in this study of a disturbance generated by severe drought in 1994 causing widespread mortality in the dominant moss, Dicranum elongatum, occupying an upland tundra site within the Hudson Bay Lowland near Churchill, Manitoba. One quarter of this moss has recently died and become encrusted with the micro-lichen, Ochrolechia spp. Moss cushions affected in this manner exhibit strong allelopathic inhibition of seedling establishment progressing to complete moss decay. Chamber NEE growing-season flux measurements show an average net release of 642 mg C /m2/d from the dead moss compared to an average net uptake of 164 mg C /m2/d from completely healthy cushions. Between these two extremes, stressed living moss cushions support abundant seedling cover which increases in direct proportion with the fractional mortality. A proxy method for estimating the growth rates of cushions, based on the length of green living shoots, indicates that the moss community is uniform in age and established shortly after the most severe drought of historical record in 1966. Subsequent growth rates of cushions show a strong dependency on proximity to the water table (4.17-1.11 mm/y over 58 cm height interval). A growing-season moss water budget identifies the dominant water flow pathways and indicates capillary uptake (0.08 mm h-1) provides 64% of the storage gains, emphasizing the importance of groundwater for growth and survival. Maximum storage capacities are directly related to cushion biomass, leading to both enhanced moisture stress and increased susceptibility to mortality as cushion size

  17. Sedimentary Records of Hyperpycnal Flows and the Influence of River Damming on Sediment Dynamics of Estuaries: Examples from the Nelson, Churchill, Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, G.; Duboc, Q.; Boyer-Villemaire, U.; Lajeunesse, P.; Bernatchez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment cores were sampled in the estuary of the Nelson and Churchill Rivers in western Hudson Bay, as well as in the estuary of the Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers in Gulf of St. Lawrence in order to evaluate the impact of hydroelectric dams on the sedimentary regime of these estuaries. The gravity cores at the mouth of the Nelson River recorded several cm-thick rapidly deposited layers with a reverse to normal grading sequence, indicating the occurrence of hyperpycnal flows generated by major floods during the last few centuries. These hyperpycnal flows were probably caused by ice-jam formation, which can increase both the flow and the sediment concentration following the breaching of such natural dams. Following the construction of hydroelectric dams since the 1960s, the regulation of river discharge prevented the formation of hyperpycnal flows, and hence the deposition of hyperpycnites in the upper part of the cores. In the core sampled in the estuary of the Churchill River, only one hyperpycnite was recorded. This lower frequency may be due to the enclosed estuary of the Churchill River, its weaker discharge and the more distal location of the coring site.In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, grain size measurements allowed the identification of a major flood around AD 1844±4 years in box cores from both the Sainte-Marguerite and Moisie Rivers, whereas a drastic decrease in variations in the median grain size occurred around AD ~1900 in the estuary of the Sainte-Marguerite River, highlighting the offshore impact of the SM1 dam construction in the early 1900s. Furthermore, sedimentological variations in the box cores from both estuaries have been investigated by wavelet analysis and the sharp disappearance of high frequencies around AD 1900 in the estuary of the dammed river (Sainte-Marguerite River), but not in the estuary of the natural river (Moisie River), also provides evidence of the influence of dams on the sedimentary regime of estuaries.

  18. Developing Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhik Chakraborty

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the reasons behind the continuation of contentious dam projects in Japanese river basins. Though the River Law of the country was reformed in 1997, and subsequent sociopolitical developments raised hopes that river governance would progress toward a more environment-oriented and bottom-up model, basin governance in Japan remains primarily based on a utilitarian vision that sees rivers as waterways. This article reviews the Achilles heel of the 1997 River Law by examining some most contentious river valley projects, and concludes that a myth of vulnerability to flooding, short-sightedness of river engineers, and bureaucratic inertia combine to place basin governance in a time warp: as projects planned during postwar reconstruction and economic growth continue to be top priorities in policymaking circles while concerns over environment remain largely unaddressed.

  19. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  20. High-resolution multicomponent seismic imaging for VMS deposits within the Paleoproterozoic Flin Flon Belt, Trans-Hudson Orogen, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, M.; White, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Flin Flon-Glennie complex (Trans-Hudson Orogen) hosts the largest Paleoproterozoic volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) district in the world. The main deposits of the Flin Flon camp have mineral compositions of predominantly pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. All of these minerals are characterised by high acoustic impedances relative to typical host rocks, thus making them excellent candidates for seismic exploration. In a concerted effort to support exploration for new ore deposits in the vicinity of Flin Flon and surrounding region, a program of seismic investigations has been implemented as part of the Targetted Geoscience Initiative-3 (TGI-3) Saskatchewan-Manitoba project. This project is a joint Federal-Provincial effort led by the Geological Survey of Canada with active participation by Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Ltd. Rock property measurements, downhole geophysical logging and vertical seismic profiles acquired in advance of the main seismic survey demonstrated the expected reflectivity of the mining camp geology. The principle seismic survey was conducted during May-September, 2007 and comprised a total of 75 km of high- resolution 2D seismic profiles and a 3D survey covering approximately 10 km2. Seismic imaging in the Flin Flon area poses significant challenges due to the complex crystalline geology, the location of the imaging targets beneath an active town and operational mine site, and the highly variable terrain. Data were recoreded using IO System IV digital vector (3-component) accelerometers, spaced at 5 m intervals (for 2D survey) with recording times of 4 s. Seismic sources spaced at 20 m intervals included Vibroseis and dynamite sources on land, and an airgun for lake areas. The results of processing the vertical-component data for P-wave reflections reveal subhorizontal reflectivity associated mainly with the Missi metasedimentary complex and steeply dipping reflectivity associated with the polydeformed volcanic rocks

  1. A tale of two orogens: Crustal processes in the Proterozoic Trans-Hudson and Grenville Orogens, eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Petrescu, L.; Gilligan, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The Precambrian core of North America was assembled in the Proterozoic by a series of collisions between Archean cratons. Among the orogenic belts, two stand out due to their significant spatial extent. The Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) and Mesoproterozoic Grenville Orogen extend for thousands of kilometers along strike and hundreds of kilometers across strike. Both have been compared to the present-day Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen (HKTO). Over the last 20-30 years, active and passive source seismic studies have contributed a wealth of information about the present-day crustal structure and composition of the two orogens in Canada. The Proterozoic orogenic crust is generally thicker than that of neighboring Archean terranes, with a more variable Moho character, ranging from relatively sharp to highly diffuse. Both orogens have a prominent high-velocity lower crustal layer, consistent with long-term preservation of a partially eclogitized root at the base of the crust and similar to that inferred beneath the western HKTO. Crustal structure in the northern THO strongly resembles the lower crustal structure of the HKTO, suggesting that Moho depths may have reached 60-70 km when the orogen was active. A prominent midcrustal discontinuity beneath the central Grenville Province and changes in the patterns of seismic anisotropy in the THO crust beneath Hudson Bay provide geophysical evidence that lower crustal flow likely played a role in the evolution of both orogens, similar to that inferred beneath the present-day HKTO. The seismic evidence from Canada supports the notion of tectonic uniformitarianism, at least as far back as the Paleoproterozoic.

  2. [Identification and classification of disease severity of wheat stripe rust using near infrared spectroscopy technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-long; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Long-lian; Li, Jun-hui; Ma, Zhan-hong; Wang, Hai-guang

    2015-02-01

    Wheat stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an economically important disease in the world. It is of great significance to assess disease severity of wheat stripe rust quickly and accurately for monitoring and controlling the disease. In this study, wheat leaves infected with stripe rust pathogen under different severity levels were acquired through artificial inoculation in artificial climate chamber. Thirty wheat leaves with disease severity equal to 1%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% or 100% were picked out, respectively, and 30 healthy leaves were chosen as controls. A total of 270 wheat leaves were obtained and then their near infrared spectra were measured using MPA spectrometer. According to disease severity levels, 270 near infrared spectra were divided into 9 categories and each category included 30 spectra. From each category, 7 or 8 spectra were randomly chosen to make up the testing set that included 67 spectra. The remaining spectra were treated as the training set. A qualitative model for identification and classification of disease severity of wheat stripe rust was built using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology combined with discriminant partial least squares (DPLS). The effects of different preprocessing methods of obtained spectra, ratios between training sets and testing sets, and spectral ranges on qualitative recognition results of the model were investigated. The optimal model based on DPLS was built using cross verification method in the spectral region of 4000-9000 cm(-1) when "centralization" was used as the preprocessing method of spectra and the spectra were divided into the training set and the testing set with the ratio equal to 3:1. Accuracy rate of the training set was 95.57% and accuracy rate of the testing set was 97.01%. The results showed that good recognition performance could be acquired using the model based on DPLS. The results indicated that the method using near infrared reflectance

  3. Oceanographic Data from Winter and Spring Circulation and Sediment Transport Studies in the Hudson Shelf Valley collected in December-April (1999/2000) and April-June 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field experiments to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley,...

  4. Population Genetics of red striped mullet (Mullus surmuletus in Turkish Seas Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevzi Bardakci

    2014-07-01

    This study was determined a preview of genetic structure of red striped mullet because of few sampling localities so a further study is would be useful to determine its population structure along its distribution area in detail.

  5. Drawn to the Sea: Charles Bradford Hudson (1865-1939), Artist, Author, Army Officer, with Special Notice of His Work for the United States Fish Commission and Bureau of Fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Springer, Victor G.; Murphy, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    The biography of Charles Bradford Hudson that follows this preface had its seeds about 1965 when I (VGS) was casually examining the extensive files of original illustrations of fishes stored in the Division of Fishes, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. I happened upon the unpublished illustration of a rainbow trout by Hudson and was greatly impressed with its quality. The thought occurred to me then that the artist must have gone on to do more than just illustrate fi...

  6. The physics of stripe patterns in turbulent channel flow determined by DNS results

    CERN Document Server

    Kiš, P; Herwig, H

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent flow in an infinitely extended plane channel is analysed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a DNS approach. Solutions are obtained in a numerical solution domain of finite size in the streamwise as well as in the lateral direction setting periodic boundary conditions in both directions. Their impact on large scale structures in the turbulent flow field is analysed carefully in order to avoid their suppression. When this is done appropriately well known stripe patterns in these flows can be observed and analysed especially with respect to their relative motion compared to the mean flow velocity. Various details of this stripe pattern dominated velocity field are shown. Also global parameters like the friction factor in the flow field and the Nusselt number in the temperature field are determined based on the statistics of the flow and temperature data in a very large time period that guarantees fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer.

  7. Pigment cell interactions and differential xanthophore recruitment underlying zebrafish stripe reiteration and Danio pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Larissa B; Bain, Emily J; Parichy, David M

    2014-11-06

    Fishes have diverse pigment patterns, yet mechanisms of pattern evolution remain poorly understood. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, pigment-cell autonomous interactions generate dark stripes of melanophores that alternate with light interstripes of xanthophores and iridophores. Here, we identify mechanisms underlying the evolution of a uniform pattern in D. albolineatus in which all three pigment cell classes are intermingled. We show that in this species xanthophores differentiate precociously over a wider area, and that cis regulatory evolution has increased expression of xanthogenic Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (Csf1). Expressing Csf1 similarly in D. rerio has cascading effects, driving the intermingling of all three pigment cell classes and resulting in the loss of stripes, as in D. albolineatus. Our results identify novel mechanisms of pattern development and illustrate how pattern diversity can be generated when a core network of pigment-cell autonomous interactions is coupled with changes in pigment cell differentiation.

  8. Angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance analysis in a single micron sized cobalt stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppner, C.; Wagner, K.; Stienen, S.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Narkowicz, R.; Suter, D.; Lindner, J.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate how planar microresonators (PMRs) can be utilized to investigate the angular dependent magnetic resonance response of single magnetic nanostructures. In contrast to alternative detection schemes like electrical or optical detection, the PMR approach provides a classical means of investigating the high frequency dynamics of single magnetic entities, enabling the use of well-established analysis methods of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. To demonstrate the performance of the PMR-based FMR setup for angular dependent measurements, we investigate the microwave excited magnons in a single Co stripe of 5 × 1 × 0.02 μm3 and compare the results to micromagnetic simulations. The evolution of excited magnons under rotation of one individual stripe with respect to a static magnetic field is investigated. Besides quasi uniform excitations, we observe magneto-static as well as localized excitations. We find a strong influence of inhomogeneous dynamic and static demagnetizing fields for all modes.

  9. Effect of an electric field on the properties of BN Möbius stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos de Melo, J. [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Campus Vitória da Conquista, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45075-265 Vitória da conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of an external electric field on the structural stability and electronic properties of boron nitride Möbius stripes with armchair and zigzag chirality. The calculation results indicate that the gap energy can be remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. Such reduction is in principle attributed to the occurrence of Stark effect, which significance depends on the orientation of the applied field relative to the stripe axis. Moreover, the electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum of the structure and induces a negative shift on the calculated total energy, reducing the obtained formation energy. - Highlights: • The gap energy is remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. • The electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum. • The field induces a negative shift on the total energy due to Stark effect.

  10. Stripe order in the underdoped region of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Chung, Chia-Min; Corboz, Philippe; Ehlers, Georg; Qin, Ming-Pu; Noack, Reinhard M.; Shi, Hao; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-12-01

    Competing inhomogeneous orders are a central feature of correlated electron materials, including the high-temperature superconductors. The two-dimensional Hubbard model serves as the canonical microscopic physical model for such systems. Multiple orders have been proposed in the underdoped part of the phase diagram, which corresponds to a regime of maximum numerical difficulty. By combining the latest numerical methods in exhaustive simulations, we uncover the ordering in the underdoped ground state. We find a stripe order that has a highly compressible wavelength on an energy scale of a few kelvin, with wavelength fluctuations coupled to pairing order. The favored filled stripe order is different from that seen in real materials. Our results demonstrate the power of modern numerical methods to solve microscopic models, even in challenging settings.

  11. Effect of the tiger stripes on the deformation of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, Ondřej; Hron, Jaroslav; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is a small icy moon of Saturn with active jets of water emanating from fractures around the south pole, informally called tiger stripes, which might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. The effect of these features on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with implementation of faults in continuum mechanics models. Here we estimate the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on tidal deformation and heat production within Enceladus's ice shell by representing them as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole ice shell. Assuming a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat production in this area.

  12. The external and middle ear of the striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba (Meyen 1833).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassu, R; Cozzi, B

    2007-06-01

    The ear of cetaceans, and especially the middle ear, is very different from that of terrestrial mammals and shows specific adaptations to diving. Our research, performed on six Striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded along the Italian coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, concentrated on the morphology of the external and middle ear of this species. We report the findings using a proper Veterinary Anatomical Nomenclature and describe the characteristics of the auditory meatus of the external ear and the presence and morphology of the erectile tissue in the middle ear. Our anatomical and histological data highlight the structure and possible functions of the corpus cavernosum located in the middle ear of the Striped dolphin, and suggest a possible role for this structure in relation to pressure regulation during diving. Many of our observations indicate the existence of an internal regulatory system able to prevent barotraumas by regulating pressure and volume inside the middle ear cavity.

  13. Systemic herpesvirus and morbillivirus co-infection in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, S; González, B; Willoughby, K; Maley, M; Olvera, A; Kennedy, S; Marco, A; Domingo, M

    2012-01-01

    During 2007 a dolphin morbillivirus epizootic affected the western Mediterranean and several striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on the Catalonian coasts. One of those animals had severe lymphoid depletion, necrosis and syncytial formation in lymph nodes and spleen, with large basophilic nuclear inclusions compatible with herpesvirus detected by immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination. Non-suppurative encephalitis with associated morbillivirus antigen and morbillivirus antigen within alveolar macrophages were also observed. A pan-herpesvirus nested polymerase chain reaction amplified a sequence virtually identical to two cetacean herpesvirus sequences previously identified in systemic infections in an Atlantic Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) and in a Mediterranean striped dolphin. The herpesviral infection was probably secondary to the immunosuppression caused by the morbillivirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cetacean co-infected by dolphin morbillivirus and herpesvirus with evidence of lesions attributable to both viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Linearly enhanced response of thermopower in cascaded array of dual-stripe single-metal thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Han, Danhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zhenhai; Pi, Yudan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shengyong

    2017-05-01

    Based on the width dependence of thermopower, cascaded single-metal thermocouples were demonstrated in this report. The cascaded thermocouples were made from 100 nm thick Ni films with a 100 μm wide stripe and a 5 μm narrow stripe. The experiment results showed a linearly enhanced response of thermopower. The 64-cascaded thermocouple achieved an equivalent Seebeck coefficient of up to 55.69 μV/K, which is higher than that of a commercial type-K thermocouple (39.6 μV/K). The single-metal thermocouples were also fabricated on flexible substrates. With the simple fabrication process and remarkable temperature sensing ability, the cascaded single-metal thermocouples may find promising applications in temperature measurement of modern flexible electronic products and wearable devices.

  15. Serially homologous engrailed stripes are generated via different cell lineages in the germ band of amphipod crustaceans (Malacostraca, Peracarida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, G; Patel, N H; Dohle, W

    1994-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb 4D9) was used to analyze engrailed expression in amphipod embryos. As in other arthropods, engrailed is expressed in iterated transverse stripes in the germ band. In the anterior region these stripes are generated without a recognizable division pattern, and their appearance and formation show some irregularities. In the posterior region of the germ band, engrailed expression is correlated with a stereotyped cell division pattern resulting in a highly ordered formation and array of stripes. The engrailed positive cells mark the anterior border of genealogical units, which therefore can be compared with parasegments in Drosophila. Expression starts in the mandibular segment and proceeds first anteriorly and subsequently in a posterior direction. Initial stripes are one cell wide. The widening of stripes is caused by both division of engrailed positive cells and recruitment of new cells that did not previously express engrailed. The widening process is related to segment formation as the intersegmental furrows are established behind the engrailed expressing cells, which are restricted to the posterior portion of the forming segments. A comparison of the modes of engrailed expression in different segments suggests that initial engrailed expression is independent of a certain cell lineage or division pattern. The comparison of the development of the early engrailed stripes in different insects and crustaceans reveals some similarities which show that early engrailed expression is not necessarily clonally inherited.

  16. A study of chiral magnetic stripe domains within an in-plane virtual magnetic field using SPLEEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Yang, Mengmeng; Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas; Dong, Qiaoyan; Wu, Yizheng; Hwang, Chanyong; Li, Jia; Qiu, Ziqiang

    Stripe domains form in magnetic thin films at the spin reorientation transition. Different from the typical Bloch type domain walls (DW), it was found recently that Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) could lead to chiral Néel type DMs in the stripe domain phase. While the application of an out-of-plane magnetic field is known to break the stripes into skyrmions, it is unclear how the chiral stripe phase would respond to an in-plane magnetic field? Here we report an experimental study on Fe/Ni/Cu/Co/Cu(001) system using spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). In this system, the Fe/Ni layer exhibits stripe domains with chiral Néel type DMs and its interlayer coupling to Co across the Cu spacer layer serves as an in-plane virtual magnetic field whose strength can be tuned by changing the Cu spacer layer thickness. We find the in-plane field aligns the stripes parallel to the field direction. Increasing the in-plane field strength gradually changes the Néel type DWs into Bloch type DWs. However, it is surprising the adjacent Néel DWs behave asymmetrically in-response to the in-plane magnetic field, suggesting a topological effect in switching the chiral Néel DWs to the non-chiral Bloch DWs.

  17. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, John H.; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W.; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-young; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose

    2017-01-04

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials.

  18. Mapping genes for resistance to stripe rust in spring wheat landrace PI 480035.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinita Sthapit Kandel

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikks. is an economically important disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Hexaploid spring wheat landrace PI 480035 was highly resistant to stripe rust in the field in Washington during 2011 and 2012. The objective of this research was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for stripe rust resistance in PI 480035. A spring wheat, "Avocet Susceptible" (AvS, was crossed with PI 480035 to develop a biparental population of 110 recombinant inbred lines (RIL. The population was evaluated in the field in 2013 and 2014 and seedling reactions were examined against three races (PSTv-14, PSTv-37, and PSTv-40 of the pathogen under controlled conditions. The population was genotyped with genotyping-by-sequencing and microsatellite markers across the whole wheat genome. A major QTL, QYr.wrsggl1-1BS was identified on chromosome 1B. The closest flanking markers were Xgwm273, Xgwm11, and Xbarc187 1.01 cM distal to QYr.wrsggl1-1BS, Xcfd59 0.59 cM proximal and XA365 3.19 cM proximal to QYr.wrsggl1-1BS. Another QTL, QYr.wrsggl1-3B, was identified on 3B, which was significant only for PSTv-40 and was not significant in the field, indicating it confers a race-specific resistance. Comparison with markers associated with previously reported Yr genes on 1B (Yr64, Yr65, and YrH52 indicated that QYr.wrsggl1-1BS is potentially a novel stripe rust resistance gene that can be incorporated into modern breeding materials, along with other all-stage and adult-plant resistance genes to develop cultivars that can provide durable resistance.

  19. Sustained eruptions on Enceladus explained by turbulent dissipation in tiger stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Rubin, Allan M.

    2016-04-01

    Spacecraft observations suggest that the plumes of Saturn’s moon Enceladus draw water from a subsurface ocean, but the sustainability of conduits linking ocean and surface is not understood. Observations show eruptions from “tiger stripe” fissures that are sustained (although tidally modulated) throughout each orbit, and since the 2005 discovery of the plumes. Peak plume flux lags peak tidal extension by ˜1 rad, suggestive of resonance. Here, we show that a model of the tiger stripes as tidally flexed slots that puncture the ice shell can simultaneously explain the persistence of the eruptions through the tidal cycle, the phase lag, and the total power output of the tiger stripe terrain, while suggesting that eruptions are maintained over geological timescales. The delay associated with flushing and refilling of O(1)-m-wide slots with ocean water causes erupted flux to lag tidal forcing and helps to buttress slots against closure, while tidally pumped in-slot flow leads to heating and mechanical disruption that staves off slot freezeout. Much narrower and much wider slots cannot be sustained. In the presence of long-lived slots, the 106-y average power output of the tiger stripes is buffered by a feedback between ice melt-back and subsidence to O(1010) W, which is similar to observed power output, suggesting long-term stability. Turbulent dissipation makes testable predictions for the final flybys of Enceladus by Cassini. Our model shows how open connections to an ocean can be reconciled with, and sustain, long-lived eruptions. Turbulent dissipation in long-lived slots helps maintain the ocean against freezing, maintains access by future Enceladus missions to ocean materials, and is plausibly the major energy source for tiger stripe activity.

  20. Neuronal and astrocytic involvement in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) with morbilliviral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, R; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R; Mazzariol, S; Roperto, S; Cocumelli, C; DI Guardo, G

    2017-01-01

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), a highly pathogenic agent, may cause peculiar, "brain-only" forms of infection (BOFDI), in which viral antigen and/or genome is found exclusively in the brain from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). These BOFDIs show morphopathological similarities with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis (ODE) in measles virus-infected patients and in canine distemper virus-infected dogs, respectively. The brain tissue from 3 BOFDI-affected striped dolphins was investigated by means of double labelling-indirect immunofluorescence (DL-IIF) and ultrastructurally, in order to characterize the DMV-targeted neuronal and non-neuronal cell populations, along with the associated submicroscopic findings. Viral colonization of calbindin-immunoreactive (IR) and nitric oxide synthase-IR neurons was detected in the cerebral parenchyma from the 3 DMV-infected dolphins under study, associated with nuclear (chromatin) and cytoplasmic (mitochondrial) ultrastructural changes. Furthermore, a limited viral targeting of brain astrocytes was found in these animals, all of which exhibited a prominent astrogliosis/astrocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, those herein reported should be the first submicroscopic pathology and neuropathogenetic data about BOFDI in striped dolphins. In this respect, the marked astrogliosis/astrocytosis and the low viral colonization of brain astrocytes in the 3 DMV-infected dolphins under investigation are of interest from the comparative pathology and viral neuropathogenesis standpoints, when compared with ODE-affected dogs, in whose brain a non-cytolytic, astrocyte-to-astrocyte infectious spread has been recently documented. Further studies aimed at characterizing the complex DMV-host interactions in BOFDI-affected striped dolphins are needed.

  1. A histological and NMR study of the melon of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scano, P; Maxia, C; Maggiani, F; Crnjar, R; Lai, A; Sirigu, P

    2005-03-01

    The melon, the echolocation organ of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), was investigated by morphological and high-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, in order to characterize structure and composition gradient at the histological and molecular level. Morphological analysis showed that the lipidic components are organized in an adipose tissue; moreover, a clear muscular component was observed. Age-related structural differences also were noted. Furthermore, NMR yielded detailed information at a qualitative-quantitative level on the lipid components.

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of thermal striping in automotive brake discs

    OpenAIRE

    Augustins, L; Hild, Francois; Billardon, R; Boudevin, S

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In the present study, thermal striping development on friction bands of brake discs is investigated through an experimental and numerical analysis. A test consisting of a series of several hundred severe brakings was carried out on a specific bench at PSA Peugeot Citroën. The experimental observations of the crack network evolution and a numerical analysis of a brake disc with a single crack helped to propose a macroscopic criterion capable of predicting the criticalit...

  3. River nomads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    River nomads is a movie about people on the move. The documentary film explores the lifestyle of a group of nomadic fishermen whose mobility has been the recipe of success and troubles. Engaged in trade and travel, twice a year the river nomads form impressive convoys of majestic pirogues and set...... and liberated lifestyle and the breath-taking landscapes and vistas offered by the Niger River. River Nomads is also a personal account of the Kebbawa’s way of life and their current struggles as nomadic folk living in a world divided by borders and ruled by bureaucrats....

  4. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  5. Polarization of high-energy emission in a pulsar striped wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétri, Jérôme; Kirk, John

    2008-02-01

    Recent observations of the polarization of the optical pulses from the Crab pulsar motivated detailed comparative studies of the emission predicted by the polar cap, the outer gap and the two-pole caustics models. In this work, we study the polarization properties of the synchrotron emission emanating from the striped wind model. We use an explicit asymptotic solution for the large-scale field structure related to the oblique split monopole and valid for the case of an ultra-relativistic plasma. This is combined with a crude model for the emissivity of the striped wind and of the magnetic field within the dissipating stripes themselves. We calculate the polarization properties of the high-energy pulsed emission and compare our results with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar, in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarization and a characteristic sweep of the polarization angle within the pulses are also reproduced.

  6. Polarisation Of High-Energy Emission In A Pulsar Striped Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, J. A.; Kirk, J. G.

    2006-08-01

    Recent observations of the polarisation of the optical pulses from the Crab pulsar (Kanbach et al. 2005, AIP Proceedings, astro-ph/0511636) motivated detailed comparative studies of the emission predicted by the polar cap, the outer gap and the two-pole caustics models. In this work, we study the polarisation properties of the synchrotron emission emanating from the striped wind model. We use an explicit asymptotic solution for the large-scale field structure related to the oblique split monopole and valid for the case of an ultrarelativistic plasma (Bogovalov, A&A, 1999, 349, 1017). This is combined with a crude model for the emissivity of the striped wind and of the magnetic field within the dissipating stripes themselves. We calculate the polarisation properties of the high-energy pulsed emission and compare our results with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar, in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarisation and a characteristic sweep of the polarisation angle within the pulses are also reproduced (Petri & Kirk, ApJ Letters, 2005, 627, L37).

  7. Reduction of Uncorrelated Striping Noise—Applications for Hyperspectral Pushbroom Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogass

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral images are of increasing importance in remote sensing applications. Imaging spectrometers provide semi-continuous spectra that can be used for physics based surface cover material identification and quantification. Preceding radiometric calibrations serve as a basis for the transformation of measured signals into physics based units such as radiance. Pushbroom sensors collect incident radiation by at least one detector array utilizing the photoelectric effect. Temporal variations of the detector characteristics that differ with foregoing radiometric calibration cause visually perceptible along-track stripes in the at-sensor radiance data that aggravate succeeding image-based analyses. Especially, variations of the thermally induced dark current dominate and have to be reduced. In this work, a new approach is presented that efficiently reduces dark current related stripe noise. It integrates an across-effect gradient minimization principle. The performance has been evaluated using artificially degraded whiskbroom (reference and real pushbroom acquisitions from EO-1 Hyperion and AISA DUAL that are significantly covered by stripe noise. A set of quality indicators has been used for the accuracy assessment. They clearly show that the new approach outperforms a limited set of tested state-of-the-art approaches and achieves a very high accuracy related to ground-truth for selected tests. It may substitute recent algorithms in the Reduction of Miscalibration Effects (ROME framework that is broadly used to reduce radiometric miscalibrations of pushbroom data takes.

  8. Characterization of cysteine protease-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Li, Guo-Qing; Xia, Yong-Gui; Han, Zhao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    The striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is a major pest for rice production in China and the rest of Southeast Asia. Chemical control is the main means to alleviate losses due to this pest, which causes serious environmental pollution. An effective and environmentally friendly approach is needed for the management of the striped rice stem borer. Cysteine proteases in insects could be useful targets for pest management either through engineering plant protease inhibitors, targeting insect digestive cysteine proteases, or through RNA interference-based silencing of cysteine proteases, disrupting developmental regulation of insects. In this study, eight cysteine protease-like genes were identified and partially characterized. The genes CCO2 and CCL4 were exclusively expressed in the larval gut, and their expression was affected by the state of nutrition in the insect. The expression of CCL2, CCL3, and CCO1 was significantly affected by the type of host plant, suggesting a role in host plant - insect interactions. Our initial characterization of the striped rice stem borer cysteine protease-like genes provides a foundation for further research on this important group of genes in this major insect pest of rice.

  9. The microbiome of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Rodriguez-Hilario, Arnold; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gonçalves, Filipa; Cabrera-Colon, Beatriz; Mesquita, Cristina Sousa; Soares-Castro, Pedro; Ferreira, Marisa; Marçalo, Ana; Vingada, José; Eira, Catarina; Santos, Pedro Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases with epizootic consequences have not been fully studied in marine mammals. Presently, the unprecedented depth of sequencing, made available by high-throughput approaches, allows detailed comparisons of the microbiome in health and disease. This is the first report of the striped dolphin microbiome in different body sites. Samples from one striped female edematous dolphin were acquired from a variety of body niches, including the blowhole, oral cavity, oral mucosa, tongue, stomach, intestines and genital mucosa. Detailed 16S rRNA analysis of over half a million sequences identified 235 OTUs. Beta diversity analyses indicated that microbial communities vary in structure and cluster by sample origin. Pathogenic, Gram-negative, facultative and obligate anaerobic taxa were significantly detected, including Cetobacterium, Fusobacterium and Ureaplasma. Phocoenobacter and Arcobacter dominated the oral-type samples, while Cardiobacteriaceae and Vibrio were associated with the blowhole and Photobacterium were abundant in the gut. We report for the first time the association of Epulopiscium with a marine mammal gut. The striped dolphin microbiota shows variation in structure and diversity according to the organ type. The high dominance of Gram-negative anaerobic pathogens evidences a cetacean microbiome affected by human-related bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Millennial-aged organic carbon subsidies to a modern river food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraco, Nina; Bauer, James E; Cole, Jonathan J; Petsch, Steven; Raymond, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that highly aged material is a major component of organic matter transported by most rivers. However, few studies have used natural 14C to trace the potential entry of this aged material into modern river food webs. Here we use natural abundance 14C, 13C, and deuterium (2H) to trace the contribution of aged and contemporary organic matter to an important group of consumers, crustacean zooplankton, in a large temperate river (the Hudson River, New York, USA). Zooplankton were highly 14C depleted (mean delta14C = -240 per thousand) compared to modern primary production in the river or its watershed (delta14C = -60 per thousand to +50 per thousand). In order to account for the observed 14C depletion, zooplankton must be subsidized by highly aged particulate organic carbon. IsoSource modeling suggests that the range of the aged dietary subsidy is between approximately 57%, if the aged organic matter source was produced 3400 years ago, and approximately 21%, if the organic carbon used is > or = 50 000 years in age, including fossil material that is millions of years in age. The magnitude of this aged carbon subsidy to river zooplankton suggests that modern river food webs may in some cases be buffered from the limitations set by present-day primary production.

  11. The STRIPES trial--support to rural India's public education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eble, Alex; Mann, Vera; Bhakta, Preetha; Lakshminarayana, Rashmi; Frost, Chris; Elbourne, Diana; Boone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. The study is designed to measure (i) whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii) if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls living in the other STRIPES intervention arm. One of the goals of

  12. River Piracy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Asiatic Soc. o/Bengal., 55:322-343.1886. C F Oldham. The Saraswati and the lost river of the Indian desertJ. R. Asiatic. Soc., 34:49-76. 1893. S C Sharma. The description of rivers in the Rigveda, The Geographical. Observer, 10:79-85. 1974.

  13. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or

  14. Seasonal differential expression of KiSS-1/GPR54 in the striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) among different tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Laixiang; Xue, Huiliang; Li, Shenning; Xu, Jinhui; Chen, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Kisspeptins and G protein coupled receptor (GPR54) play significant roles in regulating reproductive activity among seasonally reproductive animals; however, the mechanisms of KiSS-1 and GPR54 gene affecting the seasonal reproduction in striped hamster are still unknown. In this study, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed to examine the expression profiles of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the hypothalamus, ovaries, testes, uterus and epididymis of striped hamsters across 4 different seasons. Our results showed that, across different seasons, the KiSS-1 expression mode of male striped hamsters and the GPR54 expression mode of female striped hamsters were consistent with the seasonal photoperiod in the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, across different seasons, the expression profile of KiSS-1 in the testes and the GPR54 expression profile of male striped hamsters in the hypothalamus were consistent with the intensity of their seasonal reproductive activity. Among different tissues, the expression trend for GPR54 is consistent across 4 seasons, while that for KiSS-1 is tissue-dependent. The expression trend for GPR54 across 4 seasons is the same regardless of gender, while that for KiSS-1 is dramatically different and sex-dependent across different seasons. These results suggest that the expressions of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the striped hamsters were regulated by complicated mechanisms, and the regulatory mechanisms in the striped hamsters are seasonal-dependent and sex-dependent. This research will provide a theoretical basis for studying how KiSS-1 and GPR54 affect seasonal reproduction and the mechanisms behind their influence. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Dinoflagellate cyst production in Hudson Bay, the world's largest inland sea, based on monthly sediment trap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Maija; Pospelova, Vera; Forest, Alexandre; Stern, Gary

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplankters, microscopic primary producers of oceans are capable of responding rapidly to environmental fluctuations due to their high cell replication rates. Fast phytoplankton growth maybe balanced out by equally fast consumption by herbivorous grazers. In high-latitude marine systems, seasonal fluctuations in plankton biomass are essentially linked to light regime controlled by the waxing and waning sea-ice cover. In addition, nutrient limitation in surface waters, seasonal temperature fluctuations and changes in freshwater inputs may play important roles. In cold-water seas, many planktonic organisms cope with seasonal harshness by the production of benthic dormant stages. Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of single-celled plankton, constituting major marine primary producers, as well as herbivorous grazers of the microbial loop. Many dinoflagellate species produce highly resistant, organic-walled resting cysts that are archived in sediments and have been increasingly used to reconstruct past environmental conditions, e.g., sea-surface temperature and salinity, productivity, sea-ice cover and eutrophication. Marine sediment core sequences are characterized by slow accumulation rates and high mixing rates: the top centimeter of surface sediment from an arctic shelf may correspond to several years or decades of deposition. Consequently, sedimentary archives do not give direct information on long-term changes in seasonal bloom patterns or cues of annually recurring life-cycle events. We used two particle-intercepting sediment traps moored in eastern and western Hudson Bay, respectively, to study monthly fluctuations in dinoflagellate cyst production from October 2005 to September 2006. The traps were deployed close to the seafloor and recovered during the ArcticNet annual expeditions onboard the CCGS Amundsen in 2005 and the CCGS Pierre Radisson in 2006. We document the seasonal succession of dinoflagellate cyst taxa, together with cyst species composition

  16. Assessing the Effects of Suomi NPP VIIRS M15/M16 Detector Radiometric Stability and Relative Spectral Response Variation on Striping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern satellite radiometers have many detectors with different relative spectral response (RSR. Effect of RSR differences on striping and the root cause of striping in sensor data record (SDR radiance and brightness temperature products have not been well studied. A previous study used MODTRAN radiative transfer model (RTM to analyze striping. In this study, we make efforts to find the possible root causes of striping. Line-by-Line RTM (LBLRTM is used to evaluate the effect of RSR difference on striping and the atmospheric dependency for VIIRS bands M15 and M16. The results show that previous study using MODTRAN is repeatable: the striping is related to the difference between band-averaged and detector-level RSR, and the BT difference has some atmospheric dependency. We also analyzed VIIRS earth view (EV data with several striping index methods. Since the EV data is complex, we further analyze the onboard calibration data. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test shows that the noise along track direction is the major reason for striping. We also found evidence of correlation between solar diffuser (SD and blackbody (BB for detector 1 in M15. Digital Count Restoration (DCR and detector instability are possibly related to the striping in SD and EV data, but further analysis is needed. These findings can potentially lead to further SDR processing improvements.

  17. Ecology of the River Darter in Canadian Waters: Distribution, Relative Abundance, Life-History Traits, Diet, and Habitat Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Pratt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The River Darter (Percina shumardi is a native, rarely sampled fish that has been detected in relatively small numbers since the 1930s. It has a wide North American distribution, but little is known about the species biology and distribution across the Canadian portion of its range. We revisited many historic sampling locations and sampled additional areas to (i confirm and update the distribution of River Darters in Canadian waters; (ii assess relative abundance; (iii update life history characteristics; (iv collect diet information; and (v identify characteristics of River Darter habitat. Since 1990, a total of 1032 River Darters were recorded from 29 waterbodies across three ecoregions. River Darters were observed in relatively high abundances in both the Saskatchewan-Nelson River and Southern Hudson Bay-James Bay ecoregions. While still extant in the Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence ecoregion, River Darters persist at low abundance. Life history analyses indicate similar maximum age (age 4 and growth (10 mm/year to conspecific populations in the United States, while sex ratios are generally skewed towards female dominance. River Darter populations had high flexibility in habitat use and diet, using a range of flows and depths and a variety of seasonally available prey types.

  18. transparent, a gene affecting stripe formation in Zebrafish, encodes the mitochondrial protein Mpv17 that is required for iridophore survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Krauss

    2013-06-01

    In the skin of adult zebrafish, three pigment cell types arrange into alternating horizontal stripes, melanophores in dark stripes, xanthophores in light interstripes and iridophores in both stripes and interstripes. The analysis of mutants and regeneration studies revealed that this pattern depends on interactions between melanophores and xanthophores; however, the role of iridophores in this process is less understood. We describe the adult viable and fertile mutant transparent (tra, which shows a loss or strong reduction of iridophores throughout larval and adult stages. In addition, in adults only the number of melanophores is strongly reduced, and stripes break up into spots. Stripes in the fins are normal. By cell transplantations we show that tra acts cell-autonomously in iridophores, whereas the reduction in melanophores in the body occurs secondarily as a consequence of iridophore loss. We conclude that differentiated iridophores are required for the accumulation and maintenance of melanophores during pigment pattern formation. The tra mutant phenotype is caused by a small deletion in mpv17, an ubiquituously expressed gene whose protein product, like its mammalian and yeast homologs, localizes to mitochondria. Iridophore death might be the result of mitochondrial dysfunction, consistent with the mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome observed in mammalian mpv17 mutants. The specificity of the tra phenotype is most likely due to redundancy after gene multiplication, making this mutant a valuable model to understand the molecular function of Mpv17 in mitochondria.

  19. Magnetization dynamics of weak stripe domains in Fe–N thin films: a multi-technique complementary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, I. S.; Tacchi, S.; Garnier, L.-C.; Eddrief, M.; Fortuna, F.; Carlotti, G.; Marangolo, M.

    2017-11-01

    The resonant eigenmodes of an α‧-FeN thin film characterized by weak stripe domains are investigated by Brillouin light scattering and broadband ferromagnetic resonance experiments, assisted by micromagnetic simulations. The spectrum of the dynamic eigenmodes in the presence of the weak stripes is very rich and two different families of modes can be selectively detected using different techniques or different experimental configurations. Attention is paid to the evolution of the mode frequencies and spatial profiles under the application of an external magnetic field, of variable intensity, in the direction parallel or transverse to the stripes. The different evolution of the modes with the external magnetic field is accompanied by a distinctive spatial localization in specific regions, such as the closure domains at the surface of the stripes and the bulk domains localized in the inner part of the stripes. The complementarity of BLS and FMR techniques, based on different selection rules, is found to be a fruitful tool for the study of the wealth of localized magnetic excitations generally found in nanostructures.

  20. Twentieth Century Climate in the New York Hudson Highlands and the Potential Impacts on Eco-Hydrological Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrach, K. [Institut fuer Physik und Meteorologie, Universitaet Hohenheim, Garbenstr. 30, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany); Stieglitz, M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shaman, J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Harvard (United States); Engel, V.C. [National Parks Service, Everglades National Park, Homestead, FL (United States); Griffin, K.L. [Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, New York (United States)

    2006-01-15

    During the 20th century the northeastern U.S.A. has undergone an annual temperature increase of 1C, the combined effect of winter warming and an increase in daily summer minimum temperatures. A significant cooling of spring through autumn in maximum air temperatures is also evident since 1950. Therefore, the primary objective of this study is to document these climate trends and variability over the last century. A secondary objective is to provide a preliminary analysis of how these changes may have impacted hydrologic and ecosystem processes. Specifically, with respect to ecosystem processes, we examine how the cooling of daytime maximum temperatures may have impacted plant respiration and biomass accumulation. The study site is the Black Rock Forest, an experimental forest located in Hudson Highlands of New York that has been maintained as a conservation area over the last 100 years. For the region centered about the forest, there exists a climate/weather record and an extensively maintained biomass record that extends continuously from the early part of the 20th century through present. With such an extensive physical and biological record to draw from, this forest provides a microcosm for studying how changes in 20th century local and regional climate may have impacted ecosystem processes such as species adaptation, biomass growth, and 20th century carbon sequestration. In a subsequent paper we will more extensively explore the relationship between this record of changing climate and eco-hydrological processes.

  1. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils Obtained from Mentha longifolia L. Hudson, Dryed by Three Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Stanisavljević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The way of drying the fresh herbal material influences the chemical content and the biological activities of their essential oils. The influence of the different drying methods of the herb Mentha longifolia (L. Hudson on the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the extracted essential oils has been analyzed in this study. Drying has been carried out in three ways: in the natural way, in the laboratory oven (45°C and in the absorptional low-temperature condensational drier (35°C. The antioxidant activity of the essential oil has been estimated by FRAP and DPPH assays, while the antimicrobial activity has been estimated by the diffusible and micro-delusional method, testing on the nine types of bacteria and two types of fungi. The essential oil obtained from the herb dried in the natural way has shown the highest antioxidant activity and the lowest from the herb dried in the laboratory oven. Bacillus subtilis , Micrococcus luteus and Enterococcus faecalis have shown the highest sensitivity on the three samples. The oil obtained from the herb dried in the absorptional low-temperature drier has shown the strongest antimicrobial effect.

  2. Preliminary study of the antimicrobial activity of Mentha x villosa Hudson essential oil, rotundifolone and its analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thúlio. A. Arruda

    Full Text Available Essential oils present antimicrobial activity against a variety of bacteria and yeasts, including species resistant to antibiotics and antifungicals. In this context, this work aims at the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa Hudson ("hortelã da folha miúda", its major component (rotundifolone and four similar analogues of rotundifolone (limonene oxide, pulegone oxide, carvone epoxide and (+-pulegone against strain standards of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, E. coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomona aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Candida albicans ATCC 76645 and one strain of meticilin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA (171c from human clinic. The method of the diffusion in plates with solid medium was used. The results showed that the oil of Mentha x villosa, rotundifolone, limonene oxide and (+-pulegone, are similar regarding the antimicrobial activity against the tested strains of S. aureus and C. albicans. All of the products present antimocrobial potential with antibacterial activity for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and antifungal activity for C. albicans ATCC 76645. None of the products presented antimicrobial activity for the strains of E. coli ATCC 25922 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, representatives of the Gram negative bacteria.

  3. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  4. Peculiar early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2010-07-01

    We explore the properties of `peculiar' early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the local Universe that show (faint) morphological signatures of recent interactions such as tidal tails, shells and dust lanes. Standard-depth (~51-s exposure) multicolour galaxy images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are combined with the significantly (~2 mag) deeper monochromatic images from the public SDSS Stripe82 to extract, through careful visual inspection, a robust sample of nearby (z evidence of dust lanes and patches. An analysis of optical emission-line ratios indicates that the fraction of peculiar ETGs that are Seyferts or LINERs (19.4 per cent) is twice the corresponding values in their relaxed counterparts (10.1 per cent). LINER-like emission is the dominant type of nebular activity in all ETG classes, plausibly driven by stellar photoionization associated with recent star formation. An analysis of ultraviolet-optical colours indicates that, regardless of the luminosity range being considered, the fraction of peculiar ETGs that have experienced star formation in the last Gyr is a factor of ~1.5 higher than that in their relaxed counterparts. The spectrophotometric results strongly suggest that the interactions that produce the morphological peculiarities also induce low-level recent star formation which, based on the recent literature, are likely to contribute a few per cent of the stellar mass over the last ~1Gyr. Peculiar ETGs preferentially inhabit low-density environments (outskirts of clusters, groups or the field), either due to high peculiar velocities in clusters making merging unlikely or because shell systems are disrupted through frequent interactions within a cluster crossing time. The catalogue of galaxies that forms the basis of this paper can be obtained at http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/~ska/stripe82/skaviraj_stripe82.dat or on request from the author.

  5. Isolation and characterization of mycobacteria from striped bass Morone saxatilis from the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kaattari, I.; Gauthier, D.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis of Chesapeake Bay, USA, was first diagnosed in 1997 based on the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacteria in skin and spleen. To confirm histopathology, bacteriological detection and identification of mycobacteria were begun using splenic tissue from fish with and without skin ulcerations. On the basis of initial studies using a variety of selective and nonselective media, decontamination, homogenization and incubation conditions, a simple and quantitative recovery method using aseptic necropsy of splenic tissue was developed. Optimal recovery was obtained by spread-plating homogenates on Middlebrook 7H10 agar with incubation for 3 mo at 23??C. Mycobacteria were recovered from 76% (n = 149/196) of fish examined. Mycobacterial densities exceeded 104 colony forming units??g tissue-1 in 38% of samples (n = 63/168) that were examined using a quantitative approach. The most frequently recovered mycobacterium, present in 57% (n = 109/192) of characterized samples, was the recently named new species Mycobacterium shottsii. Polyinfections of M. shottsii and other mycobacteria were observed in 25% of samples (n = 47/192) with densities of M. shottsii usually 1 or more orders of magnitude higher than co-isolate(s). Other mycobacteria recovered included isolates that, based on phenotypic traits, resembled M. interjectum, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai and M. triplex. M. marinum, commonly associated with fish mycobacteriosis and human disease, was recovered infrequently (3%, n = 6/192). The presence of multiple mycobacterial types occurring at high densities suggests that a variety of mycobacteria could be causative agents of mycobacteriosis in striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Striped bass is the major recreational fish species in the Chesapeake Bay, and the significance of the current epizootic to human health and the potential adverse effects on fish stocks are not known.

  6. Gill remodelling and growth rate of striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus under impact of hypoxia and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2016-01-01

    Gill morphometric and gill plasticity of the air-breathing striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) exposed to different temperatures (present day 27 °C and future 33 °C) and different air saturation levels (92% and 35%) during 6 weeks were investigated using vertical sections to estimate th...... was almost eliminated in the 27 °C normoxic group, with other groups intermediate. In addition, elevated temperature had an astounding effect on growth with the 33 °C group growing nearly 8-fold faster than the 27 °C fish....

  7. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers from striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, C M; Harrison, J S; Edmands, S

    2009-11-01

    We present the isolation and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci for striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax. Thirty individuals from each of four locations revealed that all loci were polymorphic with two to 31 alleles per locus. Observed levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0.3000 to 0.9667. Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected in two loci, TA105 in Hawaii and New Zealand and TA155 in Hawaii, and null alleles may be present in loci TA105 and TA155 in those locations, and in locus TA193 in Mexico. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in any pairwise-locus comparison. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Stripes and antiphase boundaries in CaFe2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Chris; Rodriguez, Efrain; Green, Mark; Lee, Nara; Cheong, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the magnetic structure and spin dynamics in CaFe2O4 based upon an orthorhombic structure. The magnetic structure consists of two competing magnetic phases based upon stripes of S =5/2 Fe3+ ions. The magnetic dynamics illustrate that the coupling is primarily two dimensional. On application of a magnetic field, antiphase magnetic boundaries can be introduced into the lattice and frozen in at low temperatures. We investigate the structure and dynamics of these domains using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering and discuss how the triangular geometry allow these localized defects to be energetically favorable. Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Royal Society, and EPSRC.

  9. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr 2 IrO 4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effective Hamiltonian for striped and paired states at the half-filled Landau level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Nobuki

    2001-03-01

    We study a pairing mechanism for the quantum Hall system using a mean field theory with a basis on the von Neumann lattice, on which the magnetic translations commute. In the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation, we solve the gap equation for spin-polarized electrons at the half-filled Landau levels. We obtain an effective Hamiltonian which shows a continuous transition from the compressible striped state to the paired state. Furthermore, a crossover occurs in the pairing phase. The energy spectrum and energy gap of the quasiparticle in the paired state is calculated numerically at the half-filled second Landau level.

  11. IGF-I and branchial IGF receptor expression and localization during salinity acclimation in striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Luckenbach, John Adam; Madsen, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The initial response of the IGF-I system and the expression and cellular localization of IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR) were studied in the gill of a euryhaline teleost during salinity acclimation. Exposure of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) to hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic challenges induced small...... in either plasma IGF-I, liver, or gill IGF-I mRNA, or gill IGF-IR mRNA levels. In a separate experiment, FW-acclimated fish were injected with saline or IGF-I prior to a 24-h SW challenge. Rapid regain of osmotic balance following SW transfer was hindered by IGF-I. Immunohistochemistry revealed...

  12. New components in defensive secretion of the striped skunk,Mephitis mephitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W F

    1990-06-01

    GC-MS analysis of the anal sac secretion of the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), shows seven major components: (E)-2-butene-1-thiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, S-(E)-2-butenyl thioacetate,S-3-methylbutanyl thioacetate, 2-methylquinoline, 2-quinolinemethanethiol, andS-2-quinolinemethyl thioacetate. The following compounds previously reported from this secretion could not be confirmed: bis(2-butenyl) sulfide, (E)-2-Butenyl methyl disuffide, (E)-2-butenyl propyl sulfide, butyl 3-methylbutyl disulfide, and 2-butenyl butyl disulfide.

  13. Electronic structure of a striped nickelate studied by the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE) approach

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by a RIXS study of Wakimoto, et al.(Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 157001) we use density functional theory to analyze the magnetic order in the nickelate La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 and the details of its crystal and electronic structure. We compare the generalized gradient approximation to the hybrid functional approach of exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE). In contrast to the former, the latter reproduces the insulating state of the compound and the midgap states. The EECE approach, in general, appears to be appropriate for describing stripe phases in systems with orbital degrees of freedom. Copyright © EPLA, 2009.

  14. Isolation of Clostridium tertium from a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Branka; Gomercić, Martina Duras; Naglić, Tomo; Gomercić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Gomercić, Hrvoje

    2006-07-01

    Bacteriologic examination of an abscess found between blubber and musculature of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found dead on 30 March 2002 in the Adriatic Sea, Croatia, was performed and an aerotolerant, nontoxogenic Clostridium tertium was isolated in pure culture. National Collections of Industrial Food and Marine Bacteria (NCIMB Ltd., Aberdeen, Scotland, UK) confirmed the results. Sequencing results showed it to be C. tertium with 100% similarity. The strain was named Clostridium tertium strain Zagreb, acceded to the culture collection and assigned the accession number NCIMB 13970. This is the first record of C. tertium in marine mammals.

  15. Multifocal granulomatous panniculitis with ceroid pigment in two Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sara; Fondevila, Dolors; González, Beatriz; Gómez-Campos, Encarna; Domingo, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Two striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) were found stranded on the Catalonian Spanish coast. The main pathologic finding in both animals was the existence of multiple granulomatous lesions in the blubber, microscopically composed of macrophages and multinucleated cells containing vacuolar material. This material was identified as ceroid pigment due to its ultrastructural morphology, autofluorescence, and positive staining with periodic acid-Schiff and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. The special stains and electron microscopy did not reveal any microorganisms associated with the lesions. These findings are very suggestive of "nutritional panniculitis," a well-defined entity associated with vitamin E deficiency that has been rarely described in free-living species.

  16. Recovery of barotrauma injuries resulting from exposure to pile driving sound in two sizes of hybrid striped bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M Casper

    Full Text Available The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis. The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g. However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders.

  17. Cavity length and stripe width dependent lasing characteristics of InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dot lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. G.; Gong, Q.; Wang, X. Z.; Cao, C. F.; Zhou, Z. W.; Wang, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    The lasing characteristics of InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dot lasers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy were carefully studied by varying cavity length and stripe width. With the increase of injection current, the lasers having a longer cavity length and a wider stripe width exhibited simultaneously two-lasing peaks or/three-lasing peaks. The high-energy peak undergoes continuous buleshift, while the low-energy peaks are somewhat fixed. At the same times, the injection current density decreased as the stripe width increase. When the lasers were applied to external cavity system, the shorter cavity length of InAs/InP quantum dot laser had a wider tunable range.

  18. Stripe segregation and magnetic coupling in the nickelate La 5/3Sr1/3NiO4

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-03-02

    We investigate the consequences of the stripe formation in the nickelate La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 for the details of its crystal structure and electronic states. Our data are based on numerical simulations within density functional theory (DFT) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The on-site Coulomb interaction is included in terms of the LDA+U scheme. Structure optimization of preliminary experimental data indicates a strong interaction between the structural and electronic degrees of freedom. In particular, we find a segregation of the diagonal filled stripes induced by a delicate interplay with the magnetic coupling. Beyond the cooperative effect of stripe segregation and spin order, distinct octahedral distortions are essential for the formation of an insulating state. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Transmission of Rice stripe virus acquired from frozen infected leaves by the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shixian; Li, Li; Wang, Xifeng; Zhou, Guanghe

    2007-12-01

    Rice stripe disease, caused by Rice stripe virus (RSV), is one of the most serious rice diseases in temperate and subtropical regions of the world. Since RSV is not transmissible mechanically, an insect transmission test was the original basis for identification of the viral population and cultivar resistance. A simple, rapid and reliable method is described by which virus-free small brown planthoppers acquired RSV from frozen infected rice leaves and transmitted the virus to healthy rice plants. Of 30 planthoppers tested, 9 insects fed on the frozen infected leaves acquired the virus as shown by an indirect-ELISA. In the transmission tests with a single insect, fed previously on frozen leaves, 5 of 30 plants (16.67%) became infected, compared to 7 of 30 plants (23.33%) became infected when a single insect fed on fresh infected leaves. All rice plants expressing stripe symptoms were identified with the virus by RT-PCR.

  20. Mapping bound plasmon propagation on a nanoscale stripe waveguide using quantum dots: influence of spacer layer thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamanei S. Perera

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we image the highly confined long range plasmons of a nanoscale metal stripe waveguide using quantum emitters. Plasmons were excited using a highly focused 633 nm laser beam and a specially designed grating structure to provide stronger incoupling to the desired mode. A homogeneous thin layer of quantum dots was used to image the near field intensity of the propagating plasmons on the waveguide. We observed that the photoluminescence is quenched when the QD to metal surface distance is less than 10 nm. The optimised spacer layer thickness for the stripe waveguides was found to be around 20 nm. Authors believe that the findings of this paper prove beneficial for the development of plasmonic devices utilising stripe waveguides.

  1. Assessment of toxicological status of a SW Mediterranean segment population of striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) using skin biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossi, M Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Lauriano, Giancarlo; Fortuna, Caterina; Canese, Simone; Ancora, Stefania; Leonzio, Claudio; Romeo, Teresa; Merino, Ruben; Abad, Esteban; Jiménez, Begoña

    2004-01-01

    Various studies have revealed high concentrations of contaminants such as organochlorines (OCs) and heavy metals in Mediterranean cetaceans. A geographical trend of contamination (PCBs and DDTs) has been found for striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba). In this study we used a non-lethal approach (skin biopsy) to investigate bioaccumulation of OCs, including polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), DDTs, polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs), trace elements (Hg, Cd, Pb) and CYP1A activity (BPMO) in nine striped dolphins sampled in the Aeolian area (Sicily - Italy) in summer 2002. The arithmetic mean value of BPMO activity in this group was 43.46 AUF/g tissue/h. This value is approximately 3 times and 5 times lower, respectively, than the value found in the Ionian and in the Ligurian groups. Skin biopsies of striped dolphins emerged as a suitable material for assessing the toxicological status of the various Mediterranean groups.

  2. Reducing dietary protein in pond production of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis): Effects on fish performance and water quality dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous work, we demonstrated that diets containing 40% digestible protein (DP) (45% crude protein) and 18 %lipid supplemented with Met and Lys resulted in superior performance and nutrient retentions in hybrid striped bass compared to less energy-dense diets when rearing hybrid striped bass at ...

  3. Characterization of two adult-plant stripe rust resistance genes on chromosomes 3BS and 4BL in soft red winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important foliar disease of soft red winter wheat (SRWW) in the eastern U.S. However, very few resistance genes have been characterized in the SRWW germplasm pool. The SRWW line VA96W-270 is known to be resistant to stripe rust race P...

  4. Mountains to the sea: River study of plastic and non-plastic microfiber pollution in the northeast USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachael Z; Watts, Andrew J R; Winslow, Brooke O; Galloway, Tamara S; Barrows, Abigail P W

    2017-11-15

    Aquatic environments are sinks for anthropogenic contamination, whether chemical or solid pollutants. Microfibers shed from clothing and other textiles contribute to this problem. These can be plastic or non-plastic origin. Our aim was to investigate the presence and distribution of both types of anthropogenic microfibers along the length of the Hudson River, USA. Surface grab samples were collected and filtered through a 0.45μm filter paper. Abundance of fibers was determined after subtraction of potential contamination. 233 microfibers were recorded in 142 samples, averaging 0.98microfibersL-1. Subsequent micro-FTIR showed half of the fibers were plastic while the other half were non-plastic, but of anthropogenic origin. There was no relationship between fiber abundance, wastewater treatment plant location or population density. Extrapolating from this data, and using available hydrographic data, 34.4% of the Hudson River's watershed drainage area contributes an average 300 million anthropogenic microfibers into the Atlantic Ocean per day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel fungal hyperparasite of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stripe rust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangming Zhan

    Full Text Available Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, the causal fungus of wheat stripe rust, was previously reported to be infected by Lecanicillium lecanii, Microdochium nivale and Typhula idahoensis. Here, we report a novel hyperparasite on Pst. This hyperparasitic fungus was identified as Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen. GA de Vries based on morphological characteristics observed by light and scanning electron microscopy together with molecular data. The hyperparasite reduced the production and viability of urediniospores and, therefore, could potentially be used for biological control of wheat stripe rust.

  6. Evidence for Increased Aggressiveness in a Recent Widespread Strain of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Causing Stripe Rust of Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milus, Eugene A; Kristensen, Kristian; Hovmøller, Mogens S

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based...... regimes for latent period, lesion length, lesion width, lesion area, and spore production on adult plants of a susceptible wheat cultivar with no known genes for resistance to stripe rust. "New" isolates (since 2000) were significantly more aggressive than "old" isolates (before 2000) for all variables...... that wheat rust fungi can adapt to warmer temperatures and cause severe disease in previously unfavorable environments...

  7. Individual-level and Population-level Historical Prey Demand of San Francisco Estuary Striped Bass Using a Bioenergetics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Loboschefsky, Erik; Benigno, Gina; Sommer, Ted; Rose, Kenneth; Ginn, Timothy; Massoudieh, Arash; Loge, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Striped bass are both a major predator of native fishes and support a recreational fishery in the San Francisco Estuary (the estuary). Quantifying their demands on their prey is important for understanding long-term trends of fish in the estuary. In this study, we: (i) applied a bioenergetics model of sub-adult (age 1 and age 2) and adult (age 3+) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) to quantify long-term consumption patterns from 1969 through 2004 in the estuary; (ii) developed a method to estima...

  8. Nasitrema sp.-associated encephalitis in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Homer, Bruce L.; Greiner, Ellis C.; Layton, A. William

    1991-01-01

    An immature female striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found dead on a northwestern Florida beach in 1988 exhibited severe inflammation bilaterally in the dorsal and mid-thalamus in association with adult trematodes (Nasitrema sp.) and trematode eggs. Numerous specimens of Nasitrema sp. also were present in the pterygoid sinuses. Pneumonia in association with a heavy growth of Vibrio damsela was observed also. This report confirms the occurrence of Nasitrema sp.-associated encephalitis in striped dolphins and in small cetaceans from the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Trade-offs between reproduction and health in free-ranging African striped mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, I; Pillay, N; Schradin, C

    2017-05-01

    Energy is limited and must be allocated among competing life-history traits. Reproduction is considered one of the most energetically demanding life-history stages. Therefore, the amount of energy an individual invests in reproduction might carry fitness costs through reduced energy allocation to other activities such as health maintenance. We investigated whether reproduction impacts health in the seasonally breeding African striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio). We measured health in individuals that reproduced (breeders) and individuals that did not reproduce (their adult offspring) and tested whether: (1) breeders' health before reproduction was similar to that of their offspring (representing a baseline); (2) breeders' health deteriorated after reproduction; (3) breeders' health after reproduction was worse than that of their offspring. We collected blood samples from 12 breeding females and 11 breeding males both at the onset and at the end of the breeding season and from 12 adult daughters and 11 adult sons that did not reproduce at the end of the breeding season. Health was assessed using serum biochemistry analysis with VetScan Abaxis. Breeders differed considerably in their health before and after reproduction, particularly in parameters associated with digestion (lower amylase in males), metabolism (lower albumin, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and glucose), osmoregulation (lower potassium and phosphorous in females) and immunity (higher globulin and altered alanine aminotransferase). Our results suggest that with the onset of breeding striped mice shifted their energy allocation from maintaining health to reproduction, indicating that investment into reproduction carries significant health costs.

  10. Artificial feeding Rice stripe virus enables efficient virus infection of Laodelphax striatellus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yan; Chen, Liying; Su, Lei; Wu, Yao; Chen, Xiaoying; Fang, Rongxiang; Zhang, Lili

    2016-09-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV), the causative agent of rice stripe disease, is transmitted by Laodelphax striatellus in a persistent-propagative manner. Efficient virus acquisition is primary for studies of virus transmission and virus-insect vector interactions. However, under greenhouse conditions, less than 30% of the L. striatellus population, on average, become viruliferous during feeding on RSV-infected plants. Here, we explored a method for efficient RSV acquisition by feeding the insects with a virus-containing artificial diet. Virus particles were partially purified from frozen infected rice leaves. A series of RSV concentrations in a 5% sucrose solution were tested in the feed of L. striatellus nymphs. The percentage of infected insects increased along with the increasing viral concentration, and the highest infection percentage 96% was achieved using a 1200ngμL(-1) crude RSV suspension after 48h feeding. RSV particles acquired in this manner were able to spread to L. striatellus salivary glands. This improved method of obtaining viruliferous insects should assist the study of RSV transmission mechanisms in L. striatellus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. BAIT DEVELOPMENT FOR ORAL DELIVERY OF PHARMACEUTICALS TO RACCOONS (PROCYON LOTOR) AND STRIPED SKUNKS (MEPHITIS MEPHITIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shylo R; Crider, Nikki J; Weyer, Grant A; Tosh, Randall D; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2016-10-01

    Oral vaccination is one tool used to control wildlife diseases. A challenge to oral vaccination is identifying baits specific to target species. The US has been conducting oral vaccination against rabies since the 1990s. Improvements in bait development will hasten disease elimination. In Colorado, we examined a novel bait for oral vaccination and offered two different flavors, sweet and fish, to captive raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) and striped skunks ( Mephitis mephitis ) to assess consumption and flavor preference and observed bait removal by target and nontarget species in the field. During captive trials, raccoons and skunks consumed 98% and 87% of offered baits, respectively. Baits contained a sachet to simulate a vaccine package. Raccoons and skunks consumed 98% and 94% of the sachets, respectively. All unconsumed sachets were punctured, suggesting that animals had oral exposure to the contents. Raccoons preferred fish-flavored bait, but skunks did not have a preference. In the field, raccoons consumed the most baits, followed by fox squirrels ( Sciurus niger ). Other rabies host species (striped skunks, red foxes [ Vulpes vulpes ], coyotes [ Canis latrans ]) had very low visitation and were never observed consuming baits. High consumption rates by raccoons and skunks in captivity and observance of raccoons consuming baits in the field suggest that these baits may be useful for oral delivery of pharmaceuticals. Further field research is warranted to determine how to best optimize bait delivery.

  12. Cloning of a putative hypersensitive induced reaction gene from wheat infected by stripe rust fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiu-Mei; Yu, Xiu-Dao; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Huang, Xin-Jie; Guo, Jun; Han, Qing-Mei; Zhao, Jie; Huang, Li-Li; Kang, Zhen-Sheng

    2008-01-15

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is one of the most efficient forms of plant defense against biotrophic pathogens and results in localized cell death and the formation of necrotic lesions. In this study, a novel putative hypersensitive induced reaction (HIR) gene from wheat leaves infected by incompatible stripe rust pathogen CY23, designated as Ta-hir1, was identified by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Ta-hir1 encodes 284 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 31.31 KDa. A phylogenetic analysis showed that Ta-hir1 was highly homologous to Hv-hir1 from barley at both cDNA and deduced amino-acid levels. Amino-acid sequence analysis of the wheat HIR protein indicated the presence of the SPFH (Stomatins, Prohibitins, Flotillins and HflK/C) protein domain typical for stomatins which served as a negative regulator of univalent cation permeability, especially for potassium. The expression profile of the Ta-hir1 transcript detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real time-PCR), respectively, showed that the highest expression occurred 48 h post inoculation (hpi), which is consistent with our previous histopathology observations during the stripe rust fungus-wheat incompatible reaction.

  13. Visualization analysis of tiger-striped flow mark generation phenomena in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owada, Shigeru; Yokoi, Hidetoshi

    2016-03-01

    The generation mechanism of tiger-striped flow marks of polypropylene (PP)/rubber/talc blends in injection molding was investigated by dynamic visualization analysis in a glass-inserted mold. The analysis revealed that the behavior of the melt flow front correlates with the flow mark generation. The cloudy part in the tiger-striped flow marks corresponded to the low transcription rate area of the melt diverging near the cavity wall, while the glossy part corresponded to the high transcription rate area of the melt converging toward the cavity wall side. The melt temperature at the high transcription rate area was slightly lower than that at the low transcription rate area. These phenomena resulted due to the difference in the temperature of the melt front that was caused by the asymmetric fountain flow. These results suggest the followings; At the moment when the melt is broken near the one side of cavity wall due to piling the extensional strains up to a certain level, the melt spurts out near the broken side. It results in generating asymmetric fountain flow temporarily to relax the extensional front surface, which moves toward the opposite side to form the high transcription area.

  14. Calibration of Binocular Vision Sensors Based on Unknown-Sized Elliptical Stripe Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing calibration methods for binocular stereo vision sensor (BSVS depend on a high-accuracy target with feature points that are difficult and costly to manufacture and. In complex light conditions, optical filters are used for BSVS, but they affect imaging quality. Hence, the use of a high-accuracy target with certain-sized feature points for calibration is not feasible under such complex conditions. To solve these problems, a calibration method based on unknown-sized elliptical stripe images is proposed. With known intrinsic parameters, the proposed method adopts the elliptical stripes located on the parallel planes as a medium to calibrate BSVS online. In comparison with the common calibration methods, the proposed method avoids utilizing high-accuracy target with certain-sized feature points. Therefore, the proposed method is not only easy to implement but is a realistic method for the calibration of BSVS with optical filter. Changing the size of elliptical curves projected on the target solves the difficulty of applying the proposed method in different fields of view and distances. Simulative and physical experiments are conducted to validate the efficiency of the proposed method. When the field of view is approximately 400 mm × 300 mm, the proposed method can reach a calibration accuracy of 0.03 mm, which is comparable with that of Zhang’s method.

  15. Cloning and characterization of serpin-like genes from the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Cheng, Xiong-Feng; Zhang, Yang; Li, Guo-Qing; Han, Zhao-Jun

    2013-06-01

    Serpins, also called serine proteinase inhibitors, are widely distributed in eukaryotes. In insects, serpins play important roles in regulating immune responses, gut physiology, and other processes. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of 12 serpin-like cDNAs from the striped rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), a major rice pest. The putative proteins share significant sequence similarity with known insect serpins, especially those from lepidopterons. Analysis of functional domains revealed that nine of the cloned serpins are putative trypsin- or chymotrypsin-like inhibitors; two are mixed-type serpins that may act as inhibitors for trypsins, elastases, or thrombin; and the remaining one is truncate. The potential functions of these serpins in interacting with host plants were also investigated by analyzing tissue-specific expression and the impact of different host plant genotypes on gene expression. Our results provide a foundation for future studies on the role of serpins in gut physiology in the striped rice stem borer, and also useful information for comparative analyses of serpins from different insect species.

  16. Social kin associations and genetic structuring of striped dolphin populations (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Stefania; Azzellino, Arianna; Airoldi, Sabina; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2007-07-01

    We investigated hierarchical patterns of genetic subdivision, and assessed kinship within and between social groups of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Tyrrhenian Sea. A total of 165 samples were analysed at eight microsatellite DNA loci, including outgroup samples from the Adriatic, Scotland and Spain for population-level comparisons. We found population genetic structure within the Mediterranean basin, including small but significant differentiation between the Adriatic and Tyrrhenian Seas (FST=0.0047, P=0.008), and between putative 'inshore' and 'offshore' (FST=0.0217, P=0.005) populations in the Tyrrhenian Sea. Assessment of kinship within and among 12 association groups showed higher average kinship for females within than between groups, and smaller groups showed higher average kinship. Comparisons of relatedness for both sexes showed a significant difference between males and females, with females more likely to associate with adult kin. Together these data emphasize the importance of the social cohesion of kin in small groups to the structuring of striped dolphin populations in this environment.

  17. Morbilliviral encephalitis in a striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba calf from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Scholl, Francesco; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Speranza, Roberto; Pennelli, Massimiliano; Eleni, Claudia

    2011-07-12

    A free-living, striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba calf was stranded on the Latium coast of Italy in November 2009. Significant neuropathological findings included non-suppurative meningoencephalitis, microgliosis, neuronal degeneration, astrocytosis, and occasional multinucleate syncytia. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Morbillivirus were positive exclusively from the brain, with morbilliviral antigen and nucleic acid being detected in neurons and, to a lesser extent, in astrocytes. A low neutralizing antibody titer (1:10) against Morbillivirus (Canine distemper virus, CDV) was also found in blood serum, with no simultaneous presence of serum antibodies to Brucella spp. or Toxoplasma gondii. Furthermore, no pathogenic bacteria were isolated from any tissue or biological sample. This is the second report of morbilliviral encephalitis in a striped dolphin stranded along the Italian coastline in a 16 yr period (1993 to 2009). The neurohistopathological, IHC, and biomolecular features of this case are of additional interest, as antigenic and genomic positivity were exclusively confined to the brain of this dolphin, which may have acquired morbilliviral infection either postnatally or transplacentally.

  18. Contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Southeastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storelli, Maria Maddalena; Barone, Grazia; Giacominelli-Stuffler, Roberto; Marcotrigiano, Giuseppe Onofrio

    2012-09-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) including dioxin-like PCBs (non-ortho, PCB 77, PCB 126, and PCB 169 and mono-ortho, PCB 105, PCB 118, and PCB 156) were measured in different organs and tissues (melon, blubber, liver, kidney, lung, heart, and muscle tissue) of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (Adriatic Sea). The mean highest levels were in blubber and melon, followed by liver, kidney, lung, heart, and muscle tissue. PCB profiles were similar in all tissues and organs being dominated by the higher chlorinated homologues (hexa-CBs, 55.8-62.1%; penta-CBs, 15.4-20.0%; and hepta-CB PCB 180, 12.7-16.5%). Major PCBs in all tissues were congeners 138 and 153 collectively accounting for 50.6-58.3% of the total PCB concentrations, followed by PCB 101, 105, 118, and 180 constituting from 27.0% to 31.0%. PCB levels were higher in adult males than in adult females. The estimated 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents of non- and mono-ortho PCBs were much higher than the threshold level above which adverse effects have been observed in other marine mammals species, suggesting that striped dolphins in this region are at risk for toxic effects.

  19. DE-STRIPING FOR TDICCD REMOTE SENSING IMAGE BASED ON STATISTICAL FEATURES OF HISTOGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-T. Gao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim to striping noise brought by non-uniform response of remote sensing TDI CCD, a novel de-striping method based on statistical features of image histogram is put forward. By analysing the distribution of histograms,the centroid of histogram is selected to be an eigenvalue representing uniformity of ground objects,histogrammic centroid of whole image and each pixels are calculated first,the differences between them are regard as rough correction coefficients, then in order to avoid the sensitivity caused by single parameter and considering the strong continuity and pertinence of ground objects between two adjacent pixels,correlation coefficient of the histograms is introduces to reflect the similarities between them,fine correction coefficient is obtained by searching around the rough correction coefficient,additionally,in view of the influence of bright cloud on histogram,an automatic cloud detection based on multi-feature including grey level,texture,fractal dimension and edge is used to pre-process image.Two 0-level panchromatic images of SJ-9A satellite with obvious strip noise are processed by proposed method to evaluate the performance, results show that the visual quality of images are improved because the strip noise is entirely removed,we quantitatively analyse the result by calculating the non-uniformity ,which has reached about 1% and is better than histogram matching method.

  20. Megaboudins and lateral extension along the leading edge of a crystalline thrust sheet, Hudson Highlands, New York, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, A. E.

    1996-10-01

    Megascopic lenses of crystalline rock along the leading edge of the Hudson Highland thrust sheet, New York, are boudins that formed as the result of lateral extension during Late Paleozoic compression. These 'megaboudins' range from 50 m on each side to 1.2 × 3.2 km and form a NE-trending chain along the northwest side of the Green Pond outlier and Hudson Highlands. The crystalline Hudson Highlands were first thrust northwestward onto shales and siltstones of the Martinsburg Formation during the Middle Ordovician Taconian Orogeny, and later eroded leaving a NE-trending elongate klippe along the leading edge. During subsequent compression, the klippe was laterally extended into a chain of fracture boudins with λ = 3.3. The cleavage and bedding in the surrounding shales and siltstones wraps around the boudins and into the boudin gaps. The cleavage and bedding wrap through 61-114 ° forming shallow to moderately NE-plunging fold axes on the northeast side of the gaps and shallow to moderately SE-plunging fold axes on the southeast side of the gaps. Strike-slip shear indicators at the boudin corners support the mass movement of shale and siltstone. In the wider boudin gaps, conjugate NW-striking normal faults form cross-strike grabens that juxtapose overlying Silurian strata into the gap areas. Fragments of brecciated gneiss from the boudins are also transported into the gap areas along these cross-strike normal faults. The boudins, dextral strike-slip stretching faults along the southeastern margin of the boudins, and asymmetric gap fill geometries are prime criteria for the recognition and characterization of lateral stretching in contractional fold and thrust belts.

  1. Upscaling reflectance information of lichens and mosses using a singularity index: a case study of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing moisture contents of lichens and mosses using ground-based high spectral resolution spectrometers (400–2500 nm offers immense opportunities for a comprehensive monitoring of peatland moisture status by satellite/airborne imagery. This information may be valuable for present and future carbon balance modeling. Previous studies are based upon point measurements of vegetation moisture content and water table position, and therefore a detailed moisture status of entire northern peatlands is not available. Consequently, upscaling ground and remotely sensed data to the desired spatial resolutions is inevitable. This study continues our previous investigation of the impact of various moisture conditions of common sub-Arctic lichen and moss species (i.e., Cladina stellaris, Cladina rangiferina, Dicranum elongatum, and Tomenthypnum nitens upon the spectral signatures obtained in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Upscaling reflectance measurements of the above species were conducted in the field, and reflectance analysis using a singularity index was made, since this study serves as a basis for future aircraft/satellite research. An attempt to upscale current and new spectral reflectance indices developed in our previous studies was made as well. Our findings indicate that the spectral index C. rangiferina is to a lesser amount influenced by scale since it has a small R2 values between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, reduced slopes between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, and similar slopes between log reflectance and log resolution (α of two wavelengths employed by the index. Future study should focus on concurrent monitoring of moisture variations in lichens and mosses both in situ and from satellite and airborne images, as well as analysis of fractal models in relations to the upscaling experiments.

  2. TREATMENTS OF PLASMA CORONA RADIATION ON SEAWEED Gracilaria Verrucosa (HUDSON PAPENFUSS: Efforts to increase growth and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filemon Jalu N Putra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria verrucosa (Hudson Papenfuss has great potential to be farmed in the water resources in Indonesia. As natural resource, the weed has a major contribution in the field of industry both for human food and health. Efforts have been done intensively to increase the production capacity to meet the market demand especially gelatin, both national and international market. One of them is the application of plasma corona irradiation treatments on the weed to improve developmental pathways. The concept of plasma irradiation performed at atmospheric conditions may impact on nitrogen intrusion pathway that is important element in the growth of the weed. The aims of this study are to assess the potential impact of plasma irradiation in improving the growth of G. verrucosa and thus increase their biomass production. The treatments were done using five different duration of plasma irradiation, which were 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 minutes at a 0,5mA stable source of voltage and 8kV of electrical current. Observations of growth rate include thallus length and biomass of G. verrucosa , that was observed every week for 28 days. The result showed that the growth of weed exhibited better than those without radiation. The best growth was reached in the group of treatment of 8 minutes irradiation, exhibited 65,91g of biomass and 9.5515% growth rate and length of thallus reached 22,33 cm and daily growth rate of 2.9759%. The lowest growth of the weed occurred in the treatment of 10 minutes irradiation, which was 44,82 g biomass, 8.123% growth rate, 17,13 cm thallus length with a daily growth rate of 1.9942%

  3. Contested Rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Louise Lyngfeldt

    explores translocal connections through ethnographic fieldwork at a global water conference and preliminary fieldwork at chosen locations on China's Nu River. The Nu River is one of the last undammed rivers in Asia and runs through China close to the Chinese-Burmese border, then flows into the Andaman Sea...... policy making, decision drivers and framing of large hydropower projects in China. Hydropower is a complex and interesting field to explore as the consequences go beyond the immediate locality and interacts with local as well as the global contexts. Inspired by Tsing (2003) and Zhan (2008) the paper...... and natural scientists and Chinese hydropower companies (to name a few). The paper maps different actors’ framing of the issue to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of hydropower policymaking in China, as well as map the local consequences of global policymaking about large hydropower...

  4. Thermokarst and export of sediment and organic carbon in the Sheldrake River watershed, Nunavik, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivel, Maxime; Allard, Michel

    2013-09-01

    spatiotemporal computation of permafrost decay covering the period from 1957 to 2009 and validated by field investigations was made over a 76 km2 river catchment straddling the tree line, in the discontinuous permafrost zone, east of Hudson Bay, in order to estimate the amounts of sediments and organic carbon released by thermokarst. Lithalsas and palsas are the dominant permafrost landforms, whereas thermokarst ponds, landslides, active layer failures, and gullies are the main features of permafrost degradation. Results show that 21% of the existing permafrost in 1957 had disappeared in 2009, resulting in a 96% growth of the thermokarst pond cover and a 46 to 217% increase of the number of active erosion landforms. An increase of stream connectivity related with the degradation of permafrost potentially allowed for an increase of sediments and carbon delivery to the main stream by a factor of 1.6. Volume of active landslides and gullies also increased by 12 to 38%, enhancing sediment and organic matter yields. Significant differences in permafrost degradation and in sediment and carbon inputs were observed along an east-west transect, from sites located at the head of the watershed near the tree line to sites located downstream close to the Hudson Bay coast. Thermokarst ponds in the forest tundra area released 2.3 times more sediments and dissolved organic carbon per unit of area in the fluvial system than in the shrub tundra area. Despite these yields by thermokarst, the Sheldrake River catchment currently does not seem to be yielding proportionally more sediments and carbon than a permafrost-free river catchment.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana Yellow Stripe1-Like4 and Yellow Stripe1-Like6 localize to internal cellular membranes and are involved in metal ion homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Hsuan eChu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the Yellow Stripe1-Like (YSL family of transporter proteins are able to transport metal-nicotianamine (NA complexes. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the roles of the Arabidopsis YSLs that are most closely related to the founding member of the family, ZmYS1 (e.g., AtYSL1, AtYSL2 and AtYSL3, but there is little information concerning members of the other two well-conserved YSL clades. Here, we provide evidence that AtYSL4 and AtYSL6, which are the only genes in Arabidopsis belong to YSL Group II, are localized to vacuole membranes and to internal membranes resembling endoplasmic reticulum. Both single and double mutants for YSL4 and YSL6 were rigorously analyzed, and have surprisingly mild phenotypes, in spite of the strong and wide-ranging expression of YSL6. However, in the presence of toxic levels of Mn and Ni, plants with mutations in YSL4 and YSL6 and plants overexpressing GFP-tagged YSL6 showed growth defects, indicating a role for these transporters in heavy metal stress responses.

  6. Successful reproduction requires the function of Arabidopsis Yellow Stripe-Like1 and Yellow Stripe-Like3 metal-nicotianamine transporters in both vegetative and reproductive structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Heng-Hsuan; Chiecko, Jeff; Punshon, Tracy; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E; Walker, Elsbeth L

    2010-09-01

    Several members of the Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) family of proteins are transporters of metals that are bound to the metal chelator nicotianamine or the related set of mugineic acid family chelators known as phytosiderophores. Here, we examine the physiological functions of three closely related Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) YSL family members, AtYSL1, AtYSL2, and AtYSL3, to elucidate their role(s) in the allocation of metals into various organs of Arabidopsis. We show that AtYSL3 and AtYSL1 are localized to the plasma membrane and function as iron transporters in yeast functional complementation assays. By using inflorescence grafting, we show that AtYSL1 and AtYSL3 have dual roles in reproduction: their activity in the leaves is required for normal fertility and normal seed development, while activity in the inflorescences themselves is required for proper loading of metals into the seeds. We further demonstrate that the AtYSL1 and AtYSL2 proteins, when expressed from the AtYSL3 promoter, can only partially rescue the phenotypes of a ysl1ysl3 double mutant, suggesting that although these three YSL transporters are closely related and have similar patterns of expression, they have distinct activities in planta. In particular, neither AtYSL1 nor AtYSL2 is able to functionally complement the reproductive defects exhibited by ysl1ysl3 double mutant plants.

  7. Successful Reproduction Requires the Function of Arabidopsis YELLOW STRIPE-LIKE1 and YELLOW STRIPE-LIKE3 Metal-Nicotianamine Transporters in Both Vegetative and Reproductive Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, H.; Chiecko, J; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Lahner, B; Salt, D; Walker, E

    2010-01-01

    Several members of the Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) family of proteins are transporters of metals that are bound to the metal chelator nicotianamine or the related set of mugineic acid family chelators known as phytosiderophores. Here, we examine the physiological functions of three closely related Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) YSL family members, AtYSL1, AtYSL2, and AtYSL3, to elucidate their role(s) in the allocation of metals into various organs of Arabidopsis. We show that AtYSL3 and AtYSL1 are localized to the plasma membrane and function as iron transporters in yeast functional complementation assays. By using inflorescence grafting, we show that AtYSL1 and AtYSL3 have dual roles in reproduction: their activity in the leaves is required for normal fertility and normal seed development, while activity in the inflorescences themselves is required for proper loading of metals into the seeds. We further demonstrate that the AtYSL1 and AtYSL2 proteins, when expressed from the AtYSL3 promoter, can only partially rescue the phenotypes of a ysl1ysl3 double mutant, suggesting that although these three YSL transporters are closely related and have similar patterns of expression, they have distinct activities in planta. In particular, neither AtYSL1 nor AtYSL2 is able to functionally complement the reproductive defects exhibited by ysl1ysl3 double mutant plants.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Particulate Organic Carbon in the Winisk River, Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Smith, P.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Winisk River begins in the Precambrian rock of the Canadian Shield in Ontario and traverses the Hudson Bay Lowlands before terminating in Hudson Bay. It drains an area of 67,300 km2that is sparsely populated, with remote communities that depend on natural resources. Accelerated decomposition of organic carbon (OC) in the area due to climate change is supported by higher inputs of particulate and dissolved OC to surface waters (Amon et al, 2012). The Winisk River is a particularly important source of OC to Hudson Bay, shown by high rates of lignin accumulation near the mouth of the river (Kuzyk et al., 2008). Webequie First Nation (WFN) is a small community located on Eastwood Island in Winisk Lake. It is the closest community to the proposed massive development of the "Ring of Fire" chromite and other mineral deposits in the James Bay Lowlands. Mine-related developments can be expected to impact water flows, water chemistry, and carbon cycling in the region. We sampled water and sediment at the major inlets to the lake and at the northern outlet within the territorial boundaries to characterize water chemistry, relate lignin compositional patterns to C and N isotopic signatures, and interpret temporal patterns in advance of development and future climate change. Organic C in the sediments ranged from around 1% to around 30%. Samples were analyzed for lignin compounds using a CuO digestion method coupled to GC-MS to identify lignin-phenol monomers, benzoic acids, and p-hydroxy acid. Ratios of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, P-hydroxy phenols and cinnamyl phenols to total vanillyl phenols indicate that gymnosperm wood and sphagnum peat dominate the OC pool, although the proportions of gymnosperm- and sphagnum-derived material vary between sites. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N) suggests that other inputs of OC may be present that are consistent with OM derived from the erosion of older marine sediments. The results support that the proportion of sphagnum mosses

  9. Differences in the response of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) and a harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to an acoustic alarm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Jennings, N.; Verboom, W.C.; Haan, D.de; Schooneman, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Small cetacean bycatch in gillnet fisheries may be reduced by deterring odontocetes from nets acoustically. However, different odontocete species may respond differently to acoustic signals from alarms. Therefore, in this study a striped dolphin and a harbour porpoise were subjected simultaneously

  10. Genome Sequence of Acidovorax avenae Strain T10_61 Associated with Sugarcane Red Stripe in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Paola D.; Fontana, Cecilia A.; Bassi, Daniela; Puglisi, Edoardo; Salazar, Sergio M.; Vignolo, Graciela M.; Coccocelli, Pier S.

    2016-01-01

    Red stripe of sugarcane in Argentina is a bacterial disease caused by Acidovorax avenae. The genome sequence from the first isolate of this bacterium in Argentina is presented here. The draft genome of the A.?avenae T10_61 strain contains 5,646,552?bp and has a G+C content of 68.6?mol%.

  11. Interactions with the actin cytoskeleton are required for cell wall localization of barley stripe mosaic virus TGB proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host cytoskeleton and membrane system are the main routes by which plant viruses move within or between cells. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) -induced actin filament thickening was visualized in the cytoskeleton of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells expressing DsRed:Talin. ...

  12. Molecular characterization of a wheat -Thinopyrum ponticum partial amphiploid and its derived substitution line for resistance to stripe rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Guang-Rong; Zeng, Zi-Xian; Chang, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Zu-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis) occurs annually in most wheat-growing areas of the world. Thinopyrum ponticum has provided novel rust resistance genes to protect wheat from this fungal disease. Wheat - Th. ponticum partial amphiploid line 7430 and a substitution line X005 developed from crosses between wheat and 7430 were resistant to stripe rust isolates from China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis using Pseudoroegneria spicata genomic DNA as a probe demonstrated that the partial amphiploid line 7430 contained ten J(s) and six J genome chromosomes, and line X005 had a pair of J(s)-chromosomes. Giemsa-C banding further revealed that both lines 7430 and X005 were absent of wheat chromosomes 6B. The EST based PCR confirmed that the introduced J(s) chromosomes belonging to linkage group 6, indicating that line X005 was a 6J(s)/6B substitution line. Both resistance observation and sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers displayed that the introduced chromosomes 6J(s) were responsible for the stripe rust resistances. Therefore, lines 7430 and X005 can be used as a donor in wheat breeding for stripe rust resistance.

  13. 76 FR 32911 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Striped...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... (approximately 12 to 15 years) in order to cope with unfavorable stochastic environmental events (e.g., drought..., p. 610) found a decline in striped newts due to persistent drought conditions. Johnson (2002, p. 399... longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystems (Johnson 2001, p. 114; Johnson 2005, p. 95). Within metapopulations...

  14. 75 FR 13720 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Striped...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... climate change on this species and its habitat. If we determine that listing the striped newt is warranted... olive- green to dark brown. The belly is yellow, usually sparsely marked with black specks. The skin of... pond where its skin changes into the aquatic adult form. If a breeding pond retains water and does not...

  15. Effect of salinity on expression of branchial ion transporters in striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Madsen, Steffen Søndergaard; Borski, Russell John

    2004-01-01

    The time course of osmoregulatory adjustments and expressional changes of three key ion transporters in the gill were investigated in the striped bass during salinity acclimations. In three experiments, fish were transferred from fresh water (FW) to seawater (SW), from SW to FW, and from 15-ppt b...

  16. Simulated Impacts of Climate Change on Current Farming Locations of Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus; Sauvage) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.A.; Dang, V.H.; Bosma, R.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Leemans, R.; Silva, De S.S.

    2014-01-01

    In Vietnam, culturing striped catfish makes an important contribution to the Mekong Delta's economy. Water level rise during rainy season and salt intrusion during dry season affect the water exchange and quality for this culture. Sea level rise as a consequence of climate change will worsen these

  17. Actin Cytoskeleton and Golgi Involvement in Barley stripe mosaic virus Movement and Cell Wall Localization of Triple Gene Block Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, H.S.; Lee, M.Y.; Moon, J.S.; Moon, J.K.; Yu, Y.M.; Cho, I.S.; Bae, H.; Boer, de S.M.; Ju, H.; Hammond, J.; Jackson, A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) induces massive actin filament thickening at the infection front of infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. To determine the mechanisms leading to actin remodeling, fluorescent protein fusions of the BSMV triple gene block (TGB) proteins were coexpressed in cells

  18. Novel QTL for stripe rust resistance on chromosomes 4A and 6B in soft white winter wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) of wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a devastating disease in temperate regions when susceptible varieties are grown and environmental conditions sustain high disease pressures. With frequent and severe outbreaks, disease resistance is a key too...

  19. Effect of ingredient particle sizes and dietary viscosity on digestion and faecal waste of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Tu; Hien, T.T.T.; Bosma, R.H.; Heinsbroek, L.T.N.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Schrama, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    The ingredients' particle size and dietary viscosity may alter digestion, performance and faecal waste management of fish. This study aimed to assess the effect of grinding screen sizes of feed ingredients and dietary viscosity on digestibility, faecal waste and performance of striped catfish

  20. Differences in the response of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) and a harbour popoise (Phocoena phocoena) to an acoustic alarm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Jennings, N.; Verboom, W.C.; Haan, de D.; Schooneman, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Small cetacean bycatch in gillnet fisheries may be reduced by deterring odontocetes from nets acoustically. However, different odontocete species may respond differently to acoustic signals from alarms. Therefore, in this study a striped dolphin and a harbour porpoise were subjected simultaneously

  1. Morphology of the lymph nodes in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Snjezana; Lucić, H; Gomercić, H; Duras Gomercić, Martina; Gomercić, T; Skrtić, Darinka; Curković, Snjezana

    2005-01-01

    Morphology of the lymph nodes was examined in six bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and three striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Adriatic Sea. All animals had been found dead in nature. One group of the nodes was taken from the tracheal branching area and was marked as bifurcational lymph node, and the other group was taken from the mesenteric root and was marked as mesenteric lymph node. Microscopic analysis showed that the lymph nodes in both dolphin species were surrounded by a connective tissue capsule comprising smooth muscle cells. The parenchyma of the mesenteric and bifurcational lymph nodes in bottlenose dolphin was divided into the peripherally situated cortex with the lymphatic nodules and diffuse lymphatic tissue, and the centrally situated medulla structured of the medullary cords separated by the medullary sinuses. These lymph nodes structurally correspond to the lymph nodes in the majority of terrestrial mammals. The mesenteric lymph node of striped dolphin also had a peripherally situated cortex and a centrally positioned medulla as the majority of terrestrial mammals. In the bifurcational lymph nodes of striped dolphin, there was a central dense lymphatic tissue with the lymphatic nodules and a peripheral less dense lymphatic tissue structured of the cell cords and sinuses. The bifurcational lymph node in striped dolphin resembled porcine lymph nodes and belonged to the inverse lymph nodes.

  2. River Piracy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. River Piracy Saraswati that Disappeared. K S Valdiya. General Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 19-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/05/0019-0028. Author Affiliations.

  3. Bipartite stripe-like order of magneto-crystalline structure in Fe-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A., E-mail: Yazdania@modares.ac.ir; Hesani, M.

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of superconductivity in the iron-based superconductor of “LaFeAsO” is a consequence of the characteristic behavior of antiferromagnetic structure at different triplet critical points. Here, we studied x{sub 2}{sup c} (highest concentration bound) = 0.5. A new second antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure was found that is developed for three different geometrical arrangements of O/H, resulting in three different antiferromagnetic structures at x{sub 2}{sup c} = 0.5. Both crystal and magnetic orderings are a consequence of the stripe-like ordering in the stripe configuration of “H” and “O”. Moreover, in our calculation a strong correlation was obtained between the magnetic and geometrical structures, resulting in the non-uniform magnetic moments of ∼1.30 μβ (AFM1-1) and ∼1.66 μβ (AFM1-3). This phenomenon results in the Jahn-Teller distortion, reflected in the non-uniformity of spin-induced distribution, in the range of 1.07 μβ close to “H” and 1.53 μβ close to “O”, in order to stabilize the ground state of the magneto-crystalline structure. This newly found second antiferromagnetic ordering behaves as the ground state with a lower cohesive energy, resulting in a lower magnetic moment. The effects are more pronounced in the displacement of atomic positions, reflecting in the repulsion of intra-layer La atoms from each other and the attraction of inter-layer Fe atoms toward each other, in direction to induce the anisotropy variable of η ≈ 0.78. - Highlights: • A new second antiferromagnetic structure was found. • Both crystal and magnetic orderings are a consequence of stripe-like ordering. • A strong correlation between the magnetic and geometrical structures was obtained. • Decrease of asymmetrical magnetic moment in direction to the decreased energy. • The effects are more pronounced on the displacement of topological atomic position.

  4. Appraisal of wheat germplasm for adult plant resistance against stripe rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Kamran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The resurgence of wheat stripe rust is of great concern for world food security. Owing to resistance breakdown and the appearance of new virulent high-temperature adapted races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, many high yielding commercial varieties in the country lost their yield potential. Searching for new sources of resistance is the best approach to mitigate the problem. Quantitative resistance (partial or adult plant or durable resistance is reported to be more stable than race specific resistance. In the current perusal, a repertoire of 57 promising wheat lines along with the KLcheck line Morocco, developed through hybridisation and selection of local and international lines with International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT origin, were evaluated under natural field conditions at Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB during the 2012−2013 and 2013−2014 time periods. Final rust severity (FRS, the area under the rust progress curve (AURPC, the relative area under the rust progress curve (rAURPC, and the coefficient of infection (CI were unraveled to infer the level of quantitative resistance. Final rust severity was recorded when the susceptible check exhibited 100% severity. There were 21 lines which were immune (no disease, 16 which were resistant, five moderately resistant, two resistant-to-moderately resistant, one moderately resistant-to-moderately susceptible, 5 moderately susceptible-to-susceptible, one moderately susceptible, and six exhibited a susceptible response. Nevertheless, 51 lines exhibited a high level of partial resistance while the three lines, NW-5-1212-1, NW-7-30-1, and NW-7-5 all showed a moderate level of partial resistance based on FRS, while 54 lines, on the basis of AURPC and rAURPC, were identified as conferring a high level of partial resistance. Moreover, adult plant resistance was conferred by 47 wheat lines, based on CI value. It was striking that, 13 immune lines

  5. THE 31 DEG{sup 2} RELEASE OF THE STRIPE 82 X-RAY SURVEY: THE POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Urry, C. Megan; Ananna, Tonima; Civano, Francesca; Marchesi, Stefano; Pecoraro, Robert [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cappelluti, Nico; Comastri, Andrea; Brusa, Marcella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Richards, Gordon [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Cardamone, Carie [Department of Math and Science, Wheelock College, 200 Riverway, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics MC 0435, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gilfanov, Marat [Max-Planck Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Green, Paul [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Komossa, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Makler, Martin [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); and others

    2016-02-01

    We release the next installment of the Stripe 82 X-ray survey point-source catalog, which currently covers 31.3 deg{sup 2} of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 Legacy field. In total, 6181 unique X-ray sources are significantly detected with XMM-Newton (>5σ) and Chandra (>4.5σ). This catalog release includes data from XMM-Newton cycle AO 13, which approximately doubled the Stripe 82X survey area. The flux limits of the Stripe 82X survey are 8.7 × 10{sup −16} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, 4.7 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and 2.1 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in the soft (0.5–2 keV), hard (2–10 keV), and full bands (0.5–10 keV), respectively, with approximate half-area survey flux limits of 5.4 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, 2.9 × 10{sup −14} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and 1.7 × 10{sup −14} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. We matched the X-ray source lists to available multi-wavelength catalogs, including updated matches to the previous release of the Stripe 82X survey; 88% of the sample is matched to a multi-wavelength counterpart. Due to the wide area of Stripe 82X and rich ancillary multi-wavelength data, including coadded SDSS photometry, mid-infrared WISE coverage, near-infrared coverage from UKIDSS and VISTA Hemisphere Survey, ultraviolet coverage from GALEX, radio coverage from FIRST, and far-infrared coverage from Herschel, as well as existing ∼30% optical spectroscopic completeness, we are beginning to uncover rare objects, such as obscured high-luminosity active galactic nuclei at high-redshift. The Stripe 82X point source catalog is a valuable data set for constraining how this population grows and evolves, as well as for studying how they interact with the galaxies in which they live.

  6. Identification of Cephalosporium stripe resistance quantitative trait loci in two recombinant inbred line populations of winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M Dolores; Zemetra, Robert; Peterson, C James; Mundt, Christopher C

    2015-02-01

    Identification of genome regions linked to Cephalosporium stripe resistance across two populations on chromosome 3BS, 4BS, 5AL, C5BL. Results were compared to a similar previous study. Cephalosporium stripe is a vascular wilt disease of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) caused by the soil-borne fungus Cephalosporium gramineum Nisikado & Ikata. In the USA it is known to be a recurring disease when susceptible cultivars are grown in the wheat-growing region of Midwest and Pacific Northwest. There is no complete resistance in commercial wheat cultivars, although the use of moderately resistant cultivars reduces the disease severity and the amount of inoculum in subsequent seasons. The goal of this study was to detect and to compare chromosomal regions for resistance to Cephalosporium stripe in two winter wheat populations. Field inoculation was performed and Cephalosporium stripe severity was visually scored as percent of prematurely ripening heads (whiteheads) per plot. 'Tubbs'/'NSA-98-0995' and 'Einstein'/'Tubbs', each comprising a cross of a resistant and a susceptible cultivar, with population sizes of 271 and 259 F (5:6) recombinant inbred lines, respectively, were genotyped and phenotyped across four environments. In the quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, six and nine QTL were found, explaining in total, around 30 and 50 % of the phenotypic variation in 'Tubbs'/'NSA-98-0995' and 'Einstein'/'Tubbs', respectively. The QTL with the largest effect from both 'NSA-98-0995' and 'Einstein' was on chromosome 5AL.1 and linked to marker gwm291. Several QTL with smaller effects were identified in both populations on chromosomes 5AL, 6BS, and 3BS, along with other QTL identified in just one population. These results indicate that resistance to Cephalosporium stripe in both mapping populations was of a quantitative nature.

  7. TaRar1 Is Involved in Wheat Defense against Stripe Rust Pathogen Mediated by YrSu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Yaru; Liu, Peng; Ding, Yan; Mu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Xiping; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Mengxin; Huai, Baoyu; Huang, Li; Kang, Zhensheng

    2017-01-01

    RAR1 is a eukaryotic zinc-binding protein first identified as required for race-specific resistance to powdery mildew in barley. To study the function of TaRAR1 involvement in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) defense against the infection of stripe rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), we identified and cloned three wheat homeologous genes highly similar to the barley HvRar1, designated as TaRar1-2A, TaRar1-2B, and TaRar1-2D. The three TaRAR1 proteins all contain two conserved cysteine-and histidine-rich domains (CHORD-I and -II) shared by known RAR1-like proteins. Characterization of TaRar1 expression revealed that the expression was tissue-specific and up-regulated in wheat during stripe rust infection. Moreover, the transcription of TaRar1 was induced by methyl jasmonate, ethylene, and abscisic acid hormones. The same results were observed with drought and wound treatments. After TaRar1 was silenced in wheat cultivar Suwon11 containing the stripe rust resistance gene YrSu, the endogenous salicylic acid (SA) level, the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and the degree of hypersensitive response (HR) were significantly decreased, and the resistance to the avirulent pathotype of stripe rust was compromised. Meanwhile, the expression of catalase, an enzyme required for H2O2-scavenging, was up-regulated. Taken together, we concluded that TaRar1 is involved in wheat defense against stripe rust mediated by YrSu, and the defense was through SA to influence reactive oxygen species accumulation and HR.

  8. Striped nanoscale phase separation at the metal–insulator transition of heteroepitaxial nickelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, G.; Zubko, P.; Maccherozzi, F.; van der Torren, A.J.H.; Boltje, D. B.; Hadjimichael, M.; Manca, N.; Catalano, S.; Gibert, M.; Liu, Y.; Aarts, J.; Triscone, J.-M.; Dhesi, S. S.; Caviglia, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleation processes of mixed-phase states are an intrinsic characteristic of first-order phase transitions, typically related to local symmetry breaking. Direct observation of emerging mixed-phase regions in materials showing a first-order metal–insulator transition (MIT) offers unique opportunities to uncover their driving mechanism. Using photoemission electron microscopy, we image the nanoscale formation and growth of insulating domains across the temperature-driven MIT in NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films. Heteroepitaxy is found to strongly determine the nanoscale nature of the phase transition, inducing preferential formation of striped domains along the terraces of atomically flat stepped surfaces. We show that the distribution of transition temperatures is a local property, set by surface morphology and stable across multiple temperature cycles. Our data provide new insights into the MIT of heteroepitaxial nickelates and point to a rich, nanoscale phenomenology in this strongly correlated material. PMID:27804954

  9. Striped nanoscale phase separation at the metal-insulator transition of heteroepitaxial nickelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, G.; Zubko, P.; Maccherozzi, F.; van der Torren, A. J. H.; Boltje, D. B.; Hadjimichael, M.; Manca, N.; Catalano, S.; Gibert, M.; Liu, Y.; Aarts, J.; Triscone, J.-M.; Dhesi, S. S.; Caviglia, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleation processes of mixed-phase states are an intrinsic characteristic of first-order phase transitions, typically related to local symmetry breaking. Direct observation of emerging mixed-phase regions in materials showing a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) offers unique opportunities to uncover their driving mechanism. Using photoemission electron microscopy, we image the nanoscale formation and growth of insulating domains across the temperature-driven MIT in NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films. Heteroepitaxy is found to strongly determine the nanoscale nature of the phase transition, inducing preferential formation of striped domains along the terraces of atomically flat stepped surfaces. We show that the distribution of transition temperatures is a local property, set by surface morphology and stable across multiple temperature cycles. Our data provide new insights into the MIT of heteroepitaxial nickelates and point to a rich, nanoscale phenomenology in this strongly correlated material.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of the Small Brown Planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus Carrying Rice stripe virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hyun Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe virus (RSV, the type member of the genus Tenuivirus, transmits by the feeding behavior of small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus. To investigate the interactions between the virus and vector insect, total RNA was extracted from RSV-viruliferous SBPH (RVLS and non-viruliferous SBPH (NVLS adults to construct expressed sequence tag databases for comparative transcriptome analysis. Over 30 million bases were sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing to construct 1,538 and 953 of isotigs from the mRNA of RVLS and NVLS, respectively. The gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrated that both libraries have similar GO structures, however, the gene expression pattern analysis revealed that 17.8% and 16.8% of isotigs were up- and down-regulated significantly in the RVLS, respectively. These RSV-dependently regulated genes possibly have important roles in the physiology of SBPH, transmission of RSV, and RSV and SBPH interaction.

  11. Transmission Biology of Rice Stripe Mosaic Virus by an Efficient Insect Vector Recilia dorsalis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe mosaic virus (RSMV is a newly discovered species of cytorhabdovirus infecting rice plants that is transmitted by the leafhopper Recilia dorsalis. In this study, the transmission characteristics of RSMV by R. dorsalis were investigated. Under suitable growth conditions for R. dorsalis, the RSMV acquisition rate reached 71.9% in the second-generation population raised on RSMV-infected rice plants. The minimum acquisition and inoculation access periods of R. dorsalis were 3 and 30 min, respectively. The minimum and maximum latent transmission periods of RSMV in R. dorsalis were 6 and 18 d, respectively, and some R. dorsalis intermittently transmitted RSMV at 2–6 d intervals. Our findings revealed that the virus can replicate in the leafhopper body, but is likely not transovarially transmitted to offspring. These transmission characteristics will help guide the formulation of RSMV prevention and control strategies.

  12. Ladies in stripes: taxonomic confusion in a potential mimicry complex among Wallacean Coccinellidae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahui; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Pang, Hong; Ślipiński, Adam

    2014-12-24

    Two species of ladybird beetles, one belonging to Phrynocaria Timberlake (Coccinellni) and the second to Chilocorus Leach (Chilocorini) collected by R.A. Wallace in the Maluku Islands (Indonesia) have identical body size and colour pattern with longitudinal stripes on elytra. Their external features were so similar that G.R. Crotch included both of them in the type series of Chilocorus wallacii Crotch, 1874. The specimen designated as the lectotype of Chilocorus wallacii belongs to Phrynocaria. Coelophora wallacii Crotch, 1874 is also transferred to Phrynocaria (new comb.) and becomes senior homonym and Phrynocaria crotchi new name is proposed for the secondary junior homonym. Chilocorus crotchi sp. nov. is described for the taxon misidentified as Chilocorus wallacii Crotch.

  13. Dirac Nodal Lines and Tilted Semi-Dirac Cones Coexisting in a Striped Boron Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghong; Xie, Yuee; Zhang, Zhongwei; Zhong, Chengyong; Li, Yafei; Chen, Zhongfang; Chen, Yuanping

    2017-04-20

    The enchanting Dirac fermions in graphene stimulated us to seek other 2D Dirac materials, and boron monolayers may be a good candidate. So far, a number of monolayer boron sheets have been theoretically predicted, and three have been experimentally prepared. However, none of intrinsic sheets possess Dirac electrons near the Fermi level. Herein, by means of density functional theory computations, we identified a new boron monolayer, namely, hr-sB, with two types of Dirac fermions coexisting in the sheet: One type is related to Dirac nodal lines traversing Brillouin zone (BZ) with velocities approaching 106 m/s, and the other is related to tilted semi-Dirac cones with strong anisotropy. This newly predicted boron monolayer consists of hexagon and rhombus stripes. With an exceptional stability comparable to the experimentally achieved boron sheets, it is rather optimistic to grow hr-sB on some suitable substrates such as the Ag (111) surface.

  14. Morphology of lamellae-forming block copolymer films between two orthogonal chemically nanopatterned striped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoliang; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Nygård, Kim; Satapathy, Dillip K; Bunk, Oliver; de Pablo, Juan J; Nealey, Paul F

    2012-02-10

    The structure of block copolymers results from the interplay between weak intermolecular forces, typically in the order of k(B)T per molecule. This is particularly true for block copolymer thin films in the presence of chemically patterned surfaces, where the different contributions to the total free energy, the interfacial and bulklike terms, have comparable magnitudes. Here, we report on the structures formed by block copolymers films equilibrated between two chemically patterned surfaces with orthogonal stripes. Our experiments and simulations reveal that the domains are continuous through the film and the interface between domains resembles the Scherk's first minimal surface. The impact of chemical patterns on block copolymer morphologies and the underlying physics gives insight into the nanofabrication of complex nanostructures with directed self-assembly using two engineered boundary conditions, as opposed to only one.

  15. Gait transition and oxygen consumption in swimming striped surfperch Embiotoca lateralis Agassiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannas, M.; Schaefer, J.; Domenici, P.

    2006-01-01

    A flow-through respirometer and swim tunnel was used to estimate the gait transition speed (Up-c) of striped surfperch Embiotoca lateralis, a labriform swimmer, and to investigate metabolic costs associated with gait transition. The Up-c was defined as the lowest speed at which fish decrease...... the use of pectoral fins significantly. While the tail was first recruited for manoeuvring at relatively low swimming speeds, the use of the tail at these low speeds [as low as 0·75 body (fork) lengths s-1, LF s-1) was rare (..., either in addition to pectoral fins or during burst-and-coast mode. Oxygen consumption increased exponentially with swimming speeds up to gait transition, and then levelled off. Similarly, cost of transport (CT) decreased with increasing speed, and then levelled off near Up-c. When speeds =Up...

  16. Stability of Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, Marianne; Madsen, Christian Toft; Jessing, Stine

    2007-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can be used as a powerful tool for functional genomics studies in plants. With this approach, it is possible to target most genes and downregulate the messenger (m)RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is an established VIGS vector...... for barley and wheat; however, silencing using this vector is generally transient, with efficient silencing often being confined to the first two or three systemically infected leaves. To investigate this further, part of the barley Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene was inserted into BSMV and the resulting...... photobleaching in infected barley plants was used as a reporter for silencing. In addition, downregulation of PDS mRNA was measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Using fragments of PDS ranging from 128 to 584 nucleotides in BSMV, we observed that insert length...

  17. COLUMN GENERATION TECHNIQUE FOR SOLVING TWO-DIMENSIONAL CUTTING STOCK PROBLEMS: METHOD OF STRIPE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Novianingsih

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two-dimensional cutting stock problems where single rectangular stocks have to be cut into some smaller rectangular so that the number of stocks needed to satisfy the demands is minimum. In this paper we focus our study to the problem where the stocks have to be cut with guillotine cutting type and fixed orientation of finals. We formulate the problem as an integer programming, where the relaxation problem is solved by column generation technique. New pattern generation is formulated based on method of stripe. In obtaining the integer solution, we round down the optimal solution of the relaxation problem and then we derive an extra mix integer programming for satisfying the unmet demands. The optimal solution of the original problem is the combination of the round-down solution and the optimal solution of the extra mix integer programming.A numerical example of the problem is given in the end of this paper.

  18. Tissue distribution of metals in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Apulian coasts, southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellicchio, N; Giandomenico, S; Ragone, P; Di Leo, A

    2000-02-01

    Tissue distributions of metals (mercury, lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) were determined in six specimens of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba, Meyen) stranded on the Apulian coasts (Southern Italy) between February and June 1987. Methyl mercury and selenium were also determined in the liver samples. The liver accumulated the highest concentrations of metals, except for cadmium and chromium. Metal levels were higher than those found in dolphins living in the Atlantic, but lower than those recorded in the same species from the French Mediterranean coasts. Necroscopic surveys found that all specimens were affected by haemorrhagic gastritis, but the cause was not clear. While it was not possible to related the death of dolphins to a specific cause, or to contaminants, the accumulation of metals is likely to contribute to the health of the organism and represents a risk factor for dolphins.

  19. Chronic meningoencephalitis associated with Brucella sp. infection in live-stranded striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, L; Patterson, I A; Reid, R J; Foster, G; Barberán, M; Blasco, J M; Kennedy, S; Howie, F E; Godfroid, J; MacMillan, A P; Schock, A; Buxton, D

    2002-01-01

    A chronic, non-suppurative meningoencephalitis was found in three young striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) during routine neuropathological examination of marine mammals live-stranded on the Scottish coast. In all three dolphins the lesions were associated with the isolation of a Brucella sp. from the brain and with the immunohistochemical detection of brucella antigen. Moreover, antibodies to Brucella spp. were detected in the two dolphins that were subjected to serological examination. Immunohistochemical and serological examinations for morbillivirus antigen and antibodies, respectively, were negative in all cases. Although brucella infection of marine mammals has been extensively documented in recent years, its association with lesions and disease is less well recognized. The present report provides the first description of an association between Brucella sp. infection and neuropathological changes in a cetacean species. Copyright Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  20. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in meningo-encephalitis affected striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Cesare, Angela; Otranto, Domenico; Casalone, Cristina; Iulini, Barbara; Mignone, Walter; Tittarelli, Cristiana; Meloni, Silvana; Castagna, Giuseppe; Forster, Fiona; Kennedy, Seamus; Traversa, Donato

    2011-12-29

    This study reports the occurrence of Toxoplasma gondii in the brain of three striped dolphins (Stenella ceoruleoalba) found stranded on the Ligurian Sea coast of Italy between 2007 and 2008. These animals showed a severe, subacute to chronic, non-purulent, multifocal meningo-encephalitis, with the cerebral parenchyma of two dolphins harbouring protozoan cysts and zoites immunohistochemically linked to T. gondii. Molecular, phylogenetic and mutation scanning analyses showed the occurrence of Type II and of an atypical Type II T. gondii isolates in one and two dolphins, respectively. In spite of the different molecular patterns characterizing the above T. gondii genotypes, the brain lesions observed in the three animals showed common microscopic features, with no remarkable differences among them. The role of T. gondii in causing the meningo-encephalitis is herein discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Insecticide pyrethroids in liver of striped dolphin from the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Alemany, Òscar; Giménez, Joan; de Stephanis, Renaud; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2017-06-01

    Pyrethroid pesticides were analysed in liver of striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Alboran Sea (south of Spain, Mediterranean Sea). The occurrence and bioaccumulation of pyrethroid insecticides in marine mammal tissues from the northern hemisphere had never been determined before. Pyrethroids were detected in 87% of the specimens with a mean total concentration of 300 ng g-1 lw ± 932 (range 2.7-5200 ng g-1 lw). Permethrin and tetramethrin were the main contributors to the pyrethroid profiles, with enantiospecific accumulation for the first and isomer specific accumulation for the latter. Bioaccumulation of pyrethroids was unlike that of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), as pyrethroid concentrations were not correlated to the maturity stage of the specimens. Concentrations slightly increased from calves to juveniles, whereas juveniles presented similar concentrations to adults. Metabolization of pyrethroids after achieving sexual maturity might account for this pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Organochlorine residues in harp seals, Phoca groenlandica, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait: An evaluation of contaminant concentrations and burdens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, G.G.; Smith, T.G. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Nanaimo, BC (Canada)); Addison, R.F. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Sidney, BC (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    Organochlorine contaminant concentrations and burdens were evaluated in blubber samples from 50 harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) obtained from the estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait, Canada between December 1988 and December 1989. The concentration and burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) increased significantly during the winter months for males occupying the St. Lawrence estuary. The potential for rapid accumulation of contaminants in the estuary was also observed among females: nine postpartum females (1 month after weaning) had higher organochlorine levels than prepartum females from the same location. The lowest observed contaminant concentrations and burdens were in seals from Hudson Strait in autumn. In winter specimens, males had DDT and PCB concentrations about 4 and 2 times as great, respectively, as females of similar age distribution and collection date. Congeners with IUPAC Nos. 138 and 153 accounted for more than 50% of total identifiable PCBs, which is consistent with their prevalence in other marine biota. The concentration of PCBs has declined and the percent p,p'-DDE of total DDT has increased between 1982 and the present study. Unlike the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), harp seals occupy the more polluted waters of the estuary only seasonally, and this may account for their lower residue concentrations. 59 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  3. Species associations and habitat influence the range-wide distribution of breeding Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) on Western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Matthew E.; Andersen, David E.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Humburg, Dale D.

    2017-01-01

    Inter- and intra-specific interactions are potentially important factors influencing the distribution of populations. Aerial survey data, collected during range-wide breeding population surveys for Eastern Prairie Population (EPP) Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior), 1987–2008, were evaluated to assess factors influencing their nesting distribution. Specifically, associations between nesting Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) and EPP Canada Geese were quantified; and changes in the spatial distribution of EPP Canada Geese were identified. Mixed-effects Poisson regression models of EPP Canada Goose nest counts were evaluated within a cross-validation framework. The total count of EPP Canada Goose nests varied moderately among years between 1987 and 2008 with no long-term trend; however, the total count of nesting Lesser Snow Geese generally increased. Three models containing factors related to previous EPP Canada Goose nest density (representing recruitment), distance to Hudson Bay (representing brood-habitat), nesting habitat type, and Lesser Snow Goose nest density (inter-specific associations) were the most accurate, improving prediction accuracy by 45% when compared to intercept-only models. EPP Canada Goose nest density varied by habitat type, was negatively associated with distance to coastal brood-rearing areas, and suggested density-dependent intra-specific effects on recruitment. However, a non-linear relationship between Lesser Snow and EPP Canada Goose nest density suggests that as nesting Lesser Snow Geese increase, EPP Canada Geese locally decline and subsequently the spatial distribution of EPP Canada Geese on western Hudson Bay has changed.

  4. Effect of food restriction on energy budget in warm-acclimated striped hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Qiao-Xia; Cao, Jing; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of small mammals to sustain periods of food shortage largely depends on the adaptive regulation of energy budget in response to the decrease in food supply. In addition to food availability, ambient temperature (Ta) is an important factor affecting the rates of both energy intake and expenditure. To examine the effect of Ta on energy strategy and the capacity to sustain food shortage, striped hamsters were exposed to a warm condition (30°C) and were then restricted to 70% of ad libitum food intake. Body mass, energy intake and expenditure and physiological markers indicative of thermogenesis were measured. Warm exposure had no effect on body mass and digestibility, but decreased energy intake, basal metabolic rate and maximum nonshivering thermogenesis. The mitochondria protein content, cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncoupling protein 1 level of brown adipose tissue were significantly lower in hamsters at 30°C than at 21°C. Food restriction induced a significant decrease in body mass, but the decreased body mass was attenuated at 30°C relative to 21°C. This suggests that striped hamsters could not compensate for the limited food supply by decreasing daily energy expenditure at 21°C, whereas they could at 30°C. The significant reductions in the rates of metabolism and thermogenesis in warm-acclimated hamsters increase the capacity to cope with food shortage. Although, it remains uncertain whether this response represents some generalized evolutionary adaptation, the Ta-dependent adjustment in the capacity to survive food restriction may reflect that warm acclimation plays an important role in adaptive regulation of both physiology and behavior in response to the variations of food availability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoperiod and temperature differently affect immune function in striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Li; Hu, Xiao-Kai

    2017-02-01

    Small mammals generally use short day length to elevate immune function to counteract the immunosuppressive effect of low temperature in winter in light of the winter immunoenhancement hypothesis. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis in striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis). We expected that immune responses would be increased by short photoperiod but suppressed by low temperature. Thirty-four adult female hamsters were randomly divided into the long day (16L:8D) and short day (8L:16D) groups, which were further assigned into the warm (23±1°C) and the cold (5±1°C) groups, respectively. We found that body mass was not affected by photoperiod or temperature. Contrary to our expectation, short day reduced phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) response indicative of cellular immunity and the levels of immunoglobin (Ig) M. It had no effect on total body fat mass, thymus and spleen masses, white blood cells (WBC) and Ig G titers. As expected, cold stress decreased total body fat mass, WBC, Ig G and Ig M titers. However, it did not influence the masses of thymus and spleen and PHA responses. The levels of blood glucose, serum leptin and corticosterone were all not affected by temperature or photoperiod except that corticosterone levels were increased by short days. No significant correlations were detected among the levels of blood glucose, serum leptin, corticosterone and all the detected immunological parameters. Taken together, short photoperiod suppressed both cellular and humoral immunity in striped hamsters, which did not support the winter immunoenhancement hypothesis. Cold stress reduced humoral immunity and WBC, which might account for the highest mortality in winter in this species. Blood glucose, leptin and corticosterone could not interpret the changes of immunity in hamsters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nocardia seriolae infection in the three striped tigerfish, Terapon jarbua (Forsskål).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P-C; Chen, S-D; Tsai, M-A; Weng, Y-J; Chu, S-Y; Chern, R-S; Chen, S-C

    2009-04-01

    An epizootic in pond cultured three striped tigerfish, Terapon jarbua, in Taiwan was caused by Nocardia seriolae. Diseased fish first showed clinical signs and mortalities in February and March 2003. The cumulative mortality within 2 months was 2.4% (1200 of 50 000) and affected fish were 7 months old with total lengths from 18 to 25 cm. Most affected fish were pale and lethargic with haemorrhages and ulcers on the skin. The most significant gross pathological changes were varying degrees of ascites and enlargement of the spleen, kidney and liver. Obvious white nodules, varying in size, were found in these organs. Bacteria were either coccal or filamentous in appearance, with bead-like forms. Isolates from diseased fish were characterized using the API ZYM (Analytical profile index; Bio Mérieux, France) systems and conventional tests and identified as Nocardia sp. The isolate was designated NS127 and was confirmed as N. seriolae by a polymerase chain reaction assay that gave the expected specific 432 bp amplicon. In addition, its 16S rDNA sequence gave 100% sequence identity with N. seriolae. A partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene, heat shock protein gene and RNA polymerase gene (rpo B) of NS127 and the type strain of N. seriolae BCRC 13745 formed a monophyletic clade with a high sequence similarity and bootstrap value of 99.9%. White nodules induced in experimental fish were similar to naturally infected cases and N. seriolae was re-isolated on brain heart infusion agar. This is the first report of N. seriolae-infection in three striped tigerfish in aquaculture.

  7. Stripe-teeth metamaterial Al- and Nb-based rectennas (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Richard M.; Giardini, Stephen A.; Carlson, Joel B.; Joghee, Prabhuram; O'Hayre, Ryan P.; Diest, Kenneth; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2015-09-01

    Unlike a semiconductor, where the absorption is limited by the band gap, a "microrectenna array" could theoretically very efficiently rectify any desired portion of the infrared frequency spectrum (25 - 400 THz). We investigated vertical metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes that rectify vertical high-frequency fields produced by a metamaterial planar stripe-teeth Al or Au array (above the diodes), similar to stripe arrays that have demonstrated near-perfect absorption in the infrared due to critical coupling [1]. Using our design rules that maximize asymmetry (and therefore the component of the electric field pointed into the substrate, analogous to Second Harmonic Generation), we designed, fabricated, and analyzed these metamaterial-based microrectenna arrays. NbOx and Al2O3 were produced by anodization and ALD, respectively. Smaller visible-light Pt-NbOx-Nb rectennas have produced output power when illuminated by visible (514 nm) light [2]. The resonances of these new Au/NbOx/Nb and Al/Al2O3/Al microrectenna arrays, with larger dimensions and more complex nanostructures than in Ref. 1, were characterized by microscopic FTIR microscopy and agreed well with FDTD models, once the experimental refractive index values were entered into the model. Current-voltage measurements were carried out, showed that the Al/Al2O3/Al diodes have very large barrier heights and breakdown voltages, and were compared to our model of the MIM diode. We calculate expected THz-rectification using classical [3] and quantum [4] rectification models, and compare to measurements of direct current output, under infrared illumination. [1] C. Wu, et. al., Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011) 075102. [2] R. M. Osgood III, et. al., Proc. SPIE 8096, 809610 (2011). [3] A. Sanchez, et. al., J. Appl. Phys. 49 (1978) 5270. [4] J. R. Tucker and M. J. Feldman, Rev. of Mod. Phys. 57, (1985)1055.

  8. Effect of the tiger stripes on the tidal deformation of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, Ondrej; Hron, Jaroslav; Behounkova, Marie; Cadek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    The south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus has been subjected to a thorough scientific scrutiny since the Cassini mission discovery of an enigmatic system of fractures informally known as "tiger stripes". This fault system is possibly connected to the internal water ocean and exhibits a striking geological activity manifesting itself in the form of active water geysers on the moon's surface.The effect of the faults on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with the implementation of fractures in continuum mechanics models. Employing an open source finite element FEniCS package, we provide a numerical estimate of the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on the tidal deformation and the heat production in Enceladus's ice shell by representing the faults as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole shell.For a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, and for linear elastic rheology, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat flux and to a complex deformation pattern in this area. We also present preliminary results studying the effects of (i) variable ice-shell thickness, based on the recent topography, gravity and libration inversion model by Čadek et al. (2016) and (ii) Maxwell viscoelastic rheology on the global tidal deformation of the ice shell.O.S. acknowledges support by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic through the project 15-14263Y.

  9. Pathology of morbillivirus infection in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Valencia and Murcia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, P J; Geraci, J R; Raga, J A; Calzada, N

    1992-01-01

    During the summer and fall of 1990 hundreds of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) died in the Spanish Mediterranean as a result of morbillivirus infection. A pathological investigation was carried out on dolphins from Valencia and Murcia which were among the first to die in the epizootic. The dolphins were in poor body condition and pneumonia was the main necropsy finding. Microscopic lung lesions characterized by necrosis of bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium and infiltration of alveoli with macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils and multinucleated syncytia were seen in most dolphins. Cytoplasmic and nuclear eosinophilic viral inclusions were present in bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium and in syncytia. Focal granulomatous inflammation associated with nematodes was also present. Brain lesions included diffuse degeneration and necrosis of neurons, microgliosis, perivascular cuffing, formation of syncytia and focal demyelination. Cytoplasmic and nuclear eosinophilic inclusions were present in neurons and glial cells. There was severe lymphoid necrosis and depletion of spleen and lymph nodes and syncytia also occurred in lymph nodes. Biliary and transitional epithelium contained nuclear and cytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions. Immunoperoxidase staining using monoclonal antibodies to phocine distemper virus confirmed the presence of morbillivirus antigens in lung and brain. The distribution and severity of lesions in striped dolphins are similar to those of distemper in seals, harbor porpoises and terrestrial mammals. The formation of syncytia in the lung and brain may be a useful pathological indicator of morbillivirus infection and may be used in the investigation of pinniped and cetacean strandings in North America. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1423061

  10. Topographical variation in lipid content and morphological structure of the blubber in the striped dolphin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encarna Gómez-Campos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate stratification patterns and topographical variations in the blubber of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba to gain insights into its regionally-specific functions. We collected blubber from 10 stranded striped dolphins (5 females and 5 males from the eastern coast of Spain in 2007-2009, at 11 body positions. Histological measurements (adipocyte number and area and blubber lipid content were analysed for each position. Histological measurements revealed stratification of blubber into outer, middle, and inner layers. Both the adipocyte number and area were largest in the middle layer. The adipocyte number was higher in the outer than the inner layer, whereas the adipocyte area was higher in the inner than the outer layer. The ventral anterior position did not follow this pattern, likely due to its proximity to the acoustic blubber, which is known to have a different biochemical composition. The stratification in morphological blubber characteristics most likely reflects functional differences. The outer layer may provide structural support and act as a mechanical barrier with a minor role in energy storage. The middle layer may be responsible for thermoregulation, and the inner layer could be responsible for energy mobilization, which is favoured by its proximity to the body core and a higher vascularization. In addition, an increasing gradient from dorsal to ventral positions was observed in the mean number of adipocytes and lipid content, with the exception of the caudal region. Although both ventral and dorsal blubber can have insulator and buoyancy functions, the ventral blubber may mainly serve as an energy reserve.

  11. Evaluation of thermal striping for the plugging system in the secondary auxiliary cooling system in JOYO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isozaki, Kazunori; Ogawa, Tooru; Kubo, Atsuhiko; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Kenji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Sugaya, Kazushi

    1998-05-01

    Scrutiny based on the convenient evaluation to verify whether we have the place where thermal striping in the pipe confluence part was thought to be a primary factor for the heavy accident or not has been done in JOYO. As the result, the big temperature difference ({Delta}Tin) existed at the inner pipe confluence part of the plugging system in the secondary main and auxiliary cooling system. Therefore, detailed evaluation of thermal striping was needed. With the thermocouples of high response installed, the temperature fluctuation in outer surface of the pipe was measured on the secondary auxiliary plugging system for the reason why the temperature difference ({Delta}Tin) was the biggest. And, the temperature fluctuation in inner surface of the pipe and stress occurring in the pipe plate thickness direction was evaluated by means of non-linear structure analysis system FINAS`. The above-mentioned evaluation results were as follows. (1) The maximum temperature fluctuation occurring in the pipe was always located from the center of inner pipe confluence to 10 mm position of the down-stream side. (2) The maximum temperature fluctuation range was about 33degC in outer surface of the pipe. And, controlling frequency of the temperature fluctuation was 0.04 Hz and 0.09 Hz. (3) Time delay was almost never contained in the temperature fluctuation elements between inner and outer surface of the pipe. And, the big temperature distribution did not occur in the pipe plate thickness direction was confirmed that the big temperature distribution did not occur in the pipe plate thickness direction. The temperature fluctuation range in the pipe inner surface was almost the same as that of the pipe outer surface. It was confirmed that the stress occurring there was enough lowered than the design fatigue limit of SUS304 which was the materials in the confluence part of the plugging system inner part in the secondary main and auxiliary cooling system. (J.P.N.)

  12. Effects of food supplementation on depredation of duck nests in prairies by striped skunks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R.J.; Pietruszewski, D.G.; Crawford, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    We examined provision of supplemental food as a method for reducing depredation of upland-duck nests, especially by striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Predators negatively influence duck recruitment in grassland ecosystems. Managers are in search of methods, particularly nonlethal methods, for reducing nest depredation. We conducted this study on 24 areas managed for wildlife production in the Prairie Pothole Region of central North Dakota during 1993-1994. We provided a mix of fish offal and sunflower seeds on 12 areas; no food was provided on the remaining 12 control areas. Although we observed a tendency during both years for higher nest success rates on provisioned areas ( = 46%, 1993; 36%, 1994) than on control areas ( = 27%, 1993; 31%, 1994), mean nest success rates (Mayfield 1961) overall did not differ significantly between food-provisioned areas ( = 41%) and control areas ( = 29%). Striped skunk depredation rate was lower on food-provisioned areas (11%) than on control areas (24%), suggesting that skunks reduced their consumption of eggs when provided with a food supplement. In 1994, habitat conditions were optimal, and ducks nested persistently into the summer when nest success rates of food-provisioned areas and control areas differed by only 5 percentage points. That year American badgers (Taxidea taxus) and Franklin's ground squirrels (Spermophilus franklinii) apparently compensated for reduced depredation by skunks. Thus, although skunks and other mammalian predators seem to have responded positively to food provisioning, nest depredations overall did not change. Provision of supplemental food apparently has limited value for managing depredation of upland duck nests in the Prairie Pothole Region where predator communities are complex.

  13. Future sea ice conditions in Western Hudson Bay and consequences for polar bears in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro de la Guardia, Laura; Derocher, Andrew E; Myers, Paul G; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Arjen D; Lunn, Nick J

    2013-09-01

    The primary habitat of polar bears is sea ice, but in Western Hudson Bay (WH), the seasonal ice cycle forces polar bears ashore each summer. Survival of bears on land in WH is correlated with breakup and the ice-free season length, and studies suggest that exceeding thresholds in these variables will lead to large declines in the WH population. To estimate when anthropogenic warming may have progressed sufficiently to threaten the persistence of polar bears in WH, we predict changes in the ice cycle and the sea ice concentration (SIC) in spring (the primary feeding period of polar bears) with a high-resolution sea ice-ocean model and warming forced with 21st century IPCC greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenarios: B1 (low), A1B (medium), and A2 (high). We define critical years for polar bears based on proposed thresholds in breakup and ice-free season and we assess when ice-cycle conditions cross these thresholds. In the three scenarios, critical years occur more commonly after 2050. From 2001 to 2050, 2 critical years occur under B1 and A2, and 4 under A1B; from 2051 to 2100, 8 critical years occur under B1, 35 under A1B and 41 under A2. Spring SIC in WH is high (>90%) in all three scenarios between 2001 and 2050, but declines rapidly after 2050 in A1B and A2. From 2090 to 2100, the mean spring SIC is 84 (±7)% in B1, 56 (±26)% in A1B and 20 (±13)% in A2. Our predictions suggest that the habitat of polar bears in WH will deteriorate in the 21st century. Ice predictions in A1B and A2 suggest that the polar bear population may struggle to persist after ca. 2050. Predictions under B1 suggest that reducing GHG emissions could allow polar bears to persist in WH throughout the 21st century. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. 2011 - 2012 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Lidar: Coastal New York (Long Island and along the Hudson River)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  15. National Dam Safety Program. Loon Lake Dam (Inventory Number NY-795), Upper Hudson River Basin, Warren County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    the level of Loon Lake for recreational purposes. 2 *~~~~1*~ - --7 g. Design and Construction History The plan included in this report indicates that... bulders an. .sz𔄀vQ1..d.1.. e. d._ ...n...iuteral Q’ .ardpan r~ttp - resistant ..t.o..ersj. ! l-.o . -..--..ar n...1.mp ..oua

  16. National Dam Safety Program. Garnerville Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 744), Hudson River Basin, Rockland County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    the literature on the general geology of the area. The rock in the area is the Brunswick Formation of the Newark Group of the upper Triassic ... temperature was 600 to 650 F. The reservoir had been lowered about 1 to 2 feet to allow inspection of the spillway crest and downstream face. b. Main Dam The

  17. National Dam Safety Program. Palmer Falls Dam, Upper Hudson River Basin, Saratoga and Warren Counties, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-23

    STATE OF NEW YORK j *fJrj U . MOOREJ ME , . " ALOE ’", , HOvv., RICI&RI, W. S.CRNIAN JO N J. FARqELL ..... . . ALEX. RCFMCKIM j CONSERVATION COMMISSION...ii - - Vol I T RUST SUILONGSTETSON* DALEUTICA . NEW YORK • 13501 (Ria1 I [F ROJECT NAMEDATE SUJECT PROJECT NO. I ODAWN BY II AJ’ * |.’ ~ * V. 4t

  18. National Dam Safety Program. Fresh Air Fund Dam, Site 1 (Deer Lake) (Inventory Number NY288), Lower Hudson River Basin, Dutchess County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    Ca203er DO- fac~et -fra-’ the upstzeo . or do-4nstree. toe3 of the structura. The proxi-ity depends = pon the height of the nearest aJacant o rt of t.’,c...OF PIEJ ENa TPON A lele a- I. - . -V- FILTER ON~ UE 41S t FCA- i741 - O II7-- -r r ’= -- r ~t~4 -tr -- - A.. UE &N r;-, SCALE,2 t 4 -- E NI8 HY--LO

  19. National Dam Safety Program. Mt. Beacon Reservoir (Inventory Number NY- 26), Hudson River Basin, Dutchess County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    7~~-£ ,AJI ~1 U / I, I ,~/ I ’V ) I -..-.- S S - __ ’~ ’~A .A~~~-L-’-.-- - - .q 4ky 44 x 1 ~ij ’ 2? /~’e 0/u/cc/ -~ - ~~s1 I 7~1>,cc/ 5~c//~𔄁 Jcz

  20. National Dam Safety Program. Earl Reservoir Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 203), Lower Hudson River Basin, Orange County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    3.6 feet at the left end of the dam where only the concrete faced masonry core wall is present, and there is virtually no embankment on either side...Structures o. Stability p. Miscellaneous 10) Appurtenant Structures (Power House, Lock, Gatehouse , Other) a. Description and Condition An abandoned pump house

  1. National Dam Safety Program. Altamont Main Reservoir Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 126), Lower Hudson River Basin, Albany County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-05

    return walls, and spillway chute walls and slabs. 4. Monitor the deterioration of the gatehouse catwalk anc repair as reqLired. 5. Monitor the...terrain is moderately steep with well defined drainage paths. The area is heavily wooded and virtually undeveloped. 5.2 ANALYSIS CRITERIA The analysis of...80) 10) Appurtenant Structures (Power House, Lock, Gatehouse , Other) a. Deliption and Condition - 11) Operation Procedures (Lake Level Regulation

  2. National Dam Safety Program. Conklingville Dam, Inventory no. NY 146, Upper Hudson River Basin, Saratoga County, New York. Phase 1 Inspection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-31

    Assessment/Remedial Measures 14 Appendices: A. Geology B. Hydrologic Computat tons C. Photographs D. Pertinent Correspondence and Reports E...Ii1~ II LI II I’ II iii * I I I APPENDIX GEOLOGY -g * I [-I ii LI 4 LI 44 [1 El El < i Conklingville Dam and Sacandaga Lake The bedrock in the vicinity...0,0i. e~ t’ 11U ŕ 7 ’ .vx~ suam wwfi~u ro w vpotAvt 1+99xniVwp - ’\\4..>. 4 - .,,-.. I

  3. Landscape Risk Factors for Lyme Disease in the Eastern Broadleaf Forest Province of the Hudson River Valley and the Effect of Explanatory Data Classification Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity)...

  4. National Dam Safety Program. Fresh Air Fund Dam Number 2 (Inventory Number NY726), Hudson River Basin, Dutchess County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-12

    WORK UNIT NUMBERS COI rkL FFC A,, N ADDRESS 12. REPORT OATE of Enironmntal12 September 1980 Cosrain 5 ofRoad 13. NUMBER OF PAGES 14. ONIORIG AENC NAE ...General3 t-.- Cudu U U 6 b. Condition of Sce’-vicc Spillway ~4c4ztle td AIo eled-ice. JI. 4/’otn4 pI4e o c Cdetc+ n-Al7- see7 /Iced ~6~,ITte’ep or...oe( rIoc e~ td -6 -fhe. idt eui 1tJervfc se _______ I , i_ __ __ *1 ,I I :, I. | . - c. Condition of Auxiliary Spillway !, . fldt_ L L And4. fres

  5. NOAA Digital Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  6. National Dam Safety Program. Churchtown Dam (Inventory Number NY. 79), Lower Hudson River Basin, Columbia County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    DJSTPI8uTIO-4 STATEMENT (of the "b.tr.ct .nt .d In Block 20, II dllf,,’n. ,, I.-, P. Po ,) 18. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES- 19. kifY WORS (Co-AW- nM .. we...weak sedimentary rocks. The lowlands in this vicinity have a narrow inner valley with a conspicuous terrace and gently rolling hills and ridges beyond...built tn o brick setting near the crusher and mixer, and yard. The t.t bbL of cement used per cubic yard connection with the aqueduct , and, second. at

  7. Antecedent Rivers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    far north of the high NandaDevi (7,817 m) - Api Nampa. (7,132 m) range of the Himadri. The Sindhu flows northwestwards, the Satluj goes west, the Karnali takes the southerly course and the Tsangpo flows east. These rivers flow through their pristine channels, carved out at the very outset about 50 to 55 m.y (million years) ...

  8. Effect of RFRP-3 on reproduction is sex- and developmental status-dependent in the striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhong, Min; Xue, Hui-Liang; Ding, Ji-Shun; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Jin-Hui; Chen, Lei; Xu, Lai-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    RFamide-related peptides (RFRPs) are orthologous to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) inhibiting gonadotropin release. There are only two RFRP sequences (RFRP-1 and RFRP-3) encoded in rodents. RFRP-3, which was considered as a hypothetical inhibitor on GnRH, shows a stimulatory effect on the male Syrian and male Siberian hamster in short days. As a dominant rodent pest in northern China farmland, the striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis) has higher reproductive activities and could act as a model to study the mechanism of reproduction. However, the effect of RFRP-3 on the reproductive activity for the striped hamster is less understood. In the study, we cloned 643 bp RFRP cDNA from the striped hamster hypothalamus, which contained an ORF of 570 bp encoding two RFamide-related peptide (RFRP) sequences: SPAPANKVPHSAANLPLRF-NH2 (C. barabensis RFRP-1) and TLSRVPSLPQRF-NH2 (C. barabensis RFRP-3). We also investigated the expression variation of RFRP mRNA and GnRH mRNA in the hypothalamus from hamsters with different developmental statuses (7-week-, 13-week- and 1.5-year-olds) using FQ-PCR, in which the 13-week-old female individuals were in estrous. The striped hamsters that are 7 weeks and 1.5 years old are non-breeding individuals, and those that are 13-week hamsters have breeding phenomena. The highest hypothalamus RFRP mRNA level was found in breeding males as compared to non-breeding males. Conversely, the lowest RFRP mRNA level in the hypothalamus was observed in breeding females, with no significant level when the breeding females were compared to the 7-week-old individuals. Additionally, the investigation of GnRH expression level showed a declining expression trend across the developmental stages (7-week-, 13-week- and 1.5-year-olds) in both sexes. Significant negative and positive relationships were detected in the 13-week estrous female (r=-0.997, P=0.035) and the 13-week male (r=0.998, P=0.029) striped hamsters respectively, which suggest that RFRP-3

  9. River Corridor Easements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — A River Corridor Easement (RCE) is an area of conserved land adjacent to a river or stream that was conserved to permanently protect the lateral area the river needs...

  10. Transport and bottom accumulation of fine river sediments under typhoon conditions and associated submarine landslides: case study of the Peinan River, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchiev, Alexander; Korotenko, Konstantin; Zavialov, Peter; Chiang, Wen-Son; Liu, Cheng-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a three-dimensional Eulerian ocean circulation model (POM) and a Lagrangian particle-tracking model (STRiPE) is used to study the fate of fine river sediments discharged by the Peinan River at the south-eastern coast of the Taiwan Island. The composite model is verified against in situ measurements and applied to simulate primary sediment deposition under freshet and typhoon discharge conditions of the Peinan River. It is shown that local wind plays a crucial role in sediment transport and settling at the coastal area through its influence on the river plume dynamics and turbulent mixing in the upper layer. Wind forcing conditions generally determine the location of the sediment deposit area, while its final pattern is defined by coastal circulation as modulated by the geometry of the coast and local bathymetry. In the study, region river-born sediments are deposited to the sea floor mainly in the shallow shelf areas. A significant portion of discharged fine sediments is moved offshore to the deeper ocean where it is further advected and dispersed by strong coastal circulation mainly governed by the Kuroshio Current. The performed numerical experiments showed that sediment accumulation rate under typhoon conditions is about two orders of magnitude greater comparing to freshet condition. Basing on the simulation results, we identified areas of continental shelf and continental slope adjacent to the Peinan River estuary which exhibit high risk of formation of submarine landslides during and shortly after the typhoon events.

  11. Rapid rates of aerobic methane oxidation at the feather edge of gas hydrate stability in the waters of Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonte, Mihai; Kessler, John D.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Arrington, Eleanor C.; Valentine, David L.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2017-05-01

    Aerobic oxidation is an important methane sink in seawater overlying gas seeps. Recent surveys have identified active methane seeps in the waters of Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin near the updip limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The close proximity of these seeps to the upper stability limit of methane hydrates suggests that changing bottom water temperatures may influence the release rate of methane into the overlying water column. In order to assess the significance of aerobic methane oxidation in limiting the atmospheric expression of methane released from Hudson Canyon, the total extent of methane oxidized along with integrated oxidation rates were quantified. These calculations were performed by combining the measurements of the natural levels of methane concentrations, stable carbon isotopes, and water current velocities into kinetic isotope models yielding rates ranging from 22.8 ± 17 to 116 ± 76 nM/day with an average of 62.7 ± 37 nM/day. Furthermore, an average of 63% of methane released into the water column from an average depth of 515 m was oxidized before leaving this relatively small study area (6.5 km2). Results from the kinetic isotope model were compared to previously-published but concurrently-sampled ex situ measurements of oxidation potential performed using 13C-labeled methane. Ex situ rates were substantially lower, ranging from 0.1 to 22.5 nM/day with an average of 5.6 ± 2.3 nM/day, the discrepancy likely due to the inherent differences between these two techniques. Collectively, the results reveal exceptionally-rapid methane oxidation, with turnover times for methane as low as 0.3-3.7 days, indicating that methane released to the water column is removed quantitatively within the greater extent of Hudson Canyon. The red line represents the original Rayleigh model output, Eq. (1), detailed in the text. The red line represents the original Rayleigh model output, Eq. (1), detailed in the text.

  12. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Richardson, Dennis J; Lindsay, David S

    2006-06-01

    The prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was examined in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 8 cities in Connecticut. Ten (42%) of the 24 striped skunks, 2 of 7 (29%) opossums, and 12 of 12 (100%) raccoons were positive at dilutions of 1:50 or greater. These results suggest that T. gondii is prevalent in the environment, or prey items, or both, of these omnivores in Connecticut.

  13. Clinico-pathological findings in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) affected by rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuric nephrosis (capture myopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsembiante, Federico; Centelleghe, Cinzia; Rossi, Gabriele; Giglio, Stefania; Madeo, Elena; Gelain, Maria Elena; Mazzariol, Sandro

    2017-06-10

    A striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) calf stranded alive because of a Salter-Harris fracture type 1 of a caudal vertebra and remained in a provisional rehabilitation facility for 3 days where the fracture stabilization was attempted, but he died the day after bandaging. Serum and urine samples were collected during hospitalization (days 1, 2 and 3 serum and day 2 urine). Serum analysis showed increased urea, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and serum amyloid A values, while creatinine was below the lower limit. Urine analysis showed urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio of 5.3 with glomerular proteinuria. Postmortem analyses demonstrated a severe rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuric nephrosis, suggestive of capture myopathy syndrome. We report, for the first time, the clinico-pathological changes during this condition in a striped dolphin.

  14. Candidatus Renichlamydia lutjani, a Gram-negative bacterium in internal organs of blue striped snapper Lutjanus kasmira from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Daniele; Work, Thierry M.

    2012-01-01

    The blue-striped snapper Lutjanus kasmira (Perciformes, Lutjanidae) are cosmopolitan in the Indo-Pacific but were introduced into Oahu, Hawaii, USA, in the 1950s and have since colonized most of the archipelago. Studies of microparasites in blue-striped snappers from Hawaii revealed chlamydia-like organisms (CLO) infecting the spleen and kidney, characterized by intracellular basophilic granular inclusions containing Gram-negative and Gimenez-positive bacteria similar in appearance to epitheliocysts when seen under light microscopy. We provide molecular evidence that CLO are a new member of Chlamydiae, i.e. Candidatus Renichlamydia lutjani, that represents the first reported case of chlamydial infection in organs other than the gill in fishes.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a wheat IF2 homolog required for innate immunity to stripe rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Hu, Yingang; Yang, Baoju; Xue, Fei; Wang, Changyou; Kang, Zhensheng; Ji, Wanquan

    2013-05-01

    The wheat eIF2 homolog, TaIF2, is induced by the stripe rust pathogen CYR 32 at an early stage of inoculation and is related to the innate immunity resistance level in wheat. The initiation of translation represents a critical control point in the regulation of gene expression in all organisms. We previously identified an upregulated EST S186 (EL773056) from an SSH-cDNA library of the Shaanmai 139 strain of wheat (Triticum aestivum) infected with Puccinia striiformis (Pst). In the present work, we isolated a cDNA clone and identified it as a wheat IF2 homolog. This cDNA consisted of 1,314 nucleotides and contained an open reading frame of 795 nucleotides encoding a polypeptide of 254 amino acids. The amino acids represent a conserved domain in EF-Tu, mtIF2-II, and mtIF2-Ivc. The alignment result showed that it maybe a partial cDNA of the initiation factor 2/eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (IF2/eIF5B) superfamily gene. Paradoxically, results of a Swiss-model analysis suggesting a low QMEAN Z-score implied that it was a membrane protein. Quantitative RT-PCR studies confirmed that the wheat eIF2 (TaIF2) homolog was differentially expressed in three near-isogenic lines. Critical time points for the induction of resistance by inoculation with Pst CYR32 in YrSM139-1B + YrSM139-2D immune resistance genotype occurred at 1 and 3 dpi (days post-infection). RNAi test showed that the inoculated BSMV-IF2 leaves of Shaanmai 139 showed obvious cell death after 15 days of inoculation with CYR 32. qRT-PCR analysis of the target gene in cDNA samples isolated from BSMV-IF2-Pst, BSMV-0-Pst and Pst infected leaves confirmed that the expression of TaIF2 is suppressed by BSMV-IF2 at 3 dpi. This suggested that TaIF2/eIF5B plays an important role in the mechanism of innate immunity to stripe rust pathogen.

  16. Cortical plasticity following stripe rearing in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica: neural response properties of V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James C; Donaldson, Michaela S; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2017-02-01

    The functional organization of the primary visual area (V1) and the importance of sensory experience in its normal development have been well documented in eutherian mammals. However, very few studies have investigated the response properties of V1 neurons in another large class of mammals, or whether sensory experience plays a role in shaping their response properties. Thus we reared opossums (Monodelphis domestica) in normal and vertically striped cages until they reached adulthood. They were then anesthetized using urethane, and electrophysiological techniques were used to examine neuronal responses to different orientations, spatial and temporal frequencies, and contrast levels. For normal opossums, we observed responses to the temporal and spatial characteristics of the stimulus to be similar to those described in small, nocturnal, eutherian mammals such as rats and mice; neurons in V1 responded maximally to stimuli at 0.09 cycles per degree and 2.12 cycles per second. Unlike other eutherians, but similar to other marsupials investigated, only 40% of the neurons were orientation selective. In stripe-reared animals, neurons were significantly more likely to respond to vertical stimuli at a wider range of spatial frequencies, and were more sensitive to gratings at lower contrast values compared with normal animals. These results are the first to demonstrate experience-dependent plasticity in the visual system of a marsupial species. Thus the ability of cortical neurons to alter their properties based on the dynamics of the visual environment predates the emergence of eutherian mammals and was likely present in our earliest mammalian ancestors. These results are the first description of visual response properties of the most commonly studied marsupial model organism, the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Further, these results are the first to demonstrate experience-dependent plasticity in the visual system of a marsupial species. Thus the ability of

  17. Implications of white striping and spaghetti meat abnormalities on meat quality and histological features in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, G; Soglia, F; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Canonico, L; Babini, E; Laghi, L; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2017-05-22

    During the past few years, there has been an increasing prevalence of broiler breast muscle abnormalities, such as white striping (WS) and wooden breast conditions. More recently, a new muscular abnormality termed as spaghetti meat (SM) because of the altered structural integrity of the Pectoralis major muscle often associated with WS has emerged. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of WS and SM conditions, occurring alone or combined within the same P. major muscle, on meat quality traits and muscle histology. In two replications, 96 P. major muscles were classified into four classes: normal (N), WS, SM and WS/SM. The whole fillet was used for weight assessment and morphometric measurements, then each sample was cut in order to separate the superficial layer from the deep one and used to evaluate proximate composition, histological features, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times, functional properties and both myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins profile. Fillets affected by WS and SM abnormalities exhibited higher weights and increased thickness and length. SM condition was associated with a relevant decrease in protein content coupled with a significant increase in moisture level, whereas fat content was affected only by the simultaneous presence of WS. Histological evaluations revealed that abnormal samples were characterized by several degenerative aspects that almost completely concerned the superficial layer of the fillets. White striped fillets exhibited necrosis and lysis of fibers, fibrosis, lipidosis, loss of cross striation and vacuolar degeneration. Moreover, SM samples were characterized by poor fiber uniformity and a progressive rarefaction of the endo- and peri-mysial connective tissue, whereas WS/SM fillets showed intermediate histological features. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis revealed a higher proportion of extra-myofibrillar water in the superficial section of all the abnormal fillets, especially in SM

  18. Analysis of Yellow Striped Mutants of Zea mays Reveals Novel Loci Contributing to Iron Deficiency Chlorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chan-Rodriguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The micronutrient iron (Fe is essential for photosynthesis, respiration, and many other processes, but it is only sparingly soluble in aqueous solution, making adequate acquisition by plants a serious challenge. Fe is a limiting factor for plant growth on approximately 30% of the world’s arable lands. Moreover, Fe deficiency in humans is a global health issue, affecting 1.62 billion people, or about 25% of the world’s population. It is imperative that we gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that plants use to regulate iron homeostasis, since these will be important targets for future biofortification and crop improvement strategies. Grasses and non-grasses have evolved independent mechanisms for primary iron uptake from the soil. The grasses, which include most of the world’s staple grains, have evolved a distinct ‘chelation’ mechanism to acquire iron from the soil. Strong iron chelators called phytosiderophores (PSs are synthesized by grasses and secreted into the rhizosphere where they bind and solubilize Fe(III. The Fe(III-PS complex is then taken up into root cells via transporters specific for the Fe(III-PS complex. In this study, 31 novel, uncharacterized striped maize mutants available through the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center (MGCSC were analyzed to determine whether their mutant phenotypes are caused by decreased iron. Many of these proved to be either pale yellow or white striped mutants. Complementation tests were performed by crossing the MGCSC mutants to ys1 and ys3 reference mutants. This allowed assignment of 10 ys1 alleles and 4 ys3 alleles among the novel mutants. In addition, four ys∗ mutant lines were identified that are not allelic to either ys1 or ys3. Three of these were characterized as being non-allelic to each other and as having low iron in leaves. These represent new genes involved in iron acquisition by maize, and future cloning of these genes may reveal novel aspects of the grass iron

  19. Constraining the heat flux between Enceladus’ tiger stripes: numerical modeling of funiscular plains formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael; McKinnon, William B; Schenk, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has observed at least 5 GW of thermal emission at Enceladus’ south pole. The vast majority of this emission is localized on the four long, parallel, evenly-spaced fractures dubbed tiger stripes. However, the thermal emission from regions between the tiger stripes has not been determined. These spatially localized regions have a unique morphology consisting of short-wavelength (∼1 km) ridges and troughs with topographic amplitudes of ∼100 m, and a generally ropy appearance that has led to them being referred to as “funiscular terrain.” Previous analysis pursued the hypothesis that the funiscular terrain formed via thin-skinned folding, analogous to that occurring on a pahoehoe flow top (Barr, A.C., Preuss, L.J. [2010]. Icarus 208, 499–503). Here we use finite element modeling of lithospheric shortening to further explore this hypothesis. Our best-case simulations reproduce funiscular-like morphologies, although our simulated fold wavelengths after 10% shortening are 30% longer than those observed. Reproducing short-wavelength folds requires high effective surface temperatures (∼185 K), an ice lithosphere (or high-viscosity layer) with a low thermal conductivity (one-half to one-third that of intact ice or lower), and very high heat fluxes (perhaps as great as 400 mW m−2). These conditions are driven by the requirement that the high-viscosity layer remain extremely thin (≲200 m). Whereas the required conditions are extreme, they can be met if a layer of fine grained plume material 1–10 m thick, or a highly fractured ice layer >50 m thick insulates the surface, and the lithosphere is fractured throughout as well. The source of the necessary heat flux (a factor of two greater than previous estimates) is less obvious. We also present evidence for an unusual color/spectral character of the ropy terrain, possibly related to its unique surface texture. Our simulations demonstrate

  20. Research of Efficiency of the Data Transmission Telecommunication Systems with Limited by the Frequency Stripe and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbatyy, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of the data transmission telecommunication systems with limited by frequency stripe of telecommunication channel and signal power in channel with the use of modern kinds of signal modulation was explored. The results of efficiency of the systems at the concrete kinds of modulation were got. Recommendations in relation to application of definite kinds of modulation in the data transmission telecommunication systems were given.

  1. Genome Sequence of Acidovorax avenae Strain T10_61 Associated with Sugarcane Red Stripe in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Cecilia A.; Bassi, Daniela; Puglisi, Edoardo; Salazar, Sergio M.; Vignolo, Graciela M.; Coccocelli, Pier S.

    2016-01-01

    Red stripe of sugarcane in Argentina is a bacterial disease caused by Acidovorax avenae. The genome sequence from the first isolate of this bacterium in Argentina is presented here. The draft genome of the A. avenae T10_61 strain contains 5,646,552 bp and has a G+C content of 68.6 mol%. PMID:26847889

  2. Variation in the isotopic composition of striped weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa of the Southwest Atlantic Ocean in response to dietary shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Paso Viola

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the isotopic composition in muscle of striped weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa from Southwest Atlantic Ocean in order to evaluate a possible variation in δ13C and δ15N in response to dietary shifts that occur as animals grow. We also explored for isotopic evidence of differences between sample locations. The results showed an agreement between isotope analysis and previous conventional studies. Differences in the isotope composition between sampling location were not observed. A positive relation exists between isotope values and total body length of the animals. The Cluster analysis defined three groups of size classes, validated by the MDS. Differences in the relative consumption of prey species in each size class were also observed performing isotope mixing models (SIAR. Variation in δ15N among size classes would be associated with the consumption of a different type of prey as animals grow. Small striped weakfish feed on small crustaceans and progressively increase their consumption of fish (anchovy, Engraulis anchoita, increasing by this way their isotope values. On the other hand, differences in δ13C values seemed to be related to age-class specific spatial distribution patterns. Therefore, large and small striped weakfish remain specialized but feeding on different prey at different trophic levels. These results contribute to the study of the diet of striped weakfish, improve the isotopic ecology models and highlight on the importance of accounting for variation in the isotopic composition in response to dietary shifts with the size of one of the most important fishery resources in the region.

  3. Variation in the isotopic composition of striped weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa of the Southwest Atlantic Ocean in response to dietary shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, M N Paso; Riccialdelli, L; Jaureguizar, A; Panarello, H O; Cappozzo, H L

    2017-08-17

    The aim of this study was to analyze the isotopic composition in muscle of striped weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa from Southwest Atlantic Ocean in order to evaluate a possible variation in δ13C and δ15N in response to dietary shifts that occur as animals grow. We also explored for isotopic evidence of differences between sample locations. The results showed an agreement between isotope analysis and previous conventional studies. Differences in the isotope composition between sampling location were not observed. A positive relation exists between isotope values and total body length of the animals. The Cluster analysis defined three groups of size classes, validated by the MDS. Differences in the relative consumption of prey species in each size class were also observed performing isotope mixing models (SIAR). Variation in δ15N among size classes would be associated with the consumption of a different type of prey as animals grow. Small striped weakfish feed on small crustaceans and progressively increase their consumption of fish (anchovy, Engraulis anchoita), increasing by this way their isotope values. On the other hand, differences in δ13C values seemed to be related to age-class specific spatial distribution patterns. Therefore, large and small striped weakfish remain specialized but feeding on different prey at different trophic levels. These results contribute to the study of the diet of striped weakfish, improve the isotopic ecology models and highlight on the importance of accounting for variation in the isotopic composition in response to dietary shifts with the size of one of the most important fishery resources in the region.

  4. Overfishing of small pelagic fishes increases trophic overlap between immature and mature striped dolphins in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campos, Encarna; Borrell, Assumpció; Cardona, Luis; Forcada, Jaume; Aguilar, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The interactions among diet, ecology, physiology, and biochemistry affect N and C stable isotope signatures in animal tissues. Here, we examined if ecological segregation among animals in relation to sex and age existed by analyzing the signatures of δ(15)N and δ(13)C in the muscle of Western Mediterranean striped dolphins. Moreover, we used a Bayesian mixing model to study diet composition and investigated potential dietary changes over the last two decades in this population. For this, we compared isotope signatures in samples of stranded dolphins obtained during two epizootic events occurring in 1990 and 2007-2008. Mean δ(13)C values for females and males were not significantly different, but age-related variation indicated δ(13)C enrichment in both sexes, suggesting that females and males most likely fed in the same general areas, increasing their consumption of benthic prey with age. Enrichment of δ(15)N was only observed in females, suggesting a preference for larger or higher trophic level prey than males, which could reflect different nutritional requirements. δ(13)C values showed no temporal variation, although the mean δ(15)N signature decreased from 1990 to 2007-2008, which could indicate a dietary shift in the striped dolphin over the last two decades. The results of SIAR indicated that in 1990, hake and sardine together contributed to 60% on the diet of immature striped dolphins, and close to 90% for mature striped dolphins. Conversely, the diet of both groups in 2007-2008 was more diverse, as hake and sardine contributed to less than 40% of the entire diet. These results suggest a dietary change that was possibly related to changes in food availability, which is consistent with the depletion of sardine stocks by fishing.

  5. Toward nonlinear magnonics: Intensity-dependent spin-wave switching in insulating side-coupled magnetic stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Odintsov, S. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate that the nonlinear spin-wave transport in two laterally parallel magnetic stripes exhibit the intensity-dependent power exchange between the adjacent spin-wave channels. By the means of Brillouin light scattering technique, we investigate collective nonlinear spin-wave dynamics in the presence of magnetodipolar coupling. The nonlinear intensity-dependent effect reveals itself in the spin-wave mode transformation and differential nonlinear spin-wave phase shift in each adjacent magnetic stripe. The proposed analytical theory, based on the coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations, predicts the geometry design involving the reduction of power requirement to the all-magnonic switching. A very good agreement between calculation and experiment was found. In addition, a micromagnetic and finite-element approach has been independently used to study the nonlinear behavior of spin waves in adjacent stripes and the nonlinear transformation of spatial profiles of spin-wave modes. Our results show that the proposed spin-wave coupling mechanism provides the basis for nonlinear magnonic circuits and opens the perspectives for all-magnonic computing architecture.

  6. Stripe-PZT Sensor-Based Baseline-Free Crack Diagnosis in a Structure with a Welded Stiffener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Kyu An

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a stripe-PZT sensor-based baseline-free crack diagnosis technique in the heat affected zone (HAZ of a structure with a welded stiffener. The proposed technique enables one to identify and localize a crack in the HAZ using only current data measured using a stripe-PZT sensor. The use of the stripe-PZT sensor makes it possible to significantly improve the applicability to real structures and minimize man-made errors associated with the installation process by embedding multiple piezoelectric sensors onto a printed circuit board. Moreover, a new frequency-wavenumber analysis-based baseline-free crack diagnosis algorithm minimizes false alarms caused by environmental variations by avoiding simple comparison with the baseline data accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure. The proposed technique is numerically as well as experimentally validated using a plate-like structure with a welded stiffener, reveling that it successfully identifies and localizes a crack in HAZ.

  7. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

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    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  8. Genetic effects for controlling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici resistance in wheat through joint segregation analysis

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    Kalim Ullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed inheritance analysis using joint segregation analysis (JSA for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici resistance was carried out in six basic populations (P1, F1, P2, BC1, BC2 and F2 of four wheat crosses (Hashim-08 × LU-26, Farid-06 × Shafaq, Parula × Blue Silver, TD-1 × D-97603 during crop season 2009 to 2012. Genes controlling stripe rust resistance were assessed by using area under disease progress curve (AUDPC. The AUDPC was controlled by mixed two additive-dominant-epistatic major genes plus additive-dominant-epistasis of polygenes in cross Hashim-08 × LU-26 (model E, while in Farid-06 × Shafaq, it was controlled by mixed two major additive-dominant genes plus additive-dominant polygenes (model E-2. In cross Parula × Blue Silver, the AUDPC was managed by additive, dominance and epistasis of two major genes (model B-1, however, it was controlled by mixed one major gene and additive dominant polygenes in cross TD-1 × D-97603 (model D-1. Genetic variation and heritability was higher in major genes than polygene for all the crosses showing that AUDPC was mainly controlled by major genes. The genetic behavior of the AUDPC revealed that stripe rust resistance was controlled by mixed interaction of one to two major genes plus polygenes.

  9. Dietary plasticity of the oceanic striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba , in the neritic waters of the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, J.; Richard, E.; Meynier, L.; Pusineri, C.; Ridoux, V.

    2006-05-01

    The striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, is an oceanic species that occasionally occurs in neritic habitats; in the Bay of Biscay it is abundant offshore and erratic in occurrence over the shelf. Given that prey assemblages differ widely among these habitats both in terms of taxonomic composition and of ecology, this would suggest that striped dolphins are able to shift from vertically migrating meso-pelagic prey to neritic or coastal prey types. We investigated the striped dolphin's dietary plasticity by examining the stomach contents of individuals stranded along the French Atlantic coast. 1109 prey items were identified belonging to 30 distinct taxa and their biomass was calculated. Fish accounted for 91% of the diet by number and 61% by mass; the rest was mostly cephalopods, crustaceans being present as trace. Specific composition included both oceanic (myctophid and sternoptychid fish; histioteuthid, gonatid and brachioteuthid cephalopods), neritic (gadids and anchovy; loliginid, sepiolid and sepiid cephalopods) and even coastal (atherinid fish) prey types, showing that these animals had changed their diet as they moved over the shelf.

  10. Structure and biomechanical properties of the trachea of the striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba: evidence for evolutionary adaptations to diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Bruno; Bagnoli, Paola; Acocella, Fabio; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2005-05-01

    This study analyzes the structure and mechanical properties of the trachea of the striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba, one of the most common cetacean species. The cetacean trachea is made up of closed or semiclosed cartilaginous rings without a paries membranaceus. Our results indicate that the inner lining of the trachea contains erectile tissue in which several venous lacunae permeate the mucosa. We also observed and described the presence of peripheral neurons containing nitric oxide along the rim of the venous lacunae. Data obtained from compression and tensile tests and comparison with the pig and goat tracheas indicate a higher stiffness and a different, higher breaking point for the dolphin trachea. On the whole, our data suggest that the trachea of the striped dolphin possesses structural properties that allow rapid filling with blood, possibly in relation to dive activities, and also allow modifications due to increased pressure and immediate return to the original shape without risks of permanent bending or rupture, as would happen in a terrestrial mammal. As the organ undergoes intense pressure difference during descent to optimal foraging depth and subsequent rapid ascent to surface, especially in deep dives of hundreds of meters, the specific structural and biomechanical peculiarities of the trachea of the striped dolphin may represent an evolutionary adaptation to life in the water and to diving. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Possible Correlation Between Stripe-Like Antiferromagnetic Spin Fluctuations and Superconductivity in ThFeAsN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagdish

    2017-08-01

    The recently invented ThFeAsN superconductor, belonging to the family of Fe-based superconductors, has been studied using ab initio density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate that the electronic structure of this superconductor is similar to that of other Fe-based superconductors with computed magnetic ground state showing strong dependence on atomic positions. Using relaxed atomic positions, the single- and double-stripe magnetic states are found to be energetically close to each other, which may lead to stripe-like antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. We speculate that such energetic degeneracy among two antiferromagnetic structures may be an ideal condition for strong stripe-like antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, which may be playing a key role in obtaining high transition temperature of 30 K. Fixed spin moment calculations demonstrate the possibility of local minima for magnetic states in ThFeAsN. The absence of long-range ordering in ThFeAsN may be due to presence of such local minima.

  12. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou) that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1) prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  13. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gormezano

    Full Text Available Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1 prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  14. The floods of March 1936, part 1, New England rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Nathan Clifford

    1937-01-01

    by white men, were broken many of them by wide margins. The peak of the Connecticut River at Hartford, Conn., was 8.6 feet higher than had been experienced since the settlement by white men, 300 years ago. The Susquehanna River at Harrisburg, Pa., was 3.5 feet higher than had been known in a period of record covering about 200 years. The Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pa., was 6.1 feet higher than had been known in the period beginning 1762. This volume presents many of the facts of these notable floods with respect to the New England rivers, for permanent record and for study and reference by engineers concerned with the building of highways, bridges, and industrial plants, planners of river development, and others. Similar volumes for the region from the Hudson River to the Susquehanna River and for the Potomac, James, and upper Ohio River Basins are presented in companion Water-Supply Papers 799 and 800 respectively. In this volume records of stage and discharge for the period Including the floods are presented for about 150 measurement stations; peak discharges with comparative data for other floods at more than 400 measurement points are summarized; crest stages along an aggregate length of stream channel of 2,820 miles are tabulated; and results of detailed studies of the rainfall and run-off and many other kinds of flood information are presented.

  15. Performance Trade-Offs for Wavelength Striping Optical Switching Using a Novel Star Architecture

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    Enrique Rodriguez-Colina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes various performance trade-offs that arise from the use of a technique for optical switching under various network topologies. Such switching operation can be summarized as follows: (a user data are divided into fixed-length fragments, (b each fragment is assigned to a different wavelength, and (c all wavelengths are simultaneously switched to the egress links. This concept of dividing user data into several wavelengths to be simultaneously switched is called wavelength striping and its purpose is to reduce latency and increase throughput for short distance interconnects. We depart from previous work where a building block implementing this basic switching function has been built around semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs. In this paper, we investigate diverse trade-offs that arise from the use of this switching approach in different network topologies. One of the main issues addressed in this paper is the relation between cascadability and bit error rate (BER. In this case, our results indicate that a switch fabric can cascade up to five stages without exceeding a BER of 10−9 and without incurring in power budget problems. We also show that the performance degradation, introduced by cascading SOAs, can be compensated with a star interconnect architecture that is introduced. Other issues addressed in this paper are the effect of scalability on cost and the effect of latency on TCP performance and reliability.

  16. Reproductive biology and spatiotemporal patterns of spawning in striped marlin Kajikia audax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, R K; Davie, P S; Bromhead, D B; Young, J W

    2012-11-01

    This study presents the first histology-based assessment of the reproductive dynamics of south-west Pacific striped marlin Kajikia audax. Maturity and reproductive status were assessed from histological sections of ovaries (n = 234) and testes (n = 243) of fish caught in commercial longline and recreational fisheries between 2006 and 2009. Spawning peaked in the Coral Sea during November and December at sea surface temperatures between 24.8 and 28.3° C. Lower jaw fork length (L(LJF)) at 50% maturity (L(LJF50)), a key variable for stock assessment, was estimated to be 2100 ± 102 mm (mean + s.e.) for females and 1668 ± 18 mm for males. Unlike large pelagic tunas Thunnus spp., the proportion of females increased with length and spawning fish formed multiple large-scale aggregations within a broad latitudinal band. This study provides a starting point for biological parameters needed for stock assessment and conservation of K. audax and introduces the multiple aggregation spawning concept as a reproductive mechanism to explain genetic heterogeneity observed in some highly migratory species. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Brucella ceti from two striped dolphins stranded on the Apulia coastline, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Zilli, Katiuscia; Troiano, Pasquale; Petrella, Antonio; Marotta, Francesca; Di Serafino, Gabriella; Ancora, Massimo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2014-02-01

    Since 1994, when Brucella ceti was first isolated from an aborted dolphin fetus, several cases have been reported worldwide. The first case of B. ceti in the Mediterranean (and in Italy), however, was recorded only in 2012, off the coast of Tuscany. Extensive studies, using serological and microbiological methods, have documented this bacterium in dolphins and demonstrated its zoonotic potential. We describe the typing of two B. ceti strains isolated from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on the southern Apulia coastline. B. ceti isolates were conventionally typed, and then genotyped by both the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and the multilocus variable number of tandem repeats typing (MLVA) methodologies to infer phylogeny and potential epidemiological links between the two cases. The two isolates were identified through MLST analysis as belonging to the common sequence type 26 (ST26), while MLVA analysis, having established that the two isolates have identical profiles, assigned them to a novel genotype within cluster A - a unique representative of a new Mediterranean subcluster. The results thus revealed a link between the two cases studied, demonstrating the usefulness of MLST and MLVA for the epidemiological investigation of brucellae among marine mammals.

  18. Structure and Specificity of a Binary Tandem Domain F-Lectin from Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchet, M.; Odom, E; Vasta, J; Amzel, M

    2010-01-01

    The plasma of the striped bass Morone saxatilis contains a fucose-specific lectin (MsaFBP32) that consists of two F-type carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in tandem. The crystal structure of the complex of MsaFBP32 with l-fucose reported here shows a cylindrical 81-A-long and 60-A-wide trimer divided into two globular halves: one containing N-terminal CRDs (N-CRDs) and the other containing C-terminal CRDs (C-CRDs). The resulting binding surfaces at the opposite ends of the cylindrical trimer have the potential to cross-link cell surface or humoral carbohydrate ligands. The N-CRDs and C-CRDs of MsaFBP32 exhibit significant structural differences, suggesting that they recognize different glycans. Analysis of the carbohydrate binding sites provides the structural basis for the observed specificity of MsaFBP32 for simple carbohydrates and suggests that the N-CRD recognizes more complex fucosylated oligosaccharides and with a relatively higher avidity than the C-CRD. Modeling of MsaFBP32 complexed with fucosylated glycans that are widely distributed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes rationalizes the observation that binary tandem CRD F-type lectins function as opsonins by cross-linking 'non-self' carbohydrate ligands and 'self' carbohydrate ligands, such as sugar structures displayed by microbial pathogens and glycans on the surface of phagocytic cells from the host.

  19. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (Phamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reproductive biology of the striped goby, Gobius vittatus (Gobiidae in the northern Adriatic Sea

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    Marcelo Kovacic

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The striped goby, Gobius vittatus Vinciguerra, 1883 is a Mediterranean gobiid species considered to be rare and lacking in data on its reproduction. Sex ratio, length and age at first maturity, annual cycle of gonad development, spawning period and fecundity of G. vittatus were studied on 704 specimens collected by SCUBA diving in the northern Adriatic Sea (Kvarner area from April 2001 to March 2002. The monthly sex ratio did not differ significantly, except during the spawning season, when it was strongly biased in favour of females. The estimated length at first maturity was 32.8 and 35.4 mm for females and males, respectively. In both sexes gonad development started in the first year of life. All specimens were mature by the third year. The spawning season was from April to July. Total fecundity ranged from 560 to 3045, with an average of 1426 ± 89 ripe eggs/fish. The simultaneous presence of three clearly distinct sizes of oocytes in ripe ovaries indicate that this species is a multiple spawner.