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Sample records for hto

  1. Improved ETMOD modules for HTO exchange, HT deposition, and vegetation HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's environmental tritium model, ETMOD, calculates the potential radiological impact of short duration releases of HT and HTO. This report develops and document improved modules for the following key parameters: the deposition velocity of HT to soil, the exchange velocities of HTO to soil and vegetation, and the atmospheric stability class. These new modules allow the HT deposition velocity and the HTO exchange velocities to be estimated from readily available information (e.g. soil and weather conditions), ensure that these parameters are consistent with stability class and other model input (e.g. wind speed, season, and time of day), allow diurnal and seasonal effects to be modelled, and reduce the need for site-specific input. In addition, a module to calculated HTO concentrations in vegetation is provided that will allow the calculation of potential ingestion dose. (Author)

  2. Re-emission of HTO into the atmosphere after HT/HTO conversion in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstel, H.; Lepa, K.; Trierweiler, H.

    1988-01-01

    After HT is converted to HTO by the soil, the HTO is reemitted back into the atmosphere. Since HTO is more radiotoxic by a factor of 10/sup 4/, this reemission is an important part of the radioecological pathway of HT. Laboratory studies show that the reemission rate from natural soil cores depends on the turnover in the gas space above the soil surface. Up to a wind velocity of about 4 m s/sup -1/, the portion of HTO reemitted hourly increases to about 18% of the initial amount of the reaction product. However, after the first hour, the observed reemission rate decreases quickly to about 3% h/sup -1/. Varying the humidity of an air stream fed into the reaction chamber had no influence on the reemission rate. For the Canadian release study, small soil samples were exposed to the plume and afterwards to the air. Then, at certain intervals following the release, the soil containers were sealed with gastight lids. The remnant HTO activity was then determined by azeotropic distillation. The reemission rate was about 3% h/sup -1/ during the day. During the night, no HTO loss was observed, possibly due to dew formation

  3. Environmental HTO/HT sampler development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Brown, R.M.; Wood, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    Tests of retention by several drying agents of HTO from an air stream containing HT have been performed. Two batches of Molecular Sieve (MS) 4A retained up to 1.3% of HT passed through them in contrast to material tested in 1986, when retention was -4 . Retention of 10 -5 to 10 -6 was observed for DRIERITE (anhydrous calcium sulphate) and Silica Gel. DRIERITE is preferred over Silica Gel as a desiccant in an air sampler for environmental HTO/HT, because it is much easier to decontaminate for reuse. An improved air sampler has been designed, 2 units constructed and components procured for 3 more. The air sampler may be line or battery operated, accommodates up to four 120 g drier or oxidizer traps, and will pump up to 4 L/min for up to 24 hours on battery power. It is build into a rugged aluminum case and weighs approximately 11 kg overall, facilitating deployment in the field

  4. Precipitation scavenging of tritiated water vapour (HTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.

    1985-10-01

    Precipitation scavenging (or washout) is an important mechanism for the removal of HTO from the atmosphere. Methods of parameterizing the depletion of a plume of HTO released to the atmosphere are examined. Simple approaches, commonly used for atmospheric transport modelling purposes, such as the use of a constant washout coefficient or washout ratio, or the use of parameters based on equilibrium assumptions, are often not justified. It is shown that these parameters depend strongly on ambient temperature and plume dimensions, as well as rainfall rate. An approximate expression for washout ratio, as a function of these variables, is developed, and it is shown that near equilibrium washout conditions are only expected to hold at long plume travel distances. A possible method of treating scavenging by snow is also suggested

  5. A Compact Diffusion Sampler for Environmental Applications Requiring HTO or HTO + HT Determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otlet, R.L.; Walker, A.J.; Mather, I.D.

    2005-01-01

    Passive diffusion samplers have now been in use in the UK for the measurement of tritium at environmental levels in the form of HTO and HTO + HT for more than ten years. At the outset their main purpose was to identify the direction of a possible inadvertent release of tritium into the environment. More recently, however, there has been growing interest in their use as stand-alone devices for tritium determination at environmental levels. This has necessitated a more rigorous design to reduce the 'draughts effect' in exposed locations and has also required modifications to enable the measurement of HTO + HT. The paper describes the recent design improvements and the results of validation tests carried out against dynamic, discriminating (dry-bed) samplers

  6. Measurement of HTO permeability of materials for protective appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Tomooka, M.; Kato, S.; Murata, M.; Kinouchi, N.; Yamamoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    Tritiated water (HTO) vapor permeabilities were measured for plastic and rubber films used for protective appliances (suits, gloves, wrappings, etc.). The measurement data prove that polyehylene and butyl rubbers are materials suitable for HTO protective appliances with their lower permeability. The data also indicate that desiccating protective appliances before reuse is effective for restoring their original resistances to penetrating HTO vapor when they are repeatedly used. (author)

  7. Environmental HTO/HT sampler development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Brown, R.M.; Wood, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Tests of retention by several drying agents of HTO from an air stream containing HT have been performed. Two batches of Molecular Sieve (MS) 4A retained up to 1.3% of HT passed through them, in contrast to material tested in 1986, when retention was -4 . Retention of 10 -5 to 10 -6 was observed for DRIERITE (anhydrous calcium sulphate) and Silica Gel. DRIERITE is preferred over Silica Gel as a desiccant in an air sampler for environmental HTO/HT, because it is much easier to decontaminate for reuse. An improved air sampler has been designed, 2 units constructed and components procured for 3 more. The air sampler may be line or battery operated, accommodates up to four 120 g drier or oxidizer traps, and will pump up to 4 L/min for up to 24 hours on battery power. It is built into a rugged aluminum case and weighs approximately 11 kg overall, facilitating deployment in the field. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  8. HTO deposition by vapor exchange between atmosphere and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnenberg, C.

    1989-01-01

    HTO deposition to soils occurs by vapor exchange between atmosphere and soil-air, when the concentration gradient is directed downwards, and it is principally independent from simultaneous transport of H 2 O. In relatively dry top soil, which is frequently the case, as it tries to attain equilibrium with the air humidity, HTO diffuses into deeper soil driven by the same mechanisms that caused the deposition process. The resulting HTO profile is depending on the atmospheric supply and the soil physical conditions, and it is the source for further tritium pathways, namely root uptake by plants and reemission from soil back into the ground-level air. Simulation experiments with soil columns exposed to HTO labeled atmospheres have proved the theoretical expectation that under certain boundary conditions the HTO profile can be described by an error function. The key parameter is the effective diffusion coefficient, which in turn is a function of the sorption characteristics of the particular soil. (orig.) [de

  9. Diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) in dextran+water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comper, W.D.; Van Damme, M.P.I.; Preston, B.N.

    1982-01-01

    The diffusion of HTO has been measured in dextran solutions using an open-ended capillary technique and a newly developed Sundeloef diffusion cell. HTO diffusion has been examined as a function of dextran concentration and molecular weight. These results, together with our previous results on the intradiffusion and mutual-diffusion coefficients of dextrans, now provide a complete set of conventional translational diffusion coefficients for both components in this binary system. Various assumptions associated with the theoretical description of polymer translational motion can now be examined. (author)

  10. Differential measurement of low level HTO and HT leak rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, W.E.; Muldoon, K.M.

    1976-08-01

    Leak rates of 5 x 10 -17 cm 3 /sec and greater can be measured by a very simple technique that will also differentiate tritium oxide (HTO) from tritium gas (HT). Because of the much greater health hazard of tritium oxide (200 to 1), the determination of chemical form is significant. The method involves flushing a gas collection chamber, containing the item being measured, with dry air. The flushed air is passed through an ethylene glycol bubbler which removes only the HTO. The outlet of the ethylene glycol bubbler is connected to a heated (400 0 C) palladium sponge catalyst which converts the HT to HTO and then to a second ethylene glycol bubbler for collection of the oxidized tritium gas. Liquid scintillation (p-dioxane base) counting solution is added directly to the bubblers and counted for tritium in a Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer. Advantages, method validation, operational experience, and data obtained by this technique are discussed. The sensitivity of the method is dependent on the time allowed between bubbler changes, the liquid scintillation spectrometer counting efficiency, background, and counting times employed

  11. Effects of thyroxine on the migration of hippocampal neurons in newborn rat exposed to HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Erpeng; Qiu Jun; Wang Yongsheng; Wu Cuiping; Yao Xiaobo; Wang Mingming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of thyroxine (TH) on the migration of hippocampal neurons in newborn rat exposed to tritiated water (HTO). Methods: The hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats were primarily cultured, 7 days later, randomly divided into control group, HTO group, TH group and HTO + TH group (3.7 × 10 5 Bq/ml HTO and 0.3 μg/ml TH were simultaneously added). After 24 h, the distance of neuronal migration was measured with Leica AF 6000, the expressions of BDNF and Reelin mRNA in neurons were analyzed with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the expression of β-tubulin protein in neurons was assayed with Western blot and immunocytochemical staining. Results: Compared with control group, the expression of Reelin mRNA, BDNF mRNA and β-tubulin in HTO group were significantly reduced (t=5.80, 5.48, 5.47, P<0.01), but those in HTO + TH group and TH group were obviously increased (t=7.75, 12.06, 13.65, P<0.01; t=4.34, 5.47, 5.65, P<0.01) and higher than that in HTO group (t=2.92, 10.32, 8.76, P<0.01; t=18.07, 20.55, 40.13, P<0.01). Accordingly, the neuronal migration distance in HTO group was much shorter than that in control (t=8.62, P<0.01), and in HTO + TH group and TH group was far longer than that in control (t=7.64, 4.93, P<0.01). Moreover, the neuronal migration distance in HTO + TH group was notably elongated in comparison with that in HTO group (t=11.32, 12.31, P<0.01). Conclusions: Thyroxine may promote the migration of hippocampal neurons in newborn rat exposed to HTO. (authors)

  12. HTO deposition through gas exchange between soil and atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinhals, J.

    1988-06-01

    Theoretical considerations show that the ratio of HTO/H 2 O molecules, i.e. the specific activity, is not the same in atmospheric humidity and moisture absorption but differs by the so-called specific activity coefficient k. On this basis a computer model (ATHOS) was developed which allowed the calculation of both the surface contamination of the soil due to the gas exchange with a contaminated atmosphere and the depth-specific distribution of the soil acitvity. On the one hand the equations base on a modified Philip-de Vries theory, and on the other hand on a large number of soil column experiments which served the examination of the influence of parameters of microclimate and soil physics on the absorption and diffusion of tritiated water vapour under simulated conditions Above all the individual capability of each soil type to absorb moisture must be taken into consideration in connection with the HTO transfer. In this context theoretical and experimental examinations were carried out indicating a practice-related possibility to determine the soil-specific absorption capability. (orig./DG) [de

  13. HTO/HT discriminating samplers constructed for the french experiment on the environmental behaviour of HT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.

    1988-12-01

    The French Experiment on Environmental Tritium Behaviour was a field experiment carried out to determine the rate of formation of atmospheric HTO from a release of HT to the natural environment. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project and Ontario Hydro contributed to the project by supplying HTO/HT-discriminating, atmospheric tritium samplers. Each sampler consisted of a molecular-sieve trap to capture HTO followed by a Pd-impregnated molecular-sieve trap to oxidise and collect HT from the same air stream. This method was selected as it provided high sensitivity over short sampling periods and was convenient for field use. Laboratory tests indicated that this system measured HT concentrations reliably, but only achieved limited discrimination between HT and HTO at HTO/HT concentration ratios below 10 -2 to 10 -3 . Small cold traps were therefore operated during the French experiment in addition to the molecular-sieve samplers exhibited much improved discrimination in the field (approaching 10 4 ), possibly due to higher sampling flow rates than used in the laboratory. These results demonstrate that care should be taken in using desiccant-based, HTO/HT-discriminating samplers when the HT concentration is much higher than HTO concentration, and suggest the need to systematically characterize and perhaps improve the performance of discriminating samplers at low HTO/HT ratios

  14. A Passive Diffusion Sampler for HT- and HTO-in-Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R.A.; Nunes, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion research and tritium removal facilities potentially handle large inventories of tritium gas (HT). If any HT is released into the workplace, a fraction may be converted to tritiated water vapour (HTO). A convenient method to determine the activity concentration of each species is necessary to assess the potential hazard since the radiological hazard of HTO is more than 10 4 that due to HT. Passive samplers for measuring tritiated water vapour (HTO) have been shown to be suitable for use indoors and outdoors. These simple samplers consist of a standard 20-mL liquid scintillation vial with a diffusion orifice that determines the sampling rate.The total tritium samplers described herein are passive or diffusion samplers that contain a small amount of AECL-proprietary wet-proofed catalyst fixed to the underside of the sampling heads to allow conversion of the HT to HTO that is subsequently collected in the sink, (HTO), in the bottom of the sampler. After an appropriate sampling time, liquid scintillation cocktail is added to the vial and the activity collected determined by liquid scintillation analysis. When used in conjunction with the conventional HTO passive sampler the difference between the total and HTO samplers can be used to determine the HT fraction ((HT+HTO) - HTO HT). The sampling rates for the modified diffusion sampler were measured to be 4.6 and 8.1 L/d for HTO and HT, respectively. For a fifteen-minute sampling period, passive samplers can be used to measure tritium activity concentrations from 37 kBq/m 3 to 115 MBq/m 3

  15. The behavior of 89Sr and tritium water (HTO) in a model terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongxi; Wang Shouxiang; Chen Chuangqun; Sun Zhiming; Huang Dan; Hu Bingmin

    1993-08-01

    The effect of land polluted by 89 Sr on water body and the immigration of HTO from water body to land were studied in a modelling terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem. The results are as follows: (1) The 89 Sr in soil quickly migrated to common bean plants and its concentration in common bean plants was increasing with the time, but the concentration of 89 Sr in soil was exponentially declining with the depth. About 5% of 89 Sr was migrated to water body by rainfall then distributed to other components, and it can be concentrated by aquatics in a certain degree. (2) when HTO entered into the water body, it would migrate to other components of the ecosystem. and the HTO in the pool was linearly decreasing with the time. However, the concentration of HTO in the sediments and aquatics would firstly increase then reached the peak and went down. The tritium of HTO was existed in two forms in the sediments and aquatics, free water (HTO) and bound tritium. HTO was also migrated to the adjacent land soil and absorbed by land crop plants, within one and half months the land system contained 24% of the total tritium in the aquatic system

  16. Detection of helium-containing paramagnetic complex at decay of tritium incorporated in HTO and DTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legasov, V.A.; Usatyj, A.F.; Ibragimov, R.A.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1979-01-01

    EPR technique was used to study the paramagnetic centers appearing during long-term storage of frozen (77 K) non-deoxygenated light (H 2 O) and heavy (D 2 O) water containing 3.5% vol. highly active HTO (29 ci/cm 3 ), so that the resulting activity of the sample (0.1 ml) was about 100 mci. For comparison, the same samples containing no HTO but irradiated by Co-60 rays were studied under identical conditions. A schematic of the processes involved in tritium decay in DTO (or HTO) in the aqueous matrix frozen at low temperatures was suggested

  17. Tritium (HTO and OBT) uptake within the environment and the potential risks to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B.; Stuart, M.; Shultz, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A series of rainbow trout experiments were conducted in the Chalk River Laboratories' (CRL) Biological Research Facility (BRF) to evaluate OBT formation in Rainbow trout. These were: 1) HTO exposure (7kBq/L in water) using un-tagged fish,2) OBT-spiked food exposure (30kBq/L) also using un-tagged fish,3) simultaneous exposure to HTO (7kBq/L in water) and OBT-spiked food (30kBq/L) using tagged fish, and 4)validation experiment (simultaneous exposure to HTO (7kBq/L in water) and OBT-spiked food (30 kBq/L)) using tagged fish.Each of the experiments was maintained for 130-150 days.Using all experimental results, tritium (HTO and OBT) dose was calculated based on Canadian fish products consumption. (author)

  18. Development and validation of a dynamical atmosphere-vegetation-soil HTO transport and OBT formation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Masakazu, E-mail: ohta.masakazu@jaea.go.jp [Research Group for Environmental Science, Division of Environment and Radiation, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nagai, Haruyasu [Research Group for Environmental Science, Division of Environment and Radiation, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    A numerical model simulating transport of tritiated water (HTO) in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system, and, accumulation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetative leaves was developed. Characteristic of the model is, for calculating tritium transport, it incorporates a dynamical atmosphere-soil-vegetation model (SOLVEG-II) that calculates transport of heat and water, and, exchange of CO{sub 2}. The processes included for calculating tissue free water tritium (TFWT) in leaves are HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water, root uptake of aqueous HTO in soil, photosynthetic assimilation of TFWT into OBT, and, TFWT formation from OBT through respiration. Tritium fluxes at the last two processes are input to a carbohydrate compartment model in leaves that calculates OBT translocation from leaves and allocation in them, by using photosynthesis and respiration rate in leaves. The developed model was then validated through a simulation of an existing experiment of acute exposure of grape plants to atmospheric HTO. Calculated TFWT concentration in leaves increased soon after the start of HTO exposure, reaching to equilibrium with the atmospheric HTO within a few hours, and then rapidly decreased after the end of the exposure. Calculated non-exchangeable OBT amount in leaves linearly increased during the exposure, and after the exposure, rapidly decreased in daytime, and, moderately nighttime. These variations in the calculated TFWT concentrations and OBT amounts, each mainly controlled by HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water and by carbohydrates translocation from leaves, fairly agreed with the observations within average errors of a factor of two. - Highlights: > TFWT retention and OBT formation in leaves were modeled > The model fairly well calculates TFWT concentration after an acute HTO exposure > The model well assesses OBT formation and attenuation of OBT amount in leaves.

  19. Raman and FTIR spectroscopic studies on two hydroxylated tung oils (HTO) bearing conjugated double bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuwei; Ren, Zhiyong; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wang, Huafen; Zhang, Guobao

    2018-06-01

    Tung oil (TO) was used as a model compound to study two hydroxylated tung oils (HTO), prepared from TO by either aminolysis (HTO-am) or alcoholysis (HTO-al). Main bands in Raman and FTIR spectra were initially assigned based on the detailed analysis of the compound spectra before and after exposure to elevated temperature (200 °C). The effect of heat treatment in air on spectral bands, and especially on the changes associated with double bonds, were then investigated. In the present work, changes in spectral bands due to heat treatment were compared with those revealed in the previous work of others. The results show that the conjugated triene structure of TO has been retained during alcoholysis and aminolysis, to yield the HTOs studied; yet the change of the triene structure caused by heating is different among the three samples; the H-bonding strength between OH and Cdbnd O in HTO-am is higher than that in HTO-al; the changes in HTO vOH and vCdbnd O bands in FTIR caused by the present heat treatment were significant; for TO, there is a big difference between changes in spectra as caused by thermal exposure, compared to those caused by ageing under UV light or exposure to a catalyst. The present work has laid additional groundwork for further study of the reactions of such triply conjugated double bond structures under different ageing conditions.

  20. Transfer parameters for routine release of HTO. Consideration of OBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Paunescu, N.; Cotarlea

    1997-01-01

    Knowledge of the transfer parameters for tritium is a key requirement to assess the public dose or to establish Derived Release Limit (DRL) proper for a heavy water reactor. This report revised the transfer parameters used to assess tritium doses via the ingestion pathway. First, the procedure used in Canadian standard CSA-N288.1 to assess the DRL for tritium is revisited, clearing up some misunderstandings about the derivation of transfer parameters from air to forage and animal products. Secondly, we derive the transfer parameters applying conditions of full equilibrium to dynamic equations that describe the transfer of tritiated water in food. The new transfer parameters for tritiated water in food are more plant- and site-specific then the generic transfer parameters. The most important improvement is the introduction of organically bound tritium (OBT) production in plants or animal products. Bulk transfer parameters are introduced, which include OBT as well as HTO. Based on a standard Canadian diet, the dose increase considering OBT is almost 50 %. Recent experimental data obtained under equilibrium condition are discussed, and the revised transfer parameters for assessment purposes is demonstrated. (authors)

  1. Transfer parameters for routine release of HTO - consideration of OBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.

    1994-06-01

    Knowledge of the transfer parameters for tritium is a key requirement to assess the public dose or to establish Derived Release Limits (DRL) appropriate for a heavy-water reactor. This report revises the transfer parameters used to assess tritium doses via the ingestion pathway. First, the procedure used in Canadian standard CSA-N288.1 to assess the DRL for tritium is revised, clearing up some misunderstandings about the derivation of transfer parameters for air to forage and animal products. Second, we rederive the transfer parameters, applying conditions of full equilibrium to dynamic equations that describe the transfer of tritiated water in food. The new transfer parameters for tritiated water in food are more plant- and site-specific than the generic transfer parameters. The most important improvement is the introduction of organically bound tritium (OBT) production in plants or animal products. Bulk transfer parameters are introduced, which include OBT as well as HTO. Based on a standard Canadian diet, the dose increase considering OBT is almost 50%. Recent experimental data obtained under equilibrium conditions are discussed, and the appropriateness of the revised transfer parameters for assessment purposes is demonstrated. (author). 26 refs., 7 tabs

  2. HTO transfer from contaminated surfaces to the atmosphere: a database for model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.A.; Amiro, B.D.; Workman, W.J.G.; Corbett, B.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report comprises a detailed database that can be used to validate models of the emission of tritiated water vapour (HTO) from natural contaminated surfaces to the atmosphere. The data were collected in 1992 July during an intensive field study based on the flux-gradient method of micrometeorology. The measurements were made over a wetland area at the Chalk River Laboratories, and over a grassed field near the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The study sites, the sampling protocols and the analytical techniques are described in detail, and the measured fluxes are presented. The report also contains a detailed listing of HTO concentrations in air at two heights, HTO concentrations in the source compartments (soil, surface water and vegetation), supporting meteorological data, and various vegetation and soil properties. The uncertainties in all of the measured data are estimated. (author). 15 refs., 23 tabs., 9 figs

  3. Genetic and hematopoietic effects of long-term tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    The positive effects seen using the somewhat insensitive dominant lethal test system and the effects seen on the blood-forming cells indicates that at least in the mouse there is a hazard in the continuous ingestion of HTO at a concentration of 3 μCCi/ml. A direct comparison of these results to the human drinking an equivalent amount of HTO is impossible due to the obvious differences in water metabolism between the two species. Until further experimentation at lower levels of ingestion are completed, it is difficult to comment concerning the significance of these results as related to current concepts of maximum permissible concentration. Studies are now underway examining the possible effects of lower concentrations of chronic HTO ingestion

  4. Atmospheric HT and HTO: V. distribution and large-scale circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, A.S.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    The two major chemical forms of atmospheric tritium are water vapour (HTO) and hydrogen gas (HT). These forms have quite different sources, distributions and sinks. The chemical conversion from HT to HTO in the atmosphere proceeds with a characteristic time of 6.5 years. Combined with the radioactive decay, a net lifetime of 4.8 years is estimated for atmospheric HT. HT is released predominately at the surface in mid- to high latitudes in the northern hemisphere. A negative gradient southward has been found from aircraft transects and from sampling at surface stations. After many years of a relatively constant global inventory of 1.1 kg of tritium gas, the HT mixing ratios decreased during 1977, with the sharpest drop at high latitudes. The estimated decline in annual production was 100 g. At the end of 1977, the atmospheric HT burden was 1.0 kg, and the estimated annual release was 200 g. An unknown portion is present as T 2 gas. The effect of T 2 is to decrease the net lifetime to 3.7 years. In the troposphere, the cycle of HTO has been treated exhaustively by others. The stratospheric distribution of HTO has been sampled from aircraft, and found to increase rapidly with height above the troposphere. An annual cycle has been observed, in which the lower stratosphere is depleted during the spring, and replenished by subsidence from higher levels during summer and fall. The effects of a nuclear test by the People's Republic of China in November 1976 have been clearly observed in the stratospheric HTO; however, no HT deposition was found. Presumably, the HTO at higher levels was originally deposited by the large nuclear weapons tests of the 1960s. An estimated 5 kg of tritium are now present in the stratosphere below 19 km. (author)

  5. Relative transport of water (H2O) and tritiated water (HTO) across cellulose acetate (CA) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, S.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, M.P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The relative transport characteristics of water (H 2 O) and tritiated water (HTO) were evaluated through cellulose acetate membranes under osmosis, reverse osmosis and pervaporation. The results indicate that the relative transport is independent of the process. The anamolous observations under osmotic conditions are explained. (orig.)

  6. Isotope exchange between alkaline earth metal hydroxide and HTO water in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Gounome, J.; Kano, N.

    1997-01-01

    In order reveal to what extent tritium ( 3 H or T) can be incorporated into hydroxides, the isotope exchange reaction (OT-for-OH exchange reaction) between each alkaline earth metal hydroxide (M(OH) 2 ), where M means alkaline earth metal (M=Ca, Sr or Ba) and HTO water was observed homogeneously at 30 deg C under equilibrium after mixing. Consequently, the followings were obtained: a quantitative relation between the electronegativity of each M ion and the ability (of the M ion) incorporating OT - into the M hydroxide can be found and the ability is small when the temperature is high, the exchange rate for the OT-for-OH exchange reaction is small when the electronegativity of the M ion in the M hydroxide is great, as for the dissociation of HTO water, it seems that formula (HTO ↔ T + + OH - ) is more predominant than the formula (HTO ↔H + + OT - ) when the temperature is high and the method used in this work is useful to estimate the reactivity of a certain alkaline material. (author)

  7. Tritium uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): HTO and OBT-spiked feed exposures simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Shultz, C.; Stuart, M.; Festarini, A.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently considerable interest in organically bound tritium (OBT) formation in edible fish. The major questions revolve around whether or not tritium can accumulate in fish after being released into aquatic environments. Since OBT formation rates in large, edible fish are poorly understood, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies, where fish were simultaneously exposed to tritiated water (HTO) and OBT-spiked feed over 130 days, were conducted to evaluate tritium uptake. The measured HTO activity concentrations in fish tissue confirmed that HTO in fish tissue equilibrates quickly with HTO in tank water. The data obtained also confirmed that OBT uptake is faster when fish are ingesting OBT-spiked feed compared to when fish are living in tritiated water (and consuming non-OBT-spiked feed). The difference between the two exposure types is such that the groups exposed to tritiated water and OBT-spiked feed simultaneously were showing the same uptake rates as OBT-spiked feed only exposures. Contrary to what was expected, the rate of OBT uptake (from OBT-spiked feed) seemed to be higher in slow growing fish compared to fast growing fish. Another observation from these studies was that OBT activity concentrations in all organs (viscera) had a tendency to be higher than OBT activity concentrations measured in fish flesh. - Highlights: • Edible size of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were simultaneously exposed to tritiated water (HTO) and OBT-spiked feed over 130 days. • OBT uptake is faster when fish are ingesting OBT-spiked feed compared to when fish are living in tritiated water (and consuming non-OBT-spiked feed). • The rate of OBT uptake (from OBT-spiked feed) seemed to be higher in slow growing fish compared to fast growing fish

  8. Organically bound tritium (OBT) formation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): HTO and OBT-spiked food exposure experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Shultz, C.; Stuart, M.; McNamara, E.; Festarini, A.; Bureau, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the rate of organically bound tritium (OBT) formation, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to tritiated water (HTO) or OBT-spiked food. The HTO (in water) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 7000 Bq/L and the OBT (in food) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 30,000 Bq/L. Fish in both studies were expected to be exposed to similar tritium levels assuming 25% incorporation of the tritiated amino acids found in the food. Four different sampling campaigns of HTO exposure (Day 10, 30, 70, 140) and five different sampling campaigns of OBT-spiked food exposure (Day 9, 30, 70, 100, 140) were conducted to measure HTO and OBT activity concentrations in fish tissues. OBT depuration was also evaluated over a period of 30 days following the 140 d exposure studies. The results suggested that the OBT formation rate was slower when the fish were exposed to HTO compared to when the fish were ingesting OBT. In addition, the results indicated that OBT can bioaccumulate in fish tissues following OBT-spiked food exposure. - Highlights: ► The rate of organically bound tritium (OBT) formation was determined in rainbow trout. ► Rainbow trout were exposed to tritium in the form of tritiated water (HTO) and OBT-spiked food. ► OBT formation rate was slower when the fish were exposed to HTO compared to when the fish were ingesting OBT.

  9. HTO and OBT activity concentrations in soil at the historical atmospheric HT release site (Chalk River Laboratories)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Bredlaw, M.; Korolevych, V.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tritium is routinely released by the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear facilities. Three International HT release experiments have been conducted at the CRL site in the past. The site has not been disturbed since the last historical atmospheric testing in 1994 and presents an opportunity to assess the retention of tritium in soil. This study is devoted to the measurement of HTO and OBT activity concentration profiles in the subsurface 25 cm of soil. In terms of soil HTO, there is no evidence from the past HT release experiments that HTO was retained. The HTO activity concentration in the soil pore water appears similar to concentrations found in background areas in Ontario. In contrast, OBT activity concentrations in soil at the same site were significantly higher than HTO activity concentrations in soil. Elevated OBT appears to reside in the top layer of the soil (0–5 cm). In addition, OBT activity concentrations in the top soil layer did not fluctuate much with season, again, quite in contrast with soil HTO. This result suggests that OBT activity concentrations retained the signature of the historical tritium releases. Highlights: ► At the historical HT release site, HTO and OBT activity concentrations in soil depths were investigated. ► Most organically bound tritium exists in the top layer of the soil. ► The results indicated that OBT activity concentrations can be reflective of historical tritium releases into the environment.

  10. Influence of exposure of pregnant rats to tritiated water (HTO) on swimming function and brain weight of their litters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiyuan; Guo Yuefeng

    1986-01-01

    In order to understand the effects of HTO exposure on the development of central nervous system in rats, the influence of exposure of pregnant rat to HTO on the swimming ability of their litters was studies. Experiment was completed in 21 rats and their 237 litters. It was found that exposure of rats to HTO at activity of 0.185 MBq/ml of body water (5 μCi/ml) or 0.740 MBq/ml (20 μCi/ml), begining on the 8th day of gestation, may retard the development of swimming ability in young litters (up to 18 day of life). These findings indicate that exposure to HTO at lower doses (0.20-1.85 Gy) may resut in a retardation of the function of the development of central nervous system in rats

  11. Experimental determination of the kinetic conversion rate of gaseous tritium into HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, W.; Guenot, J.; Djerassi, H.; Clerc, H.

    1986-09-01

    To assess the impact of atmospheric tritium releases from a fusion plant to the environment, the dose to man usually is determined under the conservative assumption that all tritium is released in the more dangerous oxide form. To quantify this overprediction, experiments are presently being performed by CEA. Oxidation of tritium gas by soil and subsequent resuspension of HTO from soil to atmosphere is one of them. First results have been obtained by CEA on the kinetics of HTO resuspension from contaminated soils. Immediately after contamination, the fraction of the deposited activity which is resuspended to atmosphere is in the range of 1% to 5% per hour. This resuspension rate then decreases more or less slowly with time, depending on specific conditions

  12. Cellular responses to tritium exposure in rainbow trout: HTO- and OBT-spiked feed exposure experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festarini, A.; Shultz, C.; Stuart, M.; Kim, S.B., E-mail: amy.festarini@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ferreri, C. [National Research Council of Italy, Dept. of Chemical Sciences and Materials Technologies, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Biological effects were evaluated in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to tritiated water (HTO) or food spiked with organically bound tritium (OBT). An HTO exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of 7000 Bq/L, and an OBT exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of 30 000 Bq/L. Following 140 days of in vivo HTO exposure, liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain cells did not show statistically significant differences in viability; kidney, liver, and spleen cells did not show significant differences in DNA double-strand break repair activity compared with control cells. Membrane fatty acid composition analysis was conducted on liver cells and no effects of HTO exposure could be detected. Following 140 days of in vivo OBT exposure, viability and DNA double-strand break repair activity were not statistically different from controls in liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain cells. Changes, however, were noted in the fatty acid composition of liver and muscle tissues. For both studies, all measurements were performed on each tissue and on a fraction of the same tissue that was exposed to a gamma 4 Gy dose in vitro to test for adaptive responses, and no effects were observed except for fatty acid composition. The findings demonstrated that membrane fatty acid composition is a sensitive marker and that microscopic evaluation of gamma-H2AX foci is more sensitive than the flow cytometric approach. These studies are the first to correlate uptake and depuration with biological health indicators in edible fish for tritium exposures within worldwide drinking water guidelines. (author)

  13. Cellular responses to tritium exposure in rainbow trout: HTO- and OBT-spiked feed exposure experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festarini, A.; Shultz, C.; Stuart, M.; Kim, S.B.; Ferreri, C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological effects were evaluated in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to tritiated water (HTO) or food spiked with organically bound tritium (OBT). An HTO exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of 7000 Bq/L, and an OBT exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of 30 000 Bq/L. Following 140 days of in vivo HTO exposure, liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain cells did not show statistically significant differences in viability; kidney, liver, and spleen cells did not show significant differences in DNA double-strand break repair activity compared with control cells. Membrane fatty acid composition analysis was conducted on liver cells and no effects of HTO exposure could be detected. Following 140 days of in vivo OBT exposure, viability and DNA double-strand break repair activity were not statistically different from controls in liver, heart, spleen, kidney, and brain cells. Changes, however, were noted in the fatty acid composition of liver and muscle tissues. For both studies, all measurements were performed on each tissue and on a fraction of the same tissue that was exposed to a gamma 4 Gy dose in vitro to test for adaptive responses, and no effects were observed except for fatty acid composition. The findings demonstrated that membrane fatty acid composition is a sensitive marker and that microscopic evaluation of gamma-H2AX foci is more sensitive than the flow cytometric approach. These studies are the first to correlate uptake and depuration with biological health indicators in edible fish for tritium exposures within worldwide drinking water guidelines. (author)

  14. Atmospheric HT and HTO: I. Experimental procedures and tropospheric data 1968–72

    OpenAIRE

    Östlund, H. G.; Mason, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct field sampling of atmospheric HTO and HT. Airborne, portable, and laboratory versions were implemented, and a comprehensive sampling program begun. The air is passed first through Molecular Sieve to adsorb the water, then over palladium carried on Molecular Sieve, which oxidizes atmospheric hydrogen and adsorbs the resulting water in situ. Both samples are subsequently extracted from the adsorbers, and the tritium content measured by internal low-level gas...

  15. CFD model development and data comparison for thermal-hydraulic analysis of HTO pilot scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochan, R.J.; Oh, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The DOE Hydrothermal Oxidation (HTO) program is validating computational methods for use in scaling up small HTO systems to production scale. As part of that effort, the computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT is being used to calculate the integrated fluid dynamics and chemical reactions in an HTO vessel reactor designed by MODAR, Inc. Previous validation of the code used data from a benchscale reactor. This reports presents the validation of the code using pilotscale (10 times greater throughput than benchscale) data. The model for the pilotscale reactor has been improved based upon the benchscale data by including better fluid thermal properties, a better solution algorithm, addition of external heat transfer, investigation of the effects of turbulent flow, and, although not built into the computer model, a technique for using the calculated adiabatic oxidation temperatures for selecting initial conditions. Thermal results from this model show very good agreement with the limited test data from MODAR Run 920. In addition to the reactor temperatures, flowfield details, including chemical reaction distribution, and simulated salt particle transport were obtained. This model will be very beneficial in designing and evaluating larger commercial scale units. The results of these calculations indicate that for model validation, more accurate boundary conditions need to be measured in future test runs

  16. An experimental study on the carcinogenic effect of tritiated water (HTO) in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoro, Kenjiro; Yamamoto, Osamu; Kamiya, Kenji; Fujii, Yoshiaki; Numoto, Michitaka; Kinomura, Aiko

    1986-01-01

    A large-scale study of the long-term carcinogenic effect of tritiated water (HTO) has been performed in mice. This is the interime report on the results as of May 8, 1986. A total of 391 seven-week-old (C57BL/6N x C3H/He) Fl mice were intraperitoneally given 1.0 Ci/0.2 ml of HTO (3.75, 7.5, 15, or 20 mCi/mouse), in either single or fractionated manner. The incidence of leukemia was approximately five times higher in the group receiving a fractionated administration of 20 mCi than that receiving the same amount in a single manner, as was the latent period shorter. The incidence of solid tumors, unlike leukemia, was evidently higher in the group receiving a single administration of 15 mCi than that receiving 3.75 mCi four times. The latent period also tended to be short in the former group. The groups with higher amounts of HTO had slightly higher incidence of multiple primaries. The ovary was the most common site of tumor. Expression of an oncogene, N-ras, was frequently observed in the case of leukemia, fibrosarcoma, and tumors of the thyroid, ovary, and lung. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Cytogenetic adaptive response of mouse bone marrow cells to low level HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqing; Zhang Zhaoyang; Zhou Xiangyan

    1993-01-01

    Mice were abdominally injected with a adaptive dose of 3.7 x 10 2 -3.7 x 10 5 Bq/gbw HTO, and then exposed to a challenge dose of 1.5 Gy of 6 '0Co γ-rays. In bone marrow cells that received both the adaptive and challenge doses, the chromatid breaks are lower than expected on the basis of additivity of the effects of the individual treatment. The adaptive response induced with 3.7 x 10 3 Bq/gbw HTO is the most remarkable, but at 3.7 x 10 5 Bq/gbw the adaptive response seems to disappear. The adaptive response can be observed by exposing to 1.5 Gy γ-rays from 1 to 5 days after injection of 3.7 x 10 3 Bq/gbw HTO, which is the most obvious one to reduce chromatid breaks to 50% of expected at the 5th day, but at the 7th day to equate to expected. The frequency of chromatid breaks is gradually reduced with time after challenge dose, the maximum index number of adaptive response is 0.50 and appears at 24 hr after challenge dose

  18. Organically bound tritium (OBT) formation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): HTO and OBT-spiked food exposure experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Shultz, C; Stuart, M; McNamara, E; Festarini, A; Bureau, D P

    2013-02-01

    In order to determine the rate of organically bound tritium (OBT) formation, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to tritiated water (HTO) or OBT-spiked food. The HTO (in water) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 7000 Bq/L and the OBT (in food) exposure study was conducted using a tritium activity concentration of approximately 30,000 Bq/L. Fish in both studies were expected to be exposed to similar tritium levels assuming 25% incorporation of the tritiated amino acids found in the food. Four different sampling campaigns of HTO exposure (Day 10, 30, 70, 140) and five different sampling campaigns of OBT-spiked food exposure (Day 9, 30, 70, 100, 140) were conducted to measure HTO and OBT activity concentrations in fish tissues. OBT depuration was also evaluated over a period of 30 days following the 140 d exposure studies. The results suggested that the OBT formation rate was slower when the fish were exposed to HTO compared to when the fish were ingesting OBT. In addition, the results indicated that OBT can bioaccumulate in fish tissues following OBT-spiked food exposure. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement of HTO-HT in atmosphere using the Draeger (Drager) tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.; Harris, S.J.; Giorgio, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    It is clearly that, incorporation with the liquid scintillation counting, the Drager tube measuring system for Hydrogen allows the measurement of tritium contamination in atmosphere, e.g. HTO/HT (tritiated water vapour/tritium gas) simultaneously, at levels well below those derived air concentrations (DACs) prescribed by The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the UK Regulations. The novel tritium measuring system of Drager tube, in liquid phase or gel phase, can be used as a cheap, convenient and quick method of tritium detection

  20. Investigation of tritium transfer to plants via the OBT/HTO and OBT/TFWT ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.; Guetat, P.; Vichot, L.; Losset, Y.; Boyer, C.; Fromm, M.; Mavon, C.; Boyer, C.; Tatin-Froux, F.; Badot, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled some concepts used to distinguish the various forms of water present in plants, and the reactions in presence of tritium, the authors discuss the biochemical behaviour of tritium. Then, they briefly report a literature survey and, for different plants and crops, indicate the values of the OBT/HTO (organically bound tritium/tritiated water) and OBT/TFWT (organically bound tritium/tissue free water tritium) ratios. They also report experimental studies performed by exposures of lettuces at the vicinity of a nuclear installation

  1. Development of a reference method and sampling system for continuous monitoring of environmental HT and HTO concentration in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchrin, G.

    1992-06-01

    A differential sampling system to monitor environmental Tritiated Water Vapour (HT) and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas (HTO) concentrations in the atmosphere was developed and tested. The sampler consists of an aerosol filter, diaphragm pump, absorption trap for HTO (molecular sieve), supply of H 2 carrier (electrolysis unit), conversion trap for HT (Pd-impregnated molecular sieve), flow meter and gas meter. The sampler operates with a flow rate between 30 and 80 1/h, with a typical sampling period of one week. Vacuum desorption at high temperature is used to extract the HTO collected in the absorption and conversion traps. Tritium analysis is carried out using liquid scintillation spectrometry or gas proportional counting. The sampler is equipped with built-in safety systems and can operate in remote places. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. An overview of organically bound tritium experiments in plants following a short atmospheric HTO exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeriu, D; Melintescu, A; Strack, S; Atarashi-Andoh, M; Kim, S B

    2013-04-01

    The need for a less conservative, but reliable risk assessment of accidental tritium releases is emphasized in the present debate on the nuclear energy future. The development of a standard conceptual model for accidental tritium releases must be based on the process level analysis and the appropriate experimental database. Tritium transfer from atmosphere to plants and the subsequent conversion into organically bound tritium (OBT) strongly depends on the plant characteristics, seasons, and meteorological conditions, which have a large variability. The present study presents an overview of the relevant experimental data for the short term exposure, including the unpublished information, also. Plenty of experimental data is provided for wheat, rice, and soybean and some for potato, bean, cherry tomato, radish, cabbage, and tangerine as well. Tritiated water (HTO) uptake by plants during the daytime and nighttime has an important role in further OBT synthesis. OBT formation in crops depends on the development stage, length, and condition of exposure. OBT translocation to the edible plant parts differs between the crops analyzed. OBT formation during the nighttime is comparable with that during the daytime. The present study is a preliminary step for the development of a robust model of crop contamination after an HTO accidental release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intercomparison of model predictions of tritium concentrations in soil and foods following acute airborne HTO exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.; Watkins, B.M.; Belot, Y.; Davis, P.A.; Edlund, O.; Galeriu, D.; Raskob, W.; Russell, S.; Togawa, O.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a model intercomparision exercise for predicting tritium transport through foodchains. Modellers were asked to assume that farmland was exposed for one hour to an average concentration in air of 10 4 MBq tritium m -3 . They were given the initial soil moisture content and 30 days of hourly averaged historical weather and asked to predict HTO and OBT concentrations in foods at selected times up to 30 days later when crops were assumed to be harvested. Two fumigations were postulated, one at 10.00 h (i.e., in day-light), and the other at 24.00 h (i.e., in darkness).Predicted environmental media concentrations after the daytime exposure agreed within an order of magnitude in most cases. Important sources of differences were variations in choices of numerical values for transport parameters. The different depths of soil layers used in the models appeared to make important contributions to differences in predictions for the given scenario. Following the night-time exposure, however, greater differences in predicted concentrations appeared. These arose largely because of different ways key processes were assumed to be affected by darkness. Uptake of HTO by vegetation and the rate it is converted to OBT were prominent amongst these processes. Further research, experimental data and modelling intercomparisons are required to resolve some of these issues. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Studies in uptake and turnover of tritiated water vapour (HTO) by vegetables. Untersuchungen zur Aufnahme und zum Umsatz von tritiiertem Wasserdampf (HTO) in Gemuesepflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller, M.

    1989-02-01

    The aerial parts of vegetables were exposed to tritiated water vapour for up to three days in a plant growth chamber. The species used were Raphanus sativus L., Phaseolus vulgaris K. and Daucus carota L. (red radish, bean and carrot). The increase of specific activity of tissue free water as collected by freeze drying which was observed in the aerial parts of plants is explained by direct uptake of tritiated water vapour by the exposed part of the plant. It shows different characteristics for the several organs. No translocation of water from the laminae into other parts of the plant was observed. After combustion of dry matter tritium activity was detectable in the oxidation water for all parts of the plants. Kinetics of the specific activity of organically bound tritium in leaves can be described by a single curve. The lower - steep - part of the curve is increasing approximately with the uptake rate of HTO; this is explained by reversible binding of tritium by isotopic exchange reactions. The upper - flat - part of the curve represents tritium bound by light dependent reducing reactions of photosynthesis; it is increasing with a rate similar to the growth rate of leaves. (orig./KG).

  5. Differences in the behaviour of HTO and H2O in soil after condensation from the atmosphere and conversion of HT to HTO and OBT in soil relative to moisture content and pore volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnenberg, C.; Feinhals, J.; Wiener, B.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and field and soil column experiments have identified the condensation of atmospheric water vapour as an additional process in the HTO contamination of soils. In contrast to wash-out, where tritium concentrations of the deposited water are the same as in the falling drops, the specific activity of the condensed water is increased compared with that of the atmospheric humidity, when the partial vapour pressure gradient of HTO between atmosphere and soil is higher than the H 2 O pressure gradient. With respect to HTO deposition, condensation may therefore be more effective per unit precipitation than wash-out. Experiments on the conversion rates of HT to HTO and OBT in soils have exhibited a pronounced dependence on moisture content and free pore volume. With rising moisture content, conversion increases due to enhanced bacterial action; while close to field capacity a decrease occurs as a result of restricted HT diffusion through the soil pores. In short-term experiments about 0.1% of the converted HT was found in the OBT form. (author)

  6. Importance of root HTO uptake in controlling land-surface tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition: a numerical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu; Koarashi, Jun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of belowground root uptake of tritiated water (HTO) in controlling land-surface tritium (T) dynamics, a sophisticated numerical model predicting tritium behavior in an atmosphere-vegetation-soil system was developed, and numerical experiments were conducted using the model. The developed model covered physical tritiated hydrogen (HT) transport in a multilayered atmosphere and soil, as well as microbial oxidation of HT to HTO in the soil, and it was incorporated into a well-established HTO-transfer organically bound tritium (OBT)-formation model. The model performance was tested through the simulation of an existing HT-release experiment. Numerical experiments involving a hypothetical acute HT exposure to a grassland field with a range of rooting depths showed that the HTO release from the leaves to the atmosphere, driven by the root uptake of the deposited HTO, can exceed the HTO evaporation from the ground surface to the atmosphere when root water absorption preferentially occurs beneath the ground surface. Such enhanced soil-leaf-atmosphere HTO transport, caused by the enhanced root HTO uptake, increased HTO concentrations in both the surface atmosphere and in the cellular water of the leaf. Consequently, leaf OBT assimilation calculated for shallow rooting depths increased by nearly an order of magnitude compared to that for large rooting depths. - Highlights: ► A model that calculates HT deposition from atmosphere to soil was developed. ► Tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition was studied by numerical experiments. ► OBT formation highly depends on magnitude of uptake of the deposited HTO by roots.

  7. Pre-operational HTO/HT surveys in the vicinity of the Chalk River Laboratories tritium extraction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Brown, R.M.

    1993-08-01

    Surveys of the concentrations of HT and HTO in the atmosphere downwind of the Chalk River Laboratories reactor facilities were carried out in 1986 November, and in 1989 March, April and September under different conditions of air temperature, wind direction, and snow or vegetative cover. HT usually amounted to 1-5% of total tritium, but values up to 20% were observed, probably resulting from preferential removal of HTO. In all of the surveys, the greater persistence in the atmosphere of HT than of HTO was evident. The existing levels of HT are such that they will not be augmented significantly by chronic releases from the Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP) when it comes into operation. Hence, operation of the TEP will not facilitate studies of the environmental behaviour of chronically released HT. However, longer term studies of the distribution of HT from the existing facilities would be worthwhile. Soil and vegetation HTO levels in the study area are reported. Further studies of the distribution of tritium between the air, soil and vegetation in areas subjected to chronic exposure would be valuable

  8. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  9. Preparation Effects on the Performance of Silica-Doped Hydrous Titanium Oxide (HTO:Si)-Supported Pt Catalysts for Lean-Burn NOx Reduction by Hydrocarbons; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GARDNER, TIMOTHY J.; MCLAUGHLIN, LINDA I.; MOWERY, DEBORAH L.; SANDOVAL, RONALD S.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported Pt catalysts for lean-burn NOx catalyst applications. The effects of various preparation methods, including both anion and cation exchange, and specifically the effect of Na content on the performance of Pt/HTO:Si catalysts, were evaluated. Pt/HTO:Si catalysts with low Na content ( and lt; 0.5 wt.%) were found to be very active for NOx reduction in simulated lean-burn exhaust environments utilizing propylene as the major reductant species. The activity and performance of these low Na Pt/HTO:Si catalysts were comparable to supported Pt catalysts prepared using conventional oxide or zeolite supports. In ramp down temperature profile test conditions, Pt/HTO:Si catalysts with Na contents in the range of 3-5 wt.% showed a wide temperature window of appreciable NOx conversion relative to low Na Pt/HTO:Si catalysts. Full reactant species analysis using both ramp up and isothermal test conditions with the high Na Pt/HTO:Si catalysts, as well as diffuse reflectance FTIR studies, showed that this phenomenon was related to transient NOx storage effects associated with NaNO(sub 2)/NaNO(sub 3) formation. These nitrite/nitrate species were found to decompose and release NOx at temperatures above 300 C in the reaction environment (ramp up profile). A separate NOx uptake experiment at 275 C in NO/N(sub 2)/O(sub 2) showed that the Na phase was inefficiently utilized for NOx storage. Steady state tests showed that the effect of increased Na content was to delay NOx light-off and to decrease the maximum NOx conversion. Similar results were observed for high K Pt/HTO:Si catalysts, and the effects of high alkali content were found to be independent of the sample preparation technique. Catalyst characterization (BET surface area, H(sub 2) chemisorption, and transmission electron microscopy) was performed to elucidate differences between the HTO- and HTO

  10. Tritium ( 3 H) Retention In Mice: Administered As HTO, DTO or as 3 H-Labeled Amino-Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Nicholas D; Blimkie, Melinda S J; Wyatt, Heather; Bugden, Michelle; Bannister, Laura A; Gueguen, Yann; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Klokov, Dmitry

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the biokinetics of injected H-labeled light (HTO) and heavy (DTO) water in CBA/CaJ mice and to compare the organ distribution and/or body content of H administered by chronic ingestion for 1 mo to C57Bl/6J mice, as either H-labeled water or H-labeled amino acids (glycine, alanine and proline). HTO and DTO were administered to CBA/CaJ mice by single intraperitoneal injection and body retention was determined for up to 384 h post-injection. Tritium-labeled water or H-labeled amino acids were given to C57Bl/6J mice ad libitum for 30 d in drinking water. Body content and organ distribution of H during the period of administration and subsequent to administration was determined by liquid scintillation counting. No differences were found between the biokinetics of HTO and DTO, indicating that data generated using HTO can be used to help assess the consequences of H releases from heavy water reactors. The results for H-water showed that the concentration of radionuclide in the mice reached a peak after about 10 d and dropped rapidly after the cessation of H administration. The maximum concentration reached was only 50% of that in the water consumed, indicating that mice receive a significant fraction of their water from respiration. Contrary to the findings of others, the pattern of H retention following the administration of a cocktail of the labeled amino acids was very little different from that found for the water. This is consistent with the suggestion that most of the ingested amino acids were rapidly metabolized, releasing water and carbon dioxide.

  11. Validation of the HTO-18 method for determination of CO2 production of lizards (genus Sceloporus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congdon, J.D.; King, W.W.; Nagy, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    The accuracy of doubly-labeled water measurements of CO 2 production in lizards of the genus Sceloporus was assessed by comparison of CO 2 production rates determined simultaneously by labeled water and gas chromatography. Five lizards were weighed and given intraperitoneal injections of 55 μl of water containing 10 microcuries of tritium as HTO and 50 atom % oxygen-18 as H 2 18 O. Initial blood samples were taken from the infraorbital sinus ten hours later, and the lizards were placed in sealed metabolism chambers kept at 28 C. After 179 h the lizards were weighed and blood samples taken. Blood samples were microdistilled, assayed for tritium activity and for oxygen-18 content. Isotope measurements were used to calculate rates of CO 2 production. Gas samples were withdrawn from each chamber after 18, 63, 109, and 179 h and measured against 0.5 and 1.0% CO 2 standards with a Beckman GC-55 gas chromatograph fitted with silica gel 42-60 mesh column. These results were used to calculate rates of CO 2 production. Results supported the conclusion that the doubly-labeled water method accurately measured rates of CO 2 production in Sceloporus lizards, and could therefore be a valuable technique in field studies of lizard energetics

  12. Investigation of tritium transfer to plants via the OBT/HTO and OBT/TFWT ratios; Etude du transfert du tritium aux vegetaux via les ratios OBT/HTO ET OBT/TFWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, C.; Guetat, P.; Vichot, L.; Losset, Y. [CEA Valduc, UMR, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Boyer, C.; Fromm, M.; Mavon, C. [UMR CEA E4, Universite de Franche-Comte, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besancon cedex (France); Boyer, C.; Tatin-Froux, F.; Badot, P.M. [CNRS-Universite de Franche Comte / UMR 6249 Chrono-environnement usc INRA, Place Leclerc, F-25030 Besancon cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    After having recalled some concepts used to distinguish the various forms of water present in plants, and the reactions in presence of tritium, the authors discuss the biochemical behaviour of tritium. Then, they briefly report a literature survey and, for different plants and crops, indicate the values of the OBT/HTO (organically bound tritium/tritiated water) and OBT/TFWT (organically bound tritium/tissue free water tritium) ratios. They also report experimental studies performed by exposures of lettuces at the vicinity of a nuclear installation

  13. Diffusion of Tritiated Water (HTO) and 22Na+-Ions through Non-Degraded Hardened Cement Pastes - II. Modelling Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakob, A.

    2002-12-01

    In this report, the procedure and the results of an inverse modelling study on the through-diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) and 2 2Na + -ions are presented using high-porous hardened cement pastes with a water/cement ratio of 1.3 in the first stage of the cement degradation. For the analysis two alternative models were applied: 1) a diffusion model where a possible sorption of the tracer was entirely neglected, and 2) a diffusion model with linear sorption. The analysis of the through-diffusion phase allowed extracting values for the effective diffusion coefficient (D e ) and the rock-capacity factor (α). Both models could fit the breakthrough curves equally well, and also mass-balance considerations did not allow to clearly preferring one of the two competing models to the other. But blind-predictions for tracer out-diffusion using the best-fit parameter values deduced from analysing the former through-diffusion phase gave a clear indication that linear sorption had to be included in the diffusion model. The extracted K d values for HTO are in excellent agreement with values from batch sorption experiments and are of the order of 0.8. 10 -3 m 3 /kg. Those for 2 2Na + are of the order of 1.0. 10 -3 m 3 /kg and are by a factor of two larger than values from batch sorption experiments. The values for the effective diffusion coefficients for HTO are of the order of (2-3).10 -1 0 m 2 /s, and those for sodium are roughly by a factor of two smaller than values for HTO. On the one hand, the observed tracer uptake could only partially be addressed to isotope exchange; the most obvious process which could account for the remaining part of the uptaken tracer mass is diffusion into a second type of porosity, the dead-end pores. On the other hand, the results and conclusions drawn are encouraging for future investigations; therefore no major deficiency concerning the applied equipment and the modelling methodology could be detected. In the report, however, some suggestions

  14. Influence of the rate of conversion of HT and HTO on projected radiation doses from release of molecular tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.G.; Easterly, C.E.; Phillips, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Releases of tritium in the past have been largely in the form of tritiated water, and the projected radiation doses could be estimated by assuming tritium behaviour to parallel that of water. There is increasing interest in potential releases of tritium in the form of HT because of significant recent advances in fusion reactor research. Several recent studies have shown that bacteria containing the enzyme hydrogenase can catalyse the conversion of HT to HTO at rates several orders of magnitude faster than the rates measured in atmospheric systems. Rates of conversion in the soil have been combined with estimates of rates of permeation of HT into the soil and with global and local models depicting tritium transport and cycling. The results suggest that for the expected conversion rates, the impact on projected radiation doses should be relatively minor. (author)

  15. Activation energies of the self-diffusion of HTO, 22Na+ and 36Cl- in a highly compacted argillaceous rock (Opalinus Clay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, L.R. van; Mueller, W.; Iijima, K.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the self-diffusion of HTO, 22 Na + and 36 Cl - in Opalinus Clay (OPA) was studied using a through-diffusion technique, in which the temperature was gradually increased in the steady state phase of the diffusion. The measurements were done on samples from two different geological locations. The dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient on temperature was found to be of an Arrhenius type in the temperature range between 0 and 70 deg. C. A slight difference between the two locations could be observed. The average value of the activation energy of the self-diffusion of HTO in OPA was 21.1 ± 1.6 kJ mol -1 , and 21.0 ± 3.5 and 19.4 ± 1.5 kJ mol -1 for 22 Na + and 36 Cl - , respectively. The measured values for HTO are slightly higher than the values found for the bulk liquid water (HTO: 18.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol -1 ). This indicates that the structure of the confined water in OPA might be slightly different from that of bulk liquid water. Also for Na + and Cl - , slightly higher values than in bulk liquid water (Na + : 18.4 kJ mol -1 ; Cl - : 17.4 kJ mol -1 ) were observed. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could not be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO in OPA. This additionally indicates the slightly different structure of the pore water in OPA

  16. Production of DNA Double Strand Breaks in Human Cells due to Acute Exposure to Tritiated Water (HTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, R.; German, U.; Alfassi, Z. B.; Priel, E.

    2014-01-01

    The average and maximum energies of the beta emission from 3H are 5.69 keV and 18.6 keV respectively. The average range in water (or soft tissues), around 0.5 1/4m (500 nm), is considerably less than the typical diameter of a cell (10-30 1/4m), and even of a cell nucleus (5-10 1/4m), thus the micro-location of the tritium atom may well be crucial in determining its biochemical consequences. Due to the high ionization density of the beta particles emitted by tritium (about 400 ion pairs/1/4m) possible interaction of tritium beta radiation with DNA may play a significant role. Tritiated water (HTO) is the main chemical form in which tritium is found in the environment. In the body it may be retained as organically bound tritium (OBT), binding to biological molecules or remaining as OBT with various degrees of solubility. OBT can be retained in the human body much longer than HTO and therefore the dose arising from OBT can reach 50% of the total tritium dose . Histones are major protein components of chromatin. They function as spools around which DNA winds and play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. In the absence of histones, the DNA in chromosomes would be unmanageably long, as human cells each have about 1.8 m of DNA. During mitosis, DNA is duplicated and condensed, resulting in about 120 1/4m of chromosomes. It was recently reported that the phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine residue 139 (D 3 -H2AX) is associated with Double Strand Breaks (DSB) sites in DNA), which indicates the possibility of research based on the detection of DSBs in DNA. The phosphorylated megabase chromatin domain surrounding the DSB can be immunostained and visualized as discrete foci by fluorescence microscopy, as each DNA DSB formed produces a visible D 3 -H2AX focus. Since 1 Gy of radiation produces approximately 60 DSBs/cell, doses of a few mGy should be distinguishable from the background, and it was recently shown that the exposure to 1 mGy of X-rays induces

  17. Experimental study of the transport of HTO, {sup 3}6Cl and {sup 1}37Cs through barriers of bentonite and granite; Estudio experimental del transporte de HTO, {sup 3}6Cl y {sup 1}37Cs a traves de barreras de bentonita y granito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarro, M.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Morejon, J.; Missana, T.; Gil, P.

    2013-07-01

    The evaluation of the behavior of the engineered (bentonite) and natural (granite) barrier of a deep geological repository of high level radioactive waste, needs the knowledge of radionuclide migration and retention processes under conditions as similar as possible to the real ones. In CIEMAT a large-scale experiment has been designed with the objective of studying diffusive transport at the bentonite/granite interface of a geological repository in crystalline rock. The diffusion of three tracers has been analyzed: HTO (as conservative and neural element); Cl (as conservative anionic element) and Cs (as conservative cationic element). It was observed that cesium disappeared very fast from the water deposit, due to its strong retention on bentonite. On the other hand, HTO and Cl, disappeared much slower and could be finally detected in the granite at several centimeters from the original source.

  18. The Higgs Boson in the $H\\to ZZ^{(*)}\\to4l$ decay channel with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Salvucci, Antonio; Filthaut, Frank

    This thesis is aiming to present the work contributed by the author in the context of the ATLAS experiment and the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the $H\\to ZZ^{(∗)}\\to 4l$ decay channel using the proton-proton collision data collected during 2011 and 2012. This decay channel is one of the main channels where the discovery of the Higgs boson has been made. It provides a very clean final state signature and the possibility to fully reconstruct the Higgs mass with excellent detector resolution. Moreover, it is the most suitable instrument to study the spin and parity state of the Higgs boson, since one can reconstruct the full decay chain and derive the intrinsic properties of the $H\\to ZZ$ decay amplitude from angular and invariant mass distribution of the final state. This thesis is organized as follow. An introduction of the theoretical aspects of the Standard Model and the spontaneous symmetry breaking are presented. The LHC and the ATLAS detector are introduced. For the search for the Higgs ...

  19. Comparison of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions between HTO vapor and the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Minoru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoko

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between HTO vapor and one of the sodium salts of o-, m-, and p-aminobenzoic acid (solid) was observed at 50 ∼ 80 degC. The acidity (acidity based on kinetic logic) for the materials at each temperature has been obtained with the A''-McKay plots based on the respective data obtained. The followings have been clarified by comparing these acidities (and the acidities obtained previously). 1) The acidity of aromatic amines can be expressed in terms of the acidity based on kinetic logic. 2) The reactivity of aromatic amine is strongly affected by both I-effect and R-effect. 3) It can be deduced that aromatic amines are more reactive than aliphatic amines. (author)

  20. Diffusion of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, {sup 125}I{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M

    2004-02-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}), rock capacity factors ({alpha}) and diffusion-accessible porosities ({epsilon}) were measured using the through-diffusion technique. Transport (diffusion) was measured both perpendicular and parallel to the bedding. Special cells that allowed the application of an axial confining pressure were designed. The pressures applied ranged from 1 to 5 MPa for Mont Terri samples and between 4 and 15 MPa for Benken samples, the upper values representing the in-situ confining pressure at both locations. The test solutions used in the experiments were synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water, which has Na and Cl as main components (Mont Terri: I = 0.39 M; Benken: I = 0.20 M). Pressure only had a small effect on the value of the effective diffusion coefficients. In the case of Mont Terri samples, increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of 20% for HTO, 27% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 29% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. In the case of Benken samples, increasing the pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of D{sub e} of 17% for HTO, 22% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 32% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients for for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}are smaller than for HTO, which is consistent with an effect arising from anion exclusion. This ion exclusion effect is smaller in samples from Mont Terri than in samples from Benken, which can be explained by the higher ionic strength of the Mont Terri water used in the experiments. The diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is similar to that of HTO in the case of Mont Terri OPA. For Benken OPA, the D{sub e} value of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is a factor of 2 higher than that of HTO. This last observation cannot be explained so far but is comparable to experimental data from ANDRA (1999) on Callovo-Oxfordian claystones from the Meuse/Haute Same site. {sup 125}I{sup -} is retarded with

  1. Constraints on an effective Lagrangian from the combined $H\\to ZZ^*\\to 4\\ell$ and $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ channels using 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV $pp$ collision data collected with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Six parameters of an effective field theory are constrained using the combined $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^*\\to 4\\ell$ channels, based on 36.1 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV. The parameters are sensitive to modifications of the Higgs boson couplings to strong and electroweak gauge bosons, and to the top quark. The most stringent constraints are those on the effective couplings to photons and to gluons.

  2. HTO Approach Applications in ROSATOM CICET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, E.; Aspidov, V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents Rosatom Central Institute for Continuing Education and Training (CICET) (hereinafter “CICET”) current activity in areas of nuclear facilities personnel training and relevant research. CICET has a strategic goal to get the “Safety Culture” competence centre for ROSATOM organizations. Safety culture ensures for nuclear organization to achieve both the business goals and high safety level. Safety is a state of ergatic [sic] system when influence of internal and external factors impact does not lead to its operation deterioration or stoppage. Dramatic history of world nuclear energetics shows that HOF the main assembly of factors influencing on safety. Individual work performance and organizational processes are visible, “artefact” part of the organization culture. Approaches and tools to enhance human and organization behavior are under CICET activity focus.

  3. HTO oral administration in mice: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Yokoro, K.; Seyama, T.; Kinomura, A.; Nomura, T.

    1990-01-01

    Tritiated water in various concentrations was orally administered continuously to (C57BL/6N and C3H/He)F 1 female mice in a closed animal chamber. Tritium radioactivity in various organ tissues was measured periodically after initiating tritiated water intake using an automatic sample combustion system and a liquid scintillation counter. After 7 days the specific radioactivity reached a plateau. Within a range of 1.48 x 10 11 to 5.92 x 10 11 Bq/dm 3 as the concentration of tritiated water in drinking water, the time of death after initiating the administration was about 2 weeks, a typical time for haematopoietic death. A linear relationship of times of death with tritiated water concentrations in drinking water was observed, on a log-log scale, between 1.85 x 10 10 Bq/dm 3 and 1.48 x 10 11 Bq/dm 3 . At concentrations lower than 9.25 x 10 9 Bq/dm 3 , mice no longer died from haematopoietic failure. The authors conclude, therefore, that there should be a threshold dose rate for haematopoietic death. (author)

  4. Stratospheric HTO perturbations 1980-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A. S.

    1985-02-01

    Three perturbations of the stratospheric tritiated water burden have occurred. An atmospheric nuclear detonation in 1980 injected about 2.1 MCi. The massive eruptions of the volcano El Chichon may have contributed to a doubling of the removal rate in 1982. An unusually large wintertime exchange with the upper stratosphere may have occurred between 1982 and 1983.

  5. Diffusive parameters of tritiated water (HTO) and U in chalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descostes, M.; Gandois, O.; Frasca, B.; Radwan, J.; Juery, A.; Descostes, M.; Pili, E.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The feasibility of aquifer storage and recovery systems (ASR) to counteract short and long term imbalances between freshwater supply and demand is currently investigated for the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. During the planned injection of oxic excess water into a deep anoxic aquifer the water quality evolution will depend on the extent and structure of the physical and geochemical heterogeneity and reactivity of the aquifer. A detailed geochemical characterisation was undertaken to determine amount and type of sedimentary reductants within different lithological facies. The incubation of sediment samples from the target aquifer for ∼ 52 days enabled quantification of their oxygen (O 2 ) consumption and CO 2 production [1]. Data analysis, in particular the identification of key redox and acid buffering processes, was under-pinned by hydrogeochemical modelling. Results showed that the average measured reductive capacities (MRC) towards O 2 consumption increased from the sand facies, followed by the siltstone facies, and the mud-stone/shale facies. This approach identified pyrite (20 - 100%), sedimentary organic matter (SOM; 3 - 56%), siderite (3 - 28%) and Fe(II)- aluminosilicates (8 - 55%) as the main O 2 reductants. Minute amounts of carbonate acted as buffering minerals, while a bounding pH of 3 indicated acid buffering by K-feldspar dissolution. The supernatants showed elevated aqueous concentrations of Ni, Cd and Pb to be a potential risk for the quality of the recovered water. [1] Hartog, Griffioen and Van der Weijden (2002) Environmental Science and Technology 36(11), 2338-2344

  6. Tritium transfer studies in cellulose-HTO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, A.P.; Misra, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes some aspects of studies on transfer of tritium to cellulose from tritiated water at six different specific activities and discusses the generalized tritiation pattern. Cellulose was irradiated in steps to 10 M Rads and the tritium transfer was determined at each stage. Experimental results signify substantial increase of tritiation in cellulose at higher dose of irradiation. (author). 8 refs

  7. A review of HTO evaporation studies at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.; Barry, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Results of the tritium evaporation and exchange studies on Perch Lake are discussed. A model is used to describe the tritium distribution in the atmospheric moisture above the lake. The model, however, underestimates the tritium content at heights above 5 m; such a discrepancy is attributed to the characteristics of the wind speed variation with height, by which vertical diffusion proceeds at somewhat greater rate than expected. Therefore, to represent the Perch Lake system adequately, a three-layer model is required, incorporating a thin laminar layer at the surface, a growing turbulent internal boundary layer and a third layer with high eddy diffusivity. Pan experiments have been used to determine the exponent n=(h-epsilon)/(1-h+Δepislon) of the equation describing the change in isotopic composition during evaporation. The agreement between the experimental and the theoretical values is good for high to middle relative humidities, but significant deviations are shown at low humidities. (author)

  8. HTO as a conservative tracer used for characterization of contaminant migration in porous rock environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havlova, V.; Vopalka, D.

    2010-01-01

    Methodology for diffusion coefficient determination was applied on sandstone samples, using conservative non sorbing tracer. The results proved that methodology, through-diffusion cell design and GoldSim diffusion module can be used for sandstone samples in order to determine important migration parameters, necessary for transport model input. However, rock heterogeneity factor has to be taken into account in any case as it can potentially change rock properties, even within centimeter scale. Effective diffusion coefficient D e for rock samples was determined. The values fell into the range of 1.0-6.17 x 10 -10 m 2 s -1 . Discrepancies in measured and simulated porosity were observed. Statistical analyses revealed that values of diffusion coefficient D e were in close interrelation to primary mineral (quartz) and cement forming minerals (kaolinite and organic matter). (author)

  9. Prediction of tritium behavior in rice plant after a short-term exposure of HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, Dae Sik; Lee, Kun Jai; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Chang Min

    2001-01-01

    In many Asian countries including Korea, rice is a very important food crop. Its grain is consumed by humans and its straw is used to feed animals. Because four CANDU reactors are in operation in Korea, relatively large amounts of tritium are released into the environment and the dose by these tritium in the rice plant must be estimated. Since 1997, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has carried out experimental studies to obtain domestic data on various parameters related to the direct tritium contamination of plant. But the analysis of the tritium behavior in the rice plant has been insufficient. In this study, the behavior of the tritium in the rice plant is predicted and compared with the measurement performed at KAERI. Using the conceptual model of the soil-plant-atmosphere tritiated water transport system which was suggested by Charles E. Murphy, transient tritium concentrations in soil and leaves were predicted. If the effect of tritium concentration in the soil is taken into account, the tritium concentration in leaves can be described by a double exponential model, however if the tritium concentration in the soil is disregarded, the tritium concentration in leaves can be described by a single exponential term like other relevant models e.g. UFOTRI or STAR-H3 model. The results can be used to predict the tritium concentration in the rice plant near the plant site and to estimate the ingestion dose after the release of tritium to the environment

  10. Measurements of tritium (HTO, TFWT, OBT) in environmental samples at varying distances from a nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzer, T.G.; Workman, W.J.G.

    1999-12-01

    Concentrations of tritium have been measured in environmental samples (vegetation, water, soil, air) from sites distal and proximal to a CANDU nuclear generating station in Southern Ontario (OPG-Pickering). Levels of tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetation are as high as 24,000 TU immediately adjacent to the nuclear generating station and rapidly decrease to levels of tritium which are comparable to natural ambient concentrations for tritium in the environment (approximately ≤ 60 TU). Tritium concentrations (OBT, TFTW) have also been measured in samples of vegetation and tree rings growing substantial distances away from nuclear generating stations and are within a factor of 1 to 2 of the ambient levels of tritium measured in precipitation in several parts of Canada (approximately ≤30 TU). (author)

  11. Jagiellonian University Optimizing Higgs Boson CP Measurement in $H\\to \\tau \\tau $ decay with ML Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Barberio, Elisabetta; Richter-Wąs, Elżbieta; Wąs, Zbigniew; Zanzi, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Current measurements of the CP state of the Higgs boson have favoured a scalar Higgs boson but are not able to exclude a mixing of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson states. A measurement of possible mixed CP states of the Higgs boson is best done through the $H \\to ττ$ decay mode. The decay products of $τ$ leptons, produced in $H \\to ττ$ decays, encode the CP information of the Higgs. This presents a challenge as a large proportion of τ decays involve cascade decays to three pions. This results in increased complexity in defining a CP sensitive observable. Deep learning tools (through neural networks) have been employed to extract as much sensitivity as possible. This neural network approach has been shown to effectively separate scalar and pseudoscalar hypothesis with decays of $τ$ to three pions. Assessing the effectiveness of this approach involves studies into detector resolution and $τ$ -decay modelling. Improvements to the approach are sought through the use of $E^{miss}_T$ .

  12. Measurements of tritium (HTO, TFWT, OBT) in environmental samples at varying distances from a nuclear generating station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzer, T.G.; Workman, W.J.G

    1999-12-01

    Concentrations of tritium have been measured in environmental samples (vegetation, water, soil, air) from sites distal and proximal to a CANDU nuclear generating station in Southern Ontario (OPG-Pickering). Levels of tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetation are as high as 24,000 TU immediately adjacent to the nuclear generating station and rapidly decrease to levels of tritium which are comparable to natural ambient concentrations for tritium in the environment (approximately {<=} 60 TU). Tritium concentrations (OBT, TFTW) have also been measured in samples of vegetation and tree rings growing substantial distances away from nuclear generating stations and are within a factor of 1 to 2 of the ambient levels of tritium measured in precipitation in several parts of Canada (approximately {<=}30 TU). (author)

  13. Analysis of parameters for the off-site dose calculation due to HTO, OBT, and radioactive carbon ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G. B.; Jeung, Y. K.; Bang, S. Y.; Um, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    For assessment of tritium and radiocarbon ingestion dose to off site individuals, water, hydrogen, and carbon content of main farm produce of Korea were investigated to replace the existing data in K-DOSE60, the Offsite Dose Calculation Manual(ODCM) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. (KHNP). Main items and weighting factors of farm produce were determined with the nationwide food intake data in 2001, 2002. Main farm produce were sampled around Kori, Wolsong, Ulchin, Yonggwang nuclear power sites. Content of each produce was multiplied by weighting factor and summed up to make the weighted mean group value. For grains, water, hydrogen, and carbon content was not much different from the existing data currently used in K-DOSE60, but root vegetables had 3.5 times more hydrogen, and leafy vegetables and fruits had 0.7 - 1.3 times more or less water, hydrogen, and carbon contents than K-DOSE60

  14. Organically bound deuterium in soybean exposed to atmospheric D2O vapor as a substitute for HTO under different growth phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Michiko; Maejima, Takuya; Seino, Nami; Ara, Tetsuki; Masukura, Akari; Nishihiro, Sayaka; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ichimasa, Yusuke

    2003-01-01

    Heavy water vapor release experiments were carried out in a greenhouse using deuterium as a substitute for tritium and uptake and loss kinetics of D 2 O in leaves and formation, translocation and retention of organically bound deuterium (OBD) in bean soybean exposed to D 2 O under different growth phase were investigated. Rate constants of D 2 O uptake in leaves of soybean in the daytime release were 0.6 - 6.1 hr -1 and several times higher than those in the nighttime release. Rate constants of D 2 O loss in leaves after daytime release were almost the same as those after the nighttime release. No significant difference in the half time of D 2 O loss was observed between daytime and nighttime releases. After D 2 O release, OBD concentration in bean in daytime experiments increased with time until 3 - 4 days of the experiments and then decreased with time. The OBD concentrations in bean in daytime release were several times higher than those in nighttime release while the extents of decrease of OBD concentration were somewhat lower than those in the daytime experiment. (author)

  15. Dose dependent qualitative analysis of the effects of tritiated water (HTO) on the developing mouse cerebellum from 15th day Post - Coitum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, N.; Bhatia, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of tritium toxicity in the developing mouse brain has demonstrated that the cerebellum is fairly vulnerable to tritium exposure even in young adult mice. Tritium toxicity in the postnatally developing mouse cerebellum with respect to the radiopathological changes has also been reported. In the absence of adequate dose response data on inhaled beta emitting radionuclides in man, it is necessary to obtain such information in experimental animals. This presentation is an attempt to look into the toxicity of tritium on the cerebellum of developing Swiss albino mice and hence, to collect such dose response data which are necessary to establish the safety standards for the personnel involved with radiation protection programs

  16. Measurement of the $pp\\to H\\to ZZ^* \\to 4 \\ell$ Production and $HZZ$ Tensor Coupling with the ATLAS Detector at 13 TeV Centre-of-Mass Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Walbrecht, Verena Maria; Kortner, Sandra

    In this master thesis the measurement of the Higgs boson production in the $H\\to~ZZ^*~\\to 4~\\ell$ decay channel ($\\ell=e,\\mu$) is performed together with the measurement of the tensor structure of the Higgs boson couplings to $Z$ bosons. The results are based on the Run~II dataset of LHC's proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13~TeV, with the ATLAS detector and corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of $14.78$~fb$^{-1}$. Special emphasis is given to the estimation of the reducible background contribution. Based on the signal and background estimations, there are $32.0\\pm3.2$ Higgs boson candidates expected after the final event selection, while $44$ candidates are observed. The difference is compatible at the level of about $2$ standard derivations with the Standard Model predictions. All selected candidates are used in the study of the tensor structure of the $HZZ$ coupling between the Higgs boson and the two $Z$ bosons. For this study a dedicated signal model is introduced to desc...

  17. The Higgs as a portal to the hidden sector via an analysis of $H\\to Zd_d Z_d \\to 4l$ using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Unwuchola, D A

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) has well known deciencies, and there is clearly need for new physics beyond the SM. The particles manifesting the new physics would interact at most weakly with the SM particles, and hence they are termed dark. The Higgs boson is potentially a favourable route for the production of the dark particles. There are a large class of theories where couplings or mixings at the Higgs level leads to exotic Higgs decays, which nonetheless do not signicantly disturb the known physics below the Higgs level. This is therefore a signicant potential discovery opportunity. We present the motivation and progress made in the studies which have been carried out as part of designing the search for the exotic decay of the SM Higgs which proceeds via a dark force back to SM four leptons, H $\\to$ Z$_d$Z$_d$ $\\to$ 4l from the LHC run 1 data using the ATLAS detector.

  18. Search for Higgs-Boson Production in Association with Top-Quark Pairs in $H\\to b \\bar{b}$ Decays at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 and 13 TeV with the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Garay García, Jasone; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Haller, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A search of the Higgs boson in association with a top-quark pair is presented, using pp collision data collected by the CMS detector at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV corresponding to integrated luminosities of 19 . 7 fb − 1 and 2 . 6 fb − 1 , respectively. Candidate t ̄ tH events are selected to enhance the dileptonic decay channel of the t ̄ t system and the decay of the Higgs boson into two b -quark jets ( H → b ̄ b ). The final state of the selected t ̄ tH ( b ̄ b ) processes is characterised by the presence of four b -jets, two originating from the t ̄ t system and two belonging to the Higgs-boson decay. The b -quark jet pair originating from the t ̄ t system is identified using multi-variate analysis techniques. In order to reduce the combinatorial background provided by the four b -jets in the final state, a generic method is developed to get an optimal separation between b and ̄ b jets. The remaining b -jets in the event are used to reconstruct the ( m b ̄ b ) invariant-mass di...

  19. Factors affecting calculations of dose resulting from a tritium release into the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.; Easterly, C.E.; Booth, R.S.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium releases in the form of HT represent a lower hazard to man than releases as HTO. However, during movement in the environment, HT is converted into HTO. The effects of the conversion rate on calcultions of dose are described, and a general method is presented for determining the dose from tritium for various conversion rates and relative HTO/HT risk factors

  20. Transfer of tritium released into the marine environment by French nuclear facilities bordering the English Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiévet, Bruno; Pommier, Julien; Voiseux, Claire; Bailly du Bois, Pascal; Laguionie, Philippe; Cossonnet, Catherine; Solier, Luc

    2013-06-18

    Controlled amounts of liquid tritium are discharged as tritiated water (HTO) by the nuclear industry into the English Channel. Because the isotopic discrimination between 3H and H is small, organically bound tritium (OBT) and HTO should show the same T/H ratio under steady-state conditions. We report data collected from the environment in the English Channel. Tritium concentrations measured in seawater HTO, as well as in biota HTO and OBT, confirm that tritium transfers from HTO to OBT result in conservation of the T/H ratio (ca. 1 × 10(-16)). The kinetics of the turnover of tritium between seawater HTO, biota HTO, and OBT was investigated. HTO in two algae and a mollusk is shown to exchange rapidly with seawater HTO. However, the overall tritium turnover between HTO and the whole-organism OBT is a slow process with a tritium biological half-life on the order of months. Nonsteady-state conditions exist where there are sharp changes in seawater HTO. As a consequence, for kinetic reasons, the T/H ratio in OBT may deviate transiently from that observed in HTO of samples from the marine ecosystem. Dynamic modeling is thus more realistic for predicting tritium transfers to biota OBT under nonsteady-state conditions.

  1. Study, with the help of nuclear indicators (HTO, Urea {sup 14}C and {sup 24}Na), of the renewal of water, urea and sodium in different parts of the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis and of the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in oliguria; Etude, a l'aide d'indicateurs nucleaires (HTO, UREE {sup 14}C et {sup 24}Na), du renouvellement de l'eau, de l'uree et du sodium dans les differentes regions du rein de rat en diurese aqueuse et de merion en diurese osmotique ou en oligurie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechene, C P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    In the kidney of the gerbil in oliguria there exists a cortico-papillary gradient in the concentration of the sodium and of the urea; this gradient disappears in the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis; in these three states of diuresis there is no significant difference in the potassium concentration between the surface and interior regions of the kidneys. Kinetic studies using tritiated water, urea {sup 14}C and {sup 24}Na show that water and urea in the interior regions of the kidney are only renewed very slowly (1 h) whereas the sodium is rapidly changed (1 mn). These results can be explained using WIRZ's theory concerning the mechanism of the counter-current concentration of urine. Furthermore, the evolution of the specific radioactivity of urea {sup 14}C is favorable for a cortical synthesis of urea. (author) [French] II existe dans le rein de Merions en oligurie un gradient cortico papillaire de la concentration du sodium et de l'uree; ce gradient est aboli dans le rein de Merions en diurese osmotique ou de rats en diurese aqueuse; dans ces 3 etats de diurese il n'y a pas de difference significative de la concentration du potassium entre les regions superficielles et profondes des reins. Des etudes cinetiques a l'aide d'eau tritiee, d'uree {sup 14}C et de {sup 24}Na montrent que l'eau et l'uree des regions profondes des reins ne sont renouveles que tres lentement (1 h), alors que le sodium est tres vite renouvele (1 mn). Ces resultats s'expliquent par la theorie de WIRZ sur le mecanisme de la concentration de l'urine par contre-courant. En outre, l'evolution renale de la radioactivite specifique de l'uree {sup 14}C est en faveur d'une synthese corticale de l'uree. (auteur)

  2. Study, with the help of nuclear indicators (HTO, Urea {sup 14}C and {sup 24}Na), of the renewal of water, urea and sodium in different parts of the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis and of the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in oliguria; Etude, a l'aide d'indicateurs nucleaires (HTO, UREE {sup 14}C et {sup 24}Na), du renouvellement de l'eau, de l'uree et du sodium dans les differentes regions du rein de rat en diurese aqueuse et de merion en diurese osmotique ou en oligurie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechene, C.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    In the kidney of the gerbil in oliguria there exists a cortico-papillary gradient in the concentration of the sodium and of the urea; this gradient disappears in the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis; in these three states of diuresis there is no significant difference in the potassium concentration between the surface and interior regions of the kidneys. Kinetic studies using tritiated water, urea {sup 14}C and {sup 24}Na show that water and urea in the interior regions of the kidney are only renewed very slowly (1 h) whereas the sodium is rapidly changed (1 mn). These results can be explained using WIRZ's theory concerning the mechanism of the counter-current concentration of urine. Furthermore, the evolution of the specific radioactivity of urea {sup 14}C is favorable for a cortical synthesis of urea. (author) [French] II existe dans le rein de Merions en oligurie un gradient cortico papillaire de la concentration du sodium et de l'uree; ce gradient est aboli dans le rein de Merions en diurese osmotique ou de rats en diurese aqueuse; dans ces 3 etats de diurese il n'y a pas de difference significative de la concentration du potassium entre les regions superficielles et profondes des reins. Des etudes cinetiques a l'aide d'eau tritiee, d'uree {sup 14}C et de {sup 24}Na montrent que l'eau et l'uree des regions profondes des reins ne sont renouveles que tres lentement (1 h), alors que le sodium est tres vite renouvele (1 mn). Ces resultats s'expliquent par la theorie de WIRZ sur le mecanisme de la concentration de l'urine par contre-courant. En outre, l'evolution renale de la radioactivite specifique de l'uree {sup 14}C est en faveur d'une synthese corticale de l'uree. (auteur)

  3. Relation between the tritium in continuous atmospheric release and the tritium contents of fruits and tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolevych, V Y; Kim, S B

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tissue-free water tritium (TFWT, also referred to as HTO) in fruits and tubers were measured at a garden plot in the vicinity of the source of chronic airborne tritium emissions during the 2008, 2010, and 2011 growing seasons. A continuous record of HTO concentration in the air moisture was reconstructed from the continuous record of Ar-41 ambient gamma radiation, as well as from frequent measurements of air HTO by active samplers at the garden plot and Ar-41 and air HTO monitoring data from the same sector. Performed measurements were used for testing the modified Specific Activity (SA) model based on the assumption that the average air HTO during the pod-filling period provides an appropriate basis for estimating the levels of OBT present in pods, fruits and tubers. It is established that the relationship between the OBT of fruits and tubers and the average air HTO from a 15-20 day wide window centred at the peak of the pod-filling period is consistent throughout the three analysed years, and could be expressed by the fruit or tuber's OBT to air-HTO ratio of 0.93 ± 0.21. For all three years, the concentration of HTO in fruits and tubers was found to be related to levels of HTO in the air, as averaged within a 3-day pre-harvest window. The variability in the ratio of plant HTO to air HTO appears to be three times greater than that for the OBT of the fruits and tubers. It is concluded that the OBT of fruits and tubers adequately follows an empirical relationship based on the average level of air HTO from the pod-filling window, and therefore is clearly in line with the modified SA approach. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of low dose tritium on mouse lymphocyte DNA estimated by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Yusuke; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maruyama, Satoko; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ichimasa, Michiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with low dose effect of HTO on mouse lymphocytes DNA (in vitro irradiation) estimated by the comet assay using ICR male mouse of 20 to 23 weeks old. Lymphocytes were isolated by centrifugation of whole blood sample on Ficoll-Paque solution and embedded in agarose gel just after mixed with HTO. After lymphocytes were exposed to 17-50 mGy of HTO, the agarose gel slides were washed to remove HTO and cell lysis treatment on the slides was conducted before electrophoresis. The individual comets on stained slides after electrophoresis were analyzed using imaging software. No significant DNA damages were observed. (author)

  5. Relative biological effectiveness of tritiated water on human chromosomes of lymphocytes and bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Sawada, Shozo; Kamada, Nanao

    1992-01-01

    One of the major toxic effluent from nuclear power industries is tritiated water (HTO), which is released into the environment in large quantities. Low dose radiation effects and dose rate effects of HTO on human lymphocytes and bone marrow cells are not well studied. The present study was performed to investigate dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies in the human lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, by HTO in-vitro exposure at low dose ranges of 0.1 to 1 Gy. Go lymphocytes and bone marrow cells were incubated for 10 - 150 minutes with HTO at 2 cGy/min. Also 60 Co γ and 137 Cs γ rays were used as controls. Dicentric chromosomes were scored in 1,000 to 2,000 cells of each experimental series. The RBE values of HTO at low dose range for the induction of dicentric chromosomes and chromatid type aberrations were 2.7 in lymphocytes and approximately 3.8 in bone marrow cells with respect to 60 Co γ ray, respectively. Also lymphocytes were chronically exposed to HTO for 24 to 72 hrs at lower dose rates (0.2 and 0.05 cGy/min). The yields of dicentrics and rings decreased with the reduction in the dose rate of HTO, presenting a clear dose rate effects of HTO. These results provide an useful information for the assessment for health risk in humans exposed to low concentration level to HTO. (author)

  6. Daily tritium intakes by people living near a heavy-water research reactor facility: dosimetric significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Cornett, R.J.; Galeriu, D.; Workman, W.; Brown, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    We have estimated the relative daily intakes of tritiated water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT), and have measured HTO-in-urine, in an adult population residing in the town of Deep River, Ontario, near a heavy-water research reactor facility at Chalk River. The daily intake of elevated levels of atmospheric tritium has been estimated from its concentration in environmental and biological samples, and various food items from a local tritium-monitoring program. Where the available data were inadequate, we used estimates generated by an environmental tritium-transfer model. From these data and estimates, we calculated a total daily tritium intake of about 55 Bq. Of this amount, 2.5 Bq is obtained from OBT-in-diet. Inhalation of HTO-in-air (15 Bq d -1 ) and HTO-in-drinking water (15 Bq d -1 ) accounts for more than half of the HTO intake. Skin absorption of HTO from air and bathing or swimming (for 30 min d -1 ) accounts for another 9 Bq d -1 and 0.1 Bq d -1 , respectively. The remaining intake of HTO is from food as tissue-free water tritium. The International Commission on Radiological Protection's recommended two-compartment metabolic model for tritium predicts an equilibrium body burden of about 900 Bq from HTO (818 Bq) and OBT (83 Bq) in the body, which corresponds to an annual tritium dose of 0.41 μSv. The model-predicted urinary excretion of HTO (∼18 Bq L -1 ) agrees well with measured HTO-in-urine (range, 10-32 Bq L -1 ). The OBT dose contribution to the total tritium dose is about 16%. We conclude that for the people living near the Chalk River research reactor facility, the bulk of the tritium dose is due to HTO intake. (author)

  7. Performance du calorimètre à argon liquide et recherche du boson de Higgs dans son canal de désintégration $H\\to ZZ^{(*)} \\to 4\\ell$ avec l'expérience ATLAS auprès du LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Tiouchichine, Elodie

    The work presented in this thesis within the ATLAS collaboration was performed in the context of the discovery of a new particle at the LHC in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. My contribution to the Higgs boson search is focused in the $H \\to ZZ^* \\to 4 \\ell$ channel at different level, from the data taking to the physics analysis. After a theoretical introduction, the LHC and the ATLAS detector are presented as well as their performance during the 2011 and 2012 runs. A particular consideration is given to the liquid argon calorimeters and to the data quality assessment of this system. The validation of the data recorded during non-nominal high voltage conditions is presented. This study allowed to recover 2\\% of the data collected available for physics analyses. This has a direct impact on the $H \\to ZZ^* \\to 4 \\ell$ channel were the number of signal events expected is very low. In order to optimize the acceptance of the four electrons decay channel, novel electron reconstruction algorithms wer...

  8. Study, with the help of nuclear indicators (HTO, Urea 14C and 24Na), of the renewal of water, urea and sodium in different parts of the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis and of the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in oliguria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechene, C.P.

    1965-06-01

    In the kidney of the gerbil in oliguria there exists a cortico-papillary gradient in the concentration of the sodium and of the urea; this gradient disappears in the gerbil kidney in osmotic diuresis or in the rat kidney in aqueous diuresis; in these three states of diuresis there is no significant difference in the potassium concentration between the surface and interior regions of the kidneys. Kinetic studies using tritiated water, urea 14 C and 24 Na show that water and urea in the interior regions of the kidney are only renewed very slowly (1 h) whereas the sodium is rapidly changed (1 mn). These results can be explained using WIRZ's theory concerning the mechanism of the counter-current concentration of urine. Furthermore, the evolution of the specific radioactivity of urea 14 C is favorable for a cortical synthesis of urea. (author) [fr

  9. Biological effects of tritiated water in low concentration of human lymphocyte chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Kamada, N.; Sawaeda, S.

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the dose-response relationship of tritiated water (HTO) for chromosome aberration in the human lymphocytes, at low dose in vitro exposure ranging from 0.1-1 Gy. The Relative Biological Effectiveness values of HTO with respect to 60 Co gamma ray at a dose rate of 2 cGy/min(15 mCi/ml), at low dose range for the induction of dicentric and centric ring chromosomes were 2.7 in lymphocytes. Also lymphocytes were chronically exposed to HTO for 67 to 80 hrs at different lower dose rates (0.5 and 0.02 cGy/min). There was a 77% decrease in the yields of dicentrics and centric rings, at the dose rate of 0.02cGy/min of HTO, presenting a clear dose rate effect of HTO. The RBE value of HTO relative to 137 Cs gamma ray was 2.0 at the dose rate of 0.02cGy/min(0.15mCi/ml). This suggests that a higher dose rate of HTO exposure has a higher risk and a decrease of RBE value at low dose rate. These results provide useful information for the assessment of health risks in humans specially exposed to low concentration of HTO. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  10. Atmospheric detritiation system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Jalbert, R.A.; Rossmassler, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the performance of atmospheric detritiation systems and of possible ways for improving their performance was undertaken. Small-scale experiments demonstrated that system performance is strongly dependent on catalyst bed temperature. That may be helped by addition of protium to the process gas stream, but added protium at constant temperature does not increase conversion to HTO. Collection of the HTO on dry sieve with residual HTO fraction of less than one part in 10/sup 7/ was observed. Ways suggested for improvement in collection of HTO on molecular sieve beds include adding H/sub 2/O to the stream entering the molecular sieve and premoistening of the sieve with H/sub 2/O. While these improvement schemes may reduce HTO emissions they increase the amount of tritiated waste that must be handled

  11. Hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stohl, F.V.; Richardson, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Catalysts were prepared on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) supports by ion exchange of an active metal for Na + ions incorporated in the HTO support during preparation by reaction with the parent Ti alkoxide. Strong active metal-HTO interactions as a result of the ion exchange reaction can require significantly different conditions for activation as compared to catalysts prepared by more widely used incipient wetness methods. The latter catalysts typically involve conversion or while the HTO catalysts require the alteration of electrostatic bonds between the metal and support with subsequent alteration of the support itself. In this paper, the authors discuss the activation, via sulfidation or reduction, of catalysts consisting of Co, Mo, or Ni-Mo dispersed on HTO supports by ion exchange. Correlations between the activation process and the hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, and hydrodesulfurization activities of the catalysts are presented

  12. Atmospheric detritiation system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Jalbert, R.A.; Rossmassler, R.L.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the performance of atmospheric detritiation systems and of possible ways for improving their performance was undertaken. Small-scale experiments demonstrated that system performance is strongly dependent on catalyst bed temperature. That may be helped by addition of protium to the process gas stream, but added protium at constant temperature does not increase conversion to HTO. Collection of the HTO on dry sieve with residual HTO fraction of less than one part in 10 7 was observed. Ways suggested for improvement in collection of HTO on molecular sieve beds include adding H 2 O to the stream entering the molecular sieve and premoistening of the sieve with H 2 O. While these improvement schemes may reduce HTO emissions they increase the amount of tritiated waste that must be handled. 13 refs., 4 figs

  13. Wind tunnel investigations on tritium reemission from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taeschner, M.; Bunnenberg, C.

    1993-01-01

    Future fusion plants and tritium handling facilities will contain large amounts of tritium. Following chronical or accidental releases to the atmosphere a secondary HTO source is established in the downwind sector of the tritium release point as a result of deposition processes. To investigate HTO reemission rates, experiments were performed with a special wind tunnel, in which the air flows across the surface of soil columns under controlled conditions. In order to measure the HTO content of an air sample that was experimentally contaminated by reemission of HTO from a labeled soil column, a fast method is used. The air sample is bubbled through a flask filled with a definite volume of low-tritium water. At the end of the sampling period, the volume and the specific activity of the flask water are measured. With the help of a simple mathematical formula, that is presented in this report, the HTO activity of the air sample can be calculated. (orig.) [de

  14. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihok, S.; St-Amanat, N.; Kwamena, N.O. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Clark, I.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A. [University of Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of tritium released as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into environmental models such as CSA N288.1 used for regulatory purposes in Canada. The dispersion of tritiated gas (HT) and rates of oxidation to HTO have been studied under controlled conditions, but there are few studies under natural conditions. HT is a major component of the tritium released from a gaseous tritium light manufacturing facility in Canada (CNSC INFO-0798). To support the improvement of models, a garden was set up in one summer near this facility in a spot with tritium in air averaging ∼ 5 Bq/m{sup 3} HTO (passive diffusion monitors). Atmospheric stack releases (575 GBq/week) were recorded weekly. HT releases occur mainly during working hours with an HT:HTO ratio of 2.6 as measured at the stack. Soils and plants (leaves/stems and roots/tubers) were sampled for HTO and organically-bound tritium (OBT) weekly. Active day-night monitoring of air was conducted to interpret tritium dynamics relative to weather and solar radiation. The experimental design included a plot of natural grass/soil, contrasted with grass (sod) and Swiss chard, pole beans and potatoes grown in barrels under different irrigation regimes (in local topsoil at 29 Bq/L HTO, 105 Bq/L OBT). All treatments were exposed to rain (80 Bq/L) and atmospheric releases of tritium (weekdays), and reflux of tritium from soils (initial conditions of 284 Bq/L HTO, 3,644 Bq/L OBT) from 20 years of operations. Three irrigation regimes were used for barrel plants to mimic home garden management: rain only, low tritium tap water (5 Bq/L), and high tritium well water (mean 10,013 Bq/L). This design provided a range of plants and starting conditions with contrasts in initial HTO/OBT activity in soils, and major tritium inputs from air versus water. Controls were two home gardens far from any tritium sources. Active air monitoring indicated that the plume was only occasionally present for

  15. Evaluation of neonatal squirrel monkeys receiving tritiated water throughout gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.C.L.; Krebs, J.S.; Sasmore, D.P.; Mitoma, C.

    1980-01-01

    Pregnant squirrel monkeys received tritiated water (HTO) in the drinking water throughout gestation at levels ranging from 16 to 1000 times the permissible level for human consumption (0.003 μCi/ml), resulting in mean body water HTO levels ranging from 0.05 to 3.1 μCi/ml. There were no discernible effects of HTO administration on the newborn progeny in terms of body weight, body dimensions, selected organ weights (brain, heart, adrenal, kidney, liver, spleen), hematologic patterns, and histology of selected organs and tissues (adrenal, kidney, liver, lung, brain, pancreas, jejunum, pituitary, spleen, testes, thymus, skin) other than ovaries. The number of primary oocytes in female progeny decreased markedly with increasing levels of HTO in maternal drinking water. Quantitative analysis of neonate ovaries, testes, brain tissue, and retinal tissue is in progress. No effects of HTO administration on maternal body weight, gestation time, or maintenance of pregnancy to full term were observed. Body weights of HTO-treated inseminated females that did not deliver were less than control weights, but the lack of dose dependence implies that this effect may have been associated with a stimulus characteristic of the HTO administration rather than with irradiation

  16. Tritium ecovery from waste of fuel reprocessing, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kohmoto, Harumi; Kon, Tetsuroh; Ayaki, Kazuo.

    1979-01-01

    For the Oldershaw distillation column, the effects of operating pressure, concentration of nitric acid and organic material on the separation of HTO or HDO were investigated, using 0.002 μCi/ml HTO and 1% HDO. In the total reflux and continuous distillation, the following facts were revealed: (1) High separation factor of HTO and HDO systems was obtained in the operating pressure of 100 mm Hg. (2) The overall column efficiency Eo of HDO system in the operating pressure of 760 mm Hg is large, although the effect of operating pressure in the HTO system of extremely low concentration is small. (3) The overall column efficiency Eo of HDO system is larger than that of HTO system. (4) The effect of the concentration of nitric acid and organic material is not significant in both systems. (5) The overall column efficiency E 0 of continuous distillation under the reflux ratios of 10 and 50 in HTO and 0.1 N HNO 3 system is the same as that of total reflux distillation. Thus, the distillation characteristics of HDO and HTO are not always identical. (J.P.N.)

  17. Radiotherapy for the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification: A systematic review and meta-analysis of published data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, Marko; Agarwal, Arnav; Zhang, Liying; Yip, Cheryl; Kreder, Hans J.; Nousiainen, Markku T.; Jenkinson, Richard; Tsao, May; Lam, Henry; Milakovic, Milica; Wong, Erin; Chow, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Following surgery, the formation of heterotopic ossification (HTO) can limit mobility and impair quality of life. Radiotherapy has been proven to provide efficacious prophylaxis against HTO, especially in high-risk settings. Purpose: The current review aims to determine the factors influencing HTO formation in patients receiving prophylactic radiotherapy. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted on Ovid Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Studies were included if they reported the percentage of sites developing heterotopic ossification after receiving a specified dose of prophylactic radiotherapy. Weighted linear regression analysis was conducted for continuous or categorical predictors. Results: Extracted from 61 articles, a total of 5464 treatment sites were included, spanning 85 separate study arms. Most sites were from the hip (97.7%), from United States patients (55.2%), and had radiation prescribed postoperatively (61.6%) at a dose of 700 cGy (61.0%). After adjusting for radiation site, there was no statistically significant relationship between the percentage of sites developing HTO and radiation dose (p = 0.1) or whether radiation was administered preoperatively or postoperatively (p = 0.1). Sites with previous HTO formation were more likely to develop recurrent HTO than those without previous HTO formation (p = 0.04). There was a statistically significant negative relationship between the HTO development and the cohort mean year of treatment (p = 0.007). Conclusion: Decreases in rates of HTO over time in this patient population may be a function of more efficacious surgical regimens and prophylactic radiotherapy

  18. Genetic and haematopoietic effects of long-term tritiated water ingestion in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of large amounts of tritiated water (HTO) from reactors on the environment is evaluated. Randomly bred mice of the Hale-Stoner-Brookhaven strain have been maintained on HTO (3 μCi/mlitre) for extended periods. First-generation animals on HTO from four weeks of age have been evaluated for changes in growth pattern, and second-generation animals (also on HTO) for breeding efficiency, dominant lethal mutation rate and bone-marrow integrity. A total of 18831 embryos were examined. Statistical analysis of these results using either Student's ''t'' test or Kruskal and Wallis rank test indicates that there was a significant (p<0.01) reduction in viable embryos and an increase in early deaths in matings involving animals drinking HTO. Beginning at eight weeks of age and monthly thereafter, the haematopoietic stem cell content of the bone marrow was determined using the exogenous spleen colony technique. Although the total cellularity of the bone marrow remains comparable in the control and treated groups, the total number of stem cells (CFU) was reduced beginning after approximately 12-20 weeks on the tritium regime. These findings indicate a reduction in the total number of pluripotent stem cells in the marrow together with the ability of this reduced number of cells to maintain normal levels of total cellularity in the bone marrow. Thus, continuous ingestion of HTO at a concentration of 3 μCi/mlitre by mice results in: (1) Reduction in number of viable embryos present in the female at late pregnancy from matings when either the female or both parents have been on HTO; (2) Increase in number of early post-implantation deaths when both parents are on HTO; (3) Reduction in bone-marrow stem cell content after 12 weeks or longer on HTO; (4) No apparent effect on breeding efficiency (percentage of females pregnant) or body weight. These results are discussed in relation to the accumulated radiation dose

  19. Radiation risk analysis of tritium in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun; Wang Shimin

    1999-03-01

    Tritium is a common radionuclide in PWR nuclear power plant. In the normal operation conditions, its radiation risk to plant workers is the internal radiation exposure when tritium existing in air as HTO (hydrogen tritium oxide) is breathed in. As the HTO has the same physical and chemical characteristics as water, the main way that HTO entering the air is by evaporation. There are few opening systems in Nuclear Power Plant, the radiation risk of tritium mainly exists near the area of spent fuel pit and reactor pit. The highest possible radiation risk it may cause--the maximum concentration in air is the level when equilibrium is established between water and air phases for tritium. The author analyzed the relationship among the concentration of HTO in water, in air and the water temperature when equilibrium is established, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air increases with HTO concentration in water and water temperature. The analysis revealed that at 30 degree C, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air might reach 1 DAC (derived air concentration) when the HTO concentration in water is 28 GBq/m 3 . Owing to the operation of plant ventilation systems and the existence of moisture in the input air of the ventilation, the practical tritium concentration in air is much lower than its equilibrated levels, the radiation risk of tritium in PWR plant is quite limited. In 1997, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant's practical monitoring result of the HTO concentration in the air of the nuclear island and the urine of workers supported this conclusion. Based on this analysis, some suggestions to the reduction of tritium radiation risk were made

  20. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water

  1. Development and testing of spheroidal inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    Objective was to develop sodium titanate (ST) microspheres, made by the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine) internal gelation process, to remove radionuclides and heavy metals from waste streams at DOE sites. to determine the optimum amount of ST that can be embedded in hydrous Ti oxide (HTO) microspheres, batches of 9.2 to 23.3% ST in HTO were prepared. Crush strength of the air-dried microspheres was found to be highest. Sr was removed from simulated supernatant by all composite microspheres; 13.2% ST/HTO worked best

  2. Development of dose assessment code for release of tritium during normal operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, J.; Malatova, I.

    2009-01-01

    A computer code PTM H TO has been developed to assess tritium doses to the general public. The code enables to simulate the behavior of tritium in the environment released into the atmosphere under normal operation of nuclear power plants. Code can calculate the doses for the three chemical and physical forms: tritium gas (HT), tritiated water vapor and water drops (HTO). The models in this code consist of the tritium transfer model including oxidation of HT to HTO and reemission of HTO from soil to the atmosphere, and the dose calculation model

  3. Conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakopoulos, P.J.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-05-01

    The mechanisms of conversion of tritium gas to tritiated water (HTO) have been examined for several tritium gaseous mixtures. The physical and chemical processes involved in the self-radiolysis of such mixtures have been analyzed and the kinetics involved in the formation of HTO has been presented. It has been determined that the formation of the H and/or OH free radicals, as intermediate species, are of significance in the formation of HTO. Therefore, the problem of reducing the rate of formation of tritiated water in a mixture of gaseous tritium with atmospheric components is one of finding an effective scavenger for the H and/or OH free radicals

  4. Develop of omni-tritium sample preparation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Junhua; Zheng Min; Zhang Dong

    2008-06-01

    The content of total tritium analysis is required in order to know the tritium contaminated degree of biological samples accurately. But the conversion and collection of organic tritium are difficult. A device to treat total tritium samples was developed. Plant samples were treated by combustion and catalysis. After expelling the free HTO in the samples when heated in abundant oxygen, the samples were ignited. Combustion gas passed the catalysts at 800 degree C and its oxidation was catalyzed, and then the combined tritium in tissues was converted into HTO. HTO was collected by water-cooling tube and condenser. For other samples, HTO was treated and collected by high temperature (The highest temperature is 1000 degree C)-catalysis-double condensation method. This device had solved the problem that organic tritium is difficult to gather. (authors)

  5. the role of zoological gardens in environmental education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    educational and informal recreational levels by zoos in Johannesburg ... conservation and an understanding of its importance. I NTROOUCTI .... high school education has suffered from hto ... based learning by incorporating practical work into ...

  6. Elevated tritium levels at the World Trade Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semkow, Thomas M.; Hafner, Ronald S.; Parekh, Pravin P.; Wozniak, Gordon J.; Haines, Douglas K.; Husain, Liaquat; Rabun, Robert L.; Williams, Philip G.

    2002-01-01

    Traces of tritiated water (HTO) were detected at [the]World Trade Center (WTC) ground zero after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack. A method of ultralow-background liquid scintillation counting was used after distilling HTO from the samples. A water sample from the WTC sewer, collected on 9/13/01, contained 0.174 plus or minus 0.074 (2s) nCi/L of HTO. A split water sample, collected on 9/21/01 from the basement of WTC Building 6, contained 3.53 plus or minus 0.17 and 2.83 plus or minus 0.15 nCi/L, respectively. Several water and vegetation samples were analyzed from areas outside the ground zero, located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and Kensico Reservoir. No HTO above the background was found in those samples. All these results are well below the levels of concern to human exposure

  7. Heavy water leak detection using diffusion sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.L.; Hussain, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the Pressurrised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) detection of the sources of heavy water leaks is importent both for the purpose of radiation hazard control as well as for the reduction of escape/loss of heavy water which, is an expensive nuclear material. This paper describes an application of tritium diffusion sampler for heavy water leak detection. The diffusion sampler comprises an usual tritium counting glass vial with a special orifice. The counting vial has water vapour, deficient in HTO concentration. The HTO present outside diffuses in the vial through the orifice, gets exchanged with water of the wet filter paper kept at the bottom and the moisture in the vial atmosphere which has HTO concentration lower than that outside. This results in continuation of net movement of HTO in the vial. The exchanged tritium is counted in liquid scintillation spectrometer. The method has a sensitivity of 10000 dpm/DAC-h. (author). 2 figs., 2 ta bs

  8. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, Michal; Malátová, I.; Tomášková, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, NOV (2014), s. 82-86 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : NE-OBT * HTO * NPPs * combustion * biota Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  9. Tritium detection in installations and in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calando, J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The different tritium detection devices in the atmosphere are reviewed: ionization chamber, proportional counters, Peltier effect, bubble-through device. Characteristics of those allowing to quantify the HTO form (more ''radiotoxic'' than T 2 form) are emphasized [fr

  10. Dome-shaped High Tibial Osteotomy: A Long-term Follow-up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsen Chiang

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Dome-shaped HTO is a durable time-buying procedure for patients with unicompartmental medial gonarthrosis, and can avoid subsequent development of patella baja that may complicate further prosthetic arthroplasty.

  11. Ohjaamisen ja opettamisen välimaastossa

    OpenAIRE

    Vesalainen, Anne-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tarkastellaan ohjaamisen ja opettamisen suhdetta opiskelijaryhmälähtöisessä musiikkiteatterin valmistumisprosessissa. Taidepedagogiikan näkemykset soveltuvat sekä ohjaamiselle että opettamiselle. Keskeistä ovat opiskelijalähtöisyys ja konstruktivistinen oppimiskäsitys Opettaja tai ohjaaja auttaa opiskelijan luovuutta ja oppimista. Opinnäytetyössä tarkastellaan Seurakuntaopiston Artistiluokkien (2010 ja 2011) musiikkiteatteriesitysten Stalkatut elämät (20...

  12. Search for MSSM charged Higgs bosons decaying into $\\tau\

    CERN Document Server

    Vischia, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for a charged Higgs boson with a mass larger than the top quarkin the $gg\\to H^+tb$ production process.The final states considered contain either one electron and one muon, or two electrons, or two muons,or one muon plus one hadronically decaying tau lepton,corresponding to the charged Higgs decays $H^{+}\\to tb$ and $H^+\\to \\tau^+\

  13. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-01-01

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformatio...

  14. Levels of tritium in soils and vegetation near Canadian nuclear facilities releasing tritium to the atmosphere: implications for environmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Kwamena, N.-O.A.; Ilin, M.; Wilk, M.; Clark, I.D.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) were measured over two growing seasons in vegetation and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of four nuclear facilities and two background locations in Canada. At the background locations, with few exceptions, OBT concentrations were higher than HTO concentrations: OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation varied between 0.3 and 20 and values in soil varied between 2.7 and 15. In the vicinity of the four nuclear facilities OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation and soils deviated from the expected mean value of 0.7, which is used as a default value in environmental transfer models. Ratios of the OBT activity concentration in plants ([OBT] plant ) to the OBT activity concentration in soils ([OBT] soil ) appear to be a good indicator of the long-term behaviour of tritium in soil and vegetation. In general, OBT activity concentrations in soils were nearly equal to OBT activity concentrations in plants in the vicinity of the two nuclear power plants. [OBT] plant /[OBT] soil ratios considerably below unity observed at one nuclear processing facility represents historically higher levels of tritium in the environment. The results of our study reflect the dynamic nature of HTO retention and OBT formation in vegetation and soil during the growing season. Our data support the mounting evidence suggesting that some parameters used in environmental transfer models approved for regulatory assessments should be revisited to better account for the behavior of HTO and OBT in the environment and to ensure that modelled estimates (e.g., plant OBT) are appropriately conservative. - Highlights: • We measured tritium in soils and plants near four nuclear facilities in Canada. • OBT/HTO ratios in plants are higher than default value in environmental models. • OBT/HTO ratios in background soils reflect historically higher atmospheric tritium. • Implications for environmental transfer models are discussed

  15. Behaviors of tritium in terrestrial biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Tsuyako

    1983-01-01

    The in vivo behaviors of HTO- 3 H in food chain models in experimental animals were described. Of pregnant mice that had ingested HTO and drinking water alone for 19 days, the total 3 H content in the tissue/wet weight was greater by 20% in fetuses and newborns than in mothers, and the proportion of tissue-bound 3 H was 8-24% in mothers and 3% in fetuses. The mean 3 H concentration in the free water in tissues was about 36% of ingested HTO. When only 3 H foods were ingested for 18 days, the total 3 H content in the tissue/wet weight showed no marked difference among the mother, fetuses and newborns, nor did the bound 3 H level show great differences. With respect to the tissue distribution of 3 H, only the incorporation rate by the mother's brain from HTO was satisfactory, whereas in other organs, the mother, fetuses and newborns showed higher incorporation rates from 3 H foods. The ratio of specific radioactivity of soft tissue 3 H in mothers to HTO in drinking water exceeded 1 only for the spleen, but other tissues showed no biological concentration. Again, no biological concentration was observed with 3 H foods. Environmental HTO did not result in biological concentration of 3 H in mother mice that had ingested 3 H foods, but 3 H was rather diluted. Tissues other than the spleen showed similar values of 3 H ingestion from environmental HTO through all routes. However, the proportion of bound 3 H in the total 3 H in the soft tissue was about 1.4-1.6 times that on ingestion of HTO alone. (Chiba, N.)

  16. The effects of short term and chronic exposure to tritiated drinking water on pre- and postnatal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marthens, E. van; Zamenhof, S.

    1982-01-01

    Ingestion of HTO during oocyte maturation and continued during pre-implantation time was found to depress decidual response. At birth these offspring also showed a decrease in brain cell number. When HTO was given during pregnancy only, the offspring at birth showed a similar deficit in brain cell number. Even so, we could not demonstrate a gross deficit in oocyte maturation when HTO was ingested during sexual maturity only; however, when further continued during pregnancy, the measured newborn parameters were most severely affected. In this group, cell-multiplication in the cerebrum was severely decreased, protein synthesis was decreased, and somatic growth was also highly significantly decreased. These experiments indicate that even a short-term exposure to HTO during early pregnancy (pre-implantation) alters normal development to such an extent that it is still observable at birth. During embryonic development, HTO affected the rate of actual cell division and it is apparent that the central nervous system is most vulnerable. If the exposure to HTO is prolonged, the somatic development is also severely affected. (orig./MG)

  17. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  18. Tritium behavior on a cultivated plot in the 1994 chronic HT release experiment at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, H.; Yokoyama, S.; Kinouchi, N.; Murata, M.; Amano, H.; Atarashi, M.; Ichimasa, Y.; Ichimasa, M.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of HT and HTO in air and surface soil has been studied extensively in the chronic HT release experiment carried out at Chalk River during the summer of 1994. HTO concentrations in air moisture and soil water collected in a cultivated plot showed similar time-variations, increasing rapidly during the first and second days and becoming gradual after the first 3-4 days. The air HTO concentration decreased during and following rainfall but recovered within a day. The rainfall reduced the HTO concentrations in ridge soil water but little in furrows. Time histories of HTO concentrations in air moisture and soil water suggest that the system was near steady-state within a continuous HT release period of 12 days, in spite of the presence of rain during the period. The air HTO concentrations on clear days showed diurnal cycles that were higher during daytime than at night. The experimental field had a very complex soil regime with respect to HT deposits. The deposits to soil surface varied depending on soil conditions. 12 refs., 5 figs

  19. Field studies of HT oxidation and dispersion in the environment. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The environmental dispersion and oxidation of a controlled atmospheric release of tritiated hydrogen (HT) was studied in a pilot-scale field experiment. This study was designed to test procedures and obtain preliminary results for planning a more intensive experiment to determine the environmental behaviour of HT with emphasis on the processes leading to the appearance of HTO in the atmosphere, ie., conversion, deposition and resuspension. Field observations led to the following conclusions: 1) no evidence was found for the rapid conversion of HT to HTO in the atmosphere, 2) observations support the hypothesis that the dominant process giving rise to the observed HTO in air was HT oxidation in the soil by microbial action followed by resuspension of HTO, 3) HT deposition velocities to soil ranged between 0.041 cm/s and 0.13 cm/s, consistent with previous chamber measurements, 4) the rate of HTO loss from soil, averaged over 21 days, was less than 1% per hour, and 5) vegetation HTO concentrations initially increased with time then by 48 hours decreased exponentially at a rate similar to soils. These results will be validated and extended by the intensive experiment scheduled for June, 1987

  20. Further studies on the genetic damage to bone marrow and other somatic effects following exposure to low level tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Benz, R.D.; Commerford, S.L.; Hughes, W.; Ichimasa, Y.; Ikushima, T.; Tezuka, H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper emphasizes results obtained over the last 3 years, supplementing information presented at the first 3 H workshop. Sister chromtid exchange (SCE) measurements on mice maintained on 3.0 μCi/ml of tritiated water (HTO) or receiving an equal depth dose 137 Cs gamma exposure for 52 weeks have been completed. Small but significantly higher numbers of SCEs were found in animals receiving gamma exposures or maintained on HTO than in their controls. In animals removed from the HTO regimen after 27 weeks, the number of SCEs decreases with time, but did not return to control levels within the first 30 weeks. Comparative studies with the 137 Cs exposures indicate an RBE not significantly different than 1.0. Mice were also maintained on 7.5, 15.0 and 30.0 μCi/ml HTO for SCE studies. Results similar to those described for 3.0 μCi/ml were found. Maintaining animals on a 0.15% saccharin solution is the most effective of those tested for increasing the animals' water intake and for enhancing excretion of 3 H. The rate of disappearance of 3 H from animals maintained chronically on HTO indicated a two phase 3 H disappearance curve from hemoglobin. Single injections of HTO showed a brief delay in incorporation of 3 H followed by a disappearance paralleling the slower phase of the chronic exposure curve, and indicating a RBC lifetime of approximately 40 days. 21 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  1. Role of soil-to-leaf tritium transfer in controlling leaf tritium dynamics: Comparison of experimental garden and tritium-transfer model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masakazu; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Mihok, Steve; Korolevych, Volodymyr

    2017-11-01

    Environmental transfer models assume that organically-bound tritium (OBT) is formed directly from tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) in environmental compartments. Nevertheless, studies in the literature have shown that measured OBT/HTO ratios in environmental samples are variable and generally higher than expected. The importance of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer pathway in controlling the leaf tritium dynamics is not well understood. A model inter-comparison of two tritium transfer models (CTEM-CLASS-TT and SOLVEG-II) was carried out with measured environmental samples from an experimental garden plot set up next to a tritium-processing facility. The garden plot received one of three different irrigation treatments - no external irrigation, irrigation with low tritium water and irrigation with high tritium water. The contrast between the results obtained with the different irrigation treatments provided insights into the impact of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer on the leaf tritium dynamics. Concentrations of TFWT and OBT in the garden plots that were not irrigated or irrigated with low tritium water were variable, responding to the arrival of the HTO-plume from the tritium-processing facility. In contrast, for the plants irrigated with high tritium water, the TFWT concentration remained elevated during the entire experimental period due to a continuous source of high HTO in the soil. Calculated concentrations of OBT in the leaves showed an initial increase followed by quasi-equilibration with the TFWT concentration. In this quasi-equilibrium state, concentrations of OBT remained elevated and unchanged despite the arrivals of the plume. These results from the model inter-comparison demonstrate that soil-to-leaf HTO transfer significantly affects tritium dynamics in leaves and thereby OBT/HTO ratio in the leaf regardless of the atmospheric HTO concentration, only if there is elevated HTO concentrations in the soil. The results of this work indicate that assessment models

  2. Change in gait after high tibial osteotomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Lee, O-Sung; Teo, Seow Hui; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2017-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to analyze how high tibial osteotomy (HTO) changes gait and focused on the following questions: (1) How does HTO change basic gait variables? (2) How does HTO change the gait variables in the knee joint? Twelve articles were included in the final analysis. A total of 383 knees was evaluated. There were 237 open wedge (OW) and 143 closed wedge (CW) HTOs. There were 4 level II studies and 8 level III studies. All studies included gait analysis and compared pre- and postoperative values. One study compared CWHTO and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), and another study compared CWHTO and OWHTO. Five studies compared gait variables with those of healthy controls. One study compared operated limb gait variables with those in the non-operated limb. Gait speed, stride length, knee adduction moment, and lateral thrust were major variables assessed in 2 or more studies. Walking speed increased and stride length was increased or similar after HTO compared to the preoperative value in basic gait variables. Knee adduction moment and lateral thrust were decreased after HTO compared to the preoperative knee joint gait variables. Change in co-contraction of the medial side muscle after surgery differed depending on the degree of frontal plane alignment. The relationship between change in knee adduction moment and change in mechanical axis angle was controversial. Based on our systematic review and meta-analysis, walking speed and stride length increased after HTO. Knee adduction moment and lateral thrust decreased after HTO compared to the preoperative values of gait variables in the knee joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Model for tritiated water transport in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Paunescu, N.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical forms of tritium released from nuclear facilities are mostly water (HTO) and hydrogen (HT, TT). Elemental tritium is inert in vegetation and superior animals, but the microorganisms from soil oxidize HT to HTO. After an atmospheric HT emission, in short time an equivalent quantity of HTO is re-emitted from soil. In the vicinity of a tritium source the spatial and temporary distribution of HTO is dependent on the chemical form of tritium releases. During routine tritium releases (continuously and constant releases), the local distribution of tritium reaches equilibrium, and specific activities of tritium in environmental compartments are almost equal. The situation is very different after an accidental emission. Having in view, harmful effects of tritium when it is incorporated into the body several models were developed for environmental tritium transport and dose assessment. The tritium transport into the soil is an important part of the environmental tritium behavior, but, unfortunately, in spite of the importance of this problem the corresponding modeling is unsatisfactory. The aim of this paper was the improvement of the TRICAIAP model, and the application of the model to BIOMOVS scenario. The BIOMOVS scenario predicts HTO concentrations in soil during 30 days, after one hour atmospheric HTO emission. The most important conclusions of the paper are: the principal carrier of tritium into the soil is water; the transfer processes are the reactions of water in soil and the diffusion due to concentration gradient; atmosphere-soil transport is dependent of surface characteristics (granulation, humidity, roughness, etc.); the conversion rate of HT to HTO is not well known and is dependent on active microorganism concentration in soil and on soil humidity. More experimental data are needed to decrease the uncertainty of transfer parameter, for the definition of the influence of vegetation, etc. (authors)

  4. Correlation of rates of tritium migration through porous concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, S.; Katayama, K.; Takeishi, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Edao, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Yamanishi, T. [JAEA-TPL, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a nuclear facility when tritium leaks from a glovebox to room accidentally, an atmosphere detritiation system (ADS) starts operating, and HTO released is recovered by ADS. ADS starts when tritium activity in air becomes higher than its controlled level. Before ADS operates, the laboratory walls are the final enclosure facing tritium and are usually made of porous concrete coated with a hydrophobic paint. In the present study, previous data on the diffusivity and adsorption coefficient of concrete and paints are reviewed. Tritium penetrates and migrates into concrete by following 3 ways. First, gaseous HT or T{sub 2} easily penetrates into porous concrete. Its diffusivity is almost equal to that of H{sub 2}. When a gaseous molecule diffuses through pores with a smaller diameter than a mean free path, its migration rate is described by the Knudsen diffusion formula. The second mechanism is H{sub 2}O vapor diffusion in pores. Concrete holds a lot of structural water. Therefore, H{sub 2}O or HTO vapor can diffuse inside concrete pores along with adsorption-desorption and isotopic exchange with structural water, which is the third mechanism. Literature shows that the diffusivity of HTO through the epoxy-resin paint is determined as D(HTO)=1.0*10{sup -16} m{sup 2}/s. We have used this data to set a model and we have applied it to estimate residual tritium in laboratory walls. We have considered 2 accidental cases and a normal case: first, ADS starts operating 1 hour after 100 Ci HTO is released in the room, secondly, ADS starts 24 hours after 100 Ci HTO release and thirdly, when the walls are exposed to HTO for 10 years of normal operation. It appears that the immediate start up of ADS is indispensable for safety.

  5. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.; Brooks, A.

    1982-01-01

    Somatic and genetic effects of the continuous ingestion of tritiated water (HTO) at concentrations of 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 μCi/ml were investigated in mice of the Hale-Stoner-Brookhaven strain. At these levels, there was no measurable somatic effect. Although genetic effects as measured by dominant lethal mutation (DLM) assay indicated a significant effect (P>0.01) on the number of viable embryos and early deaths in the 3.0 μCi/ml HTO group and on the number of viable embryos in the 1.0 μCi/ml HTO group, no genetic effects were significantly noted in the 0.3 μCi/ml HTO group. Liver cytogenetic studies showed a significant increase in the number of abnormal cells in the 3.0 μCi/ml HTO group. A reduction in bone marrow stem cells, without an attendant reduction in total marrow cellularity, was noted in the 3.0 and 1.0 μCi/ml HTO groups. There was no significant difference in any of the DLM parameters between animals maintained on 3.0 μCi/ml of HTO and animals exposed to the equivalent 137 Cs gamma dose (22 hours/day exposure). Consideration of the relative amounts and biological half lives of tritium present in the nucleus as water, DNA and histone suggests that after transient exposure to tritiated water, nearly all significant radiation damage can be attributed to tritium present in the nucleus as water. These data suggest that hazards from tritium attendant with normal reactor operation should not at this time be considered as a deterrent to the further development of fission and/or fusion reactor technology. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants grown under three irrigation regimes at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihok, S.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A.; St-Amant, N.; Kwamena, N.-O.A.; Clark, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of tritium released from nuclear facilities as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into regulatory assessment models. These models typically estimate organically bound tritium (OBT) for calculating public dose as OBT itself is rarely measured. Higher than expected OBT/HTO ratios in plants and soils are an emerging issue that is not well understood. To support the improvement of models, an experimental garden was set up in 2012 at a tritium processing facility in Pembroke, Ontario to characterize the circumstances under which high OBT/HTO ratios may arise. Soils and plants were sampled weekly to coincide with detailed air and stack monitoring. The design included a plot of native grass/soil, contrasted with sod and vegetables grown in barrels with commercial topsoil under natural rain and either low or high tritium irrigation water. Air monitoring indicated that the plume was present infrequently at concentrations of up to about 100 Bq/m"3 (the garden was not in a major wind sector). Mean air concentrations during the day on workdays (HTO 10.3 Bq/m"3, HT 5.8 Bq/m"3) were higher than at other times (0.7–2.6 Bq/m"3). Mean Tissue Free Water Tritium (TFWT) in plants and soils and OBT/HTO ratios were only very weakly or not at all correlated with releases on a weekly basis. TFWT was equal in soils and plants and in above and below ground parts of vegetables. OBT/HTO ratios in above ground parts of vegetables were above one when the main source of tritium was from high tritium irrigation water (1.5–1.8). Ratios were below one in below ground parts of vegetables when irrigated with high tritium water (0.4–0.6) and above one in vegetables rain-fed or irrigated with low tritium water (1.3–2.8). In contrast, OBT/HTO ratios were very high (9.0–13.5) when the source of tritium was mainly from the atmosphere. TFWT varied considerably through time as a result of SRBT's operations; OBT/HTO ratios showed no clear

  7. Tritium kinetics in a freshwater marsh ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    Ten curies of tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) were applied to a 2-ha enclosed Lake Erie marsh in northwestern Ohio on 29 October 1973. Tritium kinetics in the marsh water, bottom sediment, and selected aquatic plants and animals were determined. Following HTO application, peak tritium levels in the sediment were observed on day 13 in the top 1-cm layer, on day 27 at the 5-cm depth, and on day 64 at the 10-cm depth. Peak levels at 15 and 20 cm were not discernible, although there was some movement of HTO to the 20-cm depth. A model based on diffusion theory described tritium movement through the sediment. Unbound and bound tritium levels in curly-leaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus), pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata), and smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium) generally tended to follow tritium levels in marsh water. The unbound tritium:marsh water tritium ratio was significantly larger (P < 0.001) in curly-leaf pondweed than in either of the two emergents. Tritium uptake into the unbound compartments of crayfish (Procambarus blandingi), carp (Cyprinus carpio), and bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) was rapid. For crayfish, maximum HTO levels were observed on days 3 and 2 for viscera and muscle, respectively. Unbound HTO in carp viscera peaked on day 2, and levels in carp muscle reached a maximum in 4 hours. Maximum levels of unbound HTO in bluegill viscera and muscle were observed on day 1. After peak levels were obtained, unbound HTO paralleled marsh water HTO activity in all species. Tritium uptake into the bound compartments was not as rapid nor were the levels as high as for unbound HTO in any of the species. Peak bound levels in crayfish viscera were observed on day 20 and maximum levels in muscle were noted on day 10. Bound tritium in carp viscera and muscle reached maximum levels on day 20. In bluegills, peaks were reached on days 7 and 5 for viscera and muscle, respectively. Bound tritium in all species decreased following maximum levels

  8. Ferroelectric mesocrystals of bismuth sodium titanate: formation mechanism, nanostructure, and application to piezoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dengwei; Kong, Xingang; Mori, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Shinagawa, Kazunari; Feng, Qi

    2013-09-16

    Ferroelectric mesocrystals of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 (BNT) with [100]-crystal-axis orientation were successfully prepared using a topotactic structural transformation process from a layered titanate H1.07Ti1.73O4·nH2O (HTO). The formation reactions of BNT mesocrystals in HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 and HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction systems and their nanostructures were studied by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, SAED, and EDS, and the reaction mechanisms were given. The BNT mesocrystals are formed by a topotactic structural transformation mechanism in the HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system and by a combination mechanism of the topotactic structural transformation and epitaxial crystal growth in the HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system, respectively. The BNT mesocrystals prepared by these methods are constructed from [100]-oriented BNT nanocrystals. Furthermore, these reaction systems were successfully applied to the fabrication of [100]-oriented BNT ferroelectric ceramic materials. A BNT ceramic material with a high degree of orientation, high relative density, and small grain size was achieved.

  9. New tritium monitor for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    At DT-fueled fusion reactors, there will be a need for tritium monitors that can simultaneously measure in real time the concentrations of HTO, HT and the activated air produced by fusion neutrons. Such a monitor has been developed, tested and delivered to the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for use at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It uses semipermeable membranes to achieve the removal of HTO from the sampled air for monitoring and a catalyst to convert the HT to HTO, also for removal and monitoring. The remaining air, devoid of tritium, is routed to a third detector for monitoring the activated air. The sensitivities are those that would be expected from tritium instruments employing conventional flow-through ionization chambers: 1 to 3 μCi/m 3 . Its discriminating ability is approximately 10 -3 for any of the three components (HTO, HT and activated air) in any of the other two channels. For instance, the concentration of HT in the HTO channel is 10 -3 times its original concentration in the sampled air. This will meet the needs of TFTR

  10. Summary update of the Brookhaven tritium toxicity program with emphasis on recent cytogenetic and lifetime-shortening studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carsten, A.L.; Benz, R.D.; Hughes, W.P.; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Ikushima, Takaji; Tezuka, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    A number of years ago a multiparameter program to evaluate the toxicity of tritiated water (HTO) was undertaken in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results of most of these studies have been published and will receive brief attention. Emphasis will be placed on the unpublished studies involving the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow of mice, new biochemical information, and preliminary results on lifetime-shortening and carcinogenesis. In brief, male Hale-Stoner Brookhaven (HSB) mice maintained on HTO concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 30.0 ..mu..Ci/ml exhibited essentially the same number of SCE's per cell throughout their lifetime. Control mice showed a decrease in number of SCE's with age. The lack of a dose-response effect and the constant level of SCE's in HTO mice as compared to controls will be discussed. In the carcinogenesis study C57BL/6J male mice received various x-ray or HTO regimens. Mortality data from these and other studies in which CBA/Ca/BNL mice received single x-ray exposures or equivalent integrated dose exposures by single HTO injections will be discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Investigation of Sorption and Diffusion Mechanisms, and Preliminary Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, Sankar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes the synthesis and evaluation of molecular sieve zeolite membranes to separate and concentrate tritiated water (HTO) from dilute HTO-bearing aqueous streams. Several monovalent and divalent cation exchanged silico alumino phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve zeolite membranes were synthesized on disk supports and characterized with gas and vapor permeation measurements. The pervaporation process performance was evaluated for the separation and concentration of tritiated water. Experiments were performed using tritiated water feed solution containing tritium at the high end of the range (1 mCi/mL) anticipated in a nuclear fuel processing system that includes both acid and water streams recycling. The tritium concentration was about 0.1 ppm. The permeate was recovered under vacuum. The HTO/H2O selectivity and separation factor calculated from the measured tritium concentrations ranged from 0.99 to 1.23, and 0.83-0.98, respectively. Although the membrane performance for HTO separation was lower than expected, several encouraging observations including molecular sieving and high vapor permeance are reported. Additionally, several new approaches are proposed, such as tuning the sorption and diffusion properties offered by small pore LTA zeolite materials, and cation exchanged aluminosilicates with high metal loading. It is hypothesized that substantially improved preferential transport of tritium (HTO) resulting in a more concentrated permeate can be achieved. Preliminary economic analysis for the membrane-based process to concentrate tritiated water is also discussed.

  12. Effects of prenatal low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on rat hippocampus neurons. Electrophysiological and neuro behavioural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weimin; Zhou Xiangyan

    1997-01-01

    Pregnent Wistar rats were exposed to tritiated water (HTO) on day 13 of gestation so that for their offsprings, the absorbed doses were estimated to be 0.000, 0.044, 0.088 and 0.264 Gy. The influence of HTO to the morphology and number of hippocampus pyramidal neurons and the maximum electric current of Ca 2+ in neurons was observed for the in-vitro-cultured hippocampus of new-born rats and the learning and memory behaviours were assessed by the electric avoidance reflex test in a Y-maze and the condition reflex test for young rats. The results show that prenatal exposure to HTO in a cumulative dose of 0.088 Gy can cause a reduction in number of neurons in hippocampus cultured in vitro, and that the electric current of Ca 2+ tends to decline with cumulative dose increasing, with the significant decrease in offsprings prenatally exposed to HTO in dose of 0.264 Gy. The results of electric avoidance reflex test in a Y-maze and condition reflex test indicate that for young rats prenatally exposed to HTO, a cumulative dose of 0.088 Gy could induce damage in their learning and memory behaviours

  13. Differences between opening versus closing high tibial osteotomy on clinical outcomes and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deie, Masataka; Hoso, Takayuki; Shimada, Noboru; Iwaki, Daisuke; Nakamae, Atsuo; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-12-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is mainly performed via two procedures: closing wedge HTO (CW) and opening wedge HTO (OW). In this study, differences between these procedures were assessed by serial clinical evaluation and gait analysis before and after surgery. Twenty-one patients underwent HTO for medial knee OA in 2011 and 2012, with 12 patients undergoing CW and nine undergoing OW. The severity of OA was classified according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score for assessment of knee OA (JOA score), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and the femoral tibial angle (FTA) on X-ray were evaluated. For gait analysis, gait speed, varus moment, varus angle and lateral thrust were calculated. The JOA score and NRS were improved significantly one year postoperatively in both groups. The FTA was maintained in both groups at one year. Varus angle and varus moment were significantly improved in both groups at each postoperative follow-up, when compared preoperatively. Lateral thrust was significantly improved at three months postoperatively in both groups. However, the significant improvement in lateral thrust had disappeared in the CW group six months postoperatively, whereas it was maintained for at least one year in the OW group. This study found that clinical outcomes were well maintained after HTO. OW reduced knee varus moment and lateral thrust, whereas CW had little effect on reducing lateral thrust. Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Summary update of the Brookhaven tritium toxicity program with emphasis on recent cytogenetic and lifetime-shortening studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Benz, R.D.; Hughes, W.P.; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Ikushima, Takaji; Tezuka, Hideo.

    1988-01-01

    A number of years ago a multiparameter program to evaluate the toxicity of tritiated water (HTO) was undertaken in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results of most of these studies have been published and will receive brief attention. Emphasis will be placed on the unpublished studies involving the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow of mice, new biochemical information, and preliminary results on lifetime-shortening and carcinogenesis. In brief, male Hale-Stoner Brookhaven (HSB) mice maintained on HTO concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 30.0 μCi/ml exhibited essentially the same number of SCE's per cell throughout their lifetime. Control mice showed a decrease in number of SCE's with age. The lack of a dose-response effect and the constant level of SCE's in HTO mice as compared to controls will be discussed. In the carcinogenesis study C57BL/6J male mice received various x-ray or HTO regimens. Mortality data from these and other studies in which CBA/Ca/BNL mice received single x-ray exposures or equivalent integrated dose exposures by single HTO injections will be discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs

  15. U.S. team measurements during the June 1987 experimental HT release at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Murphy, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of HT in the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 3.54 TBq (95.7 Ci) of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. The HTO/HT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (-- 4 x 10/sup -5/ at 50 meters to almost 10/sup -3/ at 400 meters) as conversion of HT takes place. For several days after the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be very low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a very low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The free-HTO concentration in vegetation increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 1.5 - 3.0 x 10/sup 4/ Bq/L at 50 meters from the source) and decreasing by the end of the second day. The organically bound tritium continued to accumulate during the period following exposure (about 400 Bq/kg dry weight at 50 meters after two days)

  16. Dose estimation models for environmental tritium released from fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio

    1993-01-01

    Various mathematical models are being developed to predict the behavior of HT released to the natural environment and their consequent impact. This report outlines models and the major findings of HT field release studies in France and Canada. The models are constructed to incorporate the key processes thought to be responsible for the formation of atmospheric HTO from a release of HT. It has been established from the experiments that HT oxidized in surface soil is incorporated almost entirely into soil water as HTO. This tritium may be reemitted to the atmosphere in the form of HTO through exchange of soil and atmospheric moisture as well as through the bulk water mass flux from the soil the atmosphere due to evaporation and transpiration. The direct conversion of HT to HTO in air and direct uptake of HT by vegetation are expected to be negligible for the time and space scales of interest in considering short duration releases. HTO emitted to the atmosphere is can further exchange with soil and vegetation water. Validation of these models against experimental data is conducted to demonstrate their credibility. It may be concluded that further laboratory and field works are needed in order to develop a sufficiently good understanding of the dependence of the key processes on environmental factors (including diurnal cycling and seasonality) to allow the rates of the processes to be predicted from a knowledge of environmental conditions. (author)

  17. Radiation quality of tritium: a comparison with 60Co gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study, microdosimetric simulations were performed for tritium uniformly distributed in a medium, and for tritium bound to biologically critical sites of dimensions from 10 nm to 2 µm. Results of local energy density, i.e. energy deposition in microscopic regions, are different for these two cases. Based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition, dose mean lineal energies are calculated for tritium in the forms of tritiated water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT). The dose mean lineal energies of OBT are about a factor of 1.7 higher than those of HTO in a wide range of target dimensions of biological interest. The results are consistent with radiobiological findings that OBT is about twice as effective as HTO. In this study, the same calculations were performed for (60)Co gamma rays in a wide range of target dimensions of biological interest (10 nm to 2 µm). Compared with (60)Co gamma rays, the estimated relative biological effectiveness could vary from 1.3 to 3.5 for HTO, and 2.3 to 5.6 for OBT. The results are consistent with radiobiological findings for various biological endpoints in different biological systems that OBT is about twice as effective as HTO.

  18. Atmospheric tritium concentrations under influence of AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant (France) and background levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, O; Hébert, D; Solier, L; Maro, D; Pellerin, G; Voiseux, C; Lamotte, M; Laguionie, P

    2017-10-01

    In-air tritium measurements were conducted around the AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant, as well as on other sites that are not impacted by the nuclear industry in northwest of France. The results indicate that the dominant tritium form around the AREVA site is HT (86%). HT and HTO levels are lower than 5 and 1 Bq. m -3 for hourly samples taken in the plume. No tritiated organic molecules (TOM) were detected. 26 measurement campaigns were performed and links were established between near-field 85 Kr, HT and HTO activities. Environmental measurements are in line with those taken at the discharge stack, and tend to demonstrate that there are no rapid changes in the tritium forms released. Out of the influence of any nuclear activities, the levels measured were below 13 mBq.m -3 for HT and 5 mBq.m -3 for HTO (<0.5 Bq. L -1 ). HTO level in air seems to be influenced by HTO activities in surrounding seawater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a tritium monitor combined with an electrochemical tritium pump using a proton conducting oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugiyama, T. [Nagoya University, Fro-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The detection of low level tritium is one of the key issues for tritium management in tritium handling facilities. Such a detection can be performed by tritium monitors based on proton conducting oxide technique. We tested a tritium monitoring system composed of a commercial proportional counter combined with an electrochemical hydrogen pump equipped with CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-α} as proton conducting oxide. The hydrogen pump operated at 973 K under electrolysis conditions using tritiated water vapor (HTO). The proton conducting oxide extracts tritium molecules (HT) from HTO and tritium concentration is measured by the proportional counter. The advantage of the proposed tritium monitoring system is that it is able to convert HTO into molecular hydrogen.

  20. Assessment of the significance of organically-bound tritium in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    The present state of knowledge of the significance, with respect to dose, or organically-bound tritium (OBT) in diet items has been reviewed. Ratios of the specific activity of the OBT to that of the free water (HTO) in foodstuffs have been commonly reported in the range of 1 to 4. A metabolism model of Etnier, Travis and Hetrick that takes direct assimilation of food OBT into account indicates that such levels result in a dose two to three times greater than that calculated solely on the basis of body water tritium content. Very high OBT/HTO values reported by Italian studies on food items are discounted. It is recommended that OBT/HTO measurements be done on Canadian diet items and that tritium metabolism models be more thoroughly evaluated. 71 refs

  1. Sorption of tritium and tritiated water on construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.; Miller, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    Sorption and desorption of tritium (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) on materials to be used in the construction of fusion facilities were studied. In ∼ 24-hour exposures in argon or room air, metal samples sorbed 8-200 μCi/m 2 of tritium from atmospheres of 5-9 Ci/m 3 HT, and non-metallic samples sorbed 60-800 μCi/m 2 from atmospheres of 14 Ci/m 3 HT. Sorption of HTO varied much more widely than HT sorption for different samples, ranging from 4 μCi/m 2 for glass to 1,300,000 μCi/m 2 for concrete samples, in 24-hour exposures to 1 Ci/m 3 HTO in room air. Time dependence of desorption in dry air showed a rapid initial process and a slower secondary process. (Author) (10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  2. Measurement of organically bound tritium in urine and feces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Duong, T.; Leon, J.W.; Linauskas, S.H.

    1993-11-01

    A bioassay method was developed for directly measuring organically bound tritium (OBT) in urine and feces. Samples first undergo low-temperature distillation and vacuum separation to isolate tritiated water (HTO) and exchangeable tritium. This is followed by converting the non-exchangeable tritium (i.e., OBT) into HTO through oxygen combustion. The method was investigated to: optimise the sample preparation procedures; establish OBT recovery (64% ± 7% for urine and 71% ± 8% for feces); and, determine the detection limit for OBT in urine (0.3 Bq · g -1 ) and feces (5 Bq · g -1 ). The method was evaluated for error sources that are associated with the exchange between HTO and OBT. It is concluded that this bioassay method can reliably measure OBT in urine and feces within the range of ± 10%

  3. Computer modelling of HT gas metabolism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, B.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate the metabolism of HT gas in humans. The rate constants of the model were estimated by fitting the calculated curves to the experimental data by Pinson and Langham in 1957. The calculations suggest that the oxidation of HT gas (which probably occurs as a result of the enzymatic action of hydrogenase present in bacteria of human gut) occurs at a relatively low rate with a half-time of 10-12 hours. The inclusion of the dose due to the production of the HT oxidation product (HTO) in the soft tissues lowers the value of derived air concentration by about 50%. Furthermore the relationship between the concentration of HTO in urine and the dose to the lung from HT in the air in lungs is linear after short HT exposures, and hence HTO concentrations in urine can be used to estimate the upper limits on the lung dose from HT exposures. (author)

  4. A database on tritium behavior in the chronic HT release experiment. 1. Meteorological data and tritium concentrations in air and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Murata, Mikio; Amano, Hikaru; Ando, Mariko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fukutani, Satoshi

    1999-03-01

    This report comprises a database that can be used to develop and validate tritium models to assess doses to the general public due to HT continuously released from fusion facilities into the atmosphere. The data was collected in the 1994 chronic HT release experiment carried out at the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada. The data set include meteorological conditions such as solar radiation, net solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature and humidity, soil temperature and soil heat flux; soil conditions such as bulk density, water content and free pore volume fraction; HT and HTO concentrations in air, HTO concentrations in soil moisture and HTO deposition to water surface. Evapo-transpiration rates and turbulent diffusivity are estimated and tabulated. The report also contains experimental methods to observe meteorological conditions and take air and soil samples. (author)

  5. Improved permeation barriers for tritiated waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, G.; Van Den Bergh, R.; Forcey, K.S.; Perujo, A.

    1994-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is extensively used as flexible bagging or packaging for soft tritiated waste in the tritium community because of its low permeability to the more radiotoxic form of tritium, i.e., tritiated water (HTO). However, HDPE does not represent a perfect barrier to HTO nor does it effectively hinder the permeation of elemental tritium, i.e, HT. This latter drawback is particularly important considering that the elemental form may readily convert to HTO outside of the waste package. The possible use of a multilayer film as packing material for the conditioning of tritiated waste is assessed, and its capability to hinder the permeation of elemental tritium is measured and compared with that of bare HDPE. The material investigated is readily available from the food industry. 5 refs., 1 tab

  6. Environmental tritium in trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of environmental tritium in the free water and organically bound hydrogen of trees growing in the vicinity of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) has been studied. The regional dispersal of HTO in the atmosphere has been observed by surveying the tritium content of leaf moisture. Measurement of the distribution of organically bound tritium in the wood of tree ring sequences has given information on past concentrations of HTO taken up by trees growing in the CRNL Liquid Waste Disposal Area. For samples at background environmental levels, cellulose separation and analysis was done. The pattern of bomb tritium in precipitation of 1955-68 was observed to be preserved in the organically bound tritium of a tree ring sequence. Reactor tritium was discernible in a tree growing at a distance of 10 km from CRNL. These techniques provide convenient means of monitoring dispersal of HTO from nuclear facilities. (author)

  7. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-04-01

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  8. The swelling transition of lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanates into anatase under hydrothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiyu; Besselink, Rogier; Liao, Zhaoliang; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2014-04-03

    The common facets of anatase crystals are the (001) and (101) planes. However, the phase transformation from lepidocrocite-type titanate into anatase by hydrothermal processing yields an anatase microstructure with high concentration of exposed (010) planes. The phase transformation of a lepidocrocite-type protonated layered titanate (HTO) into anatase was studied using XRD, TEM, FTIR, and measurement of pH and zeta potential. It was found that HTO is proton-deficient. The phase transformation process begins after uptake of a sufficient number of protons into the lepidocrocite-type structure. With the uptake of protons new hydroxyl groups form on the internal surfaces of the layered titanate and result in a bilayer state of HTO. The phase transformation reaction is a topotactic dehydration reaction in which anatase forms and water is expelled by syneresis.

  9. Topotactic growth, selective adsorption, and adsorption-driven photocatalysis of protonated layered titanate nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qili; Yang, Xianfeng; Liu, Jia; Nie, Xin; Huang, Yongliang; Wen, Yuping; Khan, Javid; Khan, Wasim U; Wu, Mingmei; An, Taicheng

    2014-10-22

    Layered titanates with selective adsorption ability and adsorption-driven photocatalytic property can be quite attractive due to their potential applications in water purification. In this work, lepidocrocite-like layered protonated titanate (H2Ti2O5·H2O, denoted as HTO) nanosheets were successfully synthesized by an ion-exchange process. It turns out that this layered structure displays an abundant and selective adsorption toward the fluoroquinolone pharmaceutical compared with some large dye molecules due to a size selectivity of the interlayer spacing of HTO and the molecular horizontal size, as well as their electrostatic interaction. The uptake ability of HTO could be readily controlled through adjusting the pH values of adsorbate solution, and the maximum uptake capacity was achieved at the pH value of about 5.5 for ciprofloxacin (CIP) and 6.5 for moxifloxacin (MOX). The adsorption amount of smaller nalidixic acid (NAL) showed an increasing tendency as the pH value decreased. Moreover, the two-dimensional layered crystal structure also permits such HTO nanosheets to have a large percentage of (010) faces exposed, which is considerably provided by the interlayer surfaces of these nanosheets. The (010) surface has a similar Ti and O atomic arrangement as to the highly reactive anatase TiO2(001) one. Due to these specific characteristics, these HTO nanosheets show excellent photocatalytic activity in degrading CIP under UV light irradiation as well as possess a superior adsorption ability to remove CIP from aqueous solution selectively and efficiently. The photocatalytic reaction is believed to be mainly conducted on the active anatase (001)-like interlayer (010) surfaces of the layered structures since the as-prepared HTO performs an adsorption-driven molecular recognitive photocatalytic reaction.

  10. Ultralow-level measurement of organically-bound tritium in bioassay samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzer, T.; Trivedi, A.; Waito, G.; Workman, W.

    1998-12-01

    An intercomparison study of urine samples having high levels (5 Bq·L -1 ) of organically-bound tritium (OBT) was conducted, in conjunction with the oxygen combustion-liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method, to evaluate the suitability and sensitivity of the 3 He-ingrowth mass spectrometry (MS) technique for OBT in bioassay samples. The study established that 3 He ingrowth-MS has the required sensitivity to measure ultralow levels of OBT-in-urine (∼0.1 Bq·L -1 ). Cumulative 24 h urine samples from a few members of the general population, living in the vicinity of the heavy-water research reactor facility at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) at Chalk River, were collected and analyzed for tritiated water (HTO) and OBT. The participants were from Ottawa (200 km east), Deep River (10 km west) and an occasionally occupationally HTO-exposed worker at CRL. HTO-in-urine values were 6.5 Bq·L -1 for the Ottawa resident, 15.8 Bq·L -1 for the Deep River resident, and 1260 Bq·L -1 for the exposed worker. OBT-in-urine levels from these same individuals were 0.06 Bq·L -1 (Ottawa), 0.29 Bq·L -1 (Deep River), and 2.2 Bq·L -1 (exposed worker). With a model developed for calculating OBT dose fraction from the measured ratio of HTO to OBT in urine, we estimated that the dose arising from OBT in the body was about 26% of the total tritium dose for the Ottawa resident and 50% for the Deep River resident. The CRL individual had a 5% dose contribution from OBT, but had higher overall tritium dose due to frequent intakes of HTO. The study indicates that the bulk of the tritium dose to the population is the result of HTO intakes and not due to dietary intake of OBT. (author)

  11. Radiosensitive target in the early mouse embryo exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, Lynn M.; Raabe, Otto G.; Khan, Rakhshi; Straume, Tore

    1994-01-01

    We exposed mouse preimplantation embryos in vitro to either tritiated water (HTO) or tritiated thymidine (TdR) to determine whether the radiosensitive target was nuclear or extranuclear for embryonic cell proliferation disadvantage in the mouse embryo chimera assay. 8-cell embryos were incubated in either HTO or TdR for 2 h and paired with non-irradiated control embryos to form chimeras. Chimeras were cultured for an average of 20.2 h to allow for 2-3 cell cycles and then partially dissociated to obtain the number of progeny cells contributed by the two partner embryos for each chimera. These values were expressed as a 'proliferation ratio' (number of cells from the irradiated embryo: total number of cells in the chimera). A ratio significantly less than 0.50 indicates that the experimental embryo expressed an embryonic cell proliferation disadvantage, which is the endpoint of this assay. The activity concentrations of HTO and TdR were adjusted so that both would deliver comparable mean absorbed nuclear doses during the combined initial 2-h irradiation incubation and subsequent 20.2 h chimera incubation periods. Although nuclear doses were comparable under these conditions, the extranuclear dose delivered by the uniformly distributed HTO was about 100 times greater than the extranuclear dose delivered by TdR for each given nuclear dose. Consequently, obtaining mean TdR proliferation ratios≤mean HTO proliferation ratios would be evidence for a nuclear target while obtaining mean HTO proliferation ratios< mean TdR proliferation ratios would be evidence for an extranuclear target. TdR consistently produced lower mean proliferation ratios over a range of doses from 0.14 Gy to 0.43 Gy. Therefore, we conclude that the radiosensitive target for this endpoint is nuclear

  12. Biological assessment of continuous exposure to tritium and lead in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, D.F.; Reiter, L.W.; Santolucito, J.A.; Rehnberg, G.I.; Ash, M.E.; Favor, M.J.; Bursian, S.J.; Wriht, J.F.; Laskey, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    A broad investigation of the effects of simultaneous exposure to two potentially synergistic environmental pollutants, tritiated water (HTO) and lead, was conducted. Sprague-Dawley rats were continuously exposed to HTO and/or Pb in drinking water from conception of the F 1 through adulthood of the F 2 generation. A l2-cell exposure matrix was used employing HTO activities calculated to provide approximately 3-300 mrad/d whole-body irradiation and Pb levels of 5 or 50 ppm in drinking water. Observations were made on the reproductive capacity of the F 1 generation and the effects of lifetime parental exposure to HTO and/or lead on the F 2 neonates. The effects of single and combined exposures on the development and function of the central nervous system, some brain catecholamine levels and electroencephalogram patterns were also examined in both generations. The results indicate that, in both generations, continuous HTO exposures as low as 3 mrad/d delayed development of righting reflexes in young rats; 30 mrad/d additionally depressed the spontaneous activity of adult male rats. Continuous exposure to 5 ppm lead produced similar effects on righting reflex development and adult spontaneous activity. The relative brain weight of F 2 neonates was decreased after lifetime parental exposure to 300 mrad/d or 5 and 50 ppm lead. Chronic lead exposure also appears to induce superovulation and increase preimplantation deaths in F 1 dams. Dose-effect responses to both HTO and lead were less than additive in their interactive effects on the parameters measured. (author)

  13. Incorporation of tritium into planctonic algae in a continuous culture under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, S.; Kistner, G.; Emeis, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    For the purpose of modelling the ecologic behaviour of organically bound tritium (OBT) in aquatic food chains under dynamic conditions (i.e. by changing tritium concentrations), a continuous culture of algae was chosen to which tritium was added by a single injection as tritiated water (HTO). The culture was working according to the chemostatic principle where the concentration of cells is in a steady state. Therefore, according to the growth of algae, tritium is incorporated into the organic substance, while in a parallel process HTO and algae are eliminated from the system at the same rate. From these two processes of first-order kinetics, a special function resulted for the concentration process of OBT in the fermenter that is well known in the field of drug kinetics. Initially it increases until it reaches a maximum value where it intersects the elimination curve of HTO, then decreases and asymptotically approaches the time axis - in the same manner as the elimination curve - only at a superior level. A comparison of this theoretically calculated function with the concentration actually found shows that also under dynamic conditions tritium is undergoing discrimination because of isotopic effects up to a ratio of I=0.80. The calculation of the ratios R=(OBT)/(HTO) in the continuous culture by comparing the function for OBT with the elimination curve for HTO shows a linear increase of R-values during the experiment. At maximum tritium concentration in the algae, the ratio becomes greater than one, and at the end of the experiment it reaches a value of about 6. However, by extrapolating to a time of 40 half-lives, when the absolute concentration of HTO has already decreased by a factor of 10 -12 , a ratio of about 25 was found. The discrimination enters the estimation of R-values at a constant factor of 0.80. (author)

  14. Tritium behaviour in aquatic plants and animals in a freshwater marsh ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, L.W.; Peterle, T.J.; White, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ten curies of tritium as tritiated water (HTO) were experimentally added to an enclosed 2-ha Lake Erie marsh on 20 October 1973. Tritium kinetics in selected plants and animals were determined over a one-year period. Tritium levels in the marsh bottom sediment averaged 1.8 times the marsh water levels, with little evidence of tritium concentration above the marsh water tritium levels in the flora and fauna. The unbound tritium: marsh water tritium ratios in smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium) and pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata) (both emergents) were lower than the same ratio for pondweed (Potamogeton crispus) (a submergent). There was some evidence of bound tritium buildup in midsummer, particularly in the pondweed. Tritium uptake into the unbound compartments of crayfish (Procambarus blandingi), carp (Cyprinus carpio) and bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) was rapid. For crayfish, maximum HTO levels were observed on days 2 and 3 following treatment for muscle and viscera respectively. Unbound HTO in carp muscle peaked in 4 hours and the level in carp viscera reached a maximum in 2 days, in bluegill muscle and viscera on day 1. Unbound HTO in all species decreased following peak levels, paralleling marsh water HTO activity. Tritium uptake into the bound compartments was not as rapid nor were the levels as high as for unbound HTO in the fauna. The peak bound level in crayfish muscle was observed on day 10 (bound : unbound ratio of 0.34) and the maximum level in viscera was noted on day 20 (bound : unbound ratio of 0.23). Bound tritium in carp muscle and viscera reached maximum levels on day 20 (bound : unbound ratios of 0.25 and 0.39 respectively). In bluegills, peaks were reached on days 5 and 7 (bound : unbound ratios of 0.35 and 0.38 for muscle and viscera respectively). Bound tritium in all species decreased following maximum levels

  15. Levels of tritium in soils and vegetation near Canadian nuclear facilities releasing tritium to the atmosphere: implications for environmental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P A; Kwamena, N-O A; Ilin, M; Wilk, M; Clark, I D

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) were measured over two growing seasons in vegetation and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of four nuclear facilities and two background locations in Canada. At the background locations, with few exceptions, OBT concentrations were higher than HTO concentrations: OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation varied between 0.3 and 20 and values in soil varied between 2.7 and 15. In the vicinity of the four nuclear facilities OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation and soils deviated from the expected mean value of 0.7, which is used as a default value in environmental transfer models. Ratios of the OBT activity concentration in plants ([OBT]plant) to the OBT activity concentration in soils ([OBT]soil) appear to be a good indicator of the long-term behaviour of tritium in soil and vegetation. In general, OBT activity concentrations in soils were nearly equal to OBT activity concentrations in plants in the vicinity of the two nuclear power plants. [OBT]plant/[OBT]soil ratios considerably below unity observed at one nuclear processing facility represents historically higher levels of tritium in the environment. The results of our study reflect the dynamic nature of HTO retention and OBT formation in vegetation and soil during the growing season. Our data support the mounting evidence suggesting that some parameters used in environmental transfer models approved for regulatory assessments should be revisited to better account for the behavior of HTO and OBT in the environment and to ensure that modelled estimates (e.g., plant OBT) are appropriately conservative. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Determinations of tritium levels in urine and blood samples, medical checkups of persons employed at RC Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irlweck, K.; Teherani, D.K.

    1975-07-01

    Tritium determinations in urine and blood samples were performed with a liquid scintillation counter (Tri Carb No. 3375, PACKARD). In urine samples tritiated water (HTO) was measured after separation of organic substances by adsorption with activated charcoal and following distillation to dryness. In some urine and blood samples total Tritium content was determinated by conbustion in a sample Oxidizer (Mod. 306, PACKARD). Detection limits for HTO and total Tritium measurements were 2,5 pCi/ml and 7 or 15 pCi/ml respectively, taking 2 sigma of statistical error of background values. Tritiumconcentrations in daily urine of occupational exposed persons, employed in RC Seibersdorf occurred up to 8 pCi HTO/ml. An arithmetic mean was 3,85+-2,11 pCi/ml from investigations on 16 persons. Tritiumcontent in urine samples of occupational non exposed persons were about the same level up to 10 pCi HTO/ml. An arithmetic mean was 3,70+-2,65 pCi/ml from measurements on 20 persons. Statistical error of single values was sigma=+-1,85 pCi/ml. There was found no significantly higher concentration in urine of occupational exposed persons compared with a group of non exposed ones. Total Tritium content in urine samples seemed to be somewhat higher than HTO concentrations, also for occupational non exposed persons. Tritium levels in blood were notably higher than have to be expected assuming homogeneous distribution of HTO in body fluids. For occupational exposed persons in RC Seibersdorf Tritium concentrations between 26-58 pCi/ml were found. An estimation about Tritium intake based on such results showed no more than 0,5% of maximum permissible intake for occupational exposed persons in the most unfavorable case. For occupational non exposed persons total Tritium levels in blood were only about 10,7+-5,8 pCi/ml (arithmetic mean of measurements on 15 persons). (author)

  17. Measurement of the Higgs Boson Coupling to the Top-quark in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zanzi, Daniele; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Searches for the Higgs boson production in association with a pair of top-quarks in the $H\\to\\bar{b}b$ and $H\\to WW^{*},\\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}, ZZ^{*}$ to multilepton final states with $36.1\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV collected by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC are presented. The combination of these with searches in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H\\to ZZ^{*}\\to 4\\ell$ final states is also presented. The combined result provides evidence for the Higgs boson coupling to top-quarks.

  18. 1986 annual report of the Lower Saxony Institute for Radio-Ecology at the Hanover University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The research and development projects deal with the HTO exchange within the system of atmosphere/soil, with the conversion of HT to HTO/OBT in the soil, with the determination of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in environmental samples and with a stock taking of I-129 in human thyroids. Additional studies following the Chernobyl accident concern the determination of transfer factors, enrichments and migration of fission products or uranium. The research programme is supplemented by aerophysical studies, special radio-ecological issues (aerosol determination, washout, deposition, dispersion) and by the non-destructive biomass assay using gamma rays and microwaves. (DG) [de

  19. Performance Evaluations of Ion Exchanged Zeolite Membranes on Alumina Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, Sankar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-08-27

    This report describes the synthesis and evaluation of molecular sieve zeolite membranes to separate and concentrate tritiated water (HTO) from dilute HTO-bearing aqueous streams. In the first phase of this effort, several monovalent and divalent cation-exchanged silico alumino phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve zeolite membranes were synthesized on disk supports and characterized with gas and vapor permeation measurements. In the second phase, Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite membranes were synthesized in disk and tubular supports. The pervaporation process performance was evaluated for the separation and concentration of tritiated water.

  20. Radiobiological effects of tritiated water short-term exposure on V79 clonogenic cell survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siragusa, Mattia; Fredericia, Nina Pil Møntegaard; Jensen, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    We set out to improve the accuracy of absorbed dose calculations for in-vitro measurements of the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water (HTO) for the clonogenic cell survival assay, also considering the influence of the end-of-track Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of low-energy...... in suspension are usually comparable to those for adherent cells. RBEs calculated at the 10% survival fraction through the use of the average energy are almost similar to those obtained with the beta-spectrum. For adherent cells, an RBE of 1.6 was found when HTO cell survival curves were compared to acute γ...

  1. Oxidation of molecular tritium by intact soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, C.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors on the rate of oxidation of molecular tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO) were determined for intact soils during field exposures. Maximum deposition velocities of approximately 0.03 cm/sec were measured for T 2 at low wind speeds for a variety of soils over a wide range of conditions. Deposition velocities were slightly inhibited in wet soils and at 0 0 C. In dry soils, oxidation of T 2 to HTO occurred deeper in the soil profile, but deposition velocities were unaffected

  2. Lecture Series on Propagation Limitations for Systems Using Band- Spreading. Papers Presented in Issy-les-Moulineaux on 7-8 June 1990; Rome Italy on 11-12 Jun 1990; and Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts on 19-20 June 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    commercial atellite communications primarily ho love data rate applications with small and economic eatb-slatioots,hto pitticalar because of the vast...Attenuation of radio waces at orscelengths from0tot 940mm ot the earth’s atosphere through the slaont paths, lot. Coaf. 2MIM Waves, December 1076 Steffes PA

  3. Comparative stochastic effects from low level exposure of mice to tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewissen, D.J.; Ugarte, A.S.; Rust, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 1,133 C57 Black/6M mick of both sexes were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups. In the first group, mice received a single injection of tritiated water (HTO) at weaning time. In the second group, weaned mice were exposed to tritated drinking water for the entire lifespan. In the third group the female parent received one single injection of HTO following delivery. In the fourth group, the female parent and her progeny were exposed to tritiated drinking water for the entire lifespan. In the fifth group, dams were exposed to tritiated drinking water from the beginning of pregnancy for the entire lifespan. (Drinking HTO 1 μCi/ml; single dose of HTO 1 μCi). Data from experimental groups were statistically evaluated vis a vis extensive control groups (+- 1,000 control mice of either sex). All mice were autopsied as moribund or soon after death and tissues were microscopically examined. A significantly increased incidence of reticulum cell sarcomas was observed in female offspring from dams in the third and fifth groups. A significantly increased incidence of hepatic tumors was observed in male offspring in the fourth group. Mean survival times did not significantly differ within experimental groups but were significantly different from controls

  4. Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry - Vol 9, No 2 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Late Identification of Autistic Disorder in Nigeria: An Illustration with 2 Case Reports · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. MA Bello-Mojeed, OC Ogun, OO Omigbodun, AO Adewuya, HTO Ladapo. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njpsyc.v9i2.69920 ...

  5. TRITOX: a multiple parameter evaluation of tritium toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear reactors for power generation will lead to the introduction of tritium into the environment. The need for assessing possible immediate and long-term effects of exposure to this tritium led to the development of a broad program directed towards evaluating the possible somatic and genetic effects of continuous exposure to tritiated water (HTO). Among the parameters measured are the genetic, cytogenetic, reproductive efficiency, growth, nonspecific lifetime shortening, bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content, relative biological effectiveness as compared to 137 Cesium gamma exposure, and related biochemical and microdosimetric evaluations. These parameters have been evaluated on animals maintained on HTO at 10 to 100 times the maximum permissible concentration (0.03 - 3.0 μCi/ml) for HTO. Dominant lethal mutations, chromosome aberrations in regenerating liver, increased sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow and reduction in bone marrow stem cell content have been observed at the higher concentrations. The relative biological effectiveness for HTO ingestion as compared to external 137 Cesium gamma exposures has been found to be between 1 and 2

  6. Development of a tritium dispersion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.P.; Davis, M.W.; Joseph, S.; Wong, K.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the development and verification of a computer code designed to calculate the radiation dose to man following acute or chronic atmospheric releases of tritium gas and oxide from a point source. The Ontario Hydro Tritium Dispersion Code calculates tritium concentrations in air, soil, and vegetation and doses to man resulting from inhalation/immersion and ingestion of food, milk meat and water. The deposition of HT to soil, conversion of HT to HTO by soil enzymes and resuspension of HTO to air have been incorporated into the terrestrial compartment model and are unique features of the code. Sensitivity analysis has identified the HT deposition velocity and the equivalent water depth of the vegetation compartment as two parameters which have a strong influence on dose calculations. Tritium concentrations in vegetation and soil calculated by the code were in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The radiological significance of including the mechanisms of HT to HTO conversion and resuspension of HTO to air is illustrated

  7. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Brooks, A.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized

  8. Search for new light gauge bosons in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton final states in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-11-03

    This paper presents a search for Higgs bosons decaying to four leptons, either electrons or muons, via one or two light exotic gauge bosons $Z_d$, $H\\to Z Z_d \\to 4\\ell$ or $H\\to Z_d Z_d \\to 4\\ell$. The search was performed using $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb$^{-1}$ at the center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8 $TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds on the branching ratio of $H\\to Z Z_d \\to 4\\ell$ and on the kinetic mixing parameter between the $Z_d$ and the Standard Model hypercharge gauge boson are set in the range $(1$--$9)\\times10^{-5}$ and $(4$--$17)\\times10^{-2}$ respectively, at 95% confidence level assuming the Standard Model branching ratio of $H\\to Z Z^* \\to 4\\ell$, for $Z_d$ masses between 15 and 55 GeV. Upper bounds on the effective mass mixing parameter between the $Z$ and the $Z_d$ are also set using the branching ratio limits in the $H \\to...

  9. Removal mechanism of tritium by variously pretreated silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, M.; Tachikawa, E.; Saeki, M.; Aratono, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Removal mechanisms of HTO from variously pretreated and non-pretreated silica gel columns were investigated with pulse-loading with tritiated water vapor. With non-pretreated silica gel, the HTO physisorbed on the upper part of the column comes into contact with surface hydroxyl groups while passing downward the column, so that in each equilibration a part of the tritium is incorporated into hydroxyl groups by H/T isotopic exchange reactions. With the silica gel pretreated at a temperature below 400 0 C, most of tritium in the applied HTO is easily incorporated into surface hydroxyl groups in the upper part of the column either by H/T isotopic exchange reactions or by rehydration of the dehydrated surface (siloxyl linkage). In the pretreatment above 400 0 C, essentially all the tritium is trapped by siloxyl groups of various stabilities. The ease of rehydration of siloxyl groups by applied HTO depends on their stabilities, which, in turn, depend on the pretreatment temperature. As a general trend, treatment at higher temperature promotes annealing of the constrained siloxyl groups and thus the rate of rehydration becomes slower. (author)

  10. Effect of physiological factors on dose due to organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends the understanding of the effect of age, anatomical and physiological data on the doses in order to prescribe dose coefficient for radionuclides. The published data on OBT dose fraction after acute or chronic intakes of HTO are evaluated to examine the variation of OBT dose with the age and physiology of occupational workers. (author)

  11. Tissue-specific incorporation and genotoxicity of different forms of tritium in the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C., E-mail: ben@ecology.su.s [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Millward, Geoffrey E. [Consolidated Radio-isotope Facility, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Moody, A. John; Jha, Awadhesh N. [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Marine mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to seawater spiked with tritiated water (HTO) at a dose rate of 122 and 79 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} for 7 and 14 days, respectively, and tritiated glycine (T-Gly) at a dose rate of 4.9 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} over 7 days. This was followed by depuration in clean seawater for 21 days. Tissues (foot, gills, digestive gland, mantle, adductor muscle and byssus) and DNA extracts from tissues were analysed for their tritium activity concentrations. All tissues demonstrated bio-accumulation of tritium from HTO and T-Gly. Tritium from T-Gly showed increased incorporation into DNA compared to HTO. About 90% of the initial activity from HTO was depurated within one day, whereas T-Gly was depurated relatively slowly, indicating that tritium may be bound with different affinities in tissues. Both forms of tritium caused a significant induction of micronuclei in the haemocytes of mussels. Our findings identify significant differential impacts on Mytilus edulis of the two chemical forms of tritium and emphasise the need for a separate classification and control of releases of tritiated compounds, to adequately protect the marine ecosystem. - Tritium from tritiated glycine demonstrates greater accumulation and persistence in tissues and enhanced genotoxicity in haemocytes of marine mussels, compared to tritium from tritiated water.

  12. A preliminary study on PVDC modified composite materials of protective for tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Xiaoli; Dan Guiping; Li Ye; Wen Wei; Zhang Dong

    2012-01-01

    Through the experimental device, the HTO permeation performances of two kinds of PVDC modified composite materials were studied. The characteristic curves of the two composite materials were ascertained, and various other packing materials with anti-tritium permeation performance were compared. (authors)

  13. Open-wedge osteotomy using an internal plate fixator in patients with medial-compartment gonarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Schmal, Hagen; Hauschild, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our purpose was to evaluate the 3-year clinical results of patients with medial-compartment osteoarthritis of the knee and varus malalignment who underwent open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) with an internal plate fixator (TomoFix; Synthes, Solothurn, Switzerland). Clinical results a...

  14. The value of the intra-operative clinical mechanical axis measurement in open-wedge valgus high tibial osteotomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, G.J.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Kampen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In high tibial osteotomies (HTO) the correction needs to be precise and intra-operative assessment is essential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of the intra-operative clinical mechanical axis measurement and compare it to the post-operative weight bearing situation

  15. Hydrogenated TiO2 Thin Film for Accelerating Electron Transport in Highly Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Liang, Junhui; Li, Yuelong; Luo, Jingshan; Shi, Biao; Wei, Changchun; Zhang, Dekun; Li, Baozhang; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Xiaodan

    2017-10-01

    Intensive studies on low-temperature deposited electron transport materials have been performed to improve the efficiency of n-i-p type planar perovskite solar cells to extend their application on plastic and multijunction device architectures. Here, a TiO 2 film with enhanced conductivity and tailored band edge is prepared by magnetron sputtering at room temperature by hydrogen doping (HTO), which accelerates the electron extraction from perovskite photoabsorber and reduces charge transfer resistance, resulting in an improved short circuit current density and fill factor. The HTO film with upward shifted Fermi level guarantees a smaller loss on V OC and facilitates the growth of high-quality absorber with much larger grains and more uniform size, leading to devices with negligible hysteresis. In comparison with the pristine TiO 2 prepared without hydrogen doping, the HTO-based device exhibits a substantial performance enhancement leading to an efficiency of 19.30% and more stabilized photovoltaic performance maintaining 93% of its initial value after 300 min continuous illumination in the glove box. These properties permit the room-temperature magnetron sputtered HTO film as a promising electron transport material for flexible and tandem perovskite solar cell in the future.

  16. Optimization of nitridation conditions for high quality inter-polysilicon dielectric layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, J.H.; Bergveld, H.J.; van Kranenburg, H.; Woerlee, P.H.; Wallinga, Hans

    1996-01-01

    Nitridation of deposited high temperature oxides (HTO) was studied to form high quality inter-polysilicon dielectric layers for embedded non volatile memories. Good quality dielectric layers were obtained earlier by using an optimized deposition of polysilicon and by performing a post-dielectric

  17. A simple method to determine Tr concentrations in the moisture of the exhaust air of nuclear facilities and in the ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1983-04-01

    In the course of nuclear power plant operation radioactive tritium is generated which is released to the environment as HTO via the exhaust air and the liquid effluents. Measurement and balancing of the tritium emissions are required in order to be able to evaluate the resulting radiation exposure of the population. For determination of the HTO emission the humidity of the measured air is absorbed at a rod shaped molecular sieve of 1/16'' mesh size. The desiccant is contacted with T-free water and the T activity concentration of the water is determined after 3 H/ 1 H isotope exchange. The rod shaped molecular sieves are suited for use under this method on account of their drying capacity largely independent of temperature and air humidity and the good handling capability. The detection limit is at 19 Bq HTO/m 3 air. The exhaust air from several 3 H-emitters of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center was monitored by this method for its HTO content and the results were compared with the values measured at existing points of measurement. The good results have been the reason for the application of such collectors in the routine T-measurement performed within the framework of exhaust air monitoring on the site of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. (orig./HP) [de

  18. In vivo hydroxylation of 3H-acetanilide--evaluation of a new radiospirometric method in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutoungi, M; Bieri, H U; Huguenin, P; Karlaganis, G; Zeng, T T; Bircher, J

    1983-12-01

    The proposed in vivo methodology for the investigation of hydroxylation rates consists of of the i.v. administration of tritiated substrates and the collection of tritiated water (HTO) from exhaled air as a measure of HTO accumulation in body water. Specifically, HTO was assessed in exhaled water after i.v. administration of 3H-acetanilide. Over a wide range the half lives of accumulation of HTO in exhaled water (T50) were almost identical with the half lives of elimination of 3H-acetanilide in blood, evaluated by an inverse isotope dilution method (r = 0.96, N = 18). Average T50 amounted to 29 min in controls, was reduced to 20 min after enzyme induction by phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene, and prolonged to 45, 46 and 66 min after bile duct ligation, portacaval shunt and a single dose of ethanol, respectively. It is concluded that the chosen pharmacokinetic approach corrects for the NIH-shift and the results adequately reflect changes in acetanilide hydroxylation related to enzyme induction or inhibition and to liver pathology.

  19. Establish the Foundation of Environmental Assessment Technique in ROK via the International Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety Managed by IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Ahn, S. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Lee, C. W.; Hwang, W. T.; Seo, K. S

    2005-08-15

    Tritiated water (HTO) released from the nuclear facilities can easily be absorbed by plants via their stomata and incorporated into organics by metabolic processes such as photosynthesis. Organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant cells is mostly inexchangeable and remains at harvest to contribute some to the ingestion radiation dose (Barry et al., 1999). In assessing the ingestion dose due to an accidental release of HTO, a dynamic model simulating its environmental behaviors is needed. Various types of dynamic HTO models have been developed in many different countries. Joint international researches have been conducted many times for model comparisons and validations (BIOMOVS II, 1996a, 1996b). In 2003, however, with the understanding of an insufficiency in the validation test, the IAEA started on a joint international research program for the validation of environmental models (EMRAS : Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) as a successor to the BIOMASS (2001). The KAERI submitted 'a scenario of an acute soybean exposure to HTO' to the Tritium Working Group (Theme 1) in the EMRAS program. It was accepted as Task 2 of the working group. This report is the result of a joint research for the KAERI scenario carried out by the EMRAS tritium working group with the KAERI playing a role of a coordinator.

  20. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.; Tepley, N.W

    1978-01-01

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m 3 (approx. 10 kBq/m 3 ) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm 3 /s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  1. Tritium contamination of hematopoietic stem cells alters long-term hematopoietic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giacomo, F.; Barroca, V.; Laurent, D.; Lewandowski, D.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Granotier, Ch.; Boussin, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In vivo effects of tritium contamination are poorly documented. Here, we study the effects of tritiated Thymidine ([ 3 H] Thymidine) or tritiated water (HTO) contamination on the biological properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Materials and methods: Mouse HSC were contaminated with concentrations of [ 3 H] Thymidine ranging from 0.37-37.03 kBq/ml or of HTO ranging from 5-50 kBq/ml. The biological properties of contaminated HSC were studied in vitro after HTO contamination and in vitro and in vivo after [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. Results: Proliferation, viability and double-strand breaks were dependent on [ 3 H] Thymidine or HTO concentrations used for contamination but in vitro myeloid differentiation of HSC was not affected by [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. [ 3 H] Thymidine contaminated HSC showed a compromised long-term capacity of hematopoietic reconstitution and competition experiments showed an up to two-fold decreased capacity of contaminated HSC to reconstitute hematopoiesis. These defects were not due to impaired homing in bone marrow but to an initial decreased proliferation rate of HSC. Conclusion: These results indicate that contaminations of HSC with doses of tritium that do not result in cell death, induce short-term effects on proliferation and cell cycle and long-term effects on hematopoietic reconstitution capacity of contaminated HSC. (authors)

  2. Establish the Foundation of Environmental Assessment Technique in ROK via the International Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety Managed by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Ahn, S. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Lee, C. W.; Hwang, W. T.; Seo, K. S.

    2005-08-01

    Tritiated water (HTO) released from the nuclear facilities can easily be absorbed by plants via their stomata and incorporated into organics by metabolic processes such as photosynthesis. Organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant cells is mostly inexchangeable and remains at harvest to contribute some to the ingestion radiation dose (Barry et al., 1999). In assessing the ingestion dose due to an accidental release of HTO, a dynamic model simulating its environmental behaviors is needed. Various types of dynamic HTO models have been developed in many different countries. Joint international researches have been conducted many times for model comparisons and validations (BIOMOVS II, 1996a, 1996b). In 2003, however, with the understanding of an insufficiency in the validation test, the IAEA started on a joint international research program for the validation of environmental models (EMRAS : Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) as a successor to the BIOMASS (2001). The KAERI submitted 'a scenario of an acute soybean exposure to HTO' to the Tritium Working Group (Theme 1) in the EMRAS program. It was accepted as Task 2 of the working group. This report is the result of a joint research for the KAERI scenario carried out by the EMRAS tritium working group with the KAERI playing a role of a coordinator

  3. Evaluation of neonate squirrel monkeys receiving tritiated water throughout gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.C.L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of receiving tritiated water (HTO) throughout gestation on the developing primate was assessed by administering HTO to adult female squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) as the only source of drinking water beginning with the day of insemination and continuing throughout pregnancy. For the control (tap water) and six experimental groups, the mean urinary tritium concentrations in females delivering full-term progeny were <0.004, 0.05, 0.16, 0.33, 0.75, 1.61, and 3.09 microcuries/ml. Positive bioassays for pregnancy were observed in about half of 277 inseminated females. Among pregnant females, the full-term delivery rate was 36%, the abortion rate was 7%, and the resorption rate was 58% with no discernible effect of HTO administration on any of these parameters. The 46 full-term progeny were evaluated within 2 days of birth. No effects of HTO administration were observed in terms of gestation period (median 153 days, range 141-158 days), sex distribution, body weight, body dimensions, selected organ weights, histology (except gonads), or hematologic pattern. The number of primary oocytes in female progeny decreased markedly within increasing concentrations of tritium. Specific quantification of this effect and evaluation of the neonate testes is in progress

  4. Leeds-Lyon Symposium on Tribology ’The Tribology Design of Machine Elements’ (15th) 6-9 September 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    bearing radius 6 ILuR Radial bl 󈧎 :radial clearance A- l a0 a a 1+ b2 U: bearing speed ,. hto p, : ar "ess. 9. Aiscocity b2 b1 Fig. 1 Bearing...priorarrangement for football/ rugby /hockey/cricket, with charges beingade dependent upon playing numbers and duration of time in use. A large sports pavilion

  5. Measurement of tritium in tissue free water of pine needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaomin; Wu Zongmei

    1993-01-01

    Tissue Free Water (TFW) of pine needles is separated out through azeotropic distillation of pine needles and toluene. Recovery ratio of TFW is 90%. Tritium activity in the needles is 1.8 Bq/L(H 2 O), which is of the same level with tritiated water vapour (HTO) in atmosphere during the corresponding period

  6. ACUTRI: a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Sumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ryufuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Toshihisa; Kurosawa, Naohiro [Visible Information Center, Inc., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: inhalation from a primary plume (HT and/or HTO) released from the facilities and inhalation from a secondary plume (HTO) reemitted from the ground following deposition of HT and HTO. This report describes an outline of the ACUTRI code, a user guide and the results of test calculation. (author)

  7. Field studies of HT oxidation and dispersion in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.; Ogram, G.L.; Spencer, F.S.; Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON

    1988-10-01

    A tracer quantity of 3.54 TBq tritiated hydrogen (HT) was released into the atmosphere at a Chalk River, Ontario field site to determine the behaviour of HT in the environment. The primary objective was to establish the oxidation rate of HT to tritiated water (HTO) in air, soil and vegetation compartments. HTO/HT atmospheric concentration ratios observed during the release ranged from 0.14 x 10 -4 at 5 m to 7.0 x 10 -4 at 400 m distance from the release point indicating an effective oxidation rate of about 1.5% h -1 . Gas phase oxidation in the atmosphere would be less than this effective rate. Results confirm that surface soils play the dominant role in converting HT to HTO. Soil HT deposition velocities were between 2.7 x 10 -4 and 11 x 10 -4 m s -1 for an open field of varied composition, and between 3.3 x 10 -4 and 12 x 10 -4 m s -1 for a conifer forest. Soil HTO loss rates were initially 1 to 3 % h -1 averaged over the first 24 h after release. Vegetation tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) resulted from uptake of soil HTO and exchange with atmospheric HTO vapour. Upper limit HT deposition velocities to vegetation measured as TFWT in 5 species were 0.23 x 10 -7 to 6 x 10 -7 m s -1 expressed on a leaf area basis. TFWT loss rates were 5.2 to 8.1 % h -1 from about 12 to 48 h after release with low activity rain and 0.42 to 0.56 % h -1 from about 48 to 335 h. Vegetation organically-bound tritium/TFWT specific activity ratios (Bq g -1 H) were about 0.1 initially, increasing to 16 after 113 days as TFWT specific activity declined more rapidly than that of OBT. The effective HT oxidation rate, deposition velocities and HTO loss rates were in good agreement with a 1986 HT field release and previous laboratory experiments

  8. Influence of microstructure on the diffusive transport in pastes, mortars and concretes made with cement Portland and silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajja, Zineb

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its high mechanical strength and its potential containment capacity conferred by a compact microstructure, concrete is considered as the most suitable material to compose the engineered barrier of some radioactive waste storage structure. Knowledge of diffusion properties and microstructure of these cementitious materials is then essential to study their long-term durability. In a more specific context of low and intermediate waste management, the use of formulations containing silica fume (SF) appears of great importance. The experimental approach consists in selecting many formulations of pastes and mortars to test by the HTO through-out diffusion test. Their initial compositions (water to binder ratio, SF content, sand content and particle size) were varied in order to browse different microstructures and diffusion properties, and to see the influence of each parameter (water, SF, content and grain size of sand) on the evolution of diffusivity within these materials. The microstructure was investigated to interpret the obtained values of diffusion coefficients. Different complementary techniques have been used to characterize the porous structure (water and mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption), to verify SF reactivity (TGA, SEM associated to EDS) or to determine the profile porosity at ITZ (SEM combined with image analysis).The relationship between microstructure and diffusion coefficients (DeHTO) was then discussed. The ultimate goal was to find a link between microstructure properties and transport parameters to estimate from a simple characterization, the DeHTO of concrete, difficult to get from HTO diffusion cells test. Other attempts have also been made to try to assess the concrete diffusion coefficient, such as the multi-scale modeling approach (the scale of hydrates 3D model), or the diffusion of other elements ( like oxygen or nitrogen). This study shows that silica fume agglomerates (slurry) observed in cement paste and mortar

  9. The long term effects of {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays and tritiated water on induction on teratogenesis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, Shuneki [Hiroshima Univ., Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the teratogenesis caused by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays radiation and tritiated water (tritium {beta}-rays, HTO) in rats under long-term exposures. Many congenital anomalies are caused by environmental factors, and it is likely that this assessment of teratogenesis will be very important in the future. Pregnant Donryu strain rats were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays on days 9-18 of gestation. The animals were sacrificed on day 18 of gestation and the contents of each uterine horn were examined. The numbers of surviving, dead and resorbed fetuses were recorded. The surviving fetuses were examined for external and visceral malformations. Also given here is a measure of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water (HTO) compared to that for {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays regarding the induction of developmental anomalies such as neurocristopathy in pregnant Donryu rats. Radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 Gy for both tritiated water and {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays. Teratogenesis was dose dependent for both radiation groups. Our studies show that {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays and HTO irradiation induce similar malformations of the cardiovascular, respiratory and skeletal systems in rat fetuses. However, a number of fetuses exhibiting growth retardation, general edema, persistent atrioventricular canal, eye defects, microcephaly and craniofacial defects following maternal exposure to HTO. These include hypoplasia of the pulmonary trunk (tetralogy of Fallot), DORV, ventricular septal defect, right aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta, aberrant right subclavian artery, hypoplasia of the thymus, craniofacial anomalies, hypoplasia or incomplete lungs and trachea, as well as limb and tail malformations in HTO syndrome. These results are similar to those found in human DiGeorge syndrome, which are considered pharyngeal arch syndromes related to a cephalic neutrocristopathy. A best estimation

  10. Increased cartilage volume after injection of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis knee patients who underwent high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareancholvanich, Keerati; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat

    2014-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure used to correct abnormal mechanical loading of the knee joint; additionally, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections have been shown to restore the viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid and balance abnormal biochemical processes. It was hypothesized that combining HTO with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections would have benefit to improve the cartilage volume of knee joints. Forty patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) were randomly placed into 1 of 2 groups. The study group (n = 20) received 2 cycles (at 6-month intervals) of 5 weekly intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections after HTO operation. The control group (n = 20) did not receive any intra-articular injections after HTO surgery. Cartilage volume (primary outcome) was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pre-operatively and 1 year post-operatively. Treatment efficacy (secondary outcomes) was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC) and by the comparison of the total rescue medication (paracetamol/diclofenac) used (weeks 6, 12, 24, 48). MRI studies showed a significant increase in total cartilage volume (p = 0.033), lateral femoral cartilage volume (p = 0.044) and lateral tibial cartilage volume (p = 0.027) in the study group. Cartilage volume loss was detected at the lateral tibial plateau in the control group. There were significant improvements after surgery in both groups for all subscales of WOMAC scores (p hyaluronic acid injections may be beneficial for increasing total cartilage volume and preventing the loss of lateral tibiofemoral joint cartilage after HTO. Therapeutic study, Level I.

  11. Effect of open wedge high tibial osteotomy on the lateral tibiofemoral compartment in sheep. Part III: analysis of the microstructure of the subchondral bone and correlations with the articular cartilage and meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Raphaela; Goebel, Lars; Seidel, Roland; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Madry, Henning

    2015-09-01

    First, to evaluate whether medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) induces alterations of the microstructure of the lateral tibial subchondral bone plate of sheep. Second, to test the hypothesis that specific correlations exist between topographical structural alterations of the subchondral bone, the cartilage and the lateral meniscus. Three experimental groups received biplanar osteotomies of the right proximal tibiae: (a) closing wedge HTO (4.5° of tibial varus), (b) opening wedge HTO (4.5° tibial valgus; standard correction) and (c) opening wedge HTO (9.5° of valgus; overcorrection), each of which was compared to the non-osteotomised contralateral proximal tibiae. After 6 months, subchondral bone structure indices were measured by computed tomography. Correlations between the subchondral bone, the articular cartilage and the lateral meniscus were determined. Increased loading by valgus overcorrection led to an enlarged specific bone surface (BS/BV) in the subarticular spongiosa compared with unloading by varisation. The subchondral bone plate was 3.9-fold thicker in the central region of the lateral tibial plateau than in the submeniscal periphery. Its thickness in the central region significantly correlated with the thickness of the articular cartilage. In the submeniscal region, such correlation did not exist. In general, a higher degree of osteoarthritis (OA) correlated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. OA of the submeniscal articular cartilage also correlated with worse matrix staining of the lateral meniscus. Osteoarthritis changes are associated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. Specific topographical relationships exist in the central region between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone plate thickness, and in the submeniscal periphery between and the articular cartilage and lateral meniscus. From a clinical perspective, the combined follow-up data from this and the previous two

  12. Toxicity and mode of action of tritium alone and mixed with copper on the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rety, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Liquid releases by Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are composed of a mixture of radioactive and non-radioactive substances. When organisms are exposed to mixtures of contaminants the resultant toxicity can be enhanced, or reduced, due to interactions. In order to identify potential interactions between substances released by NPP, two substances representative of such effluents (in term of toxicity and of quantity) were selected for studies: Tritiated water (HTO) and copper (Cu). Effects of this binary mixture were studied on the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HTO, when examined along, was not very toxic to C. reinhardtii. The most sensitive and early effect of HTO was an increase in oxidative stress at concentrations of 40 kBq mL -1 (0.13 μGy h -1 ). Algae exposure to the binary mixture HTO/Cu induced interactive effects on oxidative stress. Reactive Oxygen Species production was higher from exposure to the mixture of contaminants than the addition of the effect from each substance individually. This interaction was explained by an enhanced copper uptake by the algae when in the presence of HTO. The observed supra-additive effect could also be due to direct toxic interactions, especially on the antioxidant system. To conclude, this study showed that the effects of a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive substances can be greater than what would be predicted based on mere addition of individual effects. Even thought this binary mixture is just a small part of NPP effluents, the study showed that potential interactions should be considered when determining ecological risks to aquatic ecosystems from NPP effluents. (author)

  13. The Canadian experimental HT release of June 10, 1987, US measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Murphy, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of elemental tritium (HT) released to the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 3.54 TBq (95.7 Ci)of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. Scientists from six countries participated in the experiment. The air measurements showed HT concentrations downwind of the release in general agreement with classical atmospheric diffusion (Gaussian) up to the maximum distance measured (400 m). The HTO/HT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (∼ 4 x 10/sup /minus/5/ at 50 m to almost 10/sup /minus/3/ at 400 m) as conversion of HT took place. After the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Vegetation samples were also taken since the vegetation and associated soil system have been implicated in the oxidation of HT. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The tritiated water concentration increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 15--30 kBq/L of water at 50 m from the source), and decreasing by the end of the second day. This pattern suggests oxidation in the soil followed by plant uptake through sorption of soil water. This was confirmed by measurements taken by other groups at the experiment site. The HTO in vegetation decreased with distance downwind with the same pattern as the HT measured during the release indicating that the oxidation of HT was linearly related to the HT concentration in the atmosphere during the exposure period. An adequate description of the process can be made through the observed phenomenon of HT deposition into the soil with subsequent rapid oxidation by soil bacteria. 30 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Analysis of Outcomes for High Tibial Osteotomies Performed With Cartilage Restoration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Hamid, Kamran S; Steinhaus, Michael E; Williams, Riley J

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate reported medium- to long-term outcomes after high tibial osteotomy (HTO) with associated cartilage restoration procedures. A review of the MEDLINE database was performed. The inclusion criteria were English language, clinical outcome study with HTO as the primary procedure, use of a form of cartilage repair included, and the mean follow-up period of at least 2 years. Each identified study was reviewed for study design, patient demographics, type of procedures performed, clinical outcomes, progression to total knee arthroplasty, and complications. Eight hundred and twenty-seven patients (839 knees) were included. The most common cartilage preservation technique used in conjunction with HTO was microfracture (4 studies; 22.2%). The mean Lyscholm scores, reported in 50% of the studies, ranged from 40 to 65.7 preoperatively and improved to a range of 67 to 94.6 postoperatively. Four studies (22.2%) used a visual analog scale for evaluation of pain and all had a mean visual analog scale of less than 3 postoperatively. Among studies evaluating conversion to arthroplasty, the rate of conversion was 6.8% and the range of mean number of years from HTO to conversion was 4.9 to 13.0. The overall reported complication rate was 10.3%. HTO with cartilage restoration procedures provides reliable improvement in functional status in the medium- to long-term period after surgery and has potential to delay or avoid the need for knee arthroplasty surgery. Level IV, systematic review of Level I to IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 μCi/ml, 1.0 μCi/ml, 3.0 μCi/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to 137 Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 μCi/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 μCi/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 μCi/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 μCi/ml at 28 days. 18 references

  16. Tritium in the food chain. Comparison of predicted and observed behaviour. A: Re-emission from soil and vegetation. B: Formation of organically bound tritium in grain of spring wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.; Strack, S.; Barry, P.

    1996-09-01

    This is the second Technical Report of the Special Radionuclides Tritium Working Group. It deals specifically with two major sources of model uncertainty concerning tritium re-emission from soils and vegetation, and the formation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant tissues under light and dark conditions which were identified during work undertaken for the first tritium Technical Report. Information obtained from two experiments was formulated into two specific Approach A type scenarios to investigate these aspects of tritium behaviour so that model predictions could be compared with actual observations and data. Data for HTO re-emission measured at two different field sampling sites in Canada were used as the basis for the model test exercise Scenario V2.1. One site was a wetland receiving groundwater discharge containing HTO from a nearby waste management area. The other site was a meadow which had been exposed to a gaseous discharge containing HTO vapour from a nearby CANDU nuclear power generating station. HTO re-emission was measured on several occasions while the prevailing wind carried the plume away from the site. For both sites, relevant site specific information was obtained including HTO concentrations in soil and vegetation and meteorological data for each of about 20 determinations each lasting for 30 to 45 minutes. Modelers were requested to predict net fluxes of water and HTO vapours at the two sites and specified times. Their predictions were compared with the actual water fluxes at the sites, which had been measured by both eddy-correlation and Bowen Ratio, and the HTO flux which had been obtained by measured concentration gradients and estimates of eddy diffusivities. Predicted water vapour fluxes agreed with those observed within 20% where the observed fluxes exceeded about 0.04 g m -2 s -1 . Lower fluxes were associated with meteorological conditions such as strong stability and light winds when assumptions underlying the equation are

  17. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants grown under three irrigation regimes at a tritium processing facility in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihok, S; Wilk, M; Lapp, A; St-Amant, N; Kwamena, N-O A; Clark, I D

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of tritium released from nuclear facilities as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into regulatory assessment models. These models typically estimate organically bound tritium (OBT) for calculating public dose as OBT itself is rarely measured. Higher than expected OBT/HTO ratios in plants and soils are an emerging issue that is not well understood. To support the improvement of models, an experimental garden was set up in 2012 at a tritium processing facility in Pembroke, Ontario to characterize the circumstances under which high OBT/HTO ratios may arise. Soils and plants were sampled weekly to coincide with detailed air and stack monitoring. The design included a plot of native grass/soil, contrasted with sod and vegetables grown in barrels with commercial topsoil under natural rain and either low or high tritium irrigation water. Air monitoring indicated that the plume was present infrequently at concentrations of up to about 100 Bq/m(3) (the garden was not in a major wind sector). Mean air concentrations during the day on workdays (HTO 10.3 Bq/m(3), HT 5.8 Bq/m(3)) were higher than at other times (0.7-2.6 Bq/m(3)). Mean Tissue Free Water Tritium (TFWT) in plants and soils and OBT/HTO ratios were only very weakly or not at all correlated with releases on a weekly basis. TFWT was equal in soils and plants and in above and below ground parts of vegetables. OBT/HTO ratios in above ground parts of vegetables were above one when the main source of tritium was from high tritium irrigation water (1.5-1.8). Ratios were below one in below ground parts of vegetables when irrigated with high tritium water (0.4-0.6) and above one in vegetables rain-fed or irrigated with low tritium water (1.3-2.8). In contrast, OBT/HTO ratios were very high (9.0-13.5) when the source of tritium was mainly from the atmosphere. TFWT varied considerably through time as a result of SRBT's operations; OBT/HTO ratios showed no clear temporal

  18. Porosity model for simultaneous radionuclide transfer in compact clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Ribet, S.; Landesman, C.; Altman, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Both, a mono and a dual porosity model have been developed to describe diffusion in bentonite as function of compaction, which give similar results for the diffusion coefficients. There are little advantages but more computation time for the dual porosity model compared to the mono-porosity model. A significant change in paradigm has been proposed to describe diffusion accessible porosity in bentonite: Only a single micro-porosity value is considered for anions, cations and neutral species. Hydration water in the interlayers is considered as part of the solid phase and is not considered as a constitutive part of overall porosity. Since hydration water takes part of the solid phase, it is now possible to explicitly account for retention of HTO by formulating exchange between HTO and water in the interlayers. In the adaptation of the model to experimental data, a single fit constant, the geometric factor G = 7 was used, common to all ions and neutral species and for densities between 0.2 and 1.8 kg.dm -3 . The only input parameters to describe the effect of dry density on diffusion coefficients are the micro porosity (total porosity minus interlayer porosity) and the hydration numbers of exchanging cations in the interlayers, both of which can be measured by independent means (DRX, water sorption isotherms). The modelling of simultaneous mass transfer of HTO, Cs, Br and Ni has been undertaken. From the results apparent diffusion coefficients were obtained. Effective diffusion coefficients can of course only be compared to literature data if the the same porosity hypothesis is used for Da-De conversion as used in literature (total porosity for anions and HTO, micro-porosity for anions). Then, the calculated apparent diffusion coefficients for HTO match closely the measured values in the mentioned density range. Considering large experimental data uncertainty the agreement between anion diffusion data and calculations

  19. Clinical Experience Using a 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Instrument for Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. High tibial osteotomy (HTO has been adopted as an effective surgery for medial degeneration of the osteoarthritis (OA knee. However, satisfactory outcomes necessitate the precise creation and distraction of osteotomized wedges and the use of intraoperative X-ray images to continually monitor the wedge-related manipulation. Thus HTO is highly technique-demanding and has a high radiation exposure. We report a patient-specific instrument (PSI guide for the precise creation and distraction of HTO wedge. Methods. This study first parameterized five HTO procedures to serve as a design rationale for an innovative PSI guide. Preoperative X-ray and computed tomography- (CT- scanning images were used to design and fabricate PSI guides for clinical use. The weight-bearing line (WBL of the ten patients was shifted to the Fujisawa’s point and instrumented using the TomoFix system. The radiological results of the PSI-guided HTO surgery were evaluated by the WBL percentage and tibial slope. Results. All patients consistently showed an increased range of motion and a decrease in pain and discomfort at about three-month follow-up. This study demonstrates the satisfactory accuracy of the WBL adjustment and tibial slope maintenance after HTO with PSI guide. For all patients, the average pre- and postoperative WBL are, respectively, 14.2% and 60.2%, while the tibial slopes are 9.9 and 10.1 degrees. The standard deviations are 2.78 and 0.36, respectively, in postoperative WBL and tibial slope. The relative errors of the pre- and postoperative WBL percentage and tibial slope averaged 4.9% and 4.1%, respectively. Conclusion. Instead of using navigator systems, this study integrated 2D and 3D preoperative planning to create a PSI guide that could most likely render the outcomes close to the planning. The PSI guide is a precise procedure that is time-saving, radiation-reducing, and relatively easy to use. Precise osteotomy and good short-term results were

  20. Tritiated water exposure disrupts myofibril structure and induces mis-regulation of eye opacity and DNA repair genes in zebrafish early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, Caroline; Armant, Olivier; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Simon, Olivier; Orjollet, Daniel; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Gagnaire, Béatrice

    2018-04-27

    Tritium ( 3 H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. In the environment, the most common form of tritium is tritiated water (HTO). The present study aimed to identify early biomarkers of HTO contamination through the use of an aquatic model, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). We used the zebrafish embryo-larvae model to investigate the modes of action of HTO exposure at dose rates of 0.4 and 4 mGy/h, dose rates expected to induce deleterious effects on fish. Zebrafish were exposed to HTO from 3 hpf (hours post fertilization) to 96 hpf. The transcriptomic effects were investigated 24 h and 96 h after the beginning of the contamination, using mRNAseq. Results suggested an impact of HTO contamination, regardless of the dose rate, on genes involved in muscle contraction (tnnt2d, tnni2a.4, slc6a1a or atp2a1l) and eye opacity (crygm2d9, crygmxl1, mipb or lim2.3) after 24 h of contamination. Interestingly, an opposite differential expression was highlighted in genes playing a role in muscle contraction and eye opacity in 24 hpf embryos when comparing dose rates, suggesting an onset of DNA protective mechanisms. The expression of h2afx and ddb2 involved in DNA repair was enhanced in response to HTO exposure. The entrainment of circadian clock and the response to H 2 O 2 signalling pathways were enriched at 96 hpf at 0.4 mGy/h and in both stages after 4 mGy/h. Genes involved in ROS scavenging were differentially expressed only after 24 h of exposure for the lowest dose rate, suggesting the onset of early protective mechanisms against oxidative stress. Effects highlighted on muscle at the molecular scale were confirmed at a higher biological scale, as electron microscopy observations revealed sarcomere impairments in 96 hpf larvae for both dose rates. Together with other studies, the present work provides useful data to better understand modes of action of tritium on zebrafish embryos-larvae. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tritium in the food chain. Comparison of predicted and observed behaviour. A: Re-emission from soil and vegetation. B: Formation of organically bound tritium in grain of spring wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P. [AECL, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Strack, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Barry, P. [PJS Barry, (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the second Technical Report of the Special Radionuclides Tritium Working Group. It deals specifically with two major sources of model uncertainty concerning tritium re-emission from soils and vegetation, and the formation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant tissues under light and dark conditions which were identified during work undertaken for the first tritium Technical Report. Information obtained from two experiments was formulated into two specific Approach A type scenarios to investigate these aspects of tritium behaviour so that model predictions could be compared with actual observations and data. Data for HTO re-emission measured at two different field sampling sites in Canada were used as the basis for the model test exercise Scenario V2.1. One site was a wetland receiving groundwater discharge containing HTO from a nearby waste management area. The other site was a meadow which had been exposed to a gaseous discharge containing HTO vapour from a nearby CANDU nuclear power generating station. HTO re-emission was measured on several occasions while the prevailing wind carried the plume away from the site. For both sites, relevant site specific information was obtained including HTO concentrations in soil and vegetation and meteorological data for each of about 20 determinations each lasting for 30 to 45 minutes. Modelers were requested to predict net fluxes of water and HTO vapours at the two sites and specified times. Their predictions were compared with the actual water fluxes at the sites, which had been measured by both eddy-correlation and Bowen Ratio, and the HTO flux which had been obtained by measured concentration gradients and estimates of eddy diffusivities. Predicted water vapour fluxes agreed with those observed within 20% where the observed fluxes exceeded about 0.04 g m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Lower fluxes were associated with meteorological conditions such as strong stability and light winds when assumptions underlying the

  2. Tritium toxicity program in the Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    It is possible to detect somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects resulting from exposures at 33 to 100 times the mpc's for tritiated water (HTO). The reduction in bone marrow cells in animals maintaining normal total cellularity demonstrate both the presence of an effect at the primitive cell level as well as the animal's ability to compensate for this effect by recruiting stem cells from the G 0 resting state. This evidence of damage together with the observed cytogenetic changes leads one to contemplate the possible importance of radiation exposures at these levels for the induction of leukemia or other blood dyscrasias. As predicted on the basis of established principles of radiobiology, exposure to tritium beta rays from HTO ingestion results in measureable effects on several animal systems

  3. Geohydrology of Bandelier Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, M.V.; Wheeler, M.L.; Burton, B.W.

    1981-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been disposing of radioactive wastes since 1944. Environmental studies and monitoring for radioactive contamination started concurrently. In this report, only two mechanisms and rates by which the radionuclides can enter the environment are studied in detail: subsurface transport of radionuclides by migrating water, and diffusion of tritiated water (HTO) in the vapor phase. The report also includes a section concerning the influence of moisture on shear strength and possible resulting subsidences occurring in the pit overburdens. Because subsurface transport of radionuclides is influenced by the hydraulic conductivity and this in turn is regulated by the moisture content of any given material, a study was also undertaken involving precipitation, the most important climatic element influencing the geohydrology of any given area. Further work is in progress to correlate HTO emanation to atmospheric and pedological properties, especially including thermal characteristics of the tuff

  4. Evaluation of Environmental Tritium Level in Air and Precipitation in the Area of the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid. 1998-2000; Evaluacion de los niveles de Tritio Ambiental en Aire y Lluvia en el Area del Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid 1998-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M.A.; Larena, P.

    2001-07-15

    Concentration of tritium in environmental samples (air, precipitation) has been determined during 1998-2000, by using electrolytic enrichment and liquid scintillation counting. Atmospheric tritium concentration of tritiated water vapor (HTO), expressed in Bq/l varies within a range of 0,77-10.82 giving an overall average value of 1,81{+-}1,82. HTO expressed in mBq/m''3 air varies within a range of 4,6-70; no correlation with the atmospheric humidity was observed. Tritium concentration in the precipitation ranges from 0.35 to 2,18 Bq/l, without seasonal variations. The tritium concentration in the air of the laboratory was approximately five times higher than in the atmosphere due to evaporation of tritium standard water during the process of the samples. (Author) 9 refs.

  5. Tritium in the food chain. Intercomparison of model predictions of contamination in soil, crops, milk and beef after a short exposure to tritiated water vapour in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.

    1996-09-01

    Future fusion reactors using tritium as fuel will contain large inventories of the gas. The possibility that a significant fraction of an inventory may accidentally escape into the atmosphere from this and other potential sources such as tritium handling facilities and some fission reactors e g, PWRs has to be recognized and its potential impact on local human populations and biota assessed. Tritium gas is relatively inert chemically and of low radiotoxicity but it is readily oxidized by soil organisms to the mixed oxide, HTO or tritiated water. In this form it is highly mobile, strongly reactive biologically and much more toxic. Models of how tritiated water vapour is transported through the biosphere to foodstuffs important to man are essential components of such an assessment and it is important to test the models for their suitability when used for this purpose. To evaluate such models, access to experimental measurements made after actual releases are needed. There have however, been very few accidental releases of tritiated water to the atmosphere and the experimental findings of those that have occurred have been used to develop the models under test. Models must nevertheless be evaluated before their predictions can be used to decide the acceptability or otherwise of designing and operating major nuclear facilities. To fulfil this need a model intercomparison study was carried out for a hypothetical release scenario. The study described in this report is a contribution to the development of model evaluation procedures in general as well as a description of the results of applying these procedures to the particular case of models of HTO transport in the biosphere which are currently in use or being developed. The study involved eight modelers using seven models in as many countries. In the scenario farmland was exposed to 1E10 Bq d/m 3 of HTO in air during 1 hour starting at midnight in one case and at 10.00 a.m. in the other, 30 days before harvest of crops

  6. Evaluation of storage conditions for tritiated thymidine as reference organically-bound tritium in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, T.; Trivedi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Interlaboratory intercomparison exercises have used tritiated thymidine as a reference material for organically-bound tritium (OBT) measurements in urine. We have examined the effects of storage conditions on the degradation behavior of tritium from OBT to tritiated water (HTO) in artificial and natural human urine samples. Tritiated thymidine decomposed less readily in artificial urine than natural urine samples. The degradation rate of tritiated thymidine in artificial urine, at -20 deg C, is about 10% for the first month. The rate of tritium conversion from OBT to HTO is the same at 4 deg C, but this storage temperature is less preferable, because of the danger of microbial contamination in the reference samples. The storage of the reference urine samples beyond three months after the preparation date is not recommended for quality control measurement data. (author)

  7. Tritium toxicity on postnatally developing mice testes: a qualitative and quantitative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to evaluate the possible radiobiological effects of tritiated water (HTO) on the testes of Swiss albino mice during postnatal development. Mice were continuously irradiated with different doses providing 46, 93 and 185 kBq of HTO per ml drinking water (after a priming injection) from day 1 after brith up to 6 weeks of age. Qualitative and quantitative studies were made at 6 weeks old mice testes and were compared with the sham-irradiated controls. A dose-dependent damage is noticed in the testes in the form of various radiopathological lesions such as intertubular edema, necrotic and pycnotic cells at various stages, mild cytoplasmic vacuolation, fibrosis, sclerosis, cellular edema etc. The number of various germ cells at their different phases were greatly reduced. 185 kBq/ml affect severely the spermatogonia and spermatid populations. The primary spermatocyte level was maintained at the range 64 +- 3.5%

  8. Tritium toxicity on postnatally developing mice testes: a qualitative and quantitative evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, A.L. (Rajasthan Univ., Jaipur (India). Radiation Biology Lab.)

    1982-11-01

    The present study is an attempt to evaluate the possible radiobiological effects of tritiated water (HTO) on the testes of Swiss albino mice during postnatal development. Mice were continuously irradiated with different doses providing 46, 93 and 185 kBq of HTO per ml drinking water (after a priming injection) from day 1 after brith up to 6 weeks of age. Qualitative and quantitative studies were made at 6 weeks old mice testes and were compared with the sham-irradiated controls. A dose-dependent damage is noticed in the testes in the form of various radiopathological lesions such as intertubular edema, necrotic and pycnotic cells at various stages, mild cytoplasmic vacuolation, fibrosis, sclerosis, cellular edema etc. The number of various germ cells at their different phases were greatly reduced. 185 kBq/ml affect severely the spermatogonia and spermatid populations. The primary spermatocyte level was maintained at the range 64 +- 3.5%.

  9. CP violation in charged Higgs decays in the MSSM with complex parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Christova, E C; Kraml, Sabine; Majerotto, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Supersymmetric loop contributions can lead to different decay rates of H+\\to t\\bar b and H-\\to b\\bar t. We calculate the decay rate asymmetry \\delta^CP = \\frac{\\Gamma(H+\\to t\\bar b)-\\Gamma(H-\\to b\\bar t)}{\\Gamma(H+\\to t\\bar b)+\\Gamma(H-\\to b\\bar t)} at next-to-leading order in the MSSM with complex parameters. We analyse the parameter dependence of \\delta^CP with emphasis on the phases of A_t and A_b. It turns out that the most important contribution comes from the loop with stop, sbottom, and gluino. If this contribution is present, \\delta^CP can go up to ~10%-15% for tan(beta)~10, and to ~5% for very large values of tan(beta).

  10. Study on dose-response relationship between prenatal exposure to tritiated water and the developmental retardation of brain in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiyuan; Guo Yuefeng; Wang Mingming

    1993-01-01

    The developmental retardation of brain in rats induced by parenatal exposure to HTO had observed by measuring the contents of cerebral amino acids. The HTO was injected intraperitoneally at the 11 th day of gestation with concentration of 7.4 x 10 3 -3.7 x 10 6 Bq/ml (body water). At 18-day-old the young rats were killed and their brains were separated from skulls. The brains were used to make biochemical specimens for measuring the contents of amino acids. The results showed that the contents of amino acids increases with the dose increased and the relationship between the percentage of the increased contents of amino acids in brain and logarithm of absorbed doses (D, Gy) give a good fit to liner regression equation in range of the absorbed doses from 0.0038-1.9 Gy

  11. Tritium conversion and its influence on personnel protection at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.; Phillips, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium gas is less hazardous than tritiated water. The difference appears to be on the order of 10 4 rather than the previously used figure of 10 2 . With an additional factor of 10 2 for protective clothing, a potential difference of 10 6 in the relative HTO to HT hazard results. The mechanisms for conversion of HT to HTO are not fully known but models presented strongly link the presence of H and OH radicals with the ultimate formation of water. Therefore a hindrance of this conversion may be possible by using specific quencher materials. The maintenance of tritium in the gaseous form then allows for a wider variety of tritium management schemes

  12. Performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter in Run II and its role in the measurement of the Higgs boson properties

    CERN Document Server

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The characterisation of the Higgs boson discovered in 2012 around 125 GeV, and confirmed with the data collected in Run II, requires the precise determination of its mass, width and couplings. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) is crucial for measurements in the highest resolution channels, $H\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $H\\to 4$ leptons. In particular the energy resolution, the scale uncertainty and the position resolution for electrons and photons are required to be as good as possible.During Run II the LHC is continuously operating with 25 ns bunch spacing and increasing instantaneous luminosity. The calorimeter reconstruction algorithm has been adapted to cope with increasing levels of pile-up and the calibration and monitoring strategy have been optimised to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We show first performance results from the Run II data taking periods, achieved through energy calibrations using physics events, with...

  13. Tritium monitoring in the GCFR sweep gas fuel irradiation capsule BG-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.; Pruitt, M.E.; Longest, A.W.; Epstein, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The release of tritium and its transport pathways were studied in a vented, pressure-equalized fuel rod which simulated a fuel rod in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The purpose was to determine the fraction of total tritium production transported via the various pathways and to determine its chemical form (tritiated hydrogen or water). It was concluded that the fuel rod and its effluent venting lines retained low concentrations of HT (or T 2 ) and any HTO (or T 2 O) present. However, the addition of 1% hydrogen to the helium carrier gas quantitatively eluted the tritium from the charcoal trap integral to the fuel rod and from the effluent lines. The chemical composition of the tritium arriving at the monitoring system could be determined by means of converters which convert HT to HTO and vice versa. Ht was the dominant species in the samples measured

  14. Tritium in the food chain. Intercomparison of model predictions of contamination in soil, crops, milk and beef after a short exposure to tritiated water vapour in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, P. [PJS Barry (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Future fusion reactors using tritium as fuel will contain large inventories of the gas. The possibility that a significant fraction of an inventory may accidentally escape into the atmosphere from this and other potential sources such as tritium handling facilities and some fission reactors e g, PWRs has to be recognized and its potential impact on local human populations and biota assessed. Tritium gas is relatively inert chemically and of low radiotoxicity but it is readily oxidized by soil organisms to the mixed oxide, HTO or tritiated water. In this form it is highly mobile, strongly reactive biologically and much more toxic. Models of how tritiated water vapour is transported through the biosphere to foodstuffs important to man are essential components of such an assessment and it is important to test the models for their suitability when used for this purpose. To evaluate such models, access to experimental measurements made after actual releases are needed. There have however, been very few accidental releases of tritiated water to the atmosphere and the experimental findings of those that have occurred have been used to develop the models under test. Models must nevertheless be evaluated before their predictions can be used to decide the acceptability or otherwise of designing and operating major nuclear facilities. To fulfil this need a model intercomparison study was carried out for a hypothetical release scenario. The study described in this report is a contribution to the development of model evaluation procedures in general as well as a description of the results of applying these procedures to the particular case of models of HTO transport in the biosphere which are currently in use or being developed. The study involved eight modelers using seven models in as many countries. In the scenario farmland was exposed to 1E10 Bq d/m{sup 3} of HTO in air during 1 hour starting at midnight in one case and at 10.00 a.m. in the other, 30 days before harvest of

  15. Effects of low level prenatal beta-irradiation of tritiated water on postnatal behavior, learning and memory ability in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bing; Zhou Xiangyan

    1993-01-01

    Pregnant adult C57 BL/6J strain mice, randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups, were irradiated with exponentially decreasing doses of tritium beta-rays but group 1 (used as a control) by single injection of tritiated water (HTO) at their 12.5 th day of gestation. Offsprings of male, received accumulative doses of 0, 0.5, 1.10 or 0.30 Gy in uterus were trained or examined on learning and memory ability or with behavioral tests. Significant dose-response relationships for alternations in those test were found due to exposure to 0.10 Gy or above. These results indicate that exposure to HTO during the fetal period in mice results in dose-dependent alteration in postnatal behavior, learning and memory ability. 0.05-0.10 Gy exposure may represent a threshold for the experimental conditions of this research using these parameters

  16. Tritium gas and tritiated water vapour behaviour in the environment from releases into the atmosphere from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, Marta; Perlado, Manuel

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion of tritium from fusion reactors follows different ways according to the present chemical form, tritium gas or tritiated water vapour. The atmospheric conditions, speed and direction of the wind, rain intensity or stability class, are key factors in the dry and wet deposition. The obtained results demonstrate that the wet deposition is critical for the incorporation of the tritiated water vapour to the natural biological chain. However, the dry deposition is the factor that influences in the tritium gas form. The conversion of HT into HTO in the soil is rapid (1-7 days), and 20% of HT deposited in the soil is reemitted to the atmosphere in the form HTO, while the rest incorporates into the biological cycle. The rain factor accelerates the incorporation of tritium to the ground, the superficial waters and the underground waters

  17. Dynamic evaluation of environmental impact due to tritium accidental release from the fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wu, Yican

    2015-01-01

    As one of the key safety issues of fusion reactors, tritium environmental impact of fusion accidents has attracted great attention. In this work, the dynamic tritium concentrations in the air and human body were evaluated on the time scale based on accidental release scenarios under the extreme environmental conditions. The radiation dose through various exposure pathways was assessed to find out the potential relationships among them. Based on this work, the limits of HT and HTO release amount for arbitrary accidents were proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit of ITER. The dynamic results aim to give practical guidance for establishment of fusion emergency standard and design of fusion tritium system. - Highlights: • Dynamic tritium concentration in the air and human body evaluated on the time scale. • Different intake forms and relevant radiation dose assessed to find out the potential relationships. • HT and HTO release amount limits for arbitrary accidents proposed for the fusion reactor according to dose limit

  18. Migration of tritium from a nuclear waste burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.H.

    1975-09-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) has routinely and continuously monitored the local environment (land, water, air, flora, and fauna) since 1951. As part of this intensive program, a three-part study was made to assess the tritium migration from an onsite burial ground for solid nuclear wastes and the resulting dose-to-man. A major source of tritium is buried, massive, Li-Al residues (referred to as melts) from the thermal extraction step in the SRP tritium production process. A melt with its extraction crucible and lid were immersed in water to measure the amounts of tritium released as HTO and HT to the water and to air. The result was a rapid release of 23 curies, of which approximately 99 percent was HTO that remained in the immersion water, and 1 percent was HT that passed into the air. (auth)

  19. Studies on the tritium contamination of the ambient air near nuclear facilities with large tritium inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, W.; Knieper, J.; Printz, H.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    A part of gaseous T is converted to HTO with the humidity in the air. Since HTO has considerably more radiotoxicity than T-gas it is very important to know the extent of this conversion. This question was studied on a 14-MeV-neutron generator with open target system in which, as we know, a major part of the gaseous T originally contained in the T-target is released into the waste air via the vacuum system. The exchange rates in the breathing air in working rooms, in the waste air duct and in the free atmosphere under different meteorological conditions were measured. Furthermore the exchange rate in closed test-circulations was tested in dependence on air humidity, temperature, T-concentration, and time. The T-test instruments were calibrated with gaseous T. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Tritium uptake kinetics in crayfish (Orconectes immunis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, P.H.

    1985-06-01

    Uptake of tritiated water (HTO) by Orconectes immunis was investigated under laboratory conditions. Tritium uptake in the tissue-free water fraction (TFWT) was described using an exponential model. When steady-state was reached, the ratio of TFWT to HTO was approximately 0.9. Uptake of tritium in the organically-bound fraction (OBT) proceeded slowly, and had not reached steady-state after 117 days of culture. Although steady-state was never reached, the maximum observed ration of OBT to TFWT in whole animals was approximately 0.6. However, this ratio exceeded unity in the exoskeleton. Specific activity ratios of OBT between crayfish and lettuce (food source) were less than or at unity for various test conditions

  1. Calculation of tritium release from reactor's stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhadi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for calculation of tritium release from nuclear to environment has been discussed. Part of gas effluent contain tritium in form of HTO vapor released from reactor's stack was sampled using silica-gel. The silica-gel was put in the water to withdraw HTO vapor absorbed by silica-gel. Tritium concentration in the water was measured by liquid scintillation counter of Aloka LSC-703. Tritium concentration in the gas effluent and total release of tritium from reactor's stack during certain interval time were calculated using simple mathematic formula. This method has examined for calculation of tritium release from JRR-3M's stack of JAERI, Japan. From the calculation it was obtained the value of tritium release as much as 4.63 x 10 11 Bq during one month. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Environmental Tritium Level in Air and Precipitation in the Area of the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid. 1998-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero del Hombrebueno, B.; Simon, M. A.; Larena, P.

    2001-12-01

    Concentration of tritium in environmental samples (air, precipitation) has been determined during 1998-2000, by using electrolytic enrichment and liquid scintillation counting. Atmospheric tritium concentration of tritiated water vapor (HTO), expressed in Bq/l varies within a range of 0,77-10.82 giving an overall average value of 1,81±1,82. HTO expressed in mBq/m''3 air varies within a range of 4,6-70; no correlation with the atmospheric humidity was observed. Tritium concentration in the precipitation ranges from 0.35 to 2,18 Bq/l, without seasonal variations. The tritium concentration in the air of the laboratory was approximately five times higher than in the atmosphere due to evaporation of tritium standard water during the process of the samples. (Author) 9 refs

  3. Transfer of tritium into laying hen's meat and eggs at prolonged intake with atmospheric air, water and grass meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigazinov, Zh А; Lukashenko, S N; Karatayev, S S; Panitski, А V; Mamyrbayeva, А S; Baigazy, S А; Kozhakhanov, T Ye; Subbotina, L F

    2017-11-01

    Following a continuous intake of tritium (T) by laying hens' over a 55 day period, an increase of НТО concentration both in eggs and meat was observed over the first 2 weeks for intakes via inhalation and ingestion of water and grass meal. After this time, equilibrium of the T in these products occurred. It was found that when the intake of HTO is from water, air and grass meal, the ratio of its activity concentration in muscular tissue to that in eggs does not exceed 1, 4, and 6 respectively. The ratio of ОBТ concentration to that of НТО in the meat of hens (ОBТ/HTO) when intakes were from water, air and grass meal were 0.08, 0.09 and 0.7, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tritium analysis of urine samples from the general Korean public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokwon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Lee, Seung-Sook

    2013-11-01

    The tritium concentrations of urine samples and the effective dose of the general Korean public were evaluated. To achieve accurate HTO analysis of urine samples, we established the optimal conditions for measuring the HTO content of urine samples. Urine samples from 50 Koreans who do not work at a nuclear facility were analyzed on the basis of the results. The average urine analysis result was 2.8 ±1 .4 Bq/L, and the range was 1.8-5.6 Bq/L. The measured values were lower than those reported for other countries. These results show that environmental factors and lifestyle differences are the main factors affecting the tritium level of the general public. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of effective diffusivity of cement based materials by multi-scale modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dridi, Wissem

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified composite model, which considers the contribution of each phase participating to the transport within OPC pastes and concretes. At the micrometer scale, the phases considered hereafter are capillary porosity (macro-porosity) and the Low Density and the High Density C-S-H both containing gel pores (nano-porosity). Predicted values of tritiated water (HTO) diffusivity in OPC pastes with various (w/c) ratios are confronted to experimental results with a good agreement. The approach is then extended to mortars and concretes scale where microstructure is described by a three phase composite sphere assemblage. Here, elementary phase distribution is assumed to change as a function of distance from aggregate surface. Model results about HTO diffusivities of mortars and concretes are presented with some experimental values. The competition between the more diffusing ITZ zone and the less diffusing bulk matrix is investigated from a sensitive analysis. The dominance of the ITZ control is confirmed. (authors)

  6. Age dependence of tritium metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Jiro

    1983-01-01

    3 H metabolism in vivo was studied by HTO administration to rats of varying ages for examination of the age dependence of 3 H metabolism in humans. When 1 μCi/g body weight of HTO was administered, the time-course changes of urine 3 H showed definite age dependence; the younger the rat, more rapidly did the 3 H concentration decrease. The biological half-life of whole body residues was about 2 days in nursing offsprings and about 4 days in mature rats. Tissue-bound 3 H showed high and rapid distribution to the liver, whereas it was slow in the brain and muscle, and this tendency was more prominent in younger rats. Compared with 3 H in tissue water, the concentration of bound 3 H was relatively high, being prominent in younger rats. The time-course changes of 3 H concentration from both origins also showed age dependence. The in vivo exposure dose after administration of 1 μCi/g body weight of HTO- 3 H was generally smaller in younger rats, the exposure at ages 10 and 25 days being about a half of that of mature rats. Supposing that human metabolism is similar, the estimated dose in one-year-olds after ingestion of 1 μCi/kg body weight of 3 H in the form of HTO is about 3 times that in adults, and that after 1 μCi/kg body weight of 3 H in infants, about a half of that in adults. (Chiba, N.)

  7. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of x radiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the manifold influence of radiation-induced membrane phenomenon on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries. (author)

  8. Methods of detecting tritium in gases and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petr, I

    1977-07-01

    Tritium mainly occurs in gases in two chemical forms, i.e., as water vapour (HTO) or elemental hydrogen (HT). Two methods for tritium gas measuring are described. The first consists in the use of an ionization chamber or a proportional counter with the sample sucked in through a filter to the detector working volume. The second consists in the separation of tritium (in the form of HTO) from the gas sample by sorption on silica gel or on molecular sieves and its detection using a liquid or a plastic scintillation detector. Tritium in the form of HT and gaseous organic tritium compounds are determined using the same measuring method after oxidation of the gaseous samples to HTO by burning. A description is given of detectors and measuring methods. Tritium in liquids mainly occurs in the form of tritiated water (HTO). The most commonly used method of tritium detection in liquids is the application of liquid scintillation detectors in which the sample is dissolved or suspended and measured with two photomultipliers in time-coincidence connection. The main advantage of liquid scintillators is the possibility to achieve the 4..pi.. measurement geometry. The methods of calibration and of checking the stability of a measuring system with liquid scintillators are described as are the applications of plastic scintillators in measuring tritium in liquids. Plastic scintillators are less costly in operation and show a more rapid response but their sensitivity is lower. The threshold values of activity are shown in dependence on the detector applied, the chemical form of tritium and the sampling method.

  9. Environmental radioactivity measurement. Ispra 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominici, G.; Risposi, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this report there are briefly described the measurements of environmental radioactivity performed during 1990 by the site survey group of the Radioprotection Division at the Joint Research Centre Ispra Establishment. Data are give on the concentrations of Sr-90, Cs-137, HTO and other radionuclides in precipitation, air, waters, herbage, milk and radioactive effluents. The environmental contamination is mainly a consequence of the nuclear accident of Chernobyl

  10. Lepton flavor violation in an extended MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa-Castañeda, R.; Gómez-Bock, M.; Mondragón, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore a lepton flavor violation effect induced at one loop for a flavor structure in an extended minimal standard supersymmetric model, considering an ansatz for the trilinear term. In particular we find a finite expression which will show the impact of this phenomena in the $h\\to \\mu \\tau$ decay, produced by a mixing in the trilinear coupling of the soft supersymmetric Lagrangian.

  11. The organically bound tritium: an analyst vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Baglan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the work of a work group on tritium analysis. They recall the different physical forms of tritium: gas (HT, hydrogen-tritium), water vapour (HTO or tritiated water) or methane (CH3T), but also in organic compounds (OBT, organically bound tritium) which are either exchangeable or non-exchangeable. They evoke measurement techniques and methods, notably to determine the tritium volume activity. They discuss the possibilities to analyse and distinguish exchangeable and non-exchangeable OBTs

  12. Model investigations on the longitudinal and transversal hydrodynamic dispersion of tracer solutions on porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.; Moser, H.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the research project is to assess the hydrodynamic dispersion of labelling material solutions in special ground water lines based on measurements of the ground water flow rate and on the sedimentological properties of the natural ground water line present. The investigations were carried out in the laboratory in a three-dimensional ground water flow model and in column systems with HTO as tracer. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Desactivation of tritium waters by rectification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.I.; Tyunis, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Results of experiments into the basic rectification processes dedicated to tritium separation from reactor, technological and waste waters are presented. Coefficients of separation for rectification of water (1.028), ammonia (1.05), azeotrope H 2 O - HTO - HNO 3 (1.098) and D 2 O - DTO - DNO 3 (1.039) are performed. Operating schemes of tritium separating units are reviewed [ru

  14. Knowledge status for the impact of tritium on health; Etat des connaissances de l'impact du tritium sur la sante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebaron-Jacobs, L. [CEA Cadarache, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Protection Sanitaire contre les rayonnements ionisants et les toxiques nucleaires, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    The author proposes a review about the presence of tritium in water and in food under different forms (HTO or tritiated water, OBT or organically bound tritium, or tritiated gas), and of its possible effects on health due to its behaviour in relationship with other molecules. She also evokes the assessment of the received dose, gives an assessment of the elimination delay of the three different forms of tritium for an adult. She discusses the risk assessment and some epidemiological studies

  15. Analysis of tritium releases to the atmosphere by a CTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Dana, M.T.

    1975-08-01

    Removal by atmospheric processes of routinely and accidentally released tritium from a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR) was investigated. Based on previous studies, the assumed form of the tritium for this analysis was HTO or tritiated water vapor. Assuming a CTR operation in Morris, Illinois, surface water and ground-level air concentration values of tritium were computed for three space (or time) scales: local (50 Km of a plant), regional (up to 1000 Km of the plant), and global

  16. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Takeda, H.; Melintescu, A.; Trivedi, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of 14 C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic 14 C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings

  17. Genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival effects of tritiated water in the early life stages of the marine mollusc, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagger, Josephine A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Atienzar, Franck A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2005-09-10

    Using an integrated approach linking different levels of biological organisation, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival impact of tritiated water (HTO) were investigated in the embryo-larvae of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. One-hour-old embryos were exposed to a range of concentrations (0.37-370 kBq ml{sup -1}) of HTO, which delivered a dose between 0.02 and 21.41 mGy over the exposure period for different end points. Detrimental effects, if any, were monitored at different levels of biological organisation (i.e. DNA, chromosomal, cellular and individual). Genotoxic effects were assessed using molecular and cytogenetic approaches which included analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations (Cabs). Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the proliferative rate index (PRI) of the embryo-larval cells. Developmental and survival effects were also monitored every 24 h up to 72 h. Results in general indicated that HTO significantly increased cytogenetic damage, cytotoxicity, developmental abnormalities and mortality of the embryo-larvae as a function of concentration or radiation dose. The analysis of RAPD profiles also revealed qualitative effects in the HTO exposed population compared to controls. However, while the embryo-larvae showed dose or concentration dependent effects for mortality, developmental abnormalities and induction of SCEs, the dose-dependent effects were not apparent for Cabs and PRI at higher doses. The study contributes to our limited understanding of the impact of environmentally relevant radionuclides on non-human biota and emphasises the need for further investigations to elucidate potentially long term damage induced by persistent, low levels of other radionuclides on commercially and ecologically important species, in order to protect human and ecosystem health.

  18. Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

    2012-07-31

    This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

  19. Tracer applications in oil reservoirs in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, R.M.; Ferreira Pinto, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotracer applications in oil reservoirs in Brazil started in 1997 at the request of the State Oil Company (Petrobras) at the Carmoplois oilfield. 1 Ci of HTO was injected in a regular five-spot plot and the results obtained were quite satisfactory. Shortly after this test one other request asked for distinguishing the contribution of different injection wells to a production well. It was then realized that other tracers should be available. As a first choice 35 SCN - has been selected since it could be produced at CDTN. An alternative synthesis path was defined which shortened post-irradiation manipulations. The tracer was tested in core samples and a field injection, simultaneously with HTO, was carried out at the Buracica field; again the HTO performed well but 35 SCN - showed up well ahead. Presently the HTO applications are being done on a routine basis. All in all, four tests were performed (some are still ongoing), and the detection limits for both 3 H and 35 S were optimized by refining the sample preparation stage. Lanthanide complexes used as activable tracers are also an appealing option, however core tests performed so far with La-, Ce- and Eu-EDTA indicated some delay of the tracer, so other complexants such as DOTA are to be tried in further laboratory tests and in a field application. Thus, a deeper understanding of their complexation chemistry and carefully conducted tests must be performed before lanthanide complexes can be qualified as reliable oil reservoir tracers. More recently, Petrobras has been asking for partitioning tracers intended for SOR measurement

  20. Radioselective tritiation of acetanilide and para-substituted acetanilides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Aoyama, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Acetanilide and para-substituted acetanilides were tritiated by heating with HTO in the presence of RhCl 3 .3H 2 O as a catalyst in an N,N-dimethylformamide solution at 105-107 deg C for 18 h. Under such conditions, tritium introduced into the anilide molecules was found at the adjacent ortho positions to the acetamido group with virtually 100% regioselectivity. The substituent effect on the rate of tritiation was observed. (author) 13 refs

  1. Mid-term survival analysis of closed wedge high tibial osteotomy: A comparative study of computer-assisted and conventional techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Dae Kyung; Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hur, Dong; Jeong, Ho Yeon

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical and radiographic results and survival rates between computer-assisted and conventional closing wedge high tibial osteotomies (HTOs). Data from a consecutive cohort comprised of 75 computer-assisted HTOs and 75 conventional HTOs were retrospectively reviewed. The Knee Society knee and function scores, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score and femorotibial angle (FTA) were compared between the two groups. Survival rates were also compared with procedure failure. The knee and function scores at one year postoperatively were slightly better in the computer-assisted group than those in conventional group (90.1 vs. 86.1) (82.0 vs. 76.0). The HSS scores at one year postoperatively were slightly better for the computer-assisted HTOs than those of conventional HTOs (89.5 vs. 81.8). The inlier of the postoperative FTA was wider in the computer-assisted group than that in the conventional HTO group (88.0% vs. 58.7%), and mean postoperative FTA was greater in the computer-assisted group that in the conventional HTO group (valgus 9.0° vs. valgus 7.6°, pclinical and radiographic results were better in the computer-assisted group that those in the conventional HTO group. Mid-term survival rates did not differ between computer-assisted and conventional HTOs. A comparative analysis of longer-term survival rate is required to demonstrate the long-term benefit of computer-assisted HTO. III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rigorous asymptotics of traveling-wave solutions to the thin-film equation and Tanner’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Lorenzo; Gnann, Manuel V.; Otto, Felix

    2016-09-01

    We are interested in traveling-wave solutions to the thin-film equation with zero microscopic contact angle (in the sense of complete wetting without precursor) and inhomogeneous mobility {{h}3}+{λ3-n}{{h}n} , where h, λ, and n\\in ≤ft(\\frac{3}{2},\\frac{7}{3}\\right) denote film height, slip parameter, and mobility exponent, respectively. Existence and uniqueness of these solutions have been established by Maria Chiricotto and the first of the authors in previous work under the assumption of sub-quadratic growth as h\\to ∞ . In the present work we investigate the asymptotics of solutions as h\\searrow 0 (the contact-line region) and h\\to ∞ . As h\\searrow 0 we observe, to leading order, the same asymptotics as for traveling waves or source-type self-similar solutions to the thin-film equation with homogeneous mobility h n and we additionally characterize corrections to this law. Moreover, as h\\to ∞ we identify, to leading order, the logarithmic Tanner profile, i.e. the solution to the corresponding unperturbed problem with λ =0 that determines the apparent macroscopic contact angle. Besides higher-order terms, corrections turn out to affect the asymptotic law as h\\to ∞ only by setting the length scale in the logarithmic Tanner profile. Moreover, we prove that both the correction and the length scale depend smoothly on n. Hence, in line with the common philosophy, the precise modeling of liquid-solid interactions (within our model, the mobility exponent) does not affect the qualitative macroscopic properties of the film.

  3. A conceptional design, cost and sensitivity analysis on adsorption process for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Noboru

    1986-01-01

    The system model for a conceptional design and cost estimation was studied on a multi-layered fluidizing bed with a pump which used hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) and amidoxime resin (AOR) as adsorbents. The cost effect of some parameters, namely characteristics of adsorbent, operating conditions, price of materials and some others, were estimated, and finally there was shown a direction of improvement and a possibility of cost reduction. The conceptional design and operating condition were obtained from the balance point on expansion ratio, recovery and characteristics of adsorbent. A suitable plan was obtained from the minimum cost condition in some level of the expansion ratio and some parameters. HTO was heavy in density and cheap in price. The main results of the study indicated that the thickness of the bed was 1 m, the linear velocity of seawater was 52 m/hr, the number of bed layers was 4, the construction cost of a 100 t/y plant was 10 billion yen, and the uranium cost was 160 $/1b. AOR had a large adsorption capacity. As the main results, the thickness of bed was 0.08 m, the linear velosity of seawater was 11.6 m, the number of the bed layers was 27, the construction cost of a 100 t/y plant was 15 billion yen, and the uranium cost was 280 $/1b. The size of the 100 t/y plant was about 800 m length x 80 m depth x 30 m height at 80 % of recovery. An increase of adsorption capacity in HTO, and an increase of density and particle size in AOR had the greatest merit for cost reduction. Other effective parameters were the adsorption velocity, the recovery, temperature, the price of adsorbent, the manufacturing cost of instrument, and the rate of interest. The cost of uranium by this process had a possibility of cost reduction to 67 $/1b at HTO and 79 $/1b at AOR. (author)

  4. The valley system of the Jihlava river and Mohelno reservoir with enhanced tritium activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Pavel; Kořínková, Tereza; Světlík, Ivo; Povinec, P. P.; Fejgl, Michal; Malátová, I.; Tomášková, Lenka; Štěpán, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 166, SI (2017), s. 83-90 ISSN 0265-931X Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Tritium (H-3) * non-exchangeable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) * tissue free water tritium (TFWT) * nuclear power plant (NPP) * biota * HTO Subject RIV: DO - Wilderness Conservation OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2016

  5. Synthesis of deuterium and tritium labelled tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Drabarek, S.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of synthesis of tyrosine labelled with deuterium and tritium in the aromatic ring has been developed. Deuterated and tritiated tyrosine was obtained by isotope exchange between tyrosine and deuterated or tritiated water at elevated temperature in hydrochloric acid medium using K 2 PtCl 4 as a catalyst. For synthesis of tritiated tyrosine 1 Ci HTO was used; the specific activity of the product was 5 mCi/mMol. (author)

  6. Atmospheric tritium concentration in the different chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Shima, Nagayoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH 3 T) fractions, and analyzed for the samples collected every 3 d to 14 d during fiscal year 2005. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH 3 T concentrations. The HT and CH 3 T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns through the HTO concentrations in spring were higher than those in summer. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Östlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH 3 T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH 4 to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH 3 T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. (author)

  7. Total knee replacement for tricompartmental arthritis in a patient with a below-knee amputation after a previous closing wedge high tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Fleming, MBBCH, FC orth(SA, MMED

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a 64-year-old man who had undergone a high tibial osteotomy (HTO 17 years ago of his right knee for medial compartment osteoarthritis; 5 days later, he received a below-knee amputation owing to a missed popliteal artery injury at the time of the HTO. We elected to perform a total knee replacement (TKR for progressive arthritis of the ipsilateral knee 17 years after the transtibial amputation. Although there is a plethora of literature regarding TKR in the contralateral knee of amputees, there is a paucity of data of TKR in the ipsilateral knee. Using medical search engines including Google Scholar and PubMed, we were only able to identify 4 case reports of TKR in the ipsilateral knee of below-knee amputees. This is the first description in the English literature that has the following rare pathology list: tricompartmental arthritis with a previous closing wedge HTO with a resultant truncated valgus tibia and short transtibial amputation.

  8. Environmental monitoring of tritium in air with passive diffusion samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.J.; Workman, W.J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a field trail in which outdoor air was sampled with an active reference sampler and several passive HTO-in-air samplers simultaneously carried out at Chalk River Laboratories. Both passive and active samplers were changed on an approximately monthly schedule from 1990 September 2 to 1991 April 18. Average temperatures for the sampling intervals ranged from -8.06 degrees C to +15.5 degrees C and HTO-in-air concentrations measured by the active sampler were typically 10 Bq/m 3 . A total of 1290 passive HTO-in-air sampler measurements were made during the seven sampling intervals. The passive samplers used for the field trial were prepared with either tritium-free water or a solution of 50% tritium-free water and 50% ethylene glycol. As expected, the samplers prepared with the water-glycol solution performed more consistently than the samplers prepared with water only. Good agreement between passive and active sampler measurements was observed throughout the field trial

  9. Threshold dose to developing central nerve system of rats and mice from prenatal exposure to tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiangyan; Wang Bing; Gao Weimin; Lu Huimin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the threshold dose to the developing central nerve system of rats and mice from prenatal exposure to tritiated water. methods: Pregnant adult C 57 BL/6J strain mice and Wistar strain rats were irradiated with beta-rays from HTO by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5 th and 13 th days of gestation. The activities of HTO were 24.09, 48.18 and 144.54 ( x 10 4 Bq/g bw), respectively. Fifty-six parameters including postnatal growth, neutro-behavior, pathology of brain, neuropeptide contents, changes of hippocampal neurons, Ca 2+ conductance of hippocampal neurons etc were used to test the teratogenic threshold dose the lowest dose was different from that of the control). Results: Of the observed 56 parameters of rats and mice 80.4% indicated that the threshold doses for prenatal HTO exposure ranged from 0.030 Gy to 0.092 Gy, and the other 19.6% showed the threshold doses from 0.093 to 0.300 Gy. Conclusions: There exists threshold dose from the low level tritiated water irradiation of the developing central nerve system

  10. Investigation of abrupt degradation of drain current caused by under-gate crack in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors during high temperature operation stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chang; Liao, XueYang; Li, RuGuan; Wang, YuanSheng; Chen, Yiqiang, E-mail: yiqiang-chen@hotmail.com; Su, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Li Wei; Lai, Ping; Huang, Yun; En, YunFei [Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application of Electronic Component Laboratory, The 5th Electronics Research Institute of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, 510610 Guangzhou (China)

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we investigate the degradation mode and mechanism of AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) during high temperature operation (HTO) stress. It demonstrates that there was abrupt degradation mode of drain current during HTO stress. The abrupt degradation is ascribed to the formation of crack under the gate which was the result of the brittle fracture of epilayer based on failure analysis. The origin of the mechanical damage under the gate is further investigated and discussed based on top-down scanning electron microscope, cross section transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, and stress simulation. Based on the coupled analysis of the failure physical feature and stress simulation considering the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch in different materials in gate metals/semiconductor system, the mechanical damage under the gate is related to mechanical stress induced by CTE mismatch in Au/Ti/Mo/GaN system and stress concentration caused by the localized structural damage at the drain side of the gate edge. These results indicate that mechanical stress induced by CTE mismatch of materials inside the device plays great important role on the reliability of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs during HTO stress.

  11. A novel atmospheric tritium sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lailai; Xia, Zhenghai; Gu, Shaozhong; Zhang, Dongxun; Bao, Guangliang; Han, Xingbo; Ma, Yuhua; Deng, Ke; Liu, Jiayu; Zhang, Qin; Ma, Zhaowei; Yang, Guo; Liu, Wei; Liu, Guimin

    2018-06-01

    The health hazard of tritium is related to its chemical form. Sampling different chemical forms of tritium simultaneously becomes significant. Here a novel atmospheric tritium sampling system (TS-212) was developed to collect the tritiated water (HTO), tritiated hydrogen (HT) and tritiated methane (CH3T) simultaneously. It consisted of an air inlet system, three parallel connected sampling channels, a hydrogen supply module, a methane supply module and a remote control system. It worked at air flow rate of 1 L/min to 5 L/min, with temperature of catalyst furnace at 200 °C for HT sampling and 400 °C for CH3T sampling. Conversion rates of both HT and CH3T to HTO were larger than 99%. The collecting efficiency of the two-stage trap sets for HTO was larger than 96% in 12 h working-time without being blocked. Therefore, the collected efficiencies of TS-212 are larger than 95% for tritium with different chemical forms in environment. Besides, the remote control system made sampling more intelligent, reducing the operator's work intensity. Based on the performance parameters described above, the TS-212 can be used to sample atmospheric tritium in different chemical forms.

  12. Metabolism of tritium uptake due to handling of metal surfaces exposed to tritiated hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Peterman, B.F.

    1987-08-01

    Hairless rats were exposed to tritium by rubbing HT contaminated stainless steel planchets on them. The pattern of tritium excretion in the urine (n=4), shows the OBT (organically bound tritium) retention curve to be approximated by the sum of 2 exponential curves, one with a half-life of 0.4 days and another with a half-life of 1.4 days. The retention of HTO fit a single exponential curve with a half-life of 3.1 days. Exposed skin, unexposed skin, liver, muscle and blood (n=6) were assayed for HBO, and free HTO. Highest activity was found in the exposed skin, other organs with high activity are the unexposed skin and liver. Examination of the exposed skin showed HTO to be concentrated in the uppermost layers. The distribution of OBT was similar but was incorporated at a faster rate. The basal layer is exposed to a tritium concentration between 70-90% of that of the surface. The two macromolecule fractions with the highest amount of radioactivity were lipid and insoluble protein (mainly collagen)

  13. Automatic isotope gas analysis of tritium labelled organic materials Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacs, I.; Mlinko, S.

    1978-01-01

    A new automatic procedure developed to convert tritium in HTO hydrogen for subsequent on-line gas counting is described. The water containing tritium is introduced into a column prepared from molecular sieve-5A and heated to 550 deg C. The tritium is transferred by isotopic exchange into hydrogen flowing through the column. The radioactive gas is led into an internal detector for radioactivity measurement. The procedure is free of memory effects, provides quantitative recovery with analytical reproducibility better than 0.5% rel. at a preset number of counts. The experimental and analytical results indicate that isotopic exchange between HTO and hydrogen over a column prepared from alumina or molecular sieve-5A can be successfully applied for the quantitative transfer of tritium from HTO into hydrogen for on-line gas countinq. This provides an analytical procedure for the automatic determination of tritium in water with an analytical reproducibility better than 0.5% rel. The exchange process will also be suitable for rapid tritium transfer from water formed during the decomposition of tritium-labelled organic compounds or biological materials. The application of the procedure in automatic isotope gas analysis of organic materials labelled with tritium will be described in subsequent papers (Parts II and III). (T.G.)

  14. Chemical form of tritium released from solid breeder materials and the influences of it on a bred tritium recovery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukubo, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Nishida, Y.; Kinjyo, T.; Tanifuji, Takaaki; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of HTO in total tritium was measured at release of the bred tritium to the purge gas with hydrogen using the thermal release after irradiation method, where neutron irradiation was performed at JRR-3 reactor in JAERI or KUR reactor in Kyoto University. It is experimentally confirmed in this study that not a small portion of bred tritium is released to the purge gas in the form of HTO form ceramic breeder materials even when hydrogen is added to the purge gas. The chemical composition is to be decided by the competitive reaction at the grain surface of a ceramic breeder material where desorption reaction, isotope exchange reaction 1, isotope exchange reaction 2 and water formation reaction are considered to take part. Observation in this study implies that it is necessary to have a bred tritium recovery system applicable for both HT and HTO form to recover whole bred tritium. The chemical composition also decides the amount of tritium transferable to the cooling water of the electricity generation system through the structural material in the blanket system. Permeation behavior of tritium through some structural materials at various conditions are also discussed. (author)

  15. Migration of longlived transuranium isotopes (i.e. Pu-239, Am-241) in the soil and in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubick, A.; Dippel, T.

    1977-01-01

    From an undisturbed site, soil samples were taken for Pu-239,240 analysis. Each sample represented a 2 cm thick layer. The Pu-239 distribution pattern was analysed by checking to a computer model. The mean residence time tau was used as a transport parameter in the model. The validity of tau was proved by comparing the calculated contamination values with the measured amount of contamination in the field. The migration velocity of the 50% of PuO 2 contamination at the investigated loess loamy site was calculated to be vsub(PuO2) = 0.59 cm/a. In the vicinity of the Pu-sampling site HTO-tracer experiments indicated an average water percolation velocity of vsub(HTO) = 100 cm/a. From these values a dimensionless relative PuO 2 migration velocity. vsub(r(PuO2)) = vsub((PuO2))/vsub(HTO) = 5.9 x 10 -3 followed. (orig./RW) [de

  16. The reactivity of anion-exchange resins by applying OT-for-OH exchange reaction in the equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Naoki; Nihei, Makoto; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    In order to reveal the behavior of hydroxyl group in isotope exchange reaction, OT-for-OH exchange reaction between each anion-exchange resin (OH - form) and tritiated water (abbreviated as HTO water below) was observed at 80degC under the equilibrium. Anion-exchange resins used were Amberlite IRA-400, IRA-410 (both strongly basic), and IRA-94S (weakly basic). It can be thought that an HTO molecule dissociates into H + +OT - (or T + +OH - ). The activity of each resin based on OT-for-OH exchange reaction was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. From the above-mentioned, the following five were found. Isotope exchange reaction as 'atomic group' occurred between the OH group in each anion-exchange resin and the OT group in HTO water. The reactivity of strongly basic anion-exchange resin is larger than that of weakly basic one. The ratio of the reactivity of these resins can roughly be expressed as follows: (IRA-410): (IRA-400): (IRA-94S)=42: 7: 1. The degree of OT-for-OH exchange reaction may be smaller than that of T-for-H exchange reaction. The method used and results obtained in this work may be helpful to obtain the data for the prevention of T-contamination, especially to obtain the data from certain atomic groups including T. (author)

  17. Behavioral effects of chronic exposure to organically bound tritium and tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, I.

    1982-01-01

    The results of developmental testing of F-1 and F-2-animals indicate that in HTO group no differences with control animals were observed, while there was delay in development of righting reflex in F-1-animals of T-food exposed rats, but the difference was not statistically significant. The comparison of data obtained for F-1 and F2-generation shows no cumulative effect of tritium irradiation in subsequent generations. The effects of HTO and organically bound tritium exposure on acute individual locomotor activity of 70 days old rats showed statistically significant hypoactivity of females of t-food group. The differences with the control animals were highest and statistically significant in first 20 minutes of their run in the maze, what suggests that tritium esposure alters the females reactivity to a novel situation. This effects may nor persists for the lifetime. The data of locomotor activity of 110 days old rats recorded in diurnal and nocturnal periods, showed no differences between HTO-group and control group and only slight but no statistically significant hypoactivity of females exposed to organically bound tritium. (orig./MG)

  18. Measurements of the spatial distribution of tritium in air above a chronically contaminated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workman, W.J.G.; Davis, P.A.; Wood, M.J.; Barry, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium in air (HTO) concentrations were measured over a 13 month period above a surface that is chronically contaminated by tritium-bearing groundwater from a waste management area. The measurements were made using passive diffusion samplers, which were sited at six locations (about 100 m apart) at 0.15, 0.9, and 1.8 m above ground level. The diffusion samplers were compact, sampled at a known rate, and required no external power source. They are ideal for remote locations and require a minimum of effort to collect and analyze the data. HTO-in-air concentration peaked in the summer at 500-1500 Bq.m -3 and decreased in the winter to 1-120 Bq.m -3 . In general, concentration decreased with height above ground level, implying that HTO is being lost from the surface to the atmosphere. The flux of tritium to the atmosphere must, therefore, be taken into account to estimate the tritium mass balance for a contaminated area. (Author) 3 figs., 5 tabs., 10 refs

  19. Retention in young pigs of organically bound tritium given during pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hees, M. Van; Gerber, G.B.; Kirchmann, R.; Vankerkom, J.H.; Bruwaene, R. Van

    1986-01-01

    A sow was given organically bound tritium (OBT) in food consisting of potato, milk and algal powder from 84 days before until 42 days after delivery. Shortly after birth, some piglets were exchanged with those from a non-contaminated sow to determine the amount of activity incorporated in utero and during lactation. The specific activity of tissue OBT at birth was about equal to that of food. The piglets given OBT only during suckling attained about the same tissue OBT activity as those exposed during pregnancy. Estimates of total tissue dose indicate that after OBT feeding, OBT contributes about 5-10 times more to this dose than HTO. Compared to the experiment in which HTO had been given in drinking water, the dose from OBT in food was about 40%. Under realistic conditions of water and OBT food intake, the total dose would thus probably not exceed more than 1.5 times that from HTO only. Although most long-lived tissue OBT is probably located distally from radiosensitive targets, some tissues might be at risk if the tritium is close to radiosensitive sites. Transfer factors of OBT to liver and muscle are calculated. (author)

  20. Dose Assessment Model for Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huifang; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    An improved dose assessment model for chronic atmospheric releases of tritium was proposed. The proposed model explicitly considered two chemical forms of tritium.It was based on conservative assumption of transfer of tritiated water (HTO) from air to concentration of HTO and organic beam tritium (OBT) in vegetable and animal products.The concentration of tritium in plant products was calculated based on considering dividedly leafy plant and not leafy plant, meanwhile the concentration contribution of tritium in the different plants from the tritium in soil was taken into account.Calculating the concentration of HTO in animal products, average water fraction of animal products and the average weighted tritium concentration of ingested water based on the fraction of water supplied by each source were considered,including skin absorption, inhalation, drinking water and food.Calculating the annual doses, the ingestion doses were considered, at the same time the contribution of inhalation and skin absorption to the dose was considered. Concentrations in foodstuffs and dose of annual adult calculated with the specific activity model, NEWTRI model and the model proposed by the paper were compared. The results indicate that the model proposed by the paper can predict accurately tritium doses through the food chain from chronic atmospheric releases. (authors)

  1. Search for SM $VH\\to Vb\\bar{b}$ with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Andrew Stuart; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During Run-1 of the Large Hadron Collider, a particle consistent with the Standard Model Higgs boson was observed coupling directly to the leptonic and bosonic sectors of the Standard Model. The decay of the Standard Model Higgs to $b\\bar{b}$ is the most commonly occurring decay mode, with a branching fraction of approximately $58\\%$. Probing this decay is vital to furthering our understanding of the Standard Model. Due to the large multijet background, the direct observation of $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ in the gluon fusion channel is very challenging. Instead, looking for the associated production of a Higgs with a vector boson ($W/Z$), and triggering on leptonic decays of the vector boson provides an effective way to trigger on the $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ decays and reduce the overwhelming multijet background. The result of this analysis using the full 2015 and 2016 dataset, corresponding to $36.1~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data will be presented, which will be one of the most sensitive searches to date for $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ decays.

  2. Extracellular KCl effect on organic bound tritium in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, Rafi; Uzi, German; Priel, Esther; Alfassi, Zeev B.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium atoms can replace hydrogen atoms in organic compounds, forming Organic Bound Tritium. Therefore, exposure of the body to tritium may lead to binding of tritium in tissue molecules, retaining it in the body longer than HTO, and causing higher doses. Ignoring this effect when evaluating inner exposures, may lead to under-estimation of tritium exposures. It was published, that tritium bound to some organic molecules has the potential to accumulate in organisms at higher levels as in the surrounding media. In order to investigate this effect and to identify physiological factors, OBT production in human malignant MG-63 osteoblast cells was studied. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the influence of the ionic extracellular potassium concentration on the amount of tritium in cells. Potassium is known as an ionic compound present in the body, which has the potential to cause cells swelling. Therefore, cells were exposed to isotonic and hypotonic media, supplemented with different concentrations of KCl, and the tritium accumulations were determined after incubation with HTO. An increase in the total Organic Bound Tritium production was observed, as well as an increase of the intracellular HTO content when increasing the KCl concentration. (author)

  3. The determination of effective doses from the intake of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    To comply with the regulatory requirements relating to the dose from exposures to tritiated water (HTO), Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) licensees currently measure tritium concentration in urine to determine whole body dose. This approach has been based on the consideration that the time-integrated tritium concentration (which is proportional to accumulated dose) in any organ from urine concentrations are always conservative. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends that the average soft tissue dose be used to determine effective dose equivalents for HTO exposures. The ICRP also recommends that only the retention in body water be considered when committed doses from HTO exposures are calculated; this recommendation is based on the consideration that the errors introduced by neglecting the long-lived tritium component (those tritium atoms retained in organic molecules of the body cells) are small (only of the order of 10% of the committed dose equivalent to the whole body). The AECB position is presented in the following regulatory policy statement

  4. Water diffusion in fluoropolymer-based fuel-cell electrolyte membranes investigated by radioactivated-tracer permeation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, S.; Yamaki, T.; Asano, M.; Maekawa, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Terai, T.

    2011-01-01

    The self-diffusion coefficient of water, D, in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) based on crosslinkedpolytetrafluoroethylene (cPTFE) films was measured by a radioactivated-tracer permeation technique using tritium labeled water (HTO). The D value was found to increase with the water volume fraction of the PEM, φ, probably because the water-filled regions were more effectively interconnected with each other at high φ, allowing water permeation to be faster through a PEM. Interestingly, the grafted PEMs showed the lower D compared to that of Nafion in spite of their high φ. This would be caused by tortuous structures of transport pathways and a strong coulombic interaction between water and the negatively-charged sulfonate (SO 3 - ) groups. Heavyoxygen water (H 2 18 O) was also used in the similar permeation experiment to obtain the D. Since the HTO diffusion actually occurred not only by translational motion of water but also by intermolecular hydrogen-atom hopping, comparing the D of HTO with that of H 2 18 O was likely to give the information about the state of water in the PEMs. (orig.)

  5. The modelling of tritium behaviour in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of the operation of reprocessing plants and fusion reactors the release of tritium may play a dominant role during normal operation as well as after accidents. Tritium, however, is chemically identical to hydrogen and thus interacts directly with water and organic substances, making processes like conversion of HT to HTO, re-emission after deposition, and the conversion of HTO into organically bound tritium (OBT) relevant, all of which may modify the total balance of the available HT or HTO inventories. Because of these physical and chemical properties which differ significantly from those of other radionuclides, the model UFOTRI for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental tritium releases has been developed. It describes the behaviour of tritium in the biosphere and calculates the radiological impact on individuals and the population due to inhalation and skin absorption and by ingestion pathways. The significance of the re-emission process in dose assessments - especially for HT-releases - has been clearly demonstrated in example calculations and applications of UFOTRI. The results of a comparison between an HT-release experiment in Canada 1987 and calculations of UFOTRI can be taken as a first validation of the model

  6. Neoplastic and life-span effects of chronic exposure to tritium. II. Rats exposed in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, D.F.; Wright, J.F.; Godbold, J.H.; Ward, J.M.; Laskey, J.W.; Tompkins, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects on neoplasia incidence and life-span of exposure in utero to a major environmental radionuclide. Sprague-Dawley rats were continuously exposed to tritiated water (HTO) from conception through birth in doses of 0, 1, 10, 50, and 100 μCi HTO/ml body water. HTO administration was terminated at birth. Calculated cumulative doses during gestation were approximately 0, 6.6, 66, 330, and 660 rads of total body irradiation. Under these exposure conditions, the two highest doses resulted in sterile offspring. Animals surviving through 30 days postnatally were defined as the study population and observed until their deaths. Intrauterine exposures to doses up to 66 rads had no significant effects on either sex with respect to lifespan, overall neoplasia incidence, incidence rate, or onset of mammary fibroadenomas. Females exposed to 330 or 660 rads were sterile and had lower incidence rates of mammary fibroadenomas than did controls; at 660 rads females had a lower incidence of overall neoplasia and reduced mean lifespans. Sterile male offspring had reduced mean longevity after irradiation at 660 rads. Regardless of dose group, females had significantly higher incidences of neoplasia and longer life-spans than males

  7. Comparison of the regulatory models assessing off-site radiological dose due to the routine releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, W. T.; Kim, E. H.; Han, M. H.; Choi, Y. H.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Methodologies of NEWTRIT model, NRC model and AIRDOS-EPA model, which are off-site dose assessment models for regulatory compliance from routine releases of tritium into the environment, were investigated. Using the domestic data, if available, the predictive results of the models were compared. Among them, recently developed NEWTRIT model considers only doses from organically bounded tritium (OBT) due to environmental releases of tritiated water (HTO). A total dose from all exposure pathways predicted from AIRDOS-EPA model was 1.03 and 2.46 times higher than that from NEWTRIT model and NRC model, respectively. From above result, readers should not have an understanding that a predictive dose from NRC model may be underestimated compared with a realistic dose. It is because of that both mathematical models and corresponding parameter values for regulatory compliance are based on the conservative assumptions. For a dose by food consumption predicted from NEWTRIT model, the contribution of OBT was nearly equivalent to that of HTO due to relatively high consumption of grains in Korean. Although a total dose predicted from NEWTRIT model is similar to that from AIRDOS-EPA model, NEWTRIT model may be have a meaning in the understanding of phenomena for the behavior of HTO released into the environment

  8. Effect of prenatal exposure to low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weimin; Zhou Xiangyan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Effects of prenatal exposure to HTO (tritiated water) on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of rats were studied by determination of multiple parameters. Methods: Pregnant adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups, of which 3 groups were irradiated with beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by one single intraperitoneal injection on the 13th day of gestation. Offspring of these rats received cumulative doses of 0.000, 0.044, 0.088 and 0.264 Gy utero, respectively, and were observed for the appearance of three physiologic markers (eye opening, pinna detachment, incisor eruption), the age of acquisition of two reflexes (surface righting, negative geotaxis) and sensuous function (auditory startle), movement and coordination functions and activity (forelimb hanging, continuous corridor activity), and learning and memory (electric avoidance reflex in Y-maze, conditional reflex). Results: Results for most parameters in the 0.044 and 0.088 Gy groups were different significantly from those in the controls and for most parameters a dose-dependent effect was found. Conclusion: Offspring of rats having received prenatal low dose irradiation from HTO showed delayed growth and abnormal neurobehavior

  9. Dose-response relationship for the induction of structural chromosome aberrations in human spermatozoa after in vitro exposure ti tritium. beta. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiguchi, Yujiroh; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Kazuya (Asahikawa Medical College (Japan). Department of Biological Sciences)

    1990-02-01

    THe effects of tritium (HTO) {beta}-rays on human sperm chromosomes were studied using our interspecific in vitro fertilization system between human spermatozoa and zona-free hamster oocytes. Semen samples were treated with media containing 1.53-24.3 mCi/ml HTO for about 80 min. 1290 spermatozoa from the controls and 1842 spermatozoa from the irradiated groups were karyotyped. The incidence of spermatozoa with structural chromosome aberrations increased linearly with increasing dosage. Breakage-type aberrations occurred far more frequently than exchange-type. Chromosome-type aberrations appeared far more frequently than chromatid-ype. All of these types of aberrations showed linear dose-dependent increases. The RBE valus of HTO {beta}-rays relative to X-rays were calculated for the above-mentioned 5 indices, respectively. Their RBE values franged from 1.89 to 3.00 when the absorbed dose was estimated to be the minimum, whereas the values ranged between 1.04 and 1.65 when the absorbed dose was estimated to be the maximum. (author). 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs.

  10. Environmental aspects of a tritium oxide release from the Savannah River Site on September 2 and 3, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, D.D.; Kurzeja, R.J.; Evans, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium was released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Plant during an incident on September 2 and 3, 1984 between 10 PM and 3 AM. During this five hour period, 43,800 Ci of tritium, principally in the form of the oxide (HTO), was released. An additional 14,000, Ci was released during subsequent cleanup operations between September 3 and 7. The total amount released from the incident was 57,800 Ci. The HTO cloud initially moved northward and passed near the towns of New Ellenton and Aiken, SC. Two hours after the release began, the wind shifted and carried the cloud toward Columbia, SC. The cloud moved northeast during the daytime on September 3 over the east-central portion of North Carolina. Environmental sampling teams were dispatched by SRL, SRP, and SCDHEC (South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control). SRL collected air and vegetation samples and SRP collected vegetation, water, milk and bioassay samples. SCDHEC collected vegetation, milk, and water samples. The highest activity of HTO measured in vegetation was 501 pCi/mL onsite, 2522 pCi/mL at the plant boundary, and 9859 pCi/mL offsite. These concentrations were approximately 100 times larger than normal values. 13 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs

  11. US team measurements during the June 1987 experimental HT release at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Murphy, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of HT in the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 100 Ci of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. The HTOHT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (/approximately/4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/ at 50 meters to almost 10/sup /minus/3 at 400 meters) as conversion of HT takes place. For several days after the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be very low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a very low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The tritiated water concentration increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 400 to 600 pCiml of water at 50 meters from the source) and decreasing by the end of the second day. The organically bound tritium continued to accumulate during the period following exposure (about 10 pCigm dry weight at 50 meters after two days). 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. An evaluation of an organically bound tritium measurement method in artificial and natural urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Duong, T.

    1993-03-01

    The accurate measurement of tritium in urine in the form of tritiated water (HTO) as well as in organic forms (organically bound tritium (OBT)) is an essential step in assessing tritium exposures correctly. Exchange between HTO and OBT, arising intrinsically in the separation of HTO from urine samples, is a source of error in determining the concentration of OBT using the low-temperature distillation (LTD) bioassay method. The accuracy and precision of OBT measurements using the LTD method was investigated using spiked natural and artificial urine samples. The relative bias for most of the measurements was less than 25%. The choice of testing matrix, artificial urine versus human urine, made little difference: the precisions for each urine type were similar. The appropriateness of the use of artificial urine for testing purposes was judged using a ratio of performance indices. Based on this evaluation, the artificial urine is a suitable test matrix for intercomparisons of OBT in urine measurements. It is further concluded that the LTD method is reliable for measuring OBT in urine samples. (author). 7 refs., 6 tabs

  13. An evaluation of an organically bound tritium measurement method in artificial and natural urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A; Duong, T

    1993-03-01

    The accurate measurement of tritium in urine in the form of tritiated water (HTO) as well as in organic forms (organically bound tritium (OBT)) is an essential step in assessing tritium exposures correctly. Exchange between HTO and OBT, arising intrinsically in the separation of HTO from urine samples, is a source of error in determining the concentration of OBT using the low-temperature distillation (LTD) bioassay method. The accuracy and precision of OBT measurements using the LTD method was investigated using spiked natural and artificial urine samples. The relative bias for most of the measurements was less than 25%. The choice of testing matrix, artificial urine versus human urine, made little difference: the precisions for each urine type were similar. The appropriateness of the use of artificial urine for testing purposes was judged using a ratio of performance indices. Based on this evaluation, the artificial urine is a suitable test matrix for intercomparisons of OBT in urine measurements. It is further concluded that the LTD method is reliable for measuring OBT in urine samples. (author). 7 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Developing alternative oxidation processes for the treatment of organic radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turc, H.A.; Broudic, J.Ch.; Joussot-Dubien, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    An electro-generated silver (II) mediated oxidation process is currently under development in the Atalante facility of the French Atomic Energy Commission, as an operation of the DELOS unit, with the aim to mineralize α-contaminated solvents with respect to the principles of nuclear safety. This process is a wet oxidation one involving a powerful mediator (Ag(II)/Ag(I): 1.92 V/NHE), but its throughput is mainly limited by technological constraints. Hydrothermal oxidation (HTO) has been investigated and proved by inactive studies as to be a versatile and powerful process, which could help destroying the contaminated solvents (dodecane, TBP, TLA...) produced by the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing research and industry. The current development aims to set up a continuous HTO pilot in a standard glovebox, in order to solve both technological and safety difficulties and to treat small volumes of contaminated solvents. This paper discusses the main results of the silver(II) oxidation and HTO process development works. (authors)

  15. Tritium forms discrimination in ryegrass under constant tritium exposure: From seed germination to seedling autotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, H; Maro, D; Le Dizès, S; Escobar-Gutiérrez, A; Voiseux, C; Solier, L; Hébert, D; Rozet, M; Cossonnet, C; Barillot, R

    2017-10-01

    Uncertainties remain regarding the fate of atmospheric tritium after it has been assimilated in grasslands (ryegrass) in the form of TFWT (Tissue Free Water Tritium) or OBT (Organically Bound Tritium). One such uncertainty relates to the tritium forms discrimination during transfer from TFWT to OBT resulting from photosynthesis (OBT photo ), corresponding to the OBT photo /TFWT ratio. In this study, the OBT/TFWT ratio is determined by experiments in the laboratory using a ryegrass model and hydroponic cultures, with constant activity of tritium in the form of tritiated water (denoted as HTO) in the "water" compartment (liquid HTO) and "air" compartment (HTO vapour in the air). The OBT photo /TFWT ratio and the exchangeable OBT fraction are measured for three parts of the plant: the leaf, seed and root. Plant growth is modelled using dehydrated biomass measurements taken over time in the laboratory and integrating physiological functions of the plant during the first ten days after germination. The results suggest that there is no measurable discrimination of tritium in the plant organic matter produced by photosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Studies on the Synthesis and Performance of Boron-containing High Temperature Resistant Resin Modified by Hydroxylated Tung Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. X.; Y Ren, Z.; Zheng, G.; Wang, H. F.; Jiang, L.; Fu, Y.; Yang, W. Q.; He, H. H.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, hydroxylated tung oil (HTO) modified high temperature resistant resin containing boron and benzoxazine was synthesized. HTO and ethylenediamine was used to toughen the boron phenolic resin with specific reaction. The structure of product was studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), and the heat resistance was tested by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis(TGA). The results indicated that the conjugated triene structure of HTO was involved in the crosslinking of the heating curing progress, and in addition, the open-loop polymerization reaction of benzoxazine resin during heating can effectively reduce the curing temperature of the resin and reduce the release of small molecule volatiles, which is advantageous to follow-up processing. DSC data showed that the initial decomposition temperature of the resin is 350-400 °C, the carbon residue rate under 800 °C was 65%. It indicated that the resin has better heat resistance than normal boron phenolic resin. The resin can be used as an excellent ablative material and anti-friction material and has a huge application market in many fields.

  17. Stress analysis of the tibial plateau according to the difference of blade path entry in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Woo; Xin, YuanZhu; Yang, Seok Jo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Jong Hun; Panchal, Karnav; Kwon, Oh Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been used to successfully treat patients with genu varus deformities that can improve mechanical function and condition in the knee joint. Clinical studies have reported that bow legs often occur with a concentrated load on the varus of the tibia. This study aimed to analyze and verify the clinical test data result by utilizing the three-dimensional (3D) static finite element method (FEM). The 3D model of lower extremities, which include the femur, tibia, meniscus, and knee articular cartilage, was created using the images from a computer tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging. In this report, we compared changes in stress distribution and force reaction on the tibial plateau because of critical problems caused by unexpected changes in the tibial posterior-slope angle because of HTO. The results showed that the 5 .deg. wedge-angle virtual opening wedge HTO without and with the posterior-slope angle shows has a load concentration of approximately 60% and 45% in the medial region, respectively.

  18. Palynological Investigation of the Holocene Thermal Optimum in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, R. M.; McGlone, M. S.; Wilmshurst, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    It has long been assumed in New Zealand (NZ) that the Holocene Thermal Optimum (HTO) occurred at the beginning of the Holocene. Nearly 40 years ago, Hendy and Wilson pioneered the use of 18O/16O composition of calcite in NZ speleothems to reconstruct past climate and in so doing showed an HTO occurring earlier in NZ than in comparable Northern Hemisphere records (Hendy & Wilson,1968). More recent work on NZ speleothems (Williams et al., 2005) corroborates the concept of an early HTO dated between ca 11.7 and 10.6 ka, but there is no definitive description of the event as a NZ-wide phenomenon, no intensive dating of it, nor temperature quantification. Moreover, there is no firm conclusion as to whether it is registered consistently between different proxies and across NZ regions. Until recently, attempts to quantify past climate change from NZ pollen data have been hindered by failure to demonstrate robust relationships between modern pollen assemblages and climate due, it is thought, to strong anthropogenic modification of natural vegetation patterns and steep climatic gradients (Norton et al., 1986). However, as deforestation commenced only ca 700 years ago, and is unambiguously detected in pollen records from throughout NZ, an almost unique opportunity exists to develop pollen-climate transfer functions using pre-human pollen-vegetation sources. McGlone and Wilmshurst have assembled an extensive (138-site) `modern' pollen database, based on ca 700 yr BP pre-deforestation pollen assemblages from peat and lake cores. This now provides a basis for more secure pollen-climate reconstruction than hitherto has been possible. Statistical modelling of the environmental determinants of patterns in the pre-deforestation pollen database indicates the strongest relationship (r2 > 0.8) is with Mean Annual Temperature (MAT) and suggests that this parameter can be reliably reconstructed, with error estimates, from Late Quaternary NZ pollen profiles. We use this database to

  19. Molecular and genotoxic effects in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to tritiated water at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Bean, T.; Lyons, B. [Cefas Weymouth Laboratory (United Kingdom); Turner, A. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Radioactive contaminants do not occur in isolation; organisms are also exposed to fluctuations in biological, biotic and physico-chemical factors, such as competition, other contaminants, salinity and temperature. Thermal discharge from nuclear facilities is considered to be one of the most important environmental issues surrounding these establishments, second only to the release of radionuclides. Cooling water from nuclear institutions is one of the major sources of tritium ({sup 3}H) to the aquatic environment; temperature is therefore an abiotic factor of particular concern when it comes to assessing the potential detrimental impacts of {sup 3}H exposure in marine species. In this context, we used a molecular approach to elucidate the potential mechanisms behind the genotoxicity of tritiated water (HTO) to marine mussels, at 'normal' and elevated temperatures. Mussels were exposed to control seawater or 15 MBq L{sup -1} HTO at 15 and 25 deg. C for 7 days, with haemolymph and gill tissue sampling (for comet assay to detect DNA strand breaks and gene expression analysis, respectively) after 0, 1, 12, 72 and 168 h. In addition, a Cu concentration of 40 μg L{sup -1} (previously established as genotoxic under these exposure conditions) was used concurrently as a positive control (at 15 deg. C). Tissue-specific accumulation of {sup 3}H was also determined, allowing the calculation of dose rates using the ERICA tool. Comparison of DNA strand breakage (DSB) as a function of time suggested that significant levels of DSB were induced earlier in haemocytes of mussels exposed to HTO at 25 deg. C compared to 15 deg. C (72 h vs. 168 h). Alterations in transcriptional expression of key genes also suggest that the 72 h time point is critical, with gill showing reduced expression of hsp70, hsp90, mt20, p53 and rad51 during HTO exposure at the elevated temperature. In contrast, HTO exposure at 15 deg. C resulted in significant up-regulation of the same genes after 72

  20. Tritium in some typical ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The environmental significance of 3 H releases prompted an IAEA-sponsored coordinated research programme on various aspects. Data were collected to help health physicists, radioecologists, radiobiologists and environmentalists to predict the behaviour of 3 H in the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world. A common methodology was used to carry out a variety of projects in widely varying biomes, from tropical to arctic regions: in Belgium, on terrestrial food chains, with deposition of tritiated water (HTO) on crops and pasture, and incorporation of 3 H into proteins, nucleic acids, etc.; in Finland, plots of pasture and forest were labelled by HTO, and plant uptake were studied; in France, 3 H-content in water, in relation to different parts of vines, orange and olive trees in a Mediterranean climate; in the Federal Republic of Germany, contamination due to 3 H-releases; in India, mean 3 H-residence time in some tropical trees; in Mexico, 3 H-persistence as free-water 3 H and tissue-bound 3 H in crops; in the Netherlands, 3 H-metabolism in ruminants; in the Philippines, residence time in soil and in various commonly edible crops, and excretion time; in Thailand, half residence time in soil and local vegetation; in the USA, the effects of HTO vapour and liquid exposure in a wide range of climatic conditions, including organic fixation and concentration factors. An extensive bibliography is attached, and also annexes of laboratories and project titles; plant species, exposure and residence times; comparable lists for animals studied; scientific and common names of the species, and a glossary

  1. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  2. Tritium monitor calibration at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, C.J.; Aikin, D.J.; Houlton, T.W.

    1997-08-01

    Tritium in air is monitored at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with air breathing instruments based on ionization chambers. Stack emissions are continuously monitored from sample tubes which each connect to a Tritium bubble which differentially collects HTO and HT. A set of glass vials of glycol capture the HTO. The HT is oxidized with a palladium catalyst and the resultant HTO is captured in a second set of vials of glycol. The glycol is counted with a liquid scintillation counter. All calibrations are performed with tritium containing gas. The Radiation Instrumentation and Calibration (RIC) Team has constructed and maintains two closed loop gas handling systems based on femto TECH model U24 tritium ion chamber monitors: a fixed system housed in a fume hood and a portable system mounted on two two wheeled hand trucks. The U24 monitors are calibrated against tritium in nitrogen gas standards. They are used as standard transfer instruments to calibrate other ion chamber monitors with tritium in nitrogen, diluted with air. The gas handling systems include a circulation pump which permits a closed circulation loop to be established among the U24 monitor and typically two to four other monitors of a given model during calibration. Fixed and portable monitors can be calibrated. The stack bubblers are calibrated in the field by: blending a known concentration of tritium in air within the known volume of the two portable carts, coupled into a common loop; releasing that gas mixture into a ventilation intake to the stack; collecting oxidized tritium in the bubbler; counting the glycol; and using the stack and bubbler flow rates, computing the bubbler's efficiency. Gas calibration has become a convenient and quality tool in maintaining the tritium monitors at LANL

  3. Tritium sorption on protective coatings for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Senohrabek, J.A.; Allsop, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Because of the high sorption level of tritium on unprotected concrete, a program to examine the effectiveness of various concrete coatings and sealants in reducing tritium sorption was undertaken, and various exposure conditions were examined. Coatings of epoxy, polyurethane, bituminous sealant, bituminous sealant covered with polyvinylidene chloride wrap, alkyd paint, and sodium silicate were investigated with tritium (HTO) vapor concentration, humidity and contact time being varied. An exposure to HT was also carried out, and the effect of humidity on the tritium desorption rate was investigated. The relative effectiveness of the coatings was in the order of bituminous sealant + wrap > bituminous sealant > solvent-based epoxy > 100%-solids epoxy > alkyd paint > sodium silicate. The commercially available coatings for concrete resulted in tritium sorption being reduced to less than 7% of unprotected concrete. This was improved to ∼0.1% with the use of the Saran wrap (polyvinylidene chloride). The amount of tritium sorbed was proportional to tritium concentration. The total tritium sorbed decreased with an increase in humidity. A saturation effect was observed with increasing exposure time for both the coated and unprotected samples. Under the test conditions, complete saturation was not achieved within the maximum 8-hour contact time, except for the solvent-based epoxy. The desorption rate increased with a higher-humidity air purge stream. HT desorbed more rapidly than HTO, but the amount sorbed was smaller. The experimental program showed that HTO sorption by concrete can be significantly reduced with the proper choice of coating. However, tritium sorption on concrete and proposed coatings will continue to be a concern until the effects of the various conditions that affect the adsorption and desorption of tritium are firmly established for both chronic and acute tritium release conditions. Material sorption characteristics must also be considered in

  4. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ni, Muyi, E-mail: muyi.ni@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wei, Shiping [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Conservative early dose of different unit fusion radioactivity release were assessed. • Data of accident level in INES for fusion reactor were proposed. • Method of environmental restoration time after fusion accident was proposed. • The maximum possible accident level for ITER like fusion reactor is 6. • We need 34–52 years to live after the fusion hypothetical accident. - Abstract: As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1 kg HTO and 1000 kg dust release) and 34–52 years for case 2 (1 kg HTO and 10kg–100 kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  5. Teratogenic effects of 60Co gamma rays irradiation on rat embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juing-Yi; Okuda, Hiroe; Tutimoto, Sigeo; Satow, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    The teratogenicity of 60 Co gamma rays was evaluated in Donryu rats. The results were compared with those of triterated water (HTO) for determining relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for incidence of malformations and LD 50 in rats. Pregnant rats were irradiated with a 60 Co source at a dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/min or 0.01 Gy/min on day 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 of gestation with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 2.3, 2.5, 2.8 or 3.0 Gy. HTO was administered intraperitoneal injection to pregnant rats at various doses on day 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of gestation. The rats were sacrificed on day 18 and the offspring were examined for external and visceral malformations. Mortality, teratogenicity and effects on fetal growth were day-and dosage-dependent in both radiation groups. Congenital malformations were found most frequently in the 9-day irradiated group and followed by the 8, 11, 10 and 7-day irradiated groups. The incidence of cardiovascular anomalies was highest, especially in the day 9 of gestation group, followed by malformations in the central nervous system, craniofacial system, respiratory system, hind limbs and tail. Beta rays from HTO were found to be more effective than γ rays in inducing congenital malformations. The RBE for incidence of malformations and LD 50 was between 1.3 and 1.5. These studies suggest that simulator of tritium irradiation is urgently needed to investigate the biological effects on rats to estimate the human risks, with respect to RBE of tritium beta rays. (author)

  6. Follow-up Study of ITER Safety Analysis : Large In-vessel First Wall Pipe Break with Wet Confinement Bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Previous researches have been analyzed risk assessments of fusion reactors that are dangerous in the severe accidents where the radioactive material released from confinement building to the environment. To simulate the severe accidents in ITER, a number of thermal hydraulics simulation codes were used. Before construction of the fusion reactor, to obtain ITER license about safety issue, MELCOR is chosen as one of the several codes to be used to perform ITER safety analyses. Qualification of the simulation code is to simulate the cooling system in ITER, the transport of radionuclides during design basis accidents (DBAs) including beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). MELCOR is fully integrated code that models the accidents in Light Water Reactor (LWR). To analyze the accidents in ITER, MELCOR 1.8.2 version is modified. In the nuclear fusion system, the amount of released radioactive material is criteria for safety permission. Tritium (or tritiated water: HTO) and radioactive dust aerosol are the source of radioactive leakage. In the Generic Site Safety Report (GSSR) for the ITER plant, Table I lists the release guidelines for tritium and activation products for normal operation, incidents and accidents. Several accident analyses have been studied to know how much radioactive material could be released from the severe accidents. In the present work, The MELCOR input deck of large First Wall (FW) coolant leak (pipe break) is used to study and radioactive material leakage thorough bypass accident are studied to follow up the ITER safety analysis. In this research, follow-up study of the in-vessel inboard/inboard-outboard FW pipe break was analyzed to investigate the amount of leakage of radioactive aerosol. All of the accident cases released the lower amount of radioactive aerosol compared to the IAEA guide lines. In addition, the OBB pipe break made lower HTO aerosol leakage because of condensation of HTO and adsorption between coolant and aerosol.

  7. Tritiated water uptake kinetics in tissue-free water and organically-bound fractions of tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, F.S.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of tritiated water (HTO) vapour uptake into tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) fractions of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cv Vendor, were investigated under controlled growing conditions. Most uptake data fitted a first-order kinetic model, C t = C ∞ (1-e -kt ), where C t is the tritium concentration at time t, Ca the steady-state concentration and k the uptake rate constant. During atmospheric-HTO exposure with clean-water irrigation in open pots the TFWT k values were 0.024 ± 0.023 h -1 for new foliage, 0.104 ± 0.067 h -1 for old foliage and 0.042 ± to 0.136 h -1 for new green fruit. OBT uptake rate constants were 20 percent less for new foliage and 76 percent less for new green fruit. Under steady-state conditions the ratio of tritium specific activities of TWFT to atmospheric HTO were 0.43 in new foliage, 0.46 in old foliage and 0.19 in green fruit. Within the plant, OBT and TFWT ratios were 0.70 for new foliage, 0.63 for old foliage (maximum) and between 0.72 and 1.92 for green fruit. The greater than unity tritium specific activity ratios in green fruit were not attributed to tritium enrichment but rather to the translocation of foliar OBT to the growing fruit which contained lower specific activity TFWT derived from soil water

  8. Toxicity and dosimetry of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium doses to the general public are very low (currently about 0.2 μSv per year). Radiation doses from tritium to members of the public living in the vicinity of a CANDU power station are higher but rarely exceed 20 μSv per year or 1% of normal exposures to radiation from all natural sources, but doses to some radiation workers can approach ten mSv per year. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays varies appreciably depending upon the biological endpoint. Observed RBE values at low doses and low dose-rates are usually about 2 to 3 when tritium beta rays are compared to 60 Co gamma rays but are closer to 1 than to 2 when compared to 200 kVp X-rays. This conclusion is supported by microdosimetric considerations of the quality of tritium beta rays, 60 Co gamma rays and X-rays. Since X-rays have traditionally been accepted as reference radiation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, it seems reasonable that the quality factor (Q) assigned to tritium beta rays should be close to one. Recommended procedures in Canada for estimation of effective dose equivalents from exposures to HTO and HT assume that Q = 1 and that body water represents 67% of the mass of soft tissue; they take into account conversions of HTO to appear to be reasonable for radiation protection purposes when the source of exposure is HTO or HT, but will not be adequate for exposures to other tritiated compounds. (modified author abstract) (137 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.)

  9. Tritium extraction methods proposed for a solid breeder blanket. Subtask WP-B 6.1 of the European Blanket Program 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.

    1997-04-01

    Ten different methods for the extraction of tritium from the purge gas of a ceramic blanket are described and evaluated with respect to their applicability for ITER and DEMO. The methods are based on the conditions that the purge gas is composed of helium with an addition of up to 0.1% of H 2 or O 2 and H 2 O to facilitate the release of tritium, and that tritium occurs in the purge gas in two main chemical forms, i.e. HT and HTO. Individual process steps of many methods are identical; in particular, the application of cold traps, molecular sieve beds, and diffusors are proposed in several cases. Differences between the methods arise mainly from the ways in which various process steps are combined and from the operating conditions which are chosen with respect to temperature and pressure. Up to now, none of the methods has been demonstrated to be reliably applicable for the purge gas conditions foreseen for the operation of an ITER blanket test module (or larger ceramic blanket designs such as for DEMO). These conditions are characterized by very high gas flow rates and extremely low concentrations of HT and HTO. Therefore, a proposal has been made (FZK concept) which is expected to have the best potential for applicability to ITER and DEMO and to incorporate the smallest development risk. In this concept, the extraction of tritium and excess hydrogen is accomplished by using a cold trap for freezing out HTO/H 2 O and a 5A molecular sieve bed for the adsorption of HT/H 2 . (orig.) [de

  10. Tritium effluent control project progress report, July--September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershner, C.J.; Bixel, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    In the Tritiated Liquid Waste Decontamination (Molecular Excitation) program, it was found that a 1/4'' Nd:YAG amplifier and a Faraday rotator isolator must be added to the oscillator to obtain the required power for the laser excitation experiments. The isotopic selectivity of the two-photon dissociation process was examined in more detail. The selectivity or ratio of HTO to H 2 O molecules that are photodissociated was found to be on the order of 25, which is inadequate for application to large-scale detritiation projects, e.g., nuclear fuel reprocessing plant waste. The selectivity is such that most of the laser energy is wasted in photodissociation of H 2 O. This obstacle may be overcome by pumping more vibrational energy into the HTO molecules. Various schemes towards this end are being considered. Extensive ab initio calculations on the potential surface for the hydrogen atom-water exchange reaction have been carried out. The energy barrier is calculated to be 38 1/2 kcal/mole, which implies that the exchange reaction T + H 2 O → HTO + H is at least 10 9 times slower than the exchange reaction T + H 2 → HT + H. Calculations were also performed on the analogous hydrogen atom-hydrogen fluoride exchange reaction. In lieu of other disposal methods a system using a General Electric UCT-1 regenerative cell has been assembled and tested. This system should be capable of decomposing pure water into hydrogen and oxygen gases. The tritium from this process can be purified and reused instead of buried. A preliminary economic evaluation was made of the HT/H 2 O catalytic exchange detritiation stripping process as it might apply to a 5 metric ton/day nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A tritiated water shipping container has been designed and developed for use with the ERDA--DOT approved AL--MI secondary container

  11. The effect of thickness in the through-diffusion experiment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Aalto, H.; Lehikoinen, J.; Uusheimo, K.

    1996-01-01

    The report contains an experimental study of diffusion in the water-filled pores of rock samples. The samples studied are rapakivi granite from Loviisa, southern Finland. The drill-core sample was sectioned perpendicularly with a diamond saw and three cylindrical samples were obtained. The nominal thicknesses (heights of the cylinders) are 2, 4 and 6 cm. For the diffusion measurement the sample holders were pressed between two chambers. One of the chambers was filled with 0.0044 molar sodium chloride solution spiked with tracers. Another chamber was filled with inactive solution. Tritium (HTO) considered to be a water equivalent tracer and anionic 36 Cl - were used as tracers. The through diffusion was monitored about 1000 days after which time the diffusion cells were emptied and the sample holders dismantled. The samples were sectioned into 1 cm slices and the tracers were leached from the slices. The porosities of the slices were determined by the weighing method. The rock-capacity factors could be determined from the leaching results obtained. It was seen that the porosity values were in accordance with the rock capacity factors obtained with HTO. An anion exclusion can be seen comparing the results obtained with HTO and 36 Cl - . The concentration profile through even the thickest sample had reached a constant slope and the rate of diffusion was practically at a steady state. An anion exclusion effect was also seen in the effective diffusion coefficients. The effect of thickness on diffusion shows that the connectivity of the pores decreases in the thickness range 2-4 cm studied. The decrease as reflected in the diffusion coefficient was not dramatic and it can be said that especially for studying chemical interactions during diffusion, the thickness of 2 cm is adequate. (orig.) (12 refs.)

  12. Behaviour of three chemical forms of tritium in the environment after release from inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, M.; Perlado, J.M.; Sedano, L.

    2006-01-01

    In order to fully simulate the behaviour of elementary tritium (HT), tritiated water vapour (HTO) in the environment, it is necessary to take into account diffusion and deposition processes in the soil and vegetables. In addition this work also incorporates the penetration in the underground, re-emission and later conversion to organic tritium (OBT). The whole study has led to the conclusion that the behaviour of the tritium should be simulated using two well-differentiated studies: deterministic and probabilistic. Deterministic calculations are based on a fixed meteorological data given 'a priori'. The probabilistic study is based on measured real meteorological analysis every hour, and the probability that individuals can present dose for internal irradiation. Both options have been considered for a specific mediterranean environment of the system. Once the elementary tritium has been deposited in the soil, it can be oxidized by microbial action of the enzymes of the soil, and the resulting tritium form (in its oxidize form) goes back to the atmosphere. This process of re-emission is shown to be very important since it has been typically considered that the inhaled tritium is only, HTO, when, in fact part of that account is due to the HT converted to HTO and re-emitted to the atmosphere. Our calculations demonstrate that the HT contributes very significantly to the dose for inhalation through the re-emission processes. A final aspect of this work is the dosimetric analysis of the contamination through all ways: inhalation, re-emission and ingestion. Early and chronic doses have been assessed

  13. Nuclear graphite waste's behaviour under disposal conditions: Study of the release and repartition of organic and inorganic forms of carbon 14 and tritium in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vende, L.

    2012-01-01

    23000 tons of graphite wastes will be generated during dismantling of the first generation of French reactors (9 gas cooled reactors). These wastes are classified as Long Lived Low Level wastes (LLW-LL). As requested by the law, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) is studying concepts of low-depth disposals.In this work we focus on carbon 14, the main long-lived radionuclide in graphite waste (5730 y), but also on tritium, which is the main contributor to the radioactivity in the short term. Carbon 14 and tritium may be released from graphite waste in many forms in gaseous phase ( 14 CO 2 , HT...) or in solution ( 14 CO 3 2- , HTO...). Their speciation will strongly affect their migration from the disposal site to the environment. Leaching experiments, in alkaline solution (0.1 M NaOH simulating repository conditions) have been performed on irradiated graphite, from Saint-Laurent A2 and G2 reactors, in order to quantify their release and characterize their speciation. The studies show that carbon 14 exists in both gaseous and aqueous phases. In the gaseous phase, release is weak (≤0.1%) and corresponds to oxidizable species. Carbon 14 is mainly released into liquid phase, as both inorganic and organic species. 65% of released fraction is inorganic and 35% organic carbon. Two tritiated species have been identified in gaseous phase: HTO and HT/Organically Bond Tritium. More than 90% of tritium in that phase corresponds to HT/OBT. But release is weak (≤0.1%). HTO is mainly in the liquid phase. (author)

  14. Tritium interactions with steel and construction materials in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    The literature on the interactions of tritium and tritiated water with metals, glasses, ceramics, concrete, paints, polymers and other organic materials is reviewed in this report Some of the processes affecting the amount of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and the conversion of tritium found on various materials, such as permeation, sorption and conversion of elemental tritium (T 2 ) to tritiated water (HTO), are also briefly outlined. Tritium permeation in steels is fairly well understood, but effects of surface preparation and coatings on sorption are not yet clear. Permeation of T 2 into other metals with cleaned surfaces has been studied thoroughly at high temperature, and the effect of surface oxidation has also been explored. The room-temperature permeation rates of low-permeability metals with cleaned surfaces are much faster than indicated by high-temperature results, because of grain-boundary diffusion. Elastomers have been studied to a certain extent, but some mechanisms of interaction with tritium gas and sorbed tritium are unclear. Ceramics have some of the lowest sorption and permeation rates, but ceramic coatings on stainless steels do not lower permeation or tritium as effectively as coatings obtained by oxidation of the steel, probably because of cracking caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficient. Studies on concrete are in their early stages; they show that sorption of tritiated water on concrete is a major concern in cleanup of releases of elemental tritium into air in tritium handling facilities. Some of the codes for modelling releases and sorption of T 2 and HTO contain unproven assumptions about sorption and T 2 → HTO conversion. Several experimental programs will be required in order to clear up ambiguities in previous work and to determine parameters for materials which have not yet been investigated. (146 refs., tab.)

  15. Preliminary assessment of a 'surface fusible grout' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellars, B.G.

    1992-03-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is evaluating the uptake and release of tritium (DT, T 2 ), tritiated hydrogen (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) by building materials to be used in fusion reactor enclosures. Concrete will be an important building material and poses a special problem because of its porous microstructure and the chemical makeup of the material. One approach to reducing the uptake of HT and HTO into concrete is to apply a permeation barrier directly onto the concrete. Glazed ceramic tiles are one barrier with low HT and HTO uptake; however, the grouting between tiles is a major concern. It would be desirable to seal the grout with a glassy permeation barrier. The concept investigated in this program is based on plasma spraying: injecting a powder into a high velocity flame to melt the powder particles and project them towards a target substrate. Glass on the substrate is then to be fused by the plasma flame while a molten glass is deposited on top. Ceramic bonded grouts were developed based on fused silica or borosilicate powders and ethyl silicate or sodium silicate air-set binders. Sodium silicate grouts exhibit lower porosity after drying than ethyl silicate-based grouts, although both are porous. Careful control of the ratio of coarse to fine powder fractions is necessary to minimize or eliminate drying shrinkage. The surface of grouts based on borosilicate glass could not be fused without cracking of neighbouring tiles. When a porcelain enamel glass was plasma spray deposited and fused onto the surface of a grout line and adjacent tiles crazing was observed upon dye penetrant testing

  16. Effect of temperature on the containment properties of argillaceous rocks: The case study of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Goutelard, F.; Beaucaire, C.; Charles, Y.; Fayette, A.; Herbette, M.; Larabi, Y.; Coelho, D.

    2011-01-01

    Heat generated by high level radioactive wastes could alter the performance of a clay repository. It was intended to investigate the effect of such a thermal period on the diffusive properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones. Thus, through-diffusion experiments with HTO, 36 Cl, 22 Na and 137 Cs were performed before, during and after stages of heating at 80 degrees C that lasted for up to one year. A special attention was paid to limit the occurrence of any chemical disturbance. Therefore (i) the temperature was raised to 80 degrees C, then progressively brought back to 21 degrees C, thanks to three intermediate temperature stages, and (ii) specific synthetic solutions were used for each temperature, chemistry of which being close to the equilibrium state, especially with respect to the carbonate and sulphate minerals. It was found that experiments carried out at 80 degrees C showed a clear increase of the effective diffusion coefficient values for the four tracers with respect to those obtained at 21 degrees C (by a factor of 3 for HTO and 36 Cl, 5 for 22 Na and 2 for 137 Cs). On the other hand, the porosity and rock capacity values did not exhibit any significant discrepancy between 21 degrees C and 80 degrees C, indicating no observable damage of both the pore conducing network and the sorption properties of clay minerals. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO and 36 Cl but failed to describe the diffusive evolution of the two sorbing cations, 22 Na and 137 Cs. Furthermore, experiments performed after the thermal period led to diffusive properties well matching those obtained before heating. All these results suggest that at the lab scale the heating of rock samples would not alter the clay-stone containment properties. (authors)

  17. Effect of temperature on the containment properties of argillaceous rocks: The case study of Callovo-Oxfordian claystones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoye, S; Goutelard, F; Beaucaire, C; Charles, Y; Fayette, A; Herbette, M; Larabi, Y; Coelho, D

    2011-07-01

    Heat generated by high level radioactive wastes could alter the performance of a clay repository. It was intended to investigate the effect of such a thermal period on the diffusive properties of Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Thus, through-diffusion experiments with HTO, Cl-36, Na-22 and Cs-137 were performed before, during and after stages of heating at 80°C that lasted for up to one year. A special attention was paid to limit the occurrence of any chemical disturbance. Therefore (i) the temperature was raised to 80°C, then progressively brought back to 21°C, thanks to three intermediate temperature stages, and (ii) specific synthetic solutions were used for each temperature, chemistry of which being close to the equilibrium state, especially with respect to the carbonate and sulphate minerals. It was found that experiments carried out at 80°C showed a clear increase of the effective diffusion coefficient values for the four tracers with respect to those obtained at 21°C (by a factor of 3 for HTO and Cl-36, 5 for Na-22 and 2 for Cs-137). On the other hand, the porosity and rock capacity values did not exhibit any significant discrepancy between 21°C and 80°C, indicating no observable damage of both the pore conducing network and the sorption properties of clay minerals. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO and Cl-36 but failed to describe the diffusive evolution of the two sorbing cations, Na-22 and Cs-137. Furthermore, experiments performed after the thermal period led to diffusive properties well matching those obtained before heating. All these results suggest that at the lab scale the heating of rock samples would not alter the claystone containment properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The study of subchondral lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagishi, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to examine the significance of the signal abnormalities of subchondral bone in osteoarthritic knee with 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in T2-low signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on both the T1- and T2-weighted images and T2-high signal lesions which show a low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image, we examined 54 patients (representing 58 knees) with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee on MRI as compared with the arthroscopic findings or operative findings and histologically evaluated them. In addition, in order to elucidate what becomes of those signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone after biomechanical treatment utilizing a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) which reduces the maldistributed load, we examined 30 patients (representing 34 knees) under HTO on MRI and compared these findings with the arthroscopic findings. The incidence of the presence of those signal abnormalities of subchondral bone on MRI tended to correlate with the severity of the articular cartilage damage, and also reflected the degree of damage to the articular cartilage well. In a histologically investigation, T2-high signal lesions showed granulation tissue with high vascularity, which seemed to be an active phase in OA. T2-low signal lesions of OA in a late stage showed subchondral sclerosis histologically. In addition, the signal changes of the subchondral bone on MRI seemed correlate with the changes in the load distribution in the knee joint because T2-high signal lesions before HTO were observed to either diminish or disappear after undergoing a successful osteotomy. The signal abnormalities of the subchondral bone on MRI on OA thus helped in determining the appropriate phase, therapeutic effects and prognosis of OA. (author)

  19. Tritium concentrations in the atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan before the final testing of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Shima, Nagayoshi; Iyogi, Takashi; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in precipitation and air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Tritium concentration in monthly precipitation during fiscal years 2001-2005 had a seasonal variation pattern which was high in spring and low in summer. The tritium concentration was higher than that observed at Chiba City as a whole. The seasonal peak concentration at Rokkasho was generally higher than that at Chiba City, while the baseline concentrations of both were similar. The reason for the difference may be the effect of air mass from the Asian continent which is considered to have high tritium concentration. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH(3)T) fractions, and the samples collected every 3 d-14 d during fiscal year 2005 were analyzed for these fractions. The HTO concentration as radioactivity in water correlated well with that in the precipitation samples. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH(3)T concentrations. The HT and CH(3)T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Östlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH(3)T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH(4) to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH(3)T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic tritium in freshwater ecosystems: long-term trends in the environment of French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontier, G.; Siclet, F.

    2011-01-01

    From 1977 to 2009, more than 600 measurements of organic tritium were performed on fish, aquatic plants and sediments upstream and downstream of the 15 French NPP located along rivers. Examination of the results shows that organic tritium activities have exponentially decreased over the last thirty years, in all components of aquatic ecosystems. Upstream of all NPP, OBT levels in sediments are higher than in plants and fish, themselves larger than HTO in surface water. The magnitude of these differences and the long-term trends depend on the river basin and can be explained by the varying nature of tritium sources. In river catchment, where atmospheric test fallout is the main source of tritium, the observed levels result from the exposure of aquatic organisms to two distinct tritium pools of different ages: atmospheric tritiated water (representing present fallout), and organic tritium from soils (formed over several decades) which supplies particulate matter to surface waters. In the Rhone and Rhine river basins, an additional source of organic tritium of very low bio-availability, probably originating from the luminescent paint industry, is responsible for the spiking of sediment organic matter up to 100 to 100 000 Bq.L -1 combustion water. The comparison of upstream and downstream NPP tritium levels shows that the influence of tritium discharges is detectable only in rivers, with low background OBT activities, i.e in basins other than the Rhone and Rhine. The observed increase in plant and fish OBT is lower than the added HTO activity in water due to discharge, which supports the absence of bioaccumulation for tritium originating from HTO and the absence of highly bio-available tritiated organic molecules in NPP discharges. (authors)

  1. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T 2 ) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T 2 and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  2. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yamawaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reactor or experimental rooms is a matter of problem for safety control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate these tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were studied by combining various experimental methods. From the basic studies on tritium-cement interactions, it has become possible to evaluate tritium uptake by cement or concrete and subsequent tritium release behavior as well as tritium removing methods from them

  3. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The recent developments in the field of membrane biology of eukaryotic cells result in revival of relevant radiobiological studies. The spatial relations and chemical nature of membrane components provide rather sensitive targets. Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of X-irradiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus - of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the multifold roles of radiationinduced membrane phenomena on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries. (orig.)

  4. Radiation effects on cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1982-11-01

    The recent developments in the field of membrane biology of eukaryotic cells result in revival of relevant radiobiological studies. The spatial relations and chemical nature of membrane components provide rather sensitive targets. Experimental data are presented concerning the effects of relatively low doses of X-irradiation and low concentration of tritiated water (HTO) on various receptor functions - concanavalin A, cationized ferritin, poliovirus - of plasma membranes of animal and human cells which point to early and temporary disturbances of the composite structures and functions of membranes. References are given to the multifold roles of radiationinduced membrane phenomena on the development and regeneration of radiation injuries.

  5. Advective-diffusive transport of D2O in unsaturated media under evaporation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Amano, Hikaru; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Iida, Takao

    2003-01-01

    Advective-diffusive transport of HTO in unsaturated media was investigated empirically using deuterated water (D 2 O) and columns filled with glass beads. The tortuosity factor was evaluated by numerical model calculations corresponding to first experiment for diffusion under no-evaporation condition. Temporal variations in depth profiles of D 2 O concentrations in the columns were observed by second experiment, which considers the transferring and spreading of D 2 O by pore-water flow caused by evaporation. Measurements and model calculations indicated that diffusion was about two times more efficient than dispersion for D 2 O spreading process under this evaporation condition. (author)

  6. Guidelines for calculating radiation doses to the public from a release of airborne radioactive material under hypothetical accident conditions in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This Standard provides guidelines and a methodology for calculating effective doses and thyroid doses to people (either individually or collectively) in the path of airborne radioactive material released from a nuclear facility following a hypothetical accident. The specific radionuclides considered in the Standard are those associated with substances having the greatest potential for becoming airborne in reactor accidents (eg, tritium (HTO), noble gases and their daughters (Kr-Rb, Xe-Cs), and radioiodines (I)); and certain radioactive particulates (eg, Cs, Ru, Sr, Te) that may become airborne under exceptional circumstances

  7. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) Annual Research Report 1 October 1980-30 September 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    C parrum or BCG * (𔃾lth i’Cd (’ ie ) (IIlch I. . 4MI4 IlC.) 0 IN( 5.11 1. 17.23 f.6 (.f3 1M . • 4 (N -’C 2.’) W 0.2 2.21 0.3 1 71 J).I I 8h 4) W1-’H...to the plasma membrane. Using nitroxide spin labels, the effects of ionizing radia- tion on both the lipid matrix and protein moieties have been

  8. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Mikio [Nuclear Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T{sub 2}) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T{sub 2} and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  9. Initial experience of tritium exposure control at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, B.; Campling, D.C.; Schofield, P.A.; Macheta, P.; Sandland, K.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the safety procedures and controls in place for work with tritium are described, and initial operational experience of handling tritium is discussed. A description is given of work to rectify a water leak in a JET neutral beam heating component, which involved man-access to a confined volume to perform repairs, at tritium levels about 100 DAC (80 MBq/m 3 . HTO). Control measures involving use of purge and extract ventilation, and of personal protection using air-fed pressurized suits are described. Results are given of the internal doses to project staff and of atmospheric discharges of tritium during the repair outage. (P.A.)

  10. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C.; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l −1 ). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a ‘representative’ species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  11. Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium from Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Miyabe, Kenjiro

    2002-03-01

    Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium form Tokai Reprocessing Plant of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) were investigated by analyzing monitoring data. It was ascertained that approximately 70-80% of tritium discharged from the main stack was tritiated water vapor (HTO) and approximately 20-30% was tritiated hydrogen (HT) as a result of analyzing the data taken from reprocessing campaign's in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000 and 2001, and also that the amount of tritium released from the stack was less than 1% of tritium inventory in spent fuel and the amount of tritium released into sea was approximately 20-40% of inventory. (author)

  12. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D 2 O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H 4 > H 2 H 6 >> H 7 , enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  13. An assessment method of long-term radiation impacts to environment and public individual from tritium discharged by inland NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangguan Zhihong; Huang Yanjun; Tao Yunliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an assessment method of environmental impacts from long-term releases of tritium of inland nuclear power plant is proposed; the tritium concentrations in different environmental materials, including the two main chemical form HTO and OBT. and the radiation dose to public individuals including drinking water, food, inhalation. skin adsorption, are estimated based on the method and environmental parameters from typical inland NPP. The two discharge pathways, gaseous and liquid, are considered with particular concerns to drinking and irrigation ascribed to liquid discharge. This study would contribute to the assessment techniques of environmental impacts and safety of inland NPP. (authors)

  14. Modeling and validating tritium transfer in a grassland ecosystem in response to {sup 3}H releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dizes, S.; Maro, D.; Rozet, M.; Hebert, D.; Solier, L.; Nicoulaud, V. [Institut de radioportection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN (France); Vermorel, F.; Aulagnier, C. [Electricite de France - EDF (France)

    2014-07-01

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a major radionuclide released in several forms (HTO, HT) by nuclear facilities under normal operating conditions. In terrestrial ecosystems, tritium can be found under two forms: tritium in tissue free water (TFWT) following absorption of tritiated water by leaves or roots and Organically Bound Tritium (OBT) resulting from TFWT incorporation by the plant organic matter during photosynthesis. In order to study transfers of tritium from atmospheric releases to terrestrial ecosystem such as grasslands, an in-situ laboratory has been set up by IRSN on a ryegrass field plot located 2 km downwind the AREVA NC La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant (North-West of France), as was done in the past for the assessment of transfer of radiocarbon in grasslands. The objectives of this experimental field are: (i) to better understand the OBT formation in plant by photosynthesis, (ii) to evaluate transfer processes of tritium in several forms (HT, HTO) from the atmosphere (air and rainwater) to grass and soil, (iii) to develop a modeling allowing to reproduce the dynamic response of the ecosystem to tritium atmospheric releases depending of variable environmental conditions. For this purpose, tritium activity measurements will be carried out in grass (monthly measurements of HTO, OBT), in air, rainwater, soil (daily measurements of HT, HTO) and CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O fluxes between soil and air compartments will be carried out. Then, the TOCATTA-c model previously developed to simulate {sup 14}C transfers to pasture on a hourly time-step basis will be adapted to take account for processes specific to tritium. The model will be tested by a comparison between simulated results and measurements. The objectives of this presentation are (1) to present the organization of the experimental design of the VATO study (Validation of TOCATTA) dedicated to transfers of tritium in a grassland ecosystem, (2) to document the major assumptions, conceptual modelling and

  15. Melatonin labelled by hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope exchange of melatonin with deuterium (D 2 O) and tritium (HTO) oxides under different conditions is studied. Simplicity of isotope exchange of hydrogens of the indole ring of melatonin in the acidic medium decreases in series H 4 >H 2 >H 6 >>H 7 , that permits to suggest the way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in positions 4,6 and 2 of the indole ring. The way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in position 2 according to the reaction of desulfation 2-(2,4-dinitrophenylsulphenyl) melatonin at catalyst Ni(Re)(D) is suggested

  16. Rentabilidad diagnóstica de la perimetría pulsar y la polarimetría láser en pacientes hipertensos oculares con perimetría blanco-blanco (TOP G1) normal

    OpenAIRE

    Besil Rodríguez, María Milagros

    2016-01-01

    El glaucoma es una enfermedad neurodegenerativa, un grupo de trastornos crónicos y progresivos, con una base causal multifactorial y compleja. Es un espectro, cuyo “continumm” depende del estadio en que se le identifique. Es la segunda causa de ceguera legal en el mundo y la primera de ceguera irreversible con una alta prevalencia global. En el paciente con hipertensión ocular (HTO), como sospechoso de glaucoma, el reto para el oftalmólogo es mayor y conocer la magnitud de la existencia de fa...

  17. Estabilización de los indicadores hematológicos en paciente con policitemia absoluta secundaria tratado con Vimang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Martínez-Sánchez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta un caso del sexo masculino, de 72 años de edad con antecedentes de hipertensión arterial (con un período de evolución de 5 años que fue remitido en el 2001 a la Consulta de Hematología por presentar cifras elevadas de hemoglobina (Hb y hematócrito (Hto. Las cifras elevadas de Hb y Hto se detectaron durante un chequeo médico como resultado de que el paciente presentara pérdida de conocimiento y fuera hospitalizado. El paciente se remitió al Instituto de Hematología e Inmunología (Ciudad de La Habana para realizarle un estudio de volemia y ferrocinética, el cual mostró que presentaba policitemia absoluta moderada. Se descartó policitemia vera y se buscaron causas de policitemia absoluta secundaria sin que hayan encontrado ninguna hasta el presente. Desde este momento el paciente se ha seguido en la Consulta de Hematología del Hospital General Docente Ernesto Che Guevara (Las Tunas y cada 6 meses es chequeado en el Instituto de Hematología e Inmunología, Ciudad de La Habana. A partir del mes de abril de 2004 el paciente recibió 600 mg de Vimang® (extracto de Mangifera indica L. y se incrementó 2 meses después a 900 mg en 3 dosis separadas de 300 mg (tabletas diariamente. El presente estudio analizó la historia clínica del paciente y los resultados de todos los estudios que se le practicaron en los años precedentes al tratamiento con Vimang® y los observados durante el año que estaba bajo tratamiento. Como resultado se observó una reducción en un 50 % del número de flebotomías necesarias para mantener el paciente bajo control con respecto a los valores de Hto y Hb. Se encontraron además diferencias significativas (p < 0,05 con respecto a las desviaciones estándar de los indicadores Hto y Hb, que fueron menores en el periodo en que el paciente fue tratado con el extracto natural.

  18. Environmental and radiological impact of accidental tritium release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetat, Ph. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Patryl, L. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2008-07-15

    Within the IAEA program EMRAS, an exercise has been performed by 7 countries to evaluate the consequences of an acute atmospheric release of tritium (10 g). This study aimed at giving practical technical information to decision-makers. Three scenarios with different meteorological conditions were modeled. The objective of this paper is to give the main information about transfer and impact, evaluate uncertainties in models/assessments and so help to set countermeasures. From the results of this exercise, reference activity values for countermeasures can be discussed. All pathways and chemical forms (HTO-HT-OBT) are considered. (authors)

  19. Preparation of Tritium from irradiated lithium compounds (study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the selection of a certain scheme for release, collection, measurement and analysis of Tritium as produced in Lithium compounds (Li 2 O, LiOH, Li 2 CO 3 LiF and some Lithium alloys) in accordance with the 6 Li(n, α)T reaction. Tritium technology is of vital concern to power reactor programmes as well as to fusion technology. Meanwhile the fields of activity include, tritium generation and mangement in fission and fusion reactors; enviromental studies, release modeling HT/HTO conversion and dose assessments, absorption/ deabsorption, monitoring and plant design; research and development, labeling, compatibility and physical chemical properties

  20. Preparation of inorganic hydrophobic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang

    2009-04-01

    In order to catalyse the oxidation of tritium gas, two inorganic hydrophobic catalysts are prepared. Under room temperature, the catalysed oxidation ratio of 0.3%-1% (V/V) hydrogen gas in air is higher than 95%. Pt-II inorganic hydrophobic catalysts has obviously better catalysing ability than Pt-PTFE and lower ability than Pt-SDB in H 2 -HTO isotopic exchange, because the pressure resistence of Pt-II is much higher than Pt-SDB, it can be used to the CECE cell of heavy water detritium system. (authors)

  1. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l(-1)). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a 'representative' species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  2. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L

    2014-11-01

    A pilot study aimed on possible occurrence of elevated activity of non-exchangable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) in biota was performed. The first results showed a significant surplus of NE-OBT activity in biota of the valley of Mohelno reservoir and Jihlava river. The liquid releases of HTO from the nuclear power plant Dukovany is the source of tritium in this area. This area can be a source of various types of natural samples for future studies of tritium pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comportamiento del hierro sérico y la inmunidad celular en ancianos institucionalizados en el hogar "Santovenia" Behavior of serum iron and the cellular immunity in elderlies institutionalized in "Santovenia" old people home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martínez Grau

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: relacionado con el estado nutricional, el hierro (Fe es un nutriente esencial para la mayor parte de los tejidos. Objetivo: relacionar la anemia por déficit de hierro con la inmunidad celular en adultos mayores institucionalizados en el hogar de ancianos «Santovenia». Métodos: se realizó un estudio en 41 individuos mayores de 60 años de edad procedentes del hogar de ancianos «Santovenia», 21 portadores de anemia por déficit de hierro y 20 controles normales, a los cuales se les determinó la concentración de hemoglobina (Hb, hematocrito (Hto, hierro sérico (Fe, y se les realizó estudio de la inmunidad celular, roseta activa y roseta espontánea. Resultados: se compararon los resultados del grupo control con los del grupo muestra, para estas variables. Se realizó un estudio estadístico por el test T de Student de comparación de medias, y los resultados fueron una disminución de Hb, Hto, hierro sérico y de la roseta activa y roseta espontánea en el grupo muestra con relación al control, con una diferencia significativa para a = 0,01. Conclusiones: los ancianos que presentaban los valores de Hb más bajos (£ 9, tenían valores de Fe disminuido y la inmunidad celular afectada.Introduction: Related to nutritional status, iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for most of tissues. Objective: To relate the iron-deficiency anemia with the cellular immunity in elderlies institutionalized in "Santovenia" old people home. Methods: Authors conducted a study in 41 subjects aged over 60 from the above mentioned old people home, 21 had iron-deficiency anemia and 20 normal controls, in which we determined the hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit (Hto, and serum iron (Fe concentrations and also a cellular immunity study, active and spontaneous rosettes. Results: For these variables, results from control and sample group were compared. A statistical study was conducted by Student T test of means comparisons, and results showed a decrease of Hb

  4. Safety analysis results for cryostat ingress accidents in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Accidents involving the ingress of air or water into the cryostat of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak design have been analyzed with a modified version of the MELCOR code for the ITER Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). The air ingress accident is the result of a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary into an adjoining room. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed air mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, but that the partial vacuum in the adjoining room must be accommodated in the building design. The water ingress accident is the result of a postulated magnet arc that results in melting of a Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) coolant pipe, discharging PHTS water and PHTS water activated corrosion products and HTO into the cryostat. MELCOR results for this accident demonstrate that the condensed water mass and increased heat loads are not a magnet safety concern, that the cryostat pressure remains below design limits, and that the corrosion product and HTO releases are well within the ITER release limits

  5. Irradiation of lithium-based ceramics for fusion blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Miller, J.M.; Verrall, R.A.; Bokwa, S.R.; Rose, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    Unvented CREATE (Chalk River Experiment to Assess Tritium Emission) tests have shown that under reducing conditions, most of the tritium (greater than 70%) is released from LiAlO 2 and Li 2 O as HT or T 2 ; the balance as HTO or T 2 O. Residual tritium is very small, less than 0.02%. Varying the sweep gas composition has a dramatic effect on the form of tritium released. With a quartz extraction tube during post- irradiation heating, a He sweep gas results in 10-30% release as HT or T 2 ; with a He-1%H 2 sweep gas, greater than 60% release as HT is achieved. The effect of extraction tube material is also significant. Using pure He sweep gas, a quartz extraction tube results in 10-30% release as HT or T 2 ; stainless steel produces 80-95% as HT or T 2 . Chalk River and CEA (Saclay) - fabricated LiAlO 2 behaved similarly to that from ANL in these tests. The first vented test at Chalk River, CRITIC-I, planned for 1986/87, will examine ANL-fabricated Li 2 O, 0.3 wt% 6 Li, 30 mm ID, 40 mm OD annular pellets, in a six-month irradiation at 700-1200 K, varying the sweep gas, with on-line HT/HTO measurement

  6. Importance and variability in processes relevant to environmental tritium ingestion dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.; Barry, P.

    1997-01-01

    The Aiken List was devised in 1990 to help decide which transport processes should be investigated experimentally so as to derive the greatest improvement in performance of environmental tritium assessment models. Each process was rated high, medium and low on each of two criteria. These were ''Importance'', which rated processes by how much each contributed to ingestion doses, and ''State of Modelling'', which rated the adequacy of the knowledge base on which models were built. Ratings, though unanimous, were, nevertheless, qualitative and subjective opinions. This paper describes how we have tried to quantify the ratings. To do this, we use, as measures of ''Importance'', sensitivities of predicted ingestion doses to changes in values of parameters in mathematical descriptions of individual processes. Measures of ''ModellinStatus'' were taken from a recently completed BIOMOVS study of HTO transport model performance and based either on by how much predicted transport by individual processes differed amongst participating modellers or by the variety of different ways that modellers chose to describe individual processes. The tritium transport model UFOTRI was used, and because environmental transport of HTO varies according to the weather at and after release time, sensitivities were measured in a sample of all conditions likely to arise in central Europe. (Author)

  7. Computer program for assessing the human dose due to stationary release of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masahiro; Raskob, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The computer program TriStat (Tritium dose assessment for stationary release) has been developed to assess the dose to humans assuming a stationary release of tritium as HTO and/or HT from nuclear facilities. A Gaussian dispersion model describes the behavior of HT gas and HTO vapor in the atmosphere. Tritium concentrations in soil, vegetables and forage were estimated on the basis of specific tritium concentrations in the free water component and the organic component. The uptake of contamination via food by humans was modeled by assuming a forage compartment, a vegetable component, and an animal compartment. A standardized vegetable and a standardized animal with the relative content of major nutrients, i.e. proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, representing a standard Japanese diet, were included. A standardized forage was defined in a similar manner by using the forage composition for typical farm animals. These standard feed- and foodstuffs are useful to simplify the tritium dosimetry and the food chain related to the tritium transfer to the human body. (author)

  8. Environmental contamination due to release of a large amount of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Tritium release incidents have occurred many times in the Savannah Rever Plant in the U.S. A tritium release incident also took place in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The present article outlines the reports by the plant and laboratory on these incidents and makes some comments on environmental contamination that may results from release of a large amount of tritium from nuclear fusion facilities. Tritium is normally released in the form of a combination of chemical compounds such as HT, DT and T 2 and oxides such as HTO, DTO and T 2 O. The percentage of the oxides is given in the reports by the plant. Oxides, which can be absorbed through the skin, are considered to be nearly a thousand times more toxic than the other type of tritium compounds. The HT type compounds (HT, DT and T 2 ) can be oxidized by microorganisms in soil into oxides (HTO, DTO and T 2 O) and therefore, great care should also given to this type of compounds. After each accidental tritium release, the health physics group of the plant collected various environmental samples, including ground surface water, milk, leaves of plants, soil and human urine, in leeward areas. Results on the contamination of surface water, fish and underground water are outlined and discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Experimental studies of tritium barrier concepts for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Renner, T.A.; Pelto, R.H.; Wierdak, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ongoing experimental studies at ANL aimed at the development of methods to reduce tritium migration in fusion reactor systems currently include (1) work on the development of multilayered metal composites and impurity-coated refractory metals as barriers to tritium permeation in elevated temperature (greater than 300 0 C) structures and (2) investigations of the kinetics of tritium trapping reactions in inert gas purge streams under conditions that emulate fusion reactor environments. Significant results obtained thus far are (1) demonstration of greater than 50-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of stainless steel structures by using stainless steel-clad composites containing an intermediate layer of a selected copper alloy and (2) verification that surface-oxide coatings lead to greater than 100-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of vanadium, but that severe oxygen penetration and embrittlement of the vanadium occur at temperatures in the range from 300 to 800 0 C and under conditions of extremely low oxygen potential. Other considerations pertaining to the large-scale use of metal composites in fusion reactors are discussed, and progress in efforts to demonstrate the fabricability of metal composites is reviewed. Also presented are results of studies of the efficiencies of (1) CuO and CuO--MnO 2 beds in converting HT to HTO and (2) magnesium metal beds in converting HTO to HT

  10. Results of dose calculations for NET accidental and normal operation releases of tritium and activation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.; Hasemann, I.

    1992-08-01

    This report documents conditions, data and results of dose calculations for accidental and normal operation releases of tritium and activation products, performed within the NET subtask SEP2.2 ('NET-Benchmark') of the European Fusion Technology Programme. For accidental releases, the computer codes UFOTRI and COSYMA for assessing the radiological consequences, have been applied for both deterministic and probabilistic calculations. The influence on dose estimates of different release times (2 minutes / 1 hour), two release heights (10 m / 150 m), two chemical forms of tritium (HT/HTO), and two different model approaches for the deposition velocity of HTO on soil was investigated. The dose calculations for normal operation effluents were performed using the tritium model of the German regulatory guidelines, parts of the advanced dose assessment model NORMTRI still under development, and the statistical atmospheric dispersion model ISOLA. Accidental and normal operation source terms were defined as follows: 10g (3.7 10 15 Bq) for accidental tritium releases, 10 Ci/day (3.7 10 11 Bq/day) for tritium releases during normal operation and unit releases of 10 9 Bq for accidental releases of activation products and fission products. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Copper(II) cyanido-bridged bimetallic nitroprusside-based complexes: Syntheses, X-ray structures, magnetic properties, 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and thermal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travnicek, Zdenek; Herchel, Radovan; Mikulik, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2010-01-01

    Three heterobimetallic cyanido-bridged copper(II) nitroprusside-based complexes of the compositions [Cu(tet)Fe(CN) 5 NO].H 2 O (1), where tet=N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine, [Cu(hto)Fe(CN) 5 NO].2H 2 O (2), where hto=1,3,6,9,11,14-hexaazatricyclo[12.2.1.1 6,9 ]octadecane and [Cu(nme) 2 Fe(CN) 5 NO].H 2 O (3), where nme=N-methylethylenediamine, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, 57 Fe Moessbauer and FTIR spectroscopies, thermal analysis, magnetic measurements and single-crystal X-ray analysis. The products of thermal degradation processes of 2 and 3 were studied by XRD, 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, SEM and EDS, and they were identified as mixtures of CuFe 2 O 4 and CuO. - Three heterobimetallic cyano-bridged copper(II) nitroprusside-based complexes of the general compositions of [Cu(L)Fe(CN) 5 NO].xH 2 O, where L=N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine (complex 1), 1,3,6,9,11,14-hexaazatricyclo[12.2.1.1 6,9 ]-octadecane (complex 2) and N-methylethylenediamine (complex 3), were synthesized, and fully structurally and magnetically characterized. SEM, EDS, XRD and 57 Fe Moessbauer experiments were used for characterization of thermal decomposition products of complexes 2 and 3.

  12. Description of the new version 4.0 of the tritium model UFOTRI including user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1993-08-01

    In view of the future operation of fusion reactors the release of tritium may play a dominant role during normal operation as well as after accidents. Because of its physical and chemical properties which differ significantly from those of other radionuclides, the model UFOTRI for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental tritium releases has been developed. It describes the behaviour of tritium in the biosphere and calculates the radiological impact on individuals and the population due to the direct exposure and by the ingestion pathways. Processes such as the conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water (HTO) in the soil, re-emission after deposition and the conversion of HTO into organically bound tritium, are considered. The use of UFOTRI in its probabilistic mode shows the spectrum of the radiological impact together with the associated probability of occurrence. A first model version was established in 1991. As the ongoing work on investigating the main processes of the tritium behaviour in the environment shows up new results, the model has been improved in several points. The report describes the changes incorporated into the model since 1991. Additionally provides the up-dated user guide for handling the revised UFOTRI version which will be distributed to interested organizations. (orig.) [de

  13. Absolute measurement of a tritium standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzisehovic, M.; Mocilnik, I.; Buraei, K.; Pongrac, S.; Milojevic, A.

    1978-01-01

    For the determination of a tritium absolute activity standard, a method of internal gas counting has been used. The procedure involves water reduction by uranium and zinc further the measurement of the absolute disintegration rate of tritium per unit of the effective volume of the counter by a compensation method. Criteria for the choice of methods and procedures concerning the determination and measurement of gaseous 3 H yield, parameters of gaseous hydrogen, sample mass of HTO and the absolute disintegration rate of tritium are discussed. In order to obtain gaseous sources of 3 H (and 2 H), the same reversible chemical reaction was used, namely, the water - uranium hydride - hydrogen system. This reaction was proved to be quantitative above 500 deg C by measuring the yield of the gas obtained and the absolute activity of an HTO standard. A brief description of the measuring apparatus is given, as well as a critical discussion of the brass counter quality and the possibility of obtaining equal working conditions at the counter ends. (T.G.)

  14. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to tritiated water in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocian, E.; Ziemba-zak, B.; Rosiek, O.; Sablinski, J.

    1978-01-01

    The induction of chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by tritiated water or 180 kV X-rays in vitro was studied. Lymphocytes were exposed to various concentrations of HTO for 2 h or for 53 h. Chromosome and chromatid type aberrations were scored during the first mitotic division after stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. For the analysis of the dose-response relationship the data were fitted by the method of least-squares to different models. After acute exposure to tritium β-rays and X-rays, the dicentrics + centric rings and terminal + interstitial deletions gave the best fit to the linear-quadratic function. However, data for these types of aberrations after 53 h exposure to HTO gave equally good fit to the linear and linear-quadratic functions. The best description of the dose-response relationship for chromatid aberrations is given by the linear model. In the system studied the RBE of tritium β-rays as compared to 180 KV X-rays was 1.17+-0.02. (Auth.)

  15. Tritium in organic compounds of brain of rats exposed to tritiated water or tritiated food during three successive generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The study was performed on Wistar rats which were chronically exposed to tritiated water (HTO, 37.0 kBq/ml) or to tritiated food (48.1 kBq/g). The tritium exposure of the rats was started before mating and was continued up to delivery of the F 3 generation. The incorporation of organically bound tritium (OBT) was determined in whole brain and in some organic components of rats at various ages. The specific activity of OBT in whole brain and in its organic components with the exception of proteins significantly increased in the F 1 +F 2 generations of rats in comparison with F 0 females. The contribution of OBT to the total dose rate was about 6 per cent in HTO group and 9 per cent in T-food group. The contribution of lipids and proteins to the dose rate from OBT was similar in both treatment groups, being 60 and 20 per cent, respectively. 20 refs. (author)

  16. Tritium toxicity program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of all the findings to date is given. It appears from this information that it is possible to detect somatic, cytogenetic, and genetic effects resulting from exposures at 33 to 100 times the mpc's for HTO. Similar effects also result from exposure to external gamma rays at an equivalent dose. The reduction in bone marrow cells in animals maintaining normal total cellularity is of interest since it demonstrates both the presence of an effect at the primitive cell level and the animal's ability to compensate for this effect by recruiting stem cells from the G0 resting state. This evidence of damage together with the observed cytogenetic changes leads one to contemplate the possible importance of radiation exposures at these levels for the induction of leukemia or other blood dyscrasias. Studies to investigate this question are now under way. As predicted on the basis of established principles of radiobiology, exposure to tritium beta rays from HTO ingestion results in measurable effects on several animal systems. The importance of position of incorporation of H into molecules of biological importance has not been well defined, nor have the low-dose portions of the dose-response curve for several effects of interest. Experiments designed to address these questions and measure H turnover as a means for analysis of cell kinetics in several systems are now under way

  17. A model for global cycling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Kocher, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic compartment models are widely used to describe global cycling of radionuclides for purposes of dose estimation. In this paper the authors present a new global tritium model that reproduces environmental time-series data on concentrations in precipitation, ocean surface waters, and surface fresh waters in the northern hemisphere, concentrations of atmospheric tritium in the southern hemisphere, and the latitude dependence of tritium in both hemispheres. Names TRICYCLE (for TRItium CYCLE) the model is based on the global hydrologic cycle and includes hemispheric stratospheric compartments, disaggregation of the troposphere and ocean surface waters into eight latitude zones, consideration of the different concentrations of atmospheric tritium over land and over the ocean, and a diffusive model for transport in the ocean. TRICYCLE reproduces the environmental data if it is assumed that about 50% of the tritium from atmospheric weapons testing was injected directly into the northern stratosphere as HTO. The model's latitudinal disaggregation permits taking into account the distribution of population. For a uniformly distributed release of HTO into the worldwide troposphere, TRICYCLE predicts a collective dose commitment to the world population that exceeds the NCRP model's corresponding prediction by a factor of three

  18. Change in radionuclide content of crops as a result of food preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watterson, J.; Nicholson, K.W.

    1996-01-01

    Radionuclides, including 3 H, 14 C and 35 S, are periodically and routinely discharged from nuclear powered electricity generation sites and it is important to assess the radiological impact of such discharges on humans due to food consumption. Foodstuffs may be cooked before being eaten and this can change their radionuclide content. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a range of domestic food preparation techniques on the radionuclide contents of a range of food types. Radionuclide concentrations of tritium (free tritium, HTO, and organically bound tritium, (OBT), 14 C and 35 S were examined in a selection of fruit and vegetables that would form part of a typical diet. The foodstuffs included blackberries, broad beans, cabbages, carrots and potatoes (at two stages of development). The preparation techniques included boiling (potatoes, carrots, broad beans), roasting (potatoes), steaming (cabbage), or stewing (blackberries). In general, the radionuclide concentrations were reduced at the crops by at least 30% after preparation using any of the cooking techniques. The concentrations of 35 S fell by at least 60%, and this radionuclide showed the greatest reductions in the levels of HTO and 35 S. The results of this work indicate that the effects of cooking should be considered when assessing the dose received from the intake of foodstuffs. (Author)

  19. Tritium concentration in the air at Rokkasho, Aomori before nuclear fuel reprocessing plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, Hideki; Iyogi, Takashi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Ichinohe, Takaaki

    2007-01-01

    Three different chemical forms in the atmosphere, water vapor (HTO), molecular hydrogen (HT) and hydrocarbons (CH 3 T), were separately collected at Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, Japan, from April 2005 to December 2005, and their radioactivity was measured to clarify their regional features. Water vapor was collected by passing through a cold trap cooled at -15degC and then a column (50 mm φ) packed with 500 g molecular sieve 3A (MS-3A). Molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons were separately oxidized to water by catalysts, and then collected with MS-3A columns as a form of water. Hydrogen and CH 4 gases were added as carriers prior to the oxidation by the conventional method. Since H 2 is highly flammable, the method was modified so as not to use it. Tritium-free water vapor was added to dried air as a carrier of water produced by oxidation of HT after collecting air moisture. Conversion of HT to HTO was carried out with a Pt honeycomb catalyst, which can oxidize HT completely at 100degC. Hydrocarbons were oxidized with a Pd catalyst at 350degC and the resulting water was trapped by a MS-3A column. Water in the MS-3A column was desorbed out by heating the column at 400degC with flowing N 2 gas, and was recovered on a cold trap. Tritium concentrations were determined by liquid scintillation counting with a background counter. (author)

  20. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    A search for a Higgs boson produced in association with a pair of top quarks ($t\\bar{t}H$) and decaying into a pair of bottom quarks ($H\\to b\\bar{b}$) is presented. The analysis uses 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ Tev collected in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The search is focused on the semileptonic decay mode of the $t\\bar{t}$ system which, together with the $H\\to b\\bar{b}$ decay, typically results in a final state signature characterised by one high transverse momentum isolated electron or muon, high transverse missing momentum and six jets, of which four jets originate from $b$ quarks. Events are classified in nine different topologies depending on their jet and $b$-tagged jet multiplicities in order to improve the sensitivity of the search. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is observed and 95% confidence-level upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio, $\\sigma(t\\bar{t}H)\\times BR(H\\to b\\bar{b}...

  1. Radiolysis of water confined in zeolites 4A: application to tritiated water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frances, Laetitia

    2014-01-01

    Self-radiolysis of tritiated water (HTO) adsorbed in zeolites 4A shows differences compared to free-bulk water radiolysis. We studied the roles of zeolites on that. We took special care with the influence of water loading ratio. We first exposed zeolites to external irradiations, reproducing selectively the dose or the dose rate measured in the case of tritiated water storage. This strategy enables the characterising of the samples after their irradiation since they are not contaminated by tritium. Those experiments revealed the high stability of zeolites 4A. We used a second approach which consisted in studying the precise case of self-radiolysis of tritiated water, in order to obtain radiolytic yields representative of HTO storage. The comparison between the quantities of gas released when zeolites are exposed to the three different sources that we used (electrons accelerated at 10 MeV, γ released by radioactive decay of 137 Cs and β - released by radioactive decay of tritium) revealed the strong influence of the dose rate. Moreover, whatever the irradiation source, zeolites 4A first favour hydrogen release and secondarily oxygen release too. On the contrary, zeolites favour next a recombination between those radiolytic products, with a dependence on their water loading ratio. Several processes are discussed to explain such a phenomena, not noticed during the free-bulk water radiolysis. (author) [fr

  2. Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: RCT 2 Years RSA Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Hansen, Thomas Bruno; Lind, Martin Carøe; Nielsen, Poul Torben; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the influence of three different bone grafting materials on stability and clinical outcome of the healing open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OW-HTO) with immediate partial weight bearing. A total of 45 (3 × 15) patients were randomized to injectable calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon; Biomet-Merck Biomaterials GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany), local bone autograft, or iliac crest autograft. Stability of the bony healing was evaluated with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) up to 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). RSA revealed translations and rotations close to zero regardless of bone grafting material, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Clinically, the Calcibon group had lower quality of life KOOS subscore at 2 years follow-up. We conclude that with a stable implant and 6 weeks of partial weight bearing, local autografting is sufficient to achieve solid bone consolidation following OW-HTO. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Dose-to-risk conversion factors for low-level tritium exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for tritium-many of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. These and previous studies indicate that tritium in body water produces the same spectrum of radiogenic effects, e.g., cancer, genetic effects, developmental abnormalities, and reproductive effects, observed following whole-body exposure to penetrating radiations such as gamma rays and x rays. The only significant difference in biological response between tritium beta-rays and the other common low linear-energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as gamma rays and x rays, appears to be the greater biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays. For example, tritium in the oxide form (HTO) is about 2 to 3 times more effective at low doses or low dose rates than gamma rays from 137 Cs or 60 CO (Straume, 1991). When tritium is bound to organic molecules, RBE values may be somewhat larger than those for HTO. It is now clear from the wealth of tritium data available that RBEs for tritium beta rays are higher than the quality factor of unity generally used in radiation protection

  4. Tritium isolation from lithium inorganic compounds applicable to thermonuclear reactor breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, V.G.; Ershova, Z.V.; Nikiforov, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    Tritium separation from inorganic lithium compounds: Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 , LiF, LiBeF 3 , Li 2 BeF 4 irradiated with a beam of a gamma facility and a nuclear reactor, has been studied. In the first case the gas phase is absent. In the latter one- the tritium amount in the gas does not exceed 1-2% of its total amount in the salt. Based on the EPR spectra of irradiated salts the concentrations of paramagnetic centres are calculated. It is shown that during thermal annealing the main portion of tritium in the gas phase is in the form of oxide (HTO, T 2 O). Tritium is separated from lithium fluoroberyllates in the form of hydrogen (HT, T 2 ). The kinetics of tritium oxide isolation from irradiated lithium oxide aluminate, metha- and orthosilicates, lithium sulphate has been studied. The activation energies of tritium oxide separation process are presented. A supposition is made that chemical reaction of the HTO (T 2 O) or HT(T 2 ) or HF(TF) formation is a limiting stage. Clarification of the process stage limiting the rate of tritium recovery will permit to evaluate conditions for the optimum work of lithium material in the blanket, lithium zone to select the lithium element structure and temperature regime of irradiation

  5. Biological assessment of the enhancement of tritium excretion by administration of diuretics and excessive water in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugita, Naoki; Dohi, Seitaro; Yamamoto, Hisao; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Takehiko

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether or not the administration of diuretics and excess water after tritium exposure would have any positive reducing effect not only on the retention of tritium but also on the radiation damage of hematopoietic tissue in mice. When mice were treated with diuretics and excess water for a few days after injection of tritiated water (HTO), radioactivity within the body fluid and tissues was reduced, and the number of colony-forming units (CFU-s), clonability of splenic T cells and proliferative activity assayed by Concanavalin-A blastogenesis were increased in comparison with those in the controls. When the mice were injected with a large dose of HTO (811 MBq/mouse) to assay survival, no mice treated with diuretic and excess water died 80 days after injection, while 80% of the controls died during the first month. The final committed dose in the mice treated early with diuretics was calculated to be 60% of that in the controls. These results suggest that treatment with diuretics and excess water is useful for practical purposes when a human is accidentally exposed to tritium. (author)

  6. Biological assessment of the enhancement of tritium excretion by administration of diuretics and excessive water in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunugita, Naoki; Dohi, Seitaro; Yamamoto, Hisao; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Takehiko (University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether or not the administration of diuretics and excess water after tritium exposure would have any positive reducing effect not only on the retention of tritium but also on the radiation damage of hematopoietic tissue in mice. When mice were treated with diuretics and excess water for a few days after injection of tritiated water (HTO), radioactivity within the body fluid and tissues was reduced, and the number of colony-forming units (CFU-s), clonability of splenic T cells and proliferative activity assayed by Concanavalin-A blastogenesis were increased in comparison with those in the controls. When the mice were injected with a large dose of HTO (811 MBq/mouse) to assay survival, no mice treated with diuretic and excess water died 80 days after injection, while 80% of the controls died during the first month. The final committed dose in the mice treated early with diuretics was calculated to be 60% of that in the controls. These results suggest that treatment with diuretics and excess water is useful for practical purposes when a human is accidentally exposed to tritium. (author).

  7. Behavior of water of crystallization in CuSO4·5H2O studied by the tritium tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Jiao, Yurong; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Kano, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Tritium (T) is one of hydrogen isotopes, and its chemical behavior is similar to other hydrogen isotopes. Therefore tritium is used as one of tracers in chemical experimental tracer. As one of applications, we tried to apply this method to clarifying the behavior of water of crystallization in an inorganic material. The sample used was copper sulfate pentahydrate. First, this compound was tritiated, then desorbed the water of crystallization from the tritiated compound. Comparing the behavior of amount of substance with the specific activity, the following four matters have been found. (1) There is no relation between each T concentration of HTO water and the mass of the compound within the T concentration used. (2) It can be confirmed that copper sulfate pentahydrate has three kinds of energetically different water of crystallization by T tracer method. (3) Each T concentration of water of crystallization is different at the coordinate position, and the HTO molecule is hard to coordinate at the position having weak binding force. (4) The T tracer method is useful to analyze the behavior of the combined water in materials. (author)

  8. Influence of enhanced fluid intake on reduction of committed dose after acute intake of tritiated water vapour by occupational workers at Narora Atomic Power Station, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.K.; Mitra, S.R.; Chand, Lal

    2001-01-01

    The study of acute exposure cases of male radiation workers to tritiated water vapour (HTO) in Narora Atomic Power Station, using the bi-exponential function has provided direct practical evidence that the committed dose following an HTO exposure is directly proportional to effective half-life which in turn is inversely proportional to the fluid intake. Urine samples from these workers apparently in good health, were collected and measured for tritium concentration in urine up to maximum of 163 days after the exposure. They were advised to increase their fluid intakes to accelerate the elimination of tritium for dose mitigation. Their fluid intakes reverted to normal levels in the later stage of the post exposure period. The non-linear regression analysis of the data of tritium concentration in urine showed an effective half-life of 1.5 to 3.8 days during the period of enhanced fluid intake, 3.4 to 6.9 days during the period of normal and slightly above normal fluid intake and 23.6 to 52.3 days due to elimination of metabolized organically bound tritium. This increase in elimination rate due to enhanced fluid intake directly resulted in dose mitigation of 45.1 to 76.0 percent in different subjects. (author)

  9. Parameters on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants for Korean food chain dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, K. M.; Cho, Y. H.

    2001-12-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. In this report, results of last about 15 years' studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, were summarized and put together. Soil-to-plant transfer factors, parameters quantifying the root uptake of radionuclides, were measured through greenhouse experiments and field studies. In addition to traditional transfer factors, which are based on the activity in unit weight of soil, those based on the activity applied to unit area of soil surface were also investigated. Interception factors, translocation factors and weathering half lives, parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, were investigated through greenhouse experiments. The levels of initial plant contamination with HTO and I2 vapor were described with absorption factors. Especially for HTO vapor, 3H levels in crop plants at harvest were expressed with TFWT (tissue free water tritium) reduction factors and OBT (organically bound tritium) production factors. The above-mentioned parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops and radionuclide species and application times. On the basis of summarized results, the points to be amended or improved in food chain dose assessment models were discussed both for normal operation and for accidental release

  10. Biokinetic aspects of tissue-bound tritium in algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, S.; Kistner, G.

    1978-01-01

    For the estimate of the radiation exposure of man and for the calculation of the risk of artificial tritium from nuclear power plants, organic tissue-bound tritium is of decisive importance. In model experiments, a tritium incorporation of 61 to 71% was found from tritiated water (HTO) into organic matter of planctonic algae under reproducible conditions and this was related to the theoretical value. In further experiments the tritium release from these high tritiated algae was of interest. Kept in darkness in tritium-free, non-sterile river water, so that autolytic processes and bacterial decomposition could occur, the concentration of HTO was measured over a period of three weeks. A relatively long half-life of tissue-bound tritium was found under various temperature conditions. Therefore it must be considered that a significant retention of tritium in biological matter has to be taken into account in a natural ecosystem. In streams into which the cooling water of a nuclear reactor is released all conditions are found already for a long turnover and cycling of artificial tritium in living organisms as well as the conditions for a favourable transport of tritium by food chains to man. (Auth.)

  11. A model for global cycling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Kocher, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic compartment models are widely used to describe global cycling of radionuclides for purposes of dose estimation. In this paper, we present a new global tritium model that reproduces environmental time-series data on concentrations in precipitation, ocean surface waters, and surface fresh waters in the northern hemisphere, concentrations of atmospheric tritium in the soutehrn hemisphere, and the latitude dependence of tritium in both hemispheres. Named TRICYCLE for Tritium CYCLE, the model is based on the global hydrologic cycle and includes hemisphereic stratospheric compartments, disaggregation of the troposphere and ocean surface waters into eight latitudezones, consideration of the different concentrations of atmospheric tritium over land and over the ocean, and a diffusive model for transport in the ocean. TRICYCLE reproduces the environmental data if we assume that about 50% of the tritium from atmospheric weapons testing was injected directly into the northern stratosphere as HTO. The models latitudinal disaggregation permits taking into account the distribution of population. For a unfiormaly distributed release of HTO into the worldwide troposphere, TRICYCLE predicts a collective dose commitment to the world population that exceeds the corresponding prediction by the NCRP model by about a factor of 3. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. The Lack of Cytotoxic Effect and Radioadaptive Response in Splenocytes of Mice Exposed to Low Level Internal β-Particle Irradiation through Tritiated Drinking Water in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Flegal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Health effects of tritium, a β-emitter and a by-product of the nuclear industry, is a subject of significant controversy. This mouse in vivo study was undertaken to monitor biological effects of low level tritium exposure. Mice were exposed to tritiated drinking water (HTO at 10 KBq/L, 1 MBq/L and 20 MBq/L concentrations for one month. The treatment did not result in a significant increase of apoptosis in splenocytes. To examine if this low level tritium exposure alters radiosensitivity, the extracted splenocytes were challenged in vitro with 2 Gy γ-radiation, and apoptotic responses at 1 and 24 h were measured. No alterations in the radiosensitivity were detected in cells from mice exposed to tritium compared to sham-treated mice. In contrast, low dose γ-irradiation at 20 or 100 mGy, resulted in a significant increase in resistance to apoptotic cell death after 2 Gy irradiation; an indication of the radioadaptive response. Overall, our data suggest that low concentrations of tritium given to mice as HTO in drinking water do not exert cytotoxic effect in splenocytes, nor do they change cellular sensitivity to additional high dose γ-radiation. The latter may be considered as the lack of a radioadaptive response, typically observed after low dose γ-irradiation.

  13. Neoplastic and life-span effects of chronic exposure to tritium. I. Effects on adult rats exposed during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, D.F.; Wright, J.F.; Godbold, J.H.; Ward, J.M.; Laskey, J.W.; Tompkins, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were continuously exposed to equilibrium levels of tritiated water (HTO) during pregnancy. The tritium activities were 1, 10, 50, and 100 μCi HTO/ml body water which provided cumulative, whole-body radiation doses of approximately 6.6, 66, 330, and 660 rads. Administration of the radioisotope was terminated at parturition. Throughout their life-spans and at autopsy, the dams showed an increased incidence of mammary fibroadenomas at exposure to 330 and 660 rads. Although the data for the incidence of malignant mammary neoplasms were consistent with a linear dose response, the small numbers of tumors preclude specific definition of the dose-response curve. Postexposure life-spans for dams chronically exposed to 66, 330, and 660 rads during pregnancy were reduced by 14, 24, and 22 percent, respectively. Accelerated aging was also demonstrated in these rats: The mean age for mammary fibroadenoma onset decreased with an increasing dose of radiation. (U.S.)

  14. Observed and Modeled Tritium Concentrations in the Terrestrial Food Chain near a Continuous Atmospheric Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.A.; Kim, S.B.; Chouhan, S.L.; Workman, W.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Tritium concentrations were measured in a large number of environmental and biological samples collected during 2002 at two dairy farms and a hobby farm near Pickering Nuclear Generating Station in Ontario, Canada. The data cover most compartments of the terrestrial food chain in an agricultural setting and include detailed information on the diets of the local farm animals. Ratios of plant OBT concentration to air moisture HTO varied between 0.12 and 0.56, and were generally higher for the forage crops collected at the dairy farms than for the garden vegetables sampled at the hobby farm. Animal OBT to air HTO ratios were more uniform, ranging from 0.18 to 0.45, and were generally higher for the milk and beef samples from the dairy farms than for the chicken products from the hobby farm. The observed OBT concentrations in plants and animals were compared with predictions of IMPACT, the model used by the Canadian nuclear industry to calculate annual average doses due to routine releases. The model performed well on average for the animal endpoints but overestimated concentrations in plants by a factor of 2

  15. Effect of organically bound tritium (OBT) on pre-implantation mouse embryos in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1989-01-01

    Effect of organically bound tritium (OBT), such as tritiated thymidine and tritium-labeled amino acids, on mouse preimplantation embryos was examined in vitro. Mouse zygotes fertilized in vitro (BC3F 1 eggs x ICR sperm) were cultured in the media containing OBT in various concentrations up to the blastocyst stage. The LD 50 in terms of tritium concentrations in the culture medium were determined by measuring tritium concentrations in the medium to inhibit 50 % of embryos to form blastocyst in vitro. Tritium activities in the embryos were measured at various times during culture of embryos at LD 50 concentration in order to estimate absorbed radiation dose in embryonic cells. The LD 50 values obtained indicate that OBT could inhibit the embryonic development 1000 times more effectively that tritiated water (HTO). However, differences in LD 50 values in terms of absorbed radiation dose between OBT and HTO is not so essential, and might be explained by localized spatial distribution of OBT within the cell. (author)

  16. Effects of prenatal exposure to low-dose β radiation from tritiated water on the neutrobehavior of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bing; Zhou Xiangyan.

    1995-01-01

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice, randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, 3 of them were irradiated with β-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5th day of gestation. Their offspring received cumulative doses of 0, 5, 10 or 30 cGy in utero. Male pups were trained and examined using a set of behavioral tests that included avoidance acquisition and avoidance maintenance, open field test, hole-board dipping, a water maze, and a food labyrinth. Results were found for most parameters in the 10 and 30 cGy groups that differed significantly from results for the controls, indicating that the behavioral teratogenic effect of prenatal exposure to chronic β-ray radiation from HTO may be greater than the same dose of acute X- or γ-irradiation and that 10 cGy may be the lowest detectable dose level at which behavioral changes is detectable under the conditions used in this experiment. (author) 56 refs

  17. Effects of prenatal exposure to low-dose {beta} radiation from tritiated water on the neutrobehavior of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bing [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Zhou Xiangyan

    1995-06-01

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice, randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, 3 of them were irradiated with {beta}-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5th day of gestation. Their offspring received cumulative doses of 0, 5, 10 or 30 cGy in utero. Male pups were trained and examined using a set of behavioral tests that included avoidance acquisition and avoidance maintenance, open field test, hole-board dipping, a water maze, and a food labyrinth. Results were found for most parameters in the 10 and 30 cGy groups that differed significantly from results for the controls, indicating that the behavioral teratogenic effect of prenatal exposure to chronic {beta}-ray radiation from HTO may be greater than the same dose of acute X- or {gamma}-irradiation and that 10 cGy may be the lowest detectable dose level at which behavioral changes is detectable under the conditions used in this experiment. (author) 56 refs.

  18. Air injection low temperature oxidation process for enhanced oil recovery from light oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunio, A.H.; Harijan, K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) methods to recover unswept oil from depleted light oil reservoirs. The essential theme here is the removal of oxygen at LTO (Low Temperature Oxidation) from the injected air for a light oil reservoir by means of some chemical reactions occurring between oil and oxygen. In-situ combustion process, HTO (High Temperature Oxidation) is not suitable for deep light oil reservoirs. In case of light oil reservoirs LTO is more suitable to prevail as comparative to HTO. Few laboratory experimental results were obtained from air injection process, to study the LTO reactions. LTO process is suitable for air injection rate in which reservoir has sufficiently high temperature and spontaneous reaction takes place. Out comes of this study are the effect of LTO reactions in oxygen consumption and the recovery of oil. This air injection method is economic compared to other EOR methods i.e. miscible hydrocarbon gas, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide flooding etc. This LTO air injection process is suitable for secondary recovery methods where water flooding is not feasible due to technical problems. (author)

  19. Experimental study and phenomenological modeling of the hydrolysis of tritiated sodium: influence of experimental conditions on the tritium distribution in the effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassery, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the decommissioning of fast reactors, several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them rests on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction (SWR), in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium containing impurities such as sodium hydrides, sodium oxides and tritiated sodium hydrides. Such a hydrolysis releases some amount of energy and produces a liquid effluent, composed of a solution of soda, and a gaseous effluent, composed of hydrogen, steam and an inert gas. The tritium, originally into the sodium as a soluble (T - ) or precipitate form (NaT), will be distributed between the liquid and gaseous effluent, and according to two chemical forms, the tritium hydride HT and the tritiated water HTO. HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the distribution of tritium is necessary in order to estimate the exhaust gas releases and design the process needed to treat the off-gas before its release into the environment. An experimental study has been carried out in order to determine precisely the phenomena involved in the hydrolysis. The influence of the experimental conditions on the tritium distribution has been tested. The results of this study leaded to a phenomenological description of the tritiated sodium hydrolysis that will help to predict the composition of the effluents, regarding tritium. (author) [fr

  20. Search for Higgs boson decays into pairs of light (pseudo)scalar particles in the $\\gamma\\gamma jj$ final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

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Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Helene; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gessner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag Ingemar; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giulini, Maddalena; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Goncalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; Gonnella, Francesco; Gonski, Julia Lynne; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Goessling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Goy, Corinne; Gozani, Eitan; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Graham, Emily Charlotte; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; 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Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havener, Laura Brittany; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heer, Sebastian; Heidegger, Kim Katrin; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon Frank-thomas; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Held, Alexander; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; 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Hughes, Emlyn; Huhtinen, Mika; Hunter, Robert Francis; Huo, Peng; Hupe, Andre Marc; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Hyneman, Rachel; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iguchi, Ryunosuke; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Iltzsche Speiser, Franziska; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakel, Gunnar; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Goeran; Javadov, Namig; Javurek, Tomas; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jezequel, Stephane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Junggeburth, Johannes Josef; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanjir, Luka; Kano, Yuya; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis Fawn; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John Stakely; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James Andrew; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kersten, Susanne; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kiehn, Moritz; Kilby, Callum Robert; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klitzner, Felix Fidelio; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith B F G; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Natalia; Koeneke, Karsten; Koenig, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Konya, Balazs; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Konstantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krueger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lack, David Philip John; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Joern Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Tak Shun; Laudrain, Antoine; Law, Alexander Thomas; Laycock, Paul; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi Paul; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee JR, Lawrence; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Les, Robert; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Quanyin; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Chiao-ying; Lin, Kuan-yu; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Little, Jared David; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Jesse Kar Kee; Liu, Kun; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Peilian; Liu, Yanwen; Liu, Yanlin; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez Lopez, Jorge Andres; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Losel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Fred; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lutz, Margaret Susan; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyu, Feng; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, LianLiang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Madysa, Nico; Maeda, Jumpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magerl, Veronika; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amelia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandic, Igor; Maneira, Jose; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mankinen, Katja Hannele; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Marceca, Gino; March Ruiz, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel Edison; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Ulf Fredrik Mikael; Marti i Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez Perez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mason, Lara Hannan; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Maettig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Macek, Bostjan; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie Iain; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Joshua Angus; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McKay, Madalyn Ann; McMahon, Steve; Mcnamara, Peter Charles; Mcnicol, Christopher John; McPherson, Robert; Meadows, Zachary Alden; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Melzer, Alexander; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Merlassino, Claudia; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijovic, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuz, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Millar, Declan Andrew; Miller, David; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirto, Alessandro; Mistry, Khilesh Pradip; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjoernmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Moenig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llacer, Maria; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paraschos; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey Andre; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murin, Pavel; Murray, Bill; Murrone, Alessia; Muskinja, Miha; Mwewa, Chilufya; Myagkov, Alexey; Myers, John; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara Jean May; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Ng, Yan Wing; Nguyen, Hoang Dai Nghia; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nitta, Tatsumi; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; BIN NORJOHARUDDEEN, Nurfikri; Novak, Tadej; Novgorodova, Olga; Novotny, Radek; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Abreu Juliao Ochoa De Castro, Maria Ines; Ochoa, Jean-pierre; O'Connor, Kelsey; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver, Jason Lea; Olsson, Mats Joakim Robert; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; O'Neil, Dugan; Onofre, Antonio; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oppen, Henrik; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orgill, Emily Claire; Orlando, Nicola; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; O'Shea, Val; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, Jose Guillermo; Pani, Priscilla; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parida, Bibhuti; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasner, Jacob Martin; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Costa Batalha Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Sotto-Maior Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; 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Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, You; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zhulanov, Vladimir; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zorbas, Theodoros Georgio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2018-07-10

    This Letter presents a search for exotic decays of the Higgs boson to a pair of new (pseudo)scalar particles, $H\\to aa$, with a mass in the range 20--60 GeV, and where one of the $a$ bosons decays into a pair of photons and the other to a pair of gluons. The search is performed in event samples enhanced in vector-boson fusion Higgs boson production by requiring two jets with large invariant mass in addition to the Higgs boson candidate decay products. The analysis is based on the full dataset of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 13$ TeV recorded in 2015 and 2016 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.7 fb$^{-1}$. The data are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions and an upper limit at the 95% confidence level is placed on the production cross section times the branching ratio for the decay $H\\to aa\\to \\gamma\\gamma gg$. This limit ranges from 3.1 pb to 9.0 pb depending on the mass of the $a$ boson.

  1. Possible techniques for decontamination of natural gas from gas wells stimulated by a nuclear explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wethington, Jr, John A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Decontamination of the products from gas wells stimulated by nuclear explosions requires the removal of T, present as HT, CH{sub 3}T, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}T, etc., and {sup 85}Kr from the production stream. Flaring of large volumes of gas from the Gasbuggy well led to the replacement of radioactive cavity gas with inactive formation gas, but this would not be a satisfactory production procedure because it releases T and {sup 85}Kr into the atmosphere and wastes large amounts of product gas. Exchange reactions appear to offer promise for removing the tritium. For example, water or steam flowing countercurrent to tritiated gas in the presence of a suitable catalyst can participate in the exchange reactions CH{sub 3}T + H{sub 2}O {r_reversible} CH{sub 4} + HTO, HT + H{sub 2}O {r_reversible} H{sub 2} + HTO, resulting in the transfer of T from gas into water. Other possibilities for utilizing exchange reactions include exchange of the gas with ethylene glycol used in the gas dryer, with silicate rocks introduced into the gas stream, or with a countercurrent stream of NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2}S. As another approach, use of the contaminated gas for the manufacture of ammonia synthesis gas has potential for removal of both T and {sup 85}Kr. (author)

  2. Distribution of tritiated compounds (tritiated thymidine and tritiated water) in the mother-fetus system and its consequences for the radiotoxic effect of tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreml, W; Fliedner, T M [Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie

    1978-01-01

    The incorporation and distribution of tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) and tritiated water (HTO) have been measured in newborn rats exposed to various levels of tritium by continuous infusion into pregnant rats from day 9 until term. In the animals exposed to HTO, the tritium activity was homogeneously distributed while /sup 3/H-TdR led to accumulation of DNA-bound and homogeneously distributed tritium. The incorporated activity and the specific activity of DNA from ovaries which showed a reduction of total oocyte number by approximately 50% were used to estimate the dose absorbed by the ovarian cell nuclei in both systems. From the absorbed dose a factor of 3.7 was calculated for the 'internal relative biological effectiveness' of DNA-bound tritium as compared to homogeneously distributed /sup 3/H under the restrictive assumption that the static description of the system at birth reflects the situation during the time of dynamic development of the ovaries when the toxic effect occurs. The influence of these dynamic factors of changing nuclear size and tritium incorporation during the sensitive period is weighed against the possibility that the continuous /sup 3/H-TdR infusion during pregnancy might represent a model in which DNA-bound tritium shows a higher effectiveness than homogeneously distributed tritium.

  3. Experimental and modelling studies on the exposure of wall surfaces to tritium gas in ambient room conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housiadas, C.; Douglas, K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental set-up is used to carry out static exposure tests to study the uptake and oxidation of tritium released in ambient room air, routinely or accidentally, in the presence of selected surface materials. Tritium, in its elemental form at concentrations of the order of approx.0.4 GBq/m 3 (10 -2 Ci/m 3 ), is injected into the glass exposure chamber containing the selected surface material and air at atmospheric pressure. Periodically, samples of the chamber atmosphere are analysed, using liquid scintillation counting, to obtain the concentrations of HTO and T 2 . The exposures have been performed using aluminium, 316L stainless steel and painted stainless steel plates, as the selected surface materials. Results are compared with predictions using the ITER approved TMAP4 code. The results indicate practically the same conversion rate, of about 0.02% per day, for both the aluminium and stainless steel samples and give reasonable agreement with modelling predictions. Strong absorption of both T 2 and HTO by the painted surface is observed, suggesting the use of high values for the solubility constant to correctly predict this behaviour. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Sensitive method for continuous air monitoring for /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H. Empfindliches verfahren zur koninuierlichen C-14 und H-3 luftueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, J.; Weiss, W.

    1976-07-01

    In the monitoring of air for /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H the necessary sensitivity cannot be achieved by direct measurement, but only through continuous sampling and scintillation spectroscopy. The two radionuclides are separated from each other at the time of sampling. In addition, by a catalytic reaction over CuO at 600/sup 0/C, a differentiation is achieved between tritiated atmospheric water vapor (HTO), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and other isotopically labeled substances contained in the air. Tritium is obtained in the form of water and /sup 14/C as Na/sub 2//sup 14/CO/sub 3/. Radioactivity is measured in a scintillation spectrometer. For tritium this method has a detection limit of 0.8 pCi/m/sup 3/ or air, and for C/sup 14/ 0.6 pCi/m/sup 3/ of air. These values correspond to 15 to 30% of the mean background concentration for HTO and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ observed up to the present.

  5. Experimental investigation of buried tritium in plant and animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Workman, W. J. G.; Davis, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Buried exchangeable tritium appears as part of organically bound tritium (OBT) in the traditional experimental determination of OBT. Since buried tritium quickly exchanges with hydrogen atoms in the body following ingestion, assuming that it is part of OBT rather than part of tritiated water (HTO) could result in a significant overestimate of the ingestion dose. This paper documents an experimental investigation into the existence, amount and significance of buried tritium in plant and fish samples. OBT concentrations in the samples were determined in the traditional way and also following denaturing with five chemical solutions that break down large molecules and expose buried tritium to exchange with free hydrogen atoms. A comparison of the OBT concentrations before and after denaturing, together with the concentration of HTO in the supernatant obtained after denaturing, suggests that buried OBT may exist but makes up less than 5% of the OBT concentration in plants and at most 20% of the OBT concentration in fish. The effects of rinse time and rinse water volumes were investigated to optimize the removal of exchangeable OBT from the samples. (authors)

  6. Effect of lifetime intake of organically bound tritium and tritiated water on the oocytes of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak-Flis, Z.; Wasilewska-Gomulka, M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats were continuously exposed to constant activity of tritium in drinking water (HTO group) or to tritium organically bound in food (T-food group) in the period from conception of F 1 generation through maturity. Female offspring were killed at the age of 21 and 71 days and the oocytes in their ovaries were counted. Mean dose rates absorbed in the ovaries were for the HTO groups 7.25+-0.37 and 14.73+-0.79 mGy/day and for the T-food group 4.84+-0.25 mGy/day. Reduction in the oocyte number in the ovaries of females exposed to tritiated food was bigger than in the ovaries of females exposed to tritiated water. The dependence of the survival of small oocytes on the dose rate and the corresponding total accumulated dose had an exponential character. The damaging effect of tritium was for the period from conception to 21 days of age bigger than from 21 to 71 days of age. Of all stages of oocyte development, the highest sensitivity to tritium irradiation was observed in small oocytes and oocytes with one complete layer of follicle cells. As a result, relative number of the growing and large oocytes increased. (orig.)

  7. Retention of tritium in rats after ingestion of tritiated food or tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, I.; Pietrzak-Flis, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Biological half-lives of tritium and the values of tritium fractions eliminated with particular half-lives were determined in the body water and in the liver, kidneys, lungs, small intestine and brain tissues of two groups of rats chronically exposed to tritiated food or tritiated water (HTO). The animals were exposed from conception till the 71-st day of life. They were killed at time intervals up to 50 days after cessation of tritium exposure and then tritium in the body water and non-exchangeable tritium (NET) in the tissues were determined. The retention curves obtained from these data indicate the existence of two biological half-lives for the body water tritium as well as for NET. It was found that after the exposure to tritiated food the second biological half-lives (T b2 ) were longer than after the HTO exposure, while the fractions of tritium eliminated with T b2 were smaller. However, these differences have only small influence on the values of time integral Q of deposited non-exchangeable tritium in the tissues of both groups of rats. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  8. Quantification of exchangeable and non-exchangeable organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.B.; Korolevych, V.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the relative amounts of exchangeable organically bound tritium (OBT) and non-exchangeable OBT in various vegetables. A garden plot at Perch Lake, where tritium levels are slightly elevated due to releases of tritium from a nearby nuclear waste management area and Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) operations, was used to cultivate a variety of vegetables. Five different kinds of vegetables (lettuce, cabbage, tomato, radish and beet) were studied. Exchangeable OBT behaves like tritium in tissue free water in living organisms and, based on past measurements, accounts for about 20% of the total tritium in dehydrated organic materials. In this study, the percentage of the exchangeable OBT was determined to range from 20% to 57% and was found to depend on the type of vegetables as well as the sequence of the plants exposure to HTO. -- Highlights: ► This study was to quantify the amount of exchangeable OBT compared to non-exchangeable OBT in vegetables. ► The percentage of exchangeable OBT varied between vegetable types and HTO exposure conditions. ► Exchangeable OBT varied from 20 to 36% in un-treated vegetables and from 30 to 57% in treated vegetables

  9. Investigations into the water flow and water conduction in spruce trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, S.; Unger, H.

    1988-02-01

    The water-flow systems in the xylem of healthy and ailing spruce trees, based on the distribution patterns of tritiated water (HTO), were compared. In case of the ailing tree a severely altered water-flow system was observed. Whereas in the healthy tree the injected HTO spread in the apex in a distinctly differentiated manner following the spiral pattern of the ligneous fibers, no comparable spreading pattern was detected in the ailing tree. Also the labeled water molecules distributed twice as fast in the ailing as in the healthy tree. We conclude that the water conducting cross section of the diseased tree is reduced. Indeed, heartwood formation was about 60% in the ailing as compared to 5-20% in healthy trees. The methods of determining water content in the annual rings are described. The tissue water of needles from the healthy tree showed a distinct gradation of tritium concentrations according to age. This finding suggests that there is an age specific stomatal regulation in the healthy but not in the diseased needles. Water potential measurements at various times during the vegetation period provided evidence of a tighter water budget in diseased trees; however, a chronically enhanced water stress was not evident. The role of pathological heartwood formation during the disease is discussed. (orig.) With 27 figs., 38 refs [de

  10. A dynamic compartment mode for evaluating the contamination level of tritium in agricultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Lee, Han Soo; Kang, Hee Seok; Jun, In; Choi, Yong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo

    2006-03-15

    This report describes a dynamic compartment model for evaluating the tritium level in agricultural plants after a short-term exposure to HTO vapor and its comparison with experimental results to test the predictive accuracy of the model. The model uses a time-dependent growth equation of a plant so that it can predict the contamination level of tritium depending on the stage of the growth of the plant, which is a major difference from some other compartment models using a constant crop yield. The model is able to calculate the time variable concentrations of the compartments representing the atmosphere, soil, and plants of four categories including leafy vegetables, root vegetables, grains, and tuber plants. Experimental results include the tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and the organically bound tritium (OBT) concentration of rice, soybean, cabbage, and radish exposed to HTO vapor for 1 h in the daytime at different growth stages. The model predictions showed that the model could simulate well not only the time-dependent tritium concentration of the plants but also the effect of the growth stage of the plant at the exposure time. Comparison of the model predictions with the experimental results suggested that the model could predict reasonably well the observed TFWT and OBT concentrations of the plants considered.

  11. Distribution of tritium in the different organs of calves and pigs after ingestion of various tritiated feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmann, R.; Charles, P.; Bruwaene, R. van; Remy, J.; Koch, G.; Hoek, J. van den

    1978-01-01

    The studies reported here are related to the distribution of tritium in the organs of farm animals contaminated in various ways. Two young male calves ingested tritiated milk; the daily intake of 3 H-organic form was about 15 μCi for each calf and the total activity ingested until the sacrifice was 482 μCi. Three male pigs from the same litter and about 7 weeks old were used for each experiment of the administration of tritium under different forms. It was verified that the chemical form of 3 H present in the food is of great importance for the incorporation of 3 H in the organic matter of the animal organs. The total incorporation increases by a factor 5.6 when 3 H is ingested as tritiated milkpowder by pigs as compared to HTO and with a factor 15 for calves. When tritiated potatoes were ingested by pigs a factor 15.6 was found. The transfer of 3 H from HTO and milk feed ingested in the organic fraction of organs is lower for pig than for calf. (Auth.)

  12. Diffusion Experiments in Opalinus Clay: Laboratory, Large-Scale Diffusion Experiments and Microscale Analysis by RBS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso de los Rios, U.; Missana, T.; Cormenzana, J.L.; Mingarro, M.; Morejon, J.; Gil, P.

    2008-08-06

    The Opalinus Clay (OPA) formation in the Zurcher Weiland (Switzerland) is a potential host rock for a repository for high-level radioactive waste. Samples collected in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory (URL), where the OPA formation is located at a depth between -200 and -300 m below the surface, were used to study the radionuclide diffusion in clay materials. Classical laboratory essays and a novel experimental set-up for large-scale diffusion experiments were performed together to a novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), to understand the transport properties of the OPA and to enhance the methodologies used for in situ diffusion experiments. Through-Diffusion and In-Diffusion conventional laboratory diffusion experiments were carried out with HTO, 36{sup C}l-, I-, 22{sup N}a, 75{sup S}e, 85{sup S}r, 233{sup U}, 137{sup C}s, 60{sup C}o and 152{sup E}u. Large-scale diffusion experiments were performed with HTO, 36{sup C}l, and 85{sup S}r, and new experiments with 60{sup C}o, 137{sup C}s and 152{sup E}u are ongoing. Diffusion experiments with RBS technique were done with Sr, Re, U and Eu. (Author) 38 refs.

  13. Golden Probe of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi; Spiropulu, Maria; Stolarski, Daniel; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-12-09

    The ratio of the Higgs couplings to $WW$ and $ZZ$ pairs, $\\lambda_{WZ}$, is a fundamental parameter in electroweak symmetry breaking as well as a measure of the (approximate) custodial symmetry possessed by the gauge boson mass matrix. We show that Higgs decays to four leptons are sensitive, via tree level/1-loop interference effects, to both the magnitude and, in particular, overall sign of $\\lambda_{WZ}$. Determining this sign requires interference effects, as it is nearly impossible to measure with rate information. Furthermore, simply determining the sign effectively establishes the custodial representation of the Higgs boson. We find that $h\\to4\\ell$ ($4\\ell \\equiv 2e2\\mu, 4e, 4\\mu$) decays have excellent prospects of directly establishing the overall sign at a high luminosity 13 TeV LHC. We also examine the ultimate LHC sensitivity in $h\\to4\\ell$ to the magnitude of $\\lambda_{WZ}$. Our results are independent of other measurements of the Higgs boson couplings and, in particular, largely free of assumpti...

  14. Environmental transport and long-term exposure for tritium released in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.; Bergstroem, U.; Evans, S.

    1979-01-01

    Global cycling of tritium is studied with regard to long-term exposure and dose. Dose and dose commitment are calculated for releases at different latitudes to the troposphere, land and upper ocean layer, with particular regard to effects from release into recipients of intermediate size as, for example, the Baltic Sea. The global transport of tritium appears to be governed by first order kinetics. Compartment models based on linear differential equation systems, as used in this study, should therefore be adequate. The realism and applicability of ecological compartment models are analysed with respect to completeness of the systems of reservoirs and pathways as well as accuracy in assumed reservoir sizes and exchange rates. By introducing different biospheric reservoirs and transfer mechanisms, important carriers and recipients are identified for the analysis of tritium released to air, land and water. Terrestrial biota and groundwater are shown to be significant both with regard to reservoir sizes and influence on the land-troposphere and land-sea exchange of tritium. Model studies regarding the conversion of HT to HTO in different biospheric reservoirs indicate that an atmospheric release of HT may yield up to 1.7 times the dose commitment obtained after release of the same amount of tritium as HTO. The global collective dose commitment from a tropospheric release of tritium is 0.002-0.004 man.rem per Ci depending on the latitude at the release point. Release to the surface ocean layers gives a ten times lower collective dose. (author)

  15. Lithium mass transport in ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.E.; Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to measure the lithium vaporization from lithium oxide breeder material under differing temperature and moisture partial pressure conditions. Lithium ceramics are being investigated for use as tritium breeding materials. The lithium is readily converted to tritium after reacting with a neutron. With the addition of 1000 ppM H 2 to the He purge gas, the bred tritium is readily recovered from the blanket as HT and HTO above 400 degree C. Within the solid, tritium may also be found as LiOT which may transport lithium to cooler parts of the blanket. The pressure of LiOT(g), HTO(g), or T 2 O(g) above Li 2 O(s) is the same as that for reactions involving hydrogen. In our experiments we were limited to the use of hydrogen. The purpose of this work is to investigate the transport of LiOH(g) from the blanket material. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  16. An improved air-supplied plastic suit for protection against tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiernicki, C.

    1987-01-01

    A newly developed Saran/CPE plastic suit material is described which offers significantly better protection against HTO penetration and permeation than the 12-mil PVC currently used at SRP and most other DOE and commercial sites where tritium and HTO are exposure hazards. Tritium breakthrough time is an important parameter when evaluating the applicability of protective clothing; previously published tritium permeation tests did not measure this parameter. Future studies should quantify steady-state permeation rate and breakthrough time to more fully evaluate potential tritium protective clothing. Saran/CPE has successfully been fabricated into a plastic suit because, in addition to its superior tritium resistance, it has all the characteristics required to construct a rugged, dependable, and comfortable suit. The use of the Saran/CPE suit at SRP reactor and tritium production facilities should be a major contribution to the site As Low As Reasonably Achievable program. Both Saran/CPE have demonstrated excellent resistance to a wide range of chemical contaminants; therefore, this suit material may have applications in the general chemical industry and hazardous waste site cleanup operations. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO/sub 2/) and lithium silicate (Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/) by the reaction: Li/sup 6/ + n ..-->.. /sup 4/He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100/sup 0/C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T/sub 2/), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300/sup 0/C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T/sub 2/O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H/sub 2/O, CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, NO, SO/sub 2/, SiF/sub 4/ and traces of hydrocarbons.

  18. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the generation and evolution of tritium and helium in lithium aluminate (LiAlO 2 ) and lithium silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) by the reaction: Li 6 + n → 4 He + T. Targets were irradiated 4.4 days in the K-West Reactor snout facility. (Silicate GVR* approximately 2.0 cc/cc; aluminate GVR approximately 1.4 cc/cc.) Gas release in-reactor was determined by post-irradiation drilling experiments on aluminum ampoules containing silicate and aluminate targets. In-reactor tritium release (at approximately 100 0 C) was found to decrease linearly with increasing target density. Tritium released in-reactor was primarily in the noncondensible form (HT and T 2 ), while in laboratory extractions (300-1300 0 C), the tritium appeared primarily in the condensible form (HTO and T 2 O). Concentrations of HT (and presumably HTO) were relatively high, indicating moisture pickup in canning operations or by inleakage of moisture after the capsule was welded. Impurities in extracted gases included H 2 O, CO 2 , CO, O 2 , H 2 , NO, SO 2 , SiF 4 and traces of hydrocarbons

  19. Current understanding of organically bound tritium (OBT) in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Baglan, N; Davis, P A

    2013-12-01

    It has become increasingly recognized that organically bound tritium (OBT) is the more significant tritium fraction with respect to understanding tritium behaviour in the environment. There are many different terms associated with OBT; such as total OBT, exchangeable OBT, non-exchangeable OBT, soluble OBT, insoluble OBT, tritiated organics, and buried tritium, etc. A simple classification is required to clarify understanding within the tritium research community. Unlike for tritiated water (HTO), the environmental quantification and behaviour of OBT are not well known. Tritiated water cannot bio-accumulate in the environment. However, it is not clear whether or not this is the case for OBT. Even though OBT can be detected in terrestrial biological materials, aquatic biological materials and soil samples, its behaviour is still in question. In order to evaluate the radiation dose from OBT accurately, further study will be required to understand OBT measurements and determine OBT fate in the environment. The relationship between OBT speciation and the OBT/HTO ratio in environmental samples will be useful in this regard, providing information on the previous tritium exposure conditions in the environment and the current tritium dynamics. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Variation of atmospheric tritium concentration in three chemical forms at Toki, Japan: 2004-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Uda, T

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric tritium concentrations of HTO, HT and CH3T have been measured at Toki, Japan, for the environmental impact assessment of tritium for a fusion test facility. According to the data from 2004 to 2012, the concentrations of HT and HTO in water vapour tend to increase in spring. The seasonal variation in HT concentration at Toki was compared with the H2 concentration between 1990 and 2005 at Tae-ahn Peninsula, Republic of Korea, which is at approximately the same latitude as Toki. The monthly average of HT-specific activity varied from 1.24 × 10(5) to 1.76 × 10(5) TU. The peak of the monthly average H2 concentration did not match that of HT. This indicates that the mechanism of the production or the source of HT might be different from the production mechanism of H2. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Radioecological behaviour of elementary tritium, especially dry deposition and its dependence on soil porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstel, H.

    1997-01-01

    The inventory of fusion reactors mainly consists of deuterium and tritium. The amount of tritium of each reactor is equal to the natural inventory of the earth's atmo- and hydrosphere. Elementary tritium (HT) itself is not dangerous to man, for it is hardly dissolved in water, that is neither taken up by human tissues nor metabolized anywhere in our body. In contrast to HT the tritiated water HTO quickly exchanges with any wet surface and with the humidity of air. After an accidental release into the atmosphere the main pathway of intake into the human body is as HTO via the lung; its surface is comparable to a soccer playground. HT released into air will be quickly oxidised within the upper centimetres of the soil when the plume touches the ground. Each soil tested by us until now had oxidized HT, that had shown hydrogenase activity. Neither the biological function nor the catalytic system wee identified yet. The hypothesis of a correlation between hydrogenase activity and soil nitrogen fixation could not be confirmed (nitrogen fixation shows a leakage of hydrogen): nitrogen fixing plants (nodules) do not oxidize HT. The presentation will summarize ten years of work in the laboratory and in the field. A concise picture of the radioecological behaviour of elementary tritium after an accidental release could be obtained. The work was partly done as cooperation within the frame of the EU or within the International Union of Radioecology

  2. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  3. Iodine transfer in the Tournemire argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittebroodt, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of an underground radioactive waste disposal, 129 I constitutes for the argillaceous media one of the most penalizing elements owing to its very long life and its very low affinity. The objective of this work is to characterize the iodide transfer through the Tournemire argillite (Aveyron, France), in order to study thoroughly the iodide diffusive behaviour through an argillaceous matrix. An experimental methodology, which was based on a multi experimental method approach (batch, radial diffusion and through diffusion experiments), was applied for three different tracers: iodide, bromide, HTO. In the first part of this work, we show that the comparison between the HTO diffusion parameters and the anionic species highlights the existence of an anionic exclusion phenomenon which restricts the access of the anionic species to an accessible porosity inferior to the total rock porosity. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that our retention and diffusion experiments indicate the existence of a significant affinity between 125 I and the Tournemire argillite. The 125 I retention appears to be irreversible, or with a kinetically very slow desorption within the duration of our experiments. Moreover, this retention intensity seems to be dependent on different experimental parameters such as the initial concentration of iodide or the ionic strength of the synthetic pore-water solution. (author)

  4. Food chain of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashida, Yoshihiko; Arai, Kiyohiko; Takeda, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Ceratopteris pteriodes, soy bean and aquatic rice were cultivated with HTO, and male rats were administered with the diet containing HTO and T. T metabolism and distribution were determined separately in the free water and the tissue-bound water. T in the free water of the plants showed hardly any changes according to the sites, and that in the dry tissue tended to show high values in the stage and portion of high anabolic activity. In the animal system, the T uptake by the organic components was high, and it was rapidly excreted in tissues with a high metabolic activity, but was low, accompanied by slow excretion, in tissues with a low activity. Therefore, T excreted slowly and remained in the adipose tissue and brain containing large amounts of lipids. As for the T distribution into the tissue components, T was first distributed into small molecules and then, to large molecules after metabolism, in the fraction of hepatic tissue. The in-vivo behaviors of T-labeled compounds were varied because of their in-vivo metabolism. (Chiba, N.)

  5. Impact of the solution ionic strength on strontium diffusion through the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrocks: An experimental and modeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Beaucaire, C.; Grenut, B.; Fayette, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • HTO and 85 Sr diffusion is studied in clayrocks under increasing ionic strengths. • Sr diffusive flux is 5 times higher than HTO under standard porewater ionic strength. • Sr diffusive flux is reduced when the porewater ionic strength increases. • The Sr diffusive evolution is qualitatively reproduced by a surface diffusion model. - Abstract: Diffusion of cations in clayrocks is widely investigated, because deep clay-rich formations are currently considered as one of the potential host rocks for radioactive waste repositories. However, several authors have already reported that sorbing cations seem to diffuse at rates larger than those predicted by a simple pore diffusion model from their sorption coefficients and from the diffusive flux of non-sorbing water tracers. This process has been attributed to the migration of cations within the electrical double layer, next to the mineral surfaces, called the surface diffusion phenomenon. The aim of this work was to verify whether this “enhanced” cation diffusion compared to neutral species was observed for strontium and, if so, to what extent this effect might vary with the salinity of the synthetic solutions. These questions were addressed by performing batch sorption, through-diffusion and out-diffusion experiments on rock samples from the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone formation (France). The results showed that there was a good agreement of the distribution ratios (R D ) determined on crushed and intact rocks by batch and through-diffusion methods with a R D decrease related to the increase of the sodium concentration, a sorption competitor. Such a trend was also well reproduced by means of a geochemical modeling based on the multi-site ion exchange (MSIE) theory. Moreover, the “enhanced” diffusion for strontium was clearly observed in this study: the Sr diffusive flux was almost five times higher than that for HTO in the cell with the lowest ionic strength, and diminished to less than 1

  6. Tritium concentrations in the atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan before the final testing of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Shima, Nagayoshi; Iyogi, Takashi; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in precipitation and air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Tritium concentration in monthly precipitation during fiscal years 2001-2005 had a seasonal variation pattern which was high in spring and low in summer. The tritium concentration was higher than that observed at Chiba City as a whole. The seasonal peak concentration at Rokkasho was generally higher than that at Chiba City, while the baseline concentrations of both were similar. The reason for the difference may be the effect of air mass from the Asian continent which is considered to have high tritium concentration. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH 3 T) fractions, and the samples collected every 3 d-14 d during fiscal year 2005 were analyzed for these fractions. The HTO concentration as radioactivity in water correlated well with that in the precipitation samples. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH 3 T concentrations. The HT and CH 3 T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Ostlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH 3 T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH 4 to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH 3 T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. - Highlights: → We observed background tritium concentrations in atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan. → Tritium concentration in precipitation was high in spring and low in summer. → The atmospheric HT

  7. Tritium concentrations in the atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan before the final testing of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akata, Naofumi, E-mail: nao@ies.or.jp [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1-7 Ienomae, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kakiuchi, Hideki [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1-7 Ienomae, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Shima, Nagayoshi [Entex Inc., 1-2-8 Asahi, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0852 (Japan); Iyogi, Takashi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1-7 Ienomae, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Momoshima, Noriyuki [Radioisotope Center, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Hisamatsu, Shun' ichi [Department of Radioecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1-7 Ienomae, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in precipitation and air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Tritium concentration in monthly precipitation during fiscal years 2001-2005 had a seasonal variation pattern which was high in spring and low in summer. The tritium concentration was higher than that observed at Chiba City as a whole. The seasonal peak concentration at Rokkasho was generally higher than that at Chiba City, while the baseline concentrations of both were similar. The reason for the difference may be the effect of air mass from the Asian continent which is considered to have high tritium concentration. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH{sub 3}T) fractions, and the samples collected every 3 d-14 d during fiscal year 2005 were analyzed for these fractions. The HTO concentration as radioactivity in water correlated well with that in the precipitation samples. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH{sub 3}T concentrations. The HT and CH{sub 3}T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Ostlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH{sub 3}T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH{sub 4} to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH{sub 3}T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. - Highlights: > We observed background tritium concentrations in atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan. > Tritium concentration in precipitation was high in spring and low in summer. > The

  8. Effect of degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of poly(vinyl alcohol) by applying T-for-H exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Imai, Kazunari

    1999-01-01

    In order to reveal the effect of the degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of functional polymers, the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) having each degree of polymerization and tritiated water vapor (HTO vapor) was dynamically observed at 35-80 deg C in a gas-solid system. The reason of the observation at 35 deg C is to clarify the possibility of the T-for-H exchange reaction at a temperature near the environment. The degree of polymerization of PVA used in this work was 500, 1000, 2000, 2800, or 3500. Applying the A''-McKay plot method to the data obtained in each observation, the rate constant (k) for each PVA in the reaction was calculated. Moreover, the Arrhenius plot for each PVA was made by using the k values. Comparing the k values and the results obtained previously, the following six matters have been clarified. In the temperature range of 35-80 deg C, the T-for-H exchange reaction between HTO vapor and each PVA occurred, and in this case, the atoms participating in the reaction are the H atoms in the OH groups in PVA and T atoms in HTO vapor. The reactivity of each PVA increases with rising temperature, and decreases with increasing the degree of polymerization. The rate of the decreasing of k with increasing the degree of polymerization changes at near the degree of polymerization of 1000, and the rate is fairly large under the degree of 1000. Under the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is more affected by the effect of the degree of polymerization than by the effect of temperature, and the reactivity is large when the degree of polymerization is small. Over the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is affected by both the degree of polymerization and temperature, and the reactivity is large when temperature is high. For the T-for-H exchange reaction in a gas-solid system, the reaction form is unchanged in the range of 35-80 deg C, and the reactivity at 35

  9. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  10. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H 3 ) and re-suspension of plutonium ( 239+240 Pu) and americium ( 241 Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections

  11. Patella height changes post high tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ghim Gooi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO is a well-described treatment in early medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. However, two undesirable sequelae may follow –patella baja and changes in the posterior tibial slope (TS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in patients who underwent HTO in our center between September 2009 and February 2017. Preoperative and 6-week postoperative long-leg weight bearing films and lateral knee radiographs were assessed. Pre- and postoperative radiological measurements include the Caton-Deschamps Index (CDI, the mechanical axis deviation (MAD, and the posterior TS. Independant t-test and Pearson correlation test were performed. Results: A total of 106 knees were recruited. The mean age was 48.8 ± 10.8 years. 66 (62.3% and 40 (37.7% knees were from males and females, respectively. The mean pre- and postoperative measurements was (−9.70° ± 3.67° to 0.08° ± 2.80° (−varus; +valgus for the MAD, (7.14° ± 1.78° to 8.72° ± 3.11° for posterior TS, and (0.93° ± 0.084° to 0.82° ± 0.13° for CDI (P ≤ 0.001 for all. The association between patella height change and the level of osteotomy (supra-tubercle vs. infra-tubercle was statistically significant (P < 0.001. A supra-tubercle osteotomy cut significantly lowering patella height (P = 0.011. There was otherwise no statistically significant correlations between patella height changes and the correction angle (P = 0.187 or posterior TS change (P = 0.744. Conclusions: A medial opening wedge HTO above the tibial tubercle was significantly associated with lowering patella height or reducing CDI postoperatively. Based on our results, we would recommend the use of an infra-tubercle osteotomy during the corrective surgery to prevent the complication of patella baja.

  12. Separation setup for the light water detritiation process in the water-hydrogen system based on the membrane contact devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenkevich, M. B.; Rastunova, I. L.; Prokunin, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Detritiation of light water wastes down to a level permissible to discharge into the environment while simultaneously concentrating tritium to decrease amount of waste being buried is a constant problem. The laboratory setup for the light water detritiation process is presented. The separation column consists of 10 horizontally arranged perfluorosulphonic acid Nafion-type membrane contact devises and platinum catalyst (RCTU-3SM). Each contact device has 42.3 cm 2 of the membrane and 10 cm 3 of the catalyst. The column is washed by tritium free light water (L H2O ) and the tritium-containing flow (F HTO ) feeds the electrolyser at λ = G H2 /L H2O = 2. A separation factor of 66 is noted with the device at 336 K and 0.145 MPa. (authors)

  13. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in: the development and testing of new gas mixtures more suitable for fast neutron dosimetry using the common A150-type Tissue-equivalent plastic ion chambers; comparison of photon doses determined with a graphite-walled proportional counter and with paired dosimeters irradiated by 14.8-MeV neutrons; a detector for the direct measurement of LET distributions from irradiation with fast neutrons; LET distributions from fast neutron irradiation of TE-plastic and graphite measured in a cylindrically symmetric geometry; progress in development of a tandem fast neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray source irradiation facility; an approach to the correlation of cellular response with lineal energy; calculated and measured HTO atmospheric dispersion rates within meters of a release site; application of cavity theory to fast neutrons; and fast neutron dosimetry by thermally stimulated currents in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (GHT)

  14. Progress report, Health Sciences Division: 1982 July 1 - September 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    Research at CRNL in health physics included characterization of electrochemically etched CR39 plastic, study of superheated liquid drops trapped in gels, measurement of HTO in background gamma fields, and development of components for a wide-range reactor stack effluent monitor. Environmental research continued with local hydrological studies, adsorption/desorption models of Co-60, studies of physical-chemical processes in sedimentation in lakes and rivers, and development of methods to determine the C-14 content of CO 2 and vegetation. Research in radiation biology included studies employing recombinant DNA technology, detection of damaged bases following uv irradiation, tumor induction studies, and work on improved heat resistance in yeast. Biomedical research included the completion of I-129 dose estimations in connection with a proposed waste repository

  15. Analysis of experimental air-detritiation data using TSOAK-M1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, R.H.; Maroni, V.A.; Minkoff, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer code (TSOAK-M1) has been developed which permits the determination of tritium reaction (T 2 to HTO)/adsorption/release and instrument correction parameters from enclosure (building) detritiation test data. The code is based on a simplified model which treats each parameter as a normalized time-independent constant throughout the data-unfolding steps. TSOAK-M1 was used to analyze existing small-cubicle test data with good success, and the resulting normalized parameters were employed to evaluate hypothetical reactor-building detritiation scenarios. It was concluded from the latter evaluation that the complications associated with moisture formation, adsorption, and release, particularly in terms of extended cleanup times, may not be as great as was previously thought. It is recommended that the validity of the TSOAK-M1 model be tested using data from detritiation tests conducted on large experimental enclosures (5 to 10 m 3 ) and, if possible, actual facility buildings

  16. Migration of 99Tc in a weak loess aquifer. A field column experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.L.; Wang, X.Y.; Wang, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    The migration of 99 Tc in a weak loess aquifer was investigated in-situ with undisturbed aquifer medium columns. The columns were obtained horizontally at a depth of 32∼36 m in an Underground Research Facility (URF). Quartz containing 3 H (HTO) and 99 Tc (in the form of 99 TcO 4 - ) was introduced into one end of the columns and the columns were covered tightly. Aquifer water was introduced into the columns directly from an experimental shaft in the UFR. Effluents from the columns were collected and the activity of 3 H and 99 Tc were determined with a liquid scintillation analyzer. The breakthrough curves of 3 H and 99 Tc indicate that 99 Tc migrates a little faster than that 3 H does in the aquifer. (author)

  17. The effect of thickness in the through-diffusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, J.; Uusheimo, K.; Valkiainen, M.

    1994-01-01

    The publication contains an experimental study of diffusion in the water filled pores of rock samples. The samples studied are rapakivi granite from Loviisa, southern Finland. The drill-core sample was sectioned perpendicularly with diamond saw and three cylinder formed samples were obtained. The nominal thicknesses (heights of the cylinders) are 2, 4 and 6 cm. For the diffusion measurement the sample holders were pressed between two chambers. One of the chambers was filled with 0.0044 molar sodium chloride solution spiked with tracers. Another chamber was filled with inactive solution. Tritium (HTO) considered to be water equivalent tracer and anionic 36 Cl were used as tracers. (9 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.)

  18. Relative biological effectiveness of tritiated water on cultured mammalian cells at molecular and cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, S.; Sakai, K.; Nakamura, N.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that affect RBE values have been investigated in cultured cells. It was shown that: (1) Different RBE values were obtained with the same tritiated water treated cells depending upon the biological end-point; this may be related to target size. (2) The RBE value for one end-point (e.g. cell killing) in different cell types was often different. In some cells, the RBE value increased with reducing dose; in other cells, the value remained constant. (3) The RBE value for tritiated water seemed to fit a general RBE-LET relationship. These results suggest that although the RBE value might vary from 1 to 2 when cells are exposed to HTO, there are situations where the value becomes higher than 2; these are associated with low dose and low dose rate exposures in some cell types. (author)

  19. Effects of prenatal exposure to low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on postnatal growth and neurobehavior of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weimin; Zhou Xiangyan

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups and 3 of them were irradiated with beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) by a single intraperitoneal injection on the 12.5 th day of gestation. Their offsprings received cumulative dose of 0.036, 0.071 and 0.213 Gy, respectively. Offspring of mice were observed for postnatal growth (body weight), the appearance of four physiologic makers (eye opening, pinna detachment, testes decent, vaginal opening), the age of acquisition of two reflexes (cloff avoidance, air righting) and sensuous functions (auditory startle, pain threshold), movement and coordination functions and activity (pivoting, foot splay, continuous corridor activity), and learning and memory (electric avoidance reflex in Y-maze, conditioning reflex). It was found that results for the parameters in 0.036 or 0.071 Gy group were differed significantly from those for the controls, and for most parameters, a dose dependent effect was found

  20. Use of tritium and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    There are many kinds of tritium, sources in the environment. The maximum inventory of them is the nuclear tests, although the atmospheric nuclear test has not been carried out since 1981. So that the inventory originated from them will decrease. By the latest data in 1989, the total amount of released tritium was about 24 PBq/yr by the use of atomic energy in the world. The maximum source was the heavy water moderated reactors, for example, CANDU reactor. In the future, large amount of tritium inventory may be the fusion reactor. The test of JET (Joint European Torus) released about 600 GBq of tritium until March in 1992. 80-90% of them were tritium water (HTO). The amount of tritium released from industries and medicine are limited. Although ITER has a large amount of tritium inventory, the amount of release is seemed not to be larger than other nuclear power facility. (S.Y.)

  1. Prospects for the measurement of the rare Higgs boson decay $H\\to\\mu\\mu$ with 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions collected at $\\sqrt{s} = 14$ TeV by the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This note presents a study of the prospects for the measurement of the rare Higgs boson decay $H\\to \\mu\\mu$ using 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the high-luminosity LHC. The studies assume an average number of interactions per bunch crossing $\\langle\\mu\\rangle=200$. The $H\\to\\mu\\mu$ signal from gluon fusion and vector-boson fusion is expected to be observed with a significance of more than 9 standard deviations. The uncertainty on the Higgs production cross section times the branching ratio to dimuons normalised by the Standard Model prediction is expected to be around 13%.

  2. Update report on fracture flow in saturated tuff: Dynamic transport task for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecky, D.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Ott, M.; Mitchell, A.

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of continuing experiments on the behavior of tracers during fracture flow in saturated, welded tuff. These experiments were completed during the past year as part of the Dynamic Transport Task of geochemical investigations for the Yucca Mountain Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of fluid movement in fractures when coupled with matrix diffusion and sorption but isolated from the effects of capillary suction and two-phase flow characteristic of unsaturated conditions. The experiments reported here are continuations of experimental efforts reported previously. The behavior of three tracers [HTO (tritiated water), TcO 4 - (pertechnetate), and sulforhodamine B dye] have been investigated during flow through a saturated column of densely welded tuff from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, southern Nevada. 31 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Radio-adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive response to radiation stress was found in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells, as a suppressed induction of micronuclei (MNs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the cells conditioned by very low doses. The important characteristics of the novel chromosomal response, called radio-adaptive response (RAR), that have newly emerged in this study are: 1) Low doses of beta-rays from tritiated water (HTO) as well as tritiated thymidine can cause the RAR. 2) Thermal neutrons, a high LET radiation, can not act as tritium beta-rays or gamma-rays. 3) The RAR expression is suppressed by an inhibition of protein synthesis. 4) Several proteins are newly synthesized concurrently with the RAR expression after adapting doses, viewed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of cellular proteins. These results suggest that the RAR is an adaptive chromosomal DNA repair induced by very low doses of low LET radiations under restricted conditions, accompanying the inducible specific gene expression. (author)

  4. Search for invisible decays of a Higgs boson using vector-boson fusion in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; 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Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; 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Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-28

    A search for a Higgs boson produced via vector-boson fusion and decaying into invisible particles is presented, using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV, assuming the Standard Model production cross section, an upper bound of 0.28 is set on the branching fraction of $H\\to$ invisible at 95% confidence level, where the expected upper limit is 0.31. The results are interpreted in models of Higgs-portal dark matter where the branching fraction limit is converted into upper bounds on the dark-matter--nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the dark-matter particle mass, and compared to results from the direct dark-matter detection experiments.

  5. Recent Updates to the MELCOR 1.8.2 Code for ITER Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J

    2007-05-01

    This report documents recent changes made to the MELCOR 1.8.2 computer code for application to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), as required by ITER Task Agreement ITA 81-18. There are four areas of change documented by this report. The first area is the addition to this code of a model for transporting HTO. The second area is the updating of the material oxidation correlations to match those specified in the ITER Safety Analysis Data List (SADL). The third area replaces a modification to an aerosol tranpsort subroutine that specified the nominal aerosol density internally with one that now allows the user to specify this density through user input. The fourth area corrected an error that existed in an air condensation subroutine of previous versions of this modified MELCOR code. The appendices of this report contain FORTRAN listings of the coding for these modifications.

  6. Recent Updates to the MELCOR 1.8.2 Code for ITER Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J

    2007-04-01

    This report documents recent changes made to the MELCOR 1.8.2 computer code for application to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), as required by ITER Task Agreement ITA 81-18. There are four areas of change documented by this report. The first area is the addition to this code of a model for transporting HTO. The second area is the updating of the material oxidation correlations to match those specified in the ITER Safety Analysis Data List (SADL). The third area replaces a modification to an aerosol tranpsort subroutine that specified the nominal aerosol density internally with one that now allows the user to specify this density through user input. The fourth area corrected an error that existed in an air condensation subroutine of previous versions of this modified MELCOR code. The appendices of this report contain FORTRAN listings of the coding for these modifications.

  7. Radioactive and dye tracer studies for the NWNT sewerage outfall, Hong Kong, and comparison to near-field modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A monitoring programme for the North West New Territories (NWNT) sewage outfall, located in the Urmston Road channel in Hong Kong, was completed in 1996. This included three surveys measuring effluent behaviour and oceanographic conditions near the outfall. Radioisotopes gold-198 (γ energy 0.42 MeV, half-life 2.7 days) and tritium (as tritiated water, HTO, β energy 0.018 MeV, half-life 12.3 years) were used to trace the effluent discharging from the outfall during both a wet season and dry season survey. The effluent was also simultaneously tagged with Rhodamine dye which was detected with fluorometers. The gold-198 was generally traced in real time using submersible detectors, while the tritium was measured in the laboratory from sea water samples using liquid scintillation techniques. The Radioisotopes and dye measurement techniques were progressively refined over the surveys and a reliable equipment arrangement and sampling procedure was established

  8. Tritium toxicity in postnatally developing brain: Effects of single administration on nucleic acids and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Saraswat, A.

    1988-01-01

    The brains of postnatally developing mice were studied at one, two, three, four, five and six weeks of age after injecting one day old neonates (1.95 ± 0.35 g) with 11.1 kBq and 111 kBq/ml of bondy water. The HTO-exposed developing animals though do not show any significant decline in their brain and body weight, their DNA concentration was found significantly depleted at one week by 19% after the treatment with 111 kBq dose and subsequently recovered by six week reaching 93% of the control. Protein concentration showed significant deficit in both the dose groups at all the postnatal invervals. Protein/DNA ratio increased in one and two weeks old mice and reduced from weeks onward. RNA/DNA ratio has also been found consistently low in irradiated groups. (orig.) [de

  9. Diffusion of water, cesium and neptunium in pores of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puukko, E.; Heikkinen, T.; Hakanen, M.

    1993-10-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is investigating the feasibility to dispose of spent nuclear fuel within Finland. The present plan calls for the repository to be located in crystalline rock at a depth of several hundred meters. The safety assessment of the repository includes calculations of migration of waste nuclides. The flow of waste elements in groundwater will be retarded through sorption interaction with minerals and through diffusion into rock. Diffusion is the only mechanism retarding the migration of non-sorbing species and, it is expected to be the dominating retardation mechanism of many of the sorbing elements. In the investigation the simultaneous diffusion of tritiated water (HTO), cesium and neptunium in rocks of TVO investigation sites at Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara were studied. (11 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.)

  10. Determination of tritium in wine and wine yeast samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotarlea, Monica-Ionela; Paunescu, Niculina; Galeriu, D.; Mocanu, N.; Margineanu, R.; Marin, G.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for evaluating the tritium content in wine and wine yeast was applied to estimate tritium impact on the environment in the surrounding area of nuclear power plant Cernavoda, where the vineyards are part of representative agricultural ecosystem. Analytical procedures were developed to determine HTO in wine and wine yeast samples. The content of organic compounds affecting the LSC measurement is reduced by fractionating distillation for wine samples and azeotropic distillation followed by fractional distillation for wine yeast samples. Finally, the water samples obtained after fractional distillation were normally distilled with KMO 4 . The established procedures were successfully applied for wine and wine yeast samples from Mulfatlar harvests of the years 1995 and 1996. (authors)

  11. The mass transfers of water by diffusion and permeation through a covering of wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoing, G.; Duding, B.; Margrita, R.; Launay, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments described in this article is to measure the transfer conditions similarly to the reality 'in situ', for a barrier constituted of sodic bentonite. For that purpose, these experiments were realized with a possibility of distension into the material receiving the membrane. The studied samples are constituted by a film of heavy, strong, durable and supple propylene coated with a bed of particles of sodic mineral bentonite. This clay is covered with a thin film of polyester for the mechanical protection (transport, placing). The characterisation of water transfer was realized with non mineral tritiated water HTO, nH 2 0 with a specific activity of 37 GBq.m -3 (1 Ci.m -3 ) and placed in the upward cavity of the permeameter. Diffusion, permeation and permeability coefficients are determined under pressure of 0.15.10 5 Pa (1.50 meter of water) and 10 5 Pa (10 meters of water)

  12. Guidelines for calculating radiation doses to the public from a release of airborne radioactive material under hypothetical accident conditions in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This standard provides guidelines and a methodology for calculating effective doses and thyroid doses to people (either individually or collectively) in the path of airborne radioactive material released from a nuclear facility following a hypothetical accident. The radionuclides considered are those associated with substances having the greatest potential for becoming airborne in reactor accidents: tritium (HTO), noble gases and their daughters, radioiodines, and certain radioactive particulates (Cs, Ru, Sr, Te). The standard focuses on the calculation of radiation doses for external exposures from radioactive material in the cloud; internal exposures for inhalation of radioactive material in the cloud and skin penetration of tritium; and external exposures from radionuclides deposited on the ground. It uses as modified Gaussian plume model to evaluate the time-integrated concentration downwind. (52 refs., 12 tabs., 21 figs.)

  13. Fast neutron dosimetry. Progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attix, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in: the development and testing of new gas mixtures more suitable for fast neutron dosimetry using the common A150-type Tissue-equivalent plastic ion chambers; comparison of photon doses determined with a graphite-walled proportional counter and with paired dosimeters irradiated by 14.8-MeV neutrons; a detector for the direct measurement of LET distributions from irradiation with fast neutrons; LET distributions from fast neutron irradiation of TE-plastic and graphite measured in a cylindrically symmetric geometry; progress in development of a tandem fast neutron and 60 Co gamma ray source irradiation facility; an approach to the correlation of cellular response with lineal energy; calculated and measured HTO atmospheric dispersion rates within meters of a release site; application of cavity theory to fast neutrons; and fast neutron dosimetry by thermally stimulated currents in Al 2 O 3

  14. Comparison of the reactivity of the materials having two different kinds of functional groups by applying hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, H.; Yumoto, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between m- (or p-) aminobenzoic acid and HTO vapor has been observed in order to estimate the scale of the reactivity of the material. Each rate constant has been obtained by the A''-McKay plot method. Comparing the rate constants, the following three items have been confirmed: (1) the reactivity of both COOH and NH 2 groups increases with temperature; (2) the degree of the effect of the COOH (or NH 2 ) group on the reactivity in m-aminobenzoic acid is larger than that in p-aminobenzoic acid; (3) the A''-McKay plot method is useful in studying the reactivity of the materials not only with one (or the same kinds of) functional group(s), but also with two different kinds of functional groups. (orig.)

  15. Experimental study of the tritium uptake in mammal tissues and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeune, P.; Lambotte, J.M.; Lafontaine, A.

    1975-01-01

    The authors study the tritium-labelling of ADN in rabbits who receive the tritium as HTO in their drinking water during periods of one to three months. On the basis of the MPC for tritium (according to the belgian legislation, 30 μCi/l in drinking water of occupational workers for 168 h/week exposure) it is stated that for rabbits, this value of continuous impregnation by drinking water must be exceeded by a factor 100 to observe a measurable tritium activity in the ADN, isolated from tissue with fast turnover rate, such as bone marrow. The structural molecules proteins, lipids and carbon hydrates of different organs are labelled with tritium at 5 MPC, th lowest examined concentration. These statements do not evaluate whether the observed phenomenon of tritium labelling is hazardous or not, but rather tend to establish an order of magnitude

  16. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    Each potential source of Nevada Test Site (NTS) emissions was characterized by one of the following methods: (1) monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at the NTS; (2) a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclide are released to the environment; (3) the measurement of tritiated water (as HTO or T 2 O) concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. The emissions for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) reporting are listed. They are very conservative and are used in Section 3 to calculate the EDE to the maximally exposed individual offsite. Offsite environmental surveillance data, where available, are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative

  17. Probabilistic and possibilistic approach for assessment of radiological risk due to organically bound and tissue free water tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahiya, Sudhir; Hegde, A.G.; Joshi, M.L.; Verma, P.C.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    This study illustrates use of two approaches namely probabilistic using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) and possibilistic using fuzzy α-cut (FAC) to estimate the radiological cancer risk to the population from ingestion of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tissue free water tritium (TFWT) from fish consumption from the Rana Pratap Sagar Lake (RPSL), Kota. Using FAC technique, radiological cancer risk rate (year -1 ) at A αl.0 level were 1.15E-08 and 1.50E-09 for OBT and TFWT respectively from fish ingestion pathway. The radiological cancer risk rate (year -1 ) using MCS approach at 50th percentile (median) level is 1.14E-08 and 1.49E-09 for OBT and HTO respectively from ingestion of fresh water fish. (author)

  18. Application of the permeation to the production of low radioactive calibrated gas flows. Low radioactive tritium measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot, Guy.

    1979-12-01

    The permeation of compounds (HT, HTO, 131 ICH 3 , and 129 ICH 3 ) through organic membranes in view of producing low radioactive calibrated gas flows has been studied. This process of which the diffusion is the main stage enables respecting certain conditions (choice of the membrane, temperature, partial pressure differential) our aims to be reached with a good accuracy. In order to measure radioactivity of tritiated standard gases, a detector was built. This detector is an Oeschger type proportional counter with a total volume of 17.4 dm 3 and an useful volume of 3.9 dm 3 . In the conditions of operation, the background is of 1.7.10 -6 I s -1 cm -3 . The counter coupled with a feed-rack enables various samples to be measured and it is possible in the best conditions to detect some 10 -11 μCi cm -3 NTP [fr

  19. Investigation on processing technology for tritiated water in glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Deli; Meng Daqiao

    2002-01-01

    A 0.5 nm molecular sieve absorption column and a hot decomposing magnesium bed was found to be one of the effective means to collect and decompose HTO in glove box atmosphere. The absorption characteristics of the 0.5 nm molecular sieve column and water decomposing characteristics of the hot Mg bed were obtained. The results showed that the column absorbs water vapour from air with efficiency up to 99.99%. Water in tested gases was between 3.4 x 10 3 to 4.2 x 10 3 μg·g -1 and the total water absorbed on the column was up to 162 g, under this condition no water was detected in output gases. Using the hot magnesium bed more than 99.9% desorption water from the column was decomposed

  20. FMECA about pre-treatment system for purge gas of test blanket module in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Wanfa; Luo Deli; Tang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The pre-treatment system for purge gas of TBM will be installed in Port Cell for installing TBM in ITER, the function of which includes filtering purge gas, removing HTO, cooling, and adjusting flow rate, etc. The purge gas treated will be conveyed into TES (Tritium Extraction System). The technological process and system components in pre-treatment system were introduced. Tritium releasing risk was regarded as failure criterion; failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) were carried out and several weaknesses or failure mode in the system were found. Besides, risk priority number (RPN) and failure mode criticality were calculated. Finally, some design improvement measures and usage compensation measures were given. At last, four important potential failure modes were found out. The analysis will provide the design basis for reducing risk of excessive tritium releasing, which is also a useful assist for safety analysis about other tritium system. (authors)

  1. ACUTRI a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Noguchi, H; Ryufuku, S; Sasaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: i...

  2. Electronic and steric effects in regioselective tritiation of anilides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OOhashi, Kunio; Udo, Masato (Chiba Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Arts and Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Acetanilide, propionanilide and isobutyranilide were tritiated at the ortho positions with very high regioselectivity by heating with HTO in the presence of RhCl[sub 3][center dot]3H[sub 2]O in N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF). In this reaction for pivalanilide the specific activity alone was determined, because attempts to establish the regioselectivity were unsuccessful. The extent of tritium incorporation decreased with increasing bulkiness of the alkyl groups. Only slight tritium was introduced by the same reaction for trifluoroacetanilide, which would probably be attributed to a strong electron-attracting property of the trifluoromethyl group. The above findings give support to the previous suggestion that the present isotope exchange reaction proceeds via an initial coordination of the nitrogen atom of anilides to the rhodium (III) chloride trihydrate catalyst. (author).

  3. Tritium distribution ratios between the 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD) organic phase and uranyl nitrate-nitric acid aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Uchiyama, Gunzou; Sugikawa, Susumu; Maeda, Mitsuru; Tsujino, Takeshi.

    1989-10-01

    Tritium distribution ratios between the organic and aqueous phases were measured for the system of 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD)/uranyl nitrate-nitric acid water. It was confirmed that tritium is extracted by TBP into the organic phase in both chemical forms of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated nitric acid (TNO 3 ). The value of tritium distribution ratio ranged from 0.002 to 0.005 for the conditions of 0-6 mol/L nitric acid, 0.5-800 mCi/L tritium in aqueous phase, and 0-125 g-U/L uranium in organic phase. Isotopic distribution coefficient of tritium between the organic and aqueous phases was observed to be about 0.95. (author)

  4. The measurement of tritium in Canadian food items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    Food items locally grown near Perth, Ontario and grocery store produce and locally grown items from the Pickering-Ajax area in the vicinity of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) have been analyzed for free water tritium (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT). The technique of measuring 3 He ingrowth in samples by mass spectrometry has been used because of its sensitivity and freedom from opportunity for contamination during processing and measurement. Concentrations observed at each site were of the order expected on the basis of known levels of tritium in the local atmosphere and precipitation. There was considerable variation between different materials and limited correlation between materials of a single type. (author). 10 refs., 8 tabs., 4 figs

  5. TRIF - an intermediate approach to environmental tritium modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    The movement of tritium through the environment, from an initial atmospheric release to selected end points in the food chain, involves a series of closely coupled and complex processes which are, consequently, difficult to model. TRIF (tritium transfer into food) provides a semi-empirical approach to this transport problem, which can be adjusted to bridge the gap between simple steady state approximations and a fully coupled model of tritium dispersion and migration (Higgins et al., 1996). TRIF provides a time-dependent description of the behaviour of tritium in the form of tritium gas (HT) and tritiated water (HTO) as it enters and moves through the food chain into pasture, crops and animals. This includes a representation of the production and movement of organically bound tritium (OBT). (Author)

  6. Procedures for the retention of gaseous tritium released from a tritium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, H.; Bracha, M.

    1987-01-01

    General aim of the study is the comparison of two alternative processes for the retention of gaseous tritium which is released during normal operation and emergency operation in a tritium-enrichment-plant. Two processes for the retention of tritium were compared: 1. Oxidation-process. The hydrogen-gas containing HT will be burnt on an oxidation catalyst to H 2 O and HTO. In a subsequent step the water will be removed from the process by condensation, freezing and adsorption. 2. TROC-process (Tritium Removal by Organic Compounds). The tritium is added to an organic compound (acid) via catalyst. This reaction is irreversible and leads to solid products. (orig./RB) [de

  7. Doses due to tritium releases by NET - data base and relevant parameters on biological tritium behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S.

    1990-12-01

    This study gives an overview on the current knowledge about the behaviour of tritium in plants and in food chains in order to evaluate the ingestion pathway modelling of existing computer codes for dose estimations. The tritium uptake and retention by plants standing at the beginning of the food chains is described. The different chemical forms of tritium, which may be released into the atmosphere (HT, HTO and tritiated organics), and incorporation of tritium into organic material of plants are considered. Uptake and metabolism of tritiated compounds in animals and man are reviewed with particular respect to organically bound tritium and its significance for dose estimations. Some basic remarks on tritium toxicity are also included. Furthermore, a choice of computer codes for dose estimations due to chronic or accidental tritium releases has been compared with respect to the ingestion pathway. (orig.) [de

  8. Crypt cell population kinetics in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Gupta, M.L.; Saharan, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    The behaviour of crypt cell population in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water (HTO) has been studied. Adult mice were maintained on tritiated drinking water of the activity of 1.25 μCi/ml, after priming injection. The crypts were studied at 1, 5, 7, 15 and 30 days after the initiation of treatment. It is observed that there is a partial recovery in proliferative activity after the first day of the treatment. Again there is a decrease in the crypt cells on the 7th day, after which this population appears to achieve a near-steady-state level at about 8% below normal at the last interval studied. Crypt cell population and mitotic figures showed a simultaneous dip and recovery, while dead cells showed inverse relationship. (orig.) [de

  9. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  10. The cycling of tritium and other radionuclides of global character in different types of ecosystems. Part of a coordinated programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuthamanop, A.

    1978-11-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the uptake and release of tritium by the body water and tissue in the fresh water fish under laboratory conditions. Two species of fresh water fishes were used for this experimentation, namely, Helostoma temmincki and Tilapia nilotica. The results obtained were that the uptake of tritium by body water of both fresh water fishes reached equilibrium with the pool specific activity very quickly, i.e. Helostoma temmincki and Tilapia nilotica, both of them showed approximately 4 hours after exposure to HTO to reach equilibrium where as the release of tritium by the body water showed that about 11 hours the activity remained constant after transfer to inactive water. This two species of fresh water fish showed no significant difference in behaviour of uptake and release of tritium by the body water

  11. Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs and $Z$ bosons with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; 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Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Pe