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Sample records for htgr hydrogen production

  1. Present status of research on hydrogen energy and perspective of HTGR hydrogen production system

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    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    A study was performed to make a clear positioning of research and development on hydrogen production systems with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) under currently promoting at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute through a grasp of the present status of hydrogen energy, focussing on its production and utilization as an energy in future. The study made clear that introduction of safe distance concept for hydrogen fire and explosion was practicable for a HTGR hydrogen production system, including hydrogen properties and need to provide regulations applying to handle hydrogen. And also generalization of hydrogen production processes showed technical issues of the HTGR system. Hydrogen with HTGR was competitive to one with fossil fired system due to evaluation of production cost. Hydrogen is expected to be used as promising fuel of fuel cell cars in future. In addition, the study indicated that there were a large amount of energy demand alternative to high efficiency power generation and fossil fuel with nuclear energy through the structure of energy demand and supply in Japan. Assuming that hydrogen with HTGR meets all demand of fuel cell cars, an estimation would show introduction of the maximum number of about 30 HTGRs with capacity of 100 MWt from 2020 to 2030. (author)

  2. A hybrid HTGR system producing electricity, hydrogen and such other products as water demanded in the Middle East

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    Yan, X., E-mail: yan.xing@jaea.go.jp; Noguchi, H.; Sato, H.; Tachibana, Y.; Kunitomi, K.; Hino, R.

    2014-05-01

    Alternative energy products are being considered by the Middle East countries for both consumption and export. Electricity, water, and hydrogen produced not from oil and gas are amongst those desirable. A hybrid nuclear production system, GTHTR300C, under development in JAEA can achieve this regional strategic goal. The system is based on a 600 MWt HTGR and equipped to cogenerate electricity by gas turbine and seawater desalination by using only the nuclear plant waste heat. Hydrogen is produced via a thermochemical water-splitting process driven by the reactor's 950 °C heat. Additionally process steam may be produced for industrial uses. An example is shown of manufacturing soda ash, an internationally traded commodity, from using the steam produced and the brine discharged from desalination. The nuclear reactor satisfies nearly all energy requirements for the hybrid generations without emitting CO{sub 2}. The passive safety of the reactor as described in the paper permits proximity of siting the reactor with the production facilities to enhance energy transmission. Production flowsheet of the GTHTR300C is given for up to 300 MWe electricity, 58 t/day hydrogen, 56,000 m{sup 3}/day potable water, 3500 t/day steam, and 1000 t/day soda ash. The production thermal efficiency reaches 88%.

  3. HTGR-INTEGRATED COAL TO LIQUIDS PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

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    Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood

    2010-10-01

    As part of the DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) nuclear energy development mission, the INL is leading a program to develop and design a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which has been selected as the base design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Because an HTGR operates at a higher temperature, it can provide higher temperature process heat, more closely matched to chemical process temperatures, than a conventional light water reactor. Integrating HTGRs into conventional industrial processes would increase U.S. energy security and potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), particularly CO2. This paper focuses on the integration of HTGRs into a coal to liquids (CTL) process, for the production of synthetic diesel fuel, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The plant models for the CTL processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The models were constructed with plant production capacity set at 50,000 barrels per day of liquid products. Analysis of the conventional CTL case indicated a potential need for hydrogen supplementation from high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), with heat and power supplied by the HTGR. By supplementing the process with an external hydrogen source, the need to “shift” the syngas using conventional water-gas shift reactors was eliminated. HTGR electrical power generation efficiency was set at 40%, a reactor size of 600 MWth was specified, and it was assumed that heat in the form of hot helium could be delivered at a maximum temperature of 700°C to the processes. Results from the Aspen Plus model were used to perform a preliminary economic analysis and a life cycle emissions assessment. The following conclusions were drawn when evaluating the nuclear assisted CTL process against the conventional process: • 11 HTGRs (600 MWth each) are required to support production of a 50,000 barrel per day CTL facility. When compared to conventional CTL production, nuclear integration decreases coal

  4. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

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    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  5. LABORATORY-SCALE PRODUCTION OF ADU GELS BY EXTERNAL GELATION FOR AN INTERMEDIATE HTGR NUCLEAR

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    S Simbolon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available LABORATORY-SCALE PRODUCTION OF ADU GELS BY EXTERNAL GELATION FOR AN INTERMEDIATE HTGR NUCLEAR. The The aim of this research is to produce thousands of microsphere ADU (Ammonium Diuranate gels by using external gelation for an intermediate HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor nuclear fuel in laboratory-scale. Microsphere ADU gels were based on sol-solution which was made from a homogeneous mixture of ADUN (Acid Deficient Uranyl Nitrate which was containing uranyl ion in high concentration, a water soluble organic compound PVA (Polyvinyl Alcohol and THFA (Tetrahydrofurfuryl Alcohol. The simple unified home made laboratory experimental machine was developed to replace test tube experiment method which was once used due to a tiny amount of microsphere ADU gels produced. It consists of four main parts: tank filled sol-solution connecting to peristaltic pump and vibrating nozzle, preliminary gelation and gelation column. The machine has successfully converted 150 mL sol-solution into thousands of drops which produced 120 - 130 drops in each minute in steady state in ammonia gas free sector. Preliminary gelation reaction was carried out in ammonia gas sector where drops react with ammonia gas in a bat an eye followed by gelation reaction in column containing ammonia solution 7 M. In ageing process, ADU gels were collected and submerged into a vessel containing ammonia solution which was shaken for 1 hour in a shaker device. Isopropyl alcohol (90% solution was used to wash ADU gels and a digital camera was used to measured spherical form of ADU gels. Diameters in spherical spheroid form were found between 1.8 mm until 2.2 mm. The spherical purity of ADU gels were 10% - 20% others were oblate, prolate spheroid and microsphere which have hugetiny of dimples on the surface.   PRODUKSI GEL ADU SKALA LABORATORIUM DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN GELASI EKSTERNAL UNTUK BAHAN BAKAR ANTARA HTGR. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membuat ribuan gel bulat ADU (Ammonium

  6. Analysis of fission product behavior in the Saclay Spitfire Loop Test SSL-1. [HTGR

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    Jensen, D.D.; Haire, M.J.; Ballagny, A.

    1978-02-01

    The behavior of the fission metal cesium and the fission gases krypton and xenon in the Saclay Spitfire Loop SSL-1 test has been compared to that predicted using General Atomic reference data and computer code models. This is the first in a series of analyses planned in order to provide quantitative validation of HTGR fission product design methods. In this analysis, the first attempt to rigorously verify fission product design methods, the FIPERQ code was used to model the diffusion of cesium graphite and release to the coolant stream. The comparisons showed that the cesium profile shape in the graphite web and the partition coefficient between fuel rod matrix material and fuel element graphite were correctly modeled, although the overall release was significantly underpredicted. Uncertainties in the source term (fissile particle failure fraction) and total release to the coolant precluded an accurate appraisal of the validity of FIPERQ. However, several recommendations are presented to improve the applicability of future in-pile test data for the validation of fission metal release codes. The half-life dependence of fission gas release during irradiation was found to be in good agreement with the model used in the reference design materials, providing assurance that this aspect of the fission gas release predictions is properly modeled.

  7. Hydrogen production

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    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  8. HTGR Fuel performance basis

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    Shamasundar, B.I.; Stansfield, O.M.; Jensen, D.D.

    1982-05-01

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 1600/sup 0/C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 2660/sup 0/C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents.

  9. Status of HTGR development program in Japan

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    Sanokawa, Konomo; Fujishiro, Toshio; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Considering global warming due to emission of greenhouse gases it is essentially important to make efforts to obtain a more reliable and stable energy supply by extending use of nuclear energy which includes high temperature heat generated by nuclear power plants. Hence, efforts should be made continuously to establish and upgrade technologies of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which can supply high temperature heat with high thermal efficiency and high heat-utilizing rate. It is also expected that making basic research at high temperature using HTGR will contribute to innovative basic research in the future. The construction of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is an HTGR with the maximum helium gas coolant temperature of 9500C at the reactor outlet, was decided by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan (JAEC) in 1987 and successfully completed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Functional tests of the HTTR have been carried out since May 1996. First criticality will be attained in the near future. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Heat utilization system is planned to be connected to the HTTR and demonstrated at the initial stage of the second core. Steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production is adopted as an HTTR heat utilization system. The JAERI also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as innovative basic research as well as safety demonstration tests after attaining coolant gas temperature of 950C. Preliminary tests on selected research subjects such as new semiconductors, superconductors and composite material development, have been carried out at high temperature and under irradiation. This paper describes major features of the HTTR, present status of its construction and prospects on test programs using the HTTR, and the other activity on HTGRs in Japan. 2 refs.

  10. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

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    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  11. HTGR Economic / Business Analysis and Trade Studies Market Analysis for HTGR Technologies and Applications

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    Richards, Matt [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Chris [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report provides supplemental information to the assessment of target markets provided in Appendix A of the 2012 Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Industry Alliance (NIA) business plan [NIA 2012] for deployment of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in the 2025 – 2050 time frame. This report largely reiterates the [NIA 2012] assessment for potential deployment of 400 to 800 HTGR modules (100 to 200 HTGR plants with 4 reactor modules) in the 600-MWt class in North America by 2050 for electricity generation, co-generation of steam and electricity, oil sands operations, hydrogen production, and synthetic fuels production (e.g., coal to liquids). As the result of increased natural gas supply from hydraulic fracturing, the current and historically low prices of natural gas remain a significant barrier to deployment of HTGRs and other nuclear reactor concepts in the U.S. However, based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Agency (EIA) data, U.S. natural gas prices are expected to increase by the 2030 – 2040 timeframe when a significant number of HTGR modules could be deployed. An evaluation of more recent EIA 2013 data confirms the assumptions in [NIA 2012] of future natural gas prices in the range of approximately $7/MMBtu to $10/MMBtu during the 2030 – 2040 timeframe. Natural gas prices in this range will make HTGR energy prices competitive with natural gas, even in the absence of carbon-emissions penalties. Exhibit ES-1 presents the North American projections in each market segment including a characterization of the market penetration logic. Adjustments made to the 2012 data (and reflected in Exhibit ES-1) include normalization to the slightly larger 625MWt reactor module, segregation between steam cycle and more advanced (higher outlet temperature) modules, and characterization of U.S. synthetic fuel process applications as a separate market segment.

  12. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

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    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  13. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

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    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  14. Study on system layout and component design in the HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

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    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tanihira, Masanori [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shoji [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    The global warming becomes a significant issue in the world so that it needs to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission. It is expected that hydrogen is in place of the fossil fuels such as coal and oil, and plays the important role to resolve the global warming. There are several hydrogen making processes such as water electrolysis and steam reforming of hydrocarbon. Steam reforming of hydrocarbon is a major hydrogen making process because of economy in industry. It utilizes the fossil fuels as process heat for chemical reaction and results in a large CO{sub 2} emission. New steam reforming system without fossil fuel can contribute to resolve the global warming. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has a unique feature to be able to supply a hot helium gas whose temperature is approximately 950degC at the reactor outlet. This makes HTGR possible to utilize for not only power generation but also process heat utilization. JAERI constructed the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) that is a sort of HTGR in Oarai establishment and starts operation. Nuclear heat utilization is one of the R and D items of the HTTR. The steam reforming system coupling to the HTTR for hydrogen production has been designed. This report represents the system layout and design specification of key components in HTTR steam reforming system. (author)

  15. Biological hydrogen production

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    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  16. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

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    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  17. Biomimetic hydrogen production

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    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  18. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

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    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  19. Photobiological hydrogen production

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    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  20. Photobiological hydrogen production

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    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  1. Improvement in retention of solid fission products in HTGR fuel particles by ceramic kernel additives

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    Foerthmann, R.; Groos, E.; Gruebmeier, H.

    1975-08-15

    Increased requirements concerning the retention of long-lived solid fission products in fuel elements for use in advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors led to the development of coated particles with improved fission product retention which represent an alternative to silicon carbide-coated fuel particles. Two irradiation experiments have shown that the release of strontium, barium, and caesium from pyrocarbon-coated particles can be reduced by orders of magnitude if the oxide kernel contains alumina-silica additives. It was detected by electron microprobe analysis that the improved retention of the mentioned fission products in the fuel kernel is caused by formation of the stable aluminosilicates SrAl2Si2O8, BaAl2Si2O8and CsAlSi2O6 in the additional alumina-silica phase of the kernel.

  2. Distribution of fission products in Peach Bottom HTGR fuel element E11-07

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    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.; Martin, W.J.; Bate, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This is the second in a projected series of six post-irradiation examinations of Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor driver fuel elements. Element E11-07, the subject of this report, received an equivalent of 701 full-power days of irradiation prior to scheduled withdrawal. The examination procedures emphasized the determination of fission product distributions in the graphite portions of the fuel element. Continuous axial scans indicated a /sup 137/Cs inventory of 17 Ci in the graphite sleeve and 8.3 Ci in the spine at the time of element withdrawal from the core. In addition, the nuclides /sup 134/Cs, /sup 110m/Ag, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 154/Eu were found in the graphite portions of the fuel element in significant amounts. Radial distributions of these nuclides plus the distribution of the beta emitters /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 90/Sr were obtained at six axial locations, four within the fueled region and one each above and below. The radial dissection was accomplished by use of a manipulator-operated lathe in a hot cell. These profiles reveal an increased degree of penetration of /sup 134/Cs, relative to /sup 137/Cs, evidently due to a longer time spent as xenon precursor. In addition to fission product distribution, the appearance of the element components was recorded photographically, fuel compact and graphite dimensions were recorded at numerous locations, and metallographic examinations of the fuel were performed.

  3. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

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    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  4. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  5. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

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    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Zhang, Z. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Photoelectrochemical devices-direct photoconversion systems utilizing a photovoltaic-type structure coated with water-splitting catalysts-represent a promising option to meet this goal. Direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies greater than 7% and photoelectrode lifetimes of up to 30 hours in 1 molar KOH have been demonstrated in our laboratory using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Loss analysis models indicate that the DOE`s goal of 10% solar-to-chemical conversion can be met with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, we describe recent progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, improvements in photoelectrode efficiency and stability, and designs for higher efficiency and greater stability.

  6. Conclusions from V and V studies on the German codes PANAMA and FRESCO for HTGR fuel performance and fission product release

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    Verfondern, K., E-mail: k.verfondern@fz-juelich.de [Research Center Jülich, 52425, Jülich (Germany); Cao, J.; Liu, T. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Allelein, H.-J. [Research Center Jülich, 52425, Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, 52072, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    In modern HTGR reactors, the fuel element represents the principal barrier against release of the fission products generated during reactor operation. Both the acquired experience from HTGR operation and experimental data from accident simulation testing of the fuel have always been accompanied by intensive efforts of mathematical fuel performance modeling taking into consideration as far as possible the physical phenomena that may occur. The computer codes FRESCO and PANAMA both developed at the Research Center Jülich in Germany in the early 1980s have become essential tools to predict the fission product release from spherical fuel elements and the TRISO fuel performance, respectively, under given normal or accidental conditions. These two codes are also presently being used for a conservative estimation of the source term, i.e., quantity and duration of radionuclide release, for the Chinese demonstration project HTR-PM. A description of the comprehensive efforts in the past on code verification and validation (V and V) including the most recent studies of code-to-code benchmarking studies and code-to-experiment comparisons as part of the IAEA directed CRP-6 project will be given. The conclusions drawn from those activities will be given with regard to the codes’ ability to allow for a conservative quantification of the source term as part of safety and risk analyses for pebble-bed HTGRs. Recommendations for further model improvement have been taken into account in the new code development, STACY, combining the PANAMA and FRESCO model approach and other features, as a module of the HTR Code Package (HCP)

  7. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  8. An analysis of the thermodynamic cycles with high-temperature nuclear reactor for power generation and hydrogen co-production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Michał

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, numerical analysis of the thermodynamic cycle with the high-temperature nuclear gas reactor (HTGR for electricity and hydrogen production have been done. The analysed system consists of two independent loops. The first loop is for HTGR and consists of a nuclear reactor, heat exchangers, and blower. The second loop (Rankine cycle consist of up-to four steam turbines, that operate in heat recovery system. The analysis of the system shows that it is possible to achieve significantly higher efficiency than could be offered by traditional nuclear reactor technology (PWR and BWR. It is shown that the thermal efficiency about 52.5% it is possible to achieve when reactor works at standard conditions and steam is superheated up to 530oC. For the cases when the steam has supercritical conditions the value of thermal efficiency is still very high and equal about 50%.

  9. A Small-Sized HTGR System Design for Multiple Heat Applications for Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Ohashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Japan Atomic Energy Agency has conducted a conceptual design of a 50 MWt small-sized high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR for multiple heat applications, named HTR50S, with the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 750°C and 900°C. It is first-of-a-kind of the commercial plant or a demonstration plant of a small-sized HTGR system to be deployed in developing countries in the 2020s. The design concept of HTR50S is to satisfy the user requirements for multipurpose heat applications such as the district heating and process heat supply based on the steam turbine system and the demonstration of the power generation by helium gas turbine and the hydrogen production using the water splitting iodine-sulfur process, to upgrade its performance compared to that of HTTR without significant R&D utilizing the knowledge obtained by the HTTR design and operation, and to fulfill the high level of safety by utilizing the inherent features of HTGR and a passive decay heat removal system. The evaluation of technical feasibility shows that all design targets were satisfied by the design of each system and the preliminary safety analysis. This paper describes the conceptual design and the preliminary safety analysis of HTR50S.

  10. Hydrogen production costs -- A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

    1997-12-04

    Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

  11. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  12. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  13. HTGR Fuel Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments of the HTGR Fuel Technology Program at GA Technologies Inc. during the first half of FY 83. The activities include the fuel process, fuel materials, fuel cycle, fission product transport, core component verification, and core technology transfer tasks necessary to support the design and development of a steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C) version of the HTGR.

  14. Microalgal hydrogen production - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Lindblad, Peter; Madamwar, Datta; Pandey, Ashok; Larroche, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Bio-hydrogen from microalgae including cyanobacteria has attracted commercial awareness due to its potential as an alternative, reliable and renewable energy source. Photosynthetic hydrogen production from microalgae can be interesting and promising options for clean energy. Advances in hydrogen-fuel-cell technology may attest an eco-friendly way of biofuel production, since, the use of H 2 to generate electricity releases only water as a by-product. Progress in genetic/metabolic engineering may significantly enhance the photobiological hydrogen production from microalgae. Manipulation of competing metabolic pathways by modulating the certain key enzymes such as hydrogenase and nitrogenase may enhance the evolution of H 2 from photoautotrophic cells. Moreover, biological H 2 production at low operating costs is requisite for economic viability. Several photobioreactors have been developed for large-scale biomass and hydrogen production. This review highlights the recent technological progress, enzymes involved and genetic as well as metabolic engineering approaches towards sustainable hydrogen production from microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  16. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  17. Biological hydrogen production from phytomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartacek, J.; Zabranska, J. [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Renewable sources of energy have received wide attention lately. One candidate is hydrogen which has the added advantage of involving no greenhouse gases. Biological hydrogen production from wastewater or biowastes is a very attractive production technique. So far, most studies have concentrated on the use of photosynthetic bacteria. However, dark fermentation has recently become a popular topic of research as it has the advantage of not requiring light energy input, something that limits the performance of the photosynthetic method. While pure cultures have been used in most of the investigations to date, in industrial situations mixed cultures will probably be the norm because of unavoidable contamination. In this investigation the phytomass of amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L) was used to produce hydrogen. Specific organic loading, organic loading, and pH were varied to study the effect on hydrogen production. 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  18. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  19. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short

  20. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  1. Waste/By-Product Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    Biogas , including anaerobic digester gas, can be reformed to produce hydrogen and used in a fuel cell to produce significant amounts of electricity...Waste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: � Waste bio‐mass: biogas to high temp fuel cells to produce H2 – there are over two dozen sites...and heat. � When biogas is produced and used on‐site in a fuel cell, fuel utilization or overall energy efficiency can reach 90% and can reduce

  2. Microbial hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, P.F.; Maness, P.C.; Martin, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria inhabit an anaerobic or microaerophilic world where H{sub 2} is produced and consumed as a shared intermediary metabolite. Within a given bacterial isolate there are as many as 4 to 6 distinct enzymes that function to evolve or consume H{sub 2}. Three of the H{sub 2}-evolving physiologies involving three different enzymes from photosynthetic bacteria have been examined in detail for commercial viability. Nitrogenase-mediated H{sub 2} production completely dissimilates many soluble organic compounds to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at rates up to 131 {mu}mol H{sub 2}{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} and can remain active for up to 20 days. This metabolism is very energy intensive, however, which limits solar conversion efficiencies. Fermentative hydrogenase can produce H{sub 2} at rates of 440 {mu}mol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1} at low levels of irradiation over indefinite periods. The equilibrium for this activity is low (<0.15 atmospheres), thereby requiring gas sparging, vacuuming, or microbial scavenging to retain prolonged activity. Microbial H{sub 2} production from the CO component of synthesis or producer gases maximally reaches activities of 1.5 mmol{sm_bullet}min{sup -1}{sm_bullet}g cdw{sup -1}. Mass transport of gaseous CO into an aqueous bacterial suspension is the rate-limiting step. Increased gas pressure strongly accelerates these rates. Immobilized bacteria on solid supports at ambient pressures also show enhanced shift activity when the bulk water is drained away. Scaled-up bioreactors with 100-200 cc bed volume have been constructed and tested. The near-term goal of this portion of the project is to engineer and economically evaluate a prototype system for the biological production of H{sub 2} from biomass. The CO shift enables a positive selection technique for O{sub 2}-resistant, H{sub 2}-evolving bacterial enzymes from nature.

  3. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, A. S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mazumder, M. K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karabacak, T. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kannarpady, Ganesh [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Sharma, R. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  4. Hydrogen Production for Refuelling Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulteberg, Christian; Aagesen, Diane (Intelligent Energy, Long Beach, CA (United States))

    2009-08-15

    /day); Feedstock Cost (USD 0.15 - USD 0.45 per kg); Availability (85% - 95%). The return-on-investment is between USD 90 000 and USD 180 000 in 60 % of the 5 000 simulation runs, which leads to the conclusion that given these assumptions the owning and operation of such a unit can be profitable. As for the performance of the system, it is concluded to be within targets based on the different performance measures reported above. The conversion is in the expected range (80-85%), given the throughput of 16 kg of hydrogen per day. The efficiency as reported is in the acceptable range (approx65%), with some room for improvement within the given system architecture, if desired. However, there is a trade-off between throughput, efficiency and cost that will have to be considered in every redesign of the system. The PSA chosen for the task has performed well during the 200+ hours of operation and there is no doubt that it will be sufficient for the task. The same thing can be said with respect to the system performance with respect to thermo-mechanical stress; which was proven by operating the system for more than 500 hours and performing 58 start-and-stop cycles during the testing. There does not seem to be any major differences between operating on natural gas or methane, based on the testing performed. The slight decrease in hydrogen production can be due to a difference in the H{sub 2}/CO ratio between the various fuels. As expected the efficiency increases with load as well as the hydrogen production rate. Based on the results disseminated above, there is no indication why the current reactor system cannot be configured into a field deployable system. The operation of the system has given valuable experience that will be embedded into any field deployed unit

  5. Hydrogen production processes; Procedes de production d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this first Gedepeon workshop on hydrogen production processes are: to stimulate the information exchange about research programs and research advances in the domain of hydrogen production processes, to indicate the domains of interest of these processes and the potentialities linked with the coupling of a nuclear reactor, to establish the actions of common interest for the CEA, the CNRS, and eventually EDF, that can be funded in the framework of the Gedepeon research group. This document gathers the slides of the 17 presentations given at this workshop and dealing with: the H{sub 2} question and the international research programs (Lucchese P.); the CEA's research program (Lucchese P., Anzieu P.); processes based on the iodine/sulfur cycle: efficiency of a facility - flow-sheets, efficiencies, hard points (Borgard J.M.), R and D about the I/S cycle: Bunsen reaction (Colette S.), R and D about the I/S cycle: the HI/I{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system (Doizi D.), demonstration loop/chemical engineering (Duhamet J.), materials and corrosion (Terlain A.); other processes under study: the Westinghouse cycle (Eysseric C.), other processes under study at the CEA (UT3, plasma,...) (Lemort F.), database about thermochemical cycles (Abanades S.), Zn/ZnO cycle (Broust F.), H{sub 2} production by cracking, high temperature reforming with carbon trapping (Flamant G.), membrane technology (De Lamare J.); high-temperature electrolysis: SOFC used as electrolyzers (Grastien R.); generic aspects linked with hydrogen production: technical-economical evaluation of processes (Werkoff F.), thermodynamic tools (Neveu P.), the reactor-process coupling (Aujollet P.). (J.S.)

  6. Evaluation of two processes of hydrogen production starting from energy generated by high temperature nuclear reactors; Evaluacion de dos procesos de produccion de hidrogeno a partir de energia generada por reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J., E-mail: jvalle@upmh.edu.mx [Universidad Politecnica Metropolitana de Hidalgo, Boulevard Acceso a Tolcayuca 1009, Ex-Hacienda San Javier, 43860 Tolcayuca, Hidalgo (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work an evaluation to two processes of hydrogen production using energy generated starting from high temperature nuclear reactors (HTGR's) was realized. The evaluated processes are the electrolysis of high temperature and the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur. The electrolysis of high temperature, contrary to the conventional electrolysis, allows reaching efficiencies of up to 60% because when increasing the temperature of the water, giving thermal energy, diminishes the electric power demand required to separate the molecule of the water. However, to obtain these efficiencies is necessary to have water vapor overheated to more than 850 grades C, temperatures that can be reached by the HTGR. On the other hand the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur, developed by General Atomics in the 1970 decade, requires two thermal levels basically, the great of them to 850 grades C for decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and another minor to 360 grades C approximately for decomposition of H I, a high temperature nuclear reactor can give the thermal energy required for the process whose products would be only hydrogen and oxygen. In this work these two processes are described, complete models are developed and analyzed thermodynamically that allow to couple each hydrogen generation process to a reactor HTGR that will be implemented later on for their dynamic simulation. The obtained results are presented in form of comparative data table of each process, and with them the obtained net efficiencies. (author)

  7. Solar based hydrogen production systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dincer, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of various solar based hydrogen production systems. The book covers first-law (energy based) and second-law (exergy based) efficiencies and provides a comprehensive understanding of their implications. It will help minimize the widespread misuse of efficiencies among students and researchers in energy field by using an intuitive and unified approach for defining efficiencies. The book gives a clear understanding of the sustainability and environmental impact analysis of the above systems. The book will be particularly useful for a clear understanding

  8. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  9. Bioelectrocatalytic hydrogen production by hydrogenase electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, S.V.; Karyakina, E.E.; Karyakin, A.A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation). Faculty of Chemistry; Vignais, P.M. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France). Departement de Biologie Moleculaire et Structurale, Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biophysique des Systemes Integres; Cournac, L. [Universite Mediterranee, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Departement d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale et de Microbiologie, Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosintese; Zorin, N.A. [Russian Academy of Science, Puschino (Russian Federation). Institute of Basic Biological Problems; Cosnier, S. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie Organique et Photochimie Redox

    2002-12-01

    Production of molecular hydrogen by enzyme electrodes based on direct bioelectrocatalysis by [NiFe] hydrogenases from different sources (Thiocapsa roseopersicina and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans) was investigated. Hydrogen evolution was independently controlled by means of mass spectrometry. A strong correlation between the cathodic current generated by the hydrogenase electrodes and the rate of hydrogen evolution was demonstrated. (author)

  10. Patent landscape for biological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David B; Lubieniechi, Simona

    2013-12-01

    Research and development of biological hydrogen production have expanded significantly in the past decade. Production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural, forestry, or other organic waste streams offers the possibility to contribute to hydrogen production capacity with no net, or at least with lower, greenhouse gas emissions. Significant improvements in the volumetric or molar yields of hydrogen production have been accomplished through genetic engineering of hydrogen synthesizing microorganisms. Although no commercial scale renewable biohydrogen production facilities are currently in operation, a few pilot scale systems have been demonstrated successfully, and while industrial scale production of biohydrogen still faces a number of technical and economic barriers, understanding the patent landscape is an important step in developing a viable commercialization strategy. In this paper, we review patents filed on biological hydrogen production. Patents on biohydrogen production from both the Canadian and American Patents databases were classified into three main groups: (1) patents for biological hydrogen by direct photolysis; (2) patents for biological hydrogen by dark fermentation; and (3) patents for process engineering for biological hydrogen production.

  11. Potentialities of hydrogen production in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudries, R. [CDER, Route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah Algiers (Algeria); USTHB, El Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Dizene, R. [USTHB, El Alia, Algiers (Algeria)

    2008-09-15

    The objective of the present study is to estimate the potentialities of hydrogen production in Algeria. Particular attention is paid to the clean and sustainable hydrogen production, i.e., production from renewable energy. First, the present overall energy situation in Algeria is reviewed. Trend in energy demand is analysed taking into account major parameters such as population growth, urbanization, improvement in quality of life and export opportunities. The resources available for hydrogen production are then presented. Finally, the estimation of hydrogen production potential using solar sources, the most important renewable energy sources in Algeria, is presented. This study indicates that the shift to hydrogen economy shows a promising prospect. Not only, it can meet the evergrowing local needs but it will also allow Algeria to keep its share of the energy market. Indeed, as is now the case for natural gas, hydrogen could be delivered to Western Europe through pipelines. (author)

  12. Metabolic engineering to enhance bacterial hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Hydrogen fuel is renewable, efficient and clean, and fermentative bacteria hold great promise for its generation. Here we use the isogenic Escherichia coli K‐12 KEIO library to rapidly construct multiple, precise deletions in the E. coli genome to direct the metabolic flux towards hydrogen production. Escherichia coli has three active hydrogenases, and the genes involved in the regulation of the formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) system for synthesizing hydrogen from formate via hydrogenase 3 were also manipulated to enhance hydrogen production. Specifically, we altered regulation of FHL by controlling the regulators HycA and FhlA, removed hydrogen consumption by hydrogenases 1 and 2 via the hyaB and hybC mutations, and re‐directed formate metabolism using the fdnG, fdoG, narG, focA, fnr and focB mutations. The result was a 141‐fold increase in hydrogen production from formate to create a bacterium (BW25113 hyaB hybC hycA fdoG/pCA24N‐FhlA) that produces the largest amount of hydrogen to date and one that achieves the theoretical yield for hydrogen from formate. In addition, the hydrogen yield from glucose was increased by 50%, and there was threefold higher hydrogen production from glucose with this strain. PMID:21261819

  13. Status of HTGR-related activities in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Lensa, W.; Kugeler, K. [Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The industrial activities towards the market introduction of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors as well as the related R and D programmes in Germany were stopped at the beginning of this decade in conjunction with the decision not to continue the commissioning of the 300 MWel demonstration reactor THTR 300 in Hamm-Uentrop. The 15 MWel test reactor AVR at the site of the research centre in Juelich was already shut down before, in the expectation of a further successful operation of the THTR 300. The HTGR-related activities in Germany are mainly oriented now to the decommissioning or safe closure of both plants and to the disposal of the irradiated fuel elements. Complementary to the commercial projects on evolutionary Light-Water Reactor Concepts, additional generic R and D is being performed in Germany with the aim to identify the fundamentals of an approach towards `catastrophy-free` innovative nuclear reactor technologies as being requested by the new German Atomic Act of 1994 even for beyond design basis accidents formerly assumed. The proven safety characteristics and principles of HTGRs form a sound start-up point for such considerations aiming to self-acting (passive) nuclear, thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the primary circuit and an independence of the fission product barriers. Basic Technologies and safety principles originating from HTGR-related R and D are partially also relevant for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents of other reactor types and vice versa as those scenarios are also characterised by high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions offering new application potentials e.g., for high-tech ceramic materials. The technology of coated-particles might offer significant advantages for safety and operational aspects as well as for an effective burning of plutonium and for direct disposal even beyond the HTGR frame. The use of thorium is being re-discussed as an effective tool to burn plutonium and reduce the

  14. Microstructured reactors for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartun, Ingrid

    2005-07-01

    Small scale hydrogen production by partial oxidation (POX) and oxidative steam reforming (OSR) have been studied over Rh-impregnated microchannel Fecralloy reactors and alumina foams. Trying to establish whether metallic microchannel reactors have special advantages for hydrogen production via catalytic POX or OSR with respect to activity, selectivity and stability was of special interest. The microchannel Fecralloy reactors were oxidised at 1000 deg C to form a {alpha}-Al2O3 layer in the channels in order to enhance the surface area prior to impregnation. Kr-BET measurements showed that the specific surface area after oxidation was approximately 10 times higher than the calculated geometric surface area. Approximately 1 mg Rh was deposited in the channels by impregnation with an aqueous solution of RhCl3. Annular pieces (15 mm o.d.,4 mm i.d., 14 mm length) of extruded {alpha}-Al2O3 foams were impregnated with aqueous solutions of Rh(NO3)3 to obtain 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt.% loadings, as predicted by solution uptake. ICP-AES analyses showed that the actual Rh loadings probably were higher, 0.025, 0.077 and 0.169 wt.% respectively. One of the microchannel Fecralloy reactors and all Al2O3 foams were equipped with a channel to allow for temperature measurement inside the catalytic system. Temperature profiles obtained along the reactor axes show that the metallic microchannel reactor is able to minimize temperature gradients as compared to the alumina foams. At sufficiently high furnace temperature, the gas phase in front of the Rh/Al2O3/Frecralloy microchannel reactor and the 0.025 wt.% Rh/Al2O3 foams ignites. Gas phase ignition leads to lower syngas selectivity and higher selectivity to total oxidation products and hydrocarbon by-products. Before ignition of the gas phase the hydrogen selectivity is increased in OSR as compared to POX, the main contribution being the water-gas shift reaction. After gas phase ignition, increased formation of hydrocarbon by-products

  15. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  16. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Diogo M. F.; César A. C. Sequeira; Figueiredo, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article...

  17. INVESTIGATION ON THERMAL-FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF HTGR CORE USING THERMIX-KONVEK MODULE AND VSOP'94 CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarmono Sudarmono

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The failure of heat removal system of water-cooled reactor such as PWR in Three Mile Islands and Fukushima Daiichi BWR makes nuclear society starting to consider the use of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR. Reactor Physics and Technology Division – Center for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology  (PTRKN has tasks to perform research and development on the conceptual design of cogeneration gas cooled reactor with medium power level of 200 MWt. HTGR is one of nuclear energy generation system, which has high energy efficiency, and has high and clean inherent safety level. The geometry and structure of the HTGR200 core are designed to produce the output of helium gas coolant temperature as high as 950 °C to be used for hydrogen production and other industrial processes in co-generative way. The output of very high temperature helium gas will cause thermal stress on the fuel pebble that threats the integrity of fission product confinement. Therefore, it is necessary to perform thermal-flow evaluation to determine the temperature distribution in the graphite and fuel pebble in the HTGR core. The evaluation was carried out by Thermix-Konvek module code that has been already integrated into VSOP'94 code. The HTGR core geometry was done using BIRGIT module code for 2-D model (RZ model with 5 channels of pebble flow in active core in the radial direction. The evaluation results showed that the highest and lowest temperatures in the reactor core are 999.3 °C and 886.5 °C, while the highest temperature of TRISO UO2 is 1510.20 °C in the position (z= 335.51 cm; r=0 cm. The analysis done based on reactor condition of 120 kg/s of coolant mass flow rate, 7 MPa of pressure and 200 MWth of power. Compared to the temperature distribution resulted between VSOP’94 code and fuel temperature limitation as high as 1600 oC, there is enough safety margin from melting or disintegrating. Keywords: Thermal-Flow, VSOP’94, Thermix-Konvek, HTGR, temperature

  18. Hydrogen. Production and application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueker, A. [Sued-Chemie AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Hydrogen is one of the most fascinating elements in Universe. Its unique properties made it to a matter that is used in a wide range of different industrial applications. Besides the chemical role of Hydrogen as a hydrogenation agent, it will play an ever more important role in the global energy house hold. This presentation focuses on the classical technologies for the production of Hydrogen based on a variety of raw materials and will show the most important applications of Hydrogen in large scale industry. (orig.)

  19. Hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    cum laude graduation (with distinction) To replace fossil fuels, society is currently considering alternative clean fuels for transportation. Hydrogen could be such a fuel. In theory, large amounts of renewable hydrogen can be produced from organic contaminants in wastewater. During his PhD research

  20. Scenarios of hydrogen production from wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaric, Mario

    2010-09-15

    Since almost total amount of hydrogen is currently being produced from natural gas, other ways of cleaner and 'more renewable' production should be made feasible in order to make benchmarks for total 'hydrogen economy'. Hydrogen production from wind power combined with electrolysis imposes as one possible framework for new economy development. In this paper various wind-to-hydrogen scenarios were calculated. Cash flows of asset based project financing were used as decision making tool. Most important parameters were identified and strategies for further research and development and resource allocation are suggested.

  1. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  2. Decentralized hydrogen production from diesel and biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, S.; Kraaij, G.; Wörner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Assuming that from 2015 onwards an increasing amount of fuel cell powered vehicles will enter the market, hydrogen production from liquid fuels offers a promising option to meet short- and midterm hydrogen fuelling requirements. Besides, on-board hydrogen generation from logistic fuels for auxiliary power applications has attracted increasing attention. The German Aerospace Center acts as coordinator of the 3-year project NEMESIS2+ (www.nemesis-project.eu), a collaborative project funded ...

  3. Overview of hydrogen production program in HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Ogawa, Masuro; Hada, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Takeda, Tetsuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo [Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    A demonstration program on hydrogen production has been started in January 1997. Using nuclear heat (10MW, 905C, and 4.1MPa) supplied by the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a hydrogen production system is being designed to be able to produce hydrogen with the production rate of approximately 4000 Nm{sup 3}/hr, which is in a range of commercial level, by steam reforming of natural gas. The safety principle and standard are also being investigated for nuclear heat utilization systems connected to High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) including the HTTR. The HTTR hydrogen production system is first connected to a nuclear power reactor, hence an out-of-pile test, a hydrogen permeation test and a corrosion test of a catalyst tube of the steam reformer are carried out prior to the demonstration test of the HTTR hydrogen production system. In order to confirm controllability, safety, and performance of key components in the HTTR hydrogen production system, the facility for the out-of-pile test is being designed and manufactured on the scale of approximately 1/30 of the HTTR hydrogen production system. It is equipped with an electrical heater as a heat source instead of the HTTR. The out-of-pile test will be started in the year 2000 and will be performed for 4 years. Check and review of the demonstration program in the HTTR will be made in 2000 from the view point of economy and technology, then the HTTR hydrogen production system will be constructed in 2001 and will be demonstratively operated in the period 2005-2010. The hydrogen/tritium permeation test is carried out in 1998 to obtain the data on hydrogen/tritium permeation coefficients for mainly the Hastelloy-XR, which is a nickel-base helium corrosion- and heat-resistance super alloy and is used in high temperature components of the HTTR and the HTTR hydrogen production system, and to verify the reduction method of the hydrogen/tritium permeation through the tube wall to the helium coolant

  4. Production of Hydrogen from Underground Coal Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.

    2008-10-07

    A system of obtaining hydrogen from a coal seam by providing a production well that extends into the coal seam; positioning a conduit in the production well leaving an annulus between the conduit and the coal gasification production well, the conduit having a wall; closing the annulus at the lower end to seal it from the coal gasification cavity and the syngas; providing at least a portion of the wall with a bifunctional membrane that serves the dual purpose of providing a catalyzing reaction and selectively allowing hydrogen to pass through the wall and into the annulus; and producing the hydrogen through the annulus.

  5. Developments and constraints in fermentative hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Zabranska, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2007-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a novel aspect of anaerobic digestion. The main advantage of hydrogen is that it is a clean and renewable energy source/carrier with high specific heat of combustion and no contribution to the Greenhouse effect, and can be used in many industrial applications.

  6. Hydrogen production from biomass over steam gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, R.; Potetz, A.; Hofbauer, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Weber, G. [Bioenergy 2020+, Guessing (Austria)

    2010-12-30

    Renewable hydrogen is one option for a clean energy carrier in the future. There were several research programs in the past, to produce hydrogen on a renewable basis by electrolysis, direct conversion of water or by gasification of biomass. None of these options were developed to a stage, that they could be used on a commercial basis. At the moment almost all hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels and one main consumer of hydrogen are refineries. So a good option to demonstrate the production of renewable hydrogen and bring it later into the market is over refineries. The most economic option to produce renewable hydrogen at the moment is over gasification of biomass. In Austria an indirect gasification system was developed and is demonstrated in Guessing, Austria. The biomass CHP Guessing uses the allothermal steam dual fluidised bed gasifier and produces a high grade product gas, which is used at the moment for the CHP in a gas engine. As there is no nitrogen in the product gas and high hydrogen content, this gas can be also used as synthesis gas or for production of hydrogen. The main aim of this paper is to present the experimental and simulation work to convert biomass into renewable hydrogen. The product gas of the indirect gasification system is mainly hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane. Within the ERA-Net project ''OptiBtLGas'' the reforming of methane and the CO-shift reaction was investigated to convert all hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide to hydrogen. On basis of the experimental results the mass- and energy balances of a commercial 100 MW fuel input plant was done. Here 3 different cases of complexity of the overall plant were simulated. The first case was without reforming and CO-shift, only by hydrogen separation. The second case was by including steam - reforming and afterwards separation of hydrogen. The third case includes hydrocarbon reforming, CO-shift and hydrogen separation. In all cases the off-gases (CO

  7. Photobiological production of hydrogen using cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthakur, D.; McKinley, K.R.; Bylina, E.J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are capable of generating hydrogen using sunlight and water. In both Spirulina and Anabaena, there is a soluble reversible hydrogenase that is involved in hydrogen evolution under anaerobic conditions in the dark. In addition, the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena produces hydrogen as a by-product of nitrogen fixation. Most of this hydrogen is recaptured by a membrane-bound uptake hydrogenase present in Anabaena cells. Experiments have continued to develop a gene transfer system in Spirulina in preparation for improved hydrogen production via genetic manipulation of the reversible hydrogenase. We have identified and characterized four restriction enzymes in Spirulina and cloned the genes for two methylases that protect their own DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes. We have also cloned and sequenced parts of hupB and hupM genes involved in the synthesis of uptake hydrogenase in Anabaena. Successful cloning of these hup genes represents an important and necessary step in our project because this will enable us to construct Anabaena strains with enhanced hydrogen production ability by disrupting the hup genes involved in hydrogen uptake. We are also setting up a bio-reactor to determine the amount of hydrogen released by different Spirulina and Anabaena strains under different physiological conditions.

  8. Biological hydrogen production from industrial wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Guilherme; Pantoja Filho, Jorge Luis Rodrigues; Zaiat, Marcelo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). School of Engineering. Dept. Hydraulics and Sanitation], Email: peixoto@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This research evaluates the potential for producing hydrogen in anaerobic reactors using industrial wastewaters (glycerol from bio diesel production, wastewater from the parboilization of rice, and vinasse from ethanol production). In a complementary experiment the soluble products formed during hydrogen production were evaluated for methane generation. The assays were performed in batch reactors with 2 liters volume, and sucrose was used as a control substrate. The acidogenic inoculum was taken from a packed-bed reactor used to produce hydrogen from a sucrose-based synthetic substrate. The methanogenic inoculum was taken from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. Hydrogen was produced from rice parboilization wastewater (24.27 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD) vinasse (22.75 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD) and sucrose (25.60 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} COD), while glycerol only showed potential for methane generation. (author)

  9. Recent Developments in Biological Hydrogen Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEBABRATA DAS

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen production technology can utilize renewable energy sources like biomass for the generation of hydrogen, the cleanest form of energy for the use of mankind. However, major constraints to the commercialization of these processes include lower hydrogen yields and rates of hydrogen production. To overcome these bottlenecks intensive research work has already been carried out on the advancement of these processes such as the development of genetically modified microorganisms, the improvement of the bioreactor design, molecular engineering of the key enzyme hydrogenases, the development of two stage processes, etc. The present paper explores the recent advancements that have been made till date and also presents the state of the art in molecular strategies to improve the hydrogen production.

  10. Microwave plasma for hydrogen production from liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czylkowski Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen production by conversion of liquid compounds containing hydrogen was investigated experimentally. The waveguide-supplied metal cylinder-based microwave plasma source (MPS operated at frequency of 915 MHz at atmospheric pressure was used. The decomposition of ethanol, isopropanol and kerosene was performed employing plasma dry reforming process. The liquid was introduced into the plasma in the form of vapour. The amount of vapour ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 kg/h. Carbon dioxide with the flow rate ranged from 1200 to 2700 NL/h was used as a working gas. The absorbed microwave power was up to 6 kW. The effect of absorbed microwave power, liquid composition, liquid flow rate and working gas fl ow rate was analysed. All these parameters have a clear influence on the hydrogen production efficiency, which was described with such parameters as the hydrogen production rate [NL(H2/h] and the energy yield of hydrogen production [NL(H2/kWh]. The best achieved experimental results showed that the hydrogen production rate was up to 1116 NL(H2/h and the energy yield was 223 NL(H2 per kWh of absorbed microwave energy. The results were obtained in the case of isopropanol dry reforming. The presented catalyst-free microwave plasma method can be adapted for hydrogen production not only from ethanol, isopropanol and kerosene, but also from different other liquid compounds containing hydrogen, like gasoline, heavy oils and biofuels.

  11. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Renewable Energy Testing Center program also focuses on supporting relevant and emerging renewable energy technologies in the cellulosic waste...MW water treatment systems under the previous Army SBIR Phase II and Phase II Plus programs (FY 2003-2008). In FY 2009 CHA completed the field...demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater

  12. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  13. Solar driven technologies for hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medojević Milovan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind that the production of hydrogen based on renewable energy sources, without doubt, is an important aspect to be taken into account when considering the potential of this gas, where as particularly interesting technologies stand out the ones which are based on the use of solar energy to produce hydrogen. The goal of this paper provides basic technological trajectories, with the possibility of combining, for solar driven hydrogen production, such as: electrochemical, photochemical and thermochemical process. Furthermore, the paper presents an analysis of those technologies from a technical as well as economic point of view. In addition, the paper aims to draw attention to the fact that the generation of hydrogen using renewable energy should be imposed as a logical and proper way to store solar energy in the form of chemical energy.

  14. The market viability of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botterud, A.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M. C.; Yildiz, B.

    2007-04-06

    to significantly different results in regards to the relative profitability of the different technologies and configurations. This is the case both with a deterministic and a stochastic analysis, as shown in the tables below. The flexibility in output products clearly adds substantial value to the HPE-ALWR and HTE-HTGR plants. In fact, under the GBM assumption for prices, the HTE-HTGR plant becomes more profitable than the SI-HTGR configuration, although SI-HTGR has a much lower levelized cost. For the HTE-HTGR plant it is also profitable to invest in additional electric turbine capacity (Case b) in order to fully utilize the heat from the nuclear reactor for electricity production when this is more profitable than producing hydrogen. The technologies are all at the research and development stage, so there are significant uncertainties regarding the technology cost and performance assumptions used in this analysis. As the technologies advance, the designers need to refine the cost and performance evaluation to provide a more reliable set of input for a more rigorous analysis. In addition, the durability of the catalytic activity of the materials at the hydrogen plant during repetitive price cycling is of prime importance concerning the flexibility of switching from hydrogen to electricity production. However, given the potential significant economic benefit that can be brought from cogeneration with the flexibility to quickly react to market signals, DOE should consider R&D efforts towards developing durable materials and processes that can enable this type of operation. Our future work will focus on analyzing a range of hydrogen production technologies associated with an extension of the financial analysis framework presented here. We are planning to address a variety of additional risks and options, such as the value of modular expansion in addition to the co-generation capability (i.e., a modular increase in the hydrogen production capacity of a plant in a given

  15. Hydrogen production through sorption enhanced reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijers, H.T.J.; Roskam-Bakker, D.F.; Dijkstra, J.W.; Smidt, R.P. de; Groot, A. de; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    2003-09-01

    Introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier offers an opportunity to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission from diffuse sources, like vehicles and newly built residential districts. In the long term, it is expected that a hydrogen infrastructure will contribute to CO{sub 2} reduction. In the short term, hydrogen will likely play a role where the application, especially fuel cells, asks for hydrogen. These applications include the transport sector and small-scale combined heat and power. On-site hydrogen production on a gas station or in a residential district requires an average hydrogen production rate between 1000 and 4000 Nm{sup 3}/hour. At the moment, hydrogen is produced industrially in large-scale steam-reformers at rates in the order of 100,000 Nm{sup 3}/hour and at high pressures (20 - 40 bar) and high temperatures (800 - 950 degrees C). To withstand these extreme conditions, expensive materials are required. Besides, a considerable amount of export steam is produced, which cannot be used in the small-scale hydrogen energy systems mentioned before. So there is a need for hydrogen production units operating at milder conditions, while maintaining a high system efficiency. One of the technologies currently investigated at ECN for this purpose is sorption enhanced reforming (SER). Here the methane steam reforming process is conducted in the presence of a CO{sub 2} sorbent. By removing reaction product CO{sub 2}, the equilibrium is shifted to the product side, yielding a relatively pure hydrogen stream. The system is operated periodically in two modes: an sorption cycle during which natural gas and steam are fed to the SER reactor, and a desorption cycle in which the sorbent is regenerated. The CO{sub 2} that is released during regeneration could possibly be used for CO{sub 2} sequestration. The CO{sub 2} sorbent should fulfill the following requirements: high CO{sub 2} uptake, rapid kinetics, chemical stability at high H{sub 2}O concentrations and low costs. A

  16. Probing green algal hydrogen production.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liping; Melis, Anastasios

    2002-01-01

    The recently developed two-stage photosynthesis and H(2)-production protocol with green algae is further investigated in this work. The method employs S deprivation as a tool for the metabolic regulation of photosynthesis. In the presence of S, green algae perform normal photosynthesis, carbohydrate accumulation and oxygen production. In the absence of S, normal photosynthesis stops and the algae slip into the H(2)-production mode. For the first time, to our knowledge, significant amounts of ...

  17. Artificial photosynthetic systems for production of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    The rapid consumption of fossil fuels has caused unacceptable environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect, which may lead to disastrous climatic consequences. Because fossil fuels are the products of long-term photosynthesis, it is highly desirable to develop artificial photosynthetic systems for the production of renewable and clean energy such as hydrogen. This article summarizes recent advances on studies of artificial photosynthetic systems for photocatalytic production of hydrogen with hydrogenases and their functional mimics including hybrids of natural and artificial components. Because it is highly desired to convert gaseous H2 to an easily storable form, recent progress on storage of hydrogen as liquid or solid form has also been described in this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

  19. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  20. HTGR generic technology program plan (FY 80)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the program is to develop base technology and to perform design and development common to the HTGR Steam Cycle, Gas Turbine, and Process Heat Plants. The generic technology program breaks into the base technology, generic component, pebble-bed study, technology transfer, and fresh fuel programs. (DLC)

  1. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  2. Production of pure hydrogen by ethanol dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacesaria, E.; Carotenuto, G.; Tesser, R.; Di Serio, M. [Naples ' ' Federico II' ' Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-12-30

    Hydrogen production from bio-ethanol is one of the most promising renewable processes to generate electricity using fuel cells. In this work, we have studied the production of pure hydrogen as by product of ethanol dehydrogenation reaction. This reaction is promoted by copper based catalysts and according to the catalyst used and the operative conditions gives place to acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate as main products. We studied in particular the performance of a commercial copper/copper chromite catalyst, supported on alumina and containing barium chromate as promoter that has given the best results. By operating at low pressure and temperature with short residence times, acetaldehyde is more selectively produced, while, by increasing the pressure (10-30 bars), the temperature (200-260 C) and the residence time (about 100 (grams hour/mol) of ethanol contact time) the selectivity is shifted to the production of ethyl acetate. However, in both cases pure hydrogen is obtained, as by product, that can easily be separated. Hydrogen obtained in this way is exempt of CO and can be directly fed to fuel cells without any inconvenience. In this work, runs performed in different operative conditions have been reported with the scope to individuate the best conditions. A carrier of H{sub 2} 6% in N{sub 2} has been used. The studied catalyst has also shown a good thermal stability with respect to sintering phenomena, that generally occurs during the dehydrogenation on other copper catalysts. Hydrogen productivities of 8-39 mol{sub H2} (gcat){sup -1}(h){sup -1} have been obtained for the explored temperature range 200-260 C. At last, the most accredited reaction mechanism is reported and discussed on the basis of the obtained results. (orig.)

  3. Production of pure hydrogen by ethanol dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacesaria, Elio; Carotenuto, Giuseppina; Tesser, Riccardo; Di Serio, Martino [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica

    2011-06-15

    Hydrogen production from bio-ethanol is one of the most promising renewable processes to generate electricity using fuel cells. In this work, we have studied the production of pure hydrogen as a by-product of the ethanol dehydrogenation reaction. This reaction is promoted by copper based catalysts and according to the catalyst used and the operating conditions gives place to acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate as main products. We studied in particular the performance of a commercial copper/copper chromite catalyst, supported on alumina and containing barium chromate as a promoter, which gave the best results. By operating at low pressure and temperature with short residence times, acetaldehyde is more selectively produced, while, by increasing the pressure (10-30 bars), the temperature (200-260 C) and the residence time (about 100 grams hour/mol of ethanol contact time) the selectivity is shifted to the production of ethyl acetate. However, in both cases pure hydrogen is obtained, as a by-product, which can easily be separated. Hydrogen obtained in this way is free of CO and can be directly fed to fuel cells without any inconvenience. In this work, runs performed under different operating conditions have been reported with the scope to select the best conditions. A carrier of H2 6% in N{sub 2} has been used. The studied catalyst has also shown a good thermal stability with respect to sintering phenomena, which generally occur during the dehydrogenation over other copper catalysts. Hydrogen productivities of 8-39 g{sub H2} (Kgcat){sup -1} (h){sup -1} were obtained for the explored temperature range of 200-260 C. Finally the most accredited reaction mechanism is reported and discussed on the basis of the obtained results. (orig.)

  4. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M. F. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article, the electrochemical fundamentals of alkaline water electrolysis are explained and the main process constraints (e.g., electrical, reaction, and transport are analyzed. The historical background of water electrolysis is described, different technologies are compared, and main research needs for the development of water electrolysis technologies are discussed.

  5. Method for the continuous production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, John Paul; Orr, Mark T.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

  6. Hydrogen production by fermentative consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez-Vazquez, Idania [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Ensenada, B.C. Mexico (Mexico); Poggi-Varaldo, Hector M. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, PO Box 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    In this work, H{sub 2} production by anaerobic mixed cultures was reviewed. First, the different anaerobic microbial communities that have a direct relation with the generation or consumption of H{sub 2} are discussed. Then, the different methods used to inhibit the H{sub 2}-consuming bacteria are analyzed (mainly in the methanogenesis phase) such as biokinetic control (low pH and short hydraulic retention time), heat-shock treatment and chemical inhibitors along with their advantages/disadvantages for their application on an industrial scale. After that, biochemical pathways of carbohydrate degradation to H{sub 2}, organic acids and solvents are showed. Fourth, structure, diversity and dynamics of H{sub 2}-producers communities are detailed. Later, the hydrogenase structure and activity is related with H{sub 2} production. Also, the causes for H{sub 2} production inhibition are analyzed along with strategies to avoid it. Finally, immobilized-cells systems are presented as a way to enhance H{sub 2} production. (author)

  7. Electricity-mediated biological hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have the ability to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic substrates. They also may use electricity to support chemical reactions that are energetically unfavorable. In the fermentation of sugars, hydrogen can be formed as one of the main products. However, a yield of

  8. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  9. Photobiological hydrogen production employing Spirulina Maxima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugas, A.J.; Sebastian, P.J. [CIE-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico); Duhakt, R.V.; Valencia, R.T. [IBT-UNAM, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Efforts are being made to develop materials and processes for the renewable production of hydrogen. This paper described the biological production of hydrogen using microorganisms via the photosynthetic route. Several experiments were conducted to produce hydrogen from the biomass of a strain of photosynthetic Spirulina maxim. Conductimetry was used to quantify the results, along with its introduction in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The current generated was then measured. Spirulina maxim was cultivated under illumination by magnetic agitation air bubbling. The biomass was concentrated by filtration with micro-porous nylon cloth. The algal biomass was quantified by dry weight and by spectrophotometry. The biomass underwent an anaerobic process in darkness, under a nitrogen flow for 30 minutes. The photosynthesis reaction and the production of the enzyme hydrogenase were induced by leaving the culture in agitation and under illumination for 30 minutes to 2 hours. Tests were conducted with and without the addition of 2 grams of sodium ditionite before the photosynthesis process and with the same incident radiation in the bioreactor, which was coupled to a PEM fuel cell. The electric current generated was measured. The results indicate that after a certain stage of cellular growth, Spirulina maxim was capable of producing hydrogen photosynthetically after a process of anaerobic darkness. The biological production of hydrogen was quantifiable by conductimetry and coupling the bioreactor to a PEM fuel cell. The sodium ditionite proved to be a strong reducing agent that inhibits the oxygen production during the photosynthesis process and allows the activation of the enzyme hydrogenase. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  11. Hydrogenated liquids and hydrogen production by non-thermal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, K.; Aubry, O.; Khacef, A.; Cormier, J.M. [Orleans Univ., Orleans Cedex (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Polytech d' Orleans, Group for Research and Studies on Mediators of Inflamation

    2010-07-01

    In recent years, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) has been considered as a fuel for electricity generation and transportation purposes. H{sub 2} is a renewable energy source that does not contribute to the greenhouse effect. This paper reported on a comparative study of syngas production from alcohol, with particular reference to the plasma steam-reforming of ethanol, methanol, ammonia and vegetable oil. The H{sub 2} yields and energetic cost in function of hydrogen sources were presented. The non thermal plasma used in this study was a laboratory scale experimental device static discharge. An arc formed between two electrodes made of graphite. The efficiency of the process was determined through chemical diagnostics. Gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques were used to determine concentrations of H{sub 2}, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and carbon as functions of flow and inlet liquid mixture concentration parameters. This paper also presented the values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio and the composition of synthesis gas according to various operating conditions. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. HTGR generic technology program. Semiannual report ending March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine and process heat plants.

  13. Proceedings of the Japan - U.S. Seminar on HTGR Safety Technology - Seismic Research. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-09-15

    These volumes constitute the proceedings of the f i r s t Japan-United States HTGR Safety Technology Seminar sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on September 15 and 16, 1977. This Seminar was held within the framework of the technical information exchange agreement in the area of HTGR safety research between the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Japan Atomic Energy Bureau. The agreement covers many aspects of HTGR safety res'earch, including: accident delineation, fuel cycle safety, primary coolant impurities, seismic effects, 'material properties, fission product release and transport and graphite oxidation. This f i r s t Seminar covered the safety research being carried out i n the areas of seismic effects and helium technology. in Japan and the United States. The Seminar was divided into two parallel sessions, one for Seismic Research and the second for Helium Technology. The papers presented i n the Seismic Research.session constitute Volume I of the proceedings, and the papers of the Helium Technology session constitute Volume 11. I t is hoped that these papers will form the basis for future cooperation between the Japanese and American scientific and engineering community in 'HTGR safety research.

  14. Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes the opportunities and challenges for low-cost renewable hydrogen production from wind and hydropower. The Workshop on Electrolysis Production of Hydrogen from Wind and Hydropower was held September 9-10, 2003.

  15. Photobiological hydrogen production : photochemical efficiency and bioreactor design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, I.; Janssen, M.; Rocha, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Biological production of hydrogen can be carried out by photoautotrophic or photoheterotrophic organisms. Here, the photosystems of both processes are described. The main drawback of the photoautotrophic hydrogen production process is oxygen inhibition. The few efficiencies reported on the

  16. Nuclear hydrogen - possibilities for Brazil; Hidrogenio nuclear - possibilidades para o Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio]. E-mail: saliba@ipen.br

    2008-07-01

    The energy vector hydrogen represents a good possibility to replace fossil fuels. One of the main renewable sources of interest for hydrogen is water, which is abundant and can be decomposed directly into pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This water splitting can be performed by the following methods: electrolysis, thermal decomposition, and thermochemical cycles. The thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis (HTE) are often thought to be feasible methods to be associated with a High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR). Both routines have high efficiency at temperature range of 700-950 deg C. In this work, is presented an attainable proposal for Brazilian production of hydrogen based on a HTGR followed by HTE system. A research group at Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Center - CCCH at IPEN/CNEN-SP has elaborated a working plan for 10 years, where it is proposed a R and D line for hydrogen production based on nuclear energy supplied by HTGR. So, in this work, a Brazilian program for researching in this area is proposed inviting potential cooperation. (author)

  17. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  18. Startech Hydrogen Production Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Startech Engineering Department

    2007-11-27

    The assigned work scope includes the modification and utilization of the Plasma Converter System, Integration of a StarCell{trademark} Multistage Ceramic Membrane System (StarCell), and testing of the integrated systems towards DOE targets for gasification and membrane separation. Testing and evaluation was performed at the Startech Engineering and Demonstration Test Center in Bristol, CT. The Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) Characterize the performance of the integrated Plasma Converter and StarCell{trademark} Systems for hydrogen production and purification from abundant and inexpensive feedstocks; (2) Compare integrated hydrogen production performance to conventional technologies and DOE benchmarks; (3) Run pressure and temperature testing to baseline StarCell's performance; and (4) Determine the effect of process contaminants on the StarCell{trademark} system.

  19. Hydrogen production from molten metal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eatwell-Hall, R.E.A.; Sharifi, V.N.; Swithenbank, J. [Energy and Environmental Engineering Research Group (EEERG), Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    As fossil fuel reserves are depleted, more innovative technologies are needed to facilitate fuel production, such as molten media gasification. This technique uses a liquid metal bath in a two-stage process: Stage 1) superheated steam is injected into the melt, with metal oxides formed, and H{sub 2} released; Stage 2) carbon is injected, the oxide is reduced, and CO and CO{sub 2} are released. The main study objective was to develop and test the first stage of this process. The results showed that hydrogen production peaked 100 s into the test, and then levelled off, with a maximum output of 13.6% hydrogen. XRD analysis of the metal samples showed that no tin oxides or magnetite were formed during the process, only a form of wustite (FeO). The syngas produced was very clean, and would need little gas cleaning for use as a feedstock in industrial processes or fuel cells. (author)

  20. Containment atmosphere response (CAR) program. Second status report. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landoni, J.A.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains a summary of the work performed under the Containment Atmosphere Response (CAR) Program of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety Research Task since the publication of the previous status report (February 1978). The work concentrated on development of models describing containment phenomena during core heatup in support of probabilistic risk assessment studies. Models were completed for fission product iodine sorption on coated surfaces, diffusivity and retentivity of untreated concrete, iodine interaction with condensing steam on the containment atmosphere boundaries, and the cleanup filter system. These models were incorporated into a new computer program called CARCAS, a substantial extension of the CNTB computer program, and applied to Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis for Phase II core heatup sequences. Development was begun on models describing the postulated behavior of particulate fission products or aerosols within and leaking out of the containment.

  1. Distribution and transport of tritium in the Peach Bottom HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.

    1979-08-01

    This report completes the first phase of a two-phase effort to describe and understand tritium production and movement in an operating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) system. The principal objective of phase 1 is to report the findings on tritium concentrations in core components acquired during the Peach Bottom Surveillance Program, which dealt with fission product migration in general, and a follow-on task devoted specifically to tritium. Administrative procedures are being developed for the second phase of the work to be performed in the Federal Republic of Germany under the auspices of the international umbrella agreement on gas-cooled reactor (GCR) development. In this effort, computer model predictions of tritium transport in the reactor system will be compared with observed concentration levels.

  2. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  3. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for period ending February 29, 1976. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-31

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and the data are presented in tables, graphs, and photographs.

  4. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  5. HTGR fuels and core development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending February 28, 1978. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    The work documented here includes the design, analysis, and testing of the reactor core and its components comprising the fuel elements, hexagonal reflector elements, plenum elements, neutron sources, control rods, and reserve shutdown material. Also included are studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and, where appropriate, the data are presented in tables, graphs, and photographs.

  6. Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production Potential from Fossil and Renewable Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the energy resources required to produce 4-10 million metric tonnes of domestic, low-carbon hydrogen in order to fuel approximately 20-50 million fuel cell electric vehicles. These projected energy resource requirements are compared to current consumption levels, projected 2040 business as usual consumptions levels, and projected 2040 consumption levels within a carbonconstrained future for the following energy resources: coal (assuming carbon capture and storage), natural gas, nuclear (uranium), biomass, wind (on- and offshore), and solar (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power). The analysis framework builds upon previous analysis results estimating hydrogen production potentials and drawing comparisons with economy-wide resource production projections

  7. Hydrogen production from glucose in ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenbaum, D.W.; Taccardi, N.; Berger, M.E.M.; Boesmann, A.; Enzenberger, F.; Woelfel, R.; Wasserscheid, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer chemische Reaktionstechnik

    2010-07-01

    Depletion of oil and gas reserves and growing global warming concerns have created a world-wide interest in new concepts for future sustainable energy supplies. The development of effective ways to produce hydrogen from biomass is expected to be one important contribution to such a goal [1]. Nowadays, three main processes are considered for future industrial application, namely: gasification of biomass [2], reforming in supercritical water [3] and aqueous phase reforming [4,5]. Other technologies such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars or steam reforming of bio-oils suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements and can probably not be considered for industrial applications in the closer future [6,7]. On the other hand, either the gasification of biomass, which is typically carried out at temperatures above 800 C using Ni or Fe catalysts [8,9,10,11], or the reforming in supercritical water, which is typically carried out in presence of Ru catalyst at pressures of 300bar and temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 C [12], suffer of poor energetic efficiency as a lot of energy is required to run the reactions. More recently, an alternative to the two aforementioned high temperature processes has been proposed as ''aqueous phase reforming'' (APR) by Dumesic and coworkers [13,14,15,16,17]. They achieved the reforming of polyols (such as ethylene glycol, glycerol and sorbitol) using heterogeneous catalysts at temperatures between 200 and 250 C and pressure typically between 15-50bar.The temperature level of the reaction allows generating hydrogen with low amounts of CO in a single reactor. The process typically forms 35 % of hydrogen, 40 % of CO2 and 25 % of combined alkanes. The high amount of formed alkanes originates eventually from CO hydrogenation and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction [18,19,20,21], those are thermodynamically favored in the above mentioned conditions. However, heterogeneously catalyzed APR

  8. Electrocatalysis research for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR undertakes research in the Electrocatalysis of fuel cells and for hydrogen production. The Hydrogen South Africa (HySA) strategy supports research on electrocatalysts due to their importance to the national beneficiation strategy. The work...

  9. Hydrogen production by a PEM electrolyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-González, G.; León-Galicia, A.; González-Huerta, R.; Rivera Camacho, J. M.; Uribe-Salazar, M.

    2015-01-01

    A PEM electrolyser for hydrogen production was evaluated. It was fed with water and a 400 mA, 3.5 V cc electrical power source. The electrolyser was built with two acrylic plates to form the anode and the cathode, two meshes to distribute the current, two seals, two gas diffusers and an assembly membrane-electrode. A small commercial neoprene sheet 1.7 mm thin was used to provide for the water deposit in order to avoid the machining of the structure. For the assembly of the proton interchange membrane a thin square 50 mm layer of Nafion 115 was used.

  10. Production of hydrogen from municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) includes gasification and the process for producing a gasificable slurry from raw MSW by using high pressures of steam. A potential energy source, MSW is a composite of organic materials such as: paper, wood, food waste, etc. There are different paper grades producing different results with low-quality paper forming better slurries than high-quality papers; making MSW a difficult feedstock for gasification. The objective of the bench-scale laboratory work has been to establish operating conditions for a hydrothermal pre-processing scheme for municipal solid waste (MSW) that produces a good slurry product that can be pumped and atomized to the gasifier for the production of hydrogen. Batch reactors are used to determine product yields as a function of hydrothermal treatment conditions. Various ratios of water-to-paper were used to find out solid product, gas product, and soluble product yields of MSW. Experimental conditions covered were temperature, time, and water to feed ratio. Temperature had the strongest effect on product yields.

  11. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  12. Production of hydrogen by lignins fast pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumlin, Sebastien; Broust, Francois; Bazer-Bachi, Frederic; Bourdeaux, Thomas; Herbinet, Olivier; Toutie Ndiaye, Fatou; Ferrer, Monique; Lede, Jacques [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique, CNRS-ENSIC, 1, rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    This paper reports the results of experiments performed on the flash pyrolysis of lignin samples submitted to controlled heat flux densities (short flashes of a concentrated radiation). Two types of lignins are used: Kraft and Organocell lignins. Microscopic observations of the reacted samples reveal the formation of an intermediate liquid compound that precedes the further formation of char, vapours and gases. The rates of mass loss and the production rates of the products are determined for both lignins. The results are compared to each other and to those obtained in former similar studies made with cellulose. The analyses of the produced gases reveal high syngas and H{sub 2} contents (respectively 87 and 50mol%). This composition is compared to results obtained in other different thermal conditions with lignins and other types of biomasses. The possible mechanism of hydrogen formation is further discussed. (author)

  13. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-11 and -12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Thoms, K.R.; Robbins, J.M.; Wagner, P.

    1980-06-01

    Capsules HRB-11 and -12 were irradiated in support of development of weak-acid-resin-derived recycle fuel for the high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel cycle for the HTGR. Fissil fuel particles with initial oxygen-to-metal ratios between 1.0 and 1.7 performed acceptably to full burnup for HEU fuel. Particles with ratios below 1.0 showed excessive chemical interaction between rare earth fission products and the SiC layer.

  14. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  15. Safety status of HTGR structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G.C.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1977-10-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the safety status of structural ceramics proposed for use in an HTGR. In this report the mechanical and physical properties of the proposed structural ceramics are reviewed, and the current design and material specifications are discussed. Potential safety problem areas are identified. Analytical models for creep deformation, devitrification, compatibility, fatigue, and thermal insulation stability are based on published work in the literature. The predictions made are generally based upon extrapolations to HTGR conditions. The data indicate that creep deformation in silicon nitride and alumina ceramics is acceptable if the purity and composition are properly controlled. Devitrification and creep in fused silica used in the core support structure and the thermal barrier system could be excessive. Thermodynamic data indicate that silicon nitride will be incompatible with the graphite seat used in the design. Under normal reactor operating conditions, or during start-up and shutdown, static fatigue and thermal shock effects in all three members of the core support structural ceramics could cause reductions in safety factors.

  16. Fermentation and Electrohydrogenic Approaches to Hydrogen Production (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maness, P. C.; Thammannagowda, S.; Magnusson, L.; Logan, B.

    2010-06-01

    This work describes the development of a waste biomass fermentation process using cellulose-degrading bacteria for hydrogen production. This process is then integrated with an electrohydrogenesis process via the development of a microbial electrolysis cell reactor, during which fermentation waste effluent is further converted to hydrogen to increase the total output of hydrogen from biomass.

  17. A New Hydrogen-Producing Strain and Its Characterization of Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxing; Lv, Yongkang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-12-01

    A newly isolated photo non-sulfur (PNS) bacterium was identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris PB-Z by sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes and phylogenetic analysis. Under vigorous stirring (240 rpm), the hydrogen production performances were greatly improved: The maximum hydrogen production rate and cumulative hydrogen production increased by 188.9 ± 0.07 % and 83.0 ± 0.06 %, respectively, due to the hydrogen bubbles were immediately removed from the culture medium. The effects of different wavelength of light on hydrogen production with stirring were much different from that without stirring. The ranking on the photo-hydrogen production performance was white > yellow > green > blue > red without stirring and white > yellow > blue > red > green under stirring. The best light source for hydrogen production was tungsten filament lamp. The optimum temperature was 35 °C. The maximal hydrogen production rate and cumulative hydrogen production reached 78.7 ± 2.3 ml/l/h and 1728.1 ± 92.7 mol H2/l culture, respectively, under 35 °C, 240 rpm, and illumination of 4000 lux. Pyruvate was one of the main sources of CO2 and has a great impact on the gas composition.

  18. Renewable hydrogen utilisation for the production of methanol.

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo, Cifre P; Badr, Ossama

    2007-01-01

    Electrolytic hydrogen production is an efficient way of storing renewable energy generated electricity and securing the contribution of renewables in the future electricity supply. The use of this hydrogen for the production of methanol results in a liquid fuel that can be utilised directly with minor changes in the existing infrastructure. To utilise the renewable generated hydrogen for production of renewable methanol, a sustainable carbon source is needed. This carbon can...

  19. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meeting on October 8 and 9, 2008. This document reports the initial selection process for development investment in STCH projects, the evaluation process meant to reduce the number of projects as a means to focus resources on development of a few most-likely-to-succeed efforts, the obstacles encountered in project inventory reduction and the outcomes of the evaluation process. Summary technical status of the projects under evaluation is reported and recommendations identified to improve future project planning and selection activities.

  20. Tailoring photocatalytic nanostructures for sustainable hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnello, Matteo; Diroll, Benjamin T

    2014-01-07

    Photocatalysis is an important component for achieving sustainability in chemical transformations. It requires light absorption by a semiconductor and efficient extraction of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs to chemically active sites. One of the main problems in photocatalytic materials is to avoid electron-hole recombination following excitation. Tailored nanostructures offer a new way for achieving this goal by facilitating electron-hole separation. Nanoscaling of materials offers additional opportunities to generate unique photocatalysts that demonstrated novel light absorption, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. In this feature article we highlight some recent approaches towards the preparation of materials and nanostructures that showed improved activity for the sustainable production of hydrogen. This reaction has received much attention for the supply of future demand both for chemical industry and energy-related applications.

  1. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang H [Idaho Falls, ID; Kim, Eung S [Ammon, ID; Sherman, Steven R [Augusta, GA

    2012-03-13

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  2. Hydrogen from algal biomass: A review of production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multifariousness of biofuel sources has marked an edge to an imperative energy issue. Production of hydrogen from microalgae has been gathering much contemplation right away. But, mercantile production of microalgae biofuels considering bio-hydrogen is still not practicable because of low biomass concentration and costly down streaming processes. This review has taken up the hydrogen production by microalgae. Biofuels are the up and coming alternative to exhaustible, environmentally and unsafe fossil fuels. Algal biomass has been considered as an enticing raw material for biofuel production, these days photobioreactors and open-air systems are being used for hydrogen production from algal biomass. The formers allow the careful cultivation control whereas the latter ones are cheaper and simpler. A contemporary, encouraging optimization access has been included called algal cell immobilization on various matrixes which has resulted in marked increase in the productivity per volume of a reactor and addition of the hydrogen-production phase.

  3. A microBio reactor for hydrogen production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volponi, Joanne V.; Walker, Andrew William

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the potential of developing a microfluidic reactor capable of enzymatically converting glucose and other carbohydrates to hydrogen. This aggressive project was motivated by work in enzymatic hydrogen production done by Woodward et al. at OWL. The work reported here demonstrated that hydrogen could be produced from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose. Attempts at immobilizing the enzymes resulted in reduced hydrogen production rates, probably due to buffer compatibility issues. A novel in-line sensor was also developed to monitor hydrogen production in real time at levels below 1 ppm. Finally, a theoretical design for the microfluidic reactor was developed but never produced due to the low production rates of hydrogen from the immobilized enzymes. However, this work demonstrated the potential of mimicking biological systems to create energy on the microscale.

  4. Biological processes for hydrogen production. Final report; Biologische Wasserstoffgewinnung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.; Reiss, T.

    1995-05-01

    Various biological processes for hydrogen production are described, e.g. biophotolytic hydrogen production, photoproduction of hydrogen from biomass, and hydrogen production by means of digestion processes. The structure nd function of hydrogenases is described, and biomimetic hydrogenases and water-splitting systems are gone into. A technology assessment is made. (SR) [Deutsch] Beschrieben werden verschiedene Moeglichkeiten der biologischen Wasserstoffgewinnung. Hierzu zaehlen die Biophotolytische Wasserstoffgewinnung, die Photoproduktion von Wasserstoff aus Biomasse und die Wasserstofferzeugung durch Gaerungsprozesse. Des weiteren wird die Struktur und Funktion von Hydrogenasen dargestellt, sowie biomimetische Hydrogenasen und wasserspaltende Systeme. Eine Technikfolgenabschaetzung wird dargelegt. (SR)

  5. Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürrer, Hans; Bachofen, Reinhard

    1979-01-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H2, 25 to 30% CO2). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems. Images PMID:16345375

  6. Hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuerrer, H.; Bachofen, R.

    1979-05-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H/sub 2/, 25 to 30% CO/sub 2/). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems.

  7. Integrative biological hydrogen production: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Kalia, Vipin C

    2013-03-01

    Biological hydrogen (H2) production by dark and photo-fermentative organisms is a promising area of research for generating bioenergy. A large number of organisms have been widely studied for producing H2 from diverse feeds, both as pure and as mixed cultures. However, their H2 producing efficiencies have been found to vary (from 3 to 8 mol/mol hexose) with physiological conditions, type of organisms and composition of feed (starchy waste from sweet potato, wheat, cassava and algal biomass). The present review deals with the possibilities of enhancing H2 production by integrating metabolic pathways of different organisms-dark fermentative bacteria (from cattle dung, activated sludge, Caldicellulosiruptor, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Lactobacillus, and Vibrio) and photo-fermentative bacteria (such as Rhodobacter, Rhodobium and Rhodopseudomonas). The emphasis has been laid on systems which are driven by undefined dark-fermentative cultures in combination with pure photo-fermentative bacterial cultures using biowaste as feed. Such an integrative approach may prove suitable for commercial applications on a large scale.

  8. Using SA508/533 for the HTGR Vessel Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) module power rating and normal operating temperatures on the use of SA508/533 material for the HTGR vessel system with emphasis on the calculated times at elevated temperatures approaching or exceeding ASME Code Service Limits (Levels B&C) to which the reactor pressure vessel could be exposed during postulated pressurized and depressurized conduction cooldown events over its design lifetime.

  9. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  10. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Anastasios [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The project addressed the following technical barrier from the Biological Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Low Sunlight Utilization Efficiency in Photobiological Hydrogen Production is due to a Large Photosystem Chlorophyll Antenna Size in Photosynthetic Microorganisms (Barrier AN: Light Utilization Efficiency).

  11. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  12. Principle and perspectives of hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Metz, S.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2006-01-01

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis is a novel biological hydrogen production process with the potential to efficiently convert a wide range of dissolved organic materials in wastewaters. Even substrates formerly regarded to be unsuitable for hydrogen production due to the endothermic nature of the involved

  13. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-79. It covers a period when the major design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of changing from the HTGR-SC emphasis to an HTGR-GT emphasis in the near term. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have been redirected to ensure that the tasks covered are supportive of this changing emphasis in HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop a medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel, and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine plant.

  14. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    The technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-79 are reported. The report covers a period when the major design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of changing from the HTGR-SC emphasis to an HTGR-GT emphasis in the near term. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have been redirected to ensure that the tasks covered are supportive of this changing emphasis in HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel, and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine plant.

  15. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  16. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  17. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  18. Potential of biogenic hydrogen production for hydrogen driven remediation strategies in marine environments

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Hennebel, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative production of bio-hydrogen (bio-H-2) from organic residues has emerged as a promising alternative for providing the required electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Unlike the widely used production of H-2 by bacteria in fresh water systems, few reports are available regarding the generation of biogenic H-2 and optimisation processes in marine systems. The present research aims to optimise the capability of an indigenous marine bacterium for the production of ...

  19. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  20. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xihong; Xie, Shilei; Yang, Hao; Tong, Yexiang; Ji, Hongbing

    2014-11-21

    Hydrogen, a clean energy carrier with high energy capacity, is a very promising candidate as a primary energy source for the future. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water is one of the most promising approaches to producing green chemical fuel. Compared to water splitting, hydrogen production from renewable biomass derivatives and water through a PEC process is more efficient from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. Additionally, the carbon dioxide formed can be re-transformed into carbohydrates via photosynthesis in plants. In this review, we focus on the development of photoanodes and systems for PEC hydrogen production from water and renewable biomass derivatives, such as methanol, ethanol, glycerol and sugars. We also discuss the future challenges and opportunities for the design of the state-of-the-art photoanodes and PEC systems for hydrogen production from biomass derivatives and water.

  1. Design and energy analysis of a electrolytic hydrogen production process by means of a high temperature nuclear reactor; Diseno y analisis energetico de un proceso de produccion de hidrogeno electrolitico por medio de un reactor nuclear de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, DEPFI Campus Morelos, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work an energy analysis to a process of production of hydrogen by means of electrolysis of high temperature is realized. This electrolysis type, unlike conventional electrolysis allows us to reach efficiencies of up to 60% because when increasing the temperature of the water, providing to its thermal energy, diminishes the demand of electrical energy required to separate the molecule of the water. Nevertheless, to obtain these efficiencies it is needed to have superheated aqueous vapor to but of 850 centigrade degrees, temperatures that can be reached about high temperature reactor; HTGR. In the present work it is mentioned to introduction way the importance of the hydrogen like energy vector and the advantages of obtaining it by means of nuclear energy. The electrolysis process of high temperature is described and a design is realized of this from its coupling to a nuclear power plant PBMR. The technological advances on which it counts the PBMR; efficiencies of 48% for optimized plants, their modular design and the thermodynamic cycle recuperative Brayton where upon operate; make the short term ideal candidate for the production of hydrogen. The thermodynamic analysis of optimized plant PBMR appears in another work, here the results of the balance of mass and energy involved in the process appear of hydrogen generation and the complete analysis of this. The result is a complete model of generation of hydrogen by electrolysis of high temperature coupled to an optimized plant PBMR that will be implemented for its dynamic simulation later. (Author)

  2. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian; Pedersen, Thomas; Dargusch, Matthew S.; McFarland, Eric W.; Li, Can; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals.

  3. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3......−, and conceptually illustrates the remediation of a waste product for producing valuable chemicals....

  4. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  5. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J.

    2017-06-20

    A method is provided for extracting hydrogen from lithium hydride. The method includes (a) heating lithium hydride to form liquid-phase lithium hydride; (b) extracting hydrogen from the liquid-phase lithium hydride, leaving residual liquid-phase lithium metal; (c) hydriding the residual liquid-phase lithium metal to form refined lithium hydride; and repeating steps (a) and (b) on the refined lithium hydride.

  6. Electrolytic production and dispensing of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) is undoubtedly the only option that can meet both the California zero emission vehicle (ZEV) standard and the President`s goal of tripling automobile efficiency without sacrificing performance in a standard 5-passenger vehicle. The three major automobile companies are designing and developing FCEVs powered directly by hydrogen under cost-shared contracts with the Department of Energy. Once developed, these vehicles will need a reliable and inexpensive source of hydrogen. Steam reforming of natural gas would produce the least expensive hydrogen, but funding may not be sufficient initially to build both large steam reforming plants and the transportation infrastructure necessary to deliver that hydrogen to geographically scattered FCEV fleets or individual drivers. This analysis evaluates the economic feasibility of using small scale water electrolysis to provide widely dispersed but cost-effective hydrogen for early FCEV demonstrations. We estimate the cost of manufacturing a complete electrolysis system in large quantities, including compression and storage, and show that electrolytic hydrogen could be cost competitive with fully taxed gasoline, using existing residential off-peak electricity rates.

  7. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of hydrogen production from wind power in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiche-Hamane, Lilia; Belhamel, Maiouf; Benyoucef, Boumedienne; Hamane, Mustapha [Centre for Development of Renewable Energies (CDER), Alger (Algeria)

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the potentiality of hydrogen production from wind power in Algeria has been given in this study. Wind resource assessment has been presented in cartographic form and windy sites have been identified for wind power application. A system constituted by a wind turbine, an electrolyser and a power conditioning device have been proposed for the study of hydrogen production in the southwest region of Algeria. For this purpose, the transient system simulation program (TRNSYS) have been used. The results obtained showed the sensitivity of hydrogen production to the wind resource trend and the importance of optimisation of the electrolyser according to the power produced by the wind turbine. (orig.)

  9. Tuning hydrogen production during oxide irradiation through surface grafting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.; Renault, J.Ph. [CNRS, Lab Radiolyse, SIS2M, DSM, IRAMIS, URA 331, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCP, LRSI, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Boulanger, L. [CEA, DEN, DMN, SRMP, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Taguchi, M. [Japan Atom Energy Agcy, Quantum Beam Sci Directorate, Environm and Ind Mat Res Div, Organ Pollutant Removal Technol Grp, Takasaki, Gumma 3701292, (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen production by radiolysis of water absorbed on solid is a major problem for nuclear waste management. In the present study, we demonstrate that controlling extreme surface properties of the irradiated material allows a direct tuning of the hydrogen production under irradiation. We achieve this control on a model system (silica fibers) using liquid phase atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titanium or zirconium oxide. The hydrogen production is strongly inhibited by the deposition of a sub-nano-metric layer of titanium oxide, whereas it is amplified upon zirconium oxide grafting. (authors)

  10. Technical suitability mapping of feedstocks for biological hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Karaoglanoglou, L.S.; Koullas, D.P.; Bakker, R.R.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to map and compare the technical suitability of different raw materials for biological hydrogen production. Our model was based on hydrogen yield potential, sugar mobilization efficiency, fermentability and coproduct yield and value. The suitability of the studied

  11. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  12. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  13. Hydrogen production econometric studies. [hydrogen and fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. R.; Bannerot, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The current assessments of fossil fuel resources in the United States were examined, and predictions of the maximum and minimum lifetimes of recoverable resources according to these assessments are presented. In addition, current rates of production in quads/year for the fossil fuels were determined from the literature. Where possible, costs of energy, location of reserves, and remaining time before these reserves are exhausted are given. Limitations that appear to hinder complete development of each energy source are outlined.

  14. HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of the sequential equipment operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.B.; Fields, D.E.; Kergis, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    The second sequential operation of the HTGR fuel reprocessing cold-dry head-end pilot plant equipment has been successfully completed. Twenty standard LHGTR fuel elements were crushed to a size suitable for combustion in a fluid bed burner. The graphite was combusted leaving a product of fissile and fertile fuel particles. These particles were separated in a pneumatic classifier. The fissile particles were fractured and reburned in a fluid bed to remove the inner carbon coatings. The remaining products are ready for dissolution and solvent extraction fuel recovery.

  15. Accident sequences and causes analysis in a hydrogen production process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Moo Sung; Hwang, Seok Won; Kang, Kyong Min; Ryu, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Soo; Cho, Nam Chul; Jeon, Ho Jun; Jung, Gun Hyo; Han, Kyu Min; Lee, Seng Woo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Since hydrogen production facility using IS process requires high temperature of nuclear power plant, safety assessment should be performed to guarantee the safety of facility. First of all, accident cases of hydrogen production and utilization has been surveyed. Based on the results, risk factors which can be derived from hydrogen production facility were identified. Besides the correlation between risk factors are schematized using influence diagram. Also initiating events of hydrogen production facility were identified and accident scenario development and quantification were performed. PSA methodology was used for identification of initiating event and master logic diagram was used for selection method of initiating event. Event tree analysis was used for quantification of accident scenario. The sum of all the leakage frequencies is 1.22x10{sup -4} which is similar value (1.0x10{sup -4}) for core damage frequency that International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group of IAEA suggested as a criteria.

  16. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  17. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide for methanol production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; van den Berg, Henderikus; Benneker, A.; Simmelink, G.; Timmer, J.; van Weerden, S.

    2012-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol with a capacity of 10 kt/y methanol is designed in a systematic way. The challenge will be to obtain a process with a high net CO2 conversion. From initially four conceptual designs the most feasible is selected and designed in more detail. The

  18. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  19. Electrolytic hydrogen production infrastructure options evaluation. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Fuel-cell electric vehicles have the potential to provide the range, acceleration, rapid refueling times, and other creature comforts associated with gasoline-powered vehicles, but with virtually no environmental degradation. To achieve this potential, society will have to develop the necessary infrastructure to supply hydrogen to the fuel-cell vehicles. Hydrogen could be stored directly on the vehicle, or it could be derived from methanol or other hydrocarbon fuels by on-board chemical reformation. This infrastructure analysis assumes high-pressure (5,000 psi) hydrogen on-board storage. This study evaluates one approach to providing hydrogen fuel: the electrolysis of water using off-peak electricity. Other contractors at Princeton University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating the feasibility of producing hydrogen by steam reforming natural gas, probably the least expensive hydrogen infrastructure alternative for large markets. Electrolytic hydrogen is a possible short-term transition strategy to provide relatively inexpensive hydrogen before there are enough fuel-cell vehicles to justify building large natural gas reforming facilities. In this study, the authors estimate the necessary price of off-peak electricity that would make electrolytic hydrogen costs competitive with gasoline on a per-mile basis, assuming that the electrolyzer systems are manufactured in relatively high volumes compared to current production. They then compare this off-peak electricity price goal with actual current utility residential prices across the US.

  20. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N.Z. [Univ. of Central Florida, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  1. The production and use of hydrogen in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Jurij

    2017-07-01

    Efficient and sustainable methods of clean fuel production are needed in all countries of the world in the face of depleting oil reserves and the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. With hydrogen technology we can significantly reduce harmful emissions in air and water. However, a key missing element is a large-scale method of hydrogen production from water. As a carbon-based technology, the predominant existing process (steam-methane reforming (SMR)) is unsuitable regarding global warming, icreased world population, etc. This paper focuses on a production of hydrogen in connection with a thermal power plant. We will show the technologies which allow the coupling between a thermal power plant and hydrogen technologies.

  2. Thorium utilization program quarterly progress report for the period ending February 29, 1976. [HTGR Fuel Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-31

    This publication presents results of work performed under the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Program Thorium Utilization Program. The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of HTGR fuel and the design and development of an integrated line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials. Work is also described on the development of the conceptual design of recycle facilities to identify the requirements of large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels and to incorporate the results of these studies in guidance of development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

  3. Bio-hydrogen Production Potential from Market Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanna Jaitalee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studied bio-hydrogen production from vegetable waste from a fresh market in order to recover energy. A series of batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of initial volatile solids concentration on the bio-hydrogen production process. Lab bench scale anaerobic continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR were used to study the effect of substrate and sludge inoculation on hydrogen production. Three different concentrations of initial total volatile solids (TVS of organic waste were varied from 2%, 3% and 5% respectively. The pH was controlled at 5.5 for all batches in the experiment. The results showed that bio-hydrogen production depended on feed-substrate concentration. At initial TVS content of 3%, the highest hydrogen production was achieved at a level of 0.59 L-H2/L at pH 5.5. The maximum hydrogen yield was 15.3 ml H2/g TVS or 8.5 ml H2/g COD. The composition of H2 in the biogas ranged from 28.1-30.9% and no CH4 was detected in all batch tests.

  4. Aerobic Hydrogen Production via Nitrogenase in Azotobacter vinelandii CA6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Jesse; Loveless, Telisa; Navarro-Herrero, José Luis; Olson, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii possesses three distinct nitrogenase isoenzymes, all of which produce molecular hydrogen as a by-product. In batch cultures, A. vinelandii strain CA6, a mutant of strain CA, displays multiple phenotypes distinct from its parent: tolerance to tungstate, impaired growth and molybdate transport, and increased hydrogen evolution. Determining and comparing the genomic sequences of strains CA and CA6 revealed a large deletion in CA6's genome, encompassing genes related to molybdate and iron transport and hydrogen reoxidation. A series of iron uptake analyses and chemostat culture experiments confirmed iron transport impairment and showed that the addition of fixed nitrogen (ammonia) resulted in cessation of hydrogen production. Additional chemostat experiments compared the hydrogen-producing parameters of different strains: in iron-sufficient, tungstate-free conditions, strain CA6's yields were identical to those of a strain lacking only a single hydrogenase gene. However, in the presence of tungstate, CA6 produced several times more hydrogen. A. vinelandii may hold promise for developing a novel strategy for production of hydrogen as an energy compound. PMID:25911479

  5. Hydrogen Production from Semiconductor-based Photocatalysis via Water Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. S. Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is the ideal fuel for the future because it is clean, energy efficient, and abundant in nature. While various technologies can be used to generate hydrogen, only some of them can be considered environmentally friendly. Recently, solar hydrogen generated via photocatalytic water splitting has attracted tremendous attention and has been extensively studied because of its great potential for low-cost and clean hydrogen production. This paper gives a comprehensive review of the development of photocatalytic water splitting for generating hydrogen, particularly under visible-light irradiation. The topics covered include an introduction of hydrogen production technologies, a review of photocatalytic water splitting over titania and non-titania based photocatalysts, a discussion of the types of photocatalytic water-splitting approaches, and a conclusion for the current challenges and future prospects of photocatalytic water splitting. Based on the literatures reported here, the development of highly stable visible–light-active photocatalytic materials, and the design of efficient, low-cost photoreactor systems are the key for the advancement of solar-hydrogen production via photocatalytic water splitting in the future.

  6. HTGR-GT and electrical load integrated control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, T.; Openshaw, F.; Pfremmer, D.

    1980-05-01

    A discussion of the control and operation of the HTGR-GT power plant is presented in terms of its closely coupled electrical load and core cooling functions. The system and its controls are briefly described and comparisons are made with more conventional plants. The results of analyses of selected transients are presented to illustrate the operation and control of the HTGR-GT. The events presented were specifically chosen to show the controllability of the plant and to highlight some of the unique characteristics inherent in this multiloop closed-cycle plant.

  7. Nanowires for solar energy and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Sutherland, Alexander M.; Guo, Ting

    2007-09-01

    We report here two approaches that we have developed recently to help solve the problem of energy crisis and global warming facing us today. One approach is to use nanoparticles attached to the end of single-walled carbon nanotubes to catalytically convert CO II and CH 4 into hydrogen and carbon fibers, which can then be used in hydrogen fuel cells and as the building material in transportation vehicles and many other structures. The second approach is to use silica nanowires as templates to make nanoscale electrodes to be used in solar cells. The main advantage of this type of solar cells is that it would be easy to incorporate them directly into glass windows on all the buildings.

  8. Inter-esterified palm products as alternatives to hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Nor Aini; Dian, Noor Lida Habi Mat

    2005-01-01

    Inter-esterification is one of the processes used to modify the physico-chemical characteristics of oils and fats. Inter-esterification is an acyl-rearrangement reaction on the glycerol molecule. On the other hand, hydrogenation involves addition of hydrogen to the double bonds of unsaturated fatty acids. Due to health implications of trans fatty acids, which are formed during hydrogenation, the industry needs to find alternatives to hydrogenated fats. This paper discusses some applications of inter-esterified fats, with particular reference to inter-esterified palm products, as alternatives to hydrogenation. Some physico-chemical properties of inter-esterified fats used in shortenings are discussed. With inter-esterification, more palm stearin can be incorporated in vanaspati. For confectionary fats and infant formulations, enzymatic inter-esterification has been employed.

  9. Onboard Plasmatron Hydrogen Production for Improved Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Cohn; Leslie Bromberg; Kamal Hadidi

    2005-12-31

    A plasmatron fuel reformer has been developed for onboard hydrogen generation for vehicular applications. These applications include hydrogen addition to spark-ignition internal combustion engines, NOx trap and diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, and emissions reduction from spark ignition internal combustion engines First, a thermal plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. This plasmatron used an electric arc with relatively high power to reform fuels such as gasoline, diesel and biofuels at an oxygen to carbon ratio close to 1. The draw back of this device was that it has a high electric consumption and limited electrode lifetime due to the high temperature electric arc. A second generation plasmatron fuel reformer was developed. It used a low-current high-voltage electric discharge with a completely new electrode continuation. This design uses two cylindrical electrodes with a rotating discharge that produced low temperature volumetric cold plasma., The lifetime of the electrodes was no longer an issue and the device was tested on several fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and biofuels at different flow rates and different oxygen to carbon ratios. Hydrogen concentration and yields were measured for both the thermal and non-thermal plasmatron reformers for homogeneous (non-catalytic) and catalytic reforming of several fuels. The technology was licensed to an industrial auto part supplier (ArvinMeritor) and is being implemented for some of the applications listed above. The Plasmatron reformer has been successfully tested on a bus for NOx trap regeneration. The successful development of the plasmatron reformer and its implementation in commercial applications including transportation will bring several benefits to the nation. These benefits include the reduction of NOx emissions, improving engine efficiency and reducing the nation's oil consumption. The objective of this program has been to develop attractive applications of plasmatron fuel reformer

  10. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Chloroform-treated Methanogenic Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Shulin

    In fermentative hydrogen production, the low-hydrogen-producing bacteria retention rate limits the suspended growth reactor productivity because of the long hydraulic retention time (HRT) required to maintain adequate bacteria population. Traditional bacteria immobilization methods such as calcium alginate entrapment have many application limitations in hydrogen fermentation, including limited duration time, bacteria leakage, cost, and so on. The use of chloroform-treated anaerobic granular sludge as immobilized hydrogen-producing bacteria in an immobilized hydrogen culture may be able to overcome the limitations of traditional immobilization methods. This paper reports the findings on the performance of fed-batch cultures and continuous cultures inoculated with chloroform-treated granules. The chloroform-treated granules were able to be reused over four fed-batch cultures, with pH adjustment. The upflow reactor packed with chloroform-treated granules was studied, and the HRT of the upflow reactor was found to be as low as 4 h without any decrease in hydrogen production yield. Initial pH and glucose concentration of the culture medium significantly influenced the performance of the reactor. The optimum initial pH of the culture medium was neutral, and the optimum glucose concentration of the culture medium was below 20 g chemical oxygen demand/L at HRT 4 h. This study also investigated the possibility of integrating immobilized hydrogen fermentation using chloroform-treated granules with immobilized methane production using untreated granular sludge. The results showed that the integrated batch cultures produced 1.01 mol hydrogen and 2 mol methane per mol glucose. Treating the methanogenic granules with chloroform and then using the treated granules as immobilized hydrogen-producing sludge demonstrated advantages over other immobilization methods because the treated granules provide hydrogen-producing bacteria with a protective niche, a long duration of an active

  11. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  12. A study on the solar hydrogen production techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozoglan, Elif [Department of Management, Taris Olive Oil, Agricultural, Industrial and Commercial Company, (Turkey); Midilli, Adnan [Energy Technologies, Turgut Kiran Maritime College, Marine Engineering, Rize University (Turkey); Hepbasli, Arif [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of fossil fuels and the rising concerns about the environment, interest in green energy, which is both sustainable and clean, is growing. Among the different techniques, solar energy based hydrogen production appears to be one of the simpler and more convenient methods. Several solar hydrogen production methods exist and the aim of this paper is to determine the environmental and sustainability performances of an electrolyser. A solar hydrogen system was designed to meet the demands of 100 families in Misurata, Libya, whose average consumption is 268 kW and an exergy analysis was performed on the system. Results showed that the exergy destruction factor was 0.14 and the environmental destruction factor was 0.16. This study demonstrated that producing hydrogen using solar energy is an environmentally friendly and sustainable method which does not generate any greenhouse gases in the operating stage.

  13. Two dimensional simulation of hydrogen iodide decomposition reaction using fluent code for hydrogen production using nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Jung Sik [The Institute of Machinery and Electronic Technology, Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Hyuk [Division of Marine Engineering System, Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The operating characteristics of hydrogen iodide (HI) decomposition for hydrogen production were investigated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, and various factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare device performance with that expected for device development. Hydrogen production increased with an increase of the surface-to-volume (STV) ratio. With an increase of hydrogen production, the reaction heat increased. The internal pressure and velocity of the HI decomposer were estimated through pressure drop and reducing velocity from the preheating zone. The mass of H2O was independent of the STV ratio, whereas that of HI decreased with increasing STV ratio.

  14. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  15. Hydrogen production and storage: R & D priorities and gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    This review of priorities and gaps in hydrogen production and storage R & D has been prepared by the IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in the context of the activities of the IEA Hydrogen Co-ordination Group. It includes two papers. The first is by Trygve Riis, Elisabet F. Hagen, Preben J.S. Vie and Oeystein Ulleberg. This offers an overview of the technologies for hydrogen production. The technologies discussed are reforming of natural gas; gasification of coal and biomass; and the splitting of water by water-electrolysis, photo-electrolysis, photo-biological production and high-temperature decomposition. The second paper is by Trygve Riis, Gary Sandrock, Oeystein Ulleberg and Preben J.S. Vie. The objective of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the possible hydrogen storage options available today and in the foreseeable future. Hydrogen storage can be considered for onboard vehicular, portable, stationary, bulk, and transport applications, but the main focus of this paper is on vehicular storage, namely fuel cell or ICE/electric hybrid vehicles. 7 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Microbial production of hydrogen from starch-manufacturing wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, H.; Maki, R.; Hirose, J.; Hayashi, S. [Miyazaki Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2002-05-01

    Effective hydrogen production from starch-manufacturing wastes by microorganisms was investigated. Continuous hydrogen production in high yield of 2.7 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose was attained by a mixed culture of Clostridium butyricum and Enterobacter aerogenes HO-39 in the starch waste medium consisting of sweet potato starch residue as a carbon source and corn steep liquor as a nitrogen source in a repeated batch culture. Rhodobacter sp. M-19 could produce hydrogen from the supernatant of the culture broth obtained in the repeated batch culture of C. butyricum and E. aerogenes HO-39. Hydrogen yield of 4.5 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose was obtained by culturing Rhodobacter sp. M-19 in the supernatant supplemented with 20{mu}gl{sup -1} Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} 2H{sub 2}O and 10mgl{sup -1} EDTA in a repeated batch culture with pH control at 7.5. Therefore, continuous hydrogen production with total hydrogen yield of 7.2 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose from the starch remaining in the starch residue was attained by the repeated batch culture with C. butyricum and E. aerogenes HO-39 and by the successive repeated batch culture with Rhodobacter sp. M-19. (Author)

  17. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  18. Discovery of Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Brent MacQueen

    2006-10-01

    This project for DOE was designed to address these materials-related issues through a combination of high-throughput screening of semiconductor candidates and theoretical modeling of nanostructures. High-throughput screening is an effective and economical way to examine a large number of candidates and identify those worthy of further study. Unfortunately, in the course of this project, we discovered no semiconductor candidates that can meet the DOE’s stringent requirements for an economically feasible photoelectrochemical process. However, some of our results indicated that several systems may have potential if further optimized. In particular, the published theoretical modeling work indicates that core-shell nanorod structures, if properly engineered, have the potential to overcome the shortfalls of current semiconductors. Although the synthesis of the designed core-shell nanorod structures proved to be beyond the current capabilities of our laboratories, recent advances in the synthesis of core-shell nanorod structures imply that the designed structures can be synthesized. SRI is confident that once these materials are made they will validate our models and lead to economical and environmentally friendly hydrogen from sunlight and water. The high-throughput photolysis analysis module developed at SRI will also have utility in applications such as identifying catalysts for photo-assisted chemical detoxification, as well as non-photolytic applications such as hydrogen storage, which can take advantage of the ability of the analysis module to monitor pressure over time.

  19. CIGS thin films for photoelectrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, R.; Miranda, M.; Pantoja, J. [CIE-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [CIE-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)]|[IMP, Yucatan (Mexico). Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos

    2003-07-01

    A sustainable energy economy will depend in large part on hydrogen as an energy vector. Its big advantage is its zero emission when burning or oxidation in a fuel cell, which gains added relevance when the hydrogen is produced using renewable energy such as photoelectrochemical cells. High efficiencies in solar to electrical conversion have been shown for CIGS based solar cells. The CIGS film precursors were prepared by electrodeposition from an electrochemical bath using the potentiostatic method. The precursors underwent annealing in a selenium (Se) atmosphere at 550 degrees Celsius and later on, film composition was adjusted to stoichiometric by evaporating extra indium (In) and gallium (Ga) and annealing in an Se atmosphere. Techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDAX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and opto-electronic methods were used to characterize CIGS films. The electrochemical measurements were effected in a three electrode cell. The results obtained by XRD showed a hexagonal chalcopyrite structure for the polycrystalline films and the grain structure improved with post-deposition physical vapor deposition (PVD) composition adjustment and annealing. SEM and AFM yielded similar results. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Production of Co, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles by hydrogen reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, production of Co, Ni, and Cu nanoparticles by hydrogen reduction of metal chlorides in gas phase was studied. Nanoparticles have unique properties not found in bulk or micron-scale materials. These enable new products or reduced use of raw materials. Metal nanoparticle production has been studied widely, but especially for coated metal particles, research of coating mechanisms and economic production methods is still needed. The method used in this thesis combines a high yield...

  1. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, Harold T.

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable

  2. Estimation and control in HTGR fuel rod fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, D J; Bailey, M J

    1980-01-01

    A control algorithm has been derived for a HTGR Fuel Rod Fabrication Process utilizing the method of Box and Jenkins. The estimator is a Kalman filter and is compared with a Least Square estimator and a standard control chart. The effects of system delays are presented.

  3. Principle and perspectives of hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozendal, Rene A.; Hamelers, Hubertus V.M.; Buisman, Cees J.N. [Sub-Department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, Bomenweg 2, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Euverink, Gerrit J.W.; Metz, Sybrand J. [Wetsus, Centre for Sustainable Water Technology, Agora 1, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    2006-09-15

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis is a novel biological hydrogen production process with the potential to efficiently convert a wide range of dissolved organic materials in wastewaters. Even substrates formerly regarded to be unsuitable for hydrogen production due to the endothermic nature of the involved conversion reactions can be converted with this technology. Biocatalyzed electrolysis achieves this by utilizing electrochemically active micro-organisms that are capable of generating electrical current from the oxidation of organic matter. When this biological anode is coupled to a proton reducing cathode by means of a power supply, hydrogen is generated. In the biocatalyzed electrolysis experiments presented in this article acetate is used as a model compound. In theory, biocatalyzed electrolysis of acetate requires applied voltages that can be as low as 0.14V, while hydrogen production by means of conventional water electrolysis, in practice, requires applied voltages well above 1.6V. At an applied voltage of 0.5V the biocatalyzed electrolysis setup used in this study, produces approximately 0.02m{sup 3}H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} reactor liquid volume/day from acetate at an overall efficiency of 53+/-3.5%. This performance was mainly limited by the current design of the system, diffusional loss of hydrogen from the cathode to the anode chamber and high overpotentials associated with the cathode reaction. In this article we show that optimization of the process will allow future volumetric hydrogen production rates above 10m{sup 3}H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} reactor liquid volume/day at overall efficiencies exceeding 90% and applied voltages as low as 0.3-0.4V. In the future, this will make biocatalyzed electrolysis an attractive technology for hydrogen production from a wide variety of wastewaters. (author)

  4. Photovoltaic hydrogen production with commercial alkaline electrolysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursua, A.; Lopez, J.; Gubia, E.; Marroyo, L.; Sanchis, P. [Public Univ. of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Dept. of Electric and Electronic Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources and Electrolysis generate the so-called green Hydrogen, a zero-emission and potentially fossil fuel independent energy source. However, the inherent variability of the renewable energy sources implies a mode of operation for which most current electrolysers have not been designed. This paper analyses the operation of a water electrolyser fed with photovoltaic (PV) generator electric profile. The system, Integrated by a 1 Nm{sup 3}/h Hydrogenics alkaline electrolyser and a 5100 W PV generator with 60 BP585 modules, is installed at the Public University of Navarra (Spain). The PV generator profile fed to the electrolyser is emulated by a custom-made apparatus designed and built by the authors of this paper. The profile is designed according to real irradiance data measured by a calibration cell. The irradiance data are converted to the electric power profile that the PV generator would have delivered in case of having been connected to the electrolyser by means of a DC/DC converter with maximum power point tracking (MPPT). Finally, from previously measured power-current electrolyser characteristic curves, the current profile to be delivered to the electrolyser is obtained and programmed to the electronic device. The electrolyser was tested for two types of days. During the first day, the irradiance was very stable, whereas during the second day, the irradiance was very variable. The experimental results show an average power consumption rate and an efficiency of 4908 Wh/Nm{sup 3} and 72.1%, on the first day, and 4842 Wh/Nm{sup 3} and 73.3% on the second day. The electrolyser performance was particularly good in spite of the high variability of the electric supply of the second day. (orig.)

  5. Studies on membrane acid electrolysis for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marco Antonio Oliveira da; Linardi, Marcelo; Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The electrolysis by membrane has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with noncarbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  6. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production

  7. Calculation of LUEC using HEEP Software for Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongho; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution by reducing the release of carbon dioxide. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is considered as an efficient reactor to couple with the thermo-chemical Sulfur Iodine (SI) cycle to achieve the hydrogen economy. HEEP(Hydrogen Economy Evaluation Program) is one of the software tools developed by IAEA to evaluate the economy of the nuclear hydrogen production system by estimating unit hydrogen production cost. In this paper, the LUHC (Levelized Unit Hydrogen Cost) is calculated by using HEEP for nuclear hydrogen production plant, which consists of 4 modules of 600 MWth VHTR coupled with SI process. The levelized unit hydrogen production cost(LUHC) was calculated by the HEEP software.

  8. Effective utilization of by-product oxygen from electrolysis hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Suzuoki, Yasuo [Nagoya University (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    To avoid fossil-fuel consumption and greenhouse-gas emissions, hydrogen should be produced by renewable energy resources. Water electrolysis using proton exchange membrane (PEM) is considered a promising hydrogen-production method, although the cost of the hydrogen from PEM would be very high compared with that from other mature technologies, such as steam methane reforming (SMR). In this study, we focus on the effective utilization of by-product oxygen from electrolysis hydrogen production and discuss the potential demand for it, as well as evaluating its contribution to improving process efficiency. Taking as an example the utilization of by-product oxygen for medical use, we compare the relative costs of hydrogen production by means of PEM electrolysis and SMR. (author)

  9. Potential of biogenic hydrogen production for hydrogen driven remediation strategies in marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Hennebel, Tom; Boon, Nico

    2014-09-25

    Fermentative production of bio-hydrogen (bio-H2) from organic residues has emerged as a promising alternative for providing the required electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Unlike the widely used production of H2 by bacteria in fresh water systems, few reports are available regarding the generation of biogenic H2 and optimisation processes in marine systems. The present research aims to optimise the capability of an indigenous marine bacterium for the production of bio-H2 in marine environments and subsequently develop this process for hydrogen driven remediation strategies. Fermentative conversion of organics in marine media to H2 using a marine isolate, Pseudoalteromonas sp. BH11, was determined. A Taguchi design of experimental methodology was employed to evaluate the optimal nutritional composition in batch tests to improve bio-H2 yields. Further optimisation experiments showed that alginate-immobilised bacterial cells were able to produce bio-H2 at the same rate as suspended cells over a period of several weeks. Finally, bio-H2 was used as electron donor to successfully dehalogenate trichloroethylene (TCE) using biogenic palladium nanoparticles as a catalyst. Fermentative production of bio-H2 can be a promising technique for concomitant generation of an electron source for hydrogen driven remediation strategies and treatment of organic residue in marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Realistic costs of wind-hydrogen vehicle fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnemann, J.; Steinberger-Wilckens, R. [PLANET - Planungsgruppe Energie und Technik GbR, P.O. Box 4003, D-26030 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Electricity grids with a high penetration of fluctuating energy production from wind and solar energy sources bear a risk of electricity over-production. A surplus of renewable energy can arise at times of high production when the energy volume cannot be absorbed by the electricity grid. Furthermore, the control of the stochastic power fluctuations has to be addressed since these will result in changes to grid stability. Producing hydrogen from excess electricity is one approach to solve these problems. This hydrogen can either be sold outside the electricity market, for instance as vehicle fuel, or re-converted into electricity, for instance as a means of controlling wind power output. This paper describes two different wind-hydrogen systems and analyses the ensuing costs of hydrogen per unit of energy service (i.e. kWh and Nm{sup 3}). If hydrogen is to represent a practical fuel alternative, it has to compete with conventional energy carriers. If this is not possible on strictly (micro-) economic terms, at least a macro-economic calculation, in this case including all external costs of energy services, needs to show competitiveness. (author)

  11. Electrochemical production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganisms and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  12. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  13. CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George R. Gavalas

    2004-04-01

    The preparation and performance of membranes for application to hydrogen separation from coal-derived gas is described. The membrane material investigated was dense amorphous silica deposited on a suitable support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two types of support materials were pursued. One type consisted of a two-layer composite, zeolite silicalite/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the form of tubes approximately 0.7 cm in diameter. The other type was porous glass tubes of diameter below 0.2 cm. The first type of support was prepared starting from {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes of 1{micro}m mean pore diameter and growing by hydrothermal reaction a zeolite silicalite layer inside the pores of the alumina at the OD side. After calcination to remove the organic template used in the hydrothermal reaction, CVD was carried out to deposit the final silica layer. CVD was carried out by alternating exposure of the surface with silicon tetrachloride and water vapor. SEM and N2 adsorption measurements were employed to characterize the membranes at several stages during their preparation. Permeation measurements of several gases yielded H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ideal selectivity of 150-200 at room temperature declining to 110 at 250 C. The second type of support pursued was porous glass tubes prepared by a novel extrusion technique. A thick suspension of borosilicate glass powder in a polyethersulfone solution was extruded through a spinneret and after gelation the glass-polymer tube was heat treated to obtain a gas-tight glass tube. Leaching of the glass tube in hot water yielded connected pores with diameter on the order of 100 nm. CVD of the final silica layer was not carried out on these tubes on account of their large pore size.

  14. INNOVATIVE CATALYTIC MATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.S. El Ouchdi, L. Cherif, R. Bachir, A. Choukchou-Braham, S. Merad-Bedrane [Laboratory of Catalysis and Synthesis in Organic Chemistry, University of Tlemcen, Chemistry Department, Tiemcen (Algeria)

    2008-09-30

    One of the greatest revolutions in the 20th century is that of transport. Inventions of cars, trucks, and airplanes have created a new world that has become increasingly dependent on combustion of hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel, and jet fuel. Major environmental global problems are due to emissions of pollutants from fuels combustion, such as NOx, SOx, particulate matter and greenhouse gases (CO2 , CH4 , etc.). The present work is devoted to the study of ethanol catalytic steam reforming. The challenge is a high yield in hydrogen and a high selectivity towards CO2 . The reaction is classically carried out over transition metal catalysts supported on Al2O3, MgO, ZnO and SiO2. Our innovation consists in using mesoporous materials such as SBA-15, Al-SBA-15, CMK3 and mesoporous Alumina known for very interesting and large catalytic properties as supports for our metal catalysts. Cupper and nickel were used as active metal phase. The interest of our work is to obtain high activities under mild conditions. In fact, catalytic tests were carried out in gas phase at 300 C and atmospheric pressure. Ethanol and water were automatically injected with a constant velocity of 0.033 cm3 min-1 and a molar ratio ethanol/water = 1/3. Such operating conditions could be easily reproduced on-board. Catalysts were fully characterized using XRD, EM, TPR and metal loading analysis. Influence of the nature and the structure of the mesoporous support, the nature of the metal, the preparation way, the metal loading and catalysts pre-treatment was checked. A correlation between the materials' properties and catalytic activities will be suggested. All these results will be widely discussed during the presentation.

  15. Hydrogen production from agricultural waste by dark fermentation: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xin Mei; Trably, Eric; Latrille, Eric; Carrere, Helene; Steyer, Jean-Philippe [INRA, UR050, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement, F-11100 Narbonne (France)

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of the natural environment and the energy crisis are two vital issues for sustainable development worldwide. Hydrogen is considered as one of the most promising candidates as a substitute for fossil fuels. In this context, biological processes are considered as the most environmentally friendly alternatives for satisfying future hydrogen demands. In particular, biohydrogen production from agricultural waste is very advantageous since agri-wastes are abundant, cheap, renewable and highly biodegradable. Considering that such wastes are complex substrates and can be degraded biologically by complex microbial ecosystems, the present paper focuses on dark fermentation as a key technology for producing hydrogen from crop residues, livestock waste and food waste. In this review, recent findings on biohydrogen production from agricultural wastes by dark fermentation are reported. Key operational parameters such as pH, partial pressure, temperature and microbial actors are discussed to facilitate further research in this domain. (author)

  16. Hydrogen production characteristics of photoheterotrophic Rubrivivax gelatinosus L31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ru Ying; Fang, Herbert H.P. [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2008-02-15

    A new strain of Rubrivivax gelatinosus (designated as L31) was isolated from the sediment of a local reservoir. Testing against 10 organic substrates, this strain could produce hydrogen from carbohydrates, including glucose, sucrose and starch, as well as from lactate and malate. Even though it could use acetate, propionate, butyrate, succinate and glutamate as substrate, it could not produce hydrogen from them. Based on the determined kinetic parameters derived from experimental data, lactate produced the highest amount (225.4 ml) of hydrogen with a hydrogen conversion efficiency of 50.5%, whereas starch exhibited the highest production rate of 829 ml/g/h after an extensive lag phase of 870 h. The increase of nitrogenase activity, which ranged from 9.0 to 36.3{mu} l-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/h/mg-VSS, generally resulted in higher substrate degradation and hydrogen conversion efficiency. Although both formations of hydrogen and intracellular poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate consumed electrons, there was no noticeable quantitative correlation between them. (author)

  17. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, S.; Anand, M.; Carvill, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction (SER) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process, the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The consequences of SER are: (1) reformation reaction at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than conventional SMR (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (2) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 99+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (3) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The early focus of the program will be on the identification of an adsorbent/chemisorbent for CO{sub 2} and on the demonstration of the SER concept for SMR in our state-of-the-art bench scale process. In the latter stages, a pilot plant will be built to scale-up the technology and to develop engineering data. The program has just been initiated and no significant results for SMR will be reported. However, results demonstrating the basic principles and process schemes of SER technology will be presented for reverse water gas shift reaction as the model reaction. If successful, this technology will be commercialized by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) and used in its existing hydrogen business. APCI is the world leader in merchant hydrogen production for a wide range of industrial applications.

  18. Hydrogen production from water hyacinth through dark- and photo- fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Huibo; Cheng, Jun; Zhou, Junhu; Song, Wenlu; Cen, Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2010-09-15

    This article discusses the method of producing hydrogen from water hyacinth. Water hyacinth was pretreated with microwave heating and alkali to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis and hydrogen production in a two-step process of dark- and photo- fermentation. Water hyacinth with various concentrations of 10-40 g/l was pretreated with four methods: (1) steam heating; (2) steam heating and microwave heating/alkali pretreatment; (3) steam heating and enzymatic hydrolysis; (4) steam heating, microwave heating/alkali pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Water hyacinth (20 g/l) pretreated with method 4 gave the maximum reducing sugar yield of 30.57 g/100 g TVS, which was 45.6% of the theoretical reducing sugar yield (67.0 g/100 g TVS). The pretreated water hyacinth was used to produce hydrogen by mixed H{sub 2}-producing bacteria in dark fermentation. The maximum hydrogen yield of 76.7 ml H{sub 2}/g TVS was obtained at 20 g/l of water hyacinth. The residual solutions from dark fermentation (mainly acetate and butyrate) were used to further produce hydrogen by immobilized Rhodopseudomonas palustris in photo fermentation. The maximum hydrogen yield of 522.6 ml H{sub 2}/g TVS was obtained at 10 g/l of water hyacinth. Through a combined process of dark- and photo- fermentation, the maximum hydrogen yield from water hyacinth was dramatically enhanced from 76.7 to 596.1 ml H{sub 2}/g TVS, which was 59.6% of the theoretical hydrogen yield. (author)

  19. Renewable hydrogen production via thermochemical/electrochemical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Andrea [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Babiniec, Sean Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    A coupled electrochemical/thermochemical cycle was investigated to produce hydrogen from renewable resources. Like a conventional thermochemical cycle, this cycle leverages chemical energy stored in a thermochemical working material that is reduced thermally by solar energy. However, in this concept, the stored chemical energy only needs to be partially, but not fully, capable of splitting steam to produce hydrogen. To complete the process, a proton-conducting membrane is driven to separate hydrogen as it is produced, thus shifting the thermodynamics toward further hydrogen production. This novel coupled-cycle concept provides several benefits. First, the required oxidation enthalpy of the reversible thermochemical material is reduced, enabling the process to occur at lower temperatures. Second, removing the requirement for spontaneous steam-splitting widens the scope of materials compositions, allowing for less expensive/more abundant elements to be used. Lastly, thermodynamics calculations suggest that this concept can potentially reach higher efficiencies than photovoltaic-to-electrolysis hydrogen production methods. This Exploratory Express LDRD involved assessing the practical feasibility of the proposed coupled cycle. A test stand was designed and constructed and proton-conducting membranes were synthesized. While the full proof of concept was not achieved, the individual components of the experiment were validated and new capabilities that can be leveraged by a variety of programs were developed.

  20. Heat Pre-Treatment of Beverages Wastewater on Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyub, S. Z.; Mohd, N. S.; Ibrahim, S.

    2017-06-01

    At present, a large variety of alternative fuels have been investigated and hydrogen gas is considered as the possible solution for the future due to its unique characteristics. Through dark fermentation process, several factors were found to have significant impact on the hydrogen production either through process enhancement or inhibition and degradation rates or influencing parameters. This work was initiated to investigate the optimum conditions for heat pre-treatment and initial pH for the dark fermentative process under mesophilic condition using a central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). Different heat treatment conditions and pH were performed on the seed sludge collected from the anaerobic digester of beverage wastewater treatment plant. Heat treatment of inoculum was optimized at different exposure times (30, 90, 120 min), temperatures (80, 90 and 100°C) and pH (4.5, 5.5, 6.5) in order to maximize the biohydrogen production and methanogens activity inhibition. It was found that the optimum heat pre-treatment condition and pH occurred at 100°C for 50 min and the pH of 6.00. At this optimum condition the hydrogen yield was 63.0476 ml H2/mol glucose (H2 Yield) and the COD removal efficiency was 90.87%. In conclusion, it can be hypothesized that different heat treatment conditions led to differences in the initial microbial communities (hydrogen producing bacteria) which resulted in the different hydrogen yields.

  1. Photobiological production of hydrogen: a solar energy conversion option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, P.; Lien, S.; Seibert, M.

    1979-01-01

    This literature survey of photobiological hydrogen production covers the period from its discovery in relatively pure cultures during the early 1930s to the present. The focus is hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms (and their components) which occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. The survey covers the major contributions in the area; however, in many cases, space has limited the degree of detail provided. Among the topics included is a brief historical overview of hydrogen metabolism in photosynthetic bacteria, eucaryotic algae, and cyanobacteria (blue--green algae). The primary enzyme systems, including hydrogenase and nitrogenase, are discussed along with the manner in which they are coupled to electron transport and the primary photochemistry of photosynthesis. A number of in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen evolving schemes including photosynthetic bacterial, green algal, cyanobacterial, two-stage, and cell-free systems are examined in some detail. The remainder of the review discusses specific technical problem areas that currently limit the yield and duration of many of the systems and research that might lead to progress in these specific areas. The final section outlines, in broadest terms, future research directions necessary to develop practical photobiological hydrogen-producing systems. Both whole cell (near- to mid-term) and cell-free (long-term) systems should be emphasized. Photosynthetic bacteria currently show the most promise for near-term applied systems.

  2. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    ... and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produce...

  3. Fermentative hydrogen production from pretreated biomass: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Bakker, R.R.; Budde, M.A.W.; Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of employing biomass resources from different origin as feedstocks for fermentative hydrogen production. Mild-acid pretreated and hydrolysed barley straw (BS) and corn stalk (CS), hydrolysed barley grains (BG) and corn grains (CG), and sugar beet

  4. A review on patents for hydrogen production using membrane reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; Basile, Angelo; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane reactors are a modern configuration which integrates reaction and separation units in one vessel and results in a tremendous degree of process intensification. Application of membrane reactors for hydrogen production has been widely studied in literature because membranes with infinite

  5. Non-thermal production of pure hydrogen from biomass : HYVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.

    2006-01-01

    HYVOLUTION is the acronym of an Integrated Project ¿Non-thermal production of pure hydrogen from biomass¿ which has been granted in the Sixth EU Framework Programme on Research, Technological Development and Demonstration, Priority 6.1.ii, Sustainable Energy Systems. The aim of HYVOLUTION:

  6. Non-thermal production of pure hydrogen from biomass: HYVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.; Koukios, E.G.; Niel, van E.W.J.; Eroglu, I.; Modigell, M.; Friedl, A.; Wukovits, W.; Ahrer, W.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives and methodology of the EU-funded research project HYVOLUTION devoted to hydrogen production from biomass are reviewed. The main scientific objective of this project is the development of a novel two-stage bioprocess employing thermophilic and phototrophic bacteria, for the

  7. Managing ulcerative colitis by increasing hydrogen production via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main side-effect of treatment with Acarbose, flatulence, occurs when undigested carbohydrates are fermented by colonic bacteria, resulting in considerable amounts of hydrogen. We found that the enteric benefits of Acarbose are partly due to be their ability to neutralise oxidative stress via increased production of H2 in ...

  8. Hydrogen Production From catalytic reforming of greenhouse gases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen production from CO2 reforming of methane over 20wt%.Co/Nd2O3 has been investigated in a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The 20wt%.Co/Nd2O3 catalyst was synthesized using wet impregnation method and characterized for thermal stability, textural property, crystallinity, morphology and nature of chemical ...

  9. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as well as other ...

  10. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lecturer

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as.

  11. Bio-hydrogen production from renewable organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shihwu Sung

    2004-04-30

    Methane fermentation has been in practice over a century for the stabilization of high strength organic waste/wastewater. Although methanogenesis is a well established process and methane--the end-product of methanogenesis is a useful energy source; it is a low value end product with relatively less energy content (about 56 kJ energy/g CH{sub 4}). Besides, methane and its combustion by-product are powerful greenhouse gases, and responsible for global climate change. So there is a pressing need to explore alternative environmental technologies that not only stabilize the waste/wastewater but also generate benign high value end products. From this perspective, anaerobic bioconversion of organic wastes to hydrogen gas is an attractive option that achieves both goals. From energy security stand point, generation of hydrogen energy from renewable organic waste/wastewater could substitute non-renewable fossil fuels, over two-third of which is imported from politically unstable countries. Thus, biological hydrogen production from renewable organic waste through dark fermentation represents a critically important area of bioenergy production. This study evaluated both process engineering and microbial physiology of biohydrogen production.

  12. Production of JET fuel containing molecules of high hydrogen content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasek Sz.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of aviation can only be reduced by using alternative fuels with excellent burning properties and a high hydrogen content in the constituent molecules. Due to increasing plastic consumption the amount of the plastic waste is also higher. Despite the fact that landfill plastic waste has been steadily reduced, the present scenario is not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this study is to produce JET fuel containing an alternative component made from straight-run kerosene and the waste polyethylene cracking fraction. We carried out our experiments on a commercial NiMo/Al2O3/P catalyst at the following process parameters: T=200-300°C, P=40 bar, LHSV=1.0-3.0 h-1, hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio= 400 Nm3/m3. We investigated the effects of the feedstocks and the process parameters on the product yields, the hydrodesulfurization and hydrodearomatization efficiencies, and the main product properties. The liquid product yields varied between 99.7-99.8%. As a result of the hydrogenation the sulfur (1-1780 mg/kg and the aromatic contents (9.0-20.5% of the obtained products and the values of their smoke points (26.0-34.7 mm fulfilled the requirements of JET fuel standard. Additionally, the concentration of paraffins increased in the products and the burning properties were also improved. The freezing points of the products were higher than -47°C, therefore product blending is needed.

  13. Extremophile mediated hydrogen production for hydrogenation of substrates in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjom, Mouzhgun

    Catalytic hydrogenation reactions are pervasive throughout our economy, from production of margarine as food, liquid fuels for transportation and chiral drugs such as L-DOPA. H2 production from non-fossil fuel feedstocks is highly desirable for transition to the "Hydrogen Economy". Also, the rates of hydrogenation reactions that involve a substrate, H 2 gas and a catalyst are often limited by the solubility of H2 in solvent. The present research thus envisioned designing water-soluble catalysts that could effectively utilize biologically produced H2 in a coupled system to hydrogenate substrates in homogeneous mode (two-phase system). Biological production of H2 as an end product or byproduct of the metabolism of organisms that operate under strict anaerobic conditions has been proposed. However, contrary to what was previously observed, Thermotoga neapolitana, belonging to the order of Thermotogales efficiently produces H2 gas under microaerobic conditions (Van Ooteghem et al. 2004). For H2 production by T. neapolitana in the bacterial growth medium (DSM 5068) at an optimum temperature of 70 C, our results in batch mode show that: (1) H2 was produced from glucose though with 16% efficiency, the rest goes to biomass production, (2) H2 gas was produced even when the cultures were inoculated under microaerobic conditions (up to 8% (v/v) O2) suggesting a protective mechanism for one or more [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases in T. neapolitana, (3) H2 production was pH dependent but addition of simple, non-toxic physiological buffering additives such as Methylene succinic acid increased H2 production and (4) H2 production rate varied linearly in the 100--6800 kPa pressure range. We then screened various water-soluble metal catalysts in batch mode and selected the RhCl3.3H2O/TPPTS (TPPTS is a water-soluble ligand) system that achieved 86% hydrogenation of Methylene succinic acid (an olefin) in an aqueous medium pressurized with preformed H2. When water was replaced with the DSM 5068

  14. Production of hydrogen from solar zinc in steam atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevetsky, Irina; Epstein, Michael [Solar Research Facilities Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2007-09-15

    Production of hydrogen via hydrolysis of zinc with steam is an essential step in the Zn/ZnO thermochemical cycle for splitting of water. Recent studies on reducing ZnO to Zn metal with the aid of concentrated solar energy stimulated the interest in the hydrolysis of the zinc for hydrogen production. One of these studies was focusing on solar carbothermal reduction of ZnO to produce zinc powder (EC/FP5-SOLZINC project). The current paper deals with the hydrolysis process of this material which will be referred to, hereafter, as SOLZINC. Test results obtained during the hydrolysis of SOLZINC powder in batch experiments at atmospheric pressure demonstrate possibilities of fast and high conversion of SOLZINC powder with steam to ZnO powder and hydrogen without intermediate melting or evaporation of zinc and indicate that the reaction occurs in two different rates, depending on the preheating temperature. A slow reaction starts at about 250 {sup circle} C and the hydrogen output increases with reactor temperature. The fast stage starts as the reactor temperature approaches 400 {sup circle} C. Above this temperature, the reaction develops vigorously due to fast increase of the reaction rate with temperature resulting in releasing additional exothermic heat by the reacted powder. Increasing the preheating temperature (when the steam flow starts) from 200 to 550 {sup circle} C can improve the SOLZINC conversion during the fast stage from 24% to 81% and increase the hydrogen yield. When the fast stage decays, slow reaction can be continued on for a long time until the hydrogen production is fully achieved. (author)

  15. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  16. Lighting Up Enzymes for Solar Hydrogen Production (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-01

    Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have combined quantum dots, which are spherical nanoparticles that possess unique size-tunable photophysical properties, with the high substrate selectivity and fast turnover of hydrogenase enzymes to achieve light-driven hydrogen (H2) production. They found that quantum dots of cadmium telluride coated in carboxylic acids easily formed highly stable complexes with the hydrogenase and that these hybrid assemblies functioned to catalyze H2 production using the energy of sunlight.

  17. Electrolytic hydrogen fuel production with solid polymer electrolyte technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titterington, W. A.; Fickett, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A water electrolysis technology based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) concept is presented for applicability to large-scale hydrogen production in a future energy system. High cell current density operation is selected for the application, and supporting cell test performance data are presented. Demonstrated cell life data are included to support the adaptability of the SPE system to large-size hydrogen generation utility plants as needed for bulk energy storage or transmission. The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are made through the year 2000, along with plant capital and operating cost projections.

  18. Hydrogen production from cassava in anaerobic fixed bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Nóe Nunes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of agro-industrial waste for the production of hydrogen has shown a very promising trend, because its improper disposal creates environmental problems. Thus, the objective of the research was to evaluate the production of hydrogen from cassava processing residue in anaerobic fixed bed reactor operated under progressively increasing organic loading rate (OLR of 12 kg.m-3.d-1 a 96 kg.m-3.d-1. The support material for the adhesion of biomass was expanded clay with a diameter between 2.80 - 3.35 mm, and the reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge pre heat-treated. The reactor was operated for 250 days and the progressive increase of ORL was carried out keeping the COD affluent around 4000 mg. L-1, throughout the operation of the reactor and varying the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 8 hours to 1 hour. The maximum yield of hydrogen was obtained in HRT of 2h (1.66 mol H2 / mol glucose. The soluble metabolites present during operation of the reactor were acetic acid (30.72% to 84.9%, butyric acid (2.89% to 29.13%, propionic acid (3.98 to 13.09%, caproic acid (0.55% and 22.79% and ethanol (3.64% to 10.46%. Methane production was observed along with hydrogen in all operating phases.

  19. HTGR fuel recycle development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on tradeoff studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

  20. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an LEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbines and process heat plants.

  1. Hydrogen production from methane reforming: thermodynamic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, Carla E.; Avila Neto, Cicero; Franco, Tatiana [Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The main contributions of this study are to conduct a comparative thermodynamic analysis of methane reforming reactions and to asses the influence of key operational variables on chemical equilibrium using an in-house code, developed in the open-source software Scilab{sup c} INRIA-ENPC (www.scilab.org). Equilibrium compositions are calculated by two distinct methods: evaluation of equilibrium constants and Lagrange multipliers. Both methods result in systems of non-linear algebraic equations, solved numerically using the Scilab function 'fsolve'. Comparison between experimental and simulated equilibrium data, published in the literature, was used to validate the simulated results. Effects of temperature, pressure, initial H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratio (steam reforming), initial CH{sub 4}:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ratio (dry reforming) and initial O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio (partial oxidation) on the reaction products were evaluated. (author)

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants with simultaneous production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patsoura, Alexia; Kondarides, Dimitris I.; Verykios, Xenophon E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2007-06-30

    The photocatalytic degradation of a number of organic compounds in solution, including alcohols and organic acids, has been investigated under unaerated conditions with the use of Pt/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst and solar or UV irradiation. It has been found that production of CO{sub 2} is in all cases accompanied by evolution of hydrogen, the production rate of which is significantly enhanced, compared with that obtained in the absence of organic additives in solution. Results are explained by considering that organic compounds act as sacrificial electron donors, which become progressively oxidized toward CO{sub 2} by consuming photogenerated holes and/or oxygen. This results in decreased rates of electron-hole recombination and oxygen-hydrogen back reaction and, concomitantly, in increased H{sub 2}-production rates. The rate of photoinduced hydrogen production depends strongly on the concentration of the sacrificial agent employed and to a lesser extent on solution pH and temperature. When complete mineralization of the sacrificial agent is achieved, photogenerated oxygen can no longer be removed from the photocatalyst surface and the H{sub 2}-production rate drops to steady-state values, comparable to those obtained in the absence of the organic compound in solution. The amounts of carbon dioxide and 'additional' hydrogen produced depend on the nature of the organic additive and are directly proportional to its initial concentration in solution. Quantification of results shows that the overall process may be described as 'photoinduced reforming of organic compounds at room temperature'. It is concluded that mineralization of organic pollutants such as alcohols and organic acids, which are common waste products of biomass processing industries, can be achieved with simultaneous production of H{sub 2} fuel. The process may provide an efficient and cost effective method for cleaning up waste streams. (author)

  3. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  4. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocha, S.; Peterson, M.; Arent, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Photon driven, direct conversion systems consist of a light absorber and a water splitting catalyst as a monolithic system; water is split directly upon illumination. This one-step process eliminates the need to generate electricity externally and subsequently feed it to an electrolyzer. These configurations require only the piping necessary for transport of hydrogen to an external storage system or gas pipeline. This work is focused on multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices for production of hydrogen directly using sunlight and water. Two types of multijunction cells, one consisting of a-Si triple junctions and the other GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs homojunctions, were studied for the photoelectrochemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen from an aqueous electrolyte solution. To catalyze the water decomposition process, the illuminated surface of the device was modified either by addition of platinum colloids or by coating with ruthenium dioxide. These colloids have been characterized by gel electrophoresis.

  5. Hydrogen production employing Spirulina maxima 2342: A chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juantorena, A.U.; Santoyo, E.; Gamboa, S.A.; Lastres, O.D. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco 62580, Morelos (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco 62580, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia, UP Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Sanchez-Escamilla, D. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Bustos, A. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, Ave. Universidad, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Eapen, D. [Investigacion y Desarrollo en Agroindustria, UP Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    The biomass of the cyanobacteria, Spirulina maxima 2342, was autotrophically obtained in a 20 l bioreactor under illumination and air bubbling and analyzed for its photobiological hydrogen production capability. A volume of 250 ml of Spirulina sp. taken from the reactor was used as culture sample for performing the experiments. An illumination-agitation process was employed to induce the hydrogen photoproduction reaction. The hydrogen produced in this process was quantified by gas chromatography technique using Molesieve 5 A(16ft x (1)/(8)in) column and a thermal conductivity detector (with a detector temperature of 110{sup o}C and a column temperature of 60{sup o}C). The culture samples were finally observed in an electron microscope to evaluate the effect of vacuum on the Spirulina sp. cells. (author)

  6. Water electrolysis for hydrogen production in Brazilian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Carvalho, Fatima M.S.; Bergamaschi, Vanderlei Sergio; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCCH/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Center], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation and distributed energy sector of Brazilian economy. Fossil fuels are polluting by carbogenic emissions from their combustion, being so co-responsible for present global warming. However, no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally non-carbogenic hydrogen production process is currently available for commercialization. There are feasible possibilities to use electrolysis as one of the main sources of hydrogen, especially thinking on combination with renewable sources of energy, mainly eolic and solar. In this work some perspectives for Brazilian energy context is presented, where electrolysis combined with renewable power source and fuel cell power generation would be a good basis to improve the distributed energy supply for remote areas, where the electricity grid is not present or is deficient. (author)

  7. Sequestration of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to useful products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.; Hawkins, Aaron B.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Lipscomb, Gina Lynette Pries; Schut, Gerrit Jan

    2017-03-07

    Provided herein are genetically engineered microbes that include at least a portion of a carbon fixation pathway, and in one embodiment, use molecular hydrogen to drive carbon dioxide fixation. In one embodiment, the genetically engineered microbe is modified to convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof at levels greater than a control microbe. Other products may also be produced. Also provided herein are cell free compositions that convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof. Also provided herein are methods of using the genetically engineered microbes and the cell free compositions.

  8. One-fifth-scale dowel force test report. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, J.E.

    1979-05-01

    The report presents the results of the second seismic test program conducted on the 1/5-scale, full-array model of the 3000 MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) core. The test conditions consisted of uniaxial horizontal sine sweeps at 0.5 g fixture acceleration, sine dwells at various g-levels and frequencies, and time history excitations at several g-levels conforming to NRC seismic response spectra for seismic category 1 components. The main objective of the program was to measure fuel element and reflector block dowel forces. In addition, measurements were taken for core damping, fuel element collision, and fuel element and reflector block rocking angles. These data were required to provide a broader base for validating analytical computer models used to calculate HTGR core design loads.

  9. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation: challenges and prospects towards scaled-up production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RenNanqi; GuoWanqian; LiuBingfeng; CaoGuangli; DingJie

    2011-06-01

    Among different technologies of hydrogen production, bio-hydrogen production exhibits perhaps the greatest potential to replace fossil fuels. Based on recent research on dark fermentative hydrogen production, this article reviews the following aspects towards scaled-up application of this technology: bioreactor development and parameter optimization, process modeling and simulation, exploitation of cheaper raw materials and combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation. Bioreactors are necessary for dark-fermentation hydrogen production, so the design of reactor type and optimization of parameters are essential. Process modeling and simulation can help engineers design and optimize large-scale systems and operations. Use of cheaper raw materials will surely accelerate the pace of scaled-up production of biological hydrogen. And finally, combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation holds considerable promise, and has successfully achieved maximum overall hydrogen yield from a single substrate. Future development of bio-hydrogen production will also be discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  11. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  12. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939 and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  13. Carbon dioxide free production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, L.; Fehling, T.; Geißler, T.; Baake, E.; Wetzel, T.

    2017-07-01

    The present report summarizes the theoretical modelling and experimental investigation results of the study on the direct thermal methane cracking. This work is a part of the LIMTECH-Project (Liquid Metal Technologies) funded of Helmholtz Alliance and was carried out from 2012 to 2017. The Project-part B5 “CO2-free production of hydrogen” focused on experimental testing and particularly on modelling the novel methane cracking method based on liquid metal technology. The new method uses a bubble column reactor, filled with liquid metal, where both the chemical reaction of methane decomposition and the separation of gas fraction from solid carbon occur. Such reactor system was designed and built in the liquid metal laboratory (KALLA) at KIT. The influences of liquid metal temperature distribution in reactor and feed gas flow rate on methane conversion ratio were investigated experimentally at the temperature range from 930°C to 1175 °C and methane flow rate at the reactor inlet from 50 to 200 mLn/min. In parallel with experimental investigations, a thermochemical model, giving insight in the influence of the above mentioned parameters has been developed at KIT and a CFD model was developed at LUH to get an overview about the bubble dynamics in the reaction system. The influence of different bubble sizes and shapes, multi-inlet coalescence effects as well as the potential of electromagnetic stirring have been investigated.

  14. HTGR core model response to simultaneous horizontal and vertical excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezler, P.; Curreri, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to investigate the effects of simultaneous horizontal and vertical excitation on the response of the HTGR core. The tests were conducted with block array models of the core excited with both fixed frequency and sweeping frequency harmonic forcing functions. The effects on both free standing block arrays and on block arrays preloaded in the vertical direction were investigated. The results of the tests as well as their importance as regards to the full core response, are presented.

  15. Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Central Florida

    2004-01-30

    The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

  16. Solar to hydrogen: Compact and cost effective CPV field for rooftop operation and hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-11-25

    Current commercial CPV systems are designed as large units which are targeted to be installed in open desert fields with high DNI availability. It appeared that the CPV is among some of those technologies which gained very little attention of people, with less customers and market. For conventional PV systems, the installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings have a significant share in the total installed capacity of PV systems. That is why for most of the countries, the PV installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings are aimed to be increased to half of total installed PV. On the other hand, there is no commercial CPV system available to be suitable for rooftop operation, giving motivation for the development of CPV field of compact systems. This paper discusses the development of a CPV field for the rooftop operation, comprising of compact CPV system with cost effective but highly accurate solar tracking sensor and wireless master slave control. In addition, the performance of the developed CPV systems is evaluated for production of hydrogen, which can be used as energy carrier or energy storage and a maximum solar to hydrogen efficiency of 18% is obtained. However, due to dynamic nature of the weather data and throughout the day variations in the performance of CPV and electrolyser, the solar to hydrogen performance is proposed to be reported as daily and long term average efficiency. The CPV-Hydrogen system showed daily average conversion efficiency of 15%, with solar to hydrogen production rate of 218 kW h/kg.

  17. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study

  18. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

    2011-03-10

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen

  19. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

    2004-10-25

    Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

  20. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Solar photochemical production of HBr for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, H. [Solar Reactor Technologies Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a unique and innovative hydrogen production concept utilizing renewable (Solar) energy and incorporating energy storage. The concept is based on a solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy, and supplemental electrical power. The process consumes only water, sunlight and off-peak electricity, and produces only hydrogen, oxygen, and peaking electrical power. No pollutants are emitted, and fossil fuels are not consumed. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT) under the auspices of a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Final Report: Hydrogen Production Pathways Cost Analysis (2013 – 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allan [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes work conducted under a three year Department of Energy (DOE) funded project to Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) to analyze multiple hydrogen (H2) production technologies and project their corresponding levelized production cost of H2. The analysis was conducted using the H2A Hydrogen Analysis Tool developed by the DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The project was led by SA but conducted in close collaboration with the NREL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In-depth techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five different H2 production methods was conducted. These TEAs developed projections for capital costs, fuel/feedstock usage, energy usage, indirect capital costs, land usage, labor requirements, and other parameters, for each H2 production pathway, and use the resulting cost and system parameters as inputs into the H2A discounted cash flow model to project the production cost of H2 ($/kgH2). Five technologies were analyzed as part of the project and are summarized in this report: Proton Exchange Membrane technology (PEM), High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell technology (SOEC), Dark fermentation of biomass for H2 production, H2 production via Monolithic Piston-Type Reactors with rapid swing reforming and regeneration reactions, and Reformer-Electrolyzer-Purifier (REP) technology developed by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. (FCE).

  3. Dispatchable hydrogen production at the forecourt for electricity grid balancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahil, Abdulla; Gammon, Rupert; Brown, Neil

    2017-02-01

    The rapid growth of renewable energy (RE) generation and its integration into electricity grids has been motivated by environmental issues and the depletion of fossil fuels. For the same reasons, an alternative to hydrocarbon fuels is needed for vehicles; hence the anticipated uptake of electric and fuel cell vehicles. High penetrations of RE generators with variable and intermittent output threaten to destabilise electricity networks by reducing the ability to balance electricity supply and demand. This can be greatly mitigated by the use of energy storage and demand-side response (DSR) techniques. Hydrogen production by electrolysis is a promising option for providing DSR as well as an emission-free vehicle fuel. Tariff structures can be used to incentivise the operating of electrolysers as controllable (dispatchable) loads. This paper compares the cost of hydrogen production by electrolysis at garage forecourts under both dispatchable and continuous operation, while ensuring no interruption of fuel supply to fuel cell vehicles. An optimisation algorithm is applied to investigate a hydrogen refueling station in both dispatchable and continuous operation. Three scenarios are tested to see whether a reduced off-peak electricity price could lower the cost of electrolytic hydrogen. These scenarios are: 1) "Standard Continuous", where the electrolyser is operated continuously on a standard all-day tariff of 12p/kWh; 2) "Off-peak Only", where it runs only during off-peak periods in a 2-tier tariff system at the lower price of 5p/kWh; and 3) "2-Tier Continuous", operating continuously and paying a low tariff at off- peak times and a high tariff at other times. This study uses the Libyan coastal city of Derna as a case study. The cheapest electricity cost per kg of hydrogen produced was £2.8, which occurred in Scenario 2. The next cheapest, at £5.8 - £6.3, was in Scenario 3, and the most expensive was £6.8/kg in Scenario 1.

  4. Hydrogen production from proteins via electrohydrogenesis in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Xie, Tianhui; Ren, Nanqi; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-08-15

    Microorganisms can produce hydrogen gas (H(2)) at high rates by fermentation of carbohydrates, but not from proteins. However, it is possible to produce H(2) at high rates and yields from proteins by electrohydrogenesis in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Hydrogen gas was generated using bovine serum albumin (BSA, 700 mg/L) in a single-chamber MEC at a rate of Q=0.42+/-0.07 m(3)/m(3)/day and a yield of Y(H2) = 21.0 +/- 5.0 mmol-H2/g-COD, with an energy recovery (relative to electrical input) of eta(E)=75+/-12% (applied voltage of 0.6 V). Hydrogen production was substantially reduced using a complex protein (peptone) under the same conditions, to Q=0.05+/-0.01 m(3)/m(3)/day, YH2 = 2.6 +/- 0.1 mmol-H2/g-COD, and eta(E)=14+/-3%. There was good removal of organic matter for both substrates in terms of either protein (87+/-6 -97 +/-2%) or total COD (86+/-2 - 91+/-2%). Electron recycling likely occurred as Coulombic efficiencies exceeded 100% using BSA. The use of a two-chamber design, with either a CEM or AEM membrane, reduced the hydrogen production rate, but did not appreciably affect the hydrogen yield or energy efficiency. When an MEC was first acclimated to acetate, and then switched to BSA, performance was substantially reduced and was similar to that obtained using peptone. These results demonstrate that electrohydrogenesis can be used to produce H(2) from proteins, and it can also be used as a method for treatment of protein-containing wastewaters. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Yttrium bismuth titanate pyrochlore mixed oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merka, Oliver

    2012-10-18

    In this work, the sol-gel synthesis of new non-stoichiometric pyrochlore titanates and their application in photocatalytic hydrogen production is reported. Visible light response is achieved by introducing bismuth on the A site or by doping the B site by transition metal cations featuring partially filled d orbitals. This work clearly focusses on atomic scale structural changes induced by the systematical introduction of non-stoichiometry in pyrochlore mixed oxides and the resulting influence on the activity in photocatalytic hydrogen production. The materials were characterized in detail regarding their optical properties and their atomic structure. The pyrochlore structure tolerates tremendous stoichiometry variations. The non-stoichiometry in A{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich compositions is compensated by distortions in the cationic sub-lattice for the smaller Y{sup 3+} cation and by evolution of a secondary phase for the larger Bi{sup 3+} cation on the A site. For TiO{sub 2} rich compositions, the non-stoichiometry leads to a special vacancy formation in the A and optionally O' sites. It is shown that pyrochlore mixed oxides in the yttrium bismuth titanate system represent very active and promising materials for photocatalytic hydrogen production, if precisely and carefully tuned. Whereas Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} yields stable hydrogen production rates over time, the bismuth richer compounds of YBiTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} are found to be not stable under irradiation. This drawback is overcome by applying a special co-catalyst system consisting of a precious metal core and a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell on the photocatalysts.

  6. Spurious hydrogen sulfide production by Providencia and Escherichia coli species.

    OpenAIRE

    Treleaven, B E; Diallo, A A; Renshaw, E C

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide production was noted in two Escherichia coli strands and one Provaidenica alcalifaciens (Proteus inconstans A) strain isolated from clinical stool specimens durin the summer of 1979. An investigation into this phenomenon revealed the predence of Eubacterium lentum, an anaerobe, growing in synergism with the Enterobacteriaceae and producing H2s. The implications of this association are discssed with reference to clinical microbiology laboratory practice.

  7. Advances in ethanol reforming for the production of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guerrero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic steam reforming of ethanol (SRE is a promising route for the production of renewable hydrogen (H2. This article reviews the influence of doping supported-catalysts used in SRE on the conversion of ethanol, selectivity for H2, and stability during long reaction periods. In addition, promising new technologies such as membrane reactors and electrochemical reforming for performing SRE are presented.

  8. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaselev, O.; Bansal, A.; Kocha, S.; Turner, J.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    With an eye towards developing a photoelectrochemical system for hydrogen production using sunlight as the only energy input, two types of systems were studied, both involving multijunction devices. One set of cells consisted of a-Si triple junctions and the other a GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs tandem cell combination. Additional investigations were carried out on semiconductor surface modifications to move semiconductor band edges to more favorable energetic positions.

  9. Bio-hydrogen production from hyacinth by anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Jun; Zhou Junhu; Qi Feng; Xie Binfei; Cen Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University No.38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027, (China)

    2006-07-01

    The bio-hydrogen production from hyacinth by anaerobic fermentation of digested sludge is studied in this paper. The compositions of bio-gases and volatile fatty acids in fermentation liquids are determined on TRACE 2000 gas chromatography. It is found that the H{sub 2} concentration in the biogas is 10%-20% and no CH{sub 4} is detected. The bio-hydrogen production from hyacinth with the initial pH value of 5.5 is higher than that with the initial pH value of 4.5. The fermentation temperature of 55 C is better than that of 35 C, while the weight ratio of hyacinth to microorganism of 1:1 is better than that of 3:7. The highest hydrogen production of 122.3 mL/g is obtained when the initial pH value of fermentation solution is 5.5, the fermentation temperature is 55 C and the weight ratio of hyacinth to microorganism is 1:1. (authors)

  10. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  11. Hydrogen from biomass: large-scale hydrogen production based on a dual fluidized bed steam gasification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Stefan; Stidl, Martin; Proell, Tobias; Rauch, Reinhard; Hofbauer, Hermann [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering-Future Energy Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-03-15

    Hydrogen is used as an important feedstock for the chemical industry. Common production technologies for the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels today cause relevant CO{sub 2} emissions. Hydrogen from renewable energy sources is discussed as an alternative option to replace traditional feedstock and can therefore be part of a low-carbon energy system. This paper describes the results of a simulation of a concept for the production of hydrogen with biomass as feedstock. The described investigations include a possible process design, the process simulation using the software IPSEpro, a description of the operation characteristics, and a profitability analysis of the applied hydrogen production concept. The simulation result shows that 61 MW of hydrogen can be produced from 100 MW wood chips and 6 MW of electricity. As a result, hydrogen production costs of 54 EUR/MWh can be estimated. For the investigated concept, the wood chip price is the most important factor for the hydrogen production cost followed by investment costs for the plant and the realized plant operation time per year. (orig.)

  12. Pathway of Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Sulfate-reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-02-16

    Biofuels are a promising source of sustainable energy. Such biofuels are intermediate products of microbial metabolism of renewable substrates, in particular, plant biomass. Not only are alcohols and solvents produced in this degradative process but energy-rich hydrogen as well. Non photosynthetic microbial hydrogen generation from compounds other than sugars has not been fully explored. We propose to examine the capacity of the abundant soil anaerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria, for hydrogen generation from organic acids. These apparently simple pathways have yet to be clearly established. Information obtained may facilitate the exploitation of other microbes not yet readily examined by molecular tools. Identification of the flexibility of the metabolic processes to channel reductant to hydrogen will be useful in consideration of practical applications. Because the tools for genetic and molecular manipulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio are developed, our efforts will focus on two strains, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio G20.Therefore total metabolism, flux through the pathways, and regulation are likely to be limiting factors which we can elucidate in the following experiments.

  13. Two-dimensional simulation of hydrogen iodide decomposition reaction using fluent code for hydrogen production using nuclear technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sik Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The operating characteristics of hydrogen iodide (HI decomposition for hydrogen production were investigated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, and various factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare device performance with that expected for device development. Hydrogen production increased with an increase of the surface-to-volume (STV ratio. With an increase of hydrogen production, the reaction heat increased. The internal pressure and velocity of the HI decomposer were estimated through pressure drop and reducing velocity from the preheating zone. The mass of H2O was independent of the STV ratio, whereas that of HI decreased with increasing STV ratio.

  14. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. Techno Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Production by gasification of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis Lau

    2002-12-01

    Biomass represents a large potential feedstock resource for environmentally clean processes that produce power or chemicals. It lends itself to both biological and thermal conversion processes and both options are currently being explored. Hydrogen can be produced in a variety of ways. The majority of the hydrogen produced in this country is produced through natural gas reforming and is used as chemical feedstock in refinery operations. In this report we will examine the production of hydrogen by gasification of biomass. Biomass is defined as organic matter that is available on a renewable basis through natural processes or as a by-product of processes that use renewable resources. The majority of biomass is used in combustion processes, in mills that use the renewable resources, to produce electricity for end-use product generation. This report will explore the use of hydrogen as a fuel derived from gasification of three candidate biomass feedstocks: bagasse, switchgrass, and a nutshell mix that consists of 40% almond nutshell, 40% almond prunings, and 20% walnut shell. In this report, an assessment of the technical and economic potential of producing hydrogen from biomass gasification is analyzed. The resource base was assessed to determine a process scale from feedstock costs and availability. Solids handling systems were researched. A GTI proprietary gasifier model was used in combination with a Hysys(reg. sign) design and simulation program to determine the amount of hydrogen that can be produced from each candidate biomass feed. Cost estimations were developed and government programs and incentives were analyzed. Finally, the barriers to the production and commercialization of hydrogen from biomass were determined. The end-use of the hydrogen produced from this system is small PEM fuel cells for automobiles. Pyrolysis of biomass was also considered. Pyrolysis is a reaction in which biomass or coal is partially vaporized by heating. Gasification is a more

  16. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  17. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  18. Evaluation of EPRI nuclear power division research topics supportive of HTGR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-06

    For HTGR commercialization studies, an LWR/HTGR Technology Transfer program was devised. Candidate programs were identified out of a total of 208 EPRI NPD (Nuclear Power Division) projects. Of these, 26 project areas presented the highest probability for technology transfer. (DLC)

  19. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liwei [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Deng, Xunming [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Abken, Anka [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Cao, Xinmin [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Du, Wenhui [Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC, Toledo, OH (United States); Vijh, Aarohi [Xunlight Corporation, Toledo, OH (United States); Ingler, William [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Chen, Changyong [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Fan, Qihua [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Collins, Robert [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Compaan, Alvin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Yan, Yanfa [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Giolando, Dean [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  20. Hydrogen peroxide distribution, production, and decay in boreal lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Häkkinen, P J; Anesio, Alexandre Magno; Granéli, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    The distribution, production, and decay of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were studied in 10 boreal lakes of differing physical-chemical characteristics. Diurnal and vertical fluctuations in H2O2 concentration were followed in the lakes by sampling at six depths three times per day. In addition, incubations of water filtered through 0.2-mu mesh were made under artificial irradiation to study the abiotic production and decay of H2O2. H2O2 concentrations after 8 h of artificial irradiation were signi...

  1. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  2. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  3. Hydrogen production via methane decomposition on Raney-type catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, J.L.; Orfao, J.J.M.; Cunha, A.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The catalytic decomposition of methane into hydrogen and carbon was studied on La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped Ni and Ni-Cu Raney-type catalysts. The activity and stability of the catalysts were assessed by comparing the experimental conversions with the calculated equilibrium conversions for each set of experimental conditions, and the maximum conversions with the conversions at the end of (at least) 5 h tests, respectively. Improved stability of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped catalysts was ascribed to an electronic promotion effect. There is an optimum load of the promoter, which provides for extended periods of stable catalyst operation. The carbon deposits consist of carbon nanofibers and multiwall carbon nanotubes. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped Ni-Cu Raney-type catalysts presented in this work are remarkably efficient for the production of hydrogen by methane decomposition. (author)

  4. A novel biological hydrogen production system. Impact of organic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George; El Naggar, Hesham [Western Ontario Univ. (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The patent-pending system comprises a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler for decoupling of SRT from HRT. Two biohydrogenators were operated for 220 days at 37 C, hydraulic retention time 8 h and solids retention time ranged from 1.4 to 2 days under four different glucose concentrations of 2, 8, 16, 32, 48 and 64 g/L, corresponding to organic loading rates of 6.5-206 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, and started up using anaerobically-digested sludge from the St. Marys wastewater treatment plant (St.Mary, Ontario, Canada) as the seed. The system steadily produced hydrogen with no methane. A maximum hydrogen yield of 3.1 mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose was achieved in the system for all the organic loading rates with an average of 2.8mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose. Acetate and butyrate were the main effluent liquid products at concentrations ranging from 640-7400 mg/L and 400-4600 mg/l, respectively, with no lactate detection. Microbial community analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) confirmed the absence of lactate producing bacteria Lactobacillus fermentum and other non-hydrogen producing species, and the predominance of various Clostridium species. Biomass concentrations in the biohydrogenators were steady, during the runs, varying form 1500 mg/L at the OLR of 6.5 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d to 14000 mg/L at the 104 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, thus emphasizing the potential of this novel system for sustained stable hydrogen production and prevention of biomass washout. (orig.)

  5. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  6. The use of plasma processing for catalyst and membrane synthesis and direct production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brault, P.; Thomann, A.L.; Cormier, J.M.; Lefaucheux, Ph. [Orleans Univ., Groupe de Recheches sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR 6606, 45 (France)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma technologies are introduced in the field of hydrogen synthesis related to fuel cells. Two ways are described: plasma synthesis of catalysts and membranes for the production and separation of hydrogen and direct production of hydrogen based on atmospheric plasma assisted methane steam reforming.

  7. Recent developments in graphite. [Use in HTGR and aerospace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications.

  8. Start Up of Biohydrogen Production System and Effect of Metal Ions on Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, An-ying; Li, Yong-feng; Yue, Li-ran; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a promising biochemical route to produce renewable H2. The effect of organic loading rate on the biohydrogen production during the start-up phase and effect of Fe2+ and Mg2+ concentration on biohydrogen production of a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater as substrate were investigated. It was found that an initial biomass of 14.07 gVSS/L and an organic loading rate of 6.0 kgCOD/m3ṡd, an equilibrial microbial community in the butyric-type fermentation could be established with in 30 days. It was demonstrated that both Fe2+ and Mg2+ were able to enhance the hydrogen production capacity of microorganism flora. Different concentration of Fe2+ was added to the biohydrogen producing system (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 500 mg/L), the maximum biogas production yield of 6.78 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.1 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 500 mg/L and 200 mg/L, respectively. The maximum biogas production yield of 6.84 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.2 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Mg2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively.

  9. Status of photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen and electrical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Walker, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency for conversion of electromagnetic energy to chemical and electrical energy utilizing semiconductor single crystals as photoanodes in electrochemical cells was investigated. Efficiencies as high as 20 percent were achieved for the conversion of 330 nm radiation to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen by the photoelectrolysis of water in a SrTiO3 based cell. The SrTiO3 photoanodes were shown to be stable in 9.5 M NaOH solutions for periods up to 48 hours. Efficiencies of 9 percent were measured for the conversion of broadband visible radiation to hydrogen using n-type GaAs crystals as photoanodes. Crystals of GaAs coated with 500 nm of gold, silver, or tin for surface passivation show no significant change in efficiency. By suppressing the production of hydrogen in a CdSe-based photogalvanic cell, an efficiency of 9 percent was obtained in conversion of 633 nm light to electrical energy. A CdS-based photogalvanic cell produced a conversion efficiency of 5 percent for 500 nm radiation.

  10. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  11. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirakar Pradhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  12. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  13. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  14. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  15. Hydrogen production: two stage processes for waste degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, X; Fernández, C; Fierro, J; Sánchez, M E; Escapa, A; Morán, A

    2011-09-01

    The dark fermentation process generates hydrogen by biological means. It presents two main advantages: fulfilling requirements for mild operational conditions and gaining benefit from the residual biomass. The process itself may be seen as a pre-treatment step in a complete stabilisation chain, with the aim of attaining the valorisation of residual biomass. However, increasing the yield of H2 production is an imperative task. In this manuscript, a review of recent work in the field of fermentative hydrogen production is presented. As dark fermentation has a maximum yield of 33% (on sugars), a description is also presented of possible second stage processes for the degradation of dark fermentation effluents. Alternatives considered were photofermentation and bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as processes capable of converting fermentation sub-products into H2. Anaerobic digestion as a final stabilisation stage was also considered owing to the wide application of this technology in the treatment of bio-wastes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION ACTIVITY AND ADHESIVE PROPERTIES OF AEROCOCCI, ISOLATED IN WOMEN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stepanskyi D.O; Kremenchutsky G.M; Chuyko V.I; Koshova I.P; Khomiak O.V; Krushynska T.Y

    2017-01-01

    ...: the production of organic acids, antibiotics, lysozyme, hydrogen peroxide and others. Ability to produce hydrogen peroxide under aerobic conditions and in a state of relative anaerobiosis was established in aerococci...

  17. Dispatchable Hydrogen Production at the Forecourt for Electricity Demand Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Rahil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental issues and concerns about depletion of fossil fuels have driven rapid growth in the generation of renewable energy (RE and its use in electricity grids. Similarly, the need for an alternative to hydrocarbon fuels means that the number of fuel cell vehicles is also expected to increase. The ability of electricity networks to balance supply and demand is greatly affected by the variable, intermittent output of RE generators; however, this could be relieved using energy storage and demand-side response (DSR techniques. One option would be production of hydrogen by electrolysis powered from wind and solar sources. The use of tariff structures would provide an incentive to operate electrolysers as dispatchable loads. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost of hydrogen production by electrolysis at garage forecourts in Libya, for both dispatchable and continuous operation, without interruption of fuel supply to vehicles. The coastal city of Derna was chosen as a case study, with the renewable energy being produced via a wind turbine farm. Wind speed was analysed in order to determine a suitable turbine, then the capacity was calculated to estimate how many turbines would be needed to meet demand. Finally, the excess power was calculated, based on the discrepancy between supply and demand. The study looked at a hydrogen refueling station in both dispatchable and continuous operation, using an optimisation algorithm. The following three scenarios were considered to determine whether the cost of electrolytic hydrogen could be reduced by a lower off-peak electricity price. These scenarios are: Standard Continuous, in which the electrolyser operates continuously on a standard tariff of 12 p/kWh; Off-peak Only, in which the electrolyser operates only during off-peak periods at the lower price of 5 p/kWh; and 2-Tier Continuous, in which the electrolyser operates continuously on a low tariff at off-peak times and a high tariff at other

  18. Intermetallics as advanced cathode materials in hydrogen production via electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojic, Dragica Lj.; Marceta Kaninski, Milica P.; Maksic, Aleksandar D.; Simic, Natasa D. [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001-Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Grozdic, Tomislav D. [Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies, University of Belgrade, 11030-Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-06-15

    Intermetallics phases along Mo-Pt phase diagram have been investigated as cathode materials for the production of hydrogen by electrolysis from water KOH solutions, in an attempt to increase the electrolytic process efficiency. These materials were compared with conventional cathodes (Fe and Ni), often used in the alkaline electrolysis, and also with the intermetallic Ti-Pt. An significant upgrade of the electrolytic efficiency using intermetallics in pure KOH electrolyte was achieved in comparison with conventional cathode materials. The effects of those cathode materials on the process efficiency were discussed in the context of transition metal features that issue from their electronic configuration. (author)

  19. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  20. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ENHANCED HYDROGEN ECONOMICS VIA COPRODUCTION OF FUELS AND CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, Elliot B; Bhagavatula, Abhijit; Dadyburjor, Dady; Dixit, Santhoshi; Garlapalli, Ravinder; Magean, Liviu; Mukkha, Mayuri; Olajide, Olufemi A; Stiller, Alfred H; Yurchick, Christopher L

    2011-03-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored research effort to develop environmentally cleaner projects as a spin-off of the FutureGen project, which seeks to reduce or eliminate emissions from plants that utilize coal for power or hydrogen production. New clean coal conversion processes were designed and tested for coproducing clean pitches and cokes used in the metals industry as well as a heavy crude oil. These new processes were based on direct liquefaction and pyrolysis techniques that liberate volatile liquids from coal without the need for high pressure or on-site gaseous hydrogen. As a result of the research, a commercial scale plant for the production of synthetic foundry coke has broken ground near Wise, Virginia under the auspices of Carbonite Inc. This plant will produce foundry coke by pyrolyzing a blend of steam coal feedstocks. A second plant is planned by Quantex Energy Inc (in Texas) which will use solvent extraction to coproduce a coke residue as well as crude oil. A third plant is being actively considered for Kingsport, Tennessee, pending a favorable resolution of regulatory issues.

  2. Bioelectrochemical hydrogen production from urban wastewater on a pilot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Juan A.; Martínez-Miró, Àlex; Guerrero, Javier; Ruiz, Yolanda; Guisasola, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical hydrogen production has been successfully achieved in laboratory-scale conditions with different substrates. However, scaling up microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is not straightforward, and reported attempts have not been completely successful. This work presents the design, building, start-up and operation of an MEC pilot plant (130 L) based on a cassette configuration. The plant was started up in batch mode with acetate and glucose as substrates and operated for five months with different substrates (i.e. glucose, diluted raw glycerol and real urban wastewater). The best results were obtained in the last period with primary effluent from real urban wastewater. The hydrogen production increased to values higher than 4 L d-1 with a gas purity of 95%, a cathodic gas recovery of 82% and an energy recovery of 121% with respect to the electrical input. The organic matter removal efficiency was approximately 25% for a hydraulic retention time of 2 d with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.25 gCOD·L-1·d-1. It should be possible to achieve removal efficiencies around 75% with OLRs lower than 0.05 gCOD·L-1·d-1. These results are promising and represent an important step towards the industrial implementation of these systems.

  3. VHTR-based Nuclear Hydrogen Plant Analysis for Hydrogen Production with SI, HyS, and HTSE Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Youngjoon; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, analyses of material and heat balances on the SI, HyS, and HTSE processes coupled to a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) were performed. The hydrogen production efficiency including the thermal to electric energy ratio demanded from each process is found and the normalized evaluation results obtained from three processes are compared to each other. The currently technological issues to maintain the long term continuous operation of each process will be discussed at the conference site. VHTR-based nuclear hydrogen plant analysis for hydrogen production with SI, HyS, and HTSE facilities has been carried out to determine the thermal efficiency. It is evident that the thermal to electrical energy ratio demanded from each hydrogen production process is an important parameter to select the adequate process for hydrogen production. To improve the hydrogen production efficiency in the SI process coupled to the VHTR without electrical power generation, the demand of electrical energy in the SI process should be minimized by eliminating an electrodialysis step to break through the azeotrope of the HI/I{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ternary aqueous solution.

  4. Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) for production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M.; Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process (SERP) is a novel process that is being developed for the production of lower cost hydrogen by steam-methane reforming (SMR). In this process the reaction of methane with steam is carried out in the presence of an admixture of a catalyst and a selective adsorbent for carbon dioxide. The key consequences of SERP are: (i) reformation reaction is carried out at a significantly lower temperature (300-500{degrees}C) than that in a conventional SMR reactor (800-1100{degrees}C), while achieving the same conversion of methane to hydrogen, (ii) the product hydrogen is obtained at reactor pressure (200-400 psig) and at 98+% purity directly from the reactor (compared to only 70-75% H{sub 2} from conventional SMR reactor), (iii) downstream hydrogen purification step is either eliminated or significantly reduced in size. The first phase of the program has focused on the development of a sorbent for CO{sub 2} which has (a) reversible CO{sub 2} capacity >0.3 mmol/g at low partial pressures of CO{sub 2} (0.1 - 1.0 atm) in the presence of excess steam (pH{sub 2}O/pCO{sub 2}>20) at 400-500{degrees}C and (b) fast sorption-desorption kinetics for CO{sub 2}, at 400-500{degrees}C. Several families of supported sorbents have been identified that meet the target CO{sub 2} capacity. A few of these sorbents have been tested under repeated sorption/desorption cycles and extended exposure to high pressure steam at 400-500{degrees}C. One sorbent has been scaled up to larger quantities (2-3 kg) and tested in the laboratory process equipment for sorption and desorption kinetics of CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2}, sorption and desorption kinetics are desirably fast. This was a critical path item for the first phase of the program and now has been successfully demonstrated. A reactor has been designed that will allow nearly isothermal operation for SERP-SMR. This reactor was integrated into an overall process flow diagram for the SERP-SMR process.

  5. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of By-product Hydrogen from Chlor-Alkali Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Yeon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division; Elgowainy, Amgad A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division; Dai, Qiang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division

    2017-12-01

    Current hydrogen production capacity in the U.S. is about 15.8 million tonne (or metric ton) per year (Brown 2016). Some of the hydrogen (2 million tonne) is combusted for its heating energy value, which makes total annual net production 13.8 million tonne (Table 1). If captive by-product hydrogen (3.3 million tonne) from catalytic reforming at oil refineries is excluded (Brown 2016; EIA 2008), approximately 11 million tonne is available from the conventional captive and merchant hydrogen market (DOE 2013). Captive hydrogen (owned by the refiner) is produced and consumed on site (e.g., process input at refineries), whereas merchant hydrogen is produced and sold as a commodity to external consumers. Whether it is merchant or captive, most hydrogen produced in the U.S. is on-purpose (not by-product)— around 10 million tonne/year.

  7. Design and construction of a photobioreactor for hydrogen production, including status in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjånes, Kari; Andersen, Uno; Heidorn, Thorsten; Borgvang, Stig A

    Several species of microalgae and phototrophic bacteria are able to produce hydrogen under certain conditions. A range of different photobioreactor systems have been used by different research groups for lab-scale hydrogen production experiments, and some few attempts have been made to upscale the hydrogen production process. Even though a photobioreactor system for hydrogen production does require special construction properties (e.g., hydrogen tight, mixing by other means than bubbling with air), only very few attempts have been made to design photobioreactors specifically for the purpose of hydrogen production. We have constructed a flat panel photobioreactor system that can be used in two modes: either for the cultivation of phototrophic microorganisms (upright and bubbling) or for the production of hydrogen or other anaerobic products (mixing by "rocking motion"). Special emphasis has been taken to avoid any hydrogen leakages, both by means of constructional and material choices. The flat plate photobioreactor system is controlled by a custom-built control system that can log and control temperature, pH, and optical density and additionally log the amount of produced gas and dissolved oxygen concentration. This paper summarizes the status in the field of photobioreactors for hydrogen production and describes in detail the design and construction of a purpose-built flat panel photobioreactor system, optimized for hydrogen production in terms of structural functionality, durability, performance, and selection of materials. The motivations for the choices made during the design process and advantages/disadvantages of previous designs are discussed.

  8. MET2 affects production of hydrogen sulfide during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien; Roncoroni, Miguel; Gardner, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    The production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during yeast fermentation contributes negatively to wine aroma. We have mapped naturally occurring mutations in commercial wine strains that affect production of H2S. A dominant R310G mutant allele of MET2, which encodes homoserine O-acetyltransferase, is present in several wine yeast strains as well as in the main lab strain S288c. Reciprocal hemizygosity and allele swap experiments demonstrated that the MET2 R310G allele confers reduced H2S production. Mutations were also identified in genes encoding the two subunits of sulfite reductase, MET5 and MET10, which were associated with reduced H2S production. The most severe of these, an allele of MET10, showed five additional phenotypes: reduced growth rate on sulfate, elevated secretion of sulfite, and reduced production in wine of three volatile sulfur compounds: methionol, carbon disulfide and methylthioacetate. Alleles of MET5 and MET10, but not MET2, affected H2S production measured by colour assays on BiGGY indicator agar, but MET2 effects were seen when bismuth was added to agar plates made with Sauvignon blanc grape juice. Collectively, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that H2S production during wine fermentation results predominantly from enzyme activity in the sulfur assimilation pathway. Lower H2S production results from mutations that reduce the activity of sulfite reductase, the enzyme that produces H2S, or that increase the activity of L-homoserine-O-acetyltransferase, which produces substrate for the next step in the sulfur assimilation pathway.

  9. High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced electrode spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Practical applications of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved by reducing electrode spacing but high surface area anodes are needed. The brush anode MEC with electrode spacing of 2 cm had a higher hydrogen production rate and energy efficiency than an MEC with a flat cathode and a 1-cm electrode spacing. The maximum hydrogen production rate with a 2 cm electrode spacing was 17.8 m(3)/m(3)d at an applied voltage of E(ap)=1 V. Reducing electrode spacing increased hydrogen production rates at the lower applied voltages, but not at the higher (>0.6 V) applied voltages. These results demonstrate that reducing electrode spacing can increase hydrogen production rate, but that the closest electrode spacing do not necessarily produce the highest possible hydrogen production rates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aqueous-Phase Reforming of Renewable Polyols for Production of Hydrogen using Platinum Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boga, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to fuel the energy needs of a more sustainable society. As hydrogen is not found in nature in any appreciable quantities, this energy carrier needs to be produced from a primary energy source. Biomass can serve as a source for sustainable hydrogen production. In principle,

  11. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  12. Durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Dalgaard Ebbesen, S.

    2007-05-15

    In the perspective of the increasing interest in renewable energy and hydrogen economy, the reversible solid oxide cells (SOCs) is a promising technology as it has the potential of providing efficient and cost effective hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam (HTES). Furthermore development of such electrolysis cells can gain from the results obtained within the R and D of SOFCs. For solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) to become interesting from a technological point of view, cells that are reproducible, high performing and long-term stable need to be developed. In this paper we address some of the perspectives of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} using SOECs for HTES; is there a possible market for the electrolysers? and what R and D steps are needed for the realisation of the SOEC technology? In the experimental part we present electrolysis test results on SOCs that have been optimized for fuel cell operation but applied for HTES. The SOCs are produced on a pre-pilot scale at Risoe National Laboratory. These cells have been shown to have excellent initial electrolysis performance, but the durability of such electrolysis cells are not optimal and examples of results from SOEC tests over several hundreds of hours are given here. The long-term tests have been run at current densities of -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} and -1 A/cm{sup 2}, temperatures of 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C and p(H{sub 2}O)/p(H{sub 2}) of 0.5/0.5 and 0.9/0.1. Long-term degradation rates are shown to be up to 5 times higher for SOECs compared to similar SOFC testing. Furthermore, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production prices are calculated using the experimental results from long-term electrolysis test as input and a short outlook for the future work on SOECs will be given as well. (au)

  13. Self-assembling biomolecular catalysts for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul C; Patterson, Dustin P; Saboda, Kendall N; Edwards, Ethan J; Miettinen, Heini M; Basu, Gautam; Thielges, Megan C; Douglas, Trevor

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of highly evolved protein-based compartments has inspired the design of new catalytically active materials that self-assemble from biological components. A frontier of this biodesign is the potential to contribute new catalytic systems for the production of sustainable fuels, such as hydrogen. Here, we show the encapsulation and protection of an active hydrogen-producing and oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase, sequestered within the capsid of the bacteriophage P22 through directed self-assembly. We co-opted Escherichia coli for biomolecular synthesis and assembly of this nanomaterial by expressing and maturing the EcHyd-1 hydrogenase prior to expression of the P22 coat protein, which subsequently self assembles. By probing the infrared spectroscopic signatures and catalytic activity of the engineered material, we demonstrate that the capsid provides stability and protection to the hydrogenase cargo. These results illustrate how combining biological function with directed supramolecular self-assembly can be used to create new materials for sustainable catalysis.

  14. Highly active iridium catalyst for hydrogen production from formic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Du; Yang-Bin Shen; Yu-Lu Zhan; Fan-Di Ning; Liu-Ming Yan; Xiao-Chun Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Formic acid (FA) dehydrogenation has attracted a lot of attentions since it is a convenient method for H2 production.In this work,we designed a self-supporting fuel cell system,in which H2 from FA is supplied into the fuel cell,and the exhaust heat from the fuel cell supported the FA dehydrogenation.In order to realize the system,we synthesized a highly active and selective homogeneous catalyst IrCp*Cl2bpym for FA dehydrogenation.The turnover frequency (TOF) of the catalyst for FA dehydrogenation is as high as 7150 h-1 at 50 ℃,and is up to 144,000 h-1 at 90 ℃.The catalyst also shows excellent catalytic stability for FA dehydrogenation after several cycles of test.The conversion ratio of FA can achieve 93.2%,and no carbon monoxide is detected in the evolved gas.Therefore,the evolved gas could be applied in the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) directly.This is a potential technology for hydrogen storage and generation.The power density of the PEMFC driven by the evolved gas could approximate to that using pure hydrogen.

  15. Hydrogen production by autothermal reforming of ethanol: pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Neto, Antonio Jose; Camargo, Joao Carlos; Lopes, Daniel Gabriel; Ferreira, Paulo F.P. [Hydrogen Technology (HyTron), Campinas, SP (Brazil)], Email: antonio@hytron.com.br; Neves Junior, Newton Pimenta; Pinto, Edgar A. de Godoi Rodrigues; Silva, Ennio Peres da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DFA/ IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Furlan, Andre Luis [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    This work provides information about the development of an integrated unit for hydrogen production by auto thermal reforming of ethanol with nominal capacity of 1 kg/h H{sub 2} 4.5 (99.995%). The unit is composed by a Fuel Processing Module (FPM), resulting from auto thermal and shift reactor integration, responsible for the thermochemical step, plus an over heater of the liquid input (EtOH and H{sub 2}O), operated recovering thermal energy from PSA blown-down (H{sub 2} Purification Module - MPH2), besides other thermal equipment which completes the integration. Using a computational routine for scaling the process and preliminary performance analysis, it was possible to optimize operating conditions, essential along unit operations design. Likewise, performance estimation of the integrated unit proceeds, which shows efficiency about 72.5% from FPM. Coupled with the PSA recovery rate, 72.7%, the unit could achieve overall energy performance of 52.7%, or 74.4% working in co-generation of hydrogen and heat. (author)

  16. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2010-01-05

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  18. Hydrogen production by plasma electrolysis reactor of KOH-ethanol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, N.; Batubara, T.; Bismo, S.

    2016-11-01

    Plasma electrolysis has great potential in industrial hydrogen production, chlor-alkali production, and waste water treatment. Plasma electrolysis produces more hydrogen with less energy consumption than hydrocarbon or Faraday electrolysis. This paper investigated the hydrogen production by plasma electrolysis of KOH-ethanol solution at 80 °C and 1 atm. The effects of voltage, KOH solution, ethanol addition, and cathode deep on plasma electrolysis performance were studied. The hydrogen production was analyzed using bubble flow meter and hydrogen analyzer. The electrical energy consumption was measured by a digital multimeter. The effectiveness of plasma electrolysis in terms of hydrogen production was evaluated by comparing it with Faraday Electrolysis. The results showed that hydrogen produced by plasma electrolysis is 149 times higher than the hydrogen produced by Faraday electrolysis. The optimum hydrogen production was 50.71 mmol/min, obtained at 700 V with 0.03 M KOH, 10% vol ethanol and 6.6 cm cathode deep, with energy consumption 1.49 kJ/mmol. The result demonstrates a promising path for hydrogen production by utilizing plasma electrolysis reactor.

  19. High-Yield Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water by a Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C6H10O5 (l)+7 H2O (l)→12 H2 (g)+6 CO2 (g). The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. Conclusions Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30°C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H2/glucose) of anaerobic fermentations. Significance The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30°C and atmospheric pressure), high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($∼2/kg H2), and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H2-based mass%), provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy. PMID:17520015

  20. High-yield hydrogen production from starch and water by a synthetic enzymatic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y-H Percival Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The future hydrogen economy offers a compelling energy vision, but there are four main obstacles: hydrogen production, storage, and distribution, as well as fuel cells. Hydrogen production from inexpensive abundant renewable biomass can produce cheaper hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate a synthetic enzymatic pathway consisting of 13 enzymes for producing hydrogen from starch and water. The stoichiometric reaction is C(6H(10O(5 (l+7 H(2O (l-->12 H(2 (g+6 CO(2 (g. The overall process is spontaneous and unidirectional because of a negative Gibbs free energy and separation of the gaseous products with the aqueous reactants. CONCLUSIONS: Enzymatic hydrogen production from starch and water mediated by 13 enzymes occurred at 30 degrees C as expected, and the hydrogen yields were much higher than the theoretical limit (4 H(2/glucose of anaerobic fermentations. SIGNIFICANCE: The unique features, such as mild reaction conditions (30 degrees C and atmospheric pressure, high hydrogen yields, likely low production costs ($ approximately 2/kg H(2, and a high energy-density carrier starch (14.8 H(2-based mass%, provide great potential for mobile applications. With technology improvements and integration with fuel cells, this technology also solves the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in the hydrogen economy.

  1. IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

    2001-12-01

    The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

  2. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

    2000-01-31

    The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

  3. The effect of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Sevinc, Pelin [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biotechnology; Guenduez, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus is a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium which can produce hydrogen by photofermentation on acetate and lactate. Hydrogen productivity depends on several parameters such as medium composition, pH, light intensity and temperature. In the present study, the effects of temperature and light intensity on hydrogen production were investigated. The cell growth curve has been fitted to the logistic model and hydrogen productivity was interpreted by Modified Gompertz Equation. The maximum productivity was obtained at 30 C and light intensity of 4000 lux. (orig.)

  4. Enhanced thermophilic fermentative hydrogen production from cassava stillage by chemical pretreatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Luo, Gang; Xie, Li

    2013-01-01

    Acid and alkaline pretreatments for enhanced hydrogen production from cassava stillage were investigated in the present study. The result showed that acid pretreatment was suitable for enhancement of soluble carbohydrate while alkaline pretreatment stimulated more soluble total organic carbon...... that the increase of all factors increased the soluble carbohydrate production, whereas hydrogen production was inhibited when the factors exceeded their optimal values. The optimal conditions for hydrogen production were pretreatment temperature 89.5 °C, concentration 1.4% and time 69 min for the highest hydrogen...

  5. Production of Catalyst-Free Hyperpolarised Ethanol Aqueous Solution via Heterogeneous Hydrogenation with Parahydrogen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    An experimental approach for the production of catalyst-free hyperpolarised ethanol solution in water via heterogeneous hydrogenation of vinyl acetate with parahydrogen and the subsequent hydrolysis...

  6. Intermetallics as cathode materials in the electrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojic, D.L.; Maksic, A.D.; Kaninski, M.P.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Lab. of Physical Chemistry; Cekic, B.D. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Lab. of Physics; Miljanic, S.S. [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia and Montenegro). Faculty of Physical Chemistry

    2005-01-01

    The intermetallics of transition metals have been investigated as cathode materials for the production of hydrogen by electrolysis from water-KOH solutions, in an attempt to increase the electrolytic process efficiency. We found that the best effect among all investigated cathodes (Hf{sub 2}Fe, Zr-Pt, Nb-Pd(I), Pd-Ta, Nb-Pd(II), Ti-Pt) exhibits the Hf{sub 2}Fe phase. These materials were compared with conventional cathodes (Fe and Ni), often used in the alkaline electrolysis. A significant upgrade of the electrolytic efficiency using intermetallics, either in pure KOH electrolyte or in combination with ionic activators added in situ, was achieved. The effects of these cathode materials on the process efficiency were discussed in the context of transition metal features that issue from their electronic configuration. (Author)

  7. Control design for an autonomous wind based hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, F.; Evangelista, C.A. [CONICET, Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC.91, C.P. 1900, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents a complete control scheme to efficiently manage the operation of an autonomous wind based hydrogen production system. This system comprises a wind energy generation module based on a multipolar permanent magnet synchronous generator, a lead-acid battery bank as short term energy storage and an alkaline von Hoerner electrolyzer. The control is developed in two hierarchical levels. The higher control level or supervisor control determines the general operation strategy for the whole system according to the wind conditions and the state of charge of the battery bank. On the other hand, the lower control level includes the individual controllers that regulate the respective module operation assuming the set-points determined by the supervisor control. These last controllers are approached using second-order super-twisting sliding mode techniques. The performance of the closed-loop system is assessed through representative computer simulations. (author)

  8. Biochemical and genetic engineering strategies to enhance hydrogen production in photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangan, Kajan; Pyne, Michael E; Perry Chou, C

    2011-09-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen gas is a promising substitute to carbonaceous fuels owing to its superb conversion efficiency, non-polluting nature, and high energy content. At present, hydrogen is predominately synthesized via chemical reformation of fossil fuels. While various biological methods have been extensively explored, none of them is justified as economically feasible. A sustainable platform for biological production of hydrogen will certainly impact the biofuel market. Among a selection of biological systems, algae and cyanobacteria have garnered major interests as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical systems. This article reviews recent advances of biochemical, bioprocess, and genetic engineering strategies in circumventing technological limitations to hopefully improve the applicative potential of these photosynthetic hydrogen production systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the potential for hydrogen production in the province of Cordoba, Argentina, from wind resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, C.R.; Santa Cruz, R.; Aisa, S. [Universidad Empresarial Siglo 21, Monsenor Pablo Cabrera s/n calle, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Riso, M.; Jimenez Yob, G.; Ottogalli, R. [Subsecretaria de Infraestructuras y Programas, Ministerio de Obras y Servicios Publicos del Gobierno de la Provincia de Cordoba, Av. Poeta Lugones 12, 2do. Piso, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Jeandrevin, G. [Instituto Universitario Aeronautico, Avenida Fuerza Aerea km 6 1/2, 5022 Cordoba (Argentina); Leiva, E.P.M. [INFIQC, Unidad de Matematica y Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre s/n, 5010 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The potential for hydrogen production from wind resources in the province of Cordoba, second consumer of fossil fuels for transportation in Argentina, is analyzed. Three aspects of the problem are considered: the evaluation of the hydrogen resource from wind power, the analysis of the production costs via electrolysis and the annual requirements of wind energy to generate hydrogen to fuel the vehicular transport of the province. Different scenarios were considered, including pure hydrogen as well as the so-called CNG plus, where hydrogen is mixed with compressed natural gas in a 20% V/V dilution of the former. The potential for hydrogen production from wind resources is analyzed for each department of the province, excluding those regions not suited for wind farms. The analysis takes into account the efficiency of the electrolyzer and the capacity factor of the wind power system. It is concluded that the automotive transportation could be supplied by hydrogen stemming from wind resources via electrolysis. (author)

  10. Experimental Study of the Production of Solar Hydrogen in Algeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen is a sustainable fuel option and one of the potential solutions for the current energy and environmental problems. In this study hydrogen is produced using a hydrogen generator with a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolyser. An experimental study is done in the Center of Development of the Renewable ...

  11. Hydrogen Production via a Commercially Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2005-08-23

    Single stage low-temperature-shift water-gas-shift (WGS-LTS) via a membrane reactor (MR) process was studied through both mathematical simulation and experimental verification in this quarter. Our proposed MR yields a reactor size that is 10 to >55% smaller than the comparable conventional reactor for a CO conversion of 80 to 90%. In addition, the CO contaminant level in the hydrogen produced via MR ranges from 1,000 to 4,000 ppm vs 40,000 to >70,000 ppm via the conventional reactor. The advantages of the reduced WGS reactor size and the reduced CO contaminant level provide an excellent opportunity for intensification of the hydrogen production process by the proposed MR. To prepare for the field test planned in Yr III, a significant number (i.e., 98) of full-scale membrane tubes have been produced with an on-spec ratio of >76% during this first production trial. In addition, an innovative full-scale membrane module has been designed, which can potentially deliver >20 to 30 m{sup 2}/module making it suitable for large-scale applications, such as power generation. Finally, we have verified our membrane performance and stability in a refinery pilot testing facility on a hydrocracker purge gas. No change in membrane performance was noted over the >100 hrs of testing conducted in the presence of >30% H{sub 2}S, >5,000 ppm NH{sub 3} (estimated), and heavy hydrocarbons on the order of 25%. The high stability of these membranes opens the door for the use of our membrane in the WGS environment with significantly reduced pretreatment burden.

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  14. Radiolytic hydrogen production in the subseafloor basaltic aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Dzaugis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H2 is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium (238U, 235U, thorium (232Th and potassium (40K. To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events and post-emplacement alteration. In our samples, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may

  15. Thermodynamic evaluation of methanol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic equilibrium of methanol steam reforming (MeOH SR) was studied by Gibbs free minimization for hydrogen production as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-10), reforming temperature (25-1000 °C), pressure (0.5-3 atm), and product species. The chemical species considered were methanol, water, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon (graphite), methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane, ethanol, propanol, i-butanol, n-butanol, and dimethyl ether (DME). Coke-formed and coke-free regions were also determined as a function of S/C ratio. Based upon a compound basis set MeOH, CO 2, CO, H 2 and H 2O, complete conversion of MeOH was attained at S/C = 1 when the temperature was higher than 200 °C at atmospheric pressure. The concentration and yield of hydrogen could be achieved at almost 75% on a dry basis and 100%, respectively. From the reforming efficiency, the operating condition was optimized for the temperature range of 100-225 °C, S/C range of 1.5-3, and pressure at 1 atm. The calculation indicated that the reforming condition required from sufficient CO concentration (<10 ppm) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell application is too severe for the existing catalysts (T r = 50 °C and S/C = 4-5). Only methane and coke thermodynamically coexist with H 2O, H 2, CO, and CO 2, while C 2H 6, C 3H 8, i-C 4H 10, n-C 4H 10, CH 3OH, C 2H 5OH, C 3H 7OH, i-C 4H 9OH, n-C 4H 9OH, and C 2H 6O were suppressed at essentially zero. The temperatures for coke-free region decreased with increase in S/C ratios. The impact of pressure was negligible upon the complete conversion of MeOH.

  16. Buffering action of acetate on hydrogen production by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Fei Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The buffering effect of acetate on hydrogen production during glucose fermentation by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 was investigated compared to phosphate, a widely used fermentative hydrogen production buffer. Specific concentrations of sodium acetate or phosphate were added to batch cultures, and the effects on hydrogen production were comparatively analyzed using a modified Gompertz model. Adding 50 mM acetate or phosphate suppressed the hydrogen production peak and slightly extended the lag phase. However, the overall hydrogen yields were 113.5 and 108.5 mmol/L, respectively, and the final pH was effectively controlled. Acetate buffered against hydrogen production more effectively than did phosphate, promoting cell growth and preventing decreased pH. At buffer concentrations 100–250 mM, the maximum hydrogen production was barely suppressed, and the lag phase extended past 7 h. Therefore, although acetate inhibits hydrogen production, using acetate as a buffer (like phosphate effectively prevented pH drops and increased substrate consumption, enhancing hydrogen production.

  17. Relationship between hydrogen gas and butanol production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosseau, J.D.; Yan, J.Y.; Lo, K.V.

    1986-03-01

    Two simultaneous fermentations were performed at 26 degrees C with simultaneous inocula using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum. Fermentation 1 prevented the gas formed by the biomass from escaping the fermentor while 2 allowed the gas formed to escape. Fermentor 1 provided for the production of butanol, acetone, and ethanol, while when the H/sub 2/ formed was allowed to escape with fermentor 2, neither butanol nor acetone were produced. Ethanol was also formed in both fermentors and began along with the initial growth of biomass and continued until the fermentations were complete. Butanol and acetone production began after biomass growth had reached a maximum and began to subside. The butanol-acetone-ethanol millimolar yields and ratios were 38:1:14 respectively. The fermentor 2 results show that a yield of 2.1 l H/sub 2/, 93 or 370 mmol H/sub 2//mol glucose, was formed only during the growing stage of growth; neither butanol nor acetone were produced; ethanol was formed throughout the fermentation, reaching a yield of 15.2 mmolar. It appears that hydrogen gas is required for butanol production during the resting stage of growth. 16 references.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine and homocysteine by periodontal and oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshimura, Shigeru; Nagashima, Shiori; Takehara, Tadamichi; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the predominant volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral bacteria. This study developed and evaluated a system for detecting hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria. L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase (METase) and beta carbon-sulfur (beta C-S) lyase were used to degrade homocysteine and cysteine, respectively, to produce hydrogen sulfide. Enzymatic reactions resulting in hydrogen sulfide production were assayed by reaction with bismuth trichloride, which forms a black precipitate when mixed with hydrogen sulfide. The enzymatic activities of various oral bacteria that result in hydrogen sulfide production and the capacity of bacteria from periodontal sites to form hydrogen sulfide in reaction mixtures containing L-cysteine or DL-homocysteine were assayed. With L-cysteine as the substrate, Streptococcus anginosus FW73 produced the most hydrogen sulfide, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 and W83 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 produced approximately 35% of the amount produced by the P. gingivalis strains. Finally, the hydrogen sulfide found in subgingival plaque was analyzed. Using bismuth trichloride, the hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria was visually detectable as a black precipitate. Hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria was easily analyzed using bismuth trichloride. However, further innovation is required for practical use.

  19. Optimum power generation from an HTGR heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Op het Veld, R.P.; Van Buijtenen, J.P. [Section Thermal Power Engineering - Gas Turbines, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    A preliminary design study on the thermal conversion system for an HTGR of 40 MWth has been carried out. As the fluid in a Helium cooled HTR cycle is gaseous, the conversion of heat to power is a closed Brayton Cycle. The design process of the energy conversion system and the rotating components can be divided in two phases: (1) a thermodynamic design study. The gas turbine design conditions for optimal energy conversion have to be defined. These are pressure ratio and mass flow of the gas turbine; and (2) preliminary design of the turbomachinery. The optimal architecture of the gas turbine is defined. Assumptions made in phase 1 for turbomachinery efficiencies can be verified

  20. Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

    2005-10-31

    This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional

  1. The calculation of specific heats for some important solid components in hydrogen production process based on CuCl cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Avsec Jurij

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy sources of the future enabling direct production of power and heat in fuel cells, hydrogen engines or furnaces with hydrogen burners. One of the last remainder problems in hydrogen technology is how to produce a sufficient amount of cheap hydrogen. One of the best options is large scale thermochemical production of hydrogen in combination with nuclear power plant. copper-chlorine (CuCl) cycle is the most promissi...

  2. Microbiology and optimization of hydrogen fermentation and bioelectricity production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makinen, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigated dark fermentative hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and bioelectricity production from carbohydrates. Meso- and thermophilic fermentative and mesophilic exoelectrogenic bacteria were enriched from different natural sources. The H{sub 2} production from different hexoses and pentoses, them main constituents of lignocellulose, was studied in batch assays. H{sub 2} production from xylose was examined in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Operational parameters for H{sub 2} production were optimized. Bioelectricity production was studied in microbial fuel cells and process parameters were optimized. Dynamics of microbial communities in H{sub 2} and bioelectricity production processes were determined. A novel thermophilic dark fermentative H{sub 2} producing bacterium, Thermovorax subterraneus, was enriched and isolated from geothermal underground mine. T. subterraneus had the optimum growth temperature of 72 deg C and the maximum H{sub 2} yield of 1.4 mol/mol glucose in batch assay. The main soluble fermentative end products of T. subterraneus were acetate and ethanol. Thermophilic dark fermentative mixed culture enriched from hot spring (Hisarlan, Turkey) had the maximum H{sub 2} yield of 1.7 mol/mol glucose. The optimal environmental parameters to maximize H{sub 2} yield were temperature 52 deg C, initial pH 6.5, 40 mg/L Fe{sup 2+}, 4.5 g/L yeast extract and glucose concentration of 4 g/L. Increasing the glucose concentration to 18 g/L increased the maximum H{sub 2} production rate to 56.2 mmol H{sub 2}/h/L. Environmental parameters had a significant effect on metabolic pathways of fermentation. Another hot spring (Hisarkoy, Turkey) enrichment culture was able to ferment different sugars to H{sub 2} favoring pentoses over hexoses. The best H{sub 2} yields in batch assays were obtained from pentoses: xylose, arabinose and ribose yielded 21, 15 and 8 % of the theoretical yield, respectively; whilst on glucose the yield was only 2 % of the theoretical

  3. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  4. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  5. GAT 4 production and storage of hydrogen. Report July 2004; GAT 4 procduction et stockage de l'hydrogene. Rapport juillet 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns two aspects of the hydrogen: the production and the storage. For both parts the challenges and a state of the art are presented. It discusses also the hydrogen production by renewable energies, by solar energy, the hydrogen of hydrocarbons reforming purification, active phases development, thermal transfer simulation. Concerning the hydrogen storage the hydrogen adsorption by large surface solid, the storage by metallic hydrides, the alanates and light hydrides, the adsorption on carbon nano-tubes, the storage in nano-structures, the thermal and mechanical simulation of the hydrogen are presented. (A.L.B.)

  6. Efficient Production of Hydrogen from Decomposition of Formic Acid over Zeolite Incorporated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kegnæs, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Formic acid has a great potential as a safe and convenient source of hydrogen for sustainable chemical synthesis and renewable energy storage. Here, we report a heterogeneous gold nanoparticles catalyst for efficient production of hydrogen from vapor phase decomposition of formic acid using zeolite...... sintering stability. Based on these results, we believe that incorporation of metal nanoparticles in zeolites may find use as highly active and selective heterogeneous catalysts for the production of hydrogen in future renewable energy applications....

  7. Nitrophenylboronic acids as highly chemoselective probes to detect hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Chieh-Ti; Chang, Ching-Ming; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2011-11-09

    Hydrogen peroxide is commonly used in the food processing industry as a chlorine-free bleaching and sterilizing agent, but excessive amounts of residual hydrogen peroxide have led to cases of food poisoning. Here we describe the development of a novel nonenzymatic colorimetric method for the determination of residual hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products. Nitrophenylboronic acids chemoselectively react with hydrogen peroxide under alkaline conditions to produce yellow nitrophenolates. Of the three nitrophenylboronic acid isomers tested, the p-isomer displayed the highest sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide and the fastest reaction kinetics. The reaction product, p-nitrophenolate, has an absorption maximum at 405 nm and a good linear correlation between the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the A(405) values was obtained. We successfully applied this convenient and rapid method for hydrogen peroxide determination to samples of dried bean curds and disposable chopsticks, thereby demonstrating its potential in foods and agricultural industries.

  8. Challenges and opportunities for hydrogen production from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oey, Melanie; Sawyer, Anne Linda; Ross, Ian Lawrence; Hankamer, Ben

    2016-07-01

    The global population is predicted to increase from ~7.3 billion to over 9 billion people by 2050. Together with rising economic growth, this is forecast to result in a 50% increase in fuel demand, which will have to be met while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions by 50-80% to maintain social, political, energy and climate security. This tension between rising fuel demand and the requirement for rapid global decarbonization highlights the need to fast-track the coordinated development and deployment of efficient cost-effective renewable technologies for the production of CO2 neutral energy. Currently, only 20% of global energy is provided as electricity, while 80% is provided as fuel. Hydrogen (H2 ) is the most advanced CO2 -free fuel and provides a 'common' energy currency as it can be produced via a range of renewable technologies, including photovoltaic (PV), wind, wave and biological systems such as microalgae, to power the next generation of H2 fuel cells. Microalgae production systems for carbon-based fuel (oil and ethanol) are now at the demonstration scale. This review focuses on evaluating the potential of microalgal technologies for the commercial production of solar-driven H2 from water. It summarizes key global technology drivers, the potential and theoretical limits of microalgal H2 production systems, emerging strategies to engineer next-generation systems and how these fit into an evolving H2 economy. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Risk of Hydrogen Explosion an a Submarine Part 3 Production of Hydrogen Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłos Ryszard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This series of articles presents the problems associated with the conduction of a high-risk project aimed at modernising the hydrogen combustion engines on a submarine. The article describes technical issues connected with obtaining hydrogen-air mixes.

  10. Enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from glucose and cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, S.M.; Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An enzymatic process has been used to convert glucose to molecular hydrogen with the ultimate goal of converting cellulose to hydrogen. Two enzymes from the Archae, Thermoplasma acidophilium glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase, were used to oxidize glucose and NADPH respectively, resulting in the formation of molecular hydrogen. The stoichiometric yield of hydrogen from glucose was close to the theoretical maximum expected. Further, the molar amount of hydrogen produced was greater than the molar equivalent of NADP{sup +} present in the reaction mixture indicating that this GDH cofactor was regenerated throughout the course of the reaction. Hydrogen was also shown to be produced from cellulose if cellulase was included in the reaction mixture.

  11. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased...

  12. Potential use of thermophilic dark fermentation effluents in photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozgur, E.; Afsar, N.; Vrije, de G.J.; Yucel, M.; Gunduz, U.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Eroglu, I.

    2010-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production by a sequential operation of dark and photofermentation is a promising route to produce hydrogen. The possibility of using renewable resources, like biomass and agro-industrial wastes, provides a dual effect of sustainability in biohydrogen production and simultaneous

  13. Fermentative Hydrogen Production: Influence of Application of Mesophilic and Thermophilic Bacteria on Mass and Energy Balances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foglia, D.; Wukovits, W.; Friedl, A.; Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation of biomass residues and second generation biomasses is a possible way to enable a sustainable production of hydrogen. The HYVOLUTION-project investigates the production of hydrogen by a 2-stage fermentation process of biomass. It consists of a dark fermentation step of sugars to produce

  14. Final technical report [Molecular genetic analysis of biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mets, Laurens

    2000-12-31

    The principal objective of this project was to identify genes necessary for biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae, using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental organism. The main strategy was to isolate mutants that are selectively deficient in hydrogen production and to genetically map, physically isolate, and ultimately sequence the affected genes.

  15. Hydrogen production and ammonium recovery from urine by a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, P.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) for the ammonium removal, COD removal and hydrogen production from five times diluted urine. During operation with a batch cathode, a current density of 23.07 +/- 1.15 A m(-2) was achieved corresponding to a hydrogen production rate of

  16. Long-term effect of inoculum pretreatment on fermentative hydrogen production by repeated batch cultivations: homoacetogenesis and methanogenesis as competitors to hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Xie, Li

    2011-01-01

    Long-term effects of inoculum pretreatments(heat, acid, loading-shock) on hydrogen production from glucose under different temperatures (378C, 558C) and initial pH (7 and 5.5) were studied by repeated batch cultivations. Results obtained showed that it was necessary to investigate the long......-term effect of inoculum pretreatment on hydrogen production since pretreatments may just temporarily inhibit the hydrogen consuming processes. After long-term cultivation, pretreated inocula did not enhance hydrogen production compared to untreated inocula under mesophilic conditions (initial pH 7 and pH 5......, and methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis could only be inhibited by proper control of fermentation pH and temperature. Methanogenic activity could be inhibited at pH lower than 6, both under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, while homoacetogenic activity could only be inhibited under thermophilic condition...

  17. Comparison of conventional vs. modular hydrogen refueling stations and on-site production vs. delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ethan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To meet the needs of public and private stakeholders involved in the development, construction, and operation of hydrogen fueling stations needed to support the widespread roll-out of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles, this work presents publicly available station templates and analyses. These ‘Reference Stations’ help reduce the cost and speed the deployment of hydrogen stations by providing a common baseline with which to start a design, enable quick assessment of potential sites for a hydrogen station, identify contributors to poor economics, and suggest areas of research. This work presents layouts, bills of materials, piping and instrumentation diagrams, and detailed analyses of five new station designs. In the near term, delivered hydrogen results in a lower cost of hydrogen compared to on-site production via steam methane reforming or electrolysis, although the on-site production methods have other advantages. Modular station concepts including on-site production can reduce lot sizes from conventional assemble-on-site stations.

  18. Prospects of utilization of sugar beet carbohydrates for biological hydrogen production in the EU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotopoulos, J.A.; Koukios, E.G. [Bioresource Technology Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens, GR-15700 (Greece); Bakker, R.R.; De Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR Agrotechnology and Food Innovations, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Urbaniec, K. [CERED Centre of Excellence, Warsaw University of Technology, Jachowicza 2/4, 09-402 Plock (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogen can be produced through dark anaerobic fermentation using carbohydrate-rich biomass, and through photofermentation using the organic acids produced from dark fermentation. Sugar beet is an ideal energy crop for fermentative production of hydrogen in the EU due to its environmental profile and its potential availability in the area. In this work, various aspects of cultivating sugar beet in the EU for biohydrogen were highlighted, with special focus on The Netherlands and Greece. Moreover, fermentation of sugar beet juice with Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus at sucrose concentration 10 g/l was performed, and was found comparable to the fermentation on pure sucrose except that the hydrogen production was 10% higher on sugar beet juice. A conservative estimate of the annual hydrogen potential in the EU was made (300x10{sup 6} kg hydrogen), considering the utilization of sugar beet pulp in hydrogen production.

  19. Updated hydrogen production costs and parities for conventional and renewable technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, Ricardo Guerrero [Fundacion de Estudios de Economia Aplicada (Programa Focus-Abengoa), Jorge Juan, 46, 28001 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38204 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Martinez Duart, Jose Manuel [Fundacion de Estudios de Economia Aplicada (Programa Focus-Abengoa), Jorge Juan, 46, 28001 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Campus de Cantoblanco, modulo C-XVI, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    This paper provides first a review of the production costs of hydrogen from conventional, nuclear and renewable sources, reported in the literature during the last eight years. In order to analyze the costs on a unified basis, they are updated to a common year (2009), taking into account the yearly inflation rates. The study also considers whether the hydrogen has been produced in centralized or distributed facilities. From these data, the expected future costs for conventional production of hydrogen are calculated considering several scenarios on carbon emission taxations. Based on these estimations, together with the predicted future costs (2019-2020 and 2030) for hydrogen from alternative sources, several hydrogen cost-parity analyses are exposed for renewable and nuclear energies. From the comparison between these alternative technologies for hydrogen production and the conventional ones (steam methane reforming and coal gasification), several predictions on the time-periods to reach cost parities are elaborated. (author)

  20. Biological hydrogen production from probiotic wastewater as substrate by selectively enriched anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500072, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Biohydrogen production from probiotic wastewater using mixed anaerobic consortia is reported in this paper. Batch tests are carried out in a 5.0 L batch reactor under constant mesophillic temperature (37 C). The maximum hydrogen yield 1.8 mol-hydrogen/mol-carbohydrate is obtained at an optimum pH of 5.5 and substrate concentration 5 g/L. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 168 ml/h. The hydrogen content in the biogas is more than 65% and no significant methane is observed throughout the study. In addition to hydrogen, acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol are found to be the main by-products in the metabolism of hydrogen fermentation. (author)

  1. Analysis of Production and Delivery Center Hydrogen Applied to the Southern Patagonian Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Fernando Medina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Desire department of the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, presents the greatest potential electrolytic Hydrogen Production Country, From Three primary sources of sustainable energy: wind, solar, biomass. There, the Hydrogen Plant of Pico Truncado has capacity central production of hydrogen 100m3 of H2 / day, enough to supply 353 vehicles with hybrid fuel called HGNC, made by cutting 12% V / V of hydrogen in CNG (in situ at each station. Puerto Deseado, Fitz Roy, Caleta Olivia, Las Heras, Comodoro Rivadavia, Sarmiento and the Ancients: From the production cost, the cost of delivering hydrogen to the Southern Patagonian circuit comprised analyzed. Considering various local parameters are determined as a way of delivering more profitable virtual pipeline, with total cost of hydrogen estimated 6.5 USD / kg H2 and HGNC shipped in the station at 0.50 USD / Nm3.

  2. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  3. Techno-economic evaluation of a combined bioprocess for fermentative hydrogen production from food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Fang, Jun; Liu, Zhixiang; Tang, Junhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the techno-economic evaluation of a combined bioprocess based on solid state fermentation for fermentative hydrogen production from food waste was carried out. The hydrogen production plant was assumed to be built in Hangzhou and designed for converting 3 ton food waste per day into hydrogen. The total capital cost (TCC) and the annual production cost (APC) were US$583092 and US$88298.1/year, respectively. The overall revenue after the tax was US$146473.6/year. The return on investment (ROI), payback period (PBP) and internal rate of return (IRR) of the plant were 26.75%, 5 years and 24.07%, respectively. The results exhibited that the combined bioprocess for hydrogen production from food waste was feasible. This is an important study for attracting investment and industrialization interest for hydrogen production from food waste in the industrial scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High yield hydrogen production in a single-chamber membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yejie; Wang, Liyong; Chen, Yingwen; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao

    2010-01-01

    The single-chamber membrane-less MEC exerted much better hydrogen production performance while given higher applied voltages than it did at lower. High applied voltages that could shorten the reaction time and the exposure of anode to air for at least 30 min between cycles can significantly suppress methanogen and increase hydrogen production. At an applied voltage of 1.0 V, a hydrogen production rate of 1.02 m(3)/m(3)/day with a current density of 5.7 A/m(2) was achieved. Cathodic hydrogen recovery and coulombic efficiency were 63.4% and 69.3% respectively. The hydrogen concentration of mixture gas produced of 98.4% was obtained at 1.0 V, which was the best result of reports. The reasons that such a high hydrogen concentration can be achieved were probably the high electrochemical activity and hydrogen production capability of the active microorganisms. Increase in substrate concentrations could not improve MEC's performance, but increased the reaction times. Further, reactor configuration and operation factors optimisation should be considered to increase current density, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen recovery.

  5. Catalytic upgrading of refinery cracked products by trans-hydrogenation: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Garba, Mustapha Danlami; Jackson, S. David

    2017-01-01

    The production of high premium fuel is an issue of priority to every refinery. The trans-hydrogenation process is devised to convert two low valued refinery cracked products to premium products; the conversion processes involve the combination of dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reaction as a single step process. The paper reviews the recent literature on the use of catalysts to convert low value refinery products (i.e. alkanes and alkynes or alkadienes) to alkenes (olefins) by trans-hydroge...

  6. Maximizing renewable hydrogen production from biomass in a bio/catalytic refinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westermann, Peter; Jørgensen, Betina; Lange, L.

    2007-01-01

    Biological production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentative or photofermentative microorganisms has been described in numerous research articles and reviews. The major challenge of these techniques is the low yield from fermentative production, and the large reactor volumes necessary for photo......Biological production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentative or photofermentative microorganisms has been described in numerous research articles and reviews. The major challenge of these techniques is the low yield from fermentative production, and the large reactor volumes necessary...

  7. Enhanced Process for Methanol Production by CO2 Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton Alexandru; Pragt, J.J.; Vos, H.J.; Bargeman, Gerrald; de Groot, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for a green chemical industry, much effort is devoted to the development of technologies for methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO2 – available from many sources. Low-cost sources of H2 are less frequently found, but an additional source at industrial scale is the wet hydrogen

  8. Can hydrogen peroxide and quercetin improve production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetative propagation is considered the best choice for the rapid multiplication of plant species, however, rooting may still present difficulties. Substances, such as auxins, phenolic compounds and hydrogen peroxide, are recognized as able to improve this process. The aim of the present work was to determine if hydrogen ...

  9. Management of Leaks in Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, G

    2006-04-27

    A systematic approach to manage hydrogen leakage from components is presented. Methods to evaluate the quantity of hydrogen leakage and permeation from a system are provided by calculation and testing sensitivities. The following technology components of a leak management program are described: (1) Methods to evaluate hydrogen gas loss through leaks; (2) Methods to calculate opening areas of crack like defects; (3) Permeation of hydrogen through metallic piping; (4) Code requirements for acceptable flammability limits; (5) Methods to detect flammable gas; (6) Requirements for adequate ventilation in the vicinity of the hydrogen system; (7) Methods to calculate dilution air requirements for flammable gas mixtures; and (8) Concepts for reduced leakage component selection and permeation barriers.

  10. Evaluation of Lighting Systems, Carbon Sources, and Bacteria Cultures on Photofermentative Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Choy, Sing-Ying; Giannis, Apostolos

    2017-11-10

    Fluorescent and incandescent lighting systems were applied for batch photofermentative hydrogen production by four purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria (PNSB). The hydrogen production efficiency of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodospirillum rubrum was evaluated using different carbon sources (acetate, butyrate, lactate, and malate). Incandescent light was found to be more effective for bacteria cell growth and hydrogen production. It was observed that PNSB followed substrate selection criteria for hydrogen production. Only R. palustris was able to produce hydrogen using most carbon sources. Cell density was almost constant, but cell growth rate and hydrogen production were significantly varied under the different lighting systems. The kinetics study suggested that initial substrate concentration had a positive correlation with lag phase duration. Among the PNSB, R. palustris grew faster and had higher hydrogen yields of 1.58, 4.92, and 2.57 mol H2/mol using acetate, butyrate, and lactate, respectively. In the integrative approach with dark fermentation effluents rich in organic acids, R. palustris should be enriched in the phototrophic microbial consortium of the continuous hydrogen production system.

  11. Sorption enhanced reaction process (SERP) for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hufton, J.; Mayorga, S.; Gaffney, T.; Nataraj, S.; Rao, M.; Sircar, S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The novel Sorption Enhanced Reaction Process has the potential to decrease the cost of hydrogen production by steam methane reforming. Current effort for development of this technology has focused on adsorbent development, experimental process concept testing, and process development and design. A preferred CO{sub 2} adsorbent, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted hydrotalcite, satisfies all of the performance targets and it has been scaled up for process testing. A separate class of adsorbents has been identified which could potentially improve the performance of the H{sub 2}-SER process. Although this material exhibits improved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the HTC adsorbent, its hydrothermal stability must be improved. Single-step process experiments (not cyclic) indicate that the H{sub 2}-SER reactor performance during the reaction step improves with decreasing pressure and increasing temperature and steam to methane ratio in the feed. Methane conversion in the H{sub 2}-SER reactor is higher than for a conventional catalyst-only reactor operated at similar temperature and pressure. The reactor effluent gas consists of 90+% H{sub 2}, balance CH{sub 4}, with only trace levels (< 50 ppm) of carbon oxides. A best-case process design (2.5 MMSCFD of 99.9+% H{sub 2}) based on the HTC adsorbent properties and a revised SER process cycle has been generated. Economic analysis of this design indicates the process has the potential to reduce the H{sub 2} product cost by 25--31% compared to conventional steam methane reforming.

  12. Glycerol and bioglycerol conversion in supercritical water for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wu, Q M; Weiss-Hortala, E; Barna, R; Boucard, H; Bulza, S

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic transesterification of vegetable oils leads to biodiesel and an alkaline feed (bioglycerol and organic residues, such as esters, alcohols. . .). The conversion ofbioglycerol into valuable organic molecules represents a sustainable industrial process leading to the valorization of a renewable organic resource. The physicochemical properties in the supercritical domain (T > 374 degrees C, P > 22.1 MPa) transform water into a solvent for organics and a reactant favouring radical reactions. In this context, the conversion ofbioglycerol in supercritical water (SCW) into platform molecules and/or high energetic gases (hydrogen, hydrocarbons) could represent an interesting valorization process. The reported research results concern the conversion of bioglycerol compared to pure glycerol. The experiments have been done in batch autoclaves (5 ml and 500 ml stirred). Solutions of pure (5 or 10 wt%) and crude (3.5 wt%) glycerol have been processed with or without catalyst (K2CO3 1.5 wt%) in the range of 450-600 degrees C. The molecular formula of bioglycerol was determined as C4.3H9.7O1.8Na0.1Si0.08. Glycerol was partially decomposed in the batch systems during the heating (42% before reaching 420 degrees C) and some intermediates (propanediol, ethylene glycol . . .) were quantified, leading to a proposition of a reaction pathway. Acrolein, a valuable platform molecule, was mainly produced in the absence of catalyst. No solid phase was recovered after SCW conversion of pure and bioglycerol in batch reactors. The optimal parameters for gasification were 600 degrees C, 25 MPa for bioglycerol and 525 degrees C, 25 MPa, for pure glycerol. In these operating conditions, 1 kg of pure or bioglycerol leads to 15 and, respectively, 10 mol of hydrogen. Supercritical water gasification of crude glycerol favoured the generation of light hydrocarbons, while pure glycerol promoted H2 production. SCW conversion of glycerol (pure and crude) allows to obtain simultaneously energetic

  13. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS....... The optimum PH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary...

  14. Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)); Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))

    2000-01-01

    This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an

  15. Techno-economic evaluation of a two-step biological process for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunggren, Mattias; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-01-01

    An integrated biological process for the production of hydrogen based on thermophilic and photo-heterotrophic fermentation was evaluated from a technical and economic standpoint. Besides the two fermentation steps the process also includes pretreatment of the raw material (potato steam peels) and purification of hydrogen using amine absorption. The study aimed neither at determining the absolute cost of biohydrogen nor at an economic optimization of the production process, but rather at studying the effects of different parameters on the production costs of biohydrogen as a guideline for future improvements. The effect of the key parameters, hydrogen productivity and yield and substrate concentration in the two fermentations on the cost of the hydrogen produced was studied. The selection of the process conditions was based mainly on laboratory data. The process was simulated by use of the software Aspen Plus and the capital costs were estimated using the program Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator. The study shows that the photo-fermentation is the main contributor to the hydrogen production cost mainly because of the cost of plastic tubing, for the photo-fermentors, which represents 40.5% of the hydrogen production cost. The costs of the capital investment and chemicals were also notable contributors to the hydrogen production cost. Major economic improvements could be achieved by increasing the productivity of the two fermentation steps on a medium-term to long-term scale.

  16. Photofermentative production of hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from dark fermentation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Vincenzo; Ghimire, Anish; Frunzo, Luigi; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Pirozzi, Francesco; Esposito, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production during the photofermentative treatment of the effluent from a dark fermentation reactor fed with the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Two different inocula, an adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b and a mixed consortium of purple non sulphur bacteria have been investigated under the same operational conditions. Different hydrogen productivities of 364 and 559NmL H2 L-1 were observed for the Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the mixed culture consortium tests, respectively: the consortium of PNSB resulted 1.5-fold more productive than the pure culture. On the other hand, Rhodobacter sphaeroides culture showed a higher PHB productivity (155mg PHB g COD-1) than the mixed culture (55mg PHB g COD-1). In all the tests, the concomitant H2 and PHB production was associated to a dissolved COD removal higher than 80%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  18. Hydrogen Production Using Reduced-Iron Nanoparticles by Laser Ablation in Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Takehiro; Saiki, Taku; Taniguchi, Seiji; Ueda, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nishikawa, Yusuke; Iida, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    A recyclable energy cycle using a pulsed laser and base-metal nanoparticles is proposed. In this energy cycle, iron nanoparticles reduced from iron oxides by laser ablation in liquid are used for hydrogen generation. The laser energy can be stored in the base-metal nanoparticles as the difference between the chemical energies of iron oxide and iron. According to the results of an experiment on hydrogen production using the reduced iron nanoparticles, the reaction efficiency of the hydrogen ge...

  19. Integrated analysis of transportation demand pathway options for hydrogen production, storage, and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E.S. [Directed Technologies Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Directed Technologies, Inc. has begun the development of a computer model with the goal of providing guidance to the Hydrogen Program Office regarding the most cost effective use of limited resources to meet national energy security and environmental goals through the use of hydrogen as a major energy carrier. The underlying assumption of this programmatic pathway model is that government and industry must work together to bring clean hydrogen energy devices into the marketplace. Industry cannot provide the long term resources necessary to overcome technological, regulatory, institutional, and perceptual barriers to the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, and government cannot provide the substantial investments required to develop hydrogen energy products and increased hydrogen production capacity. The computer model recognizes this necessary government/industry partnership by determining the early investments required by government to bring hydrogen energy end uses within the time horizon and profitability criteria of industry, and by estimating the subsequent investments required by industry. The model then predicts the cost/benefit ratio for government, based on contributions of each hydrogen project to meeting societal goals, and it predicts the return on investment for industry. Sensitivity analyses with respect to various government investments such as hydrogen research and development and demonstration projects will then provide guidance as to the most cost effective mix of government actions. The initial model considers the hydrogen transportation market, but this programmatic pathway methodology will be extended to other market segments in the future.

  20. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolley, George S

    2010-06-29

    An agent-based model of the transition to a hydrogen transportation economy explores influences on adoption of hydrogen vehicles and fueling infrastructure. Attention is given to whether significant penetration occurs and, if so, to the length of time required for it to occur. Estimates are provided of sensitivity to numerical values of model parameters and to effects of alternative market and policy scenarios. The model is applied to the Los Angeles metropolitan area In the benchmark simulation, the prices of hydrogen and non-hydrogen vehicles are comparable. Due to fuel efficiency, hydrogen vehicles have a fuel savings advantage of 9.8 cents per mile over non-hydrogen vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles account for 60% of new vehicle sales in 20 years from the initial entry of hydrogen vehicles into show rooms, going on to 86% in 40 years and reaching still higher values after that. If the fuel savings is 20.7 cents per mile for a hydrogen vehicle, penetration reaches 86% of new car sales by the 20th year. If the fuel savings is 0.5 cents per mile, market penetration reaches only 10% by the 20th year. To turn to vehicle price difference, if a hydrogen vehicle costs $2,000 less than a non-hydrogen vehicle, new car sales penetration reaches 92% by the 20th year. If a hydrogen vehicle costs $6,500 more than a non-hydrogen vehicle, market penetration is only 6% by the 20th year. Results from other sensitivity runs are presented. Policies that could affect hydrogen vehicle adoption are investigated. A tax credit for the purchase of a hydrogen vehicle of $2,500 tax credit results in 88% penetration by the 20th year, as compared with 60% in the benchmark case. If the tax credit is $6,000, penetration is 99% by the 20th year. Under a more modest approach, the tax credit would be available only for the first 10 years. Hydrogen sales penetration then reach 69% of sales by the 20th year with the $2,500 credit and 79% with the $6,000 credit. A carbon tax of $38 per metric ton is not

  2. Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

    1978-06-01

    An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

  3. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Dapeng; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H(2)/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH(4)/g VS added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. pH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary. Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase.

  4. Biological hydrogen production from sucrose and sugar beet by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotopoulos, John [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Wageningen UR Food and Biobased Research (Netherlands); Bakker, Robert; Vrieje, Truus de; Claassen, Pieternel [Wageningen UR Food and Biobased Research (Netherlands); Koukios, Emmanuel [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen production needs to be based on renewable resources in order to be sustainable. Sugar beet is an ideal raw material for fermentative production of hydrogen in the EU and possibly in the USA due to its environmental profile and its potential availability in these areas. In this work, the fermentative production of hydrogen from sucrose of analytical grade and sugar beet extract by pure cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was investigated, under uncontrolled and controlled conditions. In the first case, growth of pure cultures of C. saccharolyticus on sucrose derived from sugar beet was compared to growth of the microorganism on sucrose of analytical grade. The production of hydrogen and organic acids (acetate and lactate) from sugar beet was largely equal to or slightly higher than the production of the control. In the second case, fermentation of sugar beet extract at sucrose concentration 10 g/l was comparable to the fermentation on pure sucrose except that the hydrogen yield was slightly higher on sugar beet extract. In particular, hydrogen yields of 2.9 and 3.0 mol/mol hexose were determined in fermentations of sucrose and sugar beet extract, respectively, corresponding to 73% and 75% of the theoretical value of 4 mol hydrogen/mol hexose. Acetic acid was the main product and very low production of lactic acid was observed. (orig.)

  5. Modelling of hydrogen production in batch cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, Jamila; Magnin, Jean-Pierre [Grenoble Institute of Technology, LEPMI, UMR 5631 (CNRS-INPG-UJF), BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Flaus, Jean-Marie; Adrot, Olivier [Grenoble Institute of Technology, Laboratoire des sciences pour la conception, l' optimisation et la production, 46, avenue Felix Viallet, 38031 Grenoble (France); Willison, John C. [Laboratoire de Chimie et Biologie des Metaux (UMR 5249 CEA-CNRS-UJF), iRTSV/LCBM, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble (France); Zlatev, Roumen [Autonomous University of Baja California, Institute of Engineering, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    The photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, produces hydrogen under nitrogen-limited, anaerobic, photosynthetic culture conditions, using various carbon substrates. In the present study, the relationship between light intensity and hydrogen production has been modelled in order to predict both the rate of hydrogen production and the amount of hydrogen produced at a given time during batch cultures of R. capsulatus. The experimental data were obtained by investigating the effect of different light intensities (6000-50,000 lux) on hydrogen-producing cultures of R. capsulatus grown in a batch photobioreactor, using lactate as carbon and hydrogen source. The rate of hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity in a manner that was described by a static Baly model, modified to include the square of the light intensity. In agreement with previous studies, the kinetics of substrate utilization and growth of R. capsulatus was represented by the classical Monod or Michaelis-Menten model. When combined with a dynamic Leudekong-Piret model, the amount of hydrogen produced as a function of time was effectively predicted. These results will be useful for the automatization and control of bioprocesses for the photoproduction of hydrogen. (author)

  6. Effect of growth conditions on the hydrogen production with cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CH3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Chung [Institute of Clinical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 34, Chung-Chie Road, Sha Lu, Taichung 433 (China); Fan, Shin-Huei; Chiang, Char-Lin; Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 402 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Cyanobacteria could use sugars as carbon source and reductant to produce hydrogen by nitrogenase. However, oxygen is also produced during photosynthesis and it is an inhibitor of the enzyme nitrogenase. Filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. CH{sub 3} could use sugars as substrate to produce molecular hydrogen anaerobically. The production activity was dependent on growth phases. It was found that the cells at sub-stage of late-log phase had better ability to produce hydrogen than at log phase. In such case, oxygen content was too low to be detected to inhibit hydrogen production. Among different kinds of sugar, fructose and glucose had the best performance for producing hydrogen. Hydrogen could be accumulated to 0.6 mmol (in 40 ml head space) in 100 h from 1000 ppm fructose. Increasing light intensities from 65 to 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} would enhance hydrogen production to 0.8 mmol. Under illumination of 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 2000 ppm fructose, 1.7 mmol of hydrogen could be accumulated. When fructose content was higher than 2000 ppm, cells could not produce more hydrogen at all. (author)

  7. Method and apparatus for hydrogen production from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method, apparatuses and chemical compositions are provided for producing high purity hydrogen from water. Metals or alloys capable of reacting with water and producing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions are reacted with one or more inorganic hydrides capable of releasing hydrogen in aqueous solutions at ambient conditions, one or more transition metal compounds are used to catalyze the reaction and, optionally, one or more alkali metal-based compounds. The metal or alloy is preferably aluminum. The inorganic hydride is from a family of complex inorganic hydrides; most preferably, NaBH.sub.4. The transition metal catalyst is from the groups VIII and IB; preferably, Cu and Fe. The alkali metal-based compounds are preferably NaOH, KOH, and the like. Hydrogen generated has a purity of at least 99.99 vol. % (dry basis), and is used without further purification in all types of fuel cells, including the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell.

  8. Hydrogen and methane production from swine wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Rachel C; Regan, John M; Oh, Sang-Eun; Zuo, Yi; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-01

    The production of a useful and valuable product during swine wastewater treatment, such as hydrogen gas, could help to lower treatment costs. Hydrogen can theoretically be produced from wastewater by electrohydrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) or by fermentation. Using a single-chamber MEC with a graphite-fiber brush anode, hydrogen gas was generated at 0.9-1.0 m(3) m(-3) day(-1) H2 using a full-strength or diluted swine wastewater. COD removals ranged from 8 to 29% in 20-h tests, and from 69 to 75% in longer tests (184 h) using full-strength wastewater. The gas produced was up to 77+/-11% hydrogen, with overall recoveries of up to 28+/-6% of the COD in the wastewater as hydrogen gas. Methane was also produced at a maximum of 13+/-4% of total gas volume. The efficiency of hydrogen production, based on the electrical energy needed (but excluding the energy in the wastewater) compared to the energy of the hydrogen gas produced, was as high as 190+/-39% in 42-h batch tests with undiluted wastewater, but was lower in longer batch tests of 184 h (91+/-6%). Hydrogen gas could not be recovered in fermentation tests using wastewater with a heat-treated inoculum. Hydrogen production was shown to be possible by fermentation when the wastewater was sterilized, but this process would not be practical or energy efficient. We therefore conclude from these tests that MECs are an effective method for hydrogen recovery from swine wastewater treatment, although the process needs to be further evaluated for reducing methane production, increasing the efficiency of converting the organic matter into current, and increasing recovery of hydrogen gas produced at the cathode.

  9. Preliminary experiment design of graphite dust emission measurement under accident conditions for HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Tao; Sun, Qi; Wang, Jie [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A theoretical analysis is used to predict the total graphite dust release for an AVR LOCA. • Similarity criteria must be satisfied between the experiment and the actual HTGR system. • Model experiments should be conducted to predict the graphite dust resuspension rate. - Abstract: The graphite dust movement behavior is significant for the safety analyses of high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The graphite dust release for accident conditions is an important source term for HTGR safety analyses. Depressurization release tests are not practical in HTGR because of a radioactivity release to the environment. Thus, a theoretical analysis and similarity principles were used to design a group of modeling experiments. Modeling experiments for fan start-up and depressurization process and actual experiments of helium circulator start-up in an HTGR were used to predict the rate of graphite dust resuspension and the graphite dust concentration, which can be used to predict the graphite dust release during accidents. The modeling experiments are easy to realize and the helium circulator start-up test does not harm the reactor system or the environment, so this experiment program is easily achieved. The revised Rock’n’Roll model was then used to calculate the AVR reactor release. The calculation results indicate that the total graphite dust releases during a LOCA will be about 0.65 g in AVR.

  10. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR “full recycle” service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the “pebble bed” approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in “limited separation” or “minimum fuel treatment” separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  11. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick R. Soelberg

    2010-11-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR “full recycle” service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the “pebble bed” approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in “limited separation” or “minimum fuel treatment” separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication.

  12. Study on substrate metabolism process of saline waste sludge and its biological hydrogen production potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengshuai; Guo, Liang; Li, Qianqian; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian

    2017-07-01

    With the increasing of high saline waste sludge production, the treatment and utilization of saline waste sludge attracted more and more attention. In this study, the biological hydrogen production from saline waste sludge after heating pretreatment was studied. The substrate metabolism process at different salinity condition was analyzed by the changes of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), carbohydrate and protein in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and dissolved organic matters (DOM). The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) was also used to investigate the effect of salinity on EPS and DOM composition during hydrogen fermentation. The highest hydrogen yield of 23.6 mL H 2 /g VSS and hydrogen content of 77.6% were obtained at 0.0% salinity condition. The salinity could influence the hydrogen production and substrate metabolism of waste sludge.

  13. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  14. Hydrogen production from formic acid in pH-stat fed-batch operation for direct supply to fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Tai Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 harvested after cultivation was used as a whole cell biocatalyst, for the production of hydrogen. Formic acid was efficiently converted to hydrogen using the harvested cells with an initial hydrogen production rate and total hydrogen production of 491 ml/l/h and 6668 ml/l, respectively, when 1 g/l of whole cell enzyme was used. Moreover, new pH-stat fed-batch operation was conducted, and total hydrogen production was 1.4 times higher than that of batch operation. For practical application, bio-hydrogen produced from formic acid using harvested cells was directly applied to PEMFC for power generation.

  15. Probabilistic risk assessment of the modular HTGR plant. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everline, C.J.; Bellis, E.A.; Vasquez, J.

    1986-06-01

    A preliminary probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for the modular HTGR (MHTGR). This PRA is preliminary in the context that although it updates the PRA issued earlier to include a wider spectrum of events for Licensing Basis Events (LBE) selection, the final version will not be issued until later. The primary function of the assessment was to assure compliance with the NRC interim safety goals imposed by the top-level regulatory criteria, and utility/user requirements regarding public evacuation or sheltering. In addition, the assessment provides a basis for designer feedback regarding reliability allocations and barrier retention requirements as well as providing a basis for the selection of licensing basis events (LBEs) and the safety classification of structures, systems, and components. The assessment demonstrates that both the NRC interim safety goals and utility/user imposed sheltering/evacuation requirements are satisfied. Moreover, it is not anticipated that design changes introduced will jeopardize compliance with the interim safety goals or utility/user requirements. 61 refs., 48 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Multi-criteria analysis on how to select solar radiation hydrogen production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, G.; Naghiu, G. S.; Felseghi, R.-A.; Rǎboacǎ, S.; Aşchilean, I.; Giurca, I.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a method of selecting hydrogen-production systems using the electric power obtained in photovoltaic systems, and as a selecting method, we suggest the use of the Advanced Multi-Criteria Analysis based on the FRISCO formula. According to the case study on how to select the solar radiation hydrogen production system, the most convenient alternative is the alternative A4, namely the technical solution involving a hydrogen production system based on the electrolysis of water vapor obtained with concentrated solar thermal systems and electrical power obtained using concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  17. STAR - H2 : the secure transportable autonomous reactor for hydrogen production and desalinization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, D.C.; Doctor, R.; Peddicord, K.L.

    2002-02-26

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor for Hydrogen production is a modular fast reactor intended for the mid 21st century energy market wherein electricity and hydrogen are employed as complementary energy carriers and nuclear energy contributes to sustainable energy supply based on full transuranic recycle in a passively safe, environmentally friendly and proliferation-resistant manner suitable for widespread worldwide deployment.

  18. Prospects of utilization of sugar beet carbohydrates for biological hydrogen production in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Bakker, R.R.; Vrije, de G.J.; Urbaniec, K.; Koukios, E.G.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced through dark anaerobic fermentation using carbohydrate-rich biomass, and through photofermentation using the organic acids produced from dark fermentation. Sugar beet is an ideal energy crop for fermentative production of hydrogen in the EU due to its environmental profile

  19. Achieving ethanol-type fermentation for hydrogen production in a granular sludge system by aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Liu, Min; Chen, Ying; Pan, Yu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of aeration on hydrogen-producing granular system, experiments were performed in two laboratory-scale anaerobic internal circulation hydrogen production (AICHP) reactors. The preliminary experiment of Reactor 1 showed that direct aeration was beneficial to enhancing hydrogen production. After the direct aeration was implied in Reactor 2, hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen content were increased by 100% and 60%, respectively. In addition, mixed-acid fermentation was transformed into typical ethanol-type fermentation (ETF). Illumina MiSeq sequencing shows that the direct aeration did not change the species of hydrogen-producing bacteria but altered their abundance. Hydrogen-producing bacteria and ethanol-type fermentative bacteria were increased by 24.5% and 146.3%, respectively. Ethanoligenens sp. sharply increased by 162.2% and turned into predominant bacteria in the system. These findings indicated that appropriate direct aeration might be a novel and promising way to obtain ETF and enhance hydrogen production in practical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature dependence of anti-hydrogen production in the ATHENA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomi, G. E-mail: germano.bonomi@cern.ch; Amoretti, M.; Amsler, C.; Bouchta, A.; Bowe, P.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Filippini, V.; Fontana, A.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hangst, J.S.; Hayano, R.S.; Joergensen, L.V.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lindeloef, D.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Montagna, P.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Riedler, P.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Werf, D.P. van der

    2004-01-01

    The ATHENA experiment recently produced the first sample of cold anti-hydrogen atoms by mixing cold plasmas of anti-protons and positrons. The temperature of the positron plasma was increased by controlled RF heating and the anti-hydrogen production rate was measured. Preliminary results are presented.

  1. Temperature dependence of anti-hydrogen production in the ATHENA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bonomi, G; Amsler, Claude; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Van der Werf, D P

    2004-01-01

    The ATHENA experiment recently produced the first sample of cold anti-hydrogen atoms by mixing cold plasmas of anti-protons and positrons. The temperature of the positron plasma was increased by controlled RF heating and the anti-hydrogen production rate was measured. Preliminary results are presented. (8 refs).

  2. Long term hydrogen production potential of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system in tropical weather of Singapore

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-08-23

    Concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system provides highest solar energy conversion efficiency among all the photovoltaic technologies and provides the most suitable option to convert solar energy into hydrogen, as future sustainable energy carrier. So far, only conventional flat plate PV systems are being used for almost all of the commercial applications. However, most of the studies have only shown the maximum efficiency of hydrogen production using CPV. In actual field conditions, the performance of CPV-Hydrogen system is affected by many parameter and it changes continuously during whole day operation. In this paper, the daily average and long term performances are proposed to analyze the real field potential of the CPV-Hydrogen system, which is of main interest for designers and consumers. An experimental setup is developed and a performance model is proposed to investigate the average and long term production potential of CPV-Hydrogen system. The study is carried out in tropical weather of Singapore. The maximum CPV efficiency of 27-28% and solar to hydrogen (STH) efficiency of 18%, were recorded. In addition, the CPV-Hydrogen system showed the long term average efficiency of 15.5%, for period of one year (12-months), with electrolyser rating of 47 kWh/kg and STH production potential of 218 kWh/kg. Based upon the DNI availability, the system showed hydrogen production potential of 0.153-0.553 kg/m/month, with average production of 0.43 kg/m/month. However, CPV-Hydrogen system has shown annual hydrogen production potential of 5.162 kg/m/year in tropical weather of Singapore.

  3. Estimation of hydrogen production in genetically modified E. coli fermentations using an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; De Leon Rodriguez, Antonio [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a secc, San Luis Potosi, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Garcia, Raul Gonzalez [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava 6, San Luis Potosi, SLP 78210 (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    Biological hydrogen production is an active research area due to the importance of this gas as an energy carrier and the advantages of using biological systems to produce it. A cheap and practical on-line hydrogen determination is desired in those processes. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) was developed to estimate the hydrogen production in fermentative processes. A back propagation neural network (BPNN) of one hidden layer with 12 nodes was selected. The BPNN training was done using the conjugated gradient algorithm and on-line measurements of dissolved CO{sub 2}, pH and oxidation-reduction potential during the fermentations of cheese whey by Escherichia coli {delta}hycA {delta}lacI (WDHL) strain with or without pH control. The correlation coefficient between the hydrogen production determined by gas chromatography and the hydrogen production estimated by the BPNN was 0.955. Results showed that the BPNN successfully estimated the hydrogen production using only on-line parameters in genetically modified E. coli fermentations either with or without pH control. This approach could be used for other hydrogen production systems. (author)

  4. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongqiang; Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong

    2008-09-01

    Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all the reported microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) to separate the anode and cathode chambers. To reduce the potential losses associated with membrane and increase the energy recovery of this process, single-chamber membrane-free MECs were designed and used to investigate hydrogen production by one mixed culture and one pure culture: Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. At an applied voltage of 0.6 V, this system with a mixed culture achieved a hydrogen production rate of 0.53 m(3)/day/m(3) (0.11 m(3)/day/m(2)) with a current density of 9.3A/m(2) at pH 7 and 0.69 m(3)/day/m(3) (0.15m(3)/day/m(2)) with a current density of 14 A/m(2) at pH 5.8. Stable hydrogen production from lactic acid by S. oneidensis was also observed. Methane was detected during the hydrogen production process with the mixed culture and negatively affected hydrogen production rate. However, by employing suitable approaches, such as exposure of cathodes to air, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens can be suppressed. The current density and volumetric hydrogen production rate of this system have potential to increase significantly by further reducing the electrode spacing and increasing the ratio of electrode surface area/cell volume.

  5. Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Amos, W.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    To determine their technical and economic viability and to provide insight into where each technology is in its development cycle, different options to produce hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass were studied. Additionally, costs for storing and transporting hydrogen were determined for different hydrogen quantities and storage times. The analysis of hydrogen from sunlight examined the selling price of hydrogen from two technologies: direct photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of sunlight and photovoltaic (PV)-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. The wind analysis was based on wind-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. In addition to the base case analyses, which assume that hydrogen is the sole product, three alternative scenarios explore the economic impact of integrating the PV- and wind-based systems with the electric utility grid. Results show that PEC hydrogen production has the potential to be economically feasible. Additionally, the economics of the PV and wind electrolysis systems are improved by interaction with the grid. The analysis of hydrogen from biomass focused on three gasification technologies. The systems are: low pressure, indirectly-heated gasification followed by steam reforming; high pressure, oxygen-blown gasification followed by steam reforming; and pyrolysis followed by partial oxidation. For each of the systems studied, the downstream process steps include shift conversion followed by hydrogen purification. Only the low pressure system produces hydrogen within the range of the current industry selling prices (typically $0.7--$2/kg, or $5--14/GJ on a HHV basis). A sensitivity analysis showed that, for the other two systems, in order to bring the hydrogen selling price down to $2/kg, negative-priced feedstocks would be required.

  6. Modelling of hydrogen permeability of membranes for high-purity hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Yury V.; Rodchenkova, Natalia I.

    2017-11-01

    High-purity hydrogen is required for clean energy and a variety of chemical technology processes. Different alloys, which may be well-suited for use in gas-separation plants, were investigated by measuring specific hydrogen permeability. One had to estimate the parameters of diffusion and sorption to numerically model the different scenarios and experimental conditions of the material usage (including extreme ones), and identify the limiting factors. This paper presents a nonlinear mathematical model taking into account the dynamics of sorption-desorption processes and reversible capture of diffusing hydrogen by inhomogeneity of the material’s structure, and also modification of the model when the transport rate is high. The results of numerical modelling allow to obtain information about output data sensitivity with respect to variations of the material’s hydrogen permeability parameters. Furthermore, it is possible to analyze the dynamics of concentrations and fluxes that cannot be measured directly. Experimental data for Ta77Nb23 and V85Ni15 alloys were used to test the model. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project No. 15-01-00744).

  7. Hydrogen production profiles using furans in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Gover, Tansu; Yaman, Bugra; Droguetti, Jessica; Yilancioglu, Kaan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells including microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are novel biotechnological tools that can convert organic substances in wastewater or biomass into electricity or hydrogen. Electroactive microbial biofilms used in this technology have ability to transfer electrons from organic compounds to anodes. Evaluation of biofilm formation on anode is crucial for enhancing our understanding of hydrogen generation in terms of substrate utilization by microorganisms. In this study, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were analyzed for hydrogen generation using single chamber membrane-free MECs (17 mL), and anode biofilms were also examined. MECs were inoculated with mixed bacterial culture enriched using chloroethane sulphonate. Hydrogen was succesfully produced in the presence of HMF, but not furfural. MECs generated similar current densities (5.9 and 6 mA/cm 2 furfural and HMF, respectively). Biofilm samples obtained on the 24th and 40th day of cultivation using aromatic compounds were evaluated by using epi-fluorescent microscope. Our results show a correlation between biofilm density and hydrogen generation in single chamber MECs.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE PRODUCTION OF SOLAR HYDROGEN IN ALGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bendaikha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a sustainable fuel option and one of the potential solutions for the current energy and environmental problems. In this study hydrogen is produced using a hydrogen generator with a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM electrolyser. An experimental study is done in the Center of Development of the Renewable Energy, Algiers, Algeria.The experimental device contains essentially a photovoltaic module, a PEM electrolyser, a gasometer and the devices of measures of characteristics of the PEM electrolyser as well as two pyranometers for the horizontal and diffuse global radiance registration. This system in pilots scale is permitted on the one hand, to measured and analyzed the characteristics: of the PEM electrolyser for two different pressures of working (Patm and P=3 bar, on the other hand, to study the volume of hydrogen produces in the time with different sources of electrical power (generator, photovoltaic module, fluorescent lamp, the efficiency for every case is calculated and compared. We present in this paper the variation of the solar hydrogen flow rate produced according to the global radiance and according to the time for a typical day’s of August.

  9. Hydrogen and electricity production from a food processing wastewater using fermentation and microbial fuel cell technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Eun; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from fermentation of sugars in wastewaters, but much of the organic matter remains in solution. We demonstrate here that hydrogen production from a food processing wastewater high in sugar can be linked to electricity generation using a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to achieve more effective wastewater treatment. Grab samples were taken from: plant effluent at two different times during the day (Effluents 1 and 2; 735+/-15 and 3250+/-90 mg-COD/L), an equalization tank (Lagoon; 1670+/-50mg-COD/L), and waste stream containing a high concentration of organic matter (Cereal; 8920+/-150 mg-COD/L). Hydrogen production from the Lagoon and effluent samples was low, with 64+/-16 mL of hydrogen per liter of wastewater (mL/L) for Effluent 1, 21+/-18 mL/L for Effluent 2, and 16+/-2 mL/L for the Lagoon sample. There was substantially greater hydrogen production using the Cereal wastewater (210+/-56 mL/L). Assuming a theoretical maximum yield of 4 mol of hydrogen per mol of glucose, hydrogen yields were 0.61-0.79 mol/mol for the Cereal wastewater, and ranged from 1 to 2.52 mol/mol for the other samples. This suggests a strategy for hydrogen recovery from wastewater based on targeting high-COD and high-sugar wastewaters, recognizing that sugar content alone is an insufficient predictor of hydrogen yields. Preliminary tests with the Cereal wastewater (diluted to 595 mg-COD/L) in a two-chambered MFC demonstrated a maximum of 81+/-7 mW/m(2) (normalized to the anode surface area), or 25+/-2 mA per liter of wastewater, and a final COD of hydrogen production and electricity producing using MFCs in order to achieve both wastewater treatment and bioenergy production.

  10. Comparison of Damage Formation and Crack Propagation Behavior of Selected Nuclear Graphite for HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Undoubtedly, these changes are attributed to the irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure of graphite components and finally result in an increase in the probability of fracture of graphite core components menacing the safety of reactor. Due to the nature of HTGR whose core components are made of quasi-brittle graphite, the graphite core components operating for 40-60 years without failure require knowledge and understanding on the characteristics of graphite fracture. In this study, two results on the fracture of nuclear graphite, i.e., fracture under cyclic compressive loading unloading and fracture under static loading, were reevaluated to understand the fracture characteristics of selected nuclear graphite grade for HTGR. Present observation may need to be considered in the graphite selection as well as in the design and safety evaluation of the graphite core components in HTGR.

  11. Potential use of thermophilic dark fermentation effluents in photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgura, E.; Afsar, N.; Eroglu, I. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); De Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Yucel, M.; Gunduz, U. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biology, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Biological hydrogen production by a sequential operation of dark and photofermentation is a promising route to produce hydrogen. The possibility of using renewable resources, like biomass and agro-industrial wastes, provides a dual effect of sustainability in biohydrogen production and simultaneous waste removal. In this study, photofermentative hydrogen production on effluents of thermophilic dark fermentations on glucose, potato steam peels (PSP) hydrolysate and molasses was investigated in indoor, batch operated bioreactors. An extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was used in the dark fermentation step, and Rhodobacter capsulatus (DSM1710) was used in the photofermentation step. Addition of buffer, Fe and Mo to dark fermentor effluents (DFEs) improved the overall efficiency of hydrogen production. The initial acetate concentration in the DFE needed to be adjusted to 30-40 mM by dilution to increase the yield of hydrogen in batch light-supported fermentations. The thermophilic DFEs are suitable for photofermentative hydrogen production, provided that they are supplemented with buffer and nutrients. The overall hydrogen yield of the two-step fermentations was higher than the yield of single step dark fermentations.

  12. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen Gas Production in a Stand-Alone Wind Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naziry Kordkandy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is analyzing the operation of a stand-alone wind farm with variable speed turbines, permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG and a system for converting wind energy during wind speed variations. On this paper, the design and modeling of a wind system which uses PMSG’s to provide the required power of a hydrogen gas electrolyzer system, is discussed. This wind farm consists of three wind turbines, boost DC-DC converters, diode full bridge rectifiers, permanent magnet synchronous generators, MPPT control and a hydrogen gas electrolyzer system. The MPPT controller based on fuzzy logic is designed to adjust the duty ratio of the boost DC-DC converters to absorb maximum power. The proposed fuzzy logic controller assimilates, with (PSF MPPT algorithm which generally used to absorb maximum power from paralleled wind turbines and stores it in form of hydrogen gas. The system is modeled and its behavior is studied using the MATLAB software.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production via hydrothermal gasification of hexadecane

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Yousef M.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the equilibrium behaviour of the hydrothermal gasification of hexadecane, a heavy saturate model compound, under non-oxidative isothermal and oxidative adiabatic conditions, using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the direct minimisation of Gibbs free energy employed within the Aspen HYSYS. This modelling enabled establishing both the limits and optimum conditions at which the hydrogen molar yield may be theoretically maximised. The effects of parameters including the reactor isothermal temperature, pressure, water to carbon ratio, and oxygen to carbon ratio on the molar yields of produced gaseous species were analysed. The model has been validated by comparing its results with different reported modelling and experimental data under identical conditions which resulted in a good agreement. The results reported in this work show the potential of achieving economic yields of hydrogen and syngas from liquid hydrocarbons under downhole hydrothermal conditions. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights.

  15. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O' Brien

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a “hydrogen economy.” The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  16. Biological production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of OFMSW and co-fermentation with slaughterhouse wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Gomez, X.; Cuestos, M. J.

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen is an ideal, clean and sustainable energy source for the future because of its high conversion and nonpolluting nature (Lin and Lay, 2003). There are different methods for the production of hydrogen, the traditional ones, are the production from fossil fuels. Aiming to reach a development based on sustainable principles the production of hydrogen from renewable sources is a desirable goal. Among the environmental friendly alternatives for the production of hydrogen are the biological means. Dark fermentation as it is known the process when light is not used; it is a preferable option thanks to the knowledge already collected from its homologous process, the anaerobic digestion for the production of methane. There are several studies intended to the evaluation of the production of hydrogen, many are dedicated to the use of pure cultures or the utilization of basic substrates as glucose or sucrose (Lin and Lay, 2003; Chang et al., 2002, Kim et al., 2005). This study is performed to evaluate the fermentation of a mixture of wastes for the production of hydrogen. It is used as substrate the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and a mixture of this residue with slaughterhouse waste. (Author)

  17. Continuous hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage cheese whey fermentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Navarro, C B; Carrillo-Reyes, J; Davila-Vazquez, G; Alatriste-Mondragón, F; Razo-Flores, E

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of integrating biological hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage process using mixed cultures and cheese whey powder (CWP) as substrate was studied. The effect of operational parameters such as hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on the volumetric hydrogen (VHPR) and methane (VMPR) production rates was assessed. The highest VHPR was 28 L H2/L/d, obtained during stable operation in a CSTR at HRT and OLR of 6 h and 142 g lactose/ L/d, respectively. Moreover, hydrogen (13 L/L/d) was produced even at HRT as low as 3.5 h and OLR of 163 g lactose/L/d, nonetheless, the reactor operation was not stable. Regarding methane production in an UASB reactor, the acidified effluent from the hydrogen-producing bioreactor was efficiently treated obtaining COD removals above 90% at OLR and HRT of 20 g COD/L/d and 6 h, respectively. The two-stage process for continuous production of hydrogen and methane recovered over 70% of the energy present in the substrate. This study demonstrated that hydrogen production can be efficiently coupled to methane production in a two-stage system and that CWP is an adequate substrate for energy production.

  18. Methane-methanol cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.; Hickman, Robert G.

    1976-01-01

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal: CH.sub.4 + H.sub.2 O .fwdarw. CO + 3H.sub.2 (1) co + 2h.sub.2 .fwdarw. ch.sub.3 oh (2) ch.sub.3 oh + so.sub.2 + mo .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + ch.sub.4 (3) mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. mo + so.sub.2 + 1/2o.sub.2 (4) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  19. High Efficiency Solar Thermochemical Reactor for Hydrogen Production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    This research and development project is focused on the advancement of a technology that produces hydrogen at a cost that is competitive with fossil-based fuels for transportation. A twostep, solar-driven WS thermochemical cycle is theoretically capable of achieving an STH conversion ratio that exceeds the DOE target of 26% at a scale large enough to support an industrialized economy [1]. The challenge is to transition this technology from the laboratory to the marketplace and produce hydrogen at a cost that meets or exceeds DOE targets.

  20. The Development of Lifecycle Data for Hydrogen Fuel Production and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    An evaluation of renewable hydrogen production technologies anticipated to be available in the short, mid- and long-term timeframes was conducted. Renewable conversion pathways often rely on a combination of renewable and fossil energy sources, with ...

  1. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data through Quarter 2 of 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This publication includes 92 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the second quarter of 2017. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  2. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data through Quarter 4 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This publication includes 86 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the fourth quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  3. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data Through Quarter 3 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-07

    This publication includes 80 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2016 for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the third quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  4. Method of carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production from hydrocarbon decomposition over metal salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlebacher, Jonah; Gaskey, Bernard

    2017-10-03

    A process to decompose methane into carbon (graphitic powder) and hydrogen (H.sub.2 gas) without secondary production of carbon dioxide, employing a cycle in which a secondary chemical is recycled and reused, is disclosed.

  5. Methane and Hydrogen Production from Anaerobic Fermentation of Municipal Solid Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Xu, Kaiqin; Li, Yu-You; Inamori, Yuhei

    Methane and hydrogen production was investigated in batch experiments of thermophilic methane and hydrogen fermentation, using domestic garbage and food processing waste classified by fat/carbohydrate balance as a base material. Methane production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with fat content and negatively correlated with carbohydrate content in the substrate, and the average value of the methane production per unit of VS added from fat-rich materials was twice as large as that from carbohydrate-rich materials. By contrast, hydrogen production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with carbohydrate content and negatively correlated with fat content. Principal component analysis using the results obtained in this study enable an evaluation of substrates for methane and hydrogen fermentation based on nutrient composition.

  6. Photosynthetic bacteria as alternative energy sources: overview on hydrogen production research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, A.; Ohta, Y.; Frank, J.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production research towards the application of marine and non-marine species of photosynthetic bacteria is reviewed. Potential use of photosynthetic bacteria as renewable energy resources is discussed.

  7. Hierarchical Cu2O foam/g-C3N4 photocathode for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinzhou; Zhang, Jingtao; Wang, Biao; Li, Qiuguo; Chu, Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Solar photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production is a promising way for solving energy and environment problems. Earth-abundant Cu2O is a potential light absorber for PEC hydrogen production. In this article, hierarchical porous Cu2O foams are prepared by thermal oxidation of the electrochemically deposited Cu foams. PEC performances of the Cu2O foams are systematically studied and discussed. Benefiting from their higher light harvesting and more efficient charge separation, the Cu2O foams demonstrate significantly enhanced photocurrents and photostability compared to their film counterparts. Moreover, by integrating g-C3N4, hierarchical Cu2O foam/g-C3N4 composites are prepared with further improved photocurrent and photostability, appearing to be potential photocathodes for solar PEC hydrogen production. This study may provide a new and useful insight for the development of Cu2O-based photocathodes for PEC hydrogen production.

  8. Hydrogen production by geobacter species and a mixed consortium in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F; Wagner, Rachel C; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-01

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m(3) H2/m3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 +/- 7 A/m3 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% +/- 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% +/- 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% +/- 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% +/- 16% compared to 80% +/- 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% +/- 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 +/- 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current.

  9. Research Progress of Hydrogen Production fromOrganic Wastes in Microbial Electrolysis Cell(MEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yin-sheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrolysis cell(MECtechnology as an emerging technology, has achieved the target of hydrogen production from different substrates such as waste water, forestry wastes, activated sludge by simultaneous enzymolysis and fermentation, which can effectively improve the efficiency of resource utilization. This paper described the working principle of MEC and analyzed these factors influencing the process of hydrogen production from organic waste in MEC.

  10. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed.

  11. Hydrogen evolution by fermentation using seaweed as substrates and the contribution to the clean energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanisho, S.; Suganuma, T.; Yamaguchi, A. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    2001-07-01

    It is an important theme in Japan to use the sea for energy production, because Japan is surrounded by seas on all sides. Brown algae such as Laminaria have high value as the substrate of fermentative hydrogen production, since they have very high growth rate and also have high ability on the productivity of mannitol. I would like to present about the affection of salt concentration on the hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes, and also the contribution on clean energy production by the seaweed cultivation in Japan. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  13. Experimental evaluation of methane dry reforming process on a membrane reactor to hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fabiano S.A.; Benachour, Mohand; Abreu, Cesar A.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], Email: f.aruda@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In a fixed bed membrane reactor evaluations of methane-carbon dioxide reforming over a Ni/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were performed at 773 K, 823 K and 873 K. A to convert natural gas into syngas a fixed-bed reactor associate with a selective membrane was employed, where the operating procedures allowed to shift the chemical equilibrium of the reaction in the direction of the products of the process. Operations under hydrogen permeation, at 873 K, promoted the increase of methane conversion, circa 83%, and doubled the yield of hydrogen production, when compared with operations where no hydrogen permeation occurred. (author)

  14. Optimizing a steam-methane reformer for hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Westendorp, G.

    2009-01-01

    By means of steam reforming, natural gas is converted to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The reactions take place in reactor tubes which are covered with catalyst at the inside, where the reactive mixture flows. At the outside they are heated by combustion of natural gas with air. In this paper the

  15. Simulation of the daily sunlight illumination pattern for bacterial photo-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, J; Wakayama, T; Schnackenberg, J; Arai, T; Asada, Y

    1999-01-01

    Methods of illumination to simulate the daily sunlight irradiation pattern were studied in relation to photohydrogen production using the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. Three illumination patterns were compared, in which the light intensity was changed in 1, 3, or 6 steps. As a control, outdoor experiments were also carried out over a 3-d period in Tsukuba, August 1996. Outdoors, hydrogen production by Rba. sphaeroides RV was dependent on the sunlight intensity: the total volume of hydrogen produced per day varied from 14 to 28 l.m(-2), while the total light energy ranged from 5.5 to 6.4 kWh.m(-2). d(-1). The maximum hydrogen production rate was 2.8 l.m(-2).h(-1) under a 4.5-cm light path and the average light energy conversion efficiency was 1.1%. Indoors, the hydrogen production rate was found to be independent of the mode of illumination among the three patterns employed. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 3.3 l.m(-2).h(-1) with a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.0%, and it was concluded that the single-step illumination method provides an appropriate simulation of sunlight. Saturation of hydrogen production occurs during high light intensity around noon and this plays a key role in the simulation.

  16. Long-term biological hydrogen production by agar immobilized Rhodobacter capsulatus in a sequential batch photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkahlout, Kamal; Alipour, Siamak; Eroglu, Inci; Gunduz, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral

    2017-04-01

    In this study, agar immobilization technique was employed for biological hydrogen production using Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710 (wild type) and YO3 (hup-mutant) strains in sequential batch process. Different agar and glutamate concentrations were tested with defined nutrient medium. Agar concentration 4% (w/v) and 4 mM glutamate were selected for bacterial immobilization in terms of rate and longevity of hydrogen production. Acetate concentration was increased from 40 to 60-100 and 60 mM gave best results with both bacterial strains immobilized in 4% (w/v) agar. Cell concentration was increased from 2.5 to 5 mg dcw mL -1 agar and it was found that increasing cell concentration of wild-type strain caused decrease in yield and productivity while these parameters improved by increasing cell concentration of mutant strain. Also, the hydrogen production time has extended from 17 days up to 60 days according to the process conditions and parameters. Hydrogen production by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria is a convenient technology for hydrogen production as it enables to produce hydrogen with high organic acid concentrations comparing to suspended cultures. Besides, immobilization increases the stability of the system and allowed sequential batch operation for long-term application.

  17. Maximizing hydrogen production and substrate consumption by Escherichia coli WDHL in cheese whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; Alvarado-Cuevas, Zazil Donaxí; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rodríguez, Antonio De León

    2013-10-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is strongly affected by pH. In order to maximize hydrogen production and substrate consumption in Escherichia coli ΔhycA, ΔlacI (WDHL) cheese whey fermentation, the influence of pH control at values of 5.5, 6, and 6.5 was studied in batch stirred-tank bioreactors. From the conditions evaluated, pH 6.5 was the best condition, at which the highest cumulative hydrogen production and yield (1.78 mol H2/mol lactose) were obtained. Moreover, at this pH, all carbohydrates from the cheese whey were consumed, and a mix of ethanol and organic acids, mainly lactate, were produced from glucose, whereas galactose yielded acetate, ethanol, and succinate. Operating the reactor at pH 5.5 resulted in the highest maximum specific production rate, but smaller hydrogen yield because only glucose was metabolized and galactose was accumulated. At pH 6, not all cheese whey carbohydrates were consumed, and it was not favorable for hydrogen production. Lactose consumption and growth kinetics were not affected by the pH. The results show the importance of controlling pH to maximize hydrogen production and substrate consumption using cheese whey as substrate.

  18. Electrocoagulation of palm oil mill effluent as wastewater treatment and hydrogen production using electrode aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M Ansori; Yaakob, Z; Ali, Ehsan; Tasirin, S M; Abdullah, S R S

    2011-01-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is highly polluting wastewater generated from the palm oil milling process. Palm oil mill effluent was used as an electrolyte without any additive or pretreatment to perform electrocoagulation (EC) using electricity (direct current) ranging from 2 to 4 volts in the presence of aluminum electrodes with a reactor volume of 20 L. The production of hydrogen gas, removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and turbidity as a result of electrocoagulation of POME were determined. The results show that EC can reduce the COD and turbidity of POME by 57 and 62%, respectively, in addition to the 42% hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was also helpful to remove the lighter suspended solids toward the surface. The production of Al(OH)XHO at the aluminum electrode (anode) was responsible for the flocculation-coagulation process of suspended solids followed by sedimentation under gravity. The production of hydrogen gas from POME during EC was also compared with hydrogen gas production by electrolysis of tap water at pH 4 and tap water without pH adjustment under the same conditions. The main advantage of this study is to produce hydrogen gas while treating POME with EC to reduce COD and turbidity effectively. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus production by hydrogen-rich saline in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunye Ning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-production of mucus is an important pathophysiological feature in chronic airway disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. Cigarette smoking (CS is the leading cause of COPD. Oxidative stress plays a key role in CS-induced airway abnormal mucus production. Hydrogen protected cells and tissues against oxidative damage by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. In the present study we investigated the effect of hydrogen on CS-induced mucus production in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control, CS group, hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment group and hydrogen-rich saline control group. Lung morphology and tissue biochemical changes were determined by immunohistochemistry, Alcian Blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining, TUNEL, western blot and realtime RT-PCR. RESULTS: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment attenuated CS-induced mucus accumulation in the bronchiolar lumen, goblet cell hyperplasia, muc5ac over-expression and abnormal cell apoptosis in the airway epithelium as well as malondialdehyde increase in the BALF. The phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 and Nrf2 up-regulation expression in the rat lungs challenged by CS exposure were also abrogated by hydrogen-rich saline. CONCLUSION: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment ameliorated CS-induced airway mucus production and airway epithelium damage in rats. The protective role of hydrogen on CS-exposed rat lungs was achieved at least partly by its free radical scavenging ability. This is the first report to demonstrate that intraperitoneal administration of hydrogen-rich saline protected rat airways against CS damage and it could be promising in treating abnormal airway mucus production in COPD.

  20. Development of a simple bio-hydrogen production system through dark fermentation by using unique microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akihiro; Bando, Yukiko; Fujimoto, Naoshi; Suzuki, Masaharu [Department of Fermentation Science, Faculty of Applied Bio-Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1 Sakuragaoka 1-chome, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8502 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    In order to ensure efficient functioning of hydrogen fermentation systems that use Clostridium as the dominant hydrogen producer, energy-intensive process such as heat pretreatment of inoculum and/or substrate, continuous injection, and control of anaerobic conditions are required. Here, we describe a simple hydrogen fermentation system designed using microflora from leaf-litter cattle-waste compost. Hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production was measured at various hydraulic retention times, and bacterial genera were determined by PCR amplification and sequencing. Although hydrogen fermentation yield was approximately one-third of values reported in previous studies, this system requires no additional treatment and thus may be advantageous in terms of cost and operational control. Interestingly, Clostridium was absent from this system. Instead, Megasphaera elsdenii was the dominant hydrogen-producing bacterium, and lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) were prevalent. This study is the first to characterize M. elsdenii as a useful hydrogen producer in hydrogen fermentation systems. These results demonstrate that pretreatment is not necessary for stable hydrogen fermentation using food waste. (author)

  1. In vitro metabolic engineering of hydrogen production at theoretical yield from sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Suwan; Rollin, Joseph; You, Chun; Sun, Fangfang; Chandrayan, Sanjeev; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most important industrial chemicals and will be arguably the best fuel in the future. Hydrogen production from less costly renewable sugars can provide affordable hydrogen, decrease reliance on fossil fuels, and achieve nearly zero net greenhouse gas emissions, but current chemical and biological means suffer from low hydrogen yields and/or severe reaction conditions. An in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway comprised of 15 enzymes was designed to split water powered by sucrose to hydrogen. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide were spontaneously generated from sucrose or glucose and water mediated by enzyme cocktails containing up to 15 enzymes under mild reaction conditions (i.e. 37°C and atm). In a batch reaction, the hydrogen yield was 23.2mol of dihydrogen per mole of sucrose, i.e., 96.7% of the theoretical yield (i.e., 12 dihydrogen per hexose). In a fed-batch reaction, increasing substrate concentration led to 3.3-fold enhancement in reaction rate to 9.74mmol of H2/L/h. These proof-of-concept results suggest that catabolic water splitting powered by sugars catalyzed by enzyme cocktails could be an appealing green hydrogen production approach. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Control Scheme Formulation for the Production of Hydrogen on Demand to Feed an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarniel García Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a control strategy is presented to produce hydrogen on demand to feed an internal combustion (IC engine. For this purpose, the modeling of the IC engine fueled by gasoline blended with 10 % v/v of anhydrous ethanol (E10 and hydrogen as an additive is developed. It is considered that the hydrogen gas is produced according to the IC engine demand, and that the hydrogen gas is obtained by an alkaline electrolyzer. The gasoline–ethanol blend added into the combustion chamber is determined according to the stoichiometric ratio and the production of hydrogen gas is regulated by a proportional and integral controller (P.I.. The controller reference is varying according to the mass flow air induced into the cylinder, in order to ensure an adequate production of hydrogen gas for any operating condition of the IC engine. The main contribution of this work is the control scheme developed, through simulation, in order to produce hydrogen on demand for any operating point of an internal combustion engine fueled by an E10 blend. The simulation results showed that the use of hydrogen gas as an additive in an E10 blend decreases the E10 fuel consumption 23 % on average, and the thermal efficiency is increased approximately 2.13 % , without brake power loss in the IC engine.

  3. Photo-fermentational hydrogen production of Rhodobacter sp. KKU-PS1 isolated from an UASB reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitirut Assawamongkholsiri

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: KKU-PS1 can produce hydrogen from at least 8 types of organic acids. By optimizing pH and temperature, a maximal hydrogen production by this strain was obtained. Additionally, by optimizing the light intensity, Rm was increased by approximately two fold and the lag phase of hydrogen production was shortened.

  4. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  5. Timeline of bio-hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette E. TELEKY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomass is a process capable to produce biohydrogen, a clean source of alternative energy. Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural waste is considered a renewable energy source; therefore its utilization also contributes to the reduction of water, soil and air pollution. The study consists in five consecutive experiments designed to utilize anaerobic bacterial enrichment cultures originating from the Hungarian Lake, Hévíz. Wheat straw was used as complex substrate to produce hydrogen. The timeline evolution of hydrogen production was analyzed and modelled by two functions: Logistic and Boltzmann. The results proved that hydrogen production is significant, with a maximum of 0.24 mlN/ml and the highest hydrogen production occurs between the days 4-10 of the experiment.

  6. Hydrogen production with a solar steam–methanol reformer and colloid nanocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a small steam-methanol reformer with a colloid nanocatalyst is utilized to produce hydrogen. Radiation from a focused continuous green light laser (514 nm wavelength) is used to provide the energy for steam-methanol reforming. Nanocatalyst particles, fabricated by using pulsed laser ablation technology, result in a highly active catalyst with high surface to volume ratio. A small novel reformer fabricated with a borosilicate capillary is employed to increase the local temperature of the reformer and thereby increase hydrogen production. The hydrogen production output efficiency is determined and a value of 5% is achieved. Experiments using concentrated solar simulator light as the radiation source are also carried out. The results show that hydrogen production by solar steam-methanol colloid nanocatalyst reforming is both feasible and promising. © 2009 Professor T. Nejat Veziroglu.

  7. Photo-fermentative hydrogen production from crop residue: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanguo; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhiping; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhou, Xuehua; Jing, Yanyan; Ge, Xumeng; Jiang, Danping; Hu, Jianjun; He, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Photofermentative hydrogen production from crop residues, if feasible, can lead to complete conversion of organic substances to hydrogen (and carbon dioxide). This mini review lists the studies on photofermentative hydrogen production using crop residues as feedstock. Pretreatment methods, substrate structure, mechanism of photosynthetic bacteria growth and metabolism were discussed. Photofermentative hydrogen production from pure culture, consortia and mutants, and the geometry, light sources, mass transfer resistances and the operational strategies of the photo-bioreactor were herein reviewed. Future studies of regulation mechanism of photosynthetic bacteria, such as highly-efficient strain breeding and gene reconstruction, and development of new-generation photo-bioreactor were suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating the link between fermentative metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, S.J.; Nixon, P.J. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    In the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the electrons required for hydrogen production can come from both the biophotolysis of water and from the fermentation of carbohydrate reserves. Anoxia leads to the activation of several fermentative pathways, which produce a number of end products including formic, malic and acetic acid along with ethanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It has been proposed that by switching off competing fermentative pathways hydrogen production can be increased. Therefore the aim of this study was to devise an experimental strategy to down-regulate the expression of enzymes thought to control C. reinhardtii's fermentative metabolism. We demonstrate here that it is possible to use artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology to generate knock-down mutants with reduced expression of pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), a key fermentative enzyme in C. reinhardtii. This work opens up new possibilities to improve hydrogen yields through metabolic engineering. (orig.)

  9. Microalgal hydrogen production: prospects of an essential technology for a clean and sustainable energy economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2017-09-01

    Modern energy production is required to undergo a dramatic transformation. It will have to replace fossil fuel use by a sustainable and clean energy economy while meeting the growing world energy needs. This review analyzes the current energy sector, available energy sources, and energy conversion technologies. Solar energy is the only energy source with the potential to fully replace fossil fuels, and hydrogen is a crucial energy carrier for ensuring energy availability across the globe. The importance of photosynthetic hydrogen production for a solar-powered hydrogen economy is highlighted and the development and potential of this technology are discussed. Much successful research for improved photosynthetic hydrogen production under laboratory conditions has been reported, and attempts are underway to develop upscale systems. We suggest that a process of integrating these achievements into one system to strive for efficient sustainable energy conversion is already justified. Pursuing this goal may lead to a mature technology for industrial deployment.

  10. Bio-immobilization of dark fermentative bacteria for enhancing continuous hydrogen production from cornstalk hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Cao, Guang-Li; Sheng, Tao; Ren, Hong-Yu; Wang, Ai-Jie; Zhang, Jian; Zhong, Ying-Juan; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2017-11-01

    Mycelia pellets were employed as biological carrier in a continuous stirred tank reactor to reduce biomass washout and enhance hydrogen production from cornstalk hydrolysate. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) and influent substrate concentration played critical roles on hydrogen production of the bioreactor. The maximum hydrogen production rate of 14.2mmol H 2 L -1 h -1 was obtained at optimized HRT of 6h and influent concentration of 20g/L, 2.6 times higher than the counterpart without mycelia pellets. With excellent immobilization ability, biomass accumulated in the reactor and reached 1.6g/L under the optimum conditions. Upon further energy conversion analysis, continuous hydrogen production with mycelia pellets gave the maximum energy conversion efficiency of 17.8%. These results indicate mycelia pellet is an ideal biological carrier to improve biomass retention capacity of the reactor and enhance hydrogen recovery efficiency from lignocellulosic biomass, and meanwhile provides a new direction for economic and efficient hydrogen production process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic flux analysis of the hydrogen production potential in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, E. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, Campus de Teatrinos, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Montagud, A.; Fernandez de Cordoba, P.; Urchueguia, J.F. [Instituto Universitario de Matematica Pura y Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen is a promising energy vector; however, finding methods to produce it from renewable sources is essential to allow its wide-scale use. In that line, biological hydrogen production, although it is considered as a possible alternative, requires substantial improvements to overcome its present low yields. In that direction, genetic manipulation probably will play a central role and from that point of view metabolic flux analysis (MFA) constitutes an important tool to guide a priori most suitable genetic modifications oriented to a hydrogen yield increase. In this work MFA has been applied to analyze hydrogen photoproduction of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Flux analysis was carried out based on literature data and several basic fluxes were estimated in different growing conditions of the system. From this analysis, an upper limit for hydrogen photoproduction has been determined indicating a wide margin for improvement. MFA was also used to find a feasible operating space for hydrogen production, which avoids oxygen inhibition, one of the most important limitations to make hydrogen production cost effective. In addition, a set of biotechnological strategies are proposed that would be consistent with the performed mathematical analysis. (author)

  12. Comparison of various carbohydrates for hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunc Catal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct production of hydrogen from various carbohydrates of lignocellulosic biomass is examined by using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells. The mixed microbial culture was enriched with 20 mmol L−1 2-chloroethane sulphonate and 10 mmol L−1 sodium acetate as a carbon source. Hydrogen was produced from all carbon sources used, including monosaccharides (glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose and arabinose and disaccharides (maltose, saccharose and cellobiose. Hydrogen gas (18 mL was produced using 3.33 mmol L−1 maltose and 20 mL of hydrogen was produced using cellobiose after 14 d of operation. Methane was not produced under any of the tested conditions. The effects of sugar concentration were also examined. Hydrogen production rates varied from 0.01 m3 d−1 m−3 to 0.09 m3 d−1 m−3. The maximum hydrogen yield ranged from 14% to 111%. Our results suggested that carbohydrates, such as maltose and cellobiose, are suitable carbon sources for hydrogen production, when methanogens are suppressed.

  13. Alkaline Ammonia Electrolysis on Electrodeposited Platinum for Controllable Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jieun; Choun, Myounghoon; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2016-02-19

    Ammonia is beginning to attract a great deal of attention as an alternative energy source carrier, because clean hydrogen can be produced through electrolytic processes without the emission of COx . In this study, we deposited various shapes of Pt catalysts under potentiostatic mode; the electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of ammonia using these catalysts was studied in alkaline media. The electrodeposited Pt was characterized by both qualitative and quantitative analysis. To discover the optimal structure and the effect of ammonia concentration, the bulk pH value, reaction temperature, and applied current of ammonia oxidation were investigated using potential sweep and galvanostatic methods. Finally, ammonia electrolysis was conducted using a zero-gap cell, producing highly pure hydrogen with an energy efficiency over 80 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Pulsed Electrodeposited Nickel – Cerium for Hydrogen Production Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaranjani, T; Revathy, T A; Dhanapal, K; Narayanan, V; A. Stephen

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The approach of alloying different elements results in new alloy phase with exclusive properties that could be a potential candidate in various applications. In the present work an attempt has been made to electrodeposit Nickel-Cerium (NiCe) alloy. Nickel is an intriguing metal with much availability in earth's crust. The catalytic power of Nickel based alloys towards hydrogen evolution reaction has been already reported for Nickel-Metal alloys, NiO/Ni and Nickel-Rare ...

  15. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Several species of unicellular green algae, such as the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, can operate under either aerobic photosynthesis or anaerobic metabolism conditions. A particularly interesting metabolic condition is that of “anaerobic oxygenic photosynthesis”, whereby photosynthetically generated oxygen is consumed by the cell’s own respiration, causing anaerobiosis in the culture in the light, and induction of the cellular “hydrogen metabolism” process. The latter enta...

  16. Dark hydrogen production in nitrogen atmosphere - An approach for sustainability by marine cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, D.; Arun Kumar, D.; Uma, L.; Subramanian, G. [National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria (Sponsored by DBT, Govt. of India), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirapalli 620 024 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Biological hydrogen production is an ideal system for three main reasons i) forms a renewable energy source, ii) gives clean fuel and iii) serves as a good supplement to oil reserves. The major challenges faced in biological hydrogen production are the presence of uptake hydrogenase and lack of sustainability in the cyanobacterial hydrogen production system. Three different marine cyanobacterial species viz. Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041, Dichothrix baueriana BDU 40481 and Nostoc calcicola BDU 40302 were studied for their potential use in hydrogen production. Among these, L. valderiana BDU 20041, was found to produce hydrogen even in 100% nitrogen atmosphere which was 85% of the hydrogen produced in argon atmosphere. This is the first report of such a high rate of production of hydrogen in a nitrogen atmosphere by a cyanobacterium, which makes it possible to develop sustained hydrogen production systems. L. valderiana BDU 20041, a dark hydrogen producer uses the reductant essentially supplied by the respiratory pathway for hydrogen production. Using inhibitors, this organism was found to produce hydrogen due to the activities of both nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase, while it had no 'uptake' hydrogenase activity. The other two organisms though had low levels of bidirectional hydrogenase, possessed considerable 'uptake' hydrogenase activity and hence could not release much hydrogen either in argon or nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  17. Hydrogen production by photoelectrochemically splitting solutions of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Guo, Wenliang; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping

    2011-10-17

    A TiO₂/FTO (FTO=fluorine-doped tin oxide) electrode was prepared by dip-coating FTO in a suspension of TiO₂ prepared from a sol-gel method and was used as a photoanode to split an aqueous solution of formic acid to produce hydrogen. The surface of the TiO₂/FTO film was covered with assemblies of TiO₂ nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. Under irradiation by using a Xe lamp, splitting of formic acid was performed at different applied current densities. Compared to splitting water or utilizing FTO and Pt foil as the anode, the splitting voltage is much lower and can be as low as -0.27 V. The results show that the splitting voltage is related to the concentration of free formate groups. The evolution rate of hydrogen measured by using gas chromatography is 130 μmol h⁻¹ at a current density of 20 mA cm⁻² and the energy-conversion efficiency can be 1.79 %. Photoelectrolysis of formic acid has the potential to be an efficient way to produce hydrogen with a high energy-conversion efficiency. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA A COMMERCIALLY READY INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K. T. Liu

    2005-03-08

    During the 2nd half of Year I, we continued the development of the microporous ceramic layer as a transition layer for the deposition of the carbon molecular sieve membrane on the stainless steel substrate offered by Pall Corp. Based upon the positive result from the feasibility study conducted in the 1st half of Year I, our activities in this period focused on eliminating the high pore size peak and the minimization of defect. A microporous ceramic layer with 40A pore size and <1% initial flow have been successfully prepared. Further, this modified membrane has demonstrated excellent thermal stability, <1% initial flow after the 5 thermal cycles. In addition we began the CMS layer deposition on the AccuSep with the ceramic transition layer. The CMS membranes fired at the low temperature range demonstrate an excellent hydrogen permeance, up to >5 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/hr/bar, with the selectivity of {approx}20 for H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}. The extremely high permeance is indicative of the extremely thin CMS membrane layer, which becomes possible as a result of the uniform and defect free transition layer. This could be an ideal membrane for hydrogen recovery applications where the hydrogen permeance is the primary concern. Presently we are actively pursuing the intermediate temperature firing to enhance the selectivity to above this range without sacrificing too much permeance.

  19. Production of hydrogen using composite membrane in PEM water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhi priya, E.L.; Mahender, C.; Mahesh, Naga; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Electrolysis of water is the best known technology till today to produce hydrogen. The only practical way to produce hydrogen using renewable energy sources is by proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis. The most commonly used PEM membrane is Nafion. Composite membrane of TiO2 is synthesized by casting method using Nafion 5wt% solution. RuO2 is used as anode and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is used as cathode in the water electrolyser system. The performance of this Composite membrane is studied by varying voltage range 1.8 to 2.6V with respect to hydrogen yield and at current density 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5(A cm-2). This Composite membrane has been tested using in-house fabricated single cell PEM water electrolysis cell with 10cm2 active area at temperatures ranging from 30,45,65 850c and at 1 atmosphere pressure.

  20. Catalytic steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production: Brief status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineli Aulus R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen represents a promising fuel since it is considered as a cleanest energy carrier and also because during its combustion only water is emitted. It can be produced from different kinds of renewable feedstocks, such as ethanol, in this sense hydrogen could be treated as biofuel. Three chemical reactions can be used to achieve this purpose: the steam reforming (SR, the partial oxidation (POX and the autothermal reforming (ATR. In this study, the catalysts implemented in steam reforming of ethanol were reviewed. A wide variety of elements can be used as catalysts for this reaction, such as base metals (Ni, Cu and Co or noble metals (Rh, Pt and Ru usually deposited on a support material that increases surface area and improves catalytic function. The use of Rh, Ni and Pt supported or promoted with CeO2, and/or La2O3 shows excellent performance in ethanol SR catalytic process. The ratio of water to ethanol, reaction temperatures, catalysts loadings, selectivity and activity are also discussed as they are extremely important for high hydrogen yields.

  1. Analysis of near-term production and market opportunities for hydrogen and related activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, R.; Leach, S. [National Hydrogen Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper summarizes current and planned activities in the areas of hydrogen production and use, near-term venture opportunities, and codes and standards. The rationale for these efforts is to assess industry interest and engage in activities that move hydrogen technologies down the path to commercialization. Some of the work presented in this document is a condensed, preliminary version of reports being prepared under the DOE/NREL contract. In addition, the NHA work funded by Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation (WSRC) to explore the opportunities and industry interest in a Hydrogen Research Center is briefly described. Finally, the planned support of and industry input to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel (HTAP) on hydrogen demonstration projects is discussed.

  2. Influence of qualitative composition of raw materials on the production of hydrogen by microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. Б. Голуб

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the influence of the quality of the agricultural waste materials to the process of producing hydrogen group of microorganisms. Researches were conducted by microbiological and chromatographic methods of analysis. The process of producing hydrogen passes using agricultural waste in anaerobic mesophilic regime for the use of groups of microorganisms. On all types of waste found production of hydrogen. The pretreatment of raw material increases access of microorganisms to nutrients, destruction of lignino-cellulosic frame and decontamination of methanegenic bacterias. The aging of culture leads to transition the butyric type of fermentation to acetone-butyric type, which causes decreasing the yield of hydrogen. The maximum yield of hydrogen was 128 g H2 per kg of cellulose. It was obtained by using barley straw as raw material, which contains great amount of hemicelluloses.

  3. An economic analysis of hydrogen production from wind electricity for transport purposes; Une analyse economique de la production d'hydrogene a partir d'electricite eolienne pour des usages transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menanteau, P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., LEPII, CNRS, 38 (France); Quemere, M.M. [Electricite de France (EDF-RD), Recherche et Developpement, 78 - Chatou (France); Le Duigou, A. [CEA Saclay, Coordinateur du projet HyFrance3, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Bastard, S. [Electricite de France (EDF), stagiaire, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2010-09-15

    Wind electricity is often considered as a particularly promising option for hydrogen production from renewable energies, but the economics of such production remain generally rather unclear. The purpose of this paper is to explain such conditions by examining the parameters necessary for the production of hydrogen. The analysis undertaken here for transportation uses shows great variability in hydrogen production costs depending on considered demand applications, with a clear advantage for those systems that severely limit the use of storage facilities. (authors)

  4. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 in a flat plate solar bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eroglu, Inci; Tabanoglu, Altan; Eroglu, Ela [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Guenduez, Ufuk; Yuecel, Meral [Department of Biology, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-01-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U.001 can produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions and illumination. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of an 8 l flat plate solar bioreactor operating in outdoor conditions. Different organic acids were used as carbon sources (malate, lactate and acetate) and olive mill waste water was used as a sole substrate source. The consumption and the production of the organic acids were determined by HPLC. The accumulation of by-products, such as poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and carotenoid, throughout the course of hydrogen production was determined. The hydrogen production rate was highest (0.01 l/l/h) when malate was the carbon source. Formate was observed as the fermentation end product. Acetate resulted in low hydrogen gas production and high PHB accumulation. When acetate was used as the carbon source, butyrate was produced as a result of fermentation. Promising amounts of PHB and caretenoid were accumulated during hydrogen production from diluted olive mill wastewater. (author)

  5. Modeling of fermentative hydrogen production from sweet sorghum extract based on modified ADM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonopoulou, Georgia; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    of fermentative hydrogen production from the extractable sugars of sweet sorghum biomass. Kinetic parameters for sugars’ consumption and yield coefficients of acetic, propionic and butyric acid production were estimated using the experimental data obtained from the steady states of a CSTR. Batch experiments were...... used for kinetic parameter validation. Since the ADM1 does not account for metabolic products such as lactic acid and ethanol that are crucial during the fermentative hydrogen production process, the structure of the model was modified to include lactate and ethanol among the metabolites and to improve......The Anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1) framework can be used to predict fermentative hydrogen production, since the latter is directly related to the acidogenic stage of the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, the ADM1 model framework was used to simulate and predict the process...

  6. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single......:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes...

  7. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-07-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation, at relatively high rates of 2.0 ± 0.4 m3/m3 d (Eap = 0.9 V). Under the same conditions, hydrogen was produced from glucose at a yield of 7.2 mol-H2/mol and a rate of 1.9 ± 0.3 m3/m3 d. Glycerol was completely removed within 6 h, with 56% of the electrons in intermediates (primarily 1,3-propanediol), with the balance converted to current, intracellular storage products or biomass. Glucose was removed within 5 h, but intermediates (mainly propionate) accounted for only 19% of the electrons. Hydrogen was also produced using the glycerol byproduct of biodiesel fuel production at a rate of 0.41 ± 0.1 m3/m3 d. These results demonstrate that electrohydrogenesis is an effective method for producing hydrogen from either pure glycerol or glycerol byproducts of biodiesel fuel production. © 2009 International Association for Hydrogen Energy.

  8. Design and optimization of hydrogen production from hydrothermally pretreated sugarcane bagasse using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Lais Américo; Braga, Juliana Kawanishi; Motteran, Fabrício; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Silva, Edson Luiz; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen production from hydrothermally pretreated (200 °C for 10 min at 16 bar) sugarcane bagasse was analyzed using response surface methodology. The yeast extract concentration and the temperature had a significant influence for hydrogen production (p-value 0.027 and 0.009, respectively). Maximum hydrogen production (17.7 mmol/L) was observed with 3 g/L yeast extract at 60 °C (C10). In this conditions were produced acetic acid (50.44 mg/L), butyric acid (209.71 mg/L), ethanol (38.4 mg/L), and methane (6.27 mmol/L). Lower hydrogen productions (3.5 mmol/L and 3.9 mmol/L) were observed under the conditions C7 (2 g/L of yeast extract, 35.8 °C) and C9 (1 g/L of yeast extract, 40 °C), respectively. The low yeast extract concentration and low temperature caused a negative effect on the hydrogen production. By means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis 20% of similarity was observed between the archaeal population of mesophilic (35 and 40 °C) and thermophilic (50, 60 and 64 °C) reactors. Likewise, similarity of 22% was noted between the bacterial population for the reactors with the lowest hydrogen production (3.5 mmol/L), at 35.8 °C and with the highest hydrogen production (17.7 mmol/L) at 60 °C demonstrating that microbial population modification was a function of incubation temperature variation.

  9. HTGR Gas Turbine Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    Information on the HTGR-GT program is presented concerning systems design methods; systems dynamics methods; alternate design; miscellaneous controls and auxiliary systems; structural mechanics; shielding analysis; licensing; safety; availability; reactor turbine system integration with plant; PCRV liners, penetrations, and closures; PCRV structures; thermal barrier; reactor internals; turbomachinery; turbomachine remote maintenance; control valve; heat exchangers; plant protection system; and plant control system.

  10. Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shwetha Ramkumar; Mahesh Iyer; Danny Wong; Himanshu Gupta; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Lhih Fan

    2008-09-30

    High purity hydrogen is commercially produced from syngas by the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) in high and low temperature shift reactors using iron oxide and copper catalysts respectively. However, the WGSR is thermodynamically limited at high temperatures towards hydrogen production necessitating excess steam addition and catalytic operation. In the calcium looping process, the equilibrium limited WGSR is driven forward by the incessant removal of CO{sub 2} by-product through the carbonation of calcium oxide. At high pressures, this process obviates the need for a catalyst and excess steam requirement, thereby removing the costs related to the procurement and deactivation of the catalyst and steam generation. Thermodynamic analysis for the combined WGS and carbonation reaction was conducted. The combined WGS and carbonation reaction was investigated at varying pressures, temperatures and S/C ratios using a bench scale reactor system. It was found that the purity of hydrogen increases with the increase in pressure and at a pressure of 300 psig, almost 100% hydrogen is produced. It was also found that at high pressures, high purity hydrogen can be produced using stoichiometric quantities of steam. On comparing the catalytic and non catalytic modes of operation in the presence of calcium oxide, it was found that there was no difference in the purity of hydrogen produced at elevated pressures. Multicyclic reaction and regeneration experiments were also conducted and it was found that the purity of hydrogen remains almost constant after a few cycles.

  11. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernández, Carlos García, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  12. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested.

  13. DESIGN OF A NOVEL CONDUCTING COMPOSITE SUPPORTED BY PLATINUM NANOPARTICLES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem BALUN KAYAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the decrease in fossil fuel resources and the continuous increase in energy demands, clean energy requirements become extremely important for future energy generation systems. Hydrogen is well known as an efficient and environmentally friendly energy carrier. Highly catalytic active and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen production are key issues for sustainable energy technologies. Here we report an aluminium electrode modified with polypyrrole (PPy-chitosan (Chi composite film decorated with Pt nanoparticles for hydrogen production from water. Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER is examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV, Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in 0.5M H2SO4. The structural properties of the modified surfaces analyses were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The stability tests also performed for aluminium electrode coted with PPy-Chi/Pt composite film.

  14. Large scale production of densified hydrogen to the triple point and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; E Fesmire, J.; Jumper, K. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent demonstration of advanced liquid hydrogen storage techniques using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage technology at NASA Kennedy Space Center led to the production of large quantities of densified liquid and slush hydrogen in a 125,000 L tank. Production of densified hydrogen was performed at three different liquid levels and LH2 temperatures were measured by twenty silicon diode temperature sensors. Overall densification performance of the system is explored, and solid mass fractions are calculated. Experimental data reveal hydrogen temperatures dropped well below the triple point during testing, and were continuing to trend downward prior to system shutdown. Sub-triple point temperatures were seen to evolve in a time dependent manner along the length of the horizontal, cylindrical vessel. The phenomenon, observed at two fill levels, is detailed herein. The implications of using IRAS for energy storage, propellant densification, and future cryofuel systems are discussed.

  15. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  16. Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim Z [Melbourne, FL

    2011-08-23

    A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

  17. Large Scale Production of Densified Hydrogen to the Triple Point and Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Fesmire, J. E.; Jumper, K. M.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent demonstration of advanced liquid hydrogen storage techniques using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage technology at NASA Kennedy Space Center led to the production of large quantities of densified liquid and slush hydrogen in a 125,000 L tank. Production of densified hydrogen was performed at three different liquid levels and LH2 temperatures were measured by twenty silicon diode temperature sensors. Overall densification performance of the system is explored, and solid mass fractions are calculated. Experimental data reveal hydrogen temperatures dropped well below the triple point during testing, and were continuing to trend downward prior to system shutdown. Sub-triple point temperatures were seen to evolve in a time dependent manner along the length of the horizontal, cylindrical vessel. The phenomenon, observed at two fill levels, is detailed herein. The implications of using IRAS for energy storage, propellant densification, and future cryofuel systems are discussed.

  18. Combined energy production and waste management in manned spacecraft utilizing on-demand hydrogen production and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitzur, Shani; Rosenband, Valery; Gany, Alon

    2016-11-01

    Energy supply and waste management are among the most significant challenges in human spacecraft. Great efforts are invested in managing solid waste, recycling grey water and urine, cleaning the atmosphere, removing CO2, generating and saving energy, and making further use of components and products. This paper describes and investigates a concept for managing waste water and urine to simultaneously produce electric and heat energies as well as fresh water. It utilizes an original technique for aluminum activation to react spontaneously with water at room temperature to produce hydrogen on-site and on-demand. This reaction has further been proven to be effective also when using waste water and urine. Applying the hydrogen produced in a fuel cell, one obtains electric energy as well as fresh (drinking) water. The method was compared to the traditional energy production technology of the Space Shuttle, which is based on storing the fuel cell reactants, hydrogen and oxygen, in cryogenic tanks. It is shown that the alternative concept presented here may provide improved safety, compactness (reduction of more than one half of the volume of the hydrogen storage system), and management of waste liquids for energy generation and drinking water production. Nevertheless, it adds mass compared to the cryogenic hydrogen technology. It is concluded that the proposed method may be used as an emergency and backup power system as well as an additional hydrogen source for extended missions in human spacecraft.

  19. Comparative thermoeconomic analysis of hydrogen production by water electrolysis and by ethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Godoy, Gustavo; Chavez-Rodriguez, Mauro; Cavaliero, Carla [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering School], Email: garg@fem.unicamp.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is the focus of this work that evaluates in comparative form through thermo economic analysis two hydrogen production processes: water electrolysis and ethanol steam reforming. Even though technical-economical barriers still exist for the development of an economy based on hydrogen, these difficulties are opportunities for the appearance of new business of goods and services, diversification of the energy mix, focus of research activities, development and support to provide sustainability to the new economy. Exergy and rational efficiency concept are used to make a comparison between both processes. (author)

  20. Production of hydrogen and separation of cycle gases for the liquefaction of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.; Brauer, O.; Heucke, C.; Lohmueller, R.; Ranke, G.

    1984-03-01

    As with the IG-Farbenindustrie coal-hydrogenation process of the forties, low-temperature processes are now again being considered in industrial-scale coal liquefaction processes. Hydrogen can be generated by gasification of heavy residues and by steam reforming of the ethane fraction. Alternatives to the separation of cycle gas into hydrogen and product gases are butane or methane scrubbing processes and low-temperature condensation at high and medium pressures. These processes additionally use a number of absorption and adsorption stages for gas purification. They have proved successful on an industrial scale and they satisfy the legal requirements of environmental protection.

  1. Chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas emissions cleaning in vinylchloride production

    OpenAIRE

    Гармаш, Роман Вікторович

    2013-01-01

    The paper gives the data on mathematical modeling of simultaneous absorption of chlorine and hydrogen chloride by alkaline solutions. The mathematical model of the process includes the system of differential equations of component-wise material balance and the system of kinetic equations. The system of material balance equations describes the change in concentrations of components along the column height. For its solving it is necessary to know the numerical values of chemisorption accelerati...

  2. Future production of hydrogen from solar energy and water - A summary and assessment of U.S. developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, J. A.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines technologies of hydrogen production. Its delivery, distribution, and end-use systems are reviewed, and a classification of solar energy and hydrogen production methods is suggested. The operation of photoelectric processes, biophotolysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrolysis, and of photovoltaic systems are reviewed, with comments on their possible hydrogen production potential. It is concluded that solar hydrogen derived from wind energy, photovoltaic technology, solar thermal electric technology, and hydropower could supply some of the hydrogen for air transport by the middle of the next century.

  3. Hydrogen production by means of bio-catalyzed electrolysis; Waterstofproductie middels biogekatalyseerde elektrolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremiasse, A; Sleutels, T. [Wageningen Universiteit, Wageningen (Netherlands); Rozendal, R. [Wetsus, Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    Until recently, the efficiency of hydrogen production from waste flows was low. However, with a new technology (biocatalyzed electrolysis) a much higher efficiency can be realized. In addition, more waste flows can now be converted into hydrogen than previously. [mk]. [Dutch] Tot voor kort was het rendement van waterstofproductie uit afvalstromen laag. Echter, met een nieuwe technologie (biogekatalyseerde elektrolyse) kan een veel hoger rendement worden behaald. Bovendien kunnen meer afvalstromen in waterstof worden omgezet dan voorheen mogelijk was.

  4. The role of ionic activators in the electrolytic production of hydrogen from alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miljanic, S.S. [Belgrade Univ., Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Kaninski, M.P.; Maksic, A.; Stojic, D.LJ. [Vinea Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-09-01

    We have investigated possibilities to reduce energy consumption in the electrolytic hydrogen production using ionic activators added into an alkaline electrolyte. Special attention was paid to use of iron as the electrode material. We have found that some activators, like tris-(ethylenediamine)Co(III) chloride complex in combination with the sodium molybdate can reduce energy needs per mass unit of hydrogen produced for more than ten percent in some cases, compared to those of non activated electrolytes. (authors)

  5. Efficient photothermal catalytic hydrogen production over nonplasmonic Pt metal supported on TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Luo, Bing; Jing, Dengwei

    2016-10-01

    Most of the traditional photocatalytic hydrogen productions were conducted under room temperature. In this work, we selected nonplasmonic Pt metal anchored on TiO2 nanoparticles with photothermal activity to explore more efficient hydrogen production technology over the whole solar spectrum. Photothermal experiments were carried out in a carefully designed top irradiated photocatalytic reactor that can withstand high temperature and relatively higher pressure. Four typical organic materials, i.e., methyl alcohol (MeOH), trielthanolamne (TEOA), formic acid (HCOOH) and glucose, were investigated. Formic acid, a typical hydrogen carrier, was found to show the best activity. In addition, the effects of different basic parameters such as sacrificial agent concentration and the temperature on the activity of hydrogen generation were systematically investigated for understanding the qualitative and quantitative effects of the photothermal catalytic reaction process. The hydrogen yields at 90 °C of the photothermal catalytic reaction with Pt/TiO2 are around 8.1 and 4.2 times higher than those of reactions carried out under photo or thermal conditions alone. We can see that the photothermal hydrogen yield is not the simple sum of the photo and thermal effects. This result indicated that the Pt/TiO2 nanoparticles can efficiently couple photo and thermal energy to more effectively drive hydrogen production. As a result, the excellent ability makes it superior to other conventional semiconductor photocatalysts and thermal catalysts. Future works could concentrate on exploring photothermal catalysis as well as the potential synergism between photo and thermal effects to find more efficient hydrogen production technology using the whole solar spectrum.

  6. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharo...... molasses. Furthermore, the mixed gas with a volumetric content of 16.5% H2, 38.7% CO2, and 44.8% CH4, containing approximately 15% energy by hydrogen is viable to be bio‐hythane....

  7. Solar hydrogen production with semiconductor metal oxides: new directions in experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdes, Alvaro; Brillet, Jeremie; Graetzel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    An overview of a collaborative experimental and theoretical effort toward efficient hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical splitting of water into di-hydrogen and di-oxygen is presented here. We present state-of-the-art experimental studies using hematite and TiO2 functionalized with gold n...... nanoparticles as photoanode materials, and theoretical studies on electro and photo-catalysis of water on a range of metal oxide semiconductor materials, including recently developed implementation of self-interaction corrected energy functionals....

  8. Hydrogen production under salt stress conditions by a freshwater Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adessi, Alessandra; Concato, Margherita; Sanchini, Andrea; Rossi, Federico; De Philippis, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen represents a possible alternative energy carrier to face the growing request for energy and the shortage of fossil fuels. Photofermentation for the production of H2 constitutes a promising way for integrating the production of energy with waste treatments. Many wastes are characterized by high salinity, and polluted seawater can as well be considered as a substrate. Moreover, the application of seawater for bacterial culturing is considered cost-effective. The aims of this study were to assess the capability of the metabolically versatile freshwater Rhodopseudomonas palustris 42OL of producing hydrogen on salt-containing substrates and to investigate its salt stress response strategy, never described before. R. palustris 42OL was able to produce hydrogen in media containing up to 3 % added salt concentration and to grow in media containing up to 4.5 % salinity without the addition of exogenous osmoprotectants. While the hydrogen production performances in absence of sea salts were higher than in their presence, there was no significant difference in performances between 1 and 2 % of added sea salts. Nitrogenase expression levels indicated that the enzyme was not directly inhibited during salt stress, but a regulation of its expression may have occurred in response to salt concentration increase. During cell growth and hydrogen production in the presence of salts, trehalose was accumulated as a compatible solute; it protected the enzymatic functionality against salt stress, thus allowing hydrogen production. The possibility of producing hydrogen on salt-containing substrates widens the range of wastes that can be efficiently used in production processes.

  9. Detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydrogen iodide decomposition in sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Zhou, Junhu; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-01-15

    A new detailed kinetic modeling was developed for homogeneous decomposition of hydrogen iodide (HI) in the sulfur-iodine cycle. Results show the HI decomposition reaction is sensitive to temperature, and the response time of reaction reduces from 1 s to 10 ms as temperature increases from 500 to 800 {sup circle} C. The decomposition is also improved as pressure increased. Kinetic calculations are also compared with the experimental data, and all trends of the experiment can be reproduced by the model. Sensitivity analysis shows that the reactions of HI with HI, H and I play a major role in the hydrogen production process and the hydrogen consumption occurs primarily by reaction of H with I{sub 2} and reaction of I with H{sub 2} to form HI. As temperature increases, different reactions play a dominant role in HI decomposition process. Based on the detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis results, the HI decomposition reaction path diagram was constructed in this paper. (author)

  10. Hydrogen production in a radio-frequency plasma source operating on water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son-Ca Viet Thi

    The global energy and climate challenges have motivated development of innovative techniques to satisfy energy demand while minimizing emissions. To this end, hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier in the transportation sector is an attractive option. In addition, there is already a great need for hydrogen gas in several industrial processes such as hydro-cracking of crude oil to produce gasoline and production of ammonia and methanol. The current dominant methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels are well-developed and have reached relatively high energy efficiencies (up to 85%), but these methods rely on non-renewable natural resources and produce carbon dioxide emissions. This work investigates the feasibility of hydrogen production by dissociating water molecules in a radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge. In addition to the widespread usage of hydrogen gas, applications of water plasma have permeated in many areas of research, and information on basic behaviors of a water plasma discharge will provide fruitful insights for other researchers. An RF plasma source equipped with a double-helix antenna (m = 1 mode) and an applied axial magnetic field is designed to operate on water vapor. It is shown that water molecules are being dissociated in the discharge. Experimental results show that the rate of hydrogen production increases linearly with RF power in the absence of the applied axial magnetic field. With the magnetic field, the rate of hydrogen production increases from 250 to 500 W, and begins to saturate with RF power. Despite this saturation, it is shown that hydrogen increases with magnetic field strength at a fixed RF power. Further, the rate of hydrogen production increases with water input flow rate up to 100 sccm for a fixed RF power level, and begins to decrease at 125 sccm. This dissertation characterizes the rate of hydrogen production and plasma properties as a function of RF power, applied B-field strength, and water input flow rate. A

  11. A novel tubular microbial electrolysis cell for high rate hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-07-01

    Practical application of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for hydrogen production requires scalable reactors with low internal resistance, high current density, and high hydrogen recovery. This work reports a liter scale tubular MEC approaching these requirements. The tubular cell components (a platinum-coated titanium mesh cathode, an anion exchange membrane, and a pleated stainless steel felt anode) were arranged in a concentric configuration. The reactor had a low internal resistance (0.325 Ω, 19.5 mΩ m2) due to the high conductivity of the electrodes, a compact reactor configuration, and proper mixing. With acetate as electron donor, the MEC achieved a volumetric current density of 654 ± 22 mA L-1 (projected current density, 1.09 ± 0.04 mA cm-2) and a volumetric hydrogen production rate of 7.10 ± 0.01 L L-1 d-1 at an applied voltage of 1 V. The reactor also showed high hydrogen recovery (∼100%), high hydrogen purity (>98%), and excellent operational stability during the 3 weeks of operation. These results demonstrated that high hydrogen production rate could be achieved on larger scale MEC and this tubular MEC holds great potential for scaling up.

  12. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  13. Hydrogen production from carrot pulp by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrije, Truus de; Budde, Miriam A.W.; Lips, Steef J.; Bakker, Robert R.; Mars, Astrid E.; Claassen, Pieternel A.M. [Wageningen UR, Food and Biobased Research, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogen was produced from carrot pulp hydrolysate, untreated carrot pulp and (mixtures of) glucose and fructose by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana in pH-controlled bioreactors. Carrot pulp hydrolysate was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction in carrot pulp. The main sugars in the hydrolysate were glucose, fructose, and sucrose. In fermentations with glucose hydrogen yields and productivities were similar for both strains. With fructose the hydrogen yield of C. saccharolyticus was reduced which might be related to uptake of glucose and fructose by different types of transport systems. With T. neapolitana the fructose consumption rate and consequently the hydrogen productivity were low. The hydrogen yields of both thermophiles were 2.7-2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose with 10 g/L sugars from carrot pulp hydrolysate. With 20 g/L sugars the yield of T. neapolitana was 2.4 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose while the yield of C. saccharolyticus was reduced to 1.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol hexose due to high lactate production in the stationary growth phase. C. saccharolyticus was able to grow on carrot pulp and utilized soluble sugars and, after adaptation, pectin and some (hemi)cellulose. No growth was observed with T. neapolitana when using carrot pulp in agitated fermentations. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction prior to fermentation increased the hydrogen yield with almost 10% to 2.3 g/kg of hydrolyzed carrot pulp. (author)

  14. An experimental study of the growth and hydrogen production of C. reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamburic, B.; Burgess, S.; Nixon, P.J.; Hellgardt, K. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Some unicellular green algae, such as C. reinhardtii, have the ability to photosynthetically produce molecular hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. They offer a biological route to renewable, carbon-neutral hydrogen production from two of nature's most plentiful resources - sunlight and water. This process provides the additional benefit of carbon dioxide sequestration and the option of deriving valuable products from algal biomass. The growth of dense and healthy algal biomass is a prerequisite for efficient hydrogen production. This study investigates the growth of C. reinhardtii under different cyclic light regimes and at various continuous light intensities. Algal growth is characterised in terms of the cell count, chlorophyll content and optical density of the culture. The consumption of critical nutrients such as acetate and sulphate is measured by chromatography techniques. C. reinhardtii wild-type CC-124 strain is analysed in a 3 litre tubular flow photobioreactor featuring a large surface-to-volume ratio and excellent light penetration through the culture. Key parameters of the hydrogen production process are continuously monitored and controlled; these include pH, pO{sub 2}, optical density, temperature, agitation and light intensity. Gas phase hydrogen production is determined by mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  15. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A J; Ren, S; Ye, X; Kim, P; Labbe, N; Borole, A P

    2015-11-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using an integrated pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L anode-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50±3.2% to 76±0.5% while anode Coulombic efficiency ranged from 54±6.5% to 96±0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characteristics of fermentative hydrogen production with Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15 isolated from anaerobic sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Kun; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Wen-Song; Zhu, Ming-Long [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15 (EU360791), which was isolated from anaerobic sewage sludge, was investigated in this paper for its characteristics of fermentative hydrogen production. It was found that the anaerobic condition favored hydrogen production than that of the micro-aerobic condition. Culture temperature and pH of 37 C and 6.0 were the most favorable for the hydrogen production. The strain could grow in several kinds of monosaccharide and disaccharide, as well as the complicated corn stalk hydrolysate, with the best results exhibited in glucose. The maximum hydrogen production rate and yield of 482 ml/l/h and 2.07 mol/mol glucose were obtained at initial glucose concentration of 30 g/L and 5 g/L, respectively. Fermentation results in the diluent corn stalk hydrolysate showed that cell growth was not inhibited. However, the hydrogen production of 0.65 V/V was relatively lower than that of the glucose (1.11 V/V), which was mainly due to the interaction between xylose and glucose. (author)

  17. Upgrading of straw hydrolysate for production of hydrogen and phenols in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Anders; Marzorati, Massimo; Boon, Nico; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Verstraete, Willy

    2011-02-01

    In a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw was used for hydrogen production during selective recovery of phenols. The average H₂ production rate was 0.61 m³ H₂/m³ MEC·day and equivalent to a rate of 0.40 kg COD/m³ MEC·day. The microbial community in the anode biofilm was adapted by establishment of xylose-degrading bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum (16%) and Geobacter sulfurreducens (49%). During the process, 61% of the chemical oxygen demand was removed as hydrogen at 64% yield. The total energy production yield was 78% considering the energy content in the consumed compounds and the cell voltage of 0.7 V. The highest hydrogen production was equivalent to 0.8 kg COD/m³ MEC·day and was obtained at pH 7-8 and 25°C. Accumulation of 53% w/v phenolic compounds in the liquor was obtained by stepwise addition of the hydrolysate during simultaneous production of hydrogen from consumption of 95% for the hemicellulose and 100% of the fatty acids. Final calculations showed that hydrolysate produced from 1 kg wheat straw was upgraded by means of the MEC to 22 g hydrogen (266 L), 8 g xylan, and 9 g polyphenolics for potential utilization in biobased materials.

  18. Is the hydrogen production from biomass technology really sustainable? Answer by Life Cycle Emergy Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Hanwei; Ren, Jingzheng; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    .8303 and the emergy index of sustainability (ESI) which is a measure of the sustainability of a product, a process or a service is 0.1996. Therefore, it is not sustainable in the long term perspective for hydrogen production from corn stalks by supercritical water gasification in the current situation of Huaibei city...... and utilization efficiency of corn stalks....

  19. Efficiancy of hydrogen peroxide for cleaning production areas and equipments in the radiopharmaceutical production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Tatyana S.; Batista, Vanessa; Gomes, Antonio; Matsuda, Margareth; Fukumori, Neuza; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: tsbaptista@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A great challenge in the radiopharmaceuticals production is to fulfill the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), involving the validation of process and of all supporting activities such as cleaning and sanitization. The increasingly strict requirements for quality assurance system, with several norms and normative resolutions has led to a constant concern with programs and cleaning validation in pharmaceutical production. The main goal of GMP is to reduce risks inherent to pharmaceutical production, that is to reduce product contamination with microorganisms and cross-contamination. The basic requirements to prevent contamination is the development and implementation of efficient cleaning programs. In the case of clean rooms for the production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals, the requirement for cleaning programs is evidently higher due to the characteristics of these areas with hot cells for radioactive materials, where sterile radiopharmaceuticals are manipulated and distributed before administration to patients just after minutes or hours of its preparation. In the Radiopharmacy Department at IPEN it was established a cleaning program for clean rooms and hot cells using a hydrogen peroxide solution (20% proxitane alfa). The objective of this work was to assess effectiveness of this cleaning agent in reducing and/or eliminating microbial load in the clean rooms and equipment to acceptable levels in accordance with the current legislation. The analysis was conducted using results of the environmental monitoring program with and settling contact plates in clean rooms after the cleaning procedures. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate the action of the sanitizing agent on the microbial population on the surface of equipment and clean rooms. It was also evaluated the best way to accomplish the cleaning program considering the dosimetric factor in each production process, as the main concern of pharmaceutical companies is the microbiological contamination, in

  20. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  1. An numerical analysis of high-temperature helium reactor power plant for co-production of hydrogen and electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, M.; Podsadna, J.; Jaszczur, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the feasibility of using a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor (HTR) for electricity generation and hydrogen production are analysed. The HTR is combined with a steam and a gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for medium temperature hydrogen production. Industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high temperature electrolysis. Presented cycle shows a very promising route for continuous, efficient, large-scale and environmentally benign hydrogen production without CO2 emissions. The results show that the integration of a high temperature helium reactor, with a combined cycle for electric power generation and hydrogen production, may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  2. Hydrogen and methane production from condensed molasses fermentation soluble by a two-stage anaerobic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiu-Yue; Liang, You-Chyuan; Lay, Chyi-How [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Science; Chen, Chin-Chao [Chungchou Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China). Environmental Resources Lab.; Chang, Feng-Yuan [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Research Center for Energy and Resources

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of condensed molasses fermentation soluble (CMS) is a troublesome problem for glutamate manufacturing factory. However, CMS contains high carbohydrate and nutrient contents and is an attractive and commercially potential feedstock for bioenergy production. The aim of this paper is to produce hydrogen and methane by two-stage anaerobic fermentation process. The fermentative hydrogen production from CMS was conducted in a continuously-stirred tank bioreactor (working volume 4 L) which was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, organic loading rate (OLR) of 120 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 5.5 and sewage sludge as seed. The anaerobic methane production was conducted in an up-flow bioreactor (working volume 11 L) which was operated at a HRT of 24 -60 hrs, OLR of 4.0-10 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 7.0 with using anaerobic granule sludge from fructose manufacturing factory as the seed and the effluent from hydrogen production process as the substrate. These two reactors have been operated successfully for more than 400 days. The steady-state hydrogen content, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen production yield in the hydrogen fermentation system were 37%, 169 mmol-H{sub 2}/L-d and 93 mmol-H{sub 2}/g carbohydrate{sub removed}, respectively. In the methane fermentation system, the peak methane content and methane production rate were 66.5 and 86.8 mmol-CH{sub 4}/L-d with methane production yield of 189.3 mmol-CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub removed} at an OLR 10 kg/m{sup 3}-d. The energy production rate was used to elucidate the energy efficiency for this two-stage process. The total energy production rate of 133.3 kJ/L/d was obtained with 5.5 kJ/L/d from hydrogen fermentation and 127.8 kJ/L/d from methane fermentation. (orig.)

  3. Experimental characterization of a grid-connected hydrogen energy buffer: Hydrogen production

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Díaz, Carlos; González,Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage becomes a necessity when a high penetration of renewable energy sources is desirable. Variability in the energy production from these types of energy sources can make the utility grid unstable, if the percentage of production is important. In order to minimize this problem, the HiDRENER project was designed to study the effect of combining different renewable energy sources with energy storage on grid stability. The system has a wind generator, a gasifying biomass power plant w...

  4. Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

  5. Enhanced hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol by fermentation using mixed cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion of glycerol into high value products, such as hydrogen gas and 1,3-propanediol (PD), was examined using anaerobic fermentation with heat-treated mixed cultures. Glycerol fermentation produced 0.28 mol-H 2/mol-glycerol (72 mL-H2/g-COD) and 0.69 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. Glucose fermentation using the same mixed cultures produced more hydrogen gas (1.06 mol-H2/mol-glucose) but no PD. Changing the source of inoculum affected gas production likely due to prior acclimation of bacteria to this type of substrate. Fermentation of the glycerol produced from biodiesel fuel production (70% glycerol content) produced 0.31 mol-H 2/mol-glycerol (43 mL H2/g-COD) and 0.59 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. These are the highest yields yet reported for both hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from pure glycerol and the glycerol byproduct from biodiesel fuel production by fermentation using mixed cultures. These results demonstrate that production of biodiesel can be combined with production of hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol for maximum utilization of resources and minimization of waste. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pure hydrogen production via autothermal reforming of ethanol in a fluidized bed membrane reactor: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the production of ultra-pure hydrogen via autothermal reforming of ethanol in a fluidized bed membrane reactor has been studied. The heat needed for the steam reforming of ethanol is obtained by burning part of the hydrogen recovered via the hydrogen perm-selective membrane thereby

  7. Continuous biohydrogen production using cheese whey: Improving the hydrogen production rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Cota-Navarro, Ciria Berenice; Razo-Flores, Elias [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico); Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; de Leon-Rodriguez, Antonio [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico)

    2009-05-15

    Due to the renewed interest in finding sustainable fuels or energy carriers, biohydrogen (Bio-H{sub 2}) from biomass is a promising alternative. Fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated during 65.6 d with cheese whey (CW) as substrate. Three hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were tested (10, 6 and 4 h) and the highest volumetric hydrogen production rate (VHPR) was attained with HRT of 6 h. Therefore, four organic loading rates (OLRs) at a fixed HRT of 6 h were tested thereafter, being: 92.4, 115.5, 138.6 and 184.4 g lactose/L/d. The highest VHPR (46.61 mmol H{sub 2}/L/h) and hydrogen molar yield (HMY) of 2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol lactose were found at an OLR of 138.6 g lactose/L/d; a sharp fall in VHPR occurred at an OLR of 184.4 g lactose/L/d. Butyric, propionic and acetic acids were the main soluble metabolites found, with butyric-to-acetic ratios ranging from 1.0 to 2.4. Bacterial community was identified by partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The results showed that at HRT of 10 h and 6 h were dominated by the Clostridium genus. The VHPR attained in this study is the highest reported value for a CSTR system using CW as substrate with anaerobic sludge as inoculum and represents a 33-fold increase compared to a previous study. Thus, it was demonstrated that continuous fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production from CW can be significantly enhanced by an appropriate selection of parameters such as HRT and OLR. Enhancements in VHPR are significant because it is a critical parameter to determine the full-scale practical application of fermentation technologies that will be used for sustainable and clean energy generation. (author)

  8. A new perspective on hydrogen production by photosynthetic water-splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.W.; Greenbaum, E.

    1996-05-01

    Present energy systems are heavily dependent on fossil fuels. This will eventually lead to the foreseeable depletion of fossil energy resources and, according to some reports, global climate changes due to the emission of carbon dioxide. In principle, hydrogen production by biophotolysis of water can be an ideal solar energy conversion system for sustainable development of human activities in harmony with the global environment. In photosynthetic hydrogen production research, there are currently two main efforts: (1) Direct photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen by photosynthetic water splitting using the ferredoxin/hydrogenase pathway; (2) Dark hydrogen production by fermentation of organic reserves such as starch that are generated by photosynthesis during the light period. In this chapter, the advantages and challenges of the two approaches for hydrogen production will be discussed, in relation to a new opportunity brought by our recent discovery of a new photosynthetic water-splitting reaction which, potentially, has twice the energy efficiency of conventional watersplitting via the two light reaction Z-scheme of photosynthesis.

  9. Uncertainty propagation in modeling of plasma-assisted hydrogen production from biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaherisarabi, Shadi; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2016-10-01

    With the growing concern of global warming and the resulting emphasis on decreasing greenhouse gas emissions, there is an ever-increasing need to utilize energy-production strategies that can decrease the burning of fossil fuels. In this context, hydrogen remains an attractive clean-energy fuel that can be oxidized to produce water as a by-product. In spite of being an abundant species, hydrogen is seldom found in a form that is directly usable for energy-production. While steam reforming of methane is one popular technique for hydrogen production, plasma-assisted conversion of biogas (carbon dioxide + methane) to hydrogen is an attractive alternative. Apart from producing hydrogen, the other advantage of using biogas as raw material is the fact that two potent greenhouse gases are consumed. In this regard, modeling is an important tool to understand and optimize plasma-assisted conversion of biogas. The primary goal of this work is to perform a comprehensive statistical study that quantifies the influence of uncertain rate constants thereby determining the key reaction pathways. A 0-D chemical kinetics solver in the OpenFOAM suite is used to perform a series of simulations to propagate the uncertainty in rate constants and the resulting mean and standard deviation of outcomes.

  10. Nitrogen sources impact hydrogen production by Escherichia coli using cheese whey as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Cuevas, Zazil D; Acevedo, Leandro G Ordoñez; Salas, José Tomás Ornelas; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2013-09-25

    The impact of nitrogen source on hydrogen production by Escherichia coli WDHL (ΔhycAΔlacI) strain using cheese whey as a substrate was evaluated. To improve the assimilation of complex proteins such as lactalbumin, we assessed treatment with a protease. Also, five external nitrogen sources were tested: NH4Cl, (NH4)2SO4, urea, yeast extract, and tryptone. The treatments in 120 mL serological bottles with pancreatin 1,000 mg/L produced 1.75-fold more hydrogen than the cultures without pancreatin. In the bottle cultures supplemented with yeast extract or tryptone 5 g/L, hydrogen production increased up to 3.2- and 3.5-fold, respectively, whereas inorganic salts and urea had no statistical difference with respect to the control cultures. In 1-L bioreactors, the use of tryptone improved 2.1-fold hydrogen production. Tryptone or yeast extract enable the total consumption of lactose in 40 h, whereas in the control assay the lactose was not completely consumed. Our results demonstrate that it is necessary to select an adequate nitrogen source, which allows both carbon source consumption and high hydrogen production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving the hydrogen production capacity of Rhodobacter capsulatus by genetically modifying redox balancing pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, Yavuz [TUEBITAK Research Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey); Goekce, Abdulmecit [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics; Guergan, Muazzez; Yuecel, Meral [Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Biology

    2010-07-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, balancing the oxidation-reduction potential (redox-balance) is maintained via a number of inter-dependent regulatory mechanisms that enable these organisms to accommodate divergent growth modes. In order to maintain redox homeostasis, this bacterium possesses regulatory mechanisms functioning as electron sinks affecting the oxidation-reduction state of the ubiquinone pool. Under the photoheterotrophic growth conditions with reduced carbon sources, the excess reducing equivalents are primarily consumed via the reduction of CO{sub 2} through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway or by the reduction of protons into hydrogen with the use of dinitrogenase enzyme system. In this study, our aim was to develop strategies to funnel the excess reducing equivalents to nitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production by blocking the carbon-fixation pathway. To realize this purpose, CO{sub 2} fixation was blocked by inactivating the Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) of CBB pathway in wild type (MT1131), uptake-hydrogenase (YO3) and cyt cbb{sub 3} oxidase deficient (YO4) strains. The hydrogen production capacity of newly generated strains deficient in the Calvin-Benson-Bassham pathway were analyzed and compared with wild type strains. The results indicated that, the hydrogen production efficiency and capacity of R. capsulatus was further improved by directing the excess reducing equivalents to dinitrogenase-dependent hydrogen production. (orig.)

  12. Redox Control and Hydrogen Production in Sediment Caps Using Carbon Cloth Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Ruiling; Reible, Danny D.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment caps that degrade contaminants can improve their ability to contain contaminants relative to sand and sorbent-amended caps, but few methods to enhance contaminant degradation in sediment caps are available. The objective of this study was to determine if, carbon electrodes emplaced within a sediment cap at poised potential could create a redox gradient and provide electron donor for the potential degradation of contaminants. In a simulated sediment cap overlying sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC), electrochemically induced redox gradients were developed within 3 days and maintained over the period of the test (~100 days). Hydrogen and oxygen were produced by water electrolysis at the electrode surfaces and may serve as electron donor and acceptor for contaminant degradation. Electrochemical and geochemical factors that may influence hydrogen production were studied. Hydrogen production displayed zero order kinetics with ~75% coulombic efficiency and rates were proportional to the applied potential between 2.5V to 5V and not greatly affected by pH. Hydrogen production was promoted by increasing ionic strength and in the presence of natural organic matter. Graphite electrode-stimulated degradation of tetrachlorobenzene in a batch reactor was dependent on applied voltage and production of hydrogen to a concentration above the threshold for biological dechlorination. These findings suggest that electrochemical reactive capping can potentially be used to create “reactive” sediments caps capable of promoting chemical or biological transformations of contaminants within the cap. PMID:20879761

  13. Hydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells with different complex substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montpart, Nuria; Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The use of synthetic wastewater containing carbon sources of different complexity (glycerol, milk and starch) was evaluated in single chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for hydrogen production. The growth of an anodic syntrophic consortium between fermentative and anode respiring bacteria was operationally enhanced and increased the opportunities of these complex substrates to be treated with this technology. During inoculation, current intensities achieved in single chamber microbial fuel cells were 50, 62.5, and 9 A m⁻³ for glycerol, milk and starch respectively. Both current intensities and coulombic efficiencies were higher than other values reported in previous works. The simultaneous degradation of the three complex substrates favored power production and COD removal. After three months in MEC operation, hydrogen production was only sustained with milk as a single substrate and with the simultaneous degradation of the three substrates. The later had the best results in terms of current intensity (150 A m⁻³), hydrogen production (0.94 m³ m⁻³ d⁻¹) and cathodic gas recovery (91%) at an applied voltage of 0.8 V. Glycerol and starch as substrates in MEC could not avoid the complete proliferation of hydrogen scavengers, even under low hydrogen retention time conditions induced by continuous nitrogen sparging.

  14. Multi-Scale Ordered Cell Structure for Cost Effective Production of Hydrogen by HTWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, Elango [Ceramatec, Inc., West Valley City, UT (United States); Rao, Ranjeet [PARC, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Colella, Whitney [Gaia Energy Research Inst. LLC, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2017-12-20

    Production of hydrogen using an electrochemical device provides for large scale, high efficiency conversion and storage of electrical energy. When renewable electricity is used for conversion of steam to hydrogen, a low-cost and low emissions pathway to hydrogen production emerges. This project was intended to demonstrate a high efficiency High Temperature Water Splitting (HTWS) stack for the electrochemical production of low cost H2. The innovations investigated address the limitations of the state of the art through the use of a novel architecture that introduces macro-features to provide mechanical support of a thin electrolyte, and micro-features of the electrodes to lower polarization losses. The approach also utilizes a combination of unique sets of fabrication options that are scalable to achieve manufacturing cost objectives. The development of HTWS process and device is guided by techno-economic and life cycle analyses.

  15. Engineering Synechocystis PCC6803 for hydrogen production: influence on the tolerance to oxidative and sugar stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ortega-Ramos

    Full Text Available In the prospect of engineering cyanobacteria for the biological photoproduction of hydrogen, we have studied the hydrogen production machine in the model unicellular strain Synechocystis PCC6803 through gene deletion, and overexpression (constitutive or controlled by the growth temperature. We demonstrate that the hydrogenase-encoding hoxEFUYH operon is dispensable to standard photoautotrophic growth in absence of stress, and it operates in cell defense against oxidative (H₂O₂ and sugar (glucose and glycerol stresses. Furthermore, we showed that the simultaneous over-production of the proteins HoxEFUYH and HypABCDE (assembly of hydrogenase, combined to an increase in nickel availability, led to an approximately 20-fold increase in the level of active hydrogenase. These novel results and mutants have major implications for those interested in hydrogenase, hydrogen production and redox metabolism, and their connections with environmental conditions.

  16. PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM THE STEAM AND OXIDATIVE REFORMING OF LPG: THERMODYNAMIC AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this paper was to use a thermodynamic analysis to find operational conditions that favor the production of hydrogen from steam and oxidative reforming of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG. We also analyzed the performance of a catalyst precursor, LaNiO3, in order to compare the performance of the obtained catalyst with the thermodynamic equilibrium predictions. The results showed that it is possible to produce high concentrations of hydrogen from LPG reforming. The gradual increase of temperature and the use of high water concentrations decrease the production of coke and increase the formation of H2. The reaction of oxidative reforming of LPG was more suitable for the production of hydrogen and lower coke formation. Furthermore the use of an excess of water (H2O/LPG =7.0 and intermediate temperatures (973 K are the most suitable conditions for the process.

  17. An unexpected negative influence of light intensity on hydrogen production by dark fermentative bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrodnik, R; Laniecki, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of light intensity on biohydrogen production from glucose by Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium acetobutylicum, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied to evaluate the performance and possible application in co-culture fermentation system. The applied source of light had spectrum similar to the solar radiation. The influence of light intensity on hydrogen production in dark process by C. acetobutylicum was negligible. In contrast, dark fermentation by C. beijerinckii bacteria showed a significant decrease (83%) in produced hydrogen at light intensity of 540W/m(2). Here, the redirection of metabolism from acetic and butyric acid formation towards lactic acid was observed. This not yet reported effect was probably caused by irradiation of these bacteria by light within UVA range, which is an important component of the solar radiation. The excessive illumination with light of intensity higher than 200W/m(2) resulted in decrease in hydrogen production with photofermentative bacteria as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhicheng Wang

    2007-03-15

    The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

  19. Evaluation of Fermentative Hydrogen Production from Single and Mixed Fruit Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Akinbomi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic viability of employing dark fermentative hydrogen from whole fruit wastes as a green alternative to fossil fuels is limited by low hydrogen yield due to the inhibitory effect of some metabolites in the fermentation medium. In exploring means of increasing hydrogen production from fruit wastes, including orange, apple, banana, grape and melon, the present study assessed the hydrogen production potential of singly-fermented fruits as compared to the fermentation of mixed fruits. The fruit feedstock was subjected to varying hydraulic retention times (HRTs in a continuous fermentation process at 55 °C for 47 days. The weight distributions of the first, second and third fruit mixtures were 70%, 50% and 20% orange share, respectively, while the residual weight was shared equally by the other fruits. The results indicated that there was an improvement in cumulative hydrogen yield from all of the feedstock when the HRT was five days. Based on the results obtained, apple as a single fruit and a fruit mixture with 20% orange share have the most improved cumulative hydrogen yields of 504 (29.5% of theoretical yield and 513 mL/g volatile solid (VS (30% of theoretical yield , respectively, when compared to other fruits.

  20. Hydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells with stainless steel fiber felt cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Wei, Liling; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising technology for sustainable production of hydrogen from biodegradable carbon sources. Employing a low-cost and high efficient cathode to replace platinum catalyzed cathode (Pt/C) for hydrogen generation is a challenge for commercialization of MEC. Here we show that a 3D macroporous stainless steel fiber felt (SSFF) with high electrochemical active surface area has an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen generation, which is comparable to Pt/C cathode and superior to stainless steel mesh (SSM) cathode in the single-chamber MEC. The SSFF cathode (mean filter rating 100 μm) produces hydrogen at a rate of 3.66 ± 0.43 m3 H2 m-3d-1 (current density of 17.29 ± 1.68 A m-2), with a hydrogen recovery of 76.37 ± 15.04% and overall energy efficiency of 79.61 ± 13.07% at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. The performance of SSFF cathode improves over time due to a decrease in overpotential which caused by corrosion. These results demonstrate that SSFF can be a promising alternative for Pt catalytic cathode in MEC for hydrogen production.