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Sample records for hox cis-regulatory elements

  1. Redundancy and the evolution of cis-regulatory element multiplicity.

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    Tiago Paixão

    Full Text Available The promoter regions of many genes contain multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor (TF. One possibility is that this multiplicity evolved through transitional forms showing redundant cis-regulation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we must disentangle the relative contributions of different evolutionary mechanisms to the evolution of binding site multiplicity. Here, we attempt to do this using a model of binding site evolution. Our model considers binding sequences and their interactions with TFs explicitly, and allows us to cast the evolution of gene networks into a neutral network framework. We then test some of the model's predictions using data from yeast. Analysis of the model suggested three candidate nonadaptive processes favoring the evolution of cis-regulatory element redundancy and multiplicity: neutral evolution in long promoters, recombination and TF promiscuity. We find that recombination rate is positively associated with binding site multiplicity in yeast. Our model also indicated that weak direct selection for multiplicity (partial redundancy can play a major role in organisms with large populations. Our data suggest that selection for changes in gene expression level may have contributed to the evolution of multiple binding sites in yeast. We conclude that the evolution of cis-regulatory element redundancy and multiplicity is impacted by many aspects of the biology of an organism: both adaptive and nonadaptive processes, both changes in cis to binding sites and in trans to the TFs that interact with them, both the functional setting of the promoter and the population genetic context of the individuals carrying them.

  2. Changes in Cis-regulatory Elements during Morphological Evolution

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    Yu-Lee Paul

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available How have animals evolved new body designs (morphological evolution? This requires explanations both for simple morphological changes, such as differences in pigmentation and hair patterns between different Drosophila populations and species, and also for more complex changes, such as differences in the forelimbs of mice and bats, and the necks of amphibians and reptiles. The genetic changes and pathways involved in these evolutionary steps require identification. Many, though not all, of these events occur by changes in cis-regulatory (enhancer elements within developmental genes. Enhancers are modular, each affecting expression in only one or a few tissues. Therefore it is possible to add, remove or alter an enhancer without producing changes in multiple tissues, and thereby avoid widespread (pleiotropic deleterious effects. Ideally, for a given step in morphological evolution it is necessary to identify (i the change in phenotype, (ii the changes in gene expression, (iii the DNA region, enhancer or otherwise, affected, (iv the mutation involved, (v the nature of the transcription or other factors that bind to this site. In practice these data are incomplete for most of the published studies upon morphological evolution. Here, the investigations are categorized according to how far these analyses have proceeded.

  3. Cis-regulatory elements in the primate brain: from functional specialization to neurodegeneration

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    Vermunt, Marit W.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the noncoding part of the genome has been shown to harbour thousands of cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, that activate well-defined gene expression programs. Here, we charted active enhancers in a multiplicity of human brain regions to understand the role of

  4. Transcription of Mammalian cis-Regulatory Elements Is Restrained by Actively Enforced Early Termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austenaa, Liv M I; Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Masella, Silvia; Della Chiara, Giulia; Ghisletti, Serena; Curina, Alessia; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41363745X; de Pretis, Stefano; Piccolo, Viviana; Termanini, Alberto; Prosperini, Elena; Pelizzola, Mattia; de Laat, Wouter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/169934497; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2015-01-01

    Upon recruitment to active enhancers and promoters, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) generates short non-coding transcripts of unclear function. The mechanisms that control the length and the amount of ncRNAs generated by cis-regulatory elements are largely unknown. Here, we show that the adaptor protein

  5. Identification and functional characterization of cis-regulatory elements in the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Mullapudi, Nandita; Joseph, Sandeep J; Kissinger, Jessica C

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a member of the phylum Apicomplexa, which consists entirely of parasitic organisms that cause several diseases of veterinary and human importance. Fundamental mechanisms of gene regulation in this group of protistan parasites remain largely uncharacterized. Owing to their medical and veterinary importance, genome sequences are available for several apicomplexan parasites. Their genome sequences reveal an apparent paucity of known transcription factors and the absence of canonical cis-regulatory elements. We have approached the question of gene regulation from a sequence perspective by mining the genomic sequence data to identify putative cis-regulatory elements using a de novo approach. We have identified putative cis-regulatory elements present upstream of functionally related groups of genes and subsequently characterized the function of some of these conserved elements using reporter assays in the parasite. We show a sequence-specific role in gene-expression for seven out of eight identified elements. This work demonstrates the power of pure sequence analysis in the absence of expression data or a priori knowledge of regulatory elements in eukaryotic organisms with compact genomes.

  6. Cis-regulatory elements of the mouse Krt1.12 gene.

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    Wang, I-Jong; Carlson, Eric C; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Candace W C; Hu, Fung-Rong; Kao, Winston W Y

    2002-04-07

    Keratin 12 is a cornea epithelial cell-specific intermediate filament component. To better understand the regulatory mechanism of its expression, the cis-regulatory elements located between the transcription start site and 600 bp upstream of the Krt1.12 gene were determined. The promoter activity of reporter gene constructs containing 0.6, 0.4, and 0.2 kb of DNA 5' upstream of Krt1.12 coupled to the lac Z gene were determined in rabbit corneas using Gene Gun technology. DNA foot printing and EMSA (electrophoresis mobility shift assay) were employed to identify putative cis-regulatory elements of the Krt1.12 gene using bovine corneal epithelial cell nuclear extracts. Enzyme activity assays and histochemical analysis of beta-galactosidase from the 0.6, 0.4, and 0.2 kb K12 promoter constructs indicated that the DNA elements between -0.2 and -0.6 kb 5' of the Krt1.12 gene contain cis-regulatory elements for its corneal epithelial cell-specific expression. Foot printing and EMSA showed that the sequences between -181 to -111 and -256 to -193 upstream of the Krt1.12 gene reacted to nuclear proteins isolated from bovine corneal epithelial cells. A Genbank search revealed that these two regions were potential binding sites for many transcription factors such as AP1, c/EBP, and KLF6. Immunofluorescent staining indicated the presence of c-jun and c/EBP transcription factors in the nuclei of corneal epithelial cells. The data is consistent with the notion that the -182 to -111 and -256 to -193 fragments 5' of the Krt1.12 gene may serve as corneal epithelial cell-specific cis-regulatory elements, and the coordinated interactions of various transcription factors are required for cornea-specific expression of Krt1.12 gene.

  7. Dual functionality of cis-regulatory elements as developmental enhancers and Polycomb response elements.

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    Erceg, Jelena; Pakozdi, Tibor; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Ghavi-Helm, Yad; Girardot, Charles; Bracken, Adrian P; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2017-03-15

    Developmental gene expression is tightly regulated through enhancer elements, which initiate dynamic spatio-temporal expression, and Polycomb response elements (PREs), which maintain stable gene silencing. These two cis-regulatory functions are thought to operate through distinct dedicated elements. By examining the occupancy of the Drosophila pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC) during embryogenesis, we revealed extensive co-occupancy at developmental enhancers. Using an established in vivo assay for PRE activity, we demonstrated that a subset of characterized developmental enhancers can function as PREs, silencing transcription in a Polycomb-dependent manner. Conversely, some classic Drosophila PREs can function as developmental enhancers in vivo, activating spatio-temporal expression. This study therefore uncovers elements with dual function: activating transcription in some cells (enhancers) while stably maintaining transcriptional silencing in others (PREs). Given that enhancers initiate spatio-temporal gene expression, reuse of the same elements by the Polycomb group (PcG) system may help fine-tune gene expression and ensure the timely maintenance of cell identities. © 2017 Erceg et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Bounded search for de novo identification of degenerate cis-regulatory elements

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    Khetani Radhika S

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of statistically overrepresented sequences in the upstream regions of coregulated genes should theoretically permit the identification of potential cis-regulatory elements. However, in practice many cis-regulatory elements are highly degenerate, precluding the use of an exhaustive word-counting strategy for their identification. While numerous methods exist for inferring base distributions using a position weight matrix, recent studies suggest that the independence assumptions inherent in the model, as well as the inability to reach a global optimum, limit this approach. Results In this paper, we report PRISM, a degenerate motif finder that leverages the relationship between the statistical significance of a set of binding sites and that of the individual binding sites. PRISM first identifies overrepresented, non-degenerate consensus motifs, then iteratively relaxes each one into a high-scoring degenerate motif. This approach requires no tunable parameters, thereby lending itself to unbiased performance comparisons. We therefore compare PRISM's performance against nine popular motif finders on 28 well-characterized S. cerevisiae regulons. PRISM consistently outperforms all other programs. Finally, we use PRISM to predict the binding sites of uncharacterized regulons. Our results support a proposed mechanism of action for the yeast cell-cycle transcription factor Stb1, whose binding site has not been determined experimentally. Conclusion The relationship between statistical measures of the binding sites and the set as a whole leads to a simple means of identifying the diverse range of cis-regulatory elements to which a protein binds. This approach leverages the advantages of word-counting, in that position dependencies are implicitly accounted for and local optima are more easily avoided. While we sacrifice guaranteed optimality to prevent the exponential blowup of exhaustive search, we prove that the error

  9. Deciphering the cis-regulatory elements for XYR1 and CRE1 regulators in Trichoderma reesei.

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    Rafael Silva-Rocha

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the in silico identification of the cis-regulatory elements for XYR1 and CRE1 proteins in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei, two regulators that play a central role in the expression of cellulase genes. Using four datasets of condition-dependent genes from RNA-seq and RT-qPCR experiments, we performed unsupervised motif discovery and found two short motifs resembling the proposed binding consensus for XYR1 and CRE1. Using these motifs, we analysed the presence and arrangement of putative cis-regulatory elements recognized by both regulators and found that shortly spaced sites were more associated with XYR1- and CRE1-dependent promoters than single, high-score sites. Furthermore, the approach used here allowed the identification of the previously reported XYR1-binding sites from cel7a and xyn1 promoters, and we also mapped the potential target sequence for this regulator at the cel6a promoter that has been suggested but not identified previously. Additionally, seven other promoters (for cel7b, cel61a, cel61b, cel3c, cel3d, xyn3 and swo genes presented a putative XYR1-binding site, and strong sites for CRE1 were found at the xyr1 and cel7b promoters. Using the cis-regulatory architectures nearly defined for XYR1 and CRE1, we performed genome-wide identification of potential targets for direct regulation by both proteins and important differences on their functional regulons were elucidated. Finally, we performed binding site mapping on the promoters of differentially expressed genes found in T. reesei mutant strains lacking xyr1 or cre1 and found that indirect regulation plays a key role on their signalling pathways. Taken together, the data provided here sheds new light on the mechanisms for signal integration mediated by XYR1 and CRE1 at cellulase promoters.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Cis-Regulatory Element Activity Using Synthetic Promoters in Transgenic Plants.

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    Benn, Geoffrey; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters, introduced stably or transiently into plants, are an invaluable tool for the identification of functional regulatory elements and the corresponding transcription factor(s) that regulate the amplitude, spatial distribution, and temporal patterns of gene expression. Here, we present a protocol describing the steps required to identify and characterize putative cis-regulatory elements. These steps include application of computational tools to identify putative elements, construction of a synthetic promoter upstream of luciferase, identification of transcription factors that regulate the element, testing the functionality of the element introduced transiently and/or stably into the species of interest followed by high-throughput luciferase screening assays, and subsequent data processing and statistical analysis.

  11. Identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Cryptosporidium parvum by de novo pattern finding

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    Kissinger Jessica C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptosporidium parvum is a unicellular eukaryote in the phylum Apicomplexa. It is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes diarrhea and is a significant AIDS-related pathogen. Cryptosporidium parvum is not amenable to long-term laboratory cultivation or classical molecular genetic analysis. The parasite exhibits a complex life cycle, a broad host range, and fundamental mechanisms of gene regulation remain unknown. We have used data from the recently sequenced genome of this organism to uncover clues about gene regulation in C. parvum. We have applied two pattern finding algorithms MEME and AlignACE to identify conserved, over-represented motifs in the 5' upstream regions of genes in C. parvum. To support our findings, we have established comparative real-time -PCR expression profiles for the groups of genes examined computationally. Results We find that groups of genes that share a function or belong to a common pathway share upstream motifs. Different motifs are conserved upstream of different groups of genes. Comparative real-time PCR studies show co-expression of genes within each group (in sub-sets during the life cycle of the parasite, suggesting co-regulation of these genes may be driven by the use of conserved upstream motifs. Conclusion This is one of the first attempts to characterize cis-regulatory elements in the absence of any previously characterized elements and with very limited expression data (seven genes only. Using de novo pattern finding algorithms, we have identified specific DNA motifs that are conserved upstream of genes belonging to the same metabolic pathway or gene family. We have demonstrated the co-expression of these genes (often in subsets using comparative real-time-PCR experiments thus establishing evidence for these conserved motifs as putative cis-regulatory elements. Given the lack of prior information concerning expression patterns and organization of promoters in C. parvum we

  12. BET Bromodomain Inhibition Releases the Mediator Complex from Select cis-Regulatory Elements

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    Anand S. Bhagwat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. A shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance.

  13. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape.

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    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; De Waele, Kathleen; De Schepper, Jean; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; De Baere, Elfride

    2015-12-03

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements.

  14. Identification of a novel cis-regulatory element essential for immune tolerance

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    LaFlam, Taylor N.; Seumois, Grégory; Miller, Corey N.; Lwin, Wint; Fasano, Kayla J.; Waterfield, Michael; Proekt, Irina; Vijayanand, Pandurangan

    2015-01-01

    Thymic central tolerance is essential to preventing autoimmunity. In medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), the Autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene plays an essential role in this process by driving the expression of a diverse set of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs), which are presented and help tolerize self-reactive thymocytes. Interestingly, Aire has a highly tissue-restricted pattern of expression, with only mTECs and peripheral extrathymic Aire-expressing cells (eTACs) known to express detectable levels in adults. Despite this high level of tissue specificity, the cis-regulatory elements that control Aire expression have remained obscure. Here, we identify a highly conserved noncoding DNA element that is essential for Aire expression. This element shows enrichment of enhancer-associated histone marks in mTECs and also has characteristics of being an NF-κB-responsive element. Finally, we find that this element is essential for Aire expression in vivo and necessary to prevent spontaneous autoimmunity, reflecting the importance of this regulatory DNA element in promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26527800

  15. Computational discovery of soybean promoter cis-regulatory elements for the construction of soybean cyst nematode inducible synthetic promoters

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    Computational methods offer great hope but limited accuracy in the prediction of functional cis-regulatory elements; improvements are needed to enable synthetic promoter design. We applied an ensemble strategy for de novo soybean cyst nematode (SCN)-inducible motif discovery among promoters of 18 co...

  16. Characterization of Putative cis-Regulatory Elements in Genes Preferentially Expressed in Arabidopsis Male Meiocytes

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    Junhua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is essential for plant reproduction because it is the process during which homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and meiotic recombination occur. The meiotic transcriptome is difficult to investigate because of the size of meiocytes and the confines of anther lobes. The recent development of isolation techniques has enabled the characterization of transcriptional profiles in male meiocytes of Arabidopsis. Gene expression in male meiocytes shows unique features. The direct interaction of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory sequences forms the basis for the specificity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we identified putative cis-regulatory elements (CREs associated with male meiocyte-expressed genes using in silico tools. The upstream regions (1 kb of the top 50 genes preferentially expressed in Arabidopsis meiocytes possessed conserved motifs. These motifs are putative binding sites of TFs, some of which share common functions, such as roles in cell division. In combination with cell-type-specific analysis, our findings could be a substantial aid for the identification and experimental verification of the protein-DNA interactions for the specific TFs that drive gene expression in meiocytes.

  17. Recurrent modification of a conserved cis-regulatory element underlies fruit fly pigmentation diversity.

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    William A Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE, little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B and sex-determination (DSX transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages.

  18. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

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    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  19. GPMiner: an integrated system for mining combinatorial cis-regulatory elements in mammalian gene group.

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    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chang, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Shien, Dray-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Sequence features in promoter regions are involved in regulating gene transcription initiation. Although numerous computational methods have been developed for predicting transcriptional start sites (TSSs) or transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs), they lack annotations for do not consider some important regulatory features such as CpG islands, tandem repeats, the TATA box, CCAAT box, GC box, over-represented oligonucleotides, DNA stability, and GC content. Additionally, the combinatorial interaction of TFs regulates the gene group that is associated with same expression pattern. To investigate gene transcriptional regulation, an integrated system that annotates regulatory features in a promoter sequence and detects co-regulation of TFs in a group of genes is needed. This work identifies TSSs and regulatory features in a promoter sequence, and recognizes co-occurrence of cis-regulatory elements in co-expressed genes using a novel system. Three well-known TSS prediction tools are incorporated with orthologous conserved features, such as CpG islands, nucleotide composition, over-represented hexamer nucleotides, and DNA stability, to construct the novel Gene Promoter Miner (GPMiner) using a support vector machine (SVM). According to five-fold cross-validation results, the predictive sensitivity and specificity are both roughly 80%. The proposed system allows users to input a group of gene names/symbols, enabling the co-occurrence of TFBSs to be determined. Additionally, an input sequence can also be analyzed for homogeneity of experimental mammalian promoter sequences, and conserved regulatory features between homologous promoters can be observed through cross-species analysis. After identifying promoter regions, regulatory features are visualized graphically to facilitate gene promoter observations. The GPMiner, which has a user-friendly input/output interface, has numerous benefits in analyzing human and mouse promoters. The proposed system is freely

  20. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

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    Arindam Deb

    Full Text Available Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs, thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic

  1. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for ...

  2. Genes associated with the cis-regulatory functions of intragenic LINE-1 elements.

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    Wanichnopparat, Wachiraporn; Suwanwongse, Kulachanya; Pin-On, Piyapat; Aporntewan, Chatchawit; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2013-03-27

    Thousands of intragenic long interspersed element 1 sequences (LINE-1 elements or L1s) reside within genes. These intragenic L1 sequences are conserved and regulate the expression of their host genes. When L1 methylation is decreased, either through chemical induction or in cancer, the intragenic L1 transcription is increased. The resulting L1 mRNAs form RISC complexes with pre-mRNA to degrade the complementary mRNA. In this study, we screened for genes that are involved in intragenic L1 regulation networks. Genes containing L1s were obtained from L1Base (http://l1base.molgen.mpg.de). The expression profiles of 205 genes in 516 gene knockdown experiments were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo). The expression levels of the genes with and without L1s were compared using Pearson's chi-squared test. After a permutation based statistical analysis and a multiple hypothesis testing, 73 genes were found to induce significant regulatory changes (upregulation and/or downregulation) in genes with L1s. In detail, 5 genes were found to induce both the upregulation and downregulation of genes with L1s, whereas 27 and 37 genes induced the downregulation and upregulation, respectively, of genes with L1s. These regulations sometimes differed depending on the cell type and the orientation of the intragenic L1s. Moreover, the siRNA-regulating genes containing L1s possess a variety of molecular functions, are responsible for many cellular phenotypes and are associated with a number of diseases. Cells use intragenic L1s as cis-regulatory elements within gene bodies to modulate gene expression. There may be several mechanisms by which L1s mediate gene expression. Intragenic L1s may be involved in the regulation of several biological processes, including DNA damage and repair, inflammation, immune function, embryogenesis, cell differentiation, cellular response to external stimuli and hormonal responses. Furthermore, in addition to cancer

  3. AGRIS: Arabidopsis gene regulatory information server, an information resource of Arabidopsis cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors.

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    Davuluri, Ramana V; Sun, Hao; Palaniswamy, Saranyan K; Matthews, Nicole; Molina, Carlos; Kurtz, Mike; Grotewold, Erich

    2003-06-23

    The gene regulatory information is hardwired in the promoter regions formed by cis-regulatory elements that bind specific transcription factors (TFs). Hence, establishing the architecture of plant promoters is fundamental to understanding gene expression. The determination of the regulatory circuits controlled by each TF and the identification of the cis-regulatory sequences for all genes have been identified as two of the goals of the Multinational Coordinated Arabidopsis thaliana Functional Genomics Project by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (June 2002). AGRIS is an information resource of Arabidopsis promoter sequences, transcription factors and their target genes. AGRIS currently contains two databases, AtTFDB (Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor database) and AtcisDB (Arabidopsis thaliana cis-regulatory database). AtTFDB contains information on approximately 1,400 transcription factors identified through motif searches and grouped into 34 families. AtTFDB links the sequence of the transcription factors with available mutants and, when known, with the possible genes they may regulate. AtcisDB consists of the 5' regulatory sequences of all 29,388 annotated genes with a description of the corresponding cis-regulatory elements. Users can search the databases for (i) promoter sequences, (ii) a transcription factor, (iii) a direct target genes for a specific transcription factor, or (vi) a regulatory network that consists of transcription factors and their target genes. AGRIS provides the necessary software tools on Arabidopsis transcription factors and their putative binding sites on all genes to initiate the identification of transcriptional regulatory networks in the model dicotyledoneous plant Arabidopsis thaliana. AGRIS can be accessed from http://arabidopsis.med.ohio-state.edu.

  4. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

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    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  5. Identification of cis-regulatory elements specific for different types of reactive oxygen species in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Veselin; Vermeirssen, Vanessa; De Clercq, Inge; Van Breusegem, Frank; Minkov, Ivan; Vandepoele, Klaas; Gechev, Tsanko S

    2012-05-10

    The type of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major factor that determines the specificity of biological responses. These responses may be elicited by activation of transcription factors that recognize ROS-specific cis-regulatory elements in target genes. In search for Arabidopsis promoter motifs specific for particular types of ROS, genome-wide microarray expression profiles for 283 abiotic stress-related conditions were subjected to cluster analysis to identify gene groups induced by singlet oxygen, superoxide radicals, and H(2)O(2). Promoters of these gene groups were analyzed to identify cis-regulatory elements that are associated with specific types of ROS. Eleven ROS-specific de novo identified elements, seven known promoter motifs and several sequences enriched in ROS-responsive clusters but lacking in specificity are reported. The conservation of the identified motifs was determined in orthologous genes in C. papaya, V. vinifera and P. trichocarpa. Finally, biological functions were attributed to the motifs by calculation of GO-term enrichment for genes with conserved ROS-responsive elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon; Rifkin, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located 527bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unravelling cis-regulatory elements in the genome of the smallest photosynthetic eukaryote: phylogenetic footprinting in Ostreococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piganeau, Gwenael; Vandepoele, Klaas; Gourbière, Sébastien; Van de Peer, Yves; Moreau, Hervé

    2009-09-01

    We used a phylogenetic footprinting approach, adapted to high levels of divergence, to estimate the level of constraint in intergenic regions of the extremely gene dense Ostreococcus algae genomes (Chlorophyta, Prasinophyceae). We first benchmarked our method against the Saccharomyces sensu stricto genome data and found that the proportion of conserved non-coding sites was consistent with those obtained with methods using calibration by the neutral substitution rate. We then applied our method to the complete genomes of Ostreococcus tauri and O. lucimarinus, which are the most divergent species from the same genus sequenced so far. We found that 77% of intergenic regions in Ostreococcus still contain some phylogenetic footprints, as compared to 88% for Saccharomyces, corresponding to an average rate of constraint on intergenic region of 17% and 30%, respectively. A comparison with some known functional cis-regulatory elements enabled us to investigate whether some transcriptional regulatory pathways were conserved throughout the green lineage. Strikingly, the size of the phylogenetic footprints depends on gene orientation of neighboring genes, and appears to be genus-specific. In Ostreococcus, 5' intergenic regions contain four times more conserved sites than 3' intergenic regions, whereas in yeast a higher frequency of constrained sites in intergenic regions between genes on the same DNA strand suggests a higher frequency of bidirectional regulatory elements. The phylogenetic footprinting approach can be used despite high levels of divergence in the ultrasmall Ostreococcus algae, to decipher structure of constrained regulatory motifs, and identify putative regulatory pathways conserved within the green lineage.

  8. Retinal Expression of the Drosophila eyes absent Gene Is Controlled by Several Cooperatively Acting Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie M Weasner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The eyes absent (eya gene of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a member of an evolutionarily conserved gene regulatory network that controls eye formation in all seeing animals. The loss of eya leads to the complete elimination of the compound eye while forced expression of eya in non-retinal tissues is sufficient to induce ectopic eye formation. Within the developing retina eya is expressed in a dynamic pattern and is involved in tissue specification/determination, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell fate choice. In this report we explore the mechanisms by which eya expression is spatially and temporally governed in the developing eye. We demonstrate that multiple cis-regulatory elements function cooperatively to control eya transcription and that spacing between a pair of enhancer elements is important for maintaining correct gene expression. Lastly, we show that the loss of eya expression in sine oculis (so mutants is the result of massive cell death and a progressive homeotic transformation of retinal progenitor cells into head epidermis.

  9. Identification of Cis-regulatory Elements of Butyrophilin Gene of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Butyrophilin subfamily 1 member A1 is a highly expressed gene in mammary gland of all mammals during lactation. It is found to be the major integral protein in the milk fat globule membrane. Its interactions with other membrane elements and soluble proteins of the mammary epithelial cells regulate the secretion of milk fat.

  10. Computational discovery of soybean promoter cis-regulatory elements for the construction of soybean cyst nematode-inducible synthetic promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Mazarei, Mitra; Peng, Yanhui; Fethe, Michael H; Rudis, Mary R; Lin, Jingyu; Millwood, Reginald J; Arelli, Prakash R; Stewart, Charles Neal

    2014-10-01

    Computational methods offer great hope but limited accuracy in the prediction of functional cis-regulatory elements; improvements are needed to enable synthetic promoter design. We applied an ensemble strategy for de novo soybean cyst nematode (SCN)-inducible motif discovery among promoters of 18 co-expressed soybean genes that were selected from six reported microarray studies involving a compatible soybean-SCN interaction. A total of 116 overlapping motif regions (OMRs) were discovered bioinformatically that were identified by at least four out of seven bioinformatic tools. Using synthetic promoters, the inducibility of each OMR or motif itself was evaluated by co-localization of gain of function of an orange fluorescent protein reporter and the presence of SCN in transgenic soybean hairy roots. Among 16 OMRs detected from two experimentally confirmed SCN-inducible promoters, 11 OMRs (i.e. 68.75%) were experimentally confirmed to be SCN-inducible, leading to the discovery of 23 core motifs of 5- to 7-bp length, of which 14 are novel in plants. We found that a combination of the three best tools (i.e. SCOPE, W-AlignACE and Weeder) could detect all 23 core motifs. Thus, this strategy is a high-throughput approach for de novo motif discovery in soybean and offers great potential for novel motif discovery and synthetic promoter engineering for any plant and trait in crop biotechnology. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Functional roles of Aves class-specific cis-regulatory elements on macroevolution of bird-specific features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Ryohei; Li, Cai; Fang, Qi; Hayashi, Shinichi; Egawa, Shiro; Hu, Jiang; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Kondo, Mao; Sato, Tomohiko; Matsubara, Haruka; Kamiyama, Namiko; Kitajima, Keiichi; Saito, Daisuke; Liu, Yang; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Xing; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Irie, Naoki; Tamura, Koji; Zhang, Guojie

    2017-02-06

    Unlike microevolutionary processes, little is known about the genetic basis of macroevolutionary processes. One of these magnificent examples is the transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds that has created numerous evolutionary innovations such as self-powered flight and its associated wings with flight feathers. By analysing 48 bird genomes, we identified millions of avian-specific highly conserved elements (ASHCEs) that predominantly (>99%) reside in non-coding regions. Many ASHCEs show differential histone modifications that may participate in regulation of limb development. Comparative embryonic gene expression analyses across tetrapod species suggest ASHCE-associated genes have unique roles in developing avian limbs. In particular, we demonstrate how the ASHCE driven avian-specific expression of gene Sim1 driven by ASHCE may be associated with the evolution and development of flight feathers. Together, these findings demonstrate regulatory roles of ASHCEs in the creation of avian-specific traits, and further highlight the importance of cis-regulatory rewiring during macroevolutionary changes.

  12. In silico identification of conserved intercoding sequences in Leishmania genomes: unraveling putative cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, E J R; Terrão, M C; Ruiz, J C; Vêncio, R Z N; Cruz, A K

    2012-06-01

    In silico analyses of Leishmania spp. genome data are a powerful resource to improve the understanding of these pathogens' biology. Trypanosomatids such as Leishmania spp. have their protein-coding genes grouped in long polycistronic units of functionally unrelated genes. The control of gene expression happens by a variety of posttranscriptional mechanisms. The high degree of synteny among Leishmania species is accompanied by highly conserved coding sequences (CDS) and poorly conserved intercoding untranslated sequences. To identify the elements involved in the control of gene expression, we conducted an in silico investigation to find conserved intercoding sequences (CICS) in the genomes of L. major, L. infantum, and L. braziliensis. We used a combination of computational tools, such as Linux-Shell, PERL and R languages, BLAST, MSPcrunch, SSAKE, and Pred-A-Term algorithms to construct a pipeline which was able to: (i) search for conservation in target-regions, (ii) eliminate CICS redundancy and mask repeat elements, (iii) predict the mRNA's extremities, (iv) analyze the distribution of orthologous genes within the generated LeishCICS-clusters, (v) assign GO terms to the LeishCICS-clusters, and (vi) provide statistical support for the gene-enrichment annotation. We associated the LeishCICS-cluster data, generated at the end of the pipeline, with the expression profile of L. donovani genes during promastigote-amastigote differentiation, as previously evaluated by others (GEO accession: GSE21936). A Pearson's correlation coefficient greater than 0.5 was observed for 730 LeishCICS-clusters containing from 2 to 17 genes. The designed computational pipeline is a useful tool and its application identified potential regulatory cis elements and putative regulons in Leishmania. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An arthropod cis-regulatory element functioning in sensory organ precursor development dates back to the Cambrian

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    Simpson Pat

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of publications demonstrate conservation of function of cis-regulatory elements without sequence similarity. In invertebrates such functional conservation has only been shown for closely related species. Here we demonstrate the existence of an ancient arthropod regulatory element that functions during the selection of neural precursors. The activity of genes of the achaete-scute (ac-sc family endows cells with neural potential. An essential, conserved characteristic of proneural genes is their ability to restrict their own activity to single or a small number of progenitor cells from their initially broad domains of expression. This is achieved through a process called lateral inhibition. A regulatory element, the sensory organ precursor enhancer (SOPE, is required for this process. First identified in Drosophila, the SOPE contains discrete binding sites for four regulatory factors. The SOPE of the Drosophila asense gene is situated in the 5' UTR. Results Through a manual comparison of consensus binding site sequences we have been able to identify a SOPE in UTR sequences of asense-like genes in species belonging to all four arthropod groups (Crustacea, Myriapoda, Chelicerata and Insecta. The SOPEs of the spider Cupiennius salei and the insect Tribolium castaneum are shown to be functional in transgenic Drosophila. This would place the origin of this regulatory sequence as far back as the last common ancestor of the Arthropoda, that is, in the Cambrian, 550 million years ago. Conclusions The SOPE is not detectable by inter-specific sequence comparison, raising the possibility that other ancient regulatory modules in invertebrates might have escaped detection.

  14. SOX9 chromatin folding domains correlate with its real and putative distant cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Marta; Akdemir, Kadir Caner; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2017-03-04

    Evolutionary conserved transcription factor SOX9, encoded by the dosage sensitive SOX9 gene on chromosome 17q24.3, plays an important role in development of multiple organs, including bones and testes. Heterozygous point mutations and genomic copy-number variant (CNV) deletions involving SOX9 have been reported in patients with campomelic dysplasia (CD), a skeletal malformation syndrome often associated with male-to-female sex reversal. Balanced and unbalanced structural genomic variants with breakpoints mapping up to 1.3 Mb up- and downstream to SOX9 have been described in patients with milder phenotypes, including acampomelic campomelic dysplasia, sex reversal, and Pierre Robin sequence. Based on the localization of breakpoints of genomic rearrangements causing different phenotypes, 5 genomic intervals mapping upstream to SOX9 have been defined. We have analyzed the publically available database of high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) in multiple cell lines in the genomic regions flanking SOX9. Consistent with the literature data, chromatin domain boundaries in the SOX9 locus exhibit conservation across species and remain largely constant across multiple cell types. Interestingly, we have found that chromatin folding domains in the SOX9 locus associate with the genomic intervals harboring real and putative regulatory elements of SOX9, implicating that variation in intra-domain interactions may be critical for dynamic regulation of SOX9 expression in a cell type-specific fashion. We propose that tissue-specific enhancers for other transcription factor genes may similarly utilize chromatin folding sub-domains in gene regulation.

  15. Neutralizing the function of a β-globin-associated cis-regulatory DNA element using an artificial zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Joeva J; Masannat, Jude; Bungert, Jörg

    2012-10-30

    Gene expression is primarily regulated by cis-regulatory DNA elements and trans-interacting proteins. Transcription factors bind in a DNA sequence-specific manner and recruit activities that modulate the association and activity of transcription complexes at specific genes. Often, transcription factors belong to families of related proteins that interact with similar DNA sequences. Furthermore, genes are regulated by multiple, sometimes redundant, cis-regulatory elements. Thus, the analysis of the role of a specific DNA regulatory sequence and the interacting proteins in the context of intact cells is challenging. In this study, we designed and functionally characterized an artificial DNA-binding domain that neutralizes the function of a cis-regulatory DNA element associated with adult β-globin gene expression. The zinc finger DNA-binding domain (ZF-DBD), comprising six ZFs, interacted specifically with a CACCC site located 90 bp upstream of the transcription start site (-90 β-ZF-DBD), which is normally occupied by KLF1, a major regulator of adult β-globin gene expression. Stable expression of the -90 β-ZF-DBD in mouse erythroleukemia cells reduced the binding of KLF1 with the β-globin gene, but not with locus control region element HS2, and led to reduced transcription. Transient transgenic embryos expressing the -90 β-ZF-DBD developed normally but revealed reduced expression of the adult β-globin gene. These results demonstrate that artificial DNA-binding proteins lacking effector domains are useful tools for studying and modulating the function of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  16. The in vivo dissection of direct RFX-target gene promoters in C. elegans reveals a novel cis-regulatory element, the C-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoorn, Jan; Piasecki, Brian P; Crona, Filip; Phirke, Prasad; Jeppsson, Kristian E; Swoboda, Peter

    2012-08-15

    At the core of the primary transcriptional network regulating ciliary gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons is the RFX/DAF-19 transcription factor, which binds and thereby positively regulates 13-15 bp X-box promoter motifs found in the cis-regulatory regions of many ciliary genes. However, the variable expression of direct RFX-target genes in various sets of ciliated sensory neurons (CSNs) occurs through as of yet uncharacterized mechanisms. In this study the cis-regulatory regions of 41 direct RFX-target genes are compared using in vivo genetic analyses and computational comparisons of orthologous nematode sequences. We find that neither the proximity to the translational start site nor the exact sequence composition of the X-box promoter motif of the respective ciliary gene can explain the variation in expression patterns observed among different direct RFX-target genes. Instead, a novel enhancer element appears to co-regulate ciliary genes in a DAF-19 dependent manner. This cytosine- and thymidine-rich sequence, the C-box, was found in the cis-regulatory regions in close proximity to the respective X-box motif for 84% of the most broadly expressed direct RFX-target genes sampled in this study. Molecular characterization confirmed that these 8-11 bp C-box sequences act as strong enhancer elements for direct RFX-target genes. An artificial promoter containing only an X-box promoter motif and two of the C-box enhancer elements was able to drive strong expression of a GFP reporter construct in many C. elegans CSNs. These data provide a much-improved understanding of how direct RFX-target genes are differentially regulated in C. elegans and will provide a molecular model for uncovering the transcriptional network mediating ciliary gene expression in animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of cis-regulatory element structure and discovery of motif-driven gene co-expression networks in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Darren Chern Jan; Lopez Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Gambetta, Gregory Alan; Castellarin, Simone Diego

    2017-06-01

    Coordinated transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming ensures a plant's continued growth and survival under adverse environmental conditions. Transcription factors (TFs) act to modulate gene expression through complex cis-regulatory element (CRE) interactions. Genome-wide analysis of known plant CREs was performed for all currently predicted protein-coding gene promoters in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). Many CREs such as abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive, drought-responsive, auxin-responsive, and evening elements, exhibit bona fide CRE properties such as strong position bias towards the transcription start site (TSS) and over-representation when compared with random promoters. Genes containing these CREs are enriched in a large repertoire of plant biological pathways. Large-scale transcriptome analyses also show that these CREs are highly implicated in grapevine development and stress response. Numerous CRE-driven modules in condition-specific gene co-expression networks (GCNs) were identified and many of these modules were highly enriched for plant biological functions. Several modules corroborate known roles of CREs in drought response, pathogen defense, cell wall metabolism, and fruit ripening, whereas others reveal novel functions in plants. Comparisons with Arabidopsis suggest a general conservation in promoter architecture, gene expression dynamics, and GCN structure across species. Systems analyses of CREs provide insights into the grapevine cis-regulatory code and establish a foundation for future genomic studies in grapevine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  19. Integrative modeling of eQTLs and cis-regulatory elements suggests mechanisms underlying cell type specificity of eQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Brown

    Full Text Available Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human

  20. Group 1 Innate Lymphoid Cell Lineage Identity Is Determined by a cis-Regulatory Element Marked by a Long Non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowel, Walter K; McCright, Sam J; Kotzin, Jonathan J; Collet, Magalie A; Uyar, Asli; Chen, Xin; DeLaney, Alexandra; Spencer, Sean P; Virtue, Anthony T; Yang, EnJun; Villarino, Alejandro; Kurachi, Makoto; Dunagin, Margaret C; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Stein, Judith; Hughes, Cynthia; Fonseca-Pereira, Diogo; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Raj, Arjun; Kambayashi, Taku; Brodsky, Igor E; O'Shea, John J; Wherry, E John; Goff, Loyal A; Rinn, John L; Williams, Adam; Flavell, Richard A; Henao-Mejia, Jorge

    2017-09-19

    Commitment to the innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineage is determined by Id2, a transcriptional regulator that antagonizes T and B cell-specific gene expression programs. Yet how Id2 expression is regulated in each ILC subset remains poorly understood. We identified a cis-regulatory element demarcated by a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that controls the function and lineage identity of group 1 ILCs, while being dispensable for early ILC development and homeostasis of ILC2s and ILC3s. The locus encoding this lncRNA, which we termed Rroid, directly interacted with the promoter of its neighboring gene, Id2, in group 1 ILCs. Moreover, the Rroid locus, but not the lncRNA itself, controlled the identity and function of ILC1s by promoting chromatin accessibility and deposition of STAT5 at the promoter of Id2 in response to interleukin (IL)-15. Thus, non-coding elements responsive to extracellular cues unique to each ILC subset represent a key regulatory layer for controlling the identity and function of ILCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Hadas

    Full Text Available Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1 and Neurofascin (Nfasc are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  2. Cis-regulatory PLETHORA promoter elements directing root and nodule expression are conserved between Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Henk J; Kulikova, Olga; Willemsen, Viola; Heidstra, Renze

    2017-02-01

    Nodules are unique organs formed on roots of legumes by soil-borne bacteria, collectively known as rhizobium. Recently, we have shown that orthologs of the AINTEGUMENTA-like (AIL) AP2 transcription factors PLETHORA (PLT) 1 to 4, that redundantly regulate Arabidopsis thaliana root development are involved in root and nodule growth in Medicago truncatula. Hence, it is conceivable that rhizobium has co-opted these genes for nodule development. Whether this co-option requires the presence of specific cis-elements in the promoters and/or specialization of PLT protein function is not clear. Here, we analyzed the qualitative expression patterns of the Arabidopsis PLT1 to 4 promoters in Medicago roots and nodules and compared these with the described expression patterns of the Medicago PLT genes. Our studies reveal that the expression patterns of the investigated promoters and their Medicago orthologs are very similar, indicating that at least all cis-elements regulating spatial PLT expression are conserved among the Arabidopsis and Medicago PLT1 to 4 promoters.

  3. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Karnik

    Full Text Available The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  4. Deletion hotspots in AMACR promoter CpG island are cis-regulatory elements controlling the gene expression in the colon.

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    Xiang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase (AMACR regulates peroxisomal beta-oxidation of phytol-derived, branched-chain fatty acids from red meat and dairy products -- suspected risk factors for colon carcinoma (CCa. AMACR was first found overexpressed in prostate cancer but not in benign glands and is now an established diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. Aberrant expression of AMACR was recently reported in Cca; however, little is known about how this gene is abnormally activated in cancer. By using a panel of immunostained-laser-capture-microdissected clinical samples comprising the entire colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence, we show that deregulation of AMACR during colon carcinogenesis involves two nonrandom events, resulting in the mutually exclusive existence of double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 and deletion of CG12-16 in a newly identified CpG island within the core promoter of AMACR. The double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 was found to be a somatic lesion. It existed in histologically normal colonic glands and tubular adenomas with low AMACR expression and was absent in villous adenomas and all CCas expressing variable levels of AMACR. In contrast, deletion of CG12-16 was shown to be a constitutional allele with a frequency of 43% in a general population. Its prevalence reached 89% in moderately differentiated CCas strongly expressing AMACR but only existed at 14% in poorly differentiated CCas expressing little or no AMACR. The DNA sequences housing these deletions were found to be putative cis-regulatory elements for Sp1 at CG3 and CG10, and ZNF202 at CG12-16. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA knockdown, gel shift assay, ectopic expression, and promoter analyses supported the regulation by Sp1 and ZNF202 of AMACR gene expression in an opposite manner. Our findings identified key in vivo events and novel transcription factors responsible for AMACR regulation in CCas and suggested these AMACR deletions may have diagnostic/prognostic value for

  5. HoxA Genes and the Fin-to-Limb Transition in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Leite-Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available HoxA genes encode for important DNA-binding transcription factors that act during limb development, regulating primarily gene expression and, consequently, morphogenesis and skeletal differentiation. Within these genes, HoxA11 and HoxA13 were proposed to have played an essential role in the enigmatic evolutionary transition from fish fins to tetrapod limbs. Indeed, comparative gene expression analyses led to the suggestion that changes in their regulation might have been essential for the diversification of vertebrates’ appendages. In this review, we highlight three potential modifications in the regulation and function of these genes that may have boosted appendage evolution: (1 the expansion of polyalanine repeats in the HoxA11 and HoxA13 proteins; (2 the origin of +a novel long-non-coding RNA with a possible inhibitory function on HoxA11; and (3 the acquisition of cis-regulatory elements modulating 5’ HoxA transcription. We discuss the relevance of these mechanisms for appendage diversification reviewing the current state of the art and performing additional comparative analyses to characterize, in a phylogenetic framework, HoxA11 and HoxA13 expression, alanine composition within the encoded proteins, long-non-coding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements.

  6. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

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    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  7. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

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    Zachary H Lemmon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem. Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  8. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  9. Two potential hookworm DAF-16 target genes, SNR-3 and LPP-1: gene structure, expression profile, and implications of a cis-regulatory element in the regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Goggin, Kevin; Dowling, Camille; Qian, Jason; Hawdon, John M

    2015-01-08

    Hookworms infect nearly 700 million people, causing anemia and developmental stunting in heavy infections. Little is known about the genomic structure or gene regulation in hookworms, although recent publication of draft genome assemblies has allowed the first investigations of these topics to be undertaken. The transcription factor DAF-16 mediates multiple developmental pathways in the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and is involved in the recovery from the developmentally arrested L3 in hookworms. Identification of downstream targets of DAF-16 will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of hookworm infection. Genomic Fragment 2.23 containing a DAF-16 binding element (DBE) was used to identify overlapping complementary expressed sequence tags (ESTs). These sequences were used to search a draft assembly of the Ancylostoma caninum genome, and identified two neighboring genes, snr-3 and lpp-1, in a tail-to-tail orientation. Expression patterns of both genes during parasitic development were determined by qRT-PCR. DAF-16 dependent cis-regulatory activity of fragment 2.23 was investigated using an in vitro reporter system. The snr-3 gene spans approximately 5.6 kb in the genome and contains 3 exons and 2 introns, and contains the DBE in its 3' untranslated region. Downstream from snr-3 in a tail-to-tail arrangement is the gene lpp-1. The lpp-1 gene spans more than 6 kb and contains 10 exons and 9 introns. The A. caninum genome contains 2 apparent splice variants, but there are 7 splice variants in the A. ceylanicum genome. While the gene order is similar, the gene structures of the hookworm genes differ from their C. elegans orthologs. Both genes show peak expression in the late L4 stage. Using a cell culture based expression system, fragment 2.23 was found to have both DAF-16-dependent promoter and enhancer activity that required an intact DBE. Two putative DAF-16 targets were identified by genome wide screening for DAF-16 binding

  10. CREME: Cis-Regulatory Module Explorer for the Human Genome

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    Loots, G G; Sharan, R; Ovcharenko, I; Ben-Hur, A

    2004-02-11

    The binding of transcription factors to specific regulatory sequence elements is a primary mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Eukaryotic genes are often regulated by several transcription factors, whose binding sites are tightly clustered and form cis-regulatory modules. In this paper we present a web-server, CREME, for identifying and visualizing cis-regulatory modules in the promoter regions of a given set of potentially co-regulated genes. CREME relies on a database of putative transcription factor binding sites that have been annotated across the human genome using a library of position weight matrices and evolutionary conservation with the mouse and rat genomes. A search algorithm is applied to this dataset to identify combinations of transcription factors whose binding sites tend to co-occur in close proximity in the promoter regions of the input gene set. The identified cis-regulatory modules are statistically scored and significant combinations are reported and graphically visualized. Our web-server is available at http://creme.dcode.org/.

  11. A single three-dimensional chromatin compartment in amphioxus indicates a stepwise evolution of vertebrate Hox bimodal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acemel, Rafael D; Tena, Juan J; Irastorza-Azcarate, Ibai; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Diaz, Sergio G; Aldea, Daniel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Mangenot, Sophie; Holland, Peter W H; Devos, Damien P; Maeso, Ignacio; Escrivá, Hector; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    The HoxA and HoxD gene clusters of jawed vertebrates are organized into bipartite three-dimensional chromatin structures that separate long-range regulatory inputs coming from the anterior and posterior Hox-neighboring regions. This architecture is instrumental in allowing vertebrate Hox genes to pattern disparate parts of the body, including limbs. Almost nothing is known about how these three-dimensional topologies originated. Here we perform extensive 4C-seq profiling of the Hox cluster in embryos of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. We find that, in contrast to the architecture in vertebrates, the amphioxus Hox cluster is organized into a single chromatin interaction domain that includes long-range contacts mostly from the anterior side, bringing distant cis-regulatory elements into contact with Hox genes. We infer that the vertebrate Hox bipartite regulatory system is an evolutionary novelty generated by combining ancient long-range regulatory contacts from DNA in the anterior Hox neighborhood with new regulatory inputs from the posterior side.

  12. CRX ChIP-seq reveals the cis-regulatory architecture of mouse photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Corbo (Joseph); K.A. Lawrence (Karen); M. Karlstetter (Marcus); C.A. Myers (Connie); M. Abdelaziz (Musa); W. Dirkes (William); K. Weigelt (Karin); M. Seifert (Martin); V. Benes (Vladimir); L.G. Fritsche (Lars); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); T. Langmann (Thomas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractApproximately 98% of mammalian DNA is noncoding, yet we understand relatively little about the function of this enigmatic portion of the genome. The cis-regulatory elements that control gene expression reside in noncoding regions and can be identified by mapping the binding sites of

  13. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette; Eiberg, Hans; Hansen, Lars; Hussain, Muhammad Sajid; Rehman, Shoaib ur; Azhar, Aysha; Ali, Amjad; Bakhtiar, Syeda Marriam; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Kjaer, Klaus W

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects have been reported in ZRS, the underlying regulatory mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the effect on transcription factor binding of a novel ZRS point mutation (463T>G) in a Pakistani family with preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumb. Electrophoretical mobility shift assay demonstrated a marked difference between wild-type and the mutant probe, which uniquely bound one or several transcription factors extracted from Caco-2 cells. This finding supports a model in which ectopic anterior SHH expression in the developing limb results from abnormal binding of one or more transcription factors to the mutant sequence. PMID:20068592

  14. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (human phenotypic variation.

  15. Using hexamers to predict cis-regulatory motifs in Drosophila

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    Kibler Dennis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are short stretches of DNA that help regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. They have been found up to 1 megabase away from the genes they regulate and can be located upstream, downstream, and even within their target genes. Due to the difficulty of finding CRMs using biological and computational techniques, even well-studied regulatory systems may contain CRMs that have not yet been discovered. Results We present a simple, efficient method (HexDiff based only on hexamer frequencies of known CRMs and non-CRM sequence to predict novel CRMs in regulatory systems. On a data set of 16 gap and pair-rule genes containing 52 known CRMs, predictions made by HexDiff had a higher correlation with the known CRMs than several existing CRM prediction algorithms: Ahab, Cluster Buster, MSCAN, MCAST, and LWF. After combining the results of the different algorithms, 10 putative CRMs were identified and are strong candidates for future study. The hexamers used by HexDiff to distinguish between CRMs and non-CRM sequence were also analyzed and were shown to be enriched in regulatory elements. Conclusion HexDiff provides an efficient and effective means for finding new CRMs based on known CRMs, rather than known binding sites.

  16. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (<13,000), in part because of an overrepresentation among the former in multiallelic tandem repeat variation, especially (AC)(n) dinucleotide microsatellites. The role of microsatellites in gene expression variation may provide a larger store of heritable phenotypic variation, and a more rapid mutational input of such variation, than has been realized. Finally, we outline the distinctive consequences of cis-regulatory variation for the genotype-phenotype relationship, including ubiquitous epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions, as well as underappreciated modes of pleiotropy and overdominance. Ordinary small-scale mutations contribute to pervasive variation in transcription rates and consequently to patterns of human phenotypic variation.

  17. Exonic remnants of whole-genome duplication reveal cis-regulatory function of coding exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianjun; Navratilova, Pavla; Fredman, David; Drivenes, Øyvind; Becker, Thomas S; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-03-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the fate of genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) and identify exonic remnants that have survived the disappearance of their host genes after whole-genome duplication (WGD) in teleosts, we discover a set of 38 candidate cis-regulatory coding exons (RCEs) with predicted target genes. These elements demonstrate evolutionary separation of overlapping protein-coding and regulatory information after WGD in teleosts. We present evidence that the corresponding mammalian exons are still under both coding and non-coding selection pressure, are more conserved than other protein coding exons in the host gene and several control sets, and share key characteristics with highly conserved non-coding elements in the same regions. Their dual function is corroborated by existing experimental data. Additionally, we show examples of human exon remnants stemming from the vertebrate 2R WGD. Our findings suggest that long-range cis-regulatory inputs for developmental genes are not limited to non-coding regions, but can also overlap the coding sequence of unrelated genes. Thus, exonic regulatory elements in GRBs might be functionally equivalent to those in non-coding regions, calling for a re-evaluation of the sequence space in which to look for long-range regulatory elements and experimentally test their activity.

  18. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

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    Marina E. Singarete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes.

  19. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singarete, Marina E.; Grizante, Mariana B.; Milograna, Sarah R.; Nery, Mariana F.; Kin, Koryu; Wagner, Günter P.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS) using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes. PMID:26500429

  20. Erroneous attribution of relevant transcription factor binding sites despite successful prediction of cis-regulatory modules

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    Halfon Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules are bound by transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Characterizing these DNA sequences is central to understanding gene regulatory networks and gaining insight into mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, but genome-scale regulatory module discovery remains a challenge. One popular approach is to scan the genome for clusters of transcription factor binding sites, especially those conserved in related species. When such approaches are successful, it is typically assumed that the activity of the modules is mediated by the identified binding sites and their cognate transcription factors. However, the validity of this assumption is often not assessed. Results We successfully predicted five new cis-regulatory modules by combining binding site identification with sequence conservation and compared these to unsuccessful predictions from a related approach not utilizing sequence conservation. Despite greatly improved predictive success, the positive set had similar degrees of sequence and binding site conservation as the negative set. We explored the reasons for this by mutagenizing putative binding sites in three cis-regulatory modules. A large proportion of the tested sites had little or no demonstrable role in mediating regulatory element activity. Examination of loss-of-function mutants also showed that some transcription factors supposedly binding to the modules are not required for their function. Conclusions Our results raise important questions about interpreting regulatory module predictions obtained by finding clusters of conserved binding sites. Attribution of function to these sites and their cognate transcription factors may be incorrect even when modules are successfully identified. Our study underscores the importance of empirical validation of computational results even when these results are in line with expectation.

  1. Extensive conservation of ancient microsynteny across metazoans due to cis-regulatory constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Manuel; Tena, Juan J; Alexis, Maria S; Fernandez-Miñan, Ana; Maeso, Ignacio; Bogdanovic, Ozren; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Roy, Scott W; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L; Fraser, Hunter B

    2012-12-01

    The order of genes in eukaryotic genomes has generally been assumed to be neutral, since gene order is largely scrambled over evolutionary time. Only a handful of exceptional examples are known, typically involving deeply conserved clusters of tandemly duplicated genes (e.g., Hox genes and histones). Here we report the first systematic survey of microsynteny conservation across metazoans, utilizing 17 genome sequences. We identified nearly 600 pairs of unrelated genes that have remained tightly physically linked in diverse lineages across over 600 million years of evolution. Integrating sequence conservation, gene expression data, gene function, epigenetic marks, and other genomic features, we provide extensive evidence that many conserved ancient linkages involve (1) the coordinated transcription of neighboring genes, or (2) genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) in which transcriptional enhancers controlling developmental genes are contained within nearby bystander genes. In addition, we generated ChIP-seq data for key histone modifications in zebrafish embryos, which provided further evidence of putative GRBs in embryonic development. Finally, using chromosome conformation capture (3C) assays and stable transgenic experiments, we demonstrate that enhancers within bystander genes drive the expression of genes such as Otx and Islet, critical regulators of central nervous system development across bilaterians. These results suggest that ancient genomic functional associations are far more common than previously thought-involving ∼12% of the ancestral bilaterian genome-and that cis-regulatory constraints are crucial in determining metazoan genome architecture.

  2. Cis-regulatory landscapes of four cell types of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Dominik; Krebs, Arnaud R; Jüttner, Josephine; Roska, Botond; Schübeler, Dirk

    2017-11-16

    The retina is composed of ∼50 cell-types with specific functions for the process of vision. Identification of the cis-regulatory elements active in retinal cell-types is key to elucidate the networks controlling this diversity. Here, we combined transcriptome and epigenome profiling to map the regulatory landscape of four cell-types isolated from mouse retinas including rod and cone photoreceptors as well as rare inter-neuron populations such as horizontal and starburst amacrine cells. Integration of this information reveals sequence determinants and candidate transcription factors for controlling cellular specialization. Additionally, we refined parallel reporter assays to enable studying the transcriptional activity of large collection of sequences in individual cell-types isolated from a tissue. We provide proof of concept for this approach and its scalability by characterizing the transcriptional capacity of several hundred putative regulatory sequences within individual retinal cell-types. This generates a catalogue of cis-regulatory regions active in retinal cell types and we further demonstrate their utility as potential resource for cellular tagging and manipulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Ancient Pbx-Hox signatures define hundreds of vertebrate developmental enhancers

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    Parker Hugo J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation through cis-regulatory elements plays a crucial role in development and disease. A major aim of the post-genomic era is to be able to read the function of cis-regulatory elements through scrutiny of their DNA sequence. Whilst comparative genomics approaches have identified thousands of putative regulatory elements, our knowledge of their mechanism of action is poor and very little progress has been made in systematically de-coding them. Results Here, we identify ancient functional signatures within vertebrate conserved non-coding elements (CNEs through a combination of phylogenetic footprinting and functional assay, using genomic sequence from the sea lamprey as a reference. We uncover a striking enrichment within vertebrate CNEs for conserved binding-site motifs of the Pbx-Hox hetero-dimer. We further show that these predict reporter gene expression in a segment specific manner in the hindbrain and pharyngeal arches during zebrafish development. Conclusions These findings evoke an evolutionary scenario in which many CNEs evolved early in the vertebrate lineage to co-ordinate Hox-dependent gene-regulatory interactions that pattern the vertebrate head. In a broader context, our evolutionary analyses reveal that CNEs are composed of tightly linked transcription-factor binding-sites (TFBSs, which can be systematically identified through phylogenetic footprinting approaches. By placing a large number of ancient vertebrate CNEs into a developmental context, our findings promise to have a significant impact on efforts toward de-coding gene-regulatory elements that underlie vertebrate development, and will facilitate building general models of regulatory element evolution.

  4. Uncovering cis regulatory codes using synthetic promoter shuffling.

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    Ali Kinkhabwala

    Full Text Available Revealing the spectrum of combinatorial regulation of transcription at individual promoters is essential for understanding the complex structure of biological networks. However, the computations represented by the integration of various molecular signals at complex promoters are difficult to decipher in the absence of simple cis regulatory codes. Here we synthetically shuffle the regulatory architecture--operator sequences binding activators and repressors--of a canonical bacterial promoter. The resulting library of complex promoters allows for rapid exploration of promoter encoded logic regulation. Among all possible logic functions, NOR and ANDN promoter encoded logics predominate. A simple transcriptional cis regulatory code determines both logics, establishing a straightforward map between promoter structure and logic phenotype. The regulatory code is determined solely by the type of transcriptional regulation combinations: two repressors generate a NOR: NOT (a OR b whereas a repressor and an activator generate an ANDN: a AND NOT b. Three-input versions of both logics, having an additional repressor as an input, are also present in the library. The resulting complex promoters cover a wide dynamic range of transcriptional strengths. Synthetic promoter shuffling represents a fast and efficient method for exploring the spectrum of complex regulatory functions that can be encoded by complex promoters. From an engineering point of view, synthetic promoter shuffling enables the experimental testing of the functional properties of complex promoters that cannot necessarily be inferred ab initio from the known properties of the individual genetic components. Synthetic promoter shuffling may provide a useful experimental tool for studying naturally occurring promoter shuffling.

  5. A primer on regression methods for decoding cis-regulatory logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debopriya; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-03-03

    The rapidly emerging field of systems biology is helping us to understand the molecular determinants of phenotype on a genomic scale [1]. Cis-regulatory elements are major sequence-based determinants of biological processes in cells and tissues [2]. For instance, during transcriptional regulation, transcription factors (TFs) bind to very specific regions on the promoter DNA [2,3] and recruit the basal transcriptional machinery, which ultimately initiates mRNA transcription (Figure 1A). Learning cis-Regulatory Elements from Omics Data A vast amount of work over the past decade has shown that omics data can be used to learn cis-regulatory logic on a genome-wide scale [4-6]--in particular, by integrating sequence data with mRNA expression profiles. The most popular approach has been to identify over-represented motifs in promoters of genes that are coexpressed [4,7,8]. Though widely used, such an approach can be limiting for a variety of reasons. First, the combinatorial nature of gene regulation is difficult to explicitly model in this framework. Moreover, in many applications of this approach, expression data from multiple conditions are necessary to obtain reliable predictions. This can potentially limit the use of this method to only large data sets [9]. Although these methods can be adapted to analyze mRNA expression data from a pair of biological conditions, such comparisons are often confounded by the fact that primary and secondary response genes are clustered together--whereas only the primary response genes are expected to contain the functional motifs [10]. A set of approaches based on regression has been developed to overcome the above limitations [11-32]. These approaches have their foundations in certain biophysical aspects of gene regulation [26,33-35]. That is, the models are motivated by the expected transcriptional response of genes due to the binding of TFs to their promoters. While such methods have gathered popularity in the computational domain

  6. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiau, Timothy H-C; Diaconu, Claudiu; Myers, Connie A; Lee, Jongwoo; Cepko, Constance L; Corbo, Joseph C

    2007-07-25

    The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs) mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  7. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

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    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  8. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera

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    James J. Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  9. Evidence for the role of transposons in the recruitment of cis-regulatory motifs during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chensi; Xu, Jiajia; Zheng, Guangyong; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-03-08

    C4 photosynthesis evolved from C3 photosynthesis and has higher light, water, and nitrogen use efficiencies. Several C4 photosynthesis genes show cell-specific expression patterns, which are required for these high resource-use efficiencies. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of cis-regulatory elements that control these cell-specific expression patterns remain elusive. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the cis-regulatory motifs related to C4 photosynthesis genes were recruited from non-photosynthetic genes and further examined potential mechanisms facilitating this recruitment. We examined 65 predicted bundle sheath cell-specific motifs, 17 experimentally validated cell-specific cis-regulatory elements, and 1,034 motifs derived from gene regulatory networks. Approximately 7, 5, and 1,000 of these three categories of motifs, respectively, were apparently recruited during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. In addition, we checked 1) the distance between the acceptors and the donors of potentially recruited motifs in a chromosome, and 2) whether the potentially recruited motifs reside within the overlapping region of transposable elements and the promoter of donor genes. The results showed that 7, 4, and 658 of the potentially recruited motifs might have moved via the transposable elements. Furthermore, the potentially recruited motifs showed higher binding affinity to transcription factors compared to randomly generated sequences of the same length as the motifs. This study provides molecular evidence supporting the hypothesis that transposon-driven recruitment of pre-existing cis-regulatory elements from non-photosynthetic genes into photosynthetic genes plays an important role during C4 evolution. The findings of the present study coincide with the observed repetitive emergence of C4 during evolution.

  10. Analysis of opo cis-regulatory landscape uncovers Vsx2 requirement in early eye morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Rodrigues, Ines; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Letelier, Joaquin; Naranjo, Silvia; Tena, Juan J; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L; Martinez-Morales, Juan R

    2015-05-12

    The self-organized morphogenesis of the vertebrate optic cup entails coupling the activation of the retinal gene regulatory network to the constriction-driven infolding of the retinal epithelium. Yet the genetic mechanisms underlying this coordination remain largely unexplored. Through phylogenetic footprinting and transgenesis in zebrafish, here we examine the cis-regulatory landscape of opo, an endocytosis regulator essential for eye morphogenesis. Among the different conserved enhancers identified, we isolate a single retina-specific element (H6_10137) and show that its activity depends on binding sites for the retinal determinant Vsx2. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments and ChIP analyses reveal that Vsx2 regulates opo expression through direct binding to this retinal enhancer. Furthermore, we show that vsx2 knockdown impairs the primary optic cup folding. These data support a model by which vsx2, operating through the effector gene opo, acts as a central transcriptional node that coordinates neural retina patterning and optic cup invagination in zebrafish.

  11. Barcoded DNA-tag reporters for multiplex cis-regulatory analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmin Nam

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory DNA sequences causally mediate patterns of gene expression, but efficient experimental analysis of these control systems has remained challenging. Here we develop a new version of "barcoded" DNA-tag reporters, "Nanotags" that permit simultaneous quantitative analysis of up to 130 distinct cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. The activities of these reporters are measured in single experiments by the NanoString RNA counting method and other quantitative procedures. We demonstrate the efficiency of the Nanotag method by simultaneously measuring hourly temporal activities of 126 CRMs from 46 genes in the developing sea urchin embryo, otherwise a virtually impossible task. Nanotags are also used in gene perturbation experiments to reveal cis-regulatory responses of many CRMs at once. Nanotag methodology can be applied to many research areas, ranging from gene regulatory networks to functional and evolutionary genomics.

  12. Diverse Cis-Regulatory Mechanisms Contribute to Expression Evolution of Tandem Gene Duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin-Gonzalez, Luís; Santos, Marília A; Tempesta, Camille; Sucena, Élio; Roch, Fernando; Tanaka, Kohtaro

    2017-12-01

    Pairs of duplicated genes generally display a combination of conserved expression patterns inherited from their unduplicated ancestor and newly acquired domains. However, how the cis-regulatory architecture of duplicated loci evolves to produce these expression patterns is poorly understood. We have directly examined the gene-regulatory evolution of two tandem duplicates, the Drosophila Ly6 genes CG9336 and CG9338, which arose at the base of the drosophilids between 40 and 60 Ma. Comparing the expression patterns of the two paralogs in four Drosophila species with that of the unduplicated ortholog in the tephritid Ceratitis capitata, we show that they diverged from each other as well as from the unduplicated ortholog. Moreover, the expression divergence appears to have occurred close to the duplication event and also more recently in a lineage-specific manner. The comparison of the tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) controlling the paralog expression in the four Drosophila species indicates that diverse cis-regulatory mechanisms, including the novel tissue-specific enhancers, differential inactivation, and enhancer sharing, contributed to the expression evolution. Our analysis also reveals a surprisingly variable cis-regulatory architecture, in which the CRMs driving conserved expression domains change in number, location, and specificity. Altogether, this study provides a detailed historical account that uncovers a highly dynamic picture of how the paralog expression patterns and their underlying cis-regulatory landscape evolve. We argue that our findings will encourage studying cis-regulatory evolution at the whole-locus level to understand how interactions between enhancers and other regulatory levels shape the evolution of gene expression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Global profiling of rice and poplar transcriptomes highlights key conserved circadian-controlled pathways and cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei A Filichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks provide an adaptive advantage through anticipation of daily and seasonal environmental changes. In plants, the central clock oscillator is regulated by several interlocking feedback loops. It was shown that a substantial proportion of the Arabidopsis genome cycles with phases of peak expression covering the entire day. Synchronized transcriptome cycling is driven through an extensive network of diurnal and clock-regulated transcription factors and their target cis-regulatory elements. Study of the cycling transcriptome in other plant species could thus help elucidate the similarities and differences and identify hubs of regulation common to monocot and dicot plants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a combination of oligonucleotide microarrays and data mining pipelines, we examined daily rhythms in gene expression in one monocotyledonous and one dicotyledonous plant, rice and poplar, respectively. Cycling transcriptomes were interrogated under different diurnal (driven and circadian (free running light and temperature conditions. Collectively, photocycles and thermocycles regulated about 60% of the expressed nuclear genes in rice and poplar. Depending on the condition tested, up to one third of oscillating Arabidopsis-poplar-rice orthologs were phased within three hours of each other suggesting a high degree of conservation in terms of rhythmic gene expression. We identified clusters of rhythmically co-expressed genes and searched their promoter sequences to identify phase-specific cis-elements, including elements that were conserved in the promoters of Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that the cycling patterns of many circadian clock genes are highly conserved across poplar, rice, and Arabidopsis. The expression of many orthologous genes in key metabolic and regulatory pathways is diurnal and/or circadian regulated and phased to similar times of day. Our results confirm

  14. The Wisdom of Crowds: Can Mathematical Models Crack the cis Regulatory Code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresch, Jacqueline M; Arnosti, David N

    2015-12-23

    Genomic information includes not just a "parts list" of encoded proteins and RNAs, but also the information on regulation and function. To understand this more complex, deeper layer of biological information, recent efforts have turned to mathematical models as discovery engines of the cis regulatory code. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thousands of cis-regulatory sequence combinations are shared by Arabidopsis and poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-01-01

    The identification of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) can greatly advance our understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms. Despite the existence of binding sites of more than three transcription factors (TFs) in a CRM, studies in plants often consider only the cooccurrence of binding sites of one or two TFs. In addition, CRM studies in plants are limited to combinations of only a few families of TFs. It is thus not clear how widespread plant TFs work together, which TFs work together to regulate plant genes, and how the combinations of these TFs are shared by different plants. To fill these gaps, we applied a frequent pattern-mining-based approach to identify frequently used cis-regulatory sequence combinations in the promoter sequences of two plant species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa). A cis-regulatory sequence here corresponds to a DNA motif bound by a TF. We identified 18,638 combinations composed of two to six cis-regulatory sequences that are shared by the two plant species. In addition, with known cis-regulatory sequence combinations, gene function annotation, gene expression data, and known functional gene sets, we showed that the functionality of at least 96.8% and 65.2% of these shared combinations in Arabidopsis are partially supported, under a false discovery rate of 0.1 and 0.05, respectively. Finally, we discovered that 796 of the 18,638 combinations might relate to functions that are important in bioenergy research. Our work will facilitate the study of gene transcriptional regulation in plants.

  16. MotifCombinator: a web-based tool to search for combinations of cis-regulatory motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunoda Tatsuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A combination of multiple types of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements is often required for gene expression in eukaryotes, and the combinatorial regulation confers specific gene expression to tissues or environments. To reveal the combinatorial regulation, computational methods are developed that efficiently infer combinations of cis-regulatory motifs that are important for gene expression as measured by DNA microarrays. One promising type of computational method is to utilize regression analysis between expression levels and scores of motifs in input sequences. This type takes full advantage of information on expression levels because it does not require that the expression level of each gene be dichotomized according to whether or not it reaches a certain threshold level. However, there is no web-based tool that employs regression methods to systematically search for motif combinations and that practically handles combinations of more than two or three motifs. Results We here introduced MotifCombinator, an online tool with a user-friendly interface, to systematically search for combinations composed of any number of motifs based on regression methods. The tool utilizes well-known regression methods (the multivariate linear regression, the multivariate adaptive regression spline or MARS, and the multivariate logistic regression method for this purpose, and uses the genetic algorithm to search for combinations composed of any desired number of motifs. The visualization systems in this tool help users to intuitively grasp the process of the combination search, and the backup system allows users to easily stop and restart calculations that are expected to require large computational time. This tool also provides preparatory steps needed for systematic combination search – i.e., selecting single motifs to constitute combinations and cutting out redundant similar motifs based on clustering analysis. Conclusion

  17. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  18. Expression-guided in silico evaluation of candidate cis regulatory codes for Drosophila muscle founder cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Philippakis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed "CodeFinder" that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells.

  19. Breaking Colinearity in the Mouse HoxD Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kondo, Takashi; Duboule, Denis

    1999-01-01

    .... Previous work suggested that Hox genes were made progressively available for transcription in the course of gastrulation, implying the existence of an element capable of initiating a repressive...

  20. Systems analysis of cis-regulatory motifs in C4 photosynthesis genes using maize and rice leaf transcriptomic data during a process of de-etiolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiajia; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P M; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-09-01

    Identification of potential cis-regulatory motifs controlling the development of C4 photosynthesis is a major focus of current research. In this study, we used time-series RNA-seq data collected from etiolated maize and rice leaf tissues sampled during a de-etiolation process to systematically characterize the expression patterns of C4-related genes and to further identify potential cis elements in five different genomic regions (i.e. promoter, 5'UTR, 3'UTR, intron, and coding sequence) of C4 orthologous genes. The results demonstrate that although most of the C4 genes show similar expression patterns, a number of them, including chloroplast dicarboxylate transporter 1, aspartate aminotransferase, and triose phosphate transporter, show shifted expression patterns compared with their C3 counterparts. A number of conserved short DNA motifs between maize C4 genes and their rice orthologous genes were identified not only in the promoter, 5'UTR, 3'UTR, and coding sequences, but also in the introns of core C4 genes. We also identified cis-regulatory motifs that exist in maize C4 genes and also in genes showing similar expression patterns as maize C4 genes but that do not exist in rice C3 orthologs, suggesting a possible recruitment of pre-existing cis-elements from genes unrelated to C4 photosynthesis into C4 photosynthesis genes during C4 evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. DNaseI hypersensitivity and ultraconservation reveal novel, interdependent long-range enhancers at the complex Pax6 cis-regulatory region.

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    David J McBride

    Full Text Available The PAX6 gene plays a crucial role in development of the eye, brain, olfactory system and endocrine pancreas. Consistent with its pleiotropic role the gene exhibits a complex developmental expression pattern which is subject to strict spatial, temporal and quantitative regulation. Control of expression depends on a large array of cis-elements residing in an extended genomic domain around the coding region of the gene. The minimal essential region required for proper regulation of this complex locus has been defined through analysis of human aniridia-associated breakpoints and YAC transgenic rescue studies of the mouse smalleye mutant. We have carried out a systematic DNase I hypersensitive site (HS analysis across 200 kb of this critical region of mouse chromosome 2E3 to identify putative regulatory elements. Mapping the identified HSs onto a percent identity plot (PIP shows many HSs correspond to recognisable genomic features such as evolutionarily conserved sequences, CpG islands and retrotransposon derived repeats. We then focussed on a region previously shown to contain essential long range cis-regulatory information, the Pax6 downstream regulatory region (DRR, allowing comparison of mouse HS data with previous human HS data for this region. Reporter transgenic mice for two of the HS sites, HS5 and HS6, show that they function as tissue specific regulatory elements. In addition we have characterised enhancer activity of an ultra-conserved cis-regulatory region located near Pax6, termed E60. All three cis-elements exhibit multiple spatio-temporal activities in the embryo that overlap between themselves and other elements in the locus. Using a deletion set of YAC reporter transgenic mice we demonstrate functional interdependence of the elements. Finally, we use the HS6 enhancer as a marker for the migration of precerebellar neuro-epithelium cells to the hindbrain precerebellar nuclei along the posterior and anterior extramural streams allowing

  2. Corto and DSP1 interact and bind to a maintenance element of the Scr Hox gene: understanding the role of Enhancers of trithorax and Polycomb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boldyreva Lidiya

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb-group genes (PcG encode proteins that maintain homeotic (Hox gene repression throughout development. Conversely, trithorax-group (trxG genes encode positive factors required for maintenance of long term Hox gene activation. Both kinds of factors bind chromatin regions called maintenance elements (ME. Our previous work has shown that corto, which codes for a chromodomain protein, and dsp1, which codes for an HMGB protein, belong to a class of genes called the Enhancers of trithorax and Polycomb (ETP that interact with both PcG and trxG. Moreover, dsp1 interacts with the Hox gene Scr, the DSP1 protein is present on a Scr ME in S2 cells but not in embryos. To understand better the role of ETP, we addressed genetic and molecular interactions between corto and dsp1. Results We show that Corto and DSP1 proteins co-localize at 91 sites on polytene chromosomes and co-immunoprecipitate in embryos. They interact directly through the DSP1 HMG-boxes and the amino-part of Corto, which contains a chromodomain. In order to search for a common target, we performed a genetic interaction analysis. We observed that corto mutants suppressed dsp11 sex comb phenotypes and enhanced AntpScx phenotypes, suggesting that corto and dsp1 are simultaneously involved in the regulation of Scr. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation of the Scr ME, we found that Corto was present on this ME both in Drosophila S2 cells and in embryos, whereas DSP1 was present only in S2 cells. Conclusion Our results reveal that the proteins Corto and DSP1 are differently recruited to a Scr ME depending on whether the ME is active, as seen in S2 cells, or inactive, as in most embryonic cells. The presence of a given combination of ETPs on an ME would control the recruitment of either PcG or TrxG complexes, propagating the silenced or active state.

  3. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them.

  4. A New Algorithm for Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules Based on Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is the key to understanding mechanisms of transcription regulation. Since CRMs have specific regulatory structures that are the basis for the regulation of gene expression, how to model the regulatory structure of CRMs has a considerable impact on the performance of CRM identification. The paper proposes a CRM discovery algorithm called ComSPS. ComSPS builds a regulatory structure model of CRMs based on HMM by exploring the rules of CRM transcriptional grammar that governs the internal motif site arrangement of CRMs. We test ComSPS on three benchmark datasets and compare it with five existing methods. Experimental results show that ComSPS performs better than them. PMID:28497059

  5. Identification of cis-regulatory mutations generating de novo edges in personalized cancer gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Imrichova, Hana; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Reumers, Joke; Ceulemans, Hugo; Aerts, Stein

    2017-08-30

    The identification of functional non-coding mutations is a key challenge in the field of genomics. Here we introduce μ-cisTarget to filter, annotate and prioritize cis-regulatory mutations based on their putative effect on the underlying "personal" gene regulatory network. We validated μ-cisTarget by re-analyzing the TAL1 and LMO1 enhancer mutations in T-ALL, and the TERT promoter mutation in melanoma. Next, we re-sequenced the full genomes of ten cancer cell lines and used matched transcriptome data and motif discovery to identify master regulators with de novo binding sites that result in the up-regulation of nearby oncogenic drivers. μ-cisTarget is available from http://mucistarget.aertslab.org .

  6. PreCisIon: PREdiction of CIS-regulatory elements improved by gene's positION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elati, Mohamed; Nicolle, Rémy; Junier, Ivan; Fernández, David; Fekih, Rim; Font, Julio; Képès, François

    2013-02-01

    Conventional approaches to predict transcriptional regulatory interactions usually rely on the definition of a shared motif sequence on the target genes of a transcription factor (TF). These efforts have been frustrated by the limited availability and accuracy of TF binding site motifs, usually represented as position-specific scoring matrices, which may match large numbers of sites and produce an unreliable list of target genes. To improve the prediction of binding sites, we propose to additionally use the unrelated knowledge of the genome layout. Indeed, it has been shown that co-regulated genes tend to be either neighbors or periodically spaced along the whole chromosome. This study demonstrates that respective gene positioning carries significant information. This novel type of information is combined with traditional sequence information by a machine learning algorithm called PreCisIon. To optimize this combination, PreCisIon builds a strong gene target classifier by adaptively combining weak classifiers based on either local binding sequence or global gene position. This strategy generically paves the way to the optimized incorporation of any future advances in gene target prediction based on local sequence, genome layout or on novel criteria. With the current state of the art, PreCisIon consistently improves methods based on sequence information only. This is shown by implementing a cross-validation analysis of the 20 major TFs from two phylogenetically remote model organisms. For Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, respectively, PreCisIon achieves on average an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 70 and 60%, a sensitivity of 80 and 70% and a specificity of 60 and 56%. The newly predicted gene targets are demonstrated to be functionally consistent with previously known targets, as assessed by analysis of Gene Ontology enrichment or of the relevant literature and databases.

  7. Long-range regulation by shared retinoic acid response elements modulates dynamic expression of posterior Hoxb genes in CNS development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngwook; Mullan, Hillary E; Krumlauf, Robb

    2014-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signaling plays an important role in determining the anterior boundary of Hox gene expression in the neural tube during embryogenesis. In particular, RA signaling is implicated in a rostral expansion of the neural expression domain of 5׳ Hoxb genes (Hoxb9-Hoxb5) in mice. However, underlying mechanisms for this gene regulation have remained elusive due to the lack of RA responsive element (RARE) in the 5׳ half of the HoxB cluster. To identify cis-regulatory elements required for the rostral expansion, we developed a recombineering technology to serially label multiple genes with different reporters in a single bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector containing the mouse HoxB cluster. This allowed us to simultaneously monitor the expression of multiple genes. In contrast to plasmid-based reporters, transgenic BAC reporters faithfully recapitulated endogenous gene expression patterns of the Hoxb genes including the rostral expansion. Combined inactivation of two RAREs, DE-RARE and ENE-RARE, in the BAC completely abolished the rostral expansion of the 5׳ Hoxb genes. Knock-out of endogenous DE-RARE lead to significantly reduced expression of multiple Hoxb genes and attenuated Hox gene response to exogenous RA treatment in utero. Regulatory potential of DE-RARE was further demonstrated by its ability to anteriorize 5׳ Hoxa gene expression in the neural tube when inserted into a HoxA BAC reporter. Our data demonstrate that multiple RAREs cooperate to remotely regulate 5׳ Hoxb genes during CNS development, providing a new insight into the mechanisms for gene regulation within the Hox clusters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thousands of Cis-Regulatory Sequence Combinations Are Shared by Arabidopsis and Poplar1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-01-01

    The identification of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) can greatly advance our understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms. Despite the existence of binding sites of more than three transcription factors (TFs) in a CRM, studies in plants often consider only the cooccurrence of binding sites of one or two TFs. In addition, CRM studies in plants are limited to combinations of only a few families of TFs. It is thus not clear how widespread plant TFs work together, which TFs work together to regulate plant genes, and how the combinations of these TFs are shared by different plants. To fill these gaps, we applied a frequent pattern-mining-based approach to identify frequently used cis-regulatory sequence combinations in the promoter sequences of two plant species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa). A cis-regulatory sequence here corresponds to a DNA motif bound by a TF. We identified 18,638 combinations composed of two to six cis-regulatory sequences that are shared by the two plant species. In addition, with known cis-regulatory sequence combinations, gene function annotation, gene expression data, and known functional gene sets, we showed that the functionality of at least 96.8% and 65.2% of these shared combinations in Arabidopsis are partially supported, under a false discovery rate of 0.1 and 0.05, respectively. Finally, we discovered that 796 of the 18,638 combinations might relate to functions that are important in bioenergy research. Our work will facilitate the study of gene transcriptional regulation in plants. PMID:22058225

  9. The molecular mechanism of a cis-regulatory adaptation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Chang

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in our ability to detect adaptive evolution involving the cis-regulation of gene expression, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations has lagged far behind. Across all model organisms, the causal mutations have been discovered for only a handful of gene expression adaptations, and even for these, mechanistic details (e.g. the trans-regulatory factors involved have not been determined. We previously reported a polygenic gene expression adaptation involving down-regulation of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of a cis-acting mutation affecting a member of this pathway, ERG28. We show that the causal mutation is a two-base deletion in the promoter of ERG28 that strongly reduces the binding of two transcription factors, Sok2 and Mot3, thus abolishing their regulation of ERG28. This down-regulation increases resistance to a widely used antifungal drug targeting ergosterol, similar to mutations disrupting this pathway in clinical yeast isolates. The identification of the causal genetic variant revealed that the selection likely occurred after the deletion was already present at high frequency in the population, rather than when it was a new mutation. These results provide a detailed view of the molecular mechanism of a cis-regulatory adaptation, and underscore the importance of this view to our understanding of evolution at the molecular level.

  10. A Resource for Manipulating Gene Expression and Analyzing cis-Regulatory Modules in the Drosophila CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurina Manning

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the embryonic central nervous system expression of 5,000 GAL4 lines made using molecularly defined cis-regulatory DNA inserted into a single attP genomic location. We document and annotate the patterns in early embryos when neurogenesis is at its peak, and in older embryos where there is maximal neuronal diversity and the first neural circuits are established. We note expression in other tissues, such as the lateral body wall (muscle, sensory neurons, and trachea and viscera. Companion papers report on the adult brain and larval imaginal discs, and the integrated data sets are available online (http://www.janelia.org/gal4-gen1. This collection of embryonically expressed GAL4 lines will be valuable for determining neuronal morphology and function. The 1,862 lines expressed in small subsets of neurons (<20/segment will be especially valuable for characterizing interneuronal diversity and function, because although interneurons comprise the majority of all central nervous system neurons, their gene expression profile and function remain virtually unexplored.

  11. Bacterial regulon modeling and prediction based on systematic cis regulatory motif analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zeng, Erliang; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Regulons are the basic units of the response system in a bacterial cell, and each consists of a set of transcriptionally co-regulated operons. Regulon elucidation is the basis for studying the bacterial global transcriptional regulation network. In this study, we designed a novel co-regulation score between a pair of operons based on accurate operon identification and cis regulatory motif analyses, which can capture their co-regulation relationship much better than other scores. Taking full advantage of this discovery, we developed a new computational framework and built a novel graph model for regulon prediction. This model integrates the motif comparison and clustering and makes the regulon prediction problem substantially more solvable and accurate. To evaluate our prediction, a regulon coverage score was designed based on the documented regulons and their overlap with our prediction; and a modified Fisher Exact test was implemented to measure how well our predictions match the co-expressed modules derived from E. coli microarray gene-expression datasets collected under 466 conditions. The results indicate that our program consistently performed better than others in terms of the prediction accuracy. This suggests that our algorithms substantially improve the state-of-the-art, leading to a computational capability to reliably predict regulons for any bacteria.

  12. Functional dissection of the Hox protein Abdominal-B in Drosophila cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Zongzhao [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yang, Xingke, E-mail: yangxk@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Lohmann, Ingrid, E-mail: ilohmann@flydev.org [CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 CRM was identified to be the posterior spiracle enhancer of gene cut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 is under the direct transcriptional control of Hox protein Abd-B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient cloning system was developed to assay protein-DNA interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. -- Abstract: Hox transcription factors regulate the morphogenesis along the anterior-posterior (A/P) body axis through the interaction with small cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of their target gene, however so far very few Hox CRMs are known and have been analyzed in detail. In this study we have identified a new Hox CRM, ct340, which guides the expression of the cell type specification gene cut (ct) in the posterior spiracle under the direct control of the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Using the ct340 enhancer activity as readout, an efficient cloning system to generate VP16 activation domain fusion protein was developed to unambiguously test protein-DNA interaction in Drosophila cell culture. By functionally dissecting the Abd-B protein, new features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. Due to its easy adaptability, this system can be generally used to map functional domains within sequence-specific transcriptional factors in Drosophila cell culture, and thus provide preliminary knowledge of the protein functional domain structure for further in vivo analysis.

  13. Maps of cis-Regulatory Nodes in Megabase Long Genome Segments are an Inevitable Intermediate Step Toward Whole Genome Functional Mapping.

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    Nikolaev, Lev G; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2007-04-01

    The availability of complete human and other metazoan genome sequences has greatly facilitated positioning and analysis of various genomic functional elements, with initial emphasis on coding sequences. However, complete functional maps of sequenced eukaryotic genomes should include also positions of all non-coding regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of a multitude of regulatory sequences, such as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. Since most genomic regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements by computational methods is difficult and often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identifying and mapping genomic functional elements is highly desirable. At the same time, the creation of whole-genome map of hundreds of thousands of regulatory elements in several hundreds of tissue/cell types is presently far beyond our capabilities. A possible alternative for the whole genome approach is to concentrate efforts on individual genomic segments and then to integrate the data obtained into a whole genome functional map. Moreover, the maps of polygenic fragments with functional cis-regulatory elements would provide valuable data on complex regulatory systems, including their variability and evolution. Here, we reviewed experimental approaches to the realization of these ideas, including our own developments of experimental techniques for selection of cis-acting functionally active DNA fragments from large (megabase-sized) segments of mammalian genomes.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

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    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52 were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7 to 9.5×10(-89. The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Bioinformatic analysis of cis-regulatory interactions between progesterone and estrogen receptors in breast cancer

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    Matloob Khushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors interact with each other in a cell and sequence-specific manner in order to regulate transcription and a wealth of publically available datasets exists describing the genomic locations of these interactions. Our recently published BiSA (Binding Sites Analyser database contains transcription factor binding locations and epigenetic modifications collected from published studies and provides tools to analyse stored and imported data. Using BiSA we investigated the overlapping cis-regulatory role of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR in the T-47D breast cancer cell line. We found that ERα binding sites overlap with a subset of PR binding sites. To investigate further, we re-analysed raw data to remove any biases introduced by the use of distinct tools in the original publications. We identified 22,152 PR and 18,560 ERα binding sites (<5% false discovery rate with 4,358 overlapping regions among the two datasets. BiSA statistical analysis revealed a non-significant overall overlap correlation between the two factors, suggesting that ERα and PR are not partner factors and do not require each other for binding to occur. However, Monte Carlo simulation by Binary Interval Search (BITS, Relevant Distance, Absolute Distance, Jaccard and Projection tests by Genometricorr revealed a statistically significant spatial correlation of binding regions on chromosome between the two factors. Motif analysis revealed that the shared binding regions were enriched with binding motifs for ERα, PR and a number of other transcription and pioneer factors. Some of these factors are known to co-locate with ERα and PR binding. Therefore spatially close proximity of ERα binding sites with PR binding sites suggests that ERα and PR, in general function independently at the molecular level, but that their activities converge on a specific subset of transcriptional targets.

  16. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

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    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  17. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs

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    Girgis Hani Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF binding sites (TFBSs. Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. Results We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was

  18. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Hani Z; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2012-02-07

    Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was 21-75% more precise than a related CRM

  19. Promoter analysis reveals cis-regulatory motifs associated with the expression of the WRKY transcription factor CrWRKY1 in Catharanthus roseus.

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    Yang, Zhirong; Patra, Barunava; Li, Runzhi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2013-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as an important group of regulators of plant secondary metabolism. However, the cis-regulatory elements associated with their regulation have not been well characterized. We have previously demonstrated that CrWRKY1, a member of subgroup III of the WRKY TF family, regulates biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids in the ornamental and medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of the CrWRKY1 promoter. In silico analysis of the promoter sequence reveals the presence of several potential TF binding motifs, indicating the involvement of additional TFs in the regulation of the TIA pathway. The CrWRKY1 promoter can drive the expression of a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in native (C. roseus protoplasts and transgenic hairy roots) and heterologous (transgenic tobacco seedlings) systems. Analysis of 5'- or 3'-end deletions indicates that the sequence located between positions -140 to -93 bp and -3 to +113 bp, relative to the transcription start site, is critical for promoter activity. Mutation analysis shows that two overlapping as-1 elements and a CT-rich motif contribute significantly to promoter activity. The CrWRKY1 promoter is induced in response to methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment and the promoter region between -230 and -93 bp contains a putative MJ-responsive element. The CrWRKY1 promoter can potentially be used as a tool to isolate novel TFs involved in the regulation of the TIA pathway.

  20. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

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    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  1. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  2. Novel interactions between vertebrate Hox genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooiveld, MHW; Morgan, R; Rieden, PID; Houtzager, E; Pannese, M; Damen, K; Boncinelli, E; Durston, AJ

    1999-01-01

    Understanding why metazoan Hox/HOM-C genes are expressed in spatiotemporal sequences showing colinearity with their genomic sequence is a central challenge in developmental biology. Here, we studied the consequences of ectopically expressing Hox genes to investigate whether Hox-Hox interactions

  3. Making connections: Insulators organize eukaryotic chromosomes into independent cis-regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetverina, Darya; Aoki, Tsutomu; Erokhin, Maksim; Georgiev, Pavel; Schedl, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insulators play a central role in subdividing the chromosome into a series of discrete topologically independent domains and in ensuring that enhancers and silencers contact their appropriate target genes. In this review we first discuss the general characteristics of insulator elements and their associated protein factors. A growing collection of insulator proteins have been identified including a family of proteins whose expression is developmental regulator. We next consider several unexpected discoveries that require us to completely rethink both how insulators function (and how they can best be assayed). These discoveries also require a reevaluation of how insulators might restrict or orchestrate (by preventing or promoting) interactions between regulatory elements and their target genes. We conclude by connecting these new insights into the mechanisms of insulator action to dynamic changes in the 3-dimensional topology of the chromatin fiber and the generation of specific patterns of gene activity during development and differentiation. PMID:24277632

  4. Transcriptional regulation of human-specific SVAF₁ retrotransposons by cis-regulatory MAST2 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotneva, Anastasia A; Bantysh, Olga; Suntsova, Maria V; Efimova, Nadezhda; Malakhova, Galina V; Schumann, Gerald G; Gayfullin, Nurshat M; Buzdin, Anton A

    2012-08-15

    SVA elements represent the youngest family of hominid non-LTR retrotransposons. Recently, a human-specific subfamily (termed SVA(F1), CpG-SVA, or MAST2-SVA) was discovered representing fusion of the CpG island-containing exon 1 of the MAST2 gene and a 5'-truncated SVA. SVA(F1) includes at least 84 members, which suggests exceptionally high retrotransposition level. We investigated if the acquirement of the MAST2 CpG-island might play a role in the success of the SVA(F1) subfamily. We observed that in 16 samples representing seven human tissues, MAST2 was cotranscribed with the members of the SVA(F1) subfamily, but not with other retrotransposons. We found that the methylation status of the MAST2-derived sequences of SVA(F1) elements reversely correlates with the transcriptional activity of MAST2. The MAST2 sequence at the 5' end of SVA(F1) acts as a positive transcriptional regulator in human germ cells. Finally, in various testicular tissue samples we uncovered a transcriptional correlation of MAST2 with the human L1, Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cis Regulatory Effects on A-to-I RNA Editing in Related Drosophila Species

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    Anne L. Sapiro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing modifies maturing mRNAs through the binding of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (Adar proteins to double-stranded RNA structures in a process critical for neuronal function. Editing levels at individual editing sites span a broad range and are mediated by both cis-acting elements (surrounding RNA sequence and secondary structure and trans-acting factors. Here, we aim to determine the roles that cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors play in regulating editing levels. Using two closely related Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. sechellia, and their F1 hybrids, we dissect the effects of cis sequences from trans regulators on editing levels by comparing species-specific editing in parents and their hybrids. We report that cis sequence differences are largely responsible for editing level differences between these two Drosophila species. This study presents evidence for cis sequence and structure changes as the dominant evolutionary force that modulates RNA editing levels between these Drosophila species.

  6. Network discovery pipeline elucidates conserved time-of-day-specific cis-regulatory modules.

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    Todd P Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Correct daily phasing of transcription confers an adaptive advantage to almost all organisms, including higher plants. In this study, we describe a hypothesis-driven network discovery pipeline that identifies biologically relevant patterns in genome-scale data. To demonstrate its utility, we analyzed a comprehensive matrix of time courses interrogating the nuclear transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under different thermocycles, photocycles, and circadian conditions. We show that 89% of Arabidopsis transcripts cycle in at least one condition and that most genes have peak expression at a particular time of day, which shifts depending on the environment. Thermocycles alone can drive at least half of all transcripts critical for synchronizing internal processes such as cell cycle and protein synthesis. We identified at least three distinct transcription modules controlling phase-specific expression, including a new midnight specific module, PBX/TBX/SBX. We validated the network discovery pipeline, as well as the midnight specific module, by demonstrating that the PBX element was sufficient to drive diurnal and circadian condition-dependent expression. Moreover, we show that the three transcription modules are conserved across Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. These results confirm the complex interplay between thermocycles, photocycles, and the circadian clock on the daily transcription program, and provide a comprehensive view of the conserved genomic targets for a transcriptional network key to successful adaptation.

  7. An algorithmic perspective of de novo cis-regulatory motif finding based on ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingqiang; Yang, Jinyu; Li, Yang; McDermaid, Adam; Ma, Qin

    2017-03-08

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences and play important roles in controlling the expression levels of their target genes. Hence, prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) provides a solid foundation for inferring gene regulatory mechanisms and building regulatory networks for a genome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) technology can generate large-scale experimental data for such protein-DNA interactions, providing an unprecedented opportunity to identify TFBSs (a.k.a. cis-regulatory motifs). The bottleneck, however, is the lack of robust mathematical models, as well as efficient computational methods for TFBS prediction to make effective use of massive ChIP-seq data sets in the public domain. The purpose of this study is to review existing motif-finding methods for ChIP-seq data from an algorithmic perspective and provide new computational insight into this field. The state-of-the-art methods were shown through summarizing eight representative motif-finding algorithms along with corresponding challenges, and introducing some important relative functions according to specific biological demands, including discriminative motif finding and cofactor motifs analysis. Finally, potential directions and plans for ChIP-seq-based motif-finding tools were showcased in support of future algorithm development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Discovery of cell-type specific DNA motif grammar in cis-regulatory elements using random Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Lin, Peijie; Ho, Joshua W K

    2018-01-19

    It has been observed that many transcription factors (TFs) can bind to different genomic loci depending on the cell type in which a TF is expressed in, even though the individual TF usually binds to the same core motif in different cell types. How a TF can bind to the genome in such a highly cell-type specific manner, is a critical research question. One hypothesis is that a TF requires co-binding of different TFs in different cell types. If this is the case, it may be possible to observe different combinations of TF motifs - a motif grammar - located at the TF binding sites in different cell types. In this study, we develop a bioinformatics method to systematically identify DNA motifs in TF binding sites across multiple cell types based on published ChIP-seq data, and address two questions: (1) can we build a machine learning classifier to predict cell-type specificity based on motif combinations alone, and (2) can we extract meaningful cell-type specific motif grammars from this classifier model. We present a Random Forest (RF) based approach to build a multi-class classifier to predict the cell-type specificity of a TF binding site given its motif content. We applied this RF classifier to two published ChIP-seq datasets of TF (TCF7L2 and MAX) across multiple cell types. Using cross-validation, we show that motif combinations alone are indeed predictive of cell types. Furthermore, we present a rule mining approach to extract the most discriminatory rules in the RF classifier, thus allowing us to discover the underlying cell-type specific motif grammar. Our bioinformatics analysis supports the hypothesis that combinatorial TF motif patterns are cell-type specific.

  9. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, E.; Della Pina, S.; Castel, R.; Souer, E.; Koes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than

  10. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, E.; Della Pina, S.; Castel, R.; Souer, E.J.; Koes, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than

  11. Cis-regulatory PLETHORA promoter elements directing root and nodule expression are conserved between Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, H.G.J.M.; Kulikova, O.; Willemsen, V.A.; Heidstra, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nodules are unique organs formed on roots of legumes by soil-borne bacteria, collectively known as rhizobium. Recently, we have shown that orthologs of the AINTEGUMENTA-like (AIL) AP2 transcription factors PLETHORA (PLT) 1 to 4, that redundantly regulate Arabidopsis thaliana root development are

  12. Evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Tarang K.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Yamasaki, Shinichi; Lee, Alison P.; Lian, Michelle M.; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Yanai, Seiji; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2013-01-01

    Cyclostomes, comprising jawless vertebrates such as lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and hence an important group for understanding the origin and diversity of vertebrates. In vertebrates and other metazoans, Hox genes determine cell fate along the anteroposterior axis of embryos and are implicated in driving morphological diversity. Invertebrates contain a single Hox cluster (either intact or fragmented), whereas elephant shark, coelacanth, and tetrapods contain four Hox clusters owing to two rounds of whole-genome duplication (“1R” and “2R”) during early vertebrate evolution. By contrast, most teleost fishes contain up to eight Hox clusters because of an additional “teleost-specific” genome duplication event. By sequencing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and the whole genome, here we provide evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). This suggests that the lamprey lineage has experienced an additional genome duplication after 1R and 2R. The relative age of lamprey and human paralogs supports this hypothesis. Compared with gnathostome Hox clusters, lamprey Hox clusters are unusually large. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) were predicted in the Hox clusters of lamprey, elephant shark, and human. Transgenic zebrafish assay indicated the potential of CNEs to function as enhancers. Interestingly, CNEs in individual lamprey Hox clusters are frequently conserved in multiple Hox clusters in elephant shark and human, implying a many-to-many orthology relationship between lamprey and gnathostome Hox clusters. Such a relationship suggests that the first two rounds of genome duplication may have occurred independently in the lamprey and gnathostome lineages. PMID:24043829

  13. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

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    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  14. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  15. Whole-mount in situ hybridization of sectioned tissues of species hybrids to detect cis-regulatory changes in gene expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    To distinguish whether differences in gene expression between species or between individuals of the same species are caused by cis-regulatory changes or by distribution differences in trans-regulatory proteins, comparison of species-specific mRNA expression in an F1 hybrid by whole-mount in situ hybridization is a rarely used yet very powerful tool. If asymmetric expression pattern is observed for the two alleles, this implies a cis-regulatory divergence of this gene. Alternatively, if symmetric expression pattern is observed for both alleles, the change in expression of this gene is probably caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins. In this chapter, I describe how to prepare RNA probes, tissue samples and how to detect mRNA expression pattern using in situ hybridization. Although I choose to present here the detection of yellow-related gene (YRG) expression pattern in the larval epidermis of swallowtail butterflies, this protocol can be adapted to other species and tissues. YRG mRNA expression is correlated with interspecific differences of yellow and green larval color pattern such as V-shaped markings in swallowtail butterflies. F1 hybrids show an intermediate color pattern between parental species. In this case, both species-specific YRG mRNA showed a similar expression pattern in F1 hybrids, suggesting that the change in expression of YRG is mainly caused by changes in the distribution of trans-regulatory proteins.

  16. A Generalized Linear Model for Decomposing Cis-regulatory, Parent-of-Origin, and Maternal Effects on Allele-Specific Gene Expression

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    Yasuaki Takada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint quantification of genetic and epigenetic effects on gene expression is important for understanding the establishment of complex gene regulation systems in living organisms. In particular, genomic imprinting and maternal effects play important roles in the developmental process of mammals and flowering plants. However, the influence of these effects on gene expression are difficult to quantify because they act simultaneously with cis-regulatory mutations. Here we propose a simple method to decompose cis-regulatory (i.e., allelic genotype, genomic imprinting [i.e., parent-of-origin (PO], and maternal [i.e., maternal genotype (MG] effects on allele-specific gene expression using RNA-seq data obtained from reciprocal crosses. We evaluated the efficiency of method using a simulated dataset and applied the method to whole-body Drosophila and mouse trophoblast stem cell (TSC and liver RNA-seq data. Consistent with previous studies, we found little evidence of PO and MG effects in adult Drosophila samples. In contrast, we identified dozens and hundreds of mouse genes with significant PO and MG effects, respectively. Interestingly, a similar number of genes with significant PO effect were detect in mouse TSCs and livers, whereas more genes with significant MG effect were observed in livers. Further application of this method will clarify how these three effects influence gene expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, and provide novel insight into the evolution of gene expression regulation.

  17. Phosphorylation of HOX11/TLX1 on Threonine-247 during mitosis modulates expression of cyclin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesney Alden

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HOX11/TLX1 (hereafter referred to as HOX11 homeobox gene was originally identified at a t(10;14(q24;q11 translocation breakpoint, a chromosomal abnormality observed in 5-7% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs. We previously reported a predisposition to aberrant spindle assembly checkpoint arrest and heightened incidences of chromosome missegregation in HOX11-overexpressing B lymphocytes following exposure to spindle poisons. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate cell cycle specific expression of HOX11. Results Cell cycle specific expression studies revealed a phosphorylated form of HOX11 detectable only in the mitotic fraction of cells after treatment with inhibitors to arrest cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Mutational analyses revealed phosphorylation on threonine-247 (Thr247, a conserved amino acid that defines the HOX11 gene family and is integral for the association with DNA binding elements. The effect of HOX11 phosphorylation on its ability to modulate expression of the downstream target, cyclin B1, was tested. A HOX11 mutant in which Thr247 was substituted with glutamic acid (HOX11 T247E, thereby mimicking a constitutively phosphorylated HOX11 isoform, was unable to bind the cyclin B1 promoter or enhance levels of the cyclin B1 protein. Expression of the wildtype HOX11 was associated with accelerated progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, impaired synchronization in prometaphase and reduced apoptosis whereas expression of the HOX11 T247E mutant restored cell cycle kinetics, the spindle checkpoint and apoptosis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of HOX11 is regulated by phosphorylation of Thr247 in a cell cycle-specific manner and that this phosphorylation modulates the expression of the target gene, cyclin B1. Since it is likely that Thr247 phosphorylation regulates DNA binding activity to multiple HOX11 target sequences, it is

  18. Rearrangements of 2.5 Kilobases of Noncoding DNA from the Drosophila even-skipped Locus Define Predictive Rules of Genomic cis-Regulatory Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Ram; Martinez, Carlos; Ionides, John; Ramos, Alexandre F.; Ludwig, Michael Z.; Ogawa, Nobuo; Sharp, David H.; Reinitz, John

    2013-01-01

    Rearrangements of about 2.5 kilobases of regulatory DNA located 5′ of the transcription start site of the Drosophila even-skipped locus generate large-scale changes in the expression of even-skipped stripes 2, 3, and 7. The most radical effects are generated by juxtaposing the minimal stripe enhancers MSE2 and MSE3 for stripes 2 and 3 with and without small “spacer” segments less than 360 bp in length. We placed these fusion constructs in a targeted transformation site and obtained quantitative expression data for these transformants together with their controlling transcription factors at cellular resolution. These data demonstrated that the rearrangements can alter expression levels in stripe 2 and the 2–3 interstripe by a factor of more than 10. We reasoned that this behavior would place tight constraints on possible rules of genomic cis-regulatory logic. To find these constraints, we confronted our new expression data together with previously obtained data on other constructs with a computational model. The model contained representations of thermodynamic protein–DNA interactions including steric interference and cooperative binding, short-range repression, direct repression, activation, and coactivation. The model was highly constrained by the training data, which it described within the limits of experimental error. The model, so constrained, was able to correctly predict expression patterns driven by enhancers for other Drosophila genes; even-skipped enhancers not included in the training set; stripe 2, 3, and 7 enhancers from various Drosophilid and Sepsid species; and long segments of even-skipped regulatory DNA that contain multiple enhancers. The model further demonstrated that elevated expression driven by a fusion of MSE2 and MSE3 was a consequence of the recruitment of a portion of MSE3 to become a functional component of MSE2, demonstrating that cis-regulatory “elements” are not elementary objects. PMID:23468638

  19. Control of cotton fibre elongation by a homeodomain transcription factor GhHOX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Chun-Min; Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Chao, Lu-Men; Yang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ling-Jian; Zhu, Hua-Yu; Zeng, Yan-Da; Guo, Wang-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang; Hu, Guan-Jing; Guan, Xue-Ying; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Wendel, Jonathan F; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2014-11-21

    Cotton fibres are unusually long, single-celled epidermal seed trichomes and a model for plant cell growth, but little is known about the regulation of fibre cell elongation. Here we report that a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHOX3, controls cotton fibre elongation. GhHOX3 genes are localized to the 12th homoeologous chromosome set of allotetraploid cotton cultivars, associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fibre length. Silencing of GhHOX3 greatly reduces (>80%) fibre length, whereas its overexpression leads to longer fibre. Combined transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify target genes of GhHOX3 that also contain the L1-box cis-element, including two cell wall loosening protein genes GhRDL1 and GhEXPA1. GhHOX3 interacts with GhHD1, another homeodomain protein, resulting in enhanced transcriptional activity, and with cotton DELLA, GhSLR1, repressor of the growth hormone gibberellin (GA). GhSLR1 interferes with the GhHOX3-GhHD1 interaction and represses target gene transcription. Our results uncover a novel mechanism whereby a homeodomain protein transduces GA signal to promote fibre cell elongation.

  20. Collinear Hox-Hox interactions are involved in patterning the vertebrate anteroposterior (A-P axis.

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    Kongju Zhu

    Full Text Available Investigating regulation and function of the Hox genes, key regulators of positional identity in the embryo, opened a new vista in developmental biology. One of their most striking features is collinearity: the temporal and spatial orders of expression of these clustered genes each match their 3' to 5' order on the chromosome. Despite recent progress, the mechanisms underlying collinearity are not understood. Here we show that ectopic expression of 4 different single Hox genes predictably induces and represses expression of others, leading to development of different predictable specific sections of the body axis. We use ectopic expression in wild-type and noggin-dorsalised (Hox-free Xenopus embryos, to show that two Hox-Hox interactions are important. Posterior induction (induction of posterior Hox genes by anterior ones: PI, drives Hox temporal collinearity (Hox timer, which itself drives anteroposterior (A-P patterning. Posterior prevalence (repression of anterior Hox genes by posterior ones: PP is important in translating temporal to spatial collinearity. We thus demonstrate for the first time that two collinear Hox interactions are important for vertebrate axial patterning. These findings considerably extend and clarify earlier work suggesting the existence and importance of PP and PI, and provide a major new insight into genesis of the body axis.

  1. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. © 2016 The Authors. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The significance of Hox gene collinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Arthropods and vertebrates inherited their Hox clusters from an ancestral cluster of at least six genes already present in their last common ancestor, Urbilateria. Clustering and a common transcriptional direction are both likely features of the way that the gene complex first arose in a process of tandem gene duplication. Spatial collinearity (correspondence between ordering of Hox genes along the chromosome and their expression patterns along the head-tail axis) has been conserved in many animal groups and is likely to have been already present in Urbilateria. It is not known why the Hox cluster evolved with spatial collinearity. Four models are discussed. These vary in the significance they place upon Hox chromatin structure, and also on whether they propose that collinearity is primarily concerned with establishment or maintenance of Hox expression. Published proposals to explain spatial collinearity, which invoke enhancer sharing, chromatin closing or chromatin opening, are either problematic or can offer only partial explanations. In an alternative proposal it is suggested here that spatial collinearity evolved principally to maximise physical segregation, and thereby minimise incidence of boundaries, between active and inactive genes within the Hox cluster. This is to minimise erroneous transfer of transcriptional activity, or inactivity, between adjacent Hox genes.

  3. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo.

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    Lamprini G Kalampoki

    Full Text Available Coup-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor super family, has a fundamental role in the development of metazoan embryos. The study of the gene's regulatory circuit in the sea urchin embryo will facilitate the placement of this transcription factor in the well-studied embryonic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN. The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ genomic clones, containing three exons and upstream sequences of PlCoup-TF, were isolated from a genomic library. The transcription initiation site was determined and 5' deletions and individual segments of a 1930 bp upstream region were placed ahead of a GFP reporter cassette and injected into fertilized P.lividus eggs. Module a (-532 to -232, was necessary and sufficient to confer ciliary band expression to the reporter. Comparison of P.lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus upstream Coup-TF sequences, revealed considerable conservation, but none within module a. 5' and internal deletions into module a, defined a smaller region that confers ciliary band specific expression. Putative regulatory cis-acting elements (RE1, RE2 and RE3 within module a, were specifically bound by proteins in sea urchin embryonic nuclear extracts. Site-specific mutagenesis of these elements resulted in loss of reporter activity (RE1 or ectopic expression (RE2, RE3. It is proposed that sea urchin transcription factors, which bind these three regulatory sites, are necessary for spatial and quantitative regulation of the PlCoup-TF gene at pluteus stage sea urchin embryos. These findings lead to the future identification of these factors and to the hierarchical positioning of PlCoup-TF within the embryonic GRN.

  4. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalampoki, Lamprini G; Flytzanis, Constantin N

    2014-01-01

    Coup-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor super family, has a fundamental role in the development of metazoan embryos. The study of the gene's regulatory circuit in the sea urchin embryo will facilitate the placement of this transcription factor in the well-studied embryonic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN). The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF) is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ genomic clones, containing three exons and upstream sequences of PlCoup-TF, were isolated from a genomic library. The transcription initiation site was determined and 5' deletions and individual segments of a 1930 bp upstream region were placed ahead of a GFP reporter cassette and injected into fertilized P.lividus eggs. Module a (-532 to -232), was necessary and sufficient to confer ciliary band expression to the reporter. Comparison of P.lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus upstream Coup-TF sequences, revealed considerable conservation, but none within module a. 5' and internal deletions into module a, defined a smaller region that confers ciliary band specific expression. Putative regulatory cis-acting elements (RE1, RE2 and RE3) within module a, were specifically bound by proteins in sea urchin embryonic nuclear extracts. Site-specific mutagenesis of these elements resulted in loss of reporter activity (RE1) or ectopic expression (RE2, RE3). It is proposed that sea urchin transcription factors, which bind these three regulatory sites, are necessary for spatial and quantitative regulation of the PlCoup-TF gene at pluteus stage sea urchin embryos. These findings lead to the future identification of these factors and to the hierarchical positioning of PlCoup-TF within the embryonic GRN.

  5. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Ryan M.; Grbi?, Miodrag; Nagy, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods h...

  6. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Ryan M.; Miodrag Grbić; Nagy, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant art...

  7. Exact p-value calculation for heterotypic clusters of regulatory motifs and its application in computational annotation of cis-regulatory modules

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    Roytberg Mikhail A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cis-Regulatory modules (CRMs of eukaryotic genes often contain multiple binding sites for transcription factors. The phenomenon that binding sites form clusters in CRMs is exploited in many algorithms to locate CRMs in a genome. This gives rise to the problem of calculating the statistical significance of the event that multiple sites, recognized by different factors, would be found simultaneously in a text of a fixed length. The main difficulty comes from overlapping occurrences of motifs. So far, no tools have been developed allowing the computation of p-values for simultaneous occurrences of different motifs which can overlap. Results We developed and implemented an algorithm computing the p-value that s different motifs occur respectively k1, ..., ks or more times, possibly overlapping, in a random text. Motifs can be represented with a majority of popular motif models, but in all cases, without indels. Zero or first order Markov chains can be adopted as a model for the random text. The computational tool was tested on the set of cis-regulatory modules involved in D. melanogaster early development, for which there exists an annotation of binding sites for transcription factors. Our test allowed us to correctly identify transcription factors cooperatively/competitively binding to DNA. Method The algorithm that precisely computes the probability of simultaneous motif occurrences is inspired by the Aho-Corasick automaton and employs a prefix tree together with a transition function. The algorithm runs with the O(n|Σ|(m|ℋ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaat0uy0HwzTfgDPnwy1egaryqtHrhAL1wy0L2yHvdaiqaacqWFlecsaaa@3762@| + K|σ|K ∏i ki time complexity, where n is the length of the text, |Σ| is the alphabet size, m is the

  8. "Self-regulation," a new facet of Hox genes' function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rushikesh; Bastida, Maria Félix; Kmita, Marie; Ros, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Precise temporal and spatial expression of the clustered Hox genes is essential for patterning the developing embryo. Temporal activation of Hox genes was shown to be cluster-autonomous. However, gene clustering appears dispensable for spatial colinear expression. Generally, a set of Hox genes expressed in a group of cells instructs these cells about their fate such that the differential expression of Hox genes results in morphological diversity. The spatial colinearity is considered to rely both on local and long-range cis regulation. Here, we report on the global deregulation of HoxA and HoxD expression patterns upon inactivation of a subset of HOXA and HOXD proteins. Our data suggest the existence of a "self-regulation" mechanism, a process by which HOX proteins establish and/or maintain the spatial domains of the Hox gene family and we propose that the functionally dominant HOX proteins could contribute to generating the spatial parameters of Hox expression in a given tissue, i.e., HOX controlling the establishment of the ultimate HOX code. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

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    Hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF, a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1. In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN. This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs, including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  10. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2 kb deletion located ~240 kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype.

  11. A variant in a cis-regulatory element enhances claudin-14 expression and is associated with pediatric-onset hypercalciuria and kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, Megan E; Heydari, Emma; Pan, Wanling; Ramesh, Ajay; Rehman, Sabah; Morgan, Catherine; Pinsk, Maury; Erickson, Robin; Herrmann, Johannes M; Dimke, Henrik; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Lemaire, Mathieu; Walter, Michael; Alexander, R Todd

    2017-06-01

    The greatest risk factor for kidney stones is hypercalciuria, the etiology of which is largely unknown. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) linked hypercalciuria and kidney stones to a claudin-14 (CLDN14) risk haplotype. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was not delineated. Recently, renal CLDN14 expression was found to increase in response to increased plasma calcium, thereby inducing calciuria. We hypothesized therefore that some children with hypercalciuria and kidney stones harbor a CLDN14 variant that inappropriately increases gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the CLDN14 risk haplotype in a cohort of children with idiopathic hypercalciuria and kidney stones. An intronic SNP was more frequent in affected children. Dual luciferase and cell-based assays demonstrated increased reporter or CLDN14 expression when this polymorphism was introduced. In silico studies predicted the SNP introduced a novel insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1) transcription factor binding site. Consistent with this, repeating the dual luciferase assay in the presence of INSM1 further increased reporter expression. Our data suggest that children with the INSM1 binding site within the CLDN14 risk haplotype have a higher likelihood of hypercalciuria and kidney stones. Enhanced CLDN14 expression may play a role in the pathophysiology of their hypercalciuria. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A variant in a Cis-regulatory element enhances claudin-14 expression and is associated with pediatric-onset hypercalciuria and kidney stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ure, Megan E; Heydari, Emma; Pan, Wanling

    2017-01-01

    The greatest risk factor for kidney stones is hypercalciuria, the etiology of which is largely unknown. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) linked hypercalciuria and kidney stones to a claudin-14 (CLDN14) risk haplotype. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was not delineated....... Recently, renal CLDN14 expression was found to increase in response to increased plasma calcium, thereby inducing calciuria. We hypothesized therefore that some children with hypercalciuria and kidney stones harbor a CLDN14 variant that inappropriately increases gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we...... sequenced the CLDN14 risk haplotype in a cohort of children with idiopathic hypercalciuria and kidney stones. An intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was more frequent in affected children. Dual luciferase and cell based assays demonstrated increased reporter or CLDN14 expression when...

  13. Evolution of Hox-like genes in Cnidaria: Study of Hydra Hox repertoire reveals tailor-made Hox-code for Cnidarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Unni, Manu K; Gungi, Akhila; Agarwal, Pallavi; Galande, Sanjeev

    2015-11-01

    Hox and ParaHox genes play decisive roles in patterning the anterior-posterior body axis in Bilateria. Evolutionary origin of Hox genes and primary body axis predate the divergence of Bilateria and Cnidaria. However, function of Cnidarian Hox-like genes and their regulation in axis determination is obscure due to studies limited to a few representative model systems. Present investigation is conducted using Hydra, a Hydrozoan member of phylum Cnidaria, to gain insights into the roles of Cnidarian Hox-like genes in primary axis formation. Here, we report identification of six Hox-like genes from our in-house transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes shows bilaterian counterparts of Hox1, Gsx and Mox. Additionally, we report CnoxB_HVUL, CnoxC2_HVUL and CnoxC3_HVUL belonging to two Cnidarian specific groups. In situ hybridization analysis of Hydra homologues provided important clues about their possible roles in pattern formation of polyps and bud development. Specifically, Hox1_HVUL is regulated by Wnt signaling and plays critical role in head formation. Collating information about expression patterns of different Hox-like genes from previous reports and this study reveals no conformity within Cnidaria. Indicating that unlike in Bilateria, there is no consolidated Hox-code determining primary body axis in Cnidaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

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    Ryan M. Pace

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. Results In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. Conclusions The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to

  15. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Ryan M; Grbić, Miodrag; Nagy, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to support an ancestral arthropod Hox cluster of ten genes with

  16. Possible rules for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Gaunt, Alexander L

    2016-12-07

    The Hox gene cluster is believed to have formed from a single ProtoHox gene by repeated cycles of the following events: tandem gene duplication, mutation to generate a new expression boundary along the embryonic axis, and acquisition of a new Hox patterning function. The Hox cluster in Bilateria evolved in compliance with the so-called collinearity rule. That is, the order of the genes along the chromosome corresponds with the order of their embryonic expression domains along the head-tail axis. Gaunt (2015) suggested that collinearity may have arisen as a mechanism to minimise the incidence of boundaries between active and inactive genes within the Hox cluster. We now attempt to clarify the model by presenting it in the form of three rules: 1) no two Hox genes may persist in the same cluster with the same anterior boundary of activity in the same tissue; 2) an inactive Hox gene must not be flanked by two active Hox genes; 3) an active Hox gene must not be flanked by two inactive genes. We provide evidence and illustrative computer simulations to show that these rules, which can apply only to partially overlapping patterns of Hox activity, may account for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs) at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulski, Helena; Druck, Birgit; Bhalerao, Sheetal; Ringrose, Leonie

    2011-03-16

    Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs) are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw) reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7) with a PRE from the vestigial (vg) gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT) that is essential for silencing. This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  18. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment

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    Okulski Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. Results We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7 with a PRE from the vestigial (vg gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT that is essential for silencing. Conclusions This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  19. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

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    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  20. Comparative analyses of vertebrate posterior HoxD clusters reveal atypical cluster architecture in the caecilian Typhlonectes natans

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    Amemiya Chris T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posterior genes of the HoxD cluster play a crucial role in the patterning of the tetrapod limb. This region is under the control of a global, long-range enhancer that is present in all vertebrates. Variation in limb types, as is the case in amphibians, can probably not only be attributed to variation in Hox genes, but is likely to be the product of differences in gene regulation. With a collection of vertebrate genome sequences available today, we used a comparative genomics approach to study the posterior HoxD cluster of amphibians. A frog and a caecilian were included in the study to compare coding sequences as well as to determine the gain and loss of putative regulatory sequences. Results We sequenced the posterior end of the HoxD cluster of a caecilian and performed comparative analyses of this region using HoxD clusters of other vertebrates. We determined the presence of conserved non-coding sequences and traced gains and losses of these footprints during vertebrate evolution, with particular focus on amphibians. We found that the caecilian HoxD cluster is almost three times larger than its mammalian counterpart. This enlargement is accompanied with the loss of one gene and the accumulation of repeats in that area. A similar phenomenon was observed in the coelacanth, where a different gene was lost and expansion of the area where the gene was lost has occurred. At least one phylogenetic footprint present in all vertebrates was lost in amphibians. This conserved region is a known regulatory element and functions as a boundary element in neural tissue to prevent expression of Hoxd genes. Conclusion The posterior part of the HoxD cluster of Typhlonectes natans is among the largest known today. The loss of Hoxd-12 and the expansion of the intergenic region may exert an influence on the limb enhancer, by having to bypass a distance seven times that of regular HoxD clusters. Whether or not there is a correlation with the

  1. Hox Genes in Cardiovascular Development and Diseases

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    Marine Roux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD are the leading cause of death in the first year of life. Over the past 20 years, much effort has been focused on unraveling the genetic bases of CHD. In particular, studies in human genetics coupled with those of model organisms have provided valuable insights into the gene regulatory networks underlying CHD pathogenesis. Hox genes encode transcription factors that are required for the patterning of the anterior–posterior axis in the embryo. In this review, we focus on the emerging role of anteriorly expressed Hox genes (Hoxa1, Hoxb1, and Hoxa3 in cardiac development, specifically their contribution to patterning of cardiac progenitor cells and formation of the great arteries. Recent evidence regarding the cooperative regulation of heart development by Hox proteins with members of the TALE-class of homeodomain proteins such as Pbx and Meis transcription factors is also discussed. These findings are highly relevant to human pathologies as they pinpoint new genes that increase susceptibility to cardiac anomalies and provide novel mechanistic insights into CHD.

  2. Improving Hox protein classification across the major model organisms.

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    Hueber, Stefanie D; Weiller, Georg F; Djordjevic, Michael A; Frickey, Tancred

    2010-05-25

    The family of Hox-proteins has been a major focus of research for over 30 years. Hox-proteins are crucial to the correct development of bilateral organisms, however, some uncertainty remains as to which Hox-proteins are functionally equivalent across different species. Initial classification of Hox-proteins was based on phylogenetic analysis of the 60 amino acid homeodomain. This approach was successful in classifying Hox-proteins with differing homeodomains, but the relationships of Hox-proteins with nearly identical homeodomains, yet distinct biological functions, could not be resolved. Correspondingly, these 'problematic' proteins were classified into one large unresolved group. Other classifications used the relative location of the Hox-protein coding genes on the chromosome (synteny) to further resolve this group. Although widely used, this synteny-based classification is inconsistent with experimental evidence from functional equivalence studies. These inconsistencies led us to re-examine and derive a new classification for the Hox-protein family using all Hox-protein sequences available in the GenBank non-redundant protein database (NCBI-nr). We compare the use of the homeodomain, the homeodomain with conserved flanking regions (the YPWM and linker region), and full length Hox-protein sequences as a basis for classification of Hox-proteins. In contrast to previous attempts, our approach is able to resolve the relationships for the 'problematic' as well as ABD-B-like Hox-proteins. We highlight differences to previous classifications and clarify the relationships of Hox-proteins across the five major model organisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Branchiostoma floridae, Mus musculus and Danio rerio. Comparative and functional analysis of Hox-proteins, two fields crucial to understanding the development of bilateral organisms, have been hampered by difficulties in predicting functionally equivalent Hox-proteins across species. Our

  3. Dual role for Hox genes and Hox co-factors in conferring leg motoneuron survival and identity in Drosophila.

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    Baek, Myungin; Enriquez, Jonathan; Mann, Richard S

    2013-05-01

    Adult Drosophila walk using six multi-jointed legs, each controlled by ∼50 leg motoneurons (MNs). Although MNs have stereotyped morphologies, little is known about how they are specified. Here, we describe the function of Hox genes and homothorax (hth), which encodes a Hox co-factor, in Drosophila leg MN development. Removing either Hox or Hth function from a single neuroblast (NB) lineage results in MN apoptosis. A single Hox gene, Antennapedia (Antp), is primarily responsible for MN survival in all three thoracic segments. When cell death is blocked, partially penetrant axon branching errors are observed in Hox mutant MNs. When single MNs are mutant, errors in both dendritic and axon arborizations are observed. Our data also suggest that Antp levels in post-mitotic MNs are important for specifying their identities. Thus, in addition to being essential for survival, Hox and hth are required to specify accurate MN morphologies in a level-dependent manner.

  4. Clustering of tissue-specific sub-TADs accompanies the regulation of HoxA genes in developing limbs.

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    Soizik Berlivet

    Full Text Available HoxA genes exhibit central roles during development and causal mutations have been found in several human syndromes including limb malformation. Despite their importance, information on how these genes are regulated is lacking. Here, we report on the first identification of bona fide transcriptional enhancers controlling HoxA genes in developing limbs and show that these enhancers are grouped into distinct topological domains at the sub-megabase scale (sub-TADs. We provide evidence that target genes and regulatory elements physically interact with each other through contacts between sub-TADs rather than by the formation of discreet "DNA loops". Interestingly, there is no obvious relationship between the functional domains of the enhancers within the limb and how they are partitioned among the topological domains, suggesting that sub-TAD formation does not rely on enhancer activity. Moreover, we show that suppressing the transcriptional activity of enhancers does not abrogate their contacts with HoxA genes. Based on these data, we propose a model whereby chromatin architecture defines the functional landscapes of enhancers. From an evolutionary standpoint, our data points to the convergent evolution of HoxA and HoxD regulation in the fin-to-limb transition, one of the major morphological innovations in vertebrates.

  5. Increased HOX C13 expression in metastatic melanoma progression

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    Cantile Monica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of malignant transformation, progression and metastasis of melanoma is not completely understood. Recently, the microarray technology has been used to survey transcriptional differences that might provide insight into the metastatic process, but the validation of changing gene expression during metastatic transition period is poorly investigated. A large body of literature has been produced on the role of the HOX genes network in tumour evolution, suggesting the involvement of HOX genes in several types of human cancers. Deregulated paralogous group 13 HOX genes expression has been detected in melanoma, cervical cancer and odonthogenic tumors. Among these, Hox C13 is also involved in the expression control of the human keratin genes hHa5 and hHa2, and recently it was identified as a member of human DNA replication complexes. Methods In this study, to investigate HOX C13 expression in melanoma progression, we have compared its expression pattern between naevi, primary melanoma and metastasis. In addition HOXC13 profile pattern of expression has been evaluated in melanoma cell lines. Results Our results show the strong and progressive HOX C13 overexpression in metastatic melanoma tissues and cytological samples compared to nevi and primary melanoma tissues and cells. Conclusions The data presentated in the paper suggest a possible role of HOX C13 in metastatic melanoma switch.

  6. SNPs and Hox gene mapping in Ciona intestinalis

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    Biffali Elio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tunicate Ciona intestinalis (Enterogona, Ascidiacea, a major model system for evolutionary and developmental genetics of chordates, harbours two cryptic species. To assess the degree of intra- and inter-specific genetic variability, we report the identification and analysis of C. intestinalis SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism markers. A SNP subset was used to determine the genetic distance between Hox-5 and -10 genes. Results DNA fragments were amplified from 12 regions of C. intestinalis sp. A. In total, 128 SNPs and 32 one bp indels have been identified within 8 Kb DNA. SNPs in coding regions cause 4 synonymous and 12 non-synonymous substitutions. The highest SNP frequency was detected in the Hox5 and Hox10 intragenic regions. In C. intestinalis, these two genes have lost their archetypal topology within the cluster, such that Hox10 is located between Hox4 and Hox5. A subset of the above primers was used to perform successful amplification in C. intestinalis sp. B. In this cryptic species, 62 SNPs were identified within 3614 bp: 41 in non-coding and 21 in coding regions. The genetic distance of the Hox-5 and -10 loci, computed combining a classical backcross approach with the application of SNP markers, was found to be 8.4 cM (Haldane's function. Based on the physical distance, 1 cM corresponds to 39.5 Kb. Linkage disequilibrium between the aforementioned loci was calculated in the backcross generation. Conclusion SNPs here described allow analysis and comparisons within and between C. intestinalis cryptic species. We provide the first reliable computation of genetic distance in this important model chordate. This latter result represents an important platform for future studies on Hox genes showing deviations from the archetypal topology.

  7. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

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    Ko W. Currie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Results Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior–posterior “zones” of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Conclusions Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior–posterior axis of adult planarians.

  8. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

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    Currie, Ko W; Brown, David D R; Zhu, Shujun; Xu, ChangJiang; Voisin, Veronique; Bader, Gary D; Pearson, Bret J

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea) is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior-posterior "zones" of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior-posterior axis of adult planarians.

  9. Drought-responsive genes expressed predominantly in root tissues are enriched with homotypic cis-regulatory clusters in promoters of major cereal crops

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    Muhammad Ramzan Khan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The root appears to be the most relevant organ for breeding drought stress tolerance. However, our knowledge about temporal and spatial regulation of drought-associated genes in the root remains fragmented, especially in crop plants. We performed a meta-analysis of expression divergence of essential drought-inducible genes and analyzed their association with cis-elements in model crops and major cereal crops. Our analysis of 42 selected drought-inducible genes revealed that these are expressed primarily in roots, followed by shoot, leaf, and inflorescence tissues, especially in wheat. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed higher expression of TaDREB2 and TaAQP7 in roots, correlated with extensive rooting and drought-stress tolerance in wheat. A promoter scan up to 2 kb upstream of the translation start site using phylogenetic footprinting revealed 708 transcription factor binding sites, including drought response elements (DREs, auxin response elements (AuxREs, MYCREs/MYBREs, ABAREs, and ERD1 in 19 selected genes. Interestingly, these elements were organized into clusters of overlapping transcription factor binding sites known as homotypic clusters (HCTs, which modulate drought physiology in plants. Taken together, these results revealed the expression preeminence of major drought-inducible genes in the root, suggesting its crucial role in drought adaptation. The occurrence of HCTs in drought-inducible genes highlights the putative evolutionary modifications of crop plants in developing drought adaptation. We propose that these DNA motifs can be used as molecular markers for breeding drought-resilient cultivars, particularly in the cereal crops.

  10. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

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    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin.

  11. SET1A/COMPASS and shadow enhancers in the regulation of homeotic gene expression.

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    Cao, Kaixiang; Collings, Clayton K; Marshall, Stacy A; Morgan, Marc A; Rendleman, Emily J; Wang, Lu; Sze, Christie C; Sun, Tianjiao; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Shilatifard, Ali

    2017-04-15

    The homeotic (Hox) genes are highly conserved in metazoans, where they are required for various processes in development, and misregulation of their expression is associated with human cancer. In the developing embryo, Hox genes are activated sequentially in time and space according to their genomic position within Hox gene clusters. Accumulating evidence implicates both enhancer elements and noncoding RNAs in controlling this spatiotemporal expression of Hox genes, but disentangling their relative contributions is challenging. Here, we identify two cis-regulatory elements (E1 and E2) functioning as shadow enhancers to regulate the early expression of the HoxA genes. Simultaneous deletion of these shadow enhancers in embryonic stem cells leads to impaired activation of HoxA genes upon differentiation, while knockdown of a long noncoding RNA overlapping E1 has no detectable effect on their expression. Although MLL/COMPASS (complex of proteins associated with Set1) family of histone methyltransferases is known to activate transcription of Hox genes in other contexts, we found that individual inactivation of the MLL1-4/COMPASS family members has little effect on early Hox gene activation. Instead, we demonstrate that SET1A/COMPASS is required for full transcriptional activation of multiple Hox genes but functions independently of the E1 and E2 cis-regulatory elements. Our results reveal multiple regulatory layers for Hox genes to fine-tune transcriptional programs essential for development. © 2017 Cao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. The role of HoxA11 and HoxA13 in the evolution of novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid (Leucoraja erinacea

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    Shannon N. Barry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Batoids exhibit unique body plans with derived fin morphologies, such as the anteriorly expanded pectoral fins that fuse to the head, or distally extended anterior pelvic fin lobes used for a modified swimming technique utilized by skates (Rajidae. The little skate (Leucoraja erinacea, exhibits both of these unique fin morphologies. These fin modifications are not present in a typical shark body plan, and little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying their development. A recent study identified a novel apical ectodermal ridge (AER associated with the development of the anterior pectoral fin in the little skate, but the role of the posterior HoxA genes was not featured during skate fin development. Results We present the first evidence for HoxA expression (HoxA11 and HoxA13 in novel AER domains associated with the development of three novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid, L. erinacea. We found HoxA13 expression associated with the recently described novel AER in the anterior pectoral fin, and HoxA11 expression in a novel AER domain in the anterior pelvic fin that we describe here. We find that both HoxA11 and HoxA13 are expressed in claspers, and while HoxA11 is expressed in pelvic fins and claspers, HoxA13 is expressed exclusively in developing claspers of males. Finally, HoxA11 expression is associated with the developing fin rays in paired fins. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that the posterior HoxA genes play an important role in the morphological evolution of paired fins in a representative batoid. These data suggest that the batoids utilize a unique Hox code, where the posterior HoxA genes exhibit distinct expression patterns that are likely associated with specification of novel fin morphologies.

  13. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

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    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  14. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

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    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Simple Model of Hox Genes: Bone Morphology Demonstration

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    Shmaefsky, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Visual demonstrations of abstract scientific concepts are effective strategies for enhancing content retention (Shmaefsky 2004). The concepts associated with gene regulation of growth and development are particularly complex and are well suited for teaching with visual models. This demonstration provides a simple and accurate model of Hox gene…

  16. Anterior Hox Genes in Cardiac Development and Great Artery Patterning

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    Brigitte Laforest

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During early development, the heart tube grows by progressive addition of progenitor cells to the arterial and venous poles. These cardiac progenitor cells, originally identified in 2001, are located in the splanchnic mesoderm in a region termed the second heart field (SHF. Since its discovery, our view of heart development has been refined and it is well established that perturbation in the addition of SHF cells results in a spectrum of congenital heart defects. We have previously shown that anterior Hox genes, including Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3, are expressed in distinct subdomains of the SHF that contribute to atrial and subpulmonary myocardium. It is well known that Hox proteins exert their function through interaction with members of the TALE family, including Pbx and Meis factors. The expression profile of Pbx and Meis factors overlaps with that of anterior Hox factors in the embryonic heart, and recent data suggest that they may interact together during cardiac development. This review aims to bring together recent findings in vertebrates that strongly suggest an important function for Hox, Pbx and Meis factors in heart development and disease.

  17. Hox protein mutation and macroevolution of the insect body plan.

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    Ronshaugen, Matthew; McGinnis, Nadine; McGinnis, William

    2002-02-21

    A fascinating question in biology is how molecular changes in developmental pathways lead to macroevolutionary changes in morphology. Mutations in homeotic (Hox) genes have long been suggested as potential causes of morphological evolution, and there is abundant evidence that some changes in Hox expression patterns correlate with transitions in animal axial pattern. A major morphological transition in metazoans occurred about 400 million years ago, when six-legged insects diverged from crustacean-like arthropod ancestors with multiple limbs. In Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal A (AbdA, also abd-A) Hox proteins are expressed largely in the abdominal segments, where they can suppress thoracic leg development during embryogenesis. In a branchiopod crustacean, Ubx/AbdA proteins are expressed in both thorax and abdomen, including the limb primordia, but do not repress limbs. Previous studies led us to propose that gain and loss of transcriptional activation and repression functions in Hox proteins was a plausible mechanism to diversify morphology during animal evolution. Here we show that naturally selected alteration of the Ubx protein is linked to the evolutionary transition to hexapod limb pattern.

  18. Primitive duplicate Hox clusters in the European eel's genome.

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    Christiaan V Henkel

    Full Text Available The enigmatic life cycle and elongated body of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L., 1758 have long motivated scientific enquiry. Recently, eel research has gained in urgency, as the population has dwindled to the point of critical endangerment. We have assembled a draft genome in order to facilitate advances in all provinces of eel biology. Here, we use the genome to investigate the eel's complement of the Hox developmental transcription factors. We show that unlike any other teleost fish, the eel retains fully populated, duplicate Hox clusters, which originated at the teleost-specific genome duplication. Using mRNA-sequencing and in situ hybridizations, we demonstrate that all copies are expressed in early embryos. Theories of vertebrate evolution predict that the retention of functional, duplicate Hox genes can give rise to additional developmental complexity, which is not immediately apparent in the adult. However, the key morphological innovation elsewhere in the eel's life history coincides with the evolutionary origin of its Hox repertoire.

  19. A general scenario of Hox gene inventory variation among major sarcopterygian lineages

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    Wang Chaolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes are known to play a key role in shaping the body plan of metazoans. Evolutionary dynamics of these genes is therefore essential in explaining patterns of evolutionary diversity. Among extant sarcopterygians comprising both lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods, our knowledge of the Hox genes and clusters has largely been restricted in several model organisms such as frogs, birds and mammals. Some evolutionary gaps still exist, especially for those groups with derived body morphology or occupying key positions on the tree of life, hindering our understanding of how Hox gene inventory varied along the sarcopterygian lineage. Results We determined the Hox gene inventory for six sarcopterygian groups: lungfishes, caecilians, salamanders, snakes, turtles and crocodiles by comprehensive PCR survey and genome walking. Variable Hox genes in each of the six sarcopterygian group representatives, compared to the human Hox gene inventory, were further validated for their presence/absence by PCR survey in a number of related species representing a broad evolutionary coverage of the group. Turtles, crocodiles, birds and placental mammals possess the same 39 Hox genes. HoxD12 is absent in snakes, amphibians and probably lungfishes. HoxB13 is lost in frogs and caecilians. Lobe-finned fishes, amphibians and squamate reptiles possess HoxC3. HoxC1 is only present in caecilians and lobe-finned fishes. Similar to coelacanths, lungfishes also possess HoxA14, which is only found in lobe-finned fishes to date. Our Hox gene variation data favor the lungfish-tetrapod, turtle-archosaur and frog-salamander relationships and imply that the loss of HoxD12 is not directly related to digit reduction. Conclusions Our newly determined Hox inventory data provide a more complete scenario for evolutionary dynamics of Hox genes along the sarcopterygian lineage. Limbless, worm-like caecilians and snakes possess similar Hox gene inventories to animals with

  20. Evolution of echinoderms may not have required modification of the ancestral deuterostome HOX gene cluster: first report of PG4 and PG5 Hox orthologues in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne; Martinez, Pedro; Chen, Wei-Chung; Thorndyke, Michael; Byrne, Maria

    2003-11-01

    Is the extreme derivation of the echinoderm body plan reflected in a derived echinoderm Hox genotype? Building on previous work, we exploited the sequence conservation of the homeobox to isolate putative orthologues of several Hox genes from two asteroid echinoderms. The 5-peptide motif (LPNTK) diagnostic of PG4 Hox genes was identified immediately downstream of one of the partial homeodomains from Patiriella exigua. This constitutes the first unequivocal report of a PG4 Hox gene orthologue from an echinoderm. Subsequent screenings identified genes of both PG4 and PG4/5 in Asterias rubens. Although in echinoids only a single gene (PG4/5) occupies these two contiguous cluster positions, we conclude that the ancestral echinoderm must have had the complete deuterostome suite of medial Hox genes, including orthologues of both PG4 and PG4/5 (=PG5). The reported absence of PG4 in the HOX cluster of echinoids is therefore a derived state, and the ancestral echinoderm probably had a HOX cluster not dissimilar to that of other deuterostomes. Modification of the ancestral deuterostome Hox genotype may not have been required for evolution of the highly derived echinoderm body plan.

  1. Salamander Hox clusters contain repetitive DNA and expanded non-coding regions: a typical Hox structure for non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen Randal; Putta, Srikrishna; Walker, John A; Smith, Jeramiah J; Maki, Nobuyasu; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2013-04-05

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate embryonic and post-embryonic developmental processes. The expression of Hox genes is regulated in part by the tight, spatial arrangement of conserved coding and non-coding sequences. The potential for evolutionary changes in Hox cluster structure is thought to be low among vertebrates; however, recent studies of a few non-mammalian taxa suggest greater variation than originally thought. Using next generation sequencing of large genomic fragments (>100 kb) from the red spotted newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), we found that the arrangement of Hox cluster genes was conserved relative to orthologous regions from other vertebrates, but the length of introns and intergenic regions varied. In particular, the distance between hoxd13 and hoxd11 is longer in newt than orthologous regions from vertebrate species with expanded Hox clusters and is predicted to exceed the length of the entire HoxD clusters (hoxd13-hoxd4) of humans, mice, and frogs. Many repetitive DNA sequences were identified for newt Hox clusters, including an enrichment of DNA transposon-like sequences relative to non-coding genomic fragments. Our results suggest that Hox cluster expansion and transposon accumulation are common features of non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates.

  2. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette

    2010-01-01

    have been reported in ZRS, the underlying regulatory mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the effect on transcription factor binding of a novel ZRS point mutation (463T>G) in a Pakistani family with preaxial polydactyly and triphalangeal thumb. Electrophoretical mobility shift assay...

  3. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  4. Deterministic HOX Patterning in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuroectoderm

    OpenAIRE

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Williams, Clay E.; Ruhl, David A.; Estevez-Silva, Maria C.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Ashton, Randolph S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Colinear HOX expression during hindbrain and spinal cord development diversifies and assigns regional neural phenotypes to discrete rhombomeric and vertebral domains. Despite the precision of HOX patterning in?vivo, in?vitro approaches for differentiating human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to posterior neural fates coarsely pattern HOX expression thereby generating cultures broadly specified to hindbrain or spinal cord regions. Here, we demonstrate that successive activation of fibr...

  5. In silico discovery of transcription regulatory elements in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Roch Karine G

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the sequence of the Plasmodium falciparum genome and several global mRNA and protein life cycle expression profiling projects now completed, elucidating the underlying networks of transcriptional control important for the progression of the parasite life cycle is highly pertinent to the development of new anti-malarials. To date, relatively little is known regarding the specific mechanisms the parasite employs to regulate gene expression at the mRNA level, with studies of the P. falciparum genome sequence having revealed few cis-regulatory elements and associated transcription factors. Although it is possible the parasite may evoke mechanisms of transcriptional control drastically different from those used by other eukaryotic organisms, the extreme AT-rich nature of P. falciparum intergenic regions (~90% AT presents significant challenges to in silico cis-regulatory element discovery. Results We have developed an algorithm called Gene Enrichment Motif Searching (GEMS that uses a hypergeometric-based scoring function and a position-weight matrix optimization routine to identify with high-confidence regulatory elements in the nucleotide-biased and repeat sequence-rich P. falciparum genome. When applied to promoter regions of genes contained within 21 co-expression gene clusters generated from P. falciparum life cycle microarray data using the semi-supervised clustering algorithm Ontology-based Pattern Identification, GEMS identified 34 putative cis-regulatory elements associated with a variety of parasite processes including sexual development, cell invasion, antigenic variation and protein biosynthesis. Among these candidates were novel motifs, as well as many of the elements for which biological experimental evidence already exists in the Plasmodium literature. To provide evidence for the biological relevance of a cell invasion-related element predicted by GEMS, reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays

  6. Hox expression in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Jun; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2014-08-01

    Echinoderms are a curious group of deuterostomes that forms a clade with hemichordates but has a pentameral body plan. Hox complex plays a pivotal role in axial patterning in bilaterians and often occurs in a cluster on the chromosome. In contrast to hemichordates with an organized Hox cluster, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has a Hox cluster with an atypical organization. However, the current data on hox expression in sea urchin rudiments are fragmentary. We report a comprehensive examination of hox expression in a sand dollar echinoid. Nine hox genes are expressed in the adult rudiment, which are classified into two groups, but hox11/13b belongs to both: one with linear expression in the coelomic mesoderm and another with radial expression around the adult mouth. The linear genes may endow the coelom/mesentery with axial information to direct postmetamorphic transformation of the digestive tract, whereas the radial genes developmentally correlate with the morphological novelties of echinoderms and/or sea urchins. Recruitment of the radial genes except hox11/13b appears to be accompanied by the loss of ancestral/axial roles. This in toto co-option of the hox genes provides insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of echinoderms from a bilateral ancestor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. All the three ParaHox genes are present in Nuttallochiton mirandus (Mollusca: polyplacophora): evolutionary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria A; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2006-03-15

    The ParaHox gene cluster contains three homeobox genes, Gsx, Xlox and Cdx and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary sister of the Hox gene cluster. Among deuterostomes the three genes are found in the majority of taxa, whereas among protostomes they have so far been isolated only in the phylum Sipuncula. We report the partial sequences of all three ParaHox genes in the polyplacophoran Nuttallochiton mirandus, the first species of the phylum Mollusca where all ParaHox genes have been isolated. This finding has phylogenetic implications for the phylum Mollusca and for its relationships with the other lophotrochozoan taxa. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Genome-wide tissue-specific occupancy of the Hox protein Ultrabithorax and Hox cofactor Homothorax in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Slattery

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hox genes are responsible for generating morphological diversity along the anterior-posterior axis during animal development. The Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx, for example, is required for specifying the identity of the third thoracic (T3 segment of the adult, which includes the dorsal haltere, an appendage required for flight, and the ventral T3 leg. Ubx mutants show homeotic transformations of the T3 leg towards the identity of the T2 leg and the haltere towards the wing. All Hox genes, including Ubx, encode homeodomain containing transcription factors, raising the question of what target genes Ubx regulates to generate these adult structures. To address this question, we carried out whole genome ChIP-chip studies to identify all of the Ubx bound regions in the haltere and T3 leg imaginal discs, which are the precursors to these adult structures. In addition, we used ChIP-chip to identify the sites bound by the Hox cofactor, Homothorax (Hth. In contrast to previous ChIP-chip studies carried out in Drosophila embryos, these binding studies reveal that there is a remarkable amount of tissue- and transcription factor-specific binding. Analyses of the putative target genes bound and regulated by these factors suggest that Ubx regulates many downstream transcription factors and developmental pathways in the haltere and T3 leg. Finally, we discovered additional DNA sequence motifs that in some cases are specific for individual data sets, arguing that Ubx and/or Hth work together with many regionally expressed transcription factors to execute their functions. Together, these data provide the first whole-genome analysis of the binding sites and target genes regulated by Ubx to specify the morphologies of the adult T3 segment of the fly.

  9. Hox gene cluster of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, reveals multiple ancient steps of cluster disintegration during ascidian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekigami, Yuka; Kobayashi, Takuya; Omi, Ai; Nishitsuji, Koki; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Fujiyama, Asao; Satoh, Noriyuki; Saiga, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hox gene clusters with at least 13 paralog group (PG) members are common in vertebrate genomes and in that of amphioxus. Ascidians, which belong to the subphylum Tunicata (Urochordata), are phylogenetically positioned between vertebrates and amphioxus, and traditionally divided into two groups: the Pleurogona and the Enterogona. An enterogonan ascidian, Ciona intestinalis (Ci), possesses nine Hox genes localized on two chromosomes; thus, the Hox gene cluster is disintegrated. We investigated the Hox gene cluster of a pleurogonan ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi (Hr) to investigate whether Hox gene cluster disintegration is common among ascidians, and if so, how such disintegration occurred during ascidian or tunicate evolution. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that the Hr Hox gene complement comprises nine members, including one with a relatively divergent Hox homeodomain sequence. Eight of nine Hr Hox genes were orthologous to Ci-Hox1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12 and 13. Following the phylogenetic classification into 13 PGs, we designated Hr Hox genes as Hox1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11/12/13.a, 11/12/13.b and HoxX. To address the chromosomal arrangement of the nine Hox genes, we performed two-color chromosomal fluorescent in situ hybridization, which revealed that the nine Hox genes are localized on a single chromosome in Hr, distinct from their arrangement in Ci. We further examined the order of the nine Hox genes on the chromosome by chromosome/scaffold walking. This analysis suggested a gene order of Hox1, 11/12/13.b, 11/12/13.a, 10, 5, X, followed by either Hox4, 3, 2 or Hox2, 3, 4 on the chromosome. Based on the present results and those previously reported in Ci, we discuss the establishment of the Hox gene complement and disintegration of Hox gene clusters during the course of ascidian or tunicate evolution. The Hox gene cluster and the genome must have experienced extensive reorganization during the course of evolution from the ancestral tunicate to Hr and Ci. Nevertheless

  10. Overexpression of HOX genes is prevalent in Ewing sarcoma and is associated with altered epigenetic regulation of developmental transcription programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Laurie K; Harris, Ashley; Bailey, Natashay J; Schwentner, Raphaela; Tomazou, Eleni; von Levetzow, Cornelia; Magnuson, Brian; Ljungman, Mats; Kovar, Heinrich; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2014-12-01

    The polycomb proteins BMI-1 and EZH2 are highly overexpressed by Ewing sarcoma (ES), a tumor of stem cell origin that is driven by EWS-ETS fusion oncogenes, most commonly EWS-FLI1. In the current study we analyzed expression of transcription programs that are controlled by polycomb proteins during embryonic development to determine if they are abnormal in ES. Our results show that polycomb target gene expression in ES deviates from normal tissues and stem cells and that, as expected, most targets are relatively repressed. However, we also discovered a paradoxical up regulation of numerous polycomb targets and these were highly enriched for homeobox (HOX) genes. Comparison of HOX profiles between malignant and non-malignant tissues revealed a distinctive HOX profile in ES, which was characterized by overexpression of posterior HOXD genes. In addition, ectopic expression of EWS-FLI1 during stem cell differentiation led to aberrant up regulation of posterior HOXD genes. Mechanistically, this up regulation was associated with altered epigenetic regulation. Specifically, ES and EWS-FLI1+ stem cells displayed a relative loss of polycomb-dependent H3K27me3 and gain of trithorax-dependent H3K4me3 at the promoters of posterior HOXD genes and also at the HOXD11.12 polycomb response element. In addition, a striking correlation was evident between HOXD13 and other genes whose regulation is coordinately regulated during embryonic development by distal enhancer elements. Together, these studies demonstrate that epigenetic regulation of polycomb target genes, in particular HOXD genes, is altered in ES and that these changes are mediated downstream of EWS-FLI1.

  11. Effect of increased HoxB4 on human megakaryocytic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sullenbarger, Brent [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lasky, Larry C., E-mail: Lasky.4@osu.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} HoxB4 overexpression in human TF1 cells increased the expression of CD61 and CD41a. {yields} HoxB4 fusion protein enhanced megakaryocytic development of CD34{sup +} cord blood cells. {yields} Ectopic HoxB4 increased Tpo receptor expression and decreased c-Myb expression. {yields} HoxB4 RNA silencing increased c-Myb expression and decreased Fli-1 expression. -- Abstract: In order to produce clinically useful quantities of platelets ex vivo we may need to firstly enhance early self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and/or megakaryocyte (Mk) progenitors. The homeodomain transcription factor HoxB4 has been shown to be an important regulator of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis; however, its effect on megakaryopoiesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of HoxB4 overexpression or RNA silencing on megakaryocytic development in the human TF1 progenitor cell line; we then used recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein to study the effect of exogenous HoxB4 on megakaryocytic development of human CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells. We found that ectopic HoxB4 in TF1 cells increased the antigen expression of CD61and CD41a, increased the gene expression of thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR), Scl-1, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it decreased c-Myb expression. HoxB4 RNA silencing in TF1 cells decreased the expression of CD61 and CD41a and decreased Fli-1 expression while it increased the expression of c-Myb. Recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the percentages and absolute numbers of CD41a and CD61 positive cells during megakaryocytic differentiation of CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells and increased the numbers of colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk). Adding tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the gene expression of TpoR, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it inhibited c-Myb expression. Our data suggest that increased HoxB4 enhanced early megakaryocytic development in human TF1 cells and CD34

  12. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  13. HoxB8 in noradrenergic specification and differentiation of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Leslie; Ferdin, Marius; Holzmann, Julia; Stubbusch, Jutta; Rohrer, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    Different prespecification of mesencephalic and trunk neural crest cells determines their response to environmental differentiation signals and contributes to the generation of different autonomic neuron subtypes, parasympathetic ciliary neurons in the head and trunk noradrenergic sympathetic neurons. The differentiation of ciliary and sympathetic neurons shares many features, including the initial BMP-induced expression of noradrenergic characteristics that is, however, subsequently lost in ciliary but maintained in sympathetic neurons. The molecular basis of specific prespecification and differentiation patterns has remained unclear. We show here that HoxB gene expression in trunk neural crest is maintained in sympathetic neurons. Ectopic expression of a single HoxB gene, HoxB8, in mesencephalic neural crest results in a strongly increased expression of sympathetic neuron characteristics like the transcription factor Hand2, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) in ciliary neurons. Other subtype-specific properties like RGS4 and RCad are not induced. HoxB8 has only minor effects in postmitotic ciliary neurons and is unable to induce TH and DBH in the enteric nervous system. Thus, we conclude that HoxB8 acts by maintaining noradrenergic properties transiently expressed in ciliary neuron progenitors during normal development. HoxC8, HoxB9, HoxB1 and HoxD10 elicit either small and transient or no effects on noradrenergic differentiation, suggesting a selective effect of HoxB8. These results implicate that Hox genes contribute to the differential development of autonomic neuron precursors by maintaining noradrenergic properties in the trunk sympathetic neuron lineage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  15. Multiple structure-intrinsic disorder interactions regulate and coordinate Hox protein function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondos, Sarah

    During animal development, Hox transcription factors determine fate of developing tissues to generate diverse organs and appendages. Hox proteins are famous for their bizarre mutant phenotypes, such as replacing antennae with legs. Clearly, the functions of individual Hox proteins must be distinct and reliable in vivo, or the organism risks malformation or death. However, within the Hox protein family, the DNA-binding homeodomains are highly conserved and the amino acids that contact DNA are nearly invariant. These observations raise the question: How do different Hox proteins correctly identify their distinct target genes using a common DNA binding domain? One possible means to modulate DNA binding is through the influence of the non-homeodomain protein regions, which differ significantly among Hox proteins. However genetic approaches never detected intra-protein interactions, and early biochemical attempts were hindered because the special features of ``intrinsically disordered'' sequences were not appreciated. We propose the first-ever structural model of a Hox protein to explain how specific contacts between distant, intrinsically disordered regions of the protein and the homeodomain regulate DNA binding and coordinate this activity with other Hox molecular functions.

  16. Early mesodermal expression of Hox genes in the polychaete Alitta virens (Annelida, Lophotrochozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakova, Milana A; Bakalenko, Nadezhda I; Novikova, Elena L

    2017-01-01

    Hox genes are the key regulators of axial regionalization of bilaterian animals. However, their main function is fulfilled differently in the development of animals from different evolutionary branches. Early patterning of the developing embryos by Hox gene expression in the representatives of protostomes (arthropods, mollusks) starts in the ectodermal cells. On the contrary, the instructive role of the mesoderm in the axial patterning was demonstrated for vertebrates. This makes it difficult to understand if during the axial regionalization of ancestral bilaterians Hox genes first expressed in the developing mesoderm or the ectoderm. To resolve this question, it is necessary to expand the number of models for investigation of the early axial patterning. Here, we show that three Hox genes of the polychaete Alitta virens (formerly Nereis virens, Annelida, Lophotrochozoa)-Hox2, Hox4, and Lox5-are expressed in the mesodermal anlagen of the three future larval chaetigerous segments in spatially colinear manner before the initiation of Hox expression in the larval ectoderm. This is the first evidence of sequential Hox gene expression in the mesoderm of protostomes to date.

  17. Spatial expression of Hox cluster genes in the ontogeny of a sea urchin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Mena, C.; Cameron, A. R.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Hox cluster of the sea urchin Strongylocentrous purpuratus contains ten genes in a 500 kb span of the genome. Only two of these genes are expressed during embryogenesis, while all of eight genes tested are expressed during development of the adult body plan in the larval stage. We report the spatial expression during larval development of the five 'posterior' genes of the cluster: SpHox7, SpHox8, SpHox9/10, SpHox11/13a and SpHox11/13b. The five genes exhibit a dynamic, largely mesodermal program of expression. Only SpHox7 displays extensive expression within the pentameral rudiment itself. A spatially sequential and colinear arrangement of expression domains is found in the somatocoels, the paired posterior mesodermal structures that will become the adult perivisceral coeloms. No such sequential expression pattern is observed in endodermal, epidermal or neural tissues of either the larva or the presumptive juvenile sea urchin. The spatial expression patterns of the Hox genes illuminate the evolutionary process by which the pentameral echinoderm body plan emerged from a bilateral ancestor.

  18. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  19. Highly conserved elements discovered in vertebrates are present in non-syntenic loci of tunicates, act as enhancers and can be transcribed during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanges, Remo; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Gueroult-Bellone, Marion; Roure, Agnes; Ferg, Marco; Meola, Nicola; Amore, Gabriele; Basu, Swaraj; Brown, Euan R.; De Simone, Marco; Petrera, Francesca; Licastro, Danilo; Strähle, Uwe; Banfi, Sandro; Lemaire, Patrick; Birney, Ewan; Müller, Ferenc; Stupka, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Co-option of cis-regulatory modules has been suggested as a mechanism for the evolution of expression sites during development. However, the extent and mechanisms involved in mobilization of cis-regulatory modules remains elusive. To trace the history of non-coding elements, which may represent candidate ancestral cis-regulatory modules affirmed during chordate evolution, we have searched for conserved elements in tunicate and vertebrate (Olfactores) genomes. We identified, for the first time, 183 non-coding sequences that are highly conserved between the two groups. Our results show that all but one element are conserved in non-syntenic regions between vertebrate and tunicate genomes, while being syntenic among vertebrates. Nevertheless, in all the groups, they are significantly associated with transcription factors showing specific functions fundamental to animal development, such as multicellular organism development and sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of these regions map onto ultraconserved elements and we demonstrate that they can act as functional enhancers within the organism of origin, as well as in cross-transgenesis experiments, and that they are transcribed in extant species of Olfactores. We refer to the elements as ‘Olfactores conserved non-coding elements’. PMID:23393190

  20. Quantitative assessment of Hox complex expression in the indirect development of the polychaete annelid Chaetopterus sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K. J.; Irvine, S. Q.; Cameron, R. A.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    A prediction from the set-aside theory of bilaterian origins is that pattern formation processes such as those controlled by the Hox cluster genes are required specifically for adult body plan formation. This prediction can be tested in animals that use maximal indirect development, in which the embryonic formation of the larva and the postembryonic formation of the adult body plan are temporally and spatially distinct. To this end, we quantitatively measured the amount of transcripts for five Hox genes in embryos of a lophotrochozoan, the polychaete annelid Chaetopterus sp. The polychaete Hox complex is shown not to be expressed during embryogenesis, but transcripts of all measured Hox complex genes are detected at significant levels during the initial stages of adult body plan formation. Temporal colinearity in the sequence of their activation is observed, so that activation follows the 3'-5' arrangement of the genes. Moreover, Hox gene expression is spatially localized to the region of teloblastic set-aside cells of the later-stage embryos. This study shows that an indirectly developing lophotrochozoan shares with an indirectly developing deuterostome, the sea urchin, a common mode of Hox complex utilization: construction of the larva, whether a trochophore or dipleurula, does not involve Hox cluster expression, but in both forms the complex is expressed in the set-aside cells from which the adult body plan derives.

  1. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  2. The Evolution of HoxD-11 Expression in the Bird Wing: Insights from Alligator mississippiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alexander O.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Fallon, John F.; VandenBrooks, John; Wagner, Günter P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative morphology identifies the digits of the wing of birds as 1,2 and 3, but they develop at embryological positions that become digits 2, 3 and 4 in other amniotes. A hypothesis to explain this is that a homeotic frame shift of digital identity occurred in the evolution of the bird wing, such that digits 1,2 and 3 are developing from embryological positions 2, 3 and 4. Digit 1 of the mouse is the only digit that shows no late expression of HoxD-11. This is also true for the anterior digit of the bird wing, suggesting this digit is actually a digit 1. If this is the case, we can expect closer relatives of birds to show no HoxD-11 expression only in digit 1. To test this prediction we investigate HoxD-11 expression in crocodilians, the closest living relatives of birds. Methodology/Principal Findings Using degenerate primers we cloned a 606 nucleotide fragment of exon 1 of the alligator HoxD-11 gene and used it for whole-mount in-situ detection in alligator embryos. We found that in the pentadactyl forelimbs of alligator, as in the mouse, late expression of HoxD-11 is absent only in digit 1. Conclusions/Significance The ancestral condition for amniotes is that late-phase HoxD-11 expression is absent only in digit 1. The biphalangeal morphology and lack of HoxD-11 expression of the anterior digit of the wing is like digit 1 of alligator and mouse, but its embryological position as digit 2 is derived. HoxD-11 expression in alligator is consistent with the hypothesis that both digit morphology as well as HoxD-11 expression are shifted towards posterior in the bird wing. PMID:18833328

  3. Evolution of the snake body form reveals homoplasy in amniote Hox gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jason J; Polly, P David

    2015-04-02

    Hox genes regulate regionalization of the axial skeleton in vertebrates, and changes in their expression have been proposed to be a fundamental mechanism driving the evolution of new body forms. The origin of the snake-like body form, with its deregionalized pre-cloacal axial skeleton, has been explained as either homogenization of Hox gene expression domains, or retention of standard vertebrate Hox domains with alteration of downstream expression that suppresses development of distinct regions. Both models assume a highly regionalized ancestor, but the extent of deregionalization of the primaxial domain (vertebrae, dorsal ribs) of the skeleton in snake-like body forms has never been analysed. Here we combine geometric morphometrics and maximum-likelihood analysis to show that the pre-cloacal primaxial domain of elongate, limb-reduced lizards and snakes is not deregionalized compared with limbed taxa, and that the phylogenetic structure of primaxial morphology in reptiles does not support a loss of regionalization in the evolution of snakes. We demonstrate that morphometric regional boundaries correspond to mapped gene expression domains in snakes, suggesting that their primaxial domain is patterned by a normally functional Hox code. Comparison of primaxial osteology in fossil and modern amniotes with Hox gene distributions within Amniota indicates that a functional, sequentially expressed Hox code patterned a subtle morphological gradient along the anterior-posterior axis in stem members of amniote clades and extant lizards, including snakes. The highly regionalized skeletons of extant archosaurs and mammals result from independent evolution in the Hox code and do not represent ancestral conditions for clades with snake-like body forms. The developmental origin of snakes is best explained by decoupling of the primaxial and abaxial domains and by increases in somite number, not by changes in the function of primaxial Hox genes.

  4. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas C Fröbius; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning, can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different ...

  5. Multiple chromosomal rearrangements structured the ancestral vertebrate Hox-bearing protochromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While the proposal that large-scale genome expansions occurred early in vertebrate evolution is widely accepted, the exact mechanisms of the expansion--such as a single or multiple rounds of whole genome duplication, bloc chromosome duplications, large-scale individual gene duplications, or some combination of these--is unclear. Gene families with a single invertebrate member but four vertebrate members, such as the Hox clusters, provided early support for Ohno's hypothesis that two rounds of genome duplication (the 2R-model occurred in the stem lineage of extant vertebrates. However, despite extensive study, the duplication history of the Hox clusters has remained unclear, calling into question its usefulness in resolving the role of large-scale gene or genome duplications in early vertebrates. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the vertebrate Hox clusters and several linked genes (the Hox "paralogon" and show that different phylogenies are obtained for Dlx and Col genes than for Hox and ErbB genes. We show that these results are robust to errors in phylogenetic inference and suggest that these competing phylogenies can be resolved if two chromosomal crossover events occurred in the ancestral vertebrate. These results resolve conflicting data on the order of Hox gene duplications and the role of genome duplication in vertebrate evolution and suggest that a period of genome reorganization occurred after genome duplications in early vertebrates.

  6. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  7. Close Sequence Comparisons are Sufficient to Identify Humancis-Regulatory Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2005-12-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons, due to the lack of a universal metric for sequence conservation, and also the paucity of empirically defined benchmark sets of cis-regulatory elements. To address this problem, we developed a general-purpose algorithm (Gumby) that detects slowly-evolving regions in primate, mammalian and more distant comparisons without requiring adjustment of parameters, and ranks conserved elements by P-value using Karlin-Altschul statistics. We benchmarked Gumby predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci, and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using reporter-gene assays in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity and specificity by comparison with 1-5 other eutherian mammals or 6 other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole genome comparative analysis, which explains some of these findings. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for testing at embryonic time points.

  8. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14. Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem–atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16, while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2, and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity

  9. Overview of the 2007 and 2008 campaigns conducted as part of the Greenland Summit Halogen-HOx Experiment (GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brooks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available From 10 May through 17 June 2007 and 6 June through 9 July 2008 intensive sampling campaigns at Summit, Greenland confirmed that active bromine chemistry is occurring in and above the snow pack at the highest part of the Greenland ice sheet (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W and 3.2 km above sea level. Direct measurements found BrO and soluble gas phase Br− mixing ratios in the low pptv range on many days (maxima −3 of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM to reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and enhanced OH relative to HO2 plus RO2 confirm that active bromine chemistry is impacting chemical cycles even at such low abundances of reactive bromine species. However, it does not appear that Bry chemistry can fully account for observed perturbations to HOx partitioning, suggesting unknown additional chemical processes may be important in this unique environment, or that our understanding of coupled NOx-HOx-Bry chemistry above sunlit polar snow is incomplete. Rapid transport from the north Atlantic marine boundary layer occasionally caused enhanced BrO at Summit (just two such events observed during the 12 weeks of sampling over the two seasons. In general observed reactive bromine was linked to activation of bromide (Br− in, and release of reactive bromine from, the snowpack. A coupled snow-atmosphere model simulated observed NO and BrO at Summit during a three day interval when winds were weak. The source of Br− in surface and near surface snow at Summit is not entirely clear, but concentrations were observed to increase when stronger vertical mixing brought free tropospheric air to the surface. Reactive Bry mixing ratios above the snow often increased in the day or two following increases in snow concentration, but this response was not consistent. On seasonal time scales concentrations of Br− in snow and reactive bromine in the air were directly related.

  10. Sequencing and genomic annotation of the chicken (Gallus gallus) hox clusters and mapping of evolutionarily conserved regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, M.K.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of normal development and are mutated in some diseases and malformations. Chicken HOX genes have been extensively studied in the chick limb and other developmental models. To date while the chicken HOXA cluster has been

  11. Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Nunes, Andreia; Woltering, Joost M.; Casaca, Ana; Nóvoa, Ana; Vinagre, Tânia; Hunter, Margaret E.; Duboule, Denis; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-01-01

    Patterning of the vertebrate skeleton requires the coordinated activity of Hox genes. In particular, Hox10 proteins are essential to set the transition from thoracic to lumbar vertebrae because of their rib-repressing activity. In snakes, however, the thoracic region extends well into Hox10-expressing areas of the embryo, suggesting that these proteins are unable to block rib formation. Here, we show that this is not a result of the loss of rib-repressing properties by the snake proteins, but rather to a single base pair change in a Hox/Paired box (Pax)-responsive enhancer, which prevents the binding of Hox proteins. This polymorphism is also found in Paenungulata, such as elephants and manatees, which have extended rib cages. In vivo, this modified enhancer failed to respond to Hox10 activity, supporting its role in the extension of rib cages. In contrast, the enhancer could still interact with Hoxb6 and Pax3 to promote rib formation. These results suggest that a polymorphism in the Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer may have played a role in the evolution of the vertebrate spine by differently modulating its response to rib-suppressing and rib-promoting Hox proteins.

  12. Regulation of endometrial receptivity by the highly expressed HOXA9, HOXA11 and HOXD10 HOX-class homeobox genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Bei; Geerts, Dirk; Bu, Zhiqin; Ai, Jihui; Jin, Lei; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhu, Guijin

    2014-01-01

    Are other HOX genes, in addition to HOXA10, involved in endometrial receptivity? The highly expressed HOXA9, HOXA11 and HOXD10 genes also appear to be involved in endometrial receptivity. Within the HOX family of homeobox transcription factor genes are the leading candidates for the regulation of

  13. Conservation and variation in Hox genes: how insect models pioneered the evo-devo field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffer, Alison; Pick, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo, broadly investigates how body plan diversity and morphological novelties have arisen and persisted in nature. The discovery of Hox genes in Drosophila, and their subsequent identification in most other metazoans, led biologists to try to understand how embryonic genes crucial for proper development have changed to promote the vast morphological variation seen in nature. Insects are ideal model systems for studying this diversity and the mechanisms underlying it because phylogenetic relationships are well established, powerful genetic tools have been developed, and there are many examples of evolutionary specializations that have arisen in nature in different insect lineages, such as the jumping leg of orthopterans and the helmet structures of treehoppers. Here, we briefly introduce the field of evo-devo and Hox genes, discuss functional tools available to study early developmental genes in insects, and provide examples in which changes in Hox genes have contributed to changes in body plan or morphology.

  14. How Hox genes can shed light on the place of echinoderms among the deuterostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Bruno; Mooi, Rich

    2014-01-01

    The Hox gene cluster ranks among the greatest of biological discoveries of the past 30 years. Morphogenetic patterning genes are remarkable for the systems they regulate during major ontogenetic events, and for their expressions of molecular, temporal, and spatial colinearity. Recent descriptions of exceptions to these colinearities are suggesting deep phylogenetic signal that can be used to explore origins of entire deuterostome phyla. Among the most enigmatic of these deuterostomes in terms of unique body patterning are the echinoderms. However, there remains no overall synthesis of the correlation between this signal and the variations observable in the presence/absence and expression patterns of Hox genes. Recent data from Hox cluster analyses shed light on how the bizarre shift from bilateral larvae to radial adults during echinoderm ontogeny can be accomplished by equally radical modifications within the Hox cluster. In order to explore this more fully, a compilation of observations on the genetic patterns among deuterostomes is integrated with the body patterning trajectories seen across the deuterostome clade. Synthesis of available data helps to explain morphogenesis along the anterior/posterior axis of echinoderms, delineating the origins and fate of that axis during ontogeny. From this, it is easy to distinguish between 'seriality' along echinoderm rays and true A/P axis phenomena such as colinearity within the somatocoels, and the ontogenetic outcomes of the unique translocation and inversion of the anterior Hox class found within the Echinodermata. An up-to-date summary and integration of the disparate lines of research so far produced on the relationship between Hox genes and pattern formation for all deuterostomes allows for development of a phylogeny and scenario for the evolution of deuterostomes in general, and the Echinodermata in particular.

  15. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Danielle M.; Seaver, Elaine C.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids, planarians and acoel

  16. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liang

    Full Text Available Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  17. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Shen, Yong-Yi; Pan, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Tai-Cheng; Yang, Chao; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises) are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii) and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus) for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  18. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Fröbius C.; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning...... the anteroposterior axis.Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5 parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers...

  19. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Fröbius C.; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different functional components of the nervous system and not the usual bilaterian staggered expression along...... the anteroposterior axis.Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5 parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers...

  20. Intact cluster and chordate-like expression of ParaHox genes in a sea star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Rossella; Martinez, Pedro; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2013-06-27

    The ParaHox genes are thought to be major players in patterning the gut of several bilaterian taxa. Though this is a fundamental role that these transcription factors play, their activities are not limited to the endoderm and extend to both ectodermal and mesodermal tissues. Three genes compose the ParaHox group: Gsx, Xlox and Cdx. In some taxa (mostly chordates but to some degree also in protostomes) the three genes are arranged into a genomic cluster, in a similar fashion to what has been shown for the better-known Hox genes. Sea urchins possess the full complement of ParaHox genes but they are all dispersed throughout the genome, an arrangement that, perhaps, represented the primitive condition for all echinoderms. In order to understand the evolutionary history of this group of genes we cloned and characterized all ParaHox genes, studied their expression patterns and identified their genomic loci in a member of an earlier branching group of echinoderms, the asteroid Patiria miniata. We identified the three ParaHox orthologs in the genome of P. miniata. While one of them, PmGsx is provided as maternal message, with no zygotic activation afterwards, the other two, PmLox and PmCdx are expressed during embryogenesis, within restricted domains of both endoderm and ectoderm. Screening of a Patiria bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library led to the identification of a clone containing the three genes. The transcriptional directions of PmGsx and PmLox are opposed to that of the PmCdx gene within the cluster. The identification of P. miniata ParaHox genes has revealed the fact that these genes are clustered in the genome, in contrast to what has been reported for echinoids. Since the presence of an intact cluster, or at least a partial cluster, has been reported in chordates and polychaetes respectively, it becomes clear that within echinoderms, sea urchins have modified the original bilaterian arrangement. Moreover, the sea star ParaHox domains of expression show

  1. Three cis-Regulatory Motifs, AuxRE, MYCRS1 and MYCRS2, are Required for Modulating the Auxin- and Mycorrhiza-Responsive Expression of a Tomato GH3 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Liao, Dehua; Yang, Xiaofeng; Ji, Minjie; Wang, Shuangshuang; Gu, Mian; Chen, Aiqun; Xu, Guohua

    2017-04-01

    Auxin is well known to be a key regulator that acts in almost all physiological processes during plant growth, and in interactions between plants and microbes. However, to date, the regulatory mechanisms underlying auxin-mediated plant-arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi symbiosis have not been well deciphered. Previously we identified a GH3 gene, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to both auxin induction and mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, we reported a refined dissection of the SlGH3.4 promoter activity using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter. The SlGH3.4 promoter could drive GUS expression strongly in mycorrhizal roots of soybean and rice plants, and in IAA-treated soybean roots, but not in IAA-treated rice roots. A promoter deletion assay revealed three cis-acting motifs, i.e. the auxin-responsive element, AuxRE, and two newly identified motifs named MYCRS1 and MYCRS2, involved in the activation of auxin- and AM-mediated expression of SlGH3.4. Deletion of the AuxRE from the SlGH3.4 promoter caused almost complete abolition of GUS staining in response to external IAA induction. Seven repeats of AuxRE fused to the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S minimal promoter could direct GUS expression in both IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots of tobacco plants. Four repeats of MYCRS1 or MYCRS2 fused to the CaMV35S minimal promoter was sufficient to drive GUS expression in arbuscule-containing cells, but not in IAA-treated tobacco roots. In summary, our results offer new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the potential cross-talk between the auxin and the AM regulatory pathways in modulating the expression of AM-responsive GH3 genes in diverse mycorrhizal plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Combinatorial action of Grainyhead, Extradenticle and Notch in regulating Hox mediated apoptosis in Drosophila larval CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Risha; Sipani, Rashmi; Govinda Rajan, Sriivatsan; Kumar, Raviranjan; Joshi, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    Hox mediated neuroblast apoptosis is a prevalent way to pattern larval central nervous system (CNS) by different Hox genes, but the mechanism of this apoptosis is not understood. Our studies with Abdominal-A (Abd-A) mediated larval neuroblast (pNB) apoptosis suggests that AbdA, its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd), a helix-loop-helix transcription factor Grainyhead (Grh), and Notch signaling transcriptionally contribute to expression of RHG family of apoptotic genes. We find that Grh, AbdA, and Exd function together at multiple motifs on the apoptotic enhancer. In vivo mutagenesis of these motifs suggest that they are important for the maintenance of the activity of the enhancer rather than its initiation. We also find that Exd function is independent of its known partner homothorax in this apoptosis. We extend some of our findings to Deformed expressing region of sub-esophageal ganglia where pNBs undergo a similar Hox dependent apoptosis. We propose a mechanism where common players like Exd-Grh-Notch work with different Hox genes through region specific enhancers to pattern respective segments of larval central nervous system.

  3. Polycomb-dependent regulatory contacts between distant Hox loci in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bantignies, Frédéric; Roure, Virginie; Comet, Itys

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, Hox genes are organized in an anterior and a posterior cluster, called Antennapedia complex and bithorax complex, located on the same chromosome arm and separated by 10 Mb of DNA. Both clusters are repressed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Here, we show that genes of...

  4. Role of Cdx and Hox genes in posterior axial extension in the mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304081302

    2009-01-01

    Hox and Cdx genes are phylogenetically related transcription factor-encoding genes that control positional tissue identity during embryonic develop- ment. In addition, mutations impairing Cdx activity in mice elicit poste- rior body truncations, affecting the axial skeleton, the neuraxis and cau-

  5. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbius, Andreas C; Funch, Peter

    2017-04-04

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning, can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different functional components of the nervous system and not the usual bilaterian staggered expression along the anteroposterior axis. Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5-parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers. Collectively, our results support an inclusion of chaetognaths in gnathiferans and Gnathifera as sister group to the remaining spiralians.Rotifers are microscopic animals with an unusual, nonsegmented body plan consisting of a head, trunk and foot. Here, Fröbius and Funch investigate the role of Hox genes-which are widely used in animal body plan patterning-in rotifer embryogenesis and find non-canonical expression in the nervous system.

  6. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The formation of diverse cell types from an invariant set of genes is governed by biochemical and molecular processes that regulate gene activity. A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the major function of genomics. Computational genomics is a rapidly emerging area for ...

  7. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    binding protein (NBP); promoter; transcription factor (TF); transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Abbreviations used: CNG, conserved non-genic sequence; EST, expressed sequence tag; NBP nucleic acid-binding protein; PF, phylogenetic.

  8. Patterns of cis regulatory variation in diverse human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of gene expression variation has long been studied with the aim to understand the landscape of regulatory variants, but also more recently to assist in the interpretation and elucidation of disease signals. To date, many studies have looked in specific tissues and population-based samples, but there has been limited assessment of the degree of inter-population variability in regulatory variation. We analyzed genome-wide gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a total of 726 individuals from 8 global populations from the HapMap3 project and correlated gene expression levels with HapMap3 SNPs located in cis to the genes. We describe the influence of ancestry on gene expression levels within and between these diverse human populations and uncover a non-negligible impact on global patterns of gene expression. We further dissect the specific functional pathways differentiated between populations. We also identify 5,691 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs after controlling for both non-genetic factors and population admixture and observe that half of the cis-eQTLs are replicated in one or more of the populations. We highlight patterns of eQTL-sharing between populations, which are partially determined by population genetic relatedness, and discover significant sharing of eQTL effects between Asians, European-admixed, and African subpopulations. Specifically, we observe that both the effect size and the direction of effect for eQTLs are highly conserved across populations. We observe an increasing proximity of eQTLs toward the transcription start site as sharing of eQTLs among populations increases, highlighting that variants close to TSS have stronger effects and therefore are more likely to be detected across a wider panel of populations. Together these results offer a unique picture and resource of the degree of differentiation among human populations in functional regulatory variation and provide an estimate for the transferability of complex trait variants across populations.

  9. The HD-Zip IV gene GaHOX1 from cotton is a functional homologue of the Arabidopsis GLABRA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xue-Ying; Li, Qian-Jin; Shan, Chun-Min; Wang, Shui; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2008-09-01

    Most of the plant homeodomain-containing proteins play important roles in organ patterning and development, and Arabidopsis GLABRA2 (GL2), a member of the class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) proteins, is a trichome and non-root hair cell regulator. Here we report the analysis of two cotton homeodomain-containing proteins, GaHOX1 and GaHOX2, isolated from the diploid cotton Gossypium arboreum. Both GaHOX1 and GaHOX2 belong to the class IV HD-ZIP family. When expressed under the control of the GL2 promoter, GaHOX1 rescued trichome development of an Arabidopsis glabrous mutant of gl2-2 (SALK_130213), whereas GaHOX2 did not. On the other hand, expression of GaHOX1 with a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in the wild-type Arabidopsis plants suppressed the trichome development just as the GL2 ectopic expression. Expression analysis by Northern, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization indicated that GaHOX1 is predominantly expressed in cotton fiber cells at early developmental stages, consistent with its putative role in regulating cotton fiber development, while GaHOX2 is expressed in both fiber and other ovular tissues, including outer and inner integuments. Our results suggest that GaHOX1 is a functional homolog of GL2 in plant trichome development.

  10. Evidence for independent Hox gene duplications in the hagfish lineage: a PCR-based gene inventory of Eptatretus stoutii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Bailey, Wendy J; Misof, Bernhard Y; Ruddle, Frank H; Wagner, Günter P

    2004-09-01

    Hox genes code for transcription factors that play a major role in the development of all animal phyla. In invertebrates these genes usually occur as tightly linked cluster, with a few exceptions where the clusters have been dissolved. Only in vertebrates multiple clusters have been demonstrated which arose by duplication from a single ancestral cluster. This history of Hox cluster duplications, in particular during the early elaboration of the vertebrate body plan, is still poorly understood. In this paper we report the results of a PCR survey on genomic DNA of the pacific hagfish Eptatretus stoutii. Hagfishes are one of two clades of recent jawless fishes that are an offshoot of the early radiation of jawless vertebrates. Our data provide evidence for at least 33 distinct Hox genes in the hagfish genome, which is most compatible with the hypothesis of multiple Hox clusters. The largest number, seven, of distinct homeobox fragments could be assigned to paralog group 9, which could imply that the hagfish has more than four clusters. Quartet mapping reveals that within each paralog group the hagfish sequences are statistically more closely related to gnathostome Hox genes than with either amphioxus or lamprey genes. These results support two assumptions about the history of Hox genes: (1) The association of hagfish homeobox sequences with gnathostome sequences suggests that at least one Hox cluster duplication event happened in the stem of vertebrates, i.e., prior to the most recent common ancestor of jawed and jawless vertebrates. (2) The high number of paralog group 9 sequences in hagfish and the phylogenetic position of hagfish suggests that the hagfish lineage underwent additional independent Hox cluster/-gene duplication events.

  11. Life habits, hox genes, and affinities of a 311 million-year-old holometabolan larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Labandeira, Conrad C; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Haug, Carolin; Brown, Susan

    2015-09-29

    Holometabolous insects are the most diverse, speciose and ubiquitous group of multicellular organisms in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. The enormous evolutionary and ecological success of Holometabola has been attributed to their unique postembryonic life phases in which nonreproductive and wingless larvae differ significantly in morphology and life habits from their reproductive and mostly winged adults, separated by a resting stage, the pupa. Little is known of the evolutionary developmental mechanisms that produced the holometabolous larval condition and their Paleozoic origin based on fossils and phylogeny. We provide a detailed anatomic description of a 311 million-year-old specimen, the oldest known holometabolous larva, from the Mazon Creek deposits of Illinois, U.S.A. The head is ovoidal, downwardly oriented, broadly attached to the anterior thorax, and bears possible simple eyes and antennae with insertions encircled by molting sutures; other sutures are present but often indistinct. Mouthparts are generalized, consisting of five recognizable segments: a clypeo-labral complex, mandibles, possible hypopharynx, a maxilla bearing indistinct palp-like appendages, and labium. Distinctive mandibles are robust, triangular, and dicondylic. The thorax is delineated into three, nonoverlapping regions of distinctive surface texture, each with legs of seven elements, the terminal-most bearing paired claws. The abdomen has ten segments deployed in register with overlapping tergites; the penultimate segment bears a paired, cercus-like structure. The anterior eight segments bear clawless leglets more diminutive than the thoracic legs in length and cross-sectional diameter, and inserted more ventrolaterally than ventrally on the abdominal sidewall. Srokalarva berthei occurred in an evolutionary developmental context likely responsible for the early macroevolutionary success of holometabolous insects. Srokalarva berthei bore head and prothoracic structures, leglet

  12. Anterior Hox Genes Interact with Components of the Neural Crest Specification Network to Induce Neural Crest Fates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes play a central role in neural crest (NC) patterning particularly in the cranial region of the body. Despite evidence that simultaneous loss of Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 function resulted in NC specification defects, the role of Hox genes in NC specification has remained unclear due to extended genetic redundancy among Hox genes. To circumvent this problem, we expressed anterior Hox genes in the trunk neural tube of the developing chick embryo. This demonstrated that anterior Hox genes play a central role in NC cell specification by rapidly inducing the key transcription factors Snail2 and Msx1/2 and a neural progenitor to NC cell fate switch characterized by cell adhesion changes and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells delaminated from dorsal and medial neural tube levels and generated ectopic neurons, glia progenitors, and melanocytes. The mobilization of the NC genetic cascade was dependent upon bone morphogenetic protein signaling and optimal levels of Notch signaling. Therefore, anterior Hox patterning genes participate in NC specification and EMT by interacting with NC-inducing signaling pathways and regulating the expression of key genes involved in these processes. Stem Cells 2011;29:858–870 PMID:21433221

  13. Polycomb and Hox Genes Control JNK-Induced Remodeling of the Segment Boundary during Drosophila Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Roumengous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In segmented tissues, anterior and posterior compartments represent independent morphogenetic domains, which are made of distinct lineages separated by boundaries. During dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo, specific “mixer cells” (MCs are reprogrammed in a JNK-dependent manner to express the posterior determinant engrailed (en and cross the segment boundary. Here, we show that JNK signaling induces de novo expression of en in the MCs through repression of Polycomb (Pc and release of the en locus from the silencing PcG bodies. Whereas reprogramming occurs in MCs from all thoracic and abdominal segments, cell mixing is restricted to the central abdominal region. We demonstrate that this spatial control of MC remodeling depends on the antagonist activity of the Hox genes abdominal-A and Abdominal-B. Together, these results reveal an essential JNK/en/Pc/Hox gene regulatory network important in controlling both the plasticity of segment boundaries and developmental reprogramming.

  14. Hox Function Is Required for the Development and Maintenance of the Drosophila Feeding Motor Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Friedrich

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Feeding is an evolutionarily conserved and integral behavior that depends on the rhythmic activity of feeding muscles stimulated by specific motoneurons. However, critical molecular determinants underlying the development of the neuromuscular feeding unit are largely unknown. Here, we identify the Hox transcription factor Deformed (Dfd as essential for feeding unit formation, from initial specification to the establishment of active synapses, by controlling stage-specific sets of target genes. Importantly, we found Dfd to control the expression of functional components of synapses, such as Ankyrin2-XL, a protein known to be critical for synaptic stability and connectivity. Furthermore, we uncovered Dfd as a potential regulator of synaptic specificity, as it represses expression of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule Connectin (Con. These results demonstrate that Dfd is critical for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular unit required for feeding behavior, which might be shared by other group 4 Hox genes.

  15. Trimethylation of Histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) ChIP-PCR and transcriptional expression data of Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 in the Xenopus XTC cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Warren; Sahin, Hande; Wells, Kaylee; McCusker, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    Trimethylation of Histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) is a chromatin modification that is associated with transcriptional repression (Cao et al., 2002; Sarma et al., 2008; Pengelly et al., 2013) [1], [2], [3]. In this article we performed anti-H3K27me3 Chromosomal Immunoprecipitation (ChIP-PCR), to detect the abundance of H3K27me3 marks on Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 in the Xenopus XTC cell line. We also performed RT-PCR for these genes to determine whether their expression is detectable in the XTC cell culture. The data we present here are the fold enrichment of Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 on anti-H3K27me3 ChIP compared to no antibody controls. We also present RT-PCR data on the above listed genes.

  16. HoxA-11 and FOXO1A cooperate to regulate decidual prolactin expression: towards inferring the core transcriptional regulators of decidual genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the menstrual cycle, the ovarian steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone control a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs leading to a receptive state for blastocyst implantation and the establishment of pregnancy. A key marker gene of this decidualization process is the prolactin gene. Several transcriptional regulators have been identified that are essential for decidualization of ESCs, including the Hox genes HoxA-10 and HoxA-11, and the forkhead box gene FOXO1A. While previous studies have identified downstream target genes for HoxA-10 and FOXO1A, the role of HoxA-11 in decidualization has not been investigated. Here, we show that HoxA-11 is required for prolactin expression in decidualized ESC. While HoxA-11 alone is a repressor on the decidual prolactin promoter, it turns into an activator when combined with FOXO1A. Conversely, HoxA-10, which has been previously shown to associate with FOXO1A to upregulate decidual IGFBP-1 expression, is unable to upregulate PRL expression when co-expressed with FOXO1A. By co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate physical association of HoxA-11 and FOXO1A, and binding of both factors to an enhancer region (-395 to -148 relative to the PRL transcriptional start site of the decidual prolactin promoter. Because FOXO1A is induced upon decidualization, it serves to assemble a decidual-specific transcriptional complex including HoxA-11. These data highlight cooperativity between numerous transcription factors to upregulate PRL in differentiating ESC, and suggest that this core set of transcription factors physically and functionally interact to drive the expression of a gene battery upregulated in differentiated ESC. In addition, the functional non-equivalence of HoxA-11 and HoxA-10 with respect to PRL regulation suggests that these transcription factors regulate distinct sets of target genes during decidualization.

  17. An adaptive transposable element insertion in the regulatory region of the EO gene in the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Yi-Hong; Han, Min-Jin; Cao, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Although there are many studies to show a key role of transposable elements (TEs) in adaptive evolution of higher organisms, little is known about the molecular mechanisms. In this study, we found that a partial TE (Taguchi) inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the silkworm ecdysone oxidase (EO) gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme to reduce the titer of molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E). The TE insertion occurred during domestication of silkworm and the frequency of the TE insertion in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori) is high, 54.24%. The linkage disequilibrium in the TE inserted strains of the domesticated silkworm was elevated. Molecular population genetics analyses suggest that this TE insertion is adaptive for the domesticated silkworm. Luminescent reporter assay shows that the TE inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene functions as a 20E-induced enhancer of the gene expression. Further, phenotypic bioassay indicates that the silkworm with the TE insertion exhibited more stable developmental phenotype than the silkworm without the TE insertion when suffering from food shortage. Thus, the inserted TE in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene increased developmental uniformity of silkworm individuals through regulating 20E metabolism, partially explaining transformation of a domestication developmental trait in the domesticated silkworm. Our results emphasize the exceptional role of gene expression regulation in developmental transition of domesticated animals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Coupling of HOx, NOx and halogen chemistry in the antarctic boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Salmon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study of radical chemistry in the coastal Antarctic boundary layer, based upon observations performed in the course of the CHABLIS (Chemistry of the Antarctic Boundary Layer and the Interface with Snow campaign at Halley Research Station in coastal Antarctica during the austral summer 2004/2005, is described: a detailed zero-dimensional photochemical box model was used, employing inorganic and organic reaction schemes drawn from the Master Chemical Mechanism, with additional halogen (iodine and bromine reactions added. The model was constrained to observations of long-lived chemical species, measured photolysis frequencies and meteorological parameters, and the simulated levels of HOx, NOx and XO compared with those observed. The model was able to replicate the mean levels and diurnal variation in the halogen oxides IO and BrO, and to reproduce NOx levels and speciation very well. The NOx source term implemented compared well with that directly measured in the course of the CHABLIS experiments. The model systematically overestimated OH and HO2 levels, likely a consequence of the combined effects of (a estimated physical parameters and (b uncertainties within the halogen, particularly iodine, chemical scheme. The principal sources of HOx radicals were the photolysis and bromine-initiated oxidation of HCHO, together with O(1D + H2O. The main sinks for HOx were peroxy radical self- and cross-reactions, with the sum of all halogen-mediated HOx loss processes accounting for 40% of the total sink. Reactions with the halogen monoxides dominated CH3O2-HO2-OH interconversion, with associated local chemical ozone destruction in place of the ozone production which is associated with radical cycling driven by the analogous NO reactions. The analysis highlights the need for observations of physical parameters such as aerosol surface area and boundary layer structure to constrain such calculations, and the dependence of simulated radical levels

  19. Atmospheric Processing of European Air Masses: Evidences from the Modelling of HOx Measurements over Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, C.; Martinez, M.; Novelli, A.; Reiffs, A.; Derstroff, B.; Sauvage, C.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Fischer, H.; Meusel, H.; Su, H.; Crowley, J.; Schuladen, J.; Williams, J.; Tomsche, L.; Hafermann, S.; Javed, M. U.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), were measured in Cyprus along with a suite of other trace gases during the CYPHEX (CYprus PHotochemistry EXperiment) field campaign, in the summer of 2014. Cyprus is a remote island in the Eastern Mediterranean located downwind of the mainland Europe emissions. The lowest HOx production was observed in aged air masses with the lowest O3 and CO levels and processed for an extended period in the marine boundary layer. To study the contributions of various photochemical precursors to the HOx budget, OH and HO2 were simulated with a photochemical box model (CAABA) constrained with measurements. The model could simulate the observed HOx levels reasonably well, but it failed to reproduce the HOx partitioning, and OH levels were overestimated by about 50% when biogenic hydrocarbons were not included. When isoprene, emitted from the local vegetation, was included in the model, the gap between modelled and measured OH reduced, with the modelled OH being only about 20% too high. The remaining discrepancy vanished by including measured pinene (α and β) reactivity (concentration x rate constant w.r.t. OH) into the model. However, pinene chemistry caused the model to underestimate HO2 by about 20%. Since biogenic emissions account for a major fraction of the global hydrocarbon budget, we tested the performance of a global model EMAC, with the same chemical scheme as CAABA, in simulating the measured OH and HO2 in Cyprus. We found that EMAC is able to simulate the HO2 concentrations, but severely overestimated OH (as well as NO levels), which influences the lifetime of many gaseous species in the atmosphere.

  20. The Homeobox BcHOX8 Gene in Botrytis Cinerea Regulates Vegetative Growth and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Zsuzsanna; Rascle, Christine; Cimerman, Agnès; Viaud, Muriel; Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Choquer, Mathias; Bruel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. PMID:23133556

  1. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  2. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications. PMID:26812882

  3. Phylogeny based discovery of regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Barak A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Algorithms that locate evolutionarily conserved sequences have become powerful tools for finding functional DNA elements, including transcription factor binding sites; however, most methods do not take advantage of an explicit model for the constrained evolution of functional DNA sequences. Results We developed a probabilistic framework that combines an HKY85 model, which assigns probabilities to different base substitutions between species, and weight matrix models of transcription factor binding sites, which describe the probabilities of observing particular nucleotides at specific positions in the binding site. The method incorporates the phylogenies of the species under consideration and takes into account the position specific variation of transcription factor binding sites. Using our framework we assessed the suitability of alignments of genomic sequences from commonly used species as substrates for comparative genomic approaches to regulatory motif finding. We then applied this technique to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species by examining all possible six base pair DNA sequences (hexamers and identifying sequences that are conserved in a significant number of promoters. By combining similar conserved hexamers we reconstructed known cis-regulatory motifs and made predictions of previously unidentified motifs. We tested one prediction experimentally, finding it to be a regulatory element involved in the transcriptional response to glucose. Conclusion The experimental validation of a regulatory element prediction missed by other large-scale motif finding studies demonstrates that our approach is a useful addition to the current suite of tools for finding regulatory motifs.

  4. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wavelength-Resolved Photon Fluxes of Indoor Light Sources: Implications for HOx Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Shawn F; Allen, Seth R; Kahan, Tara F

    2017-09-19

    Photochemistry is a largely unconsidered potential source of reactive species such as hydroxyl and peroxy radicals (OH and HO2, "HOx") indoors. We present measured wavelength-resolved photon fluxes and distance dependences of indoor light sources including halogen, incandescent, and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) commonly used in residential buildings; fluorescent tubes common in industrial and commercial settings; and sunlight entering buildings through windows. We use these measurements to predict indoor HOx production rates from the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ozone (O3), formaldehyde (HCHO), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO). Our results suggest that while most lamps can photolyze these molecules, only sunlight and fluorescent tubes will be important to room-averaged indoor HOx levels due to the strong distance dependence of the fluxes from compact bulbs. Under ambient conditions, we predict that sunlight and fluorescent lights will photolyze HONO to form OH at rates of 106-107 molecules cm-3 s-1, and that fluorescent lights will photolyze HCHO to form HO2 at rates of ∼106 molecules cm-3 s-1; rates could be 2 orders of magnitude higher under high precursor concentrations. Ozone and H2O2 will not be important photochemical OH sources under most conditions, and CH3CHO will generally increase HO2 production rates only slightly. We also calculated photolysis rate constants for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrate radicals (NO3) in the presence of the different light sources. Photolysis is not likely an important fate for NO3 indoors, but NO2 photolysis could be an important source of indoor O3.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis Reveals Versatile Roles of Hox Genes in Crustacean Limb Specification and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Serano, Julia M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; Wang, Jennifer; Ray, Shagnik; Barker, Carryn A; O'Connell, Liam C; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-11

    Crustaceans possess a diverse array of specialized limbs. Although shifts in Hox gene expression domains have been postulated to play a role in generating this limb diversity, little functional data have been provided to understand the precise roles of Hox genes during crustacean development. We used a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis and RNAi knockdown to decipher the function of the six Hox genes expressed in the developing mouth and trunk of the amphipod Parhyale hawaiensis. These experimentally manipulated animals display specific and striking homeotic transformations. We found that abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) are required for proper posterior patterning, with knockout of Abd-B resulting in an animal with thoracic type legs along what would have been an abdomen, and abd-A disruption generating a simplified body plan characterized by a loss of specialization in both abdominal and thoracic appendages. In the thorax, Ubx is necessary for gill development and for repression of gnathal fate, and Antp dictates claw morphology. In the mouth, Scr and Antp confer the part-gnathal, part-thoracic hybrid identity of the maxilliped, and Scr and Dfd prevent antennal identity in posterior head segments. Our results allow us to define the role Hox genes play in specifying each appendage type in Parhyale, including the modular nature by which some appendages are patterned by Hox gene inputs. In addition, we define how changes in Hox gene expression have generated morphological differences between crustacean species. Finally, we also highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9-based somatic mutagenesis in emerging model organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EGL-20/Wnt and MAB-5/Hox Act Sequentially to Inhibit Anterior Migration of Neuroblasts in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Josephson

    Full Text Available Directed neuroblast and neuronal migration is important in the proper development of nervous systems. In C. elegans the bilateral Q neuroblasts QR (on the right and QL (on the left undergo an identical pattern of cell division and differentiation but migrate in opposite directions (QR and descendants anteriorly and QL and descendants posteriorly. EGL-20/Wnt, via canonical Wnt signaling, drives the expression of MAB-5/Hox in QL but not QR. MAB-5 acts as a determinant of posterior migration, and mab-5 and egl-20 mutants display anterior QL descendant migrations. Here we analyze the behaviors of QR and QL descendants as they begin their anterior and posterior migrations, and the effects of EGL-20 and MAB-5 on these behaviors. The anterior and posterior daughters of QR (QR.a/p after the first division immediately polarize and begin anterior migration, whereas QL.a/p remain rounded and non-migratory. After ~1 hour, QL.a migrates posteriorly over QL.p. We find that in egl-20/Wnt, bar-1/β-catenin, and mab-5/Hox mutants, QL.a/p polarize and migrate anteriorly, indicating that these molecules normally inhibit anterior migration of QL.a/p. In egl-20/Wnt mutants, QL.a/p immediately polarize and begin migration, whereas in bar-1/β-catenin and mab-5/Hox, the cells transiently retain a rounded, non-migratory morphology before anterior migration. Thus, EGL-20/Wnt mediates an acute inhibition of anterior migration independently of BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox, and a later, possible transcriptional response mediated by BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox. In addition to inhibiting anterior migration, MAB-5/Hox also cell-autonomously promotes posterior migration of QL.a (and QR.a in a mab-5 gain-of-function.

  8. Rational drug repurposing using sscMap analysis in a HOX-TALE model of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettyle, Laura M J; Liberante, Fabio G; Thompson, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery and development are often hampered by lack of target identification and clinical tractability. Repurposing of approved drugs to life-threatening diseases such as leukemia is emerging as a promising alternative approach. Connectivity mapping systems link approved drugs with disease-related gene signatures. Relevant preclinical models provide essential tools for system validation and proof-of-concept studies. Herein we describe procedures aimed at generating disease-based gene signatures and applying them to established cross-referencing databases of potential candidate drugs. As a proof of principle, we present the identification of Entinostat as a candidate drug for the treatment of HOX-TALE-related leukemia.

  9. Low oxygen tension reveals distinct HOX codes in human cord blood-derived stromal cells associated with specific endochondral ossification capacities in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Stefanie; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Laitinen, Anita; Donsante, Samantha; Klöckers, Robert; Laitinen, Saara; Riminucci, Mara; Kogler, Gesine

    2017-10-01

    Effects of oxygen tension on the generation, expansion, proliferation and differentiation of stromal cell types is widely described in the literature. However, data on the internal heterogeneity of applied cell populations at different O 2 levels and possible impacts on differentiation potentials are controversial. Here, the expression of 39 human HOX genes was determined in neonatal cord blood stromal cells and linked to differentiation-associated signatures. In cord blood, unrestricted somatic stromal cells (USSCs), lacking HOX gene expression, and cord blood-derived multipotent stromal cells (CB-MSCs), expressing about 20 HOX genes, are distinguished by their specific HOX code. Interestingly, 74% of the clones generated at 21% O 2 were HOX-negative USSCs, whereas 73% of upcoming clones at 3% O 2 were HOX-positive CB-MSCs. In order to better categorize distinct cell lines generated at 3% O 2 , the expression of all 39 HOX genes within HOX clusters A, B, C and D were tested and new subtypes defined: cells negative in all four HOX clusters (USSCs); cells positive in all four clusters (CB-MSCs ABCD ); and subpopulations missing a single cluster (CB-MSCs ACD and CB-MSCs BCD ). Comprehensive qPCR analyses of established chondro-osteomarkers revealed subtype-specific signatures verifiably associated with in vitro and in vivo differentiation capacity. The data presented here underline the necessity of better characterizing distinct cell populations at a clonal level, taking advantage of the inherent specific HOX code as a distinguishing feature between individual subtypes. Moreover, the correlation of subtype-specific molecular signatures with in vitro and in vivo bone formation is discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-05-15

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1(Cre), the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3(Cre)-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty M Booker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing.

  12. Hox gene expression in the embryonic genital system of the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholt, 1829), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2010-09-01

    Hox genes are conserved transcription factors which regulate embryonic morphogenesis and differentiation. For the first time, we examined the quantitative and spatial expression of two Hox 5' genes, HoxD11 and HoxA13, in the developing genital system of the olive ridley Lepidochelys olivacea, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination. Quantitative and spatial expression patterns of both genes suggest a role in the female pathway rather than the male pathway. For instance, both genes, especially HoxA13, were expressed in the undifferentiated gonad during the thermosensitive period at a female promoting temperature, and downregulated in the differentiated gonad. By contrast, expression of both genes was low in gonads incubated at a male promoting temperature and did not change significantly in the differentiated gonad. Furthermore, we found high expression levels of HoxA13 in the paramesonephric duct at the male promoting temperature but not at the female promoting temperature, suggesting a role for this Hox gene in the partial regression of the Müllerian duct in males. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 2. HOx radical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    The production of HOx radicals in the South Coast Air Basin of California is investigated during the smog episode of September 9, 1993 using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) air-quality model. Sources of HOx(hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and organic peroxy radicals) incorporated into the associated gas-phase chemical mechanism include the combination of excited-state singlet oxygen (formed from ozone (O3) photolysis (hv)) with water, the photolysis of nitrous acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde (HCHO) or higher aldehydes and ketones), the consumption of aldehydes and alkenes (ALK) by the nitrate radical, and the consumption of alkenes by O3 and the oxygen atom (O). At a given time or location for surface cells and vertical averages, each route of HOx formation may be the greatest contributor to overall formation except HCHO-hv, H2O2-hv, and ALK-O, the latter two of which are insignificant pathways in general. The contribution of the ALK-O3 pathway is dependent on the stoichiometric yield of OH, but this pathway, at least for the studied smog episode, may not be as generally significant as previous research suggests. Future emissions scenarios yield lower total HOx production rates and a shift in the relative importance of individual pathways.

  14. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut

  15. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 1. Neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The structural and the magnetic ordering in thin-film HoxPr1-x alloys have been studied using neutron-and x-ray-diffraction techniques. As the concentration of Ho decreases the alloys adopt hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), Sm, and double hexagonal-close-packed (dhcp) crystal structures. The results...... show enhanced occupation of the cubic sites by Pr in the Sm and dhcp phases. The magnetic behavior is found to be very different in the three crystalline phases. The hcp samples form basal-plane spirals and the alloys with the Sm structure form a commensurate magnetic structure with the same...... periodicity as the magnetic order on the hexagonal sites in Sm metal, but the moments are confined to the basal plane. At low temperatures both Ho and Pr are found to adopt their full saturation moments in these phases. A Pr thin film is found to order with a similar magnetic structure to bulk Pr. However...

  16. A Comprehensive Map of Insulator Elements for the Drosophila Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parantu K.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Morrison, Carolyn A.; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Feng, Xin; Ahmad, Kami; Russell, Steven; White, Robert A. H.; Stein, Lincoln; Henikoff, Steven; Kellis, Manolis; White, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Insulators are DNA sequences that control the interactions among genomic regulatory elements and act as chromatin boundaries. A thorough understanding of their location and function is necessary to address the complexities of metazoan gene regulation. We studied by ChIP–chip the genome-wide binding sites of 6 insulator-associated proteins—dCTCF, CP190, BEAF-32, Su(Hw), Mod(mdg4), and GAF—to obtain the first comprehensive map of insulator elements in Drosophila embryos. We identify over 14,000 putative insulators, including all classically defined insulators. We find two major classes of insulators defined by dCTCF/CP190/BEAF-32 and Su(Hw), respectively. Distributional analyses of insulators revealed that particular sub-classes of insulator elements are excluded between cis-regulatory elements and their target promoters; divide differentially expressed, alternative, and divergent promoters; act as chromatin boundaries; are associated with chromosomal breakpoints among species; and are embedded within active chromatin domains. Together, these results provide a map demarcating the boundaries of gene regulatory units and a framework for understanding insulator function during the development and evolution of Drosophila. PMID:20084099

  17. Comparative Analysis of Chromatin Binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and Other Polycomb Group Repressors at a Drosophila Hox Gene▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets. PMID:20351181

  18. Comparative analysis of chromatin binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and other polycomb group repressors at a Drosophila Hox gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L; Ketel, Carrie S; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets.

  19. On the chain lenth in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Igor; Kuskov, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of chain mechanisms of ozone depletion in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles has been performed. The carried out analysis has allowed to get analytical expression for calculation of the rate of limiting stage of chain prolongation, as well as chain breaking and chain length in cycles specified. It has been shown, that the correct estimation of ozone depletion in the chain processes is possible only through definition of the rate of limiting stage with taking into account of all reactions of chain prolongation, instead of the unique reaction possessing the least rate as it usually became earlier. It has been shown also, that choice of one reaction means ignoring a chain character of the process and leads to overestimate of real rate of ozone destruction. The role of null chain processes in the cycles specified above has been considered. It has been shown, that these processes play defining role in formation of families of odd oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine and bromine. By means of methods developed, data of IPCC scenario RCP 4.5, and two-dimensional model Socrates the rate of ozone destruction and chain length in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles for modeling conditions of April 2013 at 50 N and height diapason 15-120 km has been calculated. It has been shown, that in the middle stratosphere ozone destruction is due mainly to NOx cycle, whereas in the mesosphere and low thermosphere it is due mainly HOx one. It has been also shown that ClOx and BrOx have the greatest chain length in the upper stratosphere which exceeds 106 and HOx cycle in the low thermosphere has a chain length exceeding 1011.

  20. HO_x chemistry during INTEX-A 2004: Observation, model calculation, and comparison with previous studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Xinrong; Olson, Jennifer R; Crawford, James H.; Brune, William H.; Mao, Jingqiu; Long, Robert B.; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Gao; Avery, Melody A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Barrick, John D; Diskin, Glenn S.; Huey, L. Greg; Fried, Alan; Cohen, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    OH and HO_2 were measured with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) as part of a large measurement suite from the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-A (INTEX-A). This mission, which was conducted mainly over North America and the western Atlantic Ocean in summer 2004, was an excellent test of atmospheric oxidation chemistry. The HOx results from INTEX-A are compared to those from previous campaigns and to results for other related ...

  1. Physical forces may cause Hox gene collinearity in the primary and secondary axes of the developing vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    The features of spatial and temporal Hox gene collinearity along the anteroposterior and secondary axes of vertebrate development have been extensively studied. However, the understanding of these features remains problematic. Some genetic engineering experiments were performed and the consequent modifications of the Hoxd gene expressions in the vertebrate limb and trunk were presented. A two-phases model was proposed to describe the above results but still many data cannot be explained. In the present work a different mechanism is put forward in order to deal with the above experiments. This alternative mechanism (coined biophysical model), is based on the hypothesis that physical forces decondense and 'loop out' the chromatin fiber causing the observed Hox gene collinearity phenomena at the early stages of axonal development. The two models are compared in detail. The biophysical model adequately explains the data even in cases where the results are characterized as unexpected. Furthermore, the biophysical model predicts that the Hox gene expressions are entangled in space and time and this coupling is compatible with the data of the early developmental stages. Additional experiments are proposed for a direct test of this model. © 2011 The Author. Journal compilation © 2011 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Technical Note: Formal blind intercomparison of OH measurements: results from the international campaign HOxComp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schlosser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals (OH are the major oxidizing species in the troposphere. Because of their central importance, absolute measurements of their concentrations are needed to validate chemical mechanisms of atmospheric models. The extremely low and highly variable concentrations in the troposphere, however, make measurements of OH difficult. Three techniques are currently used worldwide for tropospheric observations of OH after about 30~years of technical developments: Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF, and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (CIMS. Even though many measurement campaigns with OH data were published, the question of accuracy and precision is still under discussion.

    Here, we report results of the first formal, blind intercomparison of these techniques. Six OH instruments (4~LIF, 1~CIMS, 1~DOAS participated successfully in the ground-based, international HOxComp campaign carried out in Jülich, Germany, in summer 2005. Comparisons were performed for three days in ambient air (3~LIF, 1 CIMS and for six days in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (3~LIF, 1~DOAS. All instruments were found to measure tropospheric OH concentrations with high sensitivity and good time resolution. The pairwise correlations between different data sets were linear and yielded high correlation coefficients (r2=0.75−0.96. Excellent absolute agreement was observed for the instruments at the SAPHIR chamber, yielding slopes between 1.01 and 1.13 in the linear regressions. In ambient air, the slopes deviated from unity by factors of 1.06 to 1.69, which can partly be explained by the stated instrumental accuracies. In addition, sampling inhomogeneities and calibration problems have apparently contributed to the discrepancies. The absolute intercepts of the linear regressions did not exceed 0.6×106 cm−3, mostly being insignificant and of

  3. CDX2 hox gene product in a rat model of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzetto Christian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrett's mucosa is the precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The molecular mechanisms behind Barrett's carcinogenesis are largely unknown. Experimental models of longstanding esophageal reflux of duodenal-gastric contents may provide important information on the biological sequence of the Barrett's oncogenesis. Methods The expression of CDX2 hox-gene product was assessed in a rat model of Barrett's carcinogenesis. Seventy-four rats underwent esophago-jejunostomy with gastric preservation. Excluding perisurgical deaths, the animals were sacrificed at various times after the surgical treatment (Group A: 30 weeks. Results No Cdx2 expression was detected in either squamous epithelia of the proximal esophagus or squamous cell carcinomas. De novo Cdx2 expression was consistently documented in the proliferative zone of the squamous epithelium close to reflux ulcers (Group A: 68%; Group B: 64%; Group C: 80%, multilayered epithelium and intestinal metaplasia (Group A: 9%; Group B: 41%; Group C: 60%, and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Group B: 36%; Group C: 35%. A trend for increasing overall Cdx2 expression was documented during the course of the experiment (p = 0.001. Conclusion De novo expression of Cdx2 is an early event in the spectrum of the lesions induced by experimental gastro-esophageal reflux and should be considered as a key step in the morphogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  4. CDX2 hox gene product in a rat model of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Dall'Olmo, Luigi; Segat, Daniela; Fassan, Matteo; Mescoli, Claudia; Dazzo, Emanuela; Castoro, Carlo; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Rizzetto, Christian; Baroni, Maurizio David; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Ancona, Ermanno; Rugge, Massimo

    2009-08-07

    Barrett's mucosa is the precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The molecular mechanisms behind Barrett's carcinogenesis are largely unknown. Experimental models of longstanding esophageal reflux of duodenal-gastric contents may provide important information on the biological sequence of the Barrett's oncogenesis. The expression of CDX2 hox-gene product was assessed in a rat model of Barrett's carcinogenesis. Seventy-four rats underwent esophago-jejunostomy with gastric preservation. Excluding perisurgical deaths, the animals were sacrificed at various times after the surgical treatment (Group A: 30 weeks). No Cdx2 expression was detected in either squamous epithelia of the proximal esophagus or squamous cell carcinomas. De novo Cdx2 expression was consistently documented in the proliferative zone of the squamous epithelium close to reflux ulcers (Group A: 68%; Group B: 64%; Group C: 80%), multilayered epithelium and intestinal metaplasia (Group A: 9%; Group B: 41%; Group C: 60%), and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Group B: 36%; Group C: 35%). A trend for increasing overall Cdx2 expression was documented during the course of the experiment (p = 0.001). De novo expression of Cdx2 is an early event in the spectrum of the lesions induced by experimental gastro-esophageal reflux and should be considered as a key step in the morphogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  5. The anterior determinant bicoid of Drosophila is a derived Hox class 3 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Michael; Jäckle, Herbert; Schmidt-Ott, Urs

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila gene bicoid functions as the anterior body pattern organizer of Drosophila. Embryos lacking maternally expressed bicoid fail to develop anterior segments including head and thorax. In wild-type eggs, bicoid mRNA is localized in the anterior pole region and the bicoid protein forms an anterior-to-posterior concentration gradient. bicoid activity is required for transcriptional activation of zygotic segmentation genes and the translational suppression of uniformly distributed maternal caudal mRNA in the anterior region of the embryo. caudal genes as well as other homeobox genes or members of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade have been found to be conserved in animal evolution. In contrast, bicoid homologs have been identified only in close relatives of the schizophoran fly Drosophila. This poses the question of how the bicoid gene evolved and adopted its unique function in organizing anterior–posterior polarity. We have cloned bicoid from a basal cyclorrhaphan fly, Megaselia abdita (Phoridae, Aschiza), and show that the gene originated from a recent duplication of the direct homolog of the vertebrate gene Hox3, termed zerknüllt, which specifies extraembryonic tissues in insects. PMID:10097115

  6. Resenha da obra "Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharlene Davantel Valarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A obra “Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade” constitui-se como o volume 26 da coleção “Materiais didácticos”, do Instituto de Ciências da Educação, da Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, organizada pelas professoras e pesquisadoras Isabel Mociño González e Blanca-Ana Roig Rechou. Em sua essência, reúne resenhas e outros textos sobre obras infantis e juvenis traduzidas ou por traduzir para a língua galega publicados no período de 2010 a 2015 no jornal “El correo galego”, de Santiago de Compostela. O objetivo da obra é apresentar livros estrangeiros que tragam avanços para o sistema literário da Galícia, principalmente, na formação do jovem leitor. É indicada para mediadores de leitura, professores, bibliotecários e pais, constituindo-se em uma contribuição para a divulgação da Literatura Infantil e Juvenil, visto que tanto as obras revisitadas (tidas como clássicas quanto as mais atuais se encontram apresentadas e discutidas ao longo dos textos que compõem a obra, formando um panorama das publicações mais contundentes.

  7. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hox genes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteran Bombyx mori. In this species, Antennapedia (Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antp can regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antp in the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such as sericin-3, fhxh4, and fhxh5. These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp. Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antp activates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putative sericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antp directly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. mori and the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori. We suggest that Hox genes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. PMID:26814126

  8. Transcriptional Repression of Hox Genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studencka, Maja; Wesołowski, Radosław; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Wisniewski, Jacek R.; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1) and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2) and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5), which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males. PMID:23028351

  9. Evolution of sex-specific traits through changes in HOX-dependent doublesex expression.

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    Kohtaro Tanaka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost every animal lineage is characterized by unique sex-specific traits, implying that such traits are gained and lost frequently in evolution. However, the genetic mechanisms responsible for these changes are not understood. In Drosophila, the activity of the sex determination pathway is restricted to sexually dimorphic tissues, suggesting that spatial regulation of this pathway may contribute to the evolution of sex-specific traits. We examine the regulation and function of doublesex (dsx, the main transcriptional effector of the sex determination pathway, in the development and evolution of Drosophila sex combs. Sex combs are a recent evolutionary innovation and show dramatic diversity in the relatively few Drosophila species that have them. We show that dsx expression in the presumptive sex comb region is activated by the HOX gene Sex combs reduced (Scr, and that the male isoform of dsx up-regulates Scr so that both genes become expressed at high levels in this region in males but not in females. Precise spatial regulation of dsx is essential for defining sex comb position and morphology. Comparative analysis of Scr and dsx expression reveals a tight correlation between sex comb morphology and the expression patterns of both genes. In species that primitively lack sex combs, no dsx expression is observed in the homologous region, suggesting that the origin and diversification of this structure were linked to the gain of a new dsx expression domain. Two other, distantly related fly lineages that independently evolved novel male-specific structures show evolutionary gains of dsx expression in the corresponding tissues, where dsx may also be controlled by Scr. These findings suggest that changes in the spatial regulation of sex-determining genes are a key mechanism that enables the evolution of new sex-specific traits, contributing to some of the most dramatic examples of phenotypic diversification in nature.

  10. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  11. Hox Gene Expression Leads to Differential Hind Leg Development between Honeybee Castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period. PMID:22848371

  12. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Durvalina Bomtorin

    Full Text Available Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx, whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  13. Hox genes require homothorax and extradenticle for body wall identity specification but not for appendage identity specification during metamorphosis of Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank W; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-11-01

    The establishment of segment identity is a key developmental process that allows for divergence along the anteroposterior body axis in arthropods. In Drosophila, the identity of a segment is determined by the complement of Hox genes it expresses. In many contexts, Hox transcription factors require the protein products of extradenticle (exd) and homothorax (hth) as cofactors to perform their identity specification functions. In holometabolous insects, segment identity may be specified twice, during embryogenesis and metamorphosis. To glean insight into the relationship between embryonic and metamorphic segmental identity specification, we have compared these processes in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, which develops ventral appendages during embryogenesis that later metamorphose into adult appendages with distinct morphologies. At metamorphosis, comparisons of RNAi phenotypes indicate that Hox genes function jointly with Tc-hth and Tc-exd to specify several region-specific aspects of the adult body wall. On the other hand, Hox genes specify appendage identities along the anteroposterior axis independently of Tc-hth/Tc-exd and Tc-hth/Tc-exd specify proximal vs. distal identity within appendages independently of Hox genes during this stage. During embryogenesis, Tc-hth and Tc-exd play a broad role in the segmentation process and are required for specification of body wall identities in the thorax; however, contrasting with results from other species, we did not obtain homeotic transformations of embryonic appendages in response to Tc-hth or Tc-exd RNAi. In general, the homeotic effects of interference with the function of Hox genes and Tc-hth/Tc-exd during metamorphosis did not match predictions based on embryonic roles of these genes. Comparing metamorphic patterning in T. castaneum to embryonic and post-embryonic development in hemimetabolous insects suggests that holometabolous metamorphosis combines patterning processes of both late embryogenesis and

  14. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  15. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung at exposure to fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Razieh Taghizadeh,1 Zahra Taghipour,2 Akbar Karimi,1 Ali Shamsizadeh,3 Mohammad Mohsen Taghavi,2 Mahdi Shariati,2 Ahmad Shabanizadeh,2 Hamid Reza Jafari Naveh,2 Reza Bidaki,4 Fariba Aminzadeh51Department of Biology, Payame Noor University, Isfahan, Iran; 2Department of Anatomy, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 3Department of Physiology, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 4Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran; 5Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, IranObjective: Approximately 10% of pregnant women suffer from pregnancy-associated depression. Fluoxetine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is being employed as a therapy for depressive disorders. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine on neonatal lung development.Methods: Thirty pregnant Wistar rats (weighing 200–250 g were treated daily with 7 mg/kg fluoxetine from gestation day 0 to gestation day 21, via gavage. The control group received a similar volume of distilled water only. Following delivery, the newborns and their lungs were immediately weighed in both of the groups. The right lung was fixed for histological assessments while the left lung was used for evaluation of the expression of SPC and HoxB5 by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method.Results: Results have indicated that even though the body weight and the number of neonatal rats in both groups were the same, the lung weight of neonates exposed to fluoxetine was significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.05. Expression of both genes was increased, nonetheless, only elevation of HoxB5 was significant (P<0.05. Histological studies demonstrated that lung tissue in the fluoxetine treatment group morphologically appears to be similar to the pseudoglandular phase, whereas the control group lungs experienced more development.Conclusion: According to the upregulated expression of HoxB5 concerning

  16. Adaptive evolution of conserved noncoding elements in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon Kim

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Conserved noncoding elements (CNCs are an abundant feature of vertebrate genomes. Some CNCs have been shown to act as cis-regulatory modules, but the function of most CNCs remains unclear. To study the evolution of CNCs, we have developed a statistical method called the "shared rates test" to identify CNCs that show significant variation in substitution rates across branches of a phylogenetic tree. We report an application of this method to alignments of 98,910 CNCs from the human, chimpanzee, dog, mouse, and rat genomes. We find that approximately 68% of CNCs evolve according to a null model where, for each CNC, a single parameter models the level of constraint acting throughout the phylogeny linking these five species. The remaining approximately 32% of CNCs show departures from the basic model including speed-ups and slow-downs on particular branches and occasionally multiple rate changes on different branches. We find that a subset of the significant CNCs have evolved significantly faster than the local neutral rate on a particular branch, providing strong evidence for adaptive evolution in these CNCs. The distribution of these signals on the phylogeny suggests that adaptive evolution of CNCs occurs in occasional short bursts of evolution. Our analyses suggest a large set of promising targets for future functional studies of adaptation.

  17. Structural relationships between highly conserved elements and genes in vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes.

  18. The Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax acts in both muscles and motoneurons to orchestrate formation of specific neuromuscular connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessinger, Christian; Technau, Gerhard M; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Hox genes are known to specify motoneuron pools in the developing vertebrate spinal cord and to control motoneuronal targeting in several species. However, the mechanisms controlling axial diversification of muscle innervation patterns are still largely unknown. We present data showing that the Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) acts in the late embryo to establish target specificity of ventrally projecting RP motoneurons. In abdominal segments A2 to A7, RP motoneurons innervate the ventrolateral muscles VL1-4, with VL1 and VL2 being innervated in a Wnt4-dependent manner. In Ubx mutants, these motoneurons fail to make correct contacts with muscle VL1, a phenotype partially resembling that of the Wnt4 mutant. We show that Ubx regulates expression of Wnt4 in muscle VL2 and that it interacts with the Wnt4 response pathway in the respective motoneurons. Ubx thus orchestrates the interaction between two cell types, muscles and motoneurons, to regulate establishment of the ventrolateral neuromuscular network. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. TRA-1/GLI controls the expression of the Hox gene lin-39 during C. elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Hargitai, Balázs; Regos, Agnes; Tihanyi, Borbála; Barna, János; Borsos, Eva; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Vellai, Tibor

    2009-06-15

    The vulva of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite develops from a subset of six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) by the combined effect of the Ras, Wingless and Notch signaling cascades, and of three redundant synMuv (synthetic Multivulva) pathways grouped into classes A, B and C. Here we show that signaling via the GLI- (Glioma-associated protein) like transcription factor TRA-1, which is the terminal regulator of the C. elegans sex determination cascade, is a newly discovered pathway specifying vulval cell fates. We found that TRA-1 accumulates in, and regulates the fusion process of, cells (including the VPCs and hypodermal cells) involved in vulval patterning. TRA-1 also influenced the expression of the Hox gene lin-39, a central regulator of vulval development. Furthermore, inactivation of tra-1, which transforms animals with hermaphrodite-specific karyotype into males, promoted vulval induction in synMuv A, but not in synMuv B, mutant background. This implies that TRA-1 interacts with the class B synMuv genes, many of which are involved in chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression of cell proliferation. These results may help to understand how compromised GLI activity in humans leads to cancer. Together, we suggest that the GLI protein family involved in several key developmental processes in both invertebrates and vertebrates regulates somatic cell fates through influencing, at least in part, the expression of specific Hox genes.

  20. Phase diagram with an enhanced spin-glass region of the mixed Ising-XY magnet LiHoxEr1-xF4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piatek, J. O.; Dalla Piazza, B.; Nikseresht, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental phase diagram of LiHoxEr1-xF4, a dilution series of dipolar-coupled model magnets. The phase diagram was determined using a combination of ac susceptibility and neutron scattering. Three unique phases in addition to the Ising ferromagnet LiHoF4 and the XY antiferromagnet...

  1. Concerted involvement of Cdx/Hox genes and Wnt signaling in morphogenesis of the caudal neural tube and cloacal derivatives from the posterior growth zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, C.; Bialecka, M.; Neijts, R.; Young, T.; Rowland, J.E.; Stringer, E.J.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Meijlink, F.; Novoa, A.; Freund, J.N.; Mallo, M.; Beck, F.; Deschamps, J.

    2011-01-01

    Decrease in Cdx dosage in an allelic series of mouse Cdx mutants leads to progressively more severe posterior vertebral defects. These defects are corrected by posterior gain of function of the Wnt effector Lef1. Precocious expression of Hox paralogous 13 genes also induces vertebral axis truncation

  2. Response of H{sub 2} production and Hox-hydrogenase activity to external factors in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baebprasert, Wipawee [Program of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Lindblad, Peter [Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, The Aangstroem Laboratories, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Incharoensakdi, Aran [Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-07-15

    The effects of external factors on both H{sub 2} production and bidirectional Hox-hydrogenase activity were examined in the non-N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Exogenous glucose and increased osmolality both enhanced H{sub 2} production with optimal production observed at 0.4% and 20 mosmol kg{sup -1}, respectively. Anaerobic condition for 24 h induced significant higher H{sub 2}ase activity with cells in BG11{sub 0} showing highest activities. Increasing the pH resulted in an increased Hox-hydrogenase activity with an optimum at pH 7.5. The Hox-hydrogenase activity gradually increased with increasing temperature from 30 {sup circle} C to 60 {sup circle} C with the highest activity observed at 70 {sup circle} C. A low concentration at 100 {mu}M of either DTT or {beta}-mercaptoethanol resulted in a minor stimulation of H{sub 2} production. {beta}-Mercaptoethanol added to nitrogen- and sulfur-deprived cells stimulated H{sub 2} production significantly. The highest Hox-hydrogenase activity was observed in cells in BG11{sub 0}-S-deprived condition and 750 {mu}M {beta}-mercaptoethanol measured at a temperature of 70 C; 14.32 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg chl a{sup -1} min{sup -1}. (author)

  3. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domainsNathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*1Unit of Developme...

  4. Genomic context analysis reveals dense interaction network between vertebrate ultraconserved non-coding elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrieva, Slavica; Bucher, Philipp

    2012-09-15

    Genomic context analysis, also known as phylogenetic profiling, is widely used to infer functional interactions between proteins but rarely applied to non-coding cis-regulatory DNA elements. We were wondering whether this approach could provide insights about utlraconserved non-coding elements (UCNEs). These elements are organized as large clusters, so-called gene regulatory blocks (GRBs) around key developmental genes. Their molecular functions and the reasons for their high degree of conservation remain enigmatic. In a special setting of genomic context analysis, we analyzed the fate of GRBs after a whole-genome duplication event in five fish genomes. We found that in most cases all UCNEs were retained together as a single block, whereas the corresponding target genes were often retained in two copies, one completely devoid of UCNEs. This 'winner-takes-all' pattern suggests that UCNEs of a GRB function in a highly cooperative manner. We propose that the multitude of interactions between UCNEs is the reason for their extreme sequence conservation. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online and at http://ccg.vital-it.ch/ucne/

  5. Ancient Transposable Elements Transformed the Uterine Regulatory Landscape and Transcriptome during the Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J. Lynch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in biology is determining how evolutionarily novel characters originate; however, mechanistic explanations for the origin of new characters are almost completely unknown. The evolution of pregnancy is an excellent system in which to study the origin of novelties because mammals preserve stages in the transition from egg laying to live birth. To determine the molecular bases of this transition, we characterized the pregnant/gravid uterine transcriptome from tetrapods to trace the evolutionary history of uterine gene expression. We show that thousands of genes evolved endometrial expression during the origins of mammalian pregnancy, including genes that mediate maternal-fetal communication and immunotolerance. Furthermore, thousands of cis-regulatory elements that mediate decidualization and cell-type identity in decidualized stromal cells are derived from ancient mammalian transposable elements (TEs. Our results indicate that one of the defining mammalian novelties evolved from DNA sequences derived from ancient mammalian TEs co-opted into hormone-responsive regulatory elements distributed throughout the genome.

  6. Impacts of mechanistic changes on HOx formation and recycling in the oxidation of isoprene

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    R. G. Derwent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported model-measurement discrepancies for the concentrations of the HOx radical species (OH and HO2 in locations characterized by high emission rates of isoprene have indicated possible deficiencies in the representation of OH recycling and formation in isoprene mechanisms currently employed in numerical models; particularly at low levels of NOx. Using version 3.1 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 as a base mechanism, the sensitivity of the system to a number of detailed mechanistic changes is examined for a wide range of NOx levels, using a simple box model. The studies consider sensitivity tests in relation to three general areas for which experimental and/or theoretical evidence has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, as follows: (1 implementation of propagating channels for the reactions of HO2 with acyl and β-oxo peroxy radicals with HO2, with support from a number of studies; (2 implementation of the OH-catalysed conversion of isoprene-derived hydroperoxides to isomeric epoxydiols, as characterised by Paulot et al.~(2009a; and (3 implementation of a mechanism involving respective 1,5 and 1,6 H atom shift isomerisation reactions of the β-hydroxyalkenyl and cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomers, formed from the sequential addition of OH and O2 to isoprene, based on the theoretical study of Peeters et al. (2009. All the considered mechanistic changes lead to simulated increases in the concentrations of OH, with (1 and (2 resulting in respective increases of up to about 7% and 16%, depending on the level of NOx. (3 is found to have potentially much greater impacts, with enhancements in OH concentrations of up to a factor of about 3.3, depending on the level of NOx, provided the (crucial rapid photolysis of the hydroperoxy-methyl-butenal products of the cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomerisation reactions is represented, as also postulated by Peeters et al.~(2009. Additional tests suggest that

  7. Nighttime observation and chemistry of HOx in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Oebel, A.; Dlugi, R.; Hu, M.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nighttime HOx chemistry was investigated in two ground-based field campaigns (PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006) in summer 2006 in China by comparison of measured and modeled concentration data of OH and HO2. The measurement sites were located in a rural environment in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) under urban influence and in a suburban area close to Beijing, respectively. In both locations, significant nighttime concentrations of radicals were observed under conditions with high total OH reactivities of about 40-50 s-1 in PRD and 25 s-1 near Beijing. For OH, the nocturnal concentrations were within the range of (0.5-3) × 106 cm-3, implying a significant nighttime oxidation rate of pollutants on the order of several ppb per hour. The measured nighttime concentration of HO2 was about (0.2-5) × 108 cm-3, containing a significant, model-estimated contribution from RO2 as an interference. A chemical box model based on an established chemical mechanism is capable of reproducing the measured nighttime values of the measured peroxy radicals and kOH, but underestimates in both field campaigns the observed OH by about 1 order of magnitude. Sensitivity studies with the box model demonstrate that the OH discrepancy between measured and modeled nighttime OH can be resolved, if an additional ROx production process (about 1 ppb h-1) and additional recycling (RO2 → HO2 → OH) with an efficiency equivalent to 1 ppb NO is assumed. The additional recycling mechanism was also needed to reproduce the OH observations at the same locations during daytime for conditions with NO mixing ratios below 1 ppb. This could be an indication that the same missing process operates at day and night. In principle, the required primary ROx source can be explained by ozonolysis of terpenoids, which react faster with ozone than with OH in the nighttime atmosphere. However, the amount of these highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) would require a strong local source, for which

  8. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 2. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigliante, A.; Christensen, M.J.; Hill, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray-scattering techniques have been used to study the crystal and magnetic structures of HoxPr1-x alloys in the form of thin films. Three distinct crystal structures are found as a function of concentration x, each of which has a characteristic magnetic structure. For x greater than or equal to 0.......6 a hexagonal-close-packed phase is found with the magnetic moments ordered in a basal-plane helix, whereas for 0.4 less than or equal to x... hexagonal-close-packed and remain nonmagnetic down to the lowest temperatures studied. Using x-ray magnetic resonance scattering techniques, we demonstrate that a small, static spin-density wave is induced within the alloy 5d band at both the Pr and Ho sites in both of the magnetically ordered phases...

  9. Hox Gene Deformed is likely involved in mandibular regression during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Kouhei; Saiki, Ryota; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2013-09-01

    Division of labor is a distinguishing characteristic of eusocial insects. To understand the proximate factors underlying caste determination, it is essential to clarify the developmental mechanisms during the differentiation of each caste. Termite soldiers have species-specific and diverse morphologies that are specialized for colony defense. Soldiers of the subfamily Nasutitermitinae (Termitidae), one of the most derived termite groups, possess a long, horn-like frontal projection (nasus), an invaginated glandular structure in the head (frontal gland), and regressed mandibles. These morphological changes occur prior to the molt into presoldiers (the preceding stage of soldiers). In Drosophila and other insects, Hox genes determine segment identities; thus they might be involved in such body-part-specific modifications during soldier differentiation. Deformed (Dfd) functions not only in the formation of the mandible and maxilla but also in other head parts (e.g., eye-antennal disc) in other insects. In this study, we examined Dfd functions in nasus/frontal gland formation and mandibular regression in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Relative expression analyses showed that Dfd expression levels in the mouthparts were significantly higher than those in any other body parts of workers before presoldier molt. Dfd RNA interference resulted in the inhibition of mandibular regression during presoldier differentiation, but nasus and frontal gland formation were not affected. These results suggest that Dfd is involved in the determination of mandibular positional information and specific modification during presoldier differentiation in N. takasagoensis. This is the first work to show the effects of Hox genes on caste-specific morphogenesis in social insects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Adaptive evolution of 5'HoxD genes in the origin and diversification of the cetacean flipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Lihong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zuo, Xueguo; Ru, Binghua; Zhong, Hui; Han, Naijian; Jones, Gareth; Jepson, Paul D; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-03-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 control digit patterning and limb formation in tetrapods. Both show strong expression in the limb bud during embryonic development, are highly conserved across vertebrates, and show mutations that are associated with carpal, metacarpal, and phalangeal deformities. The most dramatic evolutionary reorganization of the mammalian limb has occurred in cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which the hind limbs have been lost and the forelimbs have evolved into paddle-shaped flippers. We reconstructed the phylogeny of digit patterning in mammals and inferred that digit number has changed twice in the evolution of the cetacean forelimb. First, the divergence of the early cetaceans from their even-toed relatives coincided with the reacquisition of the pentadactyl forelimb, whereas the ancestors of tetradactyl baleen whales (Mysticeti) later lost a digit again. To test whether the evolution of the cetacean forelimb is associated with positive selection or relaxation of Hoxd12 and Hoxd13, we sequenced these genes in a wide range of mammals. In Hoxd12, we found evidence of Darwinian selection associated with both episodes of cetacean forelimb reorganization. In Hoxd13, we found a novel expansion of a polyalanine tract in cetaceans compared with other mammals (17/18 residues vs. 14/15 residues, respectively), lengthening of which has previously been shown to be linked to synpolydactyly in humans and mice. Both genes also show much greater sequence variation among cetaceans than across other mammalian lineages. Our results strongly implicate 5'HoxD genes in the modulation of digit number, web forming, and the high morphological diversity of the cetacean manus.

  11. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  12. Finding cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila using phylogenetic hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Finding the regulatory modules for transcription factors binding is an important step in elucidating the complex molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of gene expression. There are numerous methods available for solving this problem, however, very few of them take advantage of th...... of prediction over methods that do not take advantage of the data from multiple species. AVAILABILITY: The new method is made accessible under GPL in a new publicly available JAVA program: EvoPromoter. It can be downloaded at http://sourceforge.net/projects/evopromoter/....

  13. Modeling the cis-regulatory modules of genes expressed in developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yosvany; Vandenbon, Alexis; Nose, Akinao; Nakai, Kenta

    2017-01-01

    Because transcription is the first step in the regulation of gene expression, understanding how transcription factors bind to their DNA binding motifs has become absolutely necessary. It has been shown that the promoters of genes with similar expression profiles share common structural patterns. This paper presents an extensive study of the regulatory regions of genes expressed in 24 developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster. It proposes the use of a combination of structural features, such as positioning of individual motifs relative to the transcription start site, orientation, pairwise distance between motifs, and presence of motifs anywhere in the promoter for predicting gene expression from structural features of promoter sequences. RNA-sequencing data was utilized to create and validate the 24 models. When genes with high-scoring promoters were compared to those identified by RNA-seq samples, 19 (79.2%) statistically significant models, a number that exceeds previous studies, were obtained. Each model yielded a set of highly informative features, which were used to search for genes with similar biological functions.

  14. Landscape of histone modifications in a sponge reveals the origin of animal cis-regulatory complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiti, Federico; Jindrich, Katia; Fernandez-Valverde, Selene L; Roper, Kathrein E; Degnan, Bernard M; Tanurdžić, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Combinatorial patterns of histone modifications regulate developmental and cell type-specific gene expression and underpin animal complexity, but it is unclear when this regulatory system evolved. By analysing histone modifications in a morphologically-simple, early branching animal, the sponge Amphimedonqueenslandica, we show that the regulatory landscape used by complex bilaterians was already in place at the dawn of animal multicellularity. This includes distal enhancers, repressive chromatin and transcriptional units marked by H3K4me3 that vary with levels of developmental regulation. Strikingly, Amphimedon enhancers are enriched in metazoan-specific microsyntenic units, suggesting that their genomic location is extremely ancient and likely to place constraints on the evolution of surrounding genes. These results suggest that the regulatory foundation for spatiotemporal gene expression evolved prior to the divergence of sponges and eumetazoans, and was necessary for the evolution of animal multicellularity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22194.001 PMID:28395144

  15. CpG island clusters and pro-epigenetic selection for CpGs in protein-coding exons of HOX and other transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Branciamore, Sergio; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Riggs, Arthur D.; Rodin, Sergei N.

    2010-01-01

    CpG dinucleotides contribute to epigenetic mechanisms by being the only site for DNA methylation in mammalian somatic cells. They are also mutation hotspots and ∼5-fold depleted genome-wide. We report here a study focused on CpG sites in the coding regions of Hox and other transcription factor genes, comparing methylated genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Danio rerio with nonmethylated genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We analyzed 4-fold degenerate, synony...

  16. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  17. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  18. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-07-05

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  19. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs of the bithoraxoid (bxd locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly. Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods. Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  20. UTX and JMJD3 are histone H3K27 demethylases involved in HOX gene regulation and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    -methylation of Lys 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me2/me3). Owing to the essential role of the PRC2 complex in repressing a large number of genes involved in somatic processes, the H3K27me3 mark is associated with the unique epigenetic state of stem cells. The rapid decrease of the H3K27me3 mark during specific stages...... of embryogenesis and stem-cell differentiation indicates that histone demethylases specific for H3K27me3 may exist. Here we show that the human JmjC-domain-containing proteins UTX and JMJD3 demethylate tri-methylated Lys 27 on histone H3. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of JMJD3 leads...... to a strong decrease of H3K27me3 levels and causes delocalization of polycomb proteins in vivo. Consistent with the strong decrease in H3K27me3 levels associated with HOX genes during differentiation, we show that UTX directly binds to the HOXB1 locus and is required for its activation. Finally mutation of F...

  1. Hox, Wnt, and the evolution of the primary body axis: insights from the early-divergent phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph F; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    The subkingdom Bilateria encompasses the overwhelming majority of animals, including all but four early-branching phyla: Porifera, Ctenophora, Placozoa, and Cnidaria. On average, these early-branching phyla have fewer cell types, tissues, and organs, and are considered to be significantly less specialized along their primary body axis. As such, they present an attractive outgroup from which to investigate how evolutionary changes in the genetic toolkit may have contributed to the emergence of the complex animal body plans of the Bilateria. This review offers an up-to-date glimpse of genome-scale comparisons between bilaterians and these early-diverging taxa. Specifically, we examine these data in the context of how they may explain the evolutionary development of primary body axes and axial symmetry across the Metazoa. Next, we re-evaluate the validity and evolutionary genomic relevance of the zootype hypothesis, which defines an animal by a specific spatial pattern of gene expression. Finally, we extend the hypothesis that Wnt genes may be the earliest primary body axis patterning mechanism by suggesting that Hox genes were co-opted into this patterning network prior to the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Gáspár Jékely, and L Aravind. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:18078518

  2. Hox, Wnt, and the evolution of the primary body axis: insights from the early-divergent phyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxevanis Andreas D

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subkingdom Bilateria encompasses the overwhelming majority of animals, including all but four early-branching phyla: Porifera, Ctenophora, Placozoa, and Cnidaria. On average, these early-branching phyla have fewer cell types, tissues, and organs, and are considered to be significantly less specialized along their primary body axis. As such, they present an attractive outgroup from which to investigate how evolutionary changes in the genetic toolkit may have contributed to the emergence of the complex animal body plans of the Bilateria. This review offers an up-to-date glimpse of genome-scale comparisons between bilaterians and these early-diverging taxa. Specifically, we examine these data in the context of how they may explain the evolutionary development of primary body axes and axial symmetry across the Metazoa. Next, we re-evaluate the validity and evolutionary genomic relevance of the zootype hypothesis, which defines an animal by a specific spatial pattern of gene expression. Finally, we extend the hypothesis that Wnt genes may be the earliest primary body axis patterning mechanism by suggesting that Hox genes were co-opted into this patterning network prior to the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Open peer review Reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Gáspár Jékely, and L Aravind. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  3. The evolutionary origination and diversification of a dimorphic gene regulatory network through parallel innovations in cis and trans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Camino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The origination and diversification of morphological characteristics represents a key problem in understanding the evolution of development. Morphological traits result from gene regulatory networks (GRNs that form a web of transcription factors, which regulate multiple cis-regulatory element (CRE sequences to control the coordinated expression of differentiation genes. The formation and modification of GRNs must ultimately be understood at the level of individual regulatory linkages (i.e., transcription factor binding sites within CREs that constitute the network. Here, we investigate how elements within a network originated and diversified to generate a broad range of abdominal pigmentation phenotypes among Sophophora fruit flies. Our data indicates that the coordinated expression of two melanin synthesis enzymes, Yellow and Tan, recently evolved through novel CRE activities that respond to the spatial patterning inputs of Hox proteins and the sex-specific input of Bric-à-brac transcription factors. Once established, it seems that these newly evolved activities were repeatedly modified by evolutionary changes in the network's trans-regulators to generate large-scale changes in pigment pattern. By elucidating how yellow and tan are connected to the web of abdominal trans-regulators, we discovered that the yellow and tan abdominal CREs are composed of distinct regulatory inputs that exhibit contrasting responses to the same Hox proteins and Hox cofactors. These results provide an example in which CRE origination underlies a recently evolved novel trait, and highlights how coordinated expression patterns can evolve in parallel through the generation of unique regulatory linkages.

  4. Copy number variation and transposable elements feature in recent, ongoing adaptation at the Cyp6g1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joshua M; Good, Robert T; Appleton, Belinda; Sherrard, Jayne; Raymant, Greta C; Bogwitz, Michael R; Martin, Jon; Daborn, Phillip J; Goddard, Mike E; Batterham, Philip; Robin, Charles

    2010-06-24

    The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change. A fragment of an Accord transposable element inserted upstream of the Cyp6g1 gene is causally associated with resistance and has spread to high frequencies in populations around the world since the 1940s. Here we report the existence of a natural allelic series at this locus of D. melanogaster, involving copy number variation of Cyp6g1, and two additional transposable element insertions (a P and an HMS-Beagle). We provide evidence that this genetic variation underpins phenotypic variation, as the more derived the allele, the greater the level of DDT resistance. Tracking the spatial and temporal patterns of allele frequency changes indicates that the multiple steps of the allelic series are adaptive. Further, a DDT association study shows that the most resistant allele, Cyp6g1-[BP], is greatly enriched in the top 5% of the phenotypic distribution and accounts for approximately 16% of the underlying phenotypic variation in resistance to DDT. In contrast, copy number variation for another candidate resistance gene, Cyp12d1, is not associated with resistance. Thus the Cyp6g1 locus is a major contributor to DDT resistance in field populations, and evolution at this locus features multiple adaptive steps occurring in rapid succession.

  5. Copy number variation and transposable elements feature in recent, ongoing adaptation at the Cyp6g1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change. A fragment of an Accord transposable element inserted upstream of the Cyp6g1 gene is causally associated with resistance and has spread to high frequencies in populations around the world since the 1940s. Here we report the existence of a natural allelic series at this locus of D. melanogaster, involving copy number variation of Cyp6g1, and two additional transposable element insertions (a P and an HMS-Beagle. We provide evidence that this genetic variation underpins phenotypic variation, as the more derived the allele, the greater the level of DDT resistance. Tracking the spatial and temporal patterns of allele frequency changes indicates that the multiple steps of the allelic series are adaptive. Further, a DDT association study shows that the most resistant allele, Cyp6g1-[BP], is greatly enriched in the top 5% of the phenotypic distribution and accounts for approximately 16% of the underlying phenotypic variation in resistance to DDT. In contrast, copy number variation for another candidate resistance gene, Cyp12d1, is not associated with resistance. Thus the Cyp6g1 locus is a major contributor to DDT resistance in field populations, and evolution at this locus features multiple adaptive steps occurring in rapid succession.

  6. Genome-wide profiling of p63 DNA-binding sites identifies an element that regulates gene expression during limb development in the 7q21 SHFM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn N Kouwenhoven

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous mutations in p63 are associated with split hand/foot malformations (SHFM, orofacial clefting, and ectodermal abnormalities. Elucidation of the p63 gene network that includes target genes and regulatory elements may reveal new genes for other malformation disorders. We performed genome-wide DNA-binding profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq in primary human keratinocytes, and identified potential target genes and regulatory elements controlled by p63. We show that p63 binds to an enhancer element in the SHFM1 locus on chromosome 7q and that this element controls expression of DLX6 and possibly DLX5, both of which are important for limb development. A unique micro-deletion including this enhancer element, but not the DLX5/DLX6 genes, was identified in a patient with SHFM. Our study strongly indicates disruption of a non-coding cis-regulatory element located more than 250 kb from the DLX5/DLX6 genes as a novel disease mechanism in SHFM1. These data provide a proof-of-concept that the catalogue of p63 binding sites identified in this study may be of relevance to the studies of SHFM and other congenital malformations that resemble the p63-associated phenotypes.

  7. Development of a novel data mining tool to find cis-elements in rice gene promoter regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on more than 35 000 full-length Oryza sativa cDNAs, together with associated microarray gene expression data collected under various treatment conditions, has made it feasible to identify motifs that are conserved in gene promoters and may act as cis-regulatory elements with key roles under the various conditions. Results We have developed a novel tool that searches for cis-element candidates in the upstream, downstream, or coding regions of differentially regulated genes. The tool first lists cis-element candidates by motif searching based on the supposition that if there are cis-elements playing important roles in the regulation of a given set of genes, they will be statistically overrepresented and will be conserved. Then it evaluates the likelihood scores of the listed candidate motifs by association rule analysis. This strategy depends on the idea that motifs overrepresented in the promoter region could play specific roles in the regulation of expression of these genes. The tool is designed so that any biological researchers can use it easily at the publicly accessible Internet site http://hpc.irri.cgiar.org/tool/nias/ces. We evaluated the accuracy and utility of the tool by using a dataset of auxin-inducible genes that have well-studied cis-elements. The test showed the effectiveness of the tool in identifying significant relationships between cis-element candidates and related sets of genes. Conclusion The tool lists possible cis-element motifs corresponding to genes of interest, and it will contribute to the deeper understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms in plants.

  8. CONDOR: a database resource of developmentally associated conserved non-coding elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Sarah

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics is currently one of the most popular approaches to study the regulatory architecture of vertebrate genomes. Fish-mammal genomic comparisons have proved powerful in identifying conserved non-coding elements likely to be distal cis-regulatory modules such as enhancers, silencers or insulators that control the expression of genes involved in the regulation of early development. The scientific community is showing increasing interest in characterizing the function, evolution and language of these sequences. Despite this, there remains little in the way of user-friendly access to a large dataset of such elements in conjunction with the analysis and the visualization tools needed to study them. Description Here we present CONDOR (COnserved Non-coDing Orthologous Regions available at: http://condor.fugu.biology.qmul.ac.uk. In an interactive and intuitive way the website displays data on > 6800 non-coding elements associated with over 120 early developmental genes and conserved across vertebrates. The database regularly incorporates results of ongoing in vivo zebrafish enhancer assays of the CNEs carried out in-house, which currently number ~100. Included and highlighted within this set are elements derived from duplication events both at the origin of vertebrates and more recently in the teleost lineage, thus providing valuable data for studying the divergence of regulatory roles between paralogs. CONDOR therefore provides a number of tools and facilities to allow scientists to progress in their own studies on the function and evolution of developmental cis-regulation. Conclusion By providing access to data with an approachable graphics interface, the CONDOR database presents a rich resource for further studies into the regulation and evolution of genes involved in early development.

  9. Hox paralog group 2 genes control the migration of mouse pontine neurons through slit-robo signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Geisen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pontine neurons (PN represent a major source of mossy fiber projections to the cerebellum. During mouse hindbrain development, PN migrate tangentially and sequentially along both the anteroposterior (AP and dorsoventral (DV axes. Unlike DV migration, which is controlled by the Netrin-1/Dcc attractive pathway, little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding PN migration along the AP axis. Here, we show that Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 are required both intrinsically and extrinsically to maintain normal AP migration of subsets of PN, by preventing their premature ventral attraction towards the midline. Moreover, the migration defects observed in Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 mutant mice were phenocopied in compound Robo1;Robo2, Slit1;Slit2, and Robo2;Slit2 knockout animals, indicating that these guidance molecules act downstream of Hox genes to control PN migration. Indeed, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we further demonstrated that Robo2 is a direct target of Hoxa2 in vivo and that maintenance of high Robo and Slit expression levels was impaired in Hoxa2 mutant mice. Lastly, the analysis of Phox2b-deficient mice indicated that the facial motor nucleus is a major Slit signaling source required to prevent premature ventral migration of PN. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular control of neuronal migration from transcription factor to regulation of guidance receptor and ligand expression. Specifically, they address the question of how exposure to multiple guidance cues along the AP and DV axes is regulated at the transcriptional level and in turn translated into stereotyped migratory responses during tangential migration of neurons in the developing mammalian brain.

  10. Characterization of oocyte-expressed GDF9 gene in buffalo and mapping of its TSS and putative regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, B; Rajput, S; Raghav, S; Kumar, P; Verma, A; Jain, A; Jain, T; Singh, D; De, S; Goswami, S L; Datta, T K

    2013-05-01

    Summary In spite of emerging evidence about the vital role of GDF9 in determination of oocyte competence, there is insufficient information about its regulation of oocyte-specific expression, particularly in livestock animals. Because of the distinct prominence of buffalo as a dairy animal, the present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize GDF9 cDNA using orthologous primers based on the bovine GDF9 sequence. GDF9 transcripts were found to be expressed in oocytes irrespective of their follicular origin, and shared a single transcription start site (TSS) at -57 base pairs (bp) upstream of ATG. Assignment of the TSS is consistent with the presence of a TATA element at -23 of the TSS mapped in this study. Localization of a buffalo-specific minimal promoter within 320 bp upstream of ATG was consolidated by identification of an E-box element at -113bp. Presence of putative transcription factor binding sites and other cis regulatory elements were analyzed at ~5 kb upstream of TSS. Various germ cell-specific cis-acting regulatory elements (BNCF, BRNF, NR2F, SORY, Foxh1, OCT1, LHXF etc.) have been identified in the 5' flanking region of the buffalo GDF9 gene, including NOBOX DNA binding elements and consensuses E-boxes (CANNTG). Presence of two conserved E-boxes found on buffalo sequence at -520 and -718 positions deserves attention in view of its sequence deviation from other species. Two NOBOX binding elements (NBE) were detected at the -3471 and -203 positions. The fall of the NBE within the putative minimal promoter territory of buffalo GDF9 and its unique non-core binding sequence could have a possible role in the control of the core promoter activity.

  11. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  12. The intersection of the extrinsic hedgehog and WNT/wingless signals with the intrinsic Hox code underpins branching pattern and tube shape diversity in the drosophila airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Matsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tubular networks of the Drosophila respiratory system and our vasculature show distinct branching patterns and tube shapes in different body regions. These local variations are crucial for organ function and organismal fitness. Organotypic patterns and tube geometries in branched networks are typically controlled by variations of extrinsic signaling but the impact of intrinsic factors on branch patterns and shapes is not well explored. Here, we show that the intersection of extrinsic hedgehog(hh and WNT/wingless (wg signaling with the tube-intrinsic Hox code of distinct segments specifies the tube pattern and shape of the Drosophila airways. In the cephalic part of the airways, hh signaling induces expression of the transcription factor (TF knirps (kni in the anterior dorsal trunk (DTa1. kni represses the expression of another TF spalt major (salm, making DTa1 a narrow and long tube. In DTa branches of more posterior metameres, Bithorax Complex (BX-C Hox genes autonomously divert hh signaling from inducing kni, thereby allowing DTa branches to develop as salm-dependent thick and short tubes. Moreover, the differential expression of BX-C genes is partly responsible for the anterior-to-posterior gradual increase of the DT tube diameter through regulating the expression level of Salm, a transcriptional target of WNT/wg signaling. Thus, our results highlight how tube intrinsic differential competence can diversify tube morphology without changing availabilities of extrinsic factors.

  13. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churbanov, Alexander; Vorechovský, Igor; Hicks, Chindo

    2010-01-12

    Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II) for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS) sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  14. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Chindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Results Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. Conclusions We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  15. Characterization of a Suppressive Cis-acting Element in the Epstein–Barr Virus LMP1 Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoshida

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a major oncogene encoded by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and is essential for immortalization of B cells by the virus. Previous studies suggested that several transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NFκB, EBF1, AP-2 and STAT, are involved in LMP1 induction; however, the means by which the oncogene is negatively regulated remains unclear. Here, we introduced short mutations into the proximal LMP1 promoter that includes recognition sites for the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors in the context of EBV-bacterial artificial chromosome. Upon infection, the mutant exhibited increased LMP1 expression and EBV-mediated immortalization of B cells. However, single mutations of either the E-box or Ikaros sites had limited effects on LMP1 expression and transformation. Our results suggest that this region contains a suppressive cis-regulatory element, but other transcriptional repressors (apart from the E-box and Ikaros transcription factors may remain to be discovered.

  16. Heterogeneous production and loss of HOx by airborne TiO2 particles and implications for climate change mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, D. R.; Heard, D. E.; Ingham, T.; Chipperfield, M.; Seakins, P. W.; Baeza Romero, M. T. T.; Taverna, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    It is suggested that injection of TiO2 particles into the stratosphere to back-scatter solar radiation maybe an effective measure to mitigate the effects of global warming. TiO2 particles are well suited to this application because of their high refractive index.1 However, the effect of such a measure on stratospheric chemistry is not fully understood. HO2 is a key atmospheric species in both the troposphere and the stratosphere and is responsible for 40% of ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.2 In addition to this, application of TiO2 coatings to surfaces within the urban environment are used to abate ambient levels of NO2 and for their self-cleaning properties. This study investigates the heterogeneous reaction between airborne sub-micron TiO2 particles and HO2 radicals using an aerosol flow tube and the FAGE (fluorescence assay by gas expansion) technique to monitor HO2 uptake. The dependence of the uptake coefficient (γHO2) to relative humidity (RH) has been determined. Experiments performed in dark conditions at the most stratospherically relevant RH (11.1%) determined γHO2 = (2.08 ± 0.11) × 10-2. A positive dependence of γHO2 with RH was observed which showed a correlation between γHO2 and the number of monolayers of water adsorbed on the particle surface. Experiments illuminated with near-UV light (365 nm) were performed and showed significant production of HO2 from the aerosols into the gas phase. The concentrations were dependent on light flux, RH and total particle surface area. While the production of HOx in the gas phase has been observed close to TiO2 surfaces in the presence of H2O23,4 it is believed that this phenomena has not been observed from airborne TiO2 particles and parameterized in this way before. Emissions of HO2 from the surface of TiO2 particles in the stratosphere could rule out the application of TiO2 particles for use within solar-radiation management schemes. The TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model was used to predict

  17. Nighttime HOx chemistry in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006: intense oxidation without sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Dlugi, R.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the absence of sunlight, unexpected high nighttime OH concentrations reported in previous field studies are of high interest for in-depth understanding of trace gas removal and reaction kinetics. In summer 2006, within the framework of PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006, we performed intensive in-situ measurements for HOx radicals and ancillary parameters at two non-urban sites in Pearl River Delta and Beijing, respectively. During nighttime, quite similar features for both campaigns were observed. Measured nighttime OH and HO2 concentrations were about 0.5 - 3-106cm-3 and 0.2 - 5-108cm-3, respectively. A box model with the established chemical mechanism (RACM-MIM-GK) underestimated these observed OH concentrations by an order of magnitude while reproduced the observed HO2 taking into account the known interference from ambient RO2 radicals (Fuchs et al. 2011). By testing the recently proposed recycling mechanisms applied for daytime chemistry, we found both a small primary source and a secondary source of OH radicals, the last one comparable to daytime observations (Lu et al., 2011, Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). Interestingly, the widely applied LIM0 and MIM2+ showed marginal impacts on the modeled nighttime OH concentrations under high isoprene concentrations. With the help of a simple 1 d simulation, we found that direct input of ROx radicals by vertical transport was negligible while the input of PAN and MPAN could be of significance. Averaged nighttime pollutant turnover rates by OH were as high as 8 ppb/h and 4 ppb/h for PRD and Beijing, respectively, dominating nighttime oxidation processes. Fuchs, H., et al. Detection of HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence: calibration and interferences from RO2 radicals, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 1209-1225, 2011. Hofzumahaus, A. et al. Amplified Trace Gas Removal in the Troposphere, Science, 324, 1702-1704, 2009. Lu, K. D. et al. Observation and modelling of OH and HO2 concentrations in the Pearl River Delta 2006: a missing

  18. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    model are within ±25 % for OH exposure and within ±60 % for other parameters. These uncertainties are small relative to the dynamic range of outputs. Uncertainty analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis rates of O3, O2, and H2O and reactions of OH and HO2 with themselves or with some abundant species, i.e., O3 and H2O2. OHexp calculated from direct integration and estimated from SO2 decay in the model with laminar and measured residence time distributions (RTDs) are generally within a factor of 2 from the plug-flow OHexp. However, in the models with RTDs, OHexp estimated from SO2 is systematically lower than directly integrated OHexp in the case of significant SO2 consumption. We thus recommended using OHexp estimated from the decay of the species under study when possible, to obtain the most appropriate information on photochemical aging in the OFR. Using HOx-recycling vs. destructive external OH reactivity only leads to small changes in OHexp under most conditions. Changing the identity (rate constant) of external OH reactants can result in substantial changes in OHexp due to different reductions in OH suppression as the reactant is consumed. We also report two equations for estimating OH exposure in OFR254. We find that the equation estimating OHexp from measured O3 consumption performs better than an alternative equation that does not use it, and thus recommend measuring both input and output O3 concentrations in OFR254 experiments. This study contributes to establishing a firm and systematic understanding of the gas-phase HOx and Ox chemistry in these reactors, and enables better experiment planning and interpretation as well as improved design of future reactors.

  19. A role for palindromic structures in the cis-region of maize Sirevirus LTRs in transposable element evolution and host epigenetic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousios, Alexandros; Diez, Concepcion M.; Takuno, Shohei; Bystry, Vojtech; Darzentas, Nikos; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) proliferate within the genome of their host, which responds by silencing them epigenetically. Much is known about the mechanisms of silencing in plants, particularly the role of siRNAs in guiding DNA methylation. In contrast, little is known about siRNA targeting patterns along the length of TEs, yet this information may provide crucial insights into the dynamics between hosts and TEs. By focusing on 6456 carefully annotated, full-length Sirevirus LTR retrotransposons in maize, we show that their silencing associates with underlying characteristics of the TE sequence and also uncover three features of the host–TE interaction. First, siRNA mapping varies among families and among elements, but particularly along the length of elements. Within the cis-regulatory portion of the LTRs, a complex palindrome-rich region acts as a hotspot of both siRNA matching and sequence evolution. These patterns are consistent across leaf, tassel, and immature ear libraries, but particularly emphasized for floral tissues and 21- to 22-nt siRNAs. Second, this region has the ability to form hairpins, making it a potential template for the production of miRNA-like, hairpin-derived small RNAs. Third, Sireviruses are targeted by siRNAs as a decreasing function of their age, but the oldest elements remain highly targeted, partially by siRNAs that cross-map to the youngest elements. We show that the targeting of older Sireviruses reflects their conserved palindromes. Altogether, we hypothesize that the palindromes aid the silencing of active elements and influence transposition potential, siRNA targeting levels, and ultimately the fate of an element within the genome. PMID:26631490

  20. Potential novel mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: deletion of a distant region containing regulatory elements of PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Bethany A; Zinkevich, Natalya S; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F; Bosenko, Dmitry V; Reis, Linda M; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A; Semina, Elena V

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in PITX2 are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), which involves ocular, dental, and umbilical abnormalities. Identification of cis-regulatory elements of PITX2 is important to better understand the mechanisms of disease. Conserved noncoding elements surrounding PITX2/pitx2 were identified and examined through transgenic analysis in zebrafish; expression pattern was studied by in situ hybridization. Patient samples were screened for deletion/duplication of the PITX2 upstream region using arrays and probes. Zebrafish pitx2 demonstrates conserved expression during ocular and craniofacial development. Thirteen conserved noncoding sequences positioned within a gene desert as far as 1.1 Mb upstream of the human PITX2 gene were identified; 11 have enhancer activities consistent with pitx2 expression. Ten elements mediated expression in the developing brain, four regions were active during eye formation, and two sequences were associated with craniofacial expression. One region, CE4, located approximately 111 kb upstream of PITX2, directed a complex pattern including expression in the developing eye and craniofacial region, the classic sites affected in ARS. Screening of ARS patients identified an approximately 7600-kb deletion that began 106 to 108 kb upstream of the PITX2 gene, leaving PITX2 intact while removing regulatory elements CE4 to CE13. These data suggest the presence of a complex distant regulatory matrix within the gene desert located upstream of PITX2 with an essential role in its activity and provides a possible mechanism for the previous reports of ARS in patients with balanced translocations involving the 4q25 region upstream of PITX2 and the current patient with an upstream deletion.

  1. The HOONO/HONO2 branching ratio in the OH + NO2 + M reaction: how effective is this reaction as a sink for HOx and NOX?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, M.; Bean, B. D.; Mollner, A. K.; Nizkorodov, S.; Nair, G.; Sander, S. P.; Peterson, K. A.; Francisco, J. S.

    2003-04-01

    The termolecular association reaction OH + NO_2 + M rightarrow HONO_2 + M is a critical process in the lower atmosphere, because it sequesters HO_x and NO_x radicals as nitric acid. However, a minor channel leading to formation of an isomer of nitric acid, HOONO or peroxynitrous acid, can diminish the yield of HONO_2. HOONO is less stable than nitric acid and would rapidly decompose to reactants in the atmosphere. We report a laboratory study in which one isomer, cis-cis HOONO is detected in direct absorption by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy. The HOONO/HONO_2 branching ratios from the OH + NO_2 reaction are measured at low pressures, and implications for the atmosphere are discussed.

  2. An ab initio investigation of the significance of the HOOF intermediate in coupling reactions involving FOO(x) and HO(x) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, J. S.

    1993-02-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to investigate the stability and role of HOOF in the reaction of FO with HO radicals. The heat of formation for HOOF is estimated as 0.4 +/- 2 kcal/mol using an isodesmic reaction scheme. Spectroscopic properties of the HOOF intermediate is also provided in order to facilitate its identification. Decomposition pathways of the intermediate are examined. The lowest energy pathway is the formation of F atoms and HO2 radicals and requires 27.2 kcal/mol to proceed. Reactions leading to the formation of the HOOF intermediate are examined in regard to their importance in understanding stratospheric chemistry involving the coupling of fluorine and fluorine oxide with HO(x) species in catalytic cycles.

  3. A New Standard for Crustacean Genomes: The Highly Contiguous, Annotated Genome Assembly of the Clam Shrimp Eulimnadia texana Reveals HOX Gene Order and Identifies the Sex Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Stephen C; Long, Anthony D

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Vernal pool clam shrimp (Eulimnadia texana) are a promising model system due to their ease of lab culture, short generation time, modest sized genome, a somewhat rare stable androdioecious sex determination system, and a requirement to reproduce via desiccated diapaused eggs. We generated a highly contiguous genome assembly using 46× of PacBio long read data and 216× of Illumina short reads, and annotated using Illumina RNAseq obtained from adult males or hermaphrodites. Of the 120 Mb genome 85% is contained in the largest eight contigs, the smallest of which is 4.6 Mb. The assembly contains 98% of transcripts predicted via RNAseq. This assembly is qualitatively different from scaffolded Illumina assemblies: It is produced from long reads that contain sequence data along their entire length, and is thus gap free. The contiguity of the assembly allows us to order the HOX genes within the genome, identifying two loci that contain HOX gene orthologs, and which approximately maintain the order observed in other arthropods. We identified a partial duplication of the Antennapedia complex adjacent to the few genes homologous to the Bithorax locus. Because the sex chromosome of an androdioecious species is of special interest, we used existing allozyme and microsatellite markers to identify the E. texana sex chromosome, and find that it comprises nearly half of the genome of this species. Linkage patterns indicate that recombination is extremely rare and perhaps absent in hermaphrodites, and as a result the location of the sex determining locus will be difficult to refine using recombination mapping. PMID:29294012

  4. CpG island clusters and pro-epigenetic selection for CpGs in protein-coding exons of HOX and other transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciamore, Sergio; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Riggs, Arthur D; Rodin, Sergei N

    2010-08-31

    CpG dinucleotides contribute to epigenetic mechanisms by being the only site for DNA methylation in mammalian somatic cells. They are also mutation hotspots and approximately 5-fold depleted genome-wide. We report here a study focused on CpG sites in the coding regions of Hox and other transcription factor genes, comparing methylated genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Danio rerio with nonmethylated genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We analyzed 4-fold degenerate, synonymous codons with the potential for CpG. That is, we studied "silent" changes that do not affect protein products but could damage epigenetic marking. We find that DNA-binding transcription factors and other developmentally relevant genes show, only in methylated genomes, a bimodal distribution of CpG usage. Several genetic code-based tests indicate, again for methylated genomes only, that the frequency of silent CpGs in Hox genes is much greater than expectation. Also informative are NCG-GNN and NCC-GNN codon doublets, for which an unusually high rate of G to C and C to G transversions was observed at the third (silent) position of the first codon. Together these results are interpreted as evidence for strong "pro-epigenetic" selection acting to preserve CpG sites in coding regions of many genes controlling development. We also report that DNA-binding transcription factors and developmentally important genes are dramatically overrepresented in or near clusters of three or more CpG islands, suggesting a possible relationship between evolutionary preservation of CpG dinucleotides in both coding regions and CpG islands.

  5. Two estrogen response element sequences near the PCNA gene are not responsible for its estrogen-enhanced expression in MCF7 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is an essential component of DNA replication, cell cycle regulation, and epigenetic inheritance. High expression of PCNA is associated with poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The 5'-region of the PCNA gene contains two computationally-detected estrogen response element (ERE sequences, one of which is evolutionarily conserved. Both of these sequences are of undocumented cis-regulatory function. We recently demonstrated that estradiol (E2 enhances PCNA mRNA expression in MCF7 breast cancer cells. MCF7 cells proliferate in response to E2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that E2 rapidly enhanced PCNA mRNA and protein expression in a process that requires ERalpha as well as de novo protein synthesis. One of the two upstream ERE sequences was specifically bound by ERalpha-containing protein complexes, in vitro, in gel shift analysis. Yet, each ERE sequence, when cloned as a single copy, or when engineered as two tandem copies of the ERE-containing sequence, was not capable of activating a luciferase reporter construct in response to E2. In MCF7 cells, neither ERE-containing genomic region demonstrated E2-dependent recruitment of ERalpha by sensitive ChIP-PCR assays. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that E2 enhances PCNA gene expression by an indirect process and that computational detection of EREs, even when evolutionarily conserved and when near E2-responsive genes, requires biochemical validation.

  6. Element 115

    OpenAIRE

    Forsberg, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to detailed studies of element 115 decay chains using the highly efficient multi-coincidence alpha, electron, gamma and X-ray detector setup TASISpec at the gas-filled separator TASCA at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. In a three-week long experiment thirty new decay chains assumed to stem from element 115 isotopes were observed together with the very first detections of gamma rays and potential X-rays from these nuclei. Paper I describes preparations in terms of optimisations...

  7. A highly conserved cis-regulatory motif directs differential gonadal synexpression of Dmrt1 transcripts during gonad development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herpin, Amaury; Nakamura, Shuhei; Wagner, Toni U; Tanaka, Minoru; Schartl, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    ...′-UTR of dmrt1, a key gene that functions in gonad development and differentiation, an 11-bp protein-binding motif was identified that mediates gonad-specific mRNA localization during embryonic...

  8. Cis-Regulatory Control of the Nuclear Receptor Coup-TF Gene in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Lamprini G Kalampoki; Flytzanis, Constantin N.

    2014-01-01

    Coup-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor super family, has a fundamental role in the development of metazoan embryos. The study of the gene's regulatory circuit in the sea urchin embryo will facilitate the placement of this transcription factor in the well-studied embryonic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN). The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF) is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the plute...

  9. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalampoki, Lamprini G; Flytzanis, Constantin N

    2014-01-01

    ...). The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF) is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ...

  10. The Footprint of Polygenic Adaptation on Stress-Responsive Cis-Regulatory Divergence in the Arabidopsis Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Arce, Agustin L; Schmitz, Gregor; Koornneef, Maarten; Novikova, Polina; Beyer, Andreas; de Meaux, Juliette

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation of a complex trait often requires the accumulation of many modifications to finely tune its underpinning molecular components to novel environmental requirements. The investigation of cis-acting regulatory modifications can be used to pinpoint molecular systems partaking in such complex adaptations. Here, we identify cis-acting modifications with the help of an interspecific crossing scheme designed to distinguish modifications derived in each of the two sister species, Arabidopsis halleri and A. lyrata Allele-specific expression levels were assessed in three environmental conditions chosen to reflect interspecific ecological differences: cold exposure, dehydration, and standard conditions. The functions described by Gene Ontology categories enriched in cis-acting mutations are markedly different in A. halleri and A. lyrata, suggesting that polygenic adaptation reshaped distinct polygenic molecular functions in the two species. In the A. halleri lineage, an excess of cis-acting changes affecting metal transport and homeostasis was observed, confirming that the well-known heavy metal tolerance of this species is the result of polygenic selection. In A. lyrata, we find a marked excess of cis-acting changes among genes showing a transcriptional response to cold stress in the outgroup species A. thaliana The adaptive relevance of these changes will have to be validated. We finally observed that polygenic molecular functions enriched in derived cis-acting changes are more constrained at the amino acid level. Using the distribution of cis-acting variation to tackle the polygenic basis of adaptation thus reveals the contribution of mutations of small effect to Darwinian adaptation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A dual cis-regulatory code links IRF8 to constitutive and inducible gene expression in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Alessandra; Termanini, Alberto; Barozzi, Iros; Ghisletti, Serena; Ostuni, Renato; Prosperini, Elena; Ozato, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor (TF) interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) controls both developmental and inflammatory stimulus-inducible genes in macrophages, but the mechanisms underlying these two different functions are largely unknown. One possibility is that these different roles are linked to the ability of IRF8 to bind alternative DNA sequences. We found that IRF8 is recruited to distinct sets of DNA consensus sequences before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. In resting cells, IRF8 was mainly bound to composite sites together with the master regulator of myeloid development PU.1. Basal IRF8–PU.1 binding maintained the expression of a broad panel of genes essential for macrophage functions (such as microbial recognition and response to purines) and contributed to basal expression of many LPS-inducible genes. After LPS stimulation, increased expression of IRF8, other IRFs, and AP-1 family TFs enabled IRF8 binding to thousands of additional regions containing low-affinity multimerized IRF sites and composite IRF–AP-1 sites, which were not premarked by PU.1 and did not contribute to the basal IRF8 cistrome. While constitutively expressed IRF8-dependent genes contained only sites mediating basal IRF8/PU.1 recruitment, inducible IRF8-dependent genes contained variable combinations of constitutive and inducible sites. Overall, these data show at the genome scale how the same TF can be linked to constitutive and inducible gene regulation via distinct combinations of alternative DNA-binding sites. PMID:25637355

  12. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-to-teleost comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M.; Campbell, Michael S.; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J.; Mulley, John F.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P.; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E. G.; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J.; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H.; Litman, Gary W.; Litman, Ronda T.; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F.; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S.; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W. H.; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H.; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before the teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization, and development (e.g., Hox, ParaHox, and miRNA genes). Numerous conserved non-coding elements (CNEs, often cis-regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles of such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the sum of expression domains and levels from duplicated teleost genes often approximate patterns and levels of gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes, and the function of human regulatory sequences. PMID:26950095

  13. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-teleost comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R; Smith, Jeramiah J; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M; Campbell, Michael S; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J; Mulley, John F; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E G; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H; Litman, Gary W; Litman, Ronda T; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M J; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H

    2016-04-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome has conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization and development (mediated, for example, by Hox, ParaHox and microRNA genes). Numerous conserved noncoding elements (CNEs; often cis regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles for such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses showed that the sums of expression domains and expression levels for duplicated teleost genes often approximate the patterns and levels of expression for gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes and the function of human regulatory sequences.

  14. Role of halogen and hydrogen bonds for stabilization of antithyroid drugs with hypohalous acids (HOX, X = I, Br, and Cl) adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheshtawy, Hamdy S.; El-Mehasseb, Ibrahim

    2017-11-01

    The mechanism for the inhibition of thyroid hormones by the thioamide-like antithyroid drug is a key process in the thyroid gland function. Therefore, in this study theoretical investigation of the molecular interaction between two antithyroid drugs, namely methimazol (MMI) and thiazoline-2-thione (T2T), with the hypohalous acids (HOX, X = I, Br, and Cl), which act as heme-linked halogenated species to tyrosine residue was discussed. The calculations were performed by M06-2X and MP2 using aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. In addition, wB97xd/6-31G* level of theory was used in order to account for the dispersion forces. The results show the possible formation of three adducts, which is stabilized by halogen bond (I), both halogen and hydrogen bonds (II), two hydrogen bonds (III). The binding energies of the complexes reveals stabilization in the order III > II > I. The binding energies of the complexes was increased with increasing the electron affinity and polarizability of halogen atom, the dipole moment of the complexes (I and II), the electrostatic potential on halogen atom (Vmax:i.e σ-hole), and the charge-transfer process through the halogen bond in I. On the other hand, the binding energies of the complexes decreased with increasing the halogen atom electronegativity and the dipole moment of complex III. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was used to investigate the molecular orbital interactions and the charge transfer process upon complexation.

  15. About Contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in the Stratospheric Ozone Depletion in the XXIst Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Igor

    2017-04-01

    Based on the previously proposed algorithm of calculation of limiting stages of the reaction prolongations in stratospheric ozone depletion cycles* a contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in ozone destruction at the end of the XXIst century at the latitude of 50° N for different seasons have been calculated. Calculations have been performed using a two-dimensional interactive model SOCRATES, and data on the concentrations of the main greenhouse gases listed in the scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) RCP 4.5, according to which the stabilization of radiative forcing to occur by the end of the XXIst century. The work presents data on the absolute rates of ozone destruction in the cycles and their relative contribution to the destruction of ozone in 1995 and 2100 respectively in the altitude range 15-55 km for March, June, September, and December at 50° N. * Igor Larin. On the Chain Length and Rate of Ozone Depletion in the Main Stratospheric Cycles//Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (2013) №8. P. 141-149. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/acs.2013.31016

  16. TLX1/HOX11-mediated disruption of primary thymocyte differentiation prior to the CD4+CD8+ double-positive stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Bronwyn M.; Hawley, Teresa S.; Spain, Lisa M.; Kerkel, Kristi A.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The TLX1/HOX11 homeobox gene is frequently activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by the t(10;14)(q24;q11) and t(7;10)(q35;q24) chromosomal translocations or by as yet unknown transcriptional mechanisms in the absence of 10q24 cytogenetic abnormalities. Almost all TLX1+ T-ALLs exhibit a CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) phenotype. To investigate the role of TLX1 as an initiating oncogene in T-ALL pathogenesis, we assessed the consequences of retroviral vector-directed TLX1 expression during the differentiation of murine and human thymocytes in fetal thymic organ cultures. Interestingly, enforced expression of TLX1 disrupted the differentiation of murine fetal liver precursors and human cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells prior to the DP thymocyte stage. Although differentiation arrest was associated with an increased percentage of apoptotic thymocytes, it could only be partially bypassed by coexpression of transgenic BCL2. Mutation of the invariant asparagine residue at position 51 of the homeodomain – which is required for efficient DNA binding – released the block, consistent with the notion that TLX1 inhibits thymocyte differentiation and promotes T-cell oncogenesis by functioning as a transcription factor. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context of activating NOTCH1 mutations and the other genetic lesions implicated in the multistep transformation process of TLX1+ T-ALL. PMID:16398656

  17. Characterization of the cis elements in the proximal promoter regions of the anthocyanin pathway genes reveals a common regulatory logic that governs pathway regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhixin; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Yiting; Guan, Shan; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingyu; Zhang, Ruijuan; Xie, Lulu; Lu, Yingqing

    2015-07-01

    Cellular activities such as compound synthesis often require the transcriptional activation of an entire pathway; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathway activation have rarely been explained. Here, the cis regulatory architecture of the anthocyanin pathway genes targeted by the transcription factor (TF) complex including MYB, bHLH, and WDR was systematically analysed in one species and the findings extended to others. In Ipomoea purpurea, the IpMYB1-IpbHLH2-IpWDR1 (IpMBW) complex was found to be orthologous to the PAP1-GL3-TTG1 (AtPGT) complex of Arabidopsis thaliana, and interacted with a 7-bp MYB-recognizing element (MRE) and a 6-bp bHLH-recognizing element (BRE) at the proximal promoter region of the pathway genes. There was little transcription of the gene in the absence of the MRE or BRE. The cis elements identified experimentally converged on two syntaxes, ANCNNCC for MREs and CACN(A/C/T)(G/T) for BREs, and our bioinformatic analysis showed that these were present within anthocyanin gene promoters in at least 35 species, including both gymnosperms and angiosperms. For the anthocyanin pathway, IpMBW and AtPGT recognized the interspecific promoters of both early and later genes. In A. thaliana, the seed-specific TF complex (TT2, TT8, and TTG1) may regulate all the anthocyanin pathway genes, in addition to the proanthocyanidin-specific BAN. When multiple TF complexes in the anthocyanin pathway were compared, the cis architecture played a role larger than the TF complex in determining the variation in promoter activity. Collectively, a cis logic common to the pathway gene promoters was found, and this logic is essential for the trans factors to regulate the pathway. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Chromatin Heterogeneity and Distribution of Regulatory Elements in the Late-Replicating Intercalary Heterochromatin Domains of Drosophila melanogaster Chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara A Khoroshko

    Full Text Available Late-replicating domains (intercalary heterochromatin in the Drosophila genome display a number of features suggesting their organization is quite unique. Typically, they are quite large and encompass clusters of functionally unrelated tissue-specific genes. They correspond to the topologically associating domains and conserved microsynteny blocks. Our study aims at exploring further details of molecular organization of intercalary heterochromatin and has uncovered surprising heterogeneity of chromatin composition in these regions. Using the 4HMM model developed in our group earlier, intercalary heterochromatin regions were found to host chromatin fragments with a particular epigenetic profile. Aquamarine chromatin fragments (spanning 0.67% of late-replicating regions are characterized as a class of sequences that appear heterogeneous in terms of their decompactization. These fragments are enriched with enhancer sequences and binding sites for insulator proteins. They likely mark the chromatin state that is related to the binding of cis-regulatory proteins. Malachite chromatin fragments (11% of late-replicating regions appear to function as universal transitional regions between two contrasting chromatin states. Namely, they invariably delimit intercalary heterochromatin regions from the adjacent active chromatin of interbands. Malachite fragments also flank aquamarine fragments embedded in the repressed chromatin of late-replicating regions. Significant enrichment of insulator proteins CP190, SU(HW, and MOD2.2 was observed in malachite chromatin. Neither aquamarine nor malachite chromatin types appear to correlate with the positions of highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE that are typically replete in intercalary heterochromatin. Malachite chromatin found on the flanks of intercalary heterochromatin regions tends to replicate earlier than the malachite chromatin embedded in intercalary heterochromatin. In other words, there exists a

  19. TILLING in the two-rowed barley cultivar 'Barke' reveals preferred sites of functional diversity in the gene HvHox1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsuda Takao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic importance of cereals such as barley, and the demand for improved yield and quality require a better understanding of the genetic components that modulate biologically and commercially relevant traits. While Arabidopsis thaliana is the premiere model plant system, the spectrum of its traits cannot address all of the fundamental questions of crop plant development. Unlike Arabidopsis, barley is both a crop and a model system for scientific research, and it is increasingly being used for genetic and molecular investigations into the conserved biological processes of cereals. A common challenge in genetic studies in plants with large genomes arises from the very time-consuming work of associating mutant phenotypes with gene sequence information, especially if insertion mutagenesis is not routine, as in barley. Reverse genetics based on chemical mutagenesis represents the best solution to this obstacle. Findings In barley, we generated a new TILLING (Targeting Local Lesions IN Genomes resource comprising 10,279 M2 mutants in the two-rowed malting cultivar 'Barke,' which has been used in the generation of other genomic resources in barley (~150,000 ESTs, DH mapping population. The value of this new resource was tested using selected candidate genes. An average frequency of approximately one mutation per 0.5 Mb was determined by screening ten fragments of six different genes. The ethyl methanesulphonate (EMSmutagenesis efficiency was studied by recording and relating the mutagenesis-dependent effects found in the three mutant generations (M1-M3. A detailed analysis was performed for the homeodomain-leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP gene HvHox1. Thirty-one mutations were identified by screening a 1,270-bp fragment in 7,348 M2 lines. Three of the newly identified mutants exhibited either a six-rowed or an intermedium-spike phenotype, and one mutant displayed a significantly altered spikelet morphology compared to that of the 'Barke

  20. Differential DNA methylation at conserved non-genic elements and evidence for transgenerational inheritance following developmental exposure to mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and 5-azacytidine in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Sales, Liana Bastos; Aleström, Peter; Legler, Juliette

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental stressors during development may lead to latent and transgenerational adverse health effects. To understand the role of DNA methylation in these effects, we used zebrafish as a vertebrate model to investigate heritable changes in DNA methylation following chemical-induced stress during early development. We exposed zebrafish embryos to non-embryotoxic concentrations of the biologically active phthalate metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP, 30 µM) and the DNA methyltransferase 1 inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5AC, 10 µM). Direct, latent and transgenerational effects on DNA methylation were assessed using global, genome-wide and locus-specific DNA methylation analyses. Following direct exposure in zebrafish embryos from 0 to 6 days post-fertilization, genome-wide analysis revealed a multitude of differentially methylated regions, strongly enriched at conserved non-genic elements for both compounds. Pathways involved in adipogenesis were enriched with the putative obesogenic compound MEHP. Exposure to 5AC resulted in enrichment of pathways involved in embryonic development and transgenerational effects on larval body length. Locus-specific methylation analysis of 10 differentially methylated sites revealed six of these loci differentially methylated in sperm sampled from adult zebrafish exposed during development to 5AC, and in first and second generation larvae. With MEHP, consistent changes were found at 2 specific loci in first and second generation larvae. Our results suggest a functional role for DNA methylation on cis-regulatory conserved elements following developmental exposure to compounds. Effects on these regions are potentially transferred to subsequent generations.

  1. Technical Note: Formal blind intercomparison of HO2 measurements in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the HOxComp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schlosser

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroperoxy radical (HO2 concentrations were measured during the formal blind intercomparison campaign HOxComp carried out in Jülich, Germany, in 2005. Three instruments detected HO2 via chemical conversion to hydroxyl radicals (OH and subsequent detection of the sum of OH and HO2 by laser induced fluorescence (LIF. All instruments were based on the same detection and calibration scheme. Because measurements by a MIESR instrument failed during the campaign, no absolute reference measurement was available, so that the accuracy of individual instruments could not be addressed. Instruments sampled ambient air for three days and were attached to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the second part of the campaign. Six experiments of one day each were conducted in SAPHIR, where air masses are homogeneously mixed, in order to investigate the performance of instruments and to determine potential interferences of measurements under well-controlled conditions. Linear correlation coefficients (R2 between measurements of the LIF instruments are generally high and range from 0.82 to 0.98. However, the agreement between measurements is variable. The regression analysis of the entire data set of measurements in SAPHIR yields slopes between 0.69 to 1.26 and intercepts are smaller than typical atmospheric daytime concentrations (less than 1 pptv. The quality of fit parameters improves significantly, when data are grouped into data subsets of similar water vapor concentrations. Because measurements of LIF instruments were corrected for a well-characterized water dependence of their sensitivities, this indicates that an unknown factor related to water vapor affected measurements in SAPHIR. Measurements in ambient air are also well-correlated, but regression parameters differ from results obtained from SAPHIR experiments. This could have been caused by differences in HO2 concentrations in the sampled air at the slightly different locations of

  2. ATRA and As₂O₃ regulate differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells into granulocyte progenitor via alteration of HoxB8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W-J; Jiang, N-J; Guo, Q-L; Xu, Q

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and/or arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on homeobox B8 (HOXB8) mRNA and protein expressions during the differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to colony forming unit-granulocyte (CFU-G) in order to explore the pathogenesis of leukemia mediated by HOXB8 at mRNA and protein level. Twelve cord blood samples were collected from the fetal placenta umbilical vein and cultured in vitro. The proliferation and differentiation of cord blood HSCs into CFU-G was continuously disrupted with 10 nmol/l of ATRA and/or 10 nmol/l of As2O3. The expression of HOXB8 mRNA and protein were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot, respectively. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression was detected in control, ATRA, As2O3 and ATRA +As2O3 groups on days 3, 7, and 12 of culture. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression was detectable on day 3, reached its highest level on day 7 and decreased on day 12. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression in ATRA, As2O3 and ATRA+As2O3 was upregulated compared with control group (p ATRA/As2O3 up-regulate the expression of HOXB8 mRNA/protein, and treatment of leukemia with ATRA/As2O3 may regulate HOX gene expression.

  3. Multiple transcription factors directly regulate Hox gene lin-39 expression in ventral hypodermal cells of the C. elegans embryo and larva, including the hypodermal fate regulators LIN-26 and ELT-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ju; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Eisenmann, David M

    2014-05-13

    Hox genes encode master regulators of regional fate specification during early metazoan development. Much is known about the initiation and regulation of Hox gene expression in Drosophila and vertebrates, but less is known in the non-arthropod invertebrate model system, C. elegans. The C. elegans Hox gene lin-39 is required for correct fate specification in the midbody region, including the Vulval Precursor Cells (VPCs). To better understand lin-39 regulation and function, we aimed to identify transcription factors necessary for lin-39 expression in the VPCs, and in particular sought factors that initiate lin-39 expression in the embryo. We used the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) method to screen for factors that bound to 13 fragments from the lin-39 region: twelve fragments contained sequences conserved between C. elegans and two other nematode species, while one fragment was known to drive reporter gene expression in the early embryo in cells that generate the VPCs. Sixteen transcription factors that bind to eight lin-39 genomic fragments were identified in yeast, and we characterized several factors by verifying their physical interactions in vitro, and showing that reduction of their function leads to alterations in lin-39 levels and lin-39::GFP reporter expression in vivo. Three factors, the orphan nuclear hormone receptor NHR-43, the hypodermal fate regulator LIN-26, and the GATA factor ELT-6 positively regulate lin-39 expression in the embryonic precursors to the VPCs. In particular, ELT-6 interacts with an enhancer that drives GFP expression in the early embryo, and the ELT-6 site we identified is necessary for proper embryonic expression. These three factors, along with the factors ZTF-17, BED-3 and TBX-9, also positively regulate lin-39 expression in the larval VPCs. These results significantly expand the number of factors known to directly bind and regulate lin-39 expression, identify the first factors required for lin-39 expression in the embryo, and hint at a

  4. Framed primal elements

    OpenAIRE

    Debongnie, Jean-François

    1986-01-01

    Framed primal finite elements may be viewed as a generalized class of elements including conforming elements, primal hybrids, and non concorming elements passing the patch test. This systematization is illustrated on a lot of examples.

  5. Sex combs reduced (Scr) regulatory region of Drosophila revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Martín, Juan M; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    The Hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is responsible for the differentiation of the labial and prothoracic segments in Drosophila. Scr is expressed in several specific tissues throughout embryonic development, following a complex path that must be coordinated by an equally complex regulatory region. Although some cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) have been identified in the Scr regulatory region (~75 kb), there has been no detailed and systematic study of the distinct regulatory elements present within this region. In this study, the Scr regulatory region was revisited with the aim of filling this gap. We focused on the identification of Initiator elements (IEs) that bind segmentation factors, Polycomb response elements (PREs) that are recognized by the Polycomb and Trithorax complexes, as well as insulators and tethering elements. To this end, we summarized all currently available information, mainly obtained from high throughput ChIP data projects. In addition, a bioinformatic analysis based on the evolutionary conservation of regulatory sequences using the software MOTEVO was performed to identify IE and PRE candidates in the Scr region. The results obtained by this combined strategy are largely consistent with the CRMs previously identified in the Scr region and help to: (i) delimit them more accurately, (ii) subdivide two of them into different independent elements, (iii) identify a new CRM, (iv) identify the composition of their binding sites and (v) better define some of their characteristics. These positive results indicate that an approach that integrates functional and bioinformatic data might be useful to characterize other regulatory regions.

  6. Comparisons of observed and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement period of the HOxComp field campaign

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    T. Elste

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary observations was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient observations during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels observed by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1 with high R2 values (0.72–0.97 over a range of isoprene (0.3–2 ppb and NO (0.1–10 ppb mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(* levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the observations made by the single instrument. This also indicates an overprediction of the HO2 to OH recycling. Together with the good model-measurement agreement for OH, it implies a missing OH source in the model. Modeled OH and HO2(* could only be matched to the observations by addition of a strong unknown loss process for HO2(* that recycles OH at a high yield. Adding to the base model, instead, the recently proposed isomerization mechanism of isoprene peroxy radicals (Peeters and Müller, 2010 increased OH and HO2(* by 28% and 13% on average. Although these were still only 4% higher than the OH observations made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42–70% occurred with respect to the OH observations made by the other three instruments. The overestimation in OH could be diminished only when reactive alkanes (HC8 were solely introduced to the model to explain the missing fraction of observed OH reactivity. Moreover, the overprediction of HO2(* became even larger than in the base case. These analyses imply that the rates of the isomerization are not readily supported by the ensemble of radical observations. One of the

  7. The ParaHox gene Gsx patterns the apical organ and central nervous system but not the foregut in scaphopod and cephalopod mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollesen, Tim; Rodríguez Monje, Sonia Victoria; McDougall, Carmel; Degnan, Bernard M; Wanninger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the ParaHox gene Gsx patterned the foregut of the last common bilaterian ancestor. This notion was corroborated by Gsx expression in three out of four lophotrochozoan species, several ecdysozoans, and some deuterostomes. Remarkably, Gsx is also expressed in the bilaterian anterior-most central nervous system (CNS) and the gastropod and annelid apical organ. To infer whether these findings are consistent with other mollusks or even lophotrochozoans, we investigated Gsx expression in developmental stages of representatives of two other molluscan classes, the scaphopod Antalis entalis and the cephalopod Idiosepius notoides. Gsx is not expressed in the developing digestive tract of Antalis entalis and Idiosepius notoides. Instead, it is expressed in cells of the apical organ in the scaphopod trochophore and in two cells adjacent to this organ. Late-stage trochophores express Aen-Gsx in cells of the developing cerebral and pedal ganglia and in cells close to the pavilion, mantle, and foot. In postmetamorphic specimens, Aen-Gsx is expressed in the cerebral and pedal ganglia, the foot, and the nascent captacula. In early squid embryos, Ino-Gsx is expressed in the cerebral, palliovisceral, and optic ganglia. In late-stage embryos, Ino-Gsx is additionally expressed close to the eyes and in the supraesophageal and posterior subesophageal masses and optic lobes. Developmental stages close to hatching express Ino-Gsx only close to the eyes. Our results suggest that Gsx expression in the foregut might not be a plesiomorphic trait of the Lophotrochozoa as insinuated previously. Since neither ecdysozoans nor deuterostomes express Gsx in their gut, a role in gut formation in the last common bilaterian ancestor appears unlikely. Gsx is consistently expressed in the bilaterian anterior-most CNS and the apical organ of lophotrochozoan larvae, suggesting a recruitment of Gsx into the formation of this organ in the Lophotrochozoa. The cephalopod posterior

  8. RNA helicase DEAD box protein 5 regulates Polycomb repressive complex 2/Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA function in hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xing, Zheng; Mani, Saravana Kumar Kailasam; Bancel, Brigitte; Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien; Tran, Elizabeth J; Merle, Philippe; Andrisani, Ourania

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major factor in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) pathogenesis by a mechanism not yet understood. Elucidating mechanisms of HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is needed to gain insights into classification and treatment of HCC. In HBV replicating cells, including virus-associated HCCs, suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (SUZ12), a core subunit of Polycomb repressive complex2 (PRC2), undergoes proteasomal degradation. This process requires the long noncoding RNA, Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR). Intriguingly, HOTAIR interacts with PRC2 and also binds RNA-binding E3 ligases, serving as a ubiquitination scaffold. Herein, we identified the RNA helicase, DEAD box protein 5 (DDX5), as a regulator of SUZ12 stability and PRC2-mediated gene repression, acting by regulating RNA-protein complexes formed with HOTAIR. Specifically, knockdown of DDX5 and/or HOTAIR enabled reexpression of PRC2-repressed genes epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and pluripotency genes. Also, knockdown of DDX5 enhanced transcription from the HBV minichromosome. The helicase activity of DDX5 stabilized SUZ12- and PRC2-mediated gene silencing, by displacing the RNA-binding E3 ligase, Mex-3 RNA-binding family member B (Mex3b), from HOTAIR. Conversely, ectopic expression of Mex3b ubiquitinated SUZ12, displaced DDX5 from HOTAIR, and induced SUZ12 down-regulation. In G2 phase of cells expressing the HBV X protein (HBx), SUZ12 preferentially associated with Mex3b, but not DDX5, resulting in de-repression of PRC2 targets, including EpCAM and pluripotency genes. Significantly, liver tumors from HBx/c-myc bitransgenic mice and chronically HBV-infected patients exhibited a strong negative correlation between DDX5 messenger RNA levels, pluripotency gene expression, and liver tumor differentiation. Notably, chronically infected HBV patients with HCC expressing reduced DDX5 exhibited poor prognosis after tumor resection, identifying DDX5 as an

  9. Reference: OCTAMERMOTIFTAH3H4 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OCTAMERMOTIFTAH3H4 Nakayama T, Sakamoto A, Yang P, Minami M, Fujimoto Y, Ito T, Iwa...buchi M Highly conserved hexamer, octamer and nonamer motifs are positive cis-regulatory elements of the whe

  10. Dissecting the fission yeast regulatory network reveals phase-specific control elements of its cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liwen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are among the original model organisms in the study of the cell-division cycle. Unlike budding yeast, no large-scale regulatory network has been constructed for fission yeast. It has only been partially characterized. As a result, important regulatory cascades in budding yeast have no known or complete counterpart in fission yeast. Results By integrating genome-wide data from multiple time course cell cycle microarray experiments we reconstructed a gene regulatory network. Based on the network, we discovered in addition to previously known regulatory hubs in M phase, a new putative regulatory hub in the form of the HMG box transcription factor SPBC19G7.04. Further, we inferred periodic activities of several less known transcription factors over the course of the cell cycle, identified over 500 putative regulatory targets and detected many new phase-specific and conserved cis-regulatory motifs. In particular, we show that SPBC19G7.04 has highly significant periodic activity that peaks in early M phase, which is coordinated with the late G2 activity of the forkhead transcription factor fkh2. Finally, using an enhanced Bayesian algorithm to co-cluster the expression data, we obtained 31 clusters of co-regulated genes 1 which constitute regulatory modules from different phases of the cell cycle, 2 whose phase order is coherent across the 10 time course experiments, and 3 which lead to identification of phase-specific control elements at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in S. pombe. In particular, the ribosome biogenesis clusters expressed in G2 phase reveal new, highly conserved RNA motifs. Conclusion Using a systems-level analysis of the phase-specific nature of the S. pombe cell cycle gene regulation, we have provided new testable evidence for post-transcriptional regulation in the G2 phase of the fission yeast cell cycle

  11. Trace Elements and Residual Elements in Superalloys,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace elements , *Superalloys, Impurities, Nickel alloys, Refining, Refractory materials, Gases, Residuals, Porosity, Nonmetals, Metals, Metalloids, Segregation(Metallurgy), Auger electron spectroscopy, Fracture(Mechanics), Symposia

  12. Trace Elements and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the effects of arsenic, lead, zinc, mercury, and cadmium on human health, indicates the sources of the elements in water, and considers the possibility of students in high schools analyzing water for trace amounts of the elements. (AL)

  13. Data Element Registry Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data Element Registry Services (DERS) is a resource for information about value lists (aka code sets / pick lists), data dictionaries, data elements, and EPA data...

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  15. Elements of spin motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshio; Ishizaki, Hideharu

    1994-06-01

    For use in numerical studies of rotational motion, a set of elements is introduced for the torque-free rotational motion of a rigid body around its barycenter. The elements are defined as the initial values of a modification of the Andoyer canonical variables. A computational procedure is obtained for determining these elements from the combination of the spin angular momentum vector and a triad defining the orientation of the rigid body. A numerical experiment shows that the errors of transformation between the elements and variables are sufficiently small. The errors increase linearly with time for some elements and quadratically for some others.

  16. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  17. Finite element procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Finite element procedures are now an important and frequently indispensable part of engineering analyses and scientific investigations. This book focuses on finite element procedures that are very useful and are widely employed. Formulations for the linear and nonlinear analyses of solids and structures, fluids, and multiphysics problems are presented, appropriate finite elements are discussed, and solution techniques for the governing finite element equations are given. The book presents general, reliable, and effective procedures that are fundamental and can be expected to be in use for a long time. The given procedures form also the foundations of recent developments in the field.

  18. Chemistry of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaedel, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center; GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The chemistry of superheavy elements - or transactinides from their position in the Periodic Table - is summarized. After giving an overview over historical developments, nuclear aspects about synthesis of neutron-rich isotopes of these elements, produced in hot-fusion reactions, and their nuclear decay properties are briefly mentioned. Specific requirements to cope with the one-atom-at-a-time situation in automated chemical separations and recent developments in aqueous-phase and gas-phase chemistry are presented. Exciting, current developments, first applications, and future prospects of chemical separations behind physical recoil separators ('pre-separator') are discussed in detail. The status of our current knowledge about the chemistry of rutherfordium (Rf, element 104), dubnium (Db, element 105), seaborgium (Sg, element 106), bohrium (Bh, element 107), hassium (Hs, element 108), copernicium (Cn, element 112), and element 114 is discussed from an experimental point of view. Recent results are emphasized and compared with empirical extrapolations and with fully-relativistic theoretical calculations, especially also under the aspect of the architecture of the Periodic Table. (orig.)

  19. Stochastic finite element method with simple random elements

    OpenAIRE

    Starkloff, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    We propose a variant of the stochastic finite element method, where the random elements occuring in the problem formulation are approximated by simple random elements, i.e. random elements with only a finite number of possible values.

  20. The ends of elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Brett F.; Burdette, Shawn C.

    2013-05-01

    When elements 117 and 118 are finally named, should these new members of the halogen and noble gas families receive names ending in -ium as IUPAC has suggested? Brett F. Thornton and Shawn C. Burdette look at the history of element suffixes and make the case for not following this recommendation.

  1. Trace element emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  2. Movies and Literary Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Rodney D.

    Showing ten-minute movie clips can be an effective way to motivate students to read literature and to teach elements of fiction, namely plot, character, setting, symbol, irony, and theme. A clip from "And Then There Were None" may be used to teach various elements of plot, including conflict and the four types of conflict (man vs. man,…

  3. BSCW Unstructured Mixed Element Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Corase Grid: Quad Surface Faces= 9360 Tria Surface Faces= 128928 Nodes = 2869187 Total Elements = 9099201 Hex Elements = 0 Pent_5 Elements = 0 Pent_6 Elements =...

  4. A novel DFNB1 deletion allele supports the existence of a distant cis-regulatory region that controls GJB2 and GJB6 expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilch, E.; Azaiez, H.; Fisher, R.A.; Elfenbein, J.; Murgia, A.; Birkenhager, R.; Bolz, H.; Silva-Costa, S.M. Da; Castillo, I. del; Haaf, T.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Kubisch, C.; Marechal, C. Le; Pandya, A.; Sartorato, E.L.; Schneider, E.; Camp, G. van; Wuyts, W.; Smith, R.J.; Friderici, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven affected members of a large German-American family segregating recessively inherited, congenital, non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) were found to be homozygous for the common 35delG mutation of GJB2, the gene encoding the gap junction protein Connexin 26. Surprisingly, four

  5. Cis-Regulatory Control of the Nuclear Receptor Coup-TF Gene in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus Embryo: e109274

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamprini G Kalampoki; Constantin N Flytzanis

    2014-01-01

    ...). The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF) is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ...

  6. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  7. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  8. The solar element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2009-01-01

    of the nineteenth century. In the modest form of a yellow spectral line known as D3, 'helium' was sometimes supposed to exist in the Sun's atmosphere, an idea which is traditionally ascribed to J. Norman Lockyer. Did Lockyer discover helium as a solar element? How was the suggestion received by chemists, physicists...... and astronomers in the period until the spring of 1895, when William Ramsay serendipitously found the gas in uranium minerals? The hypothetical element helium was fairly well known, yet Ramsay's discovery owed little or nothing to Lockyer's solar element. Indeed, for a brief while it was thought that the two...

  9. Elements in biological AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  10. Discovery of element 112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The new elements 110, 111, and 112 were synthesized and unambiguously identified in experiments at SHIP. Due to strong shell effects the dominant decay mode is not fission, but emission of alpha particles. Theoretical investigations predict that maximum shell effects should exist in nuclei near proton number 114 and neutron number 184. Measurements give hope that isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical Superheavy Elements could be produced by fusion reactions using {sup 118}Pb as target. systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that transfer of nucleons is the important process to initiate the fusion.

  11. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  12. Divergent picornavirus IRES elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements were first identified about 20 years ago within the 5' untranslated region of picornavirus RNAs. They direct a cap-independent mechanism of translation initiation on the viral RNA. Within the picornavirus family it is now known that there are four...... classes of IRES element which vary in size (450-270nt), they also have different, complex, secondary structures and distinct requirements for cellular proteins to allow them to function. This review describes the features of each class of picornavirus IRES element but focuses on the characteristics...... of the most recently described group, initially identified within the porcine teschovirus-1 RNA, which has strong similarities to the IRES elements from within the genomes of hepatitis C virus and the pestiviruses which are members of the flavivirus family. The selection of the initiation codon...

  13. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro; Kamiya, Toshio; Atou, Toshiyuki; Susaki, Tomofumi

    2011-06-01

    While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust), many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A 'rare-element crisis' is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a 'ubiquitous element strategy' for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements.

  14. Structural elements design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Draycott, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Gives clear explanations of the logical design sequence for structural elements. The Structural Engineer says: `The book explains, in simple terms, and with many examples, Code of Practice methods for sizing structural sections in timber, concrete,masonry and steel. It is the combination into one book of section sizing methods in each of these materials that makes this text so useful....Students will find this an essential support text to the Codes of Practice in their study of element sizing'.

  15. New roof element system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlev, Jesper; Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project has been to develop an element system for warm deck roofs which, from a thermal and economical point of view, can deal with the future demands for heat loss coefficients for low slope roofs.......The aim of the project has been to develop an element system for warm deck roofs which, from a thermal and economical point of view, can deal with the future demands for heat loss coefficients for low slope roofs....

  16. Novel porcine repetitive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive elements comprise ~45% of mammalian genomes and are increasingly known to impact genomic function by contributing to the genomic architecture, by direct regulation of gene expression and by affecting genomic size, diversity and evolution. The ubiquity and increasingly understood importance of repetitive elements contribute to the need to identify and annotate them. We set out to identify previously uncharacterized repetitive DNA in the porcine genome. Once found, we characterized the prevalence of these repeats in other mammals. Results We discovered 27 repetitive elements in 220 BACs covering 1% of the porcine genome (Comparative Vertebrate Sequencing Initiative; CVSI. These repeats varied in length from 55 to 1059 nucleotides. To estimate copy numbers, we went to an independent source of data, the BAC-end sequences (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, covering approximately 15% of the porcine genome. Copy numbers in BAC-ends were less than one hundred for 6 repeat elements, between 100 and 1000 for 16 and between 1,000 and 10,000 for 5. Several of the repeat elements were found in the bovine genome and we have identified two with orthologous sites, indicating that these elements were present in their common ancestor. None of the repeat elements were found in primate, rodent or dog genomes. We were unable to identify any of the replication machinery common to active transposable elements in these newly identified repeats. Conclusion The presence of both orthologous and non-orthologous sites indicates that some sites existed prior to speciation and some were generated later. The identification of low to moderate copy number repetitive DNA that is specific to artiodactyls will be critical in the assembly of livestock genomes and studies of comparative genomics.

  17. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  18. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  19. Transposable elements in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullers, Tabitha J.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic elements that can mobilize within host genomes. As TEs comprise more than 40% of the human genome and are linked to numerous diseases, understanding their mechanisms of mobilization and regulation is important. Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model organism for the study of eukaryotic TEs as its genome contains a diverse array of active TEs. TEs universally impact host genome size via transposition and deletion events, but may also adopt unique functional roles in host organisms. There are 2 main classes of TEs: DNA transposons and retrotransposons. These classes are further divided into subgroups of TEs with unique structural and functional characteristics, demonstrating the significant variability among these elements. Despite this variability, D. melanogaster and other eukaryotic organisms utilize conserved mechanisms to regulate TEs. This review focuses on the transposition mechanisms and regulatory pathways of TEs, and their functional roles in D. melanogaster. PMID:28580197

  20. Advanced finite element technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The book presents an overview of the state of research of advanced finite element technologies. Besides the mathematical analysis, the finite element development and their engineering applications are shown to the reader. The authors give a survey of the methods and technologies concerning efficiency, robustness and performance aspects. The book covers the topics of mathematical foundations for variational approaches and the mathematical understanding of the analytical requirements of modern finite element methods. Special attention is paid to finite deformations, adaptive strategies, incompressible, isotropic or anisotropic material behavior and the mathematical and numerical treatment of the well-known locking phenomenon. Beyond that new results for the introduced approaches are presented especially for challenging nonlinear problems.

  1. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  2. Intelligent Elements for ISHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzel, John L.; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando; Oostdyk, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of architecture models for implementing Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) capabilities. For example, approaches based on the OSA-CBM and OSA-EAI models, or specific architectures developed in response to local needs. NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) has developed one such version of an extensible architecture in support of rocket engine testing that integrates a palette of functions in order to achieve an ISHM capability. Among the functional capabilities that are supported by the framework are: prognostic models, anomaly detection, a data base of supporting health information, root cause analysis, intelligent elements, and integrated awareness. This paper focuses on the role that intelligent elements can play in ISHM architectures. We define an intelligent element as a smart element with sufficient computing capacity to support anomaly detection or other algorithms in support of ISHM functions. A smart element has the capabilities of supporting networked implementations of IEEE 1451.x smart sensor and actuator protocols. The ISHM group at SSC has been actively developing intelligent elements in conjunction with several partners at other Centers, universities, and companies as part of our ISHM approach for better supporting rocket engine testing. We have developed several implementations. Among the key features for these intelligent sensors is support for IEEE 1451.1 and incorporation of a suite of algorithms for determination of sensor health. Regardless of the potential advantages that can be achieved using intelligent sensors, existing large-scale systems are still based on conventional sensors and data acquisition systems. In order to bring the benefits of intelligent sensors to these environments, we have also developed virtual implementations of intelligent sensors.

  3. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  4. Rocket propulsion elements

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, George P

    2011-01-01

    The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now revised to reflect advancements in the field For sixty years, Sutton's Rocket Propulsion Elements has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. As with the previous edition, coauthored with Oscar Biblarz, the Eighth Edition of Rocket Propulsion Elements offers a thorough introduction to basic principles of rocket propulsion for guided missiles, space flight, or satellite flight. It describes the physical mechanisms and designs for various types of rockets' and provides an unders

  5. Finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Finite element analysis is an engineering method for the numerical analysis of complex structures. This book provides a bird's eye view on this very broad matter through 27 original and innovative research studies exhibiting various investigation directions. Through its chapters the reader will have access to works related to Biomedical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Process Analysis and Civil Engineering. The text is addressed not only to researchers, but also to professional engineers, engineering lecturers and students seeking to gain a better understanding of where Finite Element Analysis stands today.

  6. Elements of linear space

    CERN Document Server

    Amir-Moez, A R; Sneddon, I N

    1962-01-01

    Elements of Linear Space is a detailed treatment of the elements of linear spaces, including real spaces with no more than three dimensions and complex n-dimensional spaces. The geometry of conic sections and quadric surfaces is considered, along with algebraic structures, especially vector spaces and transformations. Problems drawn from various branches of geometry are given.Comprised of 12 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to real Euclidean space, followed by a discussion on linear transformations and matrices. The addition and multiplication of transformations and matrices a

  7. Elements of social security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    (Alte Länder). This is the 9th and last edition of the publication,covering income levels and rules for social security and personal taxation for 1999. Basis for the projections to 1999 income levels is the 1998 data (in some cases 1999 data)for OECD's Taxing Wages as reported by national experts.......Elements of Social Security is a comparative study of important elements of the social security systems in Denmark (DK), Sweden (S), Finland (FIN), Austria (A), Germany (D), the Netherlands (NL), Great Britain (GB) and Canada (CAN). It should be emphasized that Germany is the former West Germany...

  8. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  9. Elements of Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 1. Elements of Chemistry. Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier. Classics Volume 17 Issue 1 January 2012 pp 92-100. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/01/0092-0100. Author Affiliations.

  10. Water, the intangible element

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotting, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water is the key to life. No living creature can survive without water. Too much water or polluted water are serious threats to mankind. Managing this intangible element is complex, not only in wet deltaic regions but also in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Combined efforts of the

  11. JACKETED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1958-12-01

    A fuel element is described for fast reactors comprised of a core of uranium metal containing material and a jacket around the core, the jacket consisting of from 2.5 to 15 percent of titanium, from 1 to 5 percent of niobium, and from 80 to 96.5 percent of vanadium.

  12. Elements of Social Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    Elements of Social Security contains an overview of important benefit schemes in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain and Canada. The schemes are categorized according to common sets of criteria and compared. Stylized cases illustrate the impact on disposable income...

  13. Elements of Social Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    Elements of Social Security contains an overview of important benefit schemes in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands and Canada. The schemes are categorized according to common sets of criteria and compared. Stylized cases illustrate the impact on disposable income...

  14. Elements of Social Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    Elements of Social Security contains an overview of important benefit schemes in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain and Canada. The schemes are categorized according to common sets of criteria and compared. Stylized cases illustrate the impact on disposable...

  15. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  16. CEDS Addresses: Rubric Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) Version 4 introduced a common data vocabulary for defining rubrics in a data system. The CEDS elements support digital representations of both holistic and analytic rubrics. This document shares examples of holistic and analytic project rubrics, available CEDS Connections, and a logical model showing the…

  17. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  18. Beam transport elements

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    Two of the beam transport elements for the slow ejection system. On the left, a quadrupole 1.2 m long with a 5 cm aperture, capable of producing a gradient of 5000 gauss. On the right, a 1 m bending magnet with a 4 cm gap; its field is 20 000 gauss.

  19. Epidemiology and trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C

    1985-08-01

    Basically, epidemiology is the making of measurements of known reproducibility, in a bias-free manner, on representative samples of subjects drawn from defined communities. Epidemiology has become a relatively precise science and its value in medicine is widely appreciated. So too are its limitations: the difficulties in achieving a high response rate, in identifying and controlling confounding factors in the examination of an association, and the ultimate difficulties in distinguishing causation from association. While the value of community-based studies seems to be recognized by those interested in man and his environment, the need for the strict application of epidemiological procedures, and the limitations imposed on conclusions drawn from studies in which these procedures have been compromised, does not seem to be adequately understood. There are certain known links between trace elements in the environment and disease: for example the level of iodine in soil and water and the prevalence of goitre; the level of fluoride in water and the prevalence of dental caries. The investigation of other possible associations is difficult for a number of reasons, including interrelationships between trace elements, confounding of trace element levels (and disease) with social and dietary factors, and the probability that relationships are generally weak. Two conditions in which associations are likely are cardiovascular disease and cancer. Despite research along a number of lines, the relevance of trace elements to cardiovascular disease is not clear, and certainly the apparent association with hardness of domestic water supply seems unlikely to be causal. The same general conclusion seems reasonable for cancer, and although there are a very few well established associations which are likely to be causal, such as exposure to arsenic and skin cancer, the role of trace elements is obscure, and likely to be very small.

  20. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  1. Elements of quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Meystre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Elements of Quantum Optics gives a self-contained and broad coverage of the basic elements necessary to understand and carry out research in laser physics and quantum optics, including a review of basic quantum mechanics and pedagogical introductions to system-reservoir interactions and to second quantization. The text reveals the close connection between many seemingly unrelated topics, such as probe absorption, four-wave mixing, optical instabilities, resonance fluorescence and squeezing. It also comprises discussions of cavity quantum electrodynamics and atom optics. The 4th edition includes a new chapter on quantum entanglement and quantum information, as well as added discussions of the quantum beam splitter, electromagnetically induced transparency, slow light, and the input-output formalism needed to understand many problems in quantum optics. It also provides an expanded treatment of the minimum-coupling Hamiltonian and a simple derivation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, an important gateway to rese...

  2. Archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spind......SUMMARY: Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes...... on archaeal ECEs has just started to unravel the molecular biology of these genetic entities and their interactions with archaeal hosts, it is expected to accelerate in the next decade....

  3. Quantum theory elements

    CERN Document Server

    1962-01-01

    Quantum Theory: A Treatise in Three Volumes, I: Elements focuses on the principles, methodologies, and approaches involved in quantum theory, including quantum mechanics, linear combinations, collisions, and transitions. The selection first elaborates on the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, exactly soluble bound state problems, and continuum. Discussions focus on delta function normalization, spherically symmetric potentials, rectangular potential wells, harmonic oscillators, spherically symmetrical potentials, Coulomb potential, axiomatic basis, consequences of first three postula

  4. Helium the disappearing element

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Wheeler M

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is helium, the element, and its use in myriad applications including MRI machines, particle accelerators, space telescopes, and of course balloons and blimps. It was at the birth of our Universe, or the Big Bang, where the majority of cosmic helium was created; and stellar helium production continues. Although helium is the second most abundant element in the Universe, it is actually quite rare here on Earth and only exists because of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. This book includes a detailed history of the discovery of helium, of the commercial industry built around it, how the helium we actually encounter is produced within the Earth, and the state of the helium industry today. The gas that most people associate with birthday party balloons is running out. “Who cares?” you might ask. Well, without helium, MRI machines could not function, rockets could not go into space, particle accelerators such as those used by CERN could not operate, fiber optic cables would not...

  5. Chemical Elements Bingo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Silvia; Palacios, Joaquin

    1995-12-01

    An important part of the high school chemistry program is the topic of periodic classification and periodicity. We have observed that one of the obstacles for the study of the matter is the new vocabulary necessary to initiate this work. Our students have to understand that the periodic classification is an orderly way of presenting the elements and its properties, they compare the table with other classification systems that they already know, nevertheless for the average student it is difficult to deduce or predict properties with periodic classification. As an example of this concept, we can point out the electronic configuration, atomic radii, oxidation state, and valence number. In order to facilitate the learning-teaching process of this topic in high school level, we stimulate the class to play with the periodic table, to get familiar with the general concepts of periodicity. We started our work dealing with the most common elements in each group. Chemical Elements Bingo (CEB) is a game we designed to teach periodic classification.

  6. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hosono, Katsuro Hayashi, Toshio Kamiya, Toshiyuki Atou and Tomofumi Susaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust, many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A 'rare-element crisis' is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a 'ubiquitous element strategy' for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements.

  7. Elemental matrices for the finite element method in electromagnetics with quadratic triangular elements

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, E.

    2009-01-01

    The finite element method has become a preeminent simulation technique in electromagnetics. For problems involving anisotropic media and metamaterials, proper algorithms should be developed. It has been proved that discretizing in quadratic triangular elements may lead to an improved accuracy. Here we present a collection of elemental matrices evaluated analytically for quadratic triangular elements. They could be useful for the finite element method in advanced electromagnetics.

  8. Elements of social action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the significant analytical advantages, the author prefers social action as initial sociological concept in the relation to social phenomenon. Its basic elements are: actors, subjects and tools, needs and interests, values and norms, positions and roles. Actors set in motion and unify the rest of elements, guide to the magic triangle of sociology (movement, change, order, reaffirm actor paradigm to systemic paradigm. Subjects and tools materialize an action and its overestimate results in technological determinism or (by means of property as institutional appropriation of nature in the (unclassed historical type of society. Needs and interests are the basis of person's motivation and starting point for depth analysis of sociability. The expansion of legitimate interests circle develops techniques of normative regulation. Values and norms guide to institutional-organizational, positions to vertical and roles to horizontal structure. Values give the meaning to the action as well as to human existence, they are orientations of motivate system of personality but also basic aspect of society. As abstractions, values are latent background of norms and they tell to us what to do, and norms how to do something. Norms are specified instructions for suitable behavior Without normative order, not to be possible the satisfying of needs and the conciliation of interests. Riches, power and prestige are components of social position, and legal status is the determination of rights and obligations of the position. Roles are normative expectation of behavior. Toward kinds of sanctions roles are classified. Roles but also other elements of social action are starting point for sociological analysis of legal norms and institutes. On the other side, the observation of legal component of social actions enriches, strengths and precises sociological analysis of them.

  9. Elements of analytical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolph; Stark, M

    1976-01-01

    Elements of Analytical Dynamics deals with dynamics, which studies the relationship between motion of material bodies and the forces acting on them. This book is a compilation of lectures given by the author at the Georgia and Institute of Technology and formed a part of a course in Topological Dynamics. The book begins by discussing the notions of space and time and their basic properties. It then discusses the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and Hamilton's principle and first integrals. The text concludes with a discussion on Jacobi's geometric interpretation of conservative systems. This book will

  10. Analytical elements of mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Elements of Mechanics, Volume 1, is the first of two volumes intended for use in courses in classical mechanics. The books aim to provide students and teachers with a text consistent in content and format with the author's ideas regarding the subject matter and teaching of mechanics, and to disseminate these ideas. The book opens with a detailed exposition of vector algebra, and no prior knowledge of this subject is required. This is followed by a chapter on the topic of mass centers, which is presented as a logical extension of concepts introduced in connection with centroids. A

  11. Osteoporosis and trace elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, J.; Boivin, G.; Andersen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    More than 200 million people are affected by osteoporosis worldwide, as estimated by 2 million annual hip fractures and other debilitating bone fractures (vertebrae compression and Colles' fractures). Osteoporosis is a multi-factorial disease with potential contributions from genetic, endocrine...... in new bone and results in a net gain in bone mass, but may be associated with a tissue of poor quality. Aluminum induces impairment of bone formation. Gallium and cadmium suppresses bone turnover. However, exact involvements of the trace elements in osteoporosis have not yet been fully clarified...

  12. Elements of Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elements of Architecture explores new ways of engaging architecture in archaeology. It conceives of architecture both as the physical evidence of past societies and as existing beyond the physical environment, considering how people in the past have not just dwelled in buildings but have existed...... and affective impacts, of these material remains. The contributions in this volume investigate the way time, performance and movement, both physically and emotionally, are central aspects of understanding architectural assemblages. It is a book about the constellations of people, places and things that emerge...

  13. Elements of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Elements of Energy Conversion brings together scattered information on the subject of energy conversion and presents it in terms of the fundamental thermodynamics that apply to energy conversion by any process. Emphasis is given to the development of the theory of heat engines because these are and will remain most important power sources. Descriptive material is then presented to provide elementary information on all important energy conversion devices. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of forms of energy, energy sources and storage, and energy conversion. This is foll

  14. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions.

  15. Ring-laser gyroscope system using dispersive element(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A ring-laser gyroscope system includes a ring-laser gyroscope (RLG) and at least one dispersive element optically coupled to the RLG's ring-shaped optical path. Each dispersive element has a resonant frequency that is approximately equal to the RLG's lasing frequency. A group index of refraction defined collectively by the dispersive element(s) has (i) a real portion that is greater than zero and less than one, and (ii) an imaginary portion that is less than zero.

  16. Heavy element nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, D N

    1976-01-01

    A review is made of current nuclear astrophysical theory regarding the origin of the elements heavier than iron. The pre-supernova evolution of stars is very briefly described, and speculation is given regarding the supernova mechanism. In particular, the possible role of weak neutral currents is presented. The synthesis of the trans-iron nuclei via the s and r-processes is examined. Special emphasis is given to the r-process because it depends completely on the properties of nuclei off the valley of stability. Recent explosive r-process calculations are discussed, as well as plausible astrophysical sites. The alternative n-process is also described. The possible production by the r and/or n-processes of the almost mythical superheavy elements is reviewed. The sensitivity of the results to certain crudely estimated parameters is explicitly shown. Throughout the discussion, the importance of certain nuclear physics experiments and formalism is demonstrated. Areas where advances in nuclear physics will have a d...

  17. The CEBAF Element Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  18. NIH Common Data Elements Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Repository has been designed to provide access to structured human and machine-readable definitions of data elements that have...

  19. Trace element emissions from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    Trace elements are emitted during coal combustion. The quantity, in general, depends on the physical and chemical properties of the element itself, the concentration of the element in the coal, the combustion conditions and the type of particulate control device used, and its collection efficiency as a function of particle size. Some trace elements become concentrated in certain particle streams following combustion such as bottom ash, fly ash, and flue gas particulate matter, while others do not. Various classification schemes have been developed to describe this partitioning behaviour. These classification schemes generally distinguish between: Class 1: elements that are approximately equally concentrated in the fly ash and bottom ash, or show little or no fine particle enrichment, examples include Mn, Be, Co and Cr; Class 2: elements that are enriched in the fly ash relative to bottom ash, or show increasing enrichment with decreasing particle size, examples include As, Cd, Pb and Sb; Class 3: elements which are emitted in the gas phase (primarily Hg (not discussed in this review), and in some cases, Se). Control of class 1 trace elements is directly related to control of total particulate matter emissions, while control of the class 2 elements depends on collection of fine particulates. Due to the variability in particulate control device efficiencies, emission rates of these elements can vary substantially. The volatility of class 3 elements means that particulate controls have only a limited impact on the emissions of these elements.

  20. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  1. The nonconforming virtual element method

    OpenAIRE

    de Dios, B. Ayuso; Lipnikov, K.; Manzini, G

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the nonconforming Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the approximation of second order elliptic problems. We present the construction of the new element in two and three dimensions, highlighting the main differences with the conforming VEM and the classical nonconforming finite element methods. We provide the error analysis and establish the equivalence with a family of mimetic finite difference methods.

  2. It is elemental

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Reich, Peter B.; Khachane, Amit N.

    2017-01-01

    diversity and composition were primarily driven by variation in soil resource stoichiometry (total C:N:P ratios), itself linked to different land uses, and secondarily driven by other important biodiversity drivers such as climate, soil spatial heterogeneity, soil pH, root influence (plant-soil microbe......It is well established that resource quantity and elemental stoichiometry play major roles in shaping below and aboveground plant biodiversity, but their importance for shaping microbial diversity in soil remains unclear. Here, we used statistical modeling on a regional database covering 179...... interactions) and microbial biomass (soil microbe-microbe interactions). In aggregate, these findings provide evidence that nutrient stoichiometry is a strong predictor of bacterial diversity and composition at a regional scale. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. Ucla, escuela elemental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neutra, Richard J.

    1962-03-01

    Full Text Available La Escuela Elemental de Preparación de la Universidad de California, en Los Angeles, está dedicada a la educación e investigación y preparación del profesorado de la infancia. Se ha construido en un paraje maravilloso, de frondosa vegetación, frente a un terreno bastante quebrado, circunstancia que presta mayor encanto al conjunto, construido con gran pericia y adaptación al paisaje a base de una dominante horizontalidad, con materiales sencillos (ladrillos, hierro y madera y gran comunicación con la naturaleza mediante grandes cristaleras correderas que ensanchan las clases y las suplementan hacia el jardín de acuerdo con las nuevas normas y prácticas docentes.

  4. Solar cell element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Matsukuma, Kunihiro; Kokuuchi, Shigeru; Morita, Keiichi; Yagi, Hideyuki.

    1989-07-17

    This invention aims to provide a soalr cell element with an easily formable electrode having an independent BSF and BSR. For this purpose, in this invention, a layer with high concentration of impurities (which functions as BSF on the opposite surface of the light-receiving surface) is partly and adjacently placed; a back electrode is made to have an ohmic resistance to the high-impurity layer; a metal oxide film is forther placed in other parts. By this, the functions of BSF and BSR are sufficiently utilized as a boundary surface between the high-impurity layer (BSF) and the semi-conductor substrate and the metal oxide film (BSR) are separated, thus enhancing the conversion efficiency. As for the patterns on the separated layers of BSF and BSR, various patterns are possible to be relized by using resist printing patterns. 3 figs.

  5. ELEMENTAL FORMS OF HOSPITALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Emanuel Korstanje

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern studies emphasized on the needs of researching the hospitality as relevant aspects of tourism and hospitality fields. Anyway, these approaches are inextricably intertwined to the industry of tourism and do not take seriously the anthropological and sociological roots of hospitality. In fact, the hotel seems to be a partial sphere of hospitality at all. Under this context, the present paper explores the issue of hospitality enrooted in the political and economic indo-European principle of free-transit which is associated to a much broader origin.  Starting from the premise etymologically hostel and hospital share similar origins, we follow the contributions of J Derrida to determine the elements that formed the hospitality up to date.

  6. The fantastic four.. elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Antonella; D'Addezio, Giuliana; Rubbia, Giuliana; Ramieri, Caterina; Todaro, Riccardo; Scipilliti, Francesca; Tosto, Eleonora

    2015-04-01

    With a "Sunday between territory and music to 'National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology," October 12, 2014 the headquarters of INGV Roma kicked off the activities of the second edition of the Week of Planet Earth. The laboratory of scientific outreach and museum activities together with volunteers of the National Civil Service have organized the whole day dedicated to the dissemination of earth sciences, involving adults and children. Especially for primary school children a laboratory was made involving three amusing activities all aimed at inspiring respect for the Earth: a theatrical representation called "The Fantastic 4... elements", a behavioral game and a nursery rhyme reading. The theater as a means of communication of science is an innovative and creative way to introduce children to important scientific concepts. The use of this methodology and simple language favoring the emotional involvement of the child facilitating learning. The main character is a child, chosen to facilitate the identification of the spectators with the protagonist, that through a fantastic journey discovers the importance of the four elements of our planet: earth, fire, air and water. As a second step, volunteers involved children in reading a nursery rhyme "the ABC to become a Friend of the Earth" inviting them to protect and respect the environment and its resources. Finally, the behavioral game gave indications about behaviors to adopt to safeguard the planet. Volunteers introduced a billboard divided into two colors, green to indicate the right behaviors and red for the wrong ones. Each child, after reading a card with indication on the behavior to adopt, had to decide if they were correct or not with respect to the environment safeguard. After listening to the children's answer, the volunteer gave the correct explanation about the appropriate behavior to adopt. At the end of the activities, each child received a certificate as "a friend of Planet Earth".

  7. The Chemistry of Superheavy Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Schädel, M

    2003-01-01

    The chemistry of transactinide or superheavy elements has reached element 108. Preparations are under way to leap to element 112 and beyond. The current status of this atom-at-a-time chemical research and its future perspectives are reviewed from an experimental point of view together with some of the interesting results from n -rich nuclides near and at the N=162 neutron shell. Experimental techniques and important results enlightening typical chemical properties of elements 104 through 108 are presented in an exemplary way. From the results of these experiments it is justified to place these elements in the Periodic Table of the Elements in to groups 4 through 8, respectively. However, mainly due to the influence of relativistic effects, it is no longer possible to deduce detailed chemical properties of these superheavy elements simply from this position.

  8. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-03

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides.

  9. Elements and elasmobranchs: hypotheses, assumptions and limitations of elemental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, M N; Izzo, C; Wade, B; Gillanders, B M

    2017-02-01

    Quantifying the elemental composition of elasmobranch calcified cartilage (hard parts) has the potential to answer a range of ecological and biological questions, at both the individual and population level. Few studies, however, have employed elemental analyses of elasmobranch hard parts. This paper provides an overview of the range of applications of elemental analysis in elasmobranchs, discussing the assumptions and potential limitations in cartilaginous fishes. It also reviews the available information on biotic and abiotic factors influencing patterns of elemental incorporation into hard parts of elasmobranchs and provides some comparative elemental assays and mapping in an attempt to fill knowledge gaps. Directions for future experimental research are highlighted to better understand fundamental elemental dynamics in elasmobranch hard parts. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Influence of the Li···π Interaction on the H/X···π Interactions in HOLi···C6H6···HOX/XOH (X=F, Cl, Br, I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yanli; Wu, Wenjie; Li, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Shijun; Meng, Lingpeng

    2013-06-03

    The influences of the Li···π interaction of C6H6···LiOH on the H···π interaction of C6H6···HOX (X=F, Cl, Br, I) and the X···π interaction of C6H6···XOH (X=Cl, Br, I) are investigated by means of full electronic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations and "quantum theory of atoms in molecules" (QTAIM) studies. The binding energies, binding distances, infrared vibrational frequencies, and electron densities at the bond critical points (BCPs) of the hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds prove that the addition of the Li···π interaction to benzene weakens the H···π and X···π interactions. The influences of the Li···π interaction on H···π interactions are greater than those on X···π interactions; the influences of the H···π interactions on the Li···π interaction are greater than X···π interactions on Li···π interaction. The greater the influence of Li···π interaction on H/X···π interactions, the greater the influences of H/X···π interactions on Li···π interaction. QTAIM studies show that the intermolecular interactions of C6H6···HOX and C6H6···XOH are mainly of the π type. The electron densities at the BCPs of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds decrease on going from bimolecular complexes to termolecular complexes, and the π-electron densities at the BCPs show the same pattern. Natural bond orbital analyses show that the Li···π interaction reduces electron transfer from C6 H6 to HOX and XOH. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Vesta's Elemental Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Beck, A. W.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCoy, T. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peplowski, P. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Reedy, R. C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Many lines of evidence (e.g. common geochemistry, chronology, O-isotope trends, and the presence of different HED rock types in polymict breccias) indicate that the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites originated from a single parent body. Meteorite studies show that this protoplanet underwent igneous differentiation to form a metallic core, an ultramafic mantle, and a basaltic crust. A spectroscopic match between the HEDs and 4 Vesta along with a plausible mechanism for their transfer to Earth, perhaps as chips off V-type asteroids ejected from Vesta's southern impact basin, supports the consensus view that many of these achondritic meteorites are samples of Vesta's crust and upper mantle. The HED-Vesta connection was put to the test by the NASA Dawn mission, which spent a year in close proximity to Vesta. Measurements by Dawn's three instruments, redundant Framing Cameras (FC), a Visible-InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer, and a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), along with radio science have strengthened the link. Gravity measurements by Dawn are consistent with a differentiated, silicate body, with a dense Fe-rich core. The range of pyroxene compositions determined by VIR overlaps that of the howardites. Elemental abundances determined by nuclear spectroscopy are also consistent with HED-compositions. Observations by GRaND provided a new view of Vesta inaccessible by telescopic observations. Here, we summarize the results of Dawn's geochemical investigation of Vesta and their implications.

  12. Lubrication of Machine Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1984-01-01

    The understanding of hydrodynamic lubrication began with the classical experiments of Tower and Petrov. Reynolds used a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation to generate a second order differential equation for the pressure in the narrow, converging gap of a bearing contact. Such a pressure enables a load to be transmitted between the surfaces with very low friction since the surfaces are completely separated by a film of fluid. In such a situation it is the physical properties of the lubricant, notably the dynamic viscosity, that dictate the behavior of the contact. The understanding of boundary lubrication is normally attributed to Hardy and Doubleday. In boundary lubrication it is the physical and chemical properties of thin films of molecular proportions and the surfaces to which they are attached that determine contact behavior. The lubricant viscosity is not an influential parameter. Research is devoted to a better understanding and more precise definition of other lubrication regimes between these extremes. One such regime, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, occurs in nonconformal contacts, where the pressures are high and the bearing surfaces deform elastically. In this situation the viscosity of the lubricant may raise considerably, and this further assists the formation of an effective fluid film. The science of these three lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary) are described and the manner in which this science is used in the design of machine elements is examined.

  13. Chemistry of the superheavy elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Matthias

    2015-03-13

    The quest for superheavy elements (SHEs) is driven by the desire to find and explore one of the extreme limits of existence of matter. These elements exist solely due to their nuclear shell stabilization. All 15 presently 'known' SHEs (11 are officially 'discovered' and named) up to element 118 are short-lived and are man-made atom-at-a-time in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. They are identical to the transactinide elements located in the seventh period of the periodic table beginning with rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) in groups 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Their chemical properties are often surprising and unexpected from simple extrapolations. After hassium (element 108), chemistry has now reached copernicium (element 112) and flerovium (element 114). For the later ones, the focus is on questions of their metallic or possibly noble gas-like character originating from interplay of most pronounced relativistic effects and electron-shell effects. SHEs provide unique opportunities to get insights into the influence of strong relativistic effects on the atomic electrons and to probe 'relativistically' influenced chemical properties and the architecture of the periodic table at its farthest reach. In addition, they establish a test bench to challenge the validity and predictive power of modern fully relativistic quantum chemical models. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. compartment-specific interactions of Hox proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    was on understanding gene sequences and function. These studies showed that important regulatory proteins are highly conserved in sequence and, often, in function, in organisms as diverse as mice and worms. Thus, novel genes alone do not make one organism different from another. Instead, many findings have made ...

  15. Archaeal Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spindles, rods, filaments, spheres, head-tails, bottles, and droplets, and some of these new viruses have been classified into one order, 10 families, and 16 genera. Investigation of model archaeal viruses has yielded important insights into mechanisms underlining various steps in the viral life cycle, including infection, DNA replication and transcription, and virion egression. Many of these mechanisms are unprecedented for any known bacterial or eukaryal viruses. Studies of plasmids isolated from different archaeal hosts have also revealed a striking diversity in gene content and innovation in replication strategies. Highly divergent replication proteins are identified in both viral and plasmid genomes. Genomic studies of archaeal ECEs have revealed a modular sequence structure in which modules of DNA sequence are exchangeable within, as well as among, plasmid families and probably also between viruses and plasmids. In particular, it has been suggested that ECE-host interactions have shaped the coevolution of ECEs and their archaeal hosts. Furthermore, archaeal hosts have developed defense systems, including the innate restriction-modification (R-M) system and the adaptive CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system, to restrict invasive plasmids and viruses. Together, these interactions permit a delicate balance between ECEs and their hosts, which is vitally important for maintaining an innovative gene reservoir carried by ECEs. In conclusion, while research on archaeal ECEs has just started to unravel the molecular biology of these genetic entities and their interactions with archaeal hosts, it is expected to accelerate in the next decade. PMID

  16. Photoshop Elements 10 For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Perfect your photos and images with this "focused" guide to the latest version of Photoshop Elements For most of us, the professional-level Photoshop is overkill for our needs. Amateur photographers and photo enthusiasts turn to Photoshop Elements for a powerful but simpler way to edit and retouch their snapshots. Photoshop Elements 10 For Dummies, fully updated and revised for the latest release of this software product, helps you navigate Elements to create, edit, fix, share, and organize the high-quality images you desire. Full color pages bring the techniques to life and make taking great

  17. Rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The rare-earth elements (REEs) are 15 elements that range in atomic number from 57 (lanthanum) to 71 (lutetium); they are commonly referred to as the “lanthanides.” Yttrium (atomic number 39) is also commonly regarded as an REE because it shares chemical and physical similarities and has affinities with the lanthanides. Although REEs are not rare in terms of average crustal abundance, the concentrated deposits of REEs are limited in number.Because of their unusual physical and chemical properties, the REEs have diverse defense, energy, industrial, and military technology applications. The glass industry is the leading consumer of REE raw materials, which are used for glass polishing and as additives that provide color and special optical properties to the glass. Lanthanum-based catalysts are used in petroleum refining, and cerium-based catalysts are used in automotive catalytic converters. The use of REEs in magnets is a rapidly increasing application. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets, which are the strongest known type of magnets, are used when space and weight are restrictions. Nickel-metal hydride batteries use anodes made of a lanthanum-based alloys.China, which has led the world production of REEs for decades, accounted for more than 90 percent of global production and supply, on average, during the past decade. Citing a need to retain its limited REE resources to meet domestic requirements as well as concerns about the environmental effects of mining, China began placing restrictions on the supply of REEs in 2010 through the imposition of quotas, licenses, and taxes. As a result, the global rare-earth industry has increased its stockpiling of REEs; explored for deposits outside of China; and promoted new efforts to conserve, recycle, and substitute for REEs. New mine production began at Mount Weld in Western Australia, and numerous other exploration and development projects noted in this chapter are ongoing throughout the world.The REE-bearing minerals are

  18. Trace Elements in River Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardet, J.; Viers, J.; Dupré, B.

    2003-12-01

    Trace elements are characterized by concentrations lower than 1 mg L-1 in natural waters. This means that trace elements are not considered when "total dissolved solids" are calculated in rivers, lakes, or groundwaters, because their combined mass is not significant compared to the sum of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H4SiO4, HCO3-, CO32-, SO42-, Cl-, and NO3-. Therefore, most of the elements, except about ten of them, occur at trace levels in natural waters. Being trace elements in natural waters does not necessarily qualify them as trace elements in rocks. For example, aluminum, iron, and titanium are major elements in rocks, but they occur as trace elements in waters, due to their low mobility at the Earth's surface. Conversely, trace elements in rocks such as chlorine and carbon are major elements in waters.The geochemistry of trace elements in river waters, like that of groundwater and seawater, is receiving increasing attention. This growing interest is clearly triggered by the technical advances made in the determination of concentrations at lower levels in water. In particular, the development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has considerably improved our knowledge of trace-element levels in waters since the early 1990s. ICP-MS provides the capability of determining trace elements having isotopes of interest for geochemical dating or tracing, even where their dissolved concentrations are extremely low.The determination of trace elements in natural waters is motivated by a number of issues. Although rare, trace elements in natural systems can play a major role in hydrosystems. This is particularly evident for toxic elements such as aluminum, whose concentrations are related to the abundance of fish in rivers. Many trace elements have been exploited from natural accumulation sites and used over thousands of years by human activities. Trace elements are therefore highly sensitive indexes of human impact from local to global scale. Pollution

  19. Clean elements in abelian rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a ring with identity. An element in is said to be clean if it is the sum of a unit and an idempotent. is said to be clean if all of its elements are clean. If every idempotent in is central, then is said to be abelian. In this paper we obtain some conditions equivalent to being clean in an abelian ring.

  20. Lysets rytme som belysningsarkitektonisk element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2009-01-01

    I den rytmiske tilgang til arkitektonisk belysning betragtes lyskilder som agerende elementer i et landskab, hvor en iagttager interagerer med lyset fra lyskilden.......I den rytmiske tilgang til arkitektonisk belysning betragtes lyskilder som agerende elementer i et landskab, hvor en iagttager interagerer med lyset fra lyskilden....

  1. Chemical experiments with superheavy elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Unnoticed by many chemists, the Periodic Table of the Elements has been extended significantly in the last couple of years and the 7th period has very recently been completed with eka-Rn (element 118) currently being the heaviest element whose synthesis has been reported. These 'superheavy' elements (also called transactinides with atomic number > or = 104 (Rf)) have been artificially synthesized in fusion reactions at accelerators in minute quantities of a few single atoms. In addition, all isotopes of the transactinide elements are radioactive and decay with rather short half-lives. Nevertheless, it has been possible in some cases to investigate experimentally chemical properties of transactinide elements and even synthesize simple compounds. The experimental investigation of superheavy elements is especially intriguing, since theoretical calculations predict significant deviations from periodic trends due to the influence of strong relativistic effects. In this contribution first experiments with hassium (Hs, atomic number 108), copernicium (Cn, atomic number 112) and element 114 (eka-Pb) are reviewed.

  2. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...

  3. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Christine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  4. What Is a Chemical Element?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoor, Marten J.

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to current IUPAC recommendations, the chemical element X should be defined as the nucleus of the X atom. Consequently, different isotopes with their different nuclei belong to different elements, each one with its own physical and chemical properties. This view leads to the conclusion that we no longer have a periodic table of the…

  5. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Regulatory elements in molecular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, Ashley S; Elemento, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory elements determine the connectivity of molecular networks and mediate a variety of regulatory processes ranging from DNA looping to transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational regulation. This review highlights our current understanding of the different types of regulatory elements found in molecular networks with a focus on DNA regulatory elements. We highlight technical advances and current challenges for the mapping of regulatory elements at the genome-wide scale, and describe new computational methods to uncover these elements via reconstructing regulatory networks from large genomic datasets. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1374. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Platinum-group elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The platinum-group elements (PGEs)—platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium—are metals that have similar physical and chemical properties and tend to occur together in nature. PGEs are indispensable to many industrial applications but are mined in only a few places. The availability and accessibility of PGEs could be disrupted by economic, environmental, political, and social events. The United States net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption is about 90 percent.PGEs have many industrial applications. They are used in catalytic converters to reduce carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrous oxide emissions in automobile exhaust. The chemical industry requires platinum or platinum-rhodium alloys to manufacture nitric oxide, which is the raw material used to manufacture explosives, fertilizers, and nitric acid. In the petrochemical industry, platinum-supported catalysts are needed to refine crude oil and to produce aromatic compounds and high-octane gasoline. Alloys of PGEs are exceptionally hard and durable, making them the best known coating for industrial crucibles used in the manufacture of chemicals and synthetic materials. PGEs are used by the glass manufacturing industry in the production of fiberglass and flat-panel and liquid crystal displays. In the electronics industry, PGEs are used in computer hard disks, hybridized integrated circuits, and multilayer ceramic capacitors.Aside from their industrial applications, PGEs are used in such other fields as health, consumer goods, and finance. Platinum, for example, is used in medical implants, such as pacemakers, and PGEs are used in cancer-fighting drugs. Platinum alloys are an ideal choice for jewelry because of their white color, strength, and resistance to tarnish. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in the form of coins and bars are also used as investment commodities, and various financial instruments based on the value of these PGEs are traded on major exchanges

  8. Packing element of a packer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    The packing element of a packer is proposed which consists of an elastic core and outer layer made of plastic sealing material. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to facilitate removal of the packing element from the site of installation, the outer layer has a sublayer made of polymer material which is chemically inactive in relationship to the material of the core, for example polytetrafluoroethylene. The element is also distinguished by the fact that the outer layer together with the sublayer is attached to the core through a nonhardening and nondrying glue composition, for example, based on rubber, rosin, lanolin, vaseline oil and zinc oxide.

  9. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  10. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  11. Hadronic matrix elements for Kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijnens, Johan [Department of Theoretical Physics 2, Lund University, Soelvegatan 14A, S-22362 Lund (Sweden); Gamiz, Elvira [CAFPE and Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada Campus de Fuente Nueva, E-18002 Granada (Spain); Prades, Joaquim [CAFPE and Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada Campus de Fuente Nueva, E-18002 Granada (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    We review some work done by us calculating matrix elements for Kaons. Emphasis is put on the matrix elements which are relevant to predict non-leptonic Kaon CP violating observables. In particular, we recall our results for the B{sub K} parameter which governs the K{sup 0}-K{sup 0} mixing and update our results for {epsilon}'inK including estimated all-higher-order CHPT corrections and the new results from recent analytical calculations of the {delta}itI = 3/2 component. Some comments on future prospects on calculating matrix elements for Kaons are also added.

  12. How Certain Trace Elements Behave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingaro, Ralph A.

    1979-01-01

    Fluorine, selenium, tin, and arsenic are among the trace elements occurring in the environment which are considered. Emphasis is given to developing a qualitative survey of the extent and kinds of metal transformations and their resultant effects. (CS)

  13. More frequent elements in coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejci-Graf, K.

    1982-04-01

    On frequent elements in coals: in the case of bioelements (H, C, N, O) even bare quantities may offer evidence of origin and transformation of coals. With those as with other frequent elements it is not so much quantity (as is still with S), as variability, and ratios of pairs of elements, which may give evidence of transformation. Enrichments in different plants and tissues - excepting H, C, N, O - are extremely different in different samples. In coalification original contents are lowered, mixed, or veiled by import. Influences of surroundings change during the stages of coalification, while the surroundings themselves are in continual transformation. Only with frequent elements one may hope to recognize traces of original conditions. More exact knowledge of seams may help in prospection and parallelization.

  14. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ELEMENTS IN MARKETING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TOCARIU Liliana

    2015-01-01

    .... Marketing uses industrial design elements in order to draw up advertisements for products, to develop logos or packaging with all its attached factors, to organise promotional sales with the view...

  15. Elemental balance in soy sauce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruyama, Yoichi; Saito, Manabu [Kyoto Prefectural Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Lab. of Applied Physics; Yoshida, Koji

    1996-12-31

    We have measured the elemental concentrations of soy sauce and its actual raw materials which are used in a certain soy sauce factory. In the present measurement, we measured de-fatted soybean, wheat and salt as raw materials and soy sauce and soy sauce waste as final products. Five kinds of elements, such as Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Br, were detected. We obtained elemental concentrations of them except for Mn in each materials. The measured elemental concentration in soy sauce agreed well each other with the calculated one within the experimental errors using the measured concentration in the raw materials and their weight in actual producing process. Contrary to our expectation, it was found that wheat contributes to soy sauce bromine concentration dominantly in the present case. (author)

  16. Green's Functions and Finite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Friedel

    2013-01-01

    This book elucidates how Finite Element methods look like from the perspective of Green’s functions, and shows new insights into the mathematical theory of Finite Elements. Practically, this new view on Finite Elements enables the reader to better assess solutions of standard programs and to find better model of a given problem. The book systematically introduces the basic concepts how Finite Elements fulfill the strategy of Green’s functions  and how approximating of Green’s functions. It discusses in detail the discretization error and shows that are coherent with the strategy of “goal oriented refinement”. The book also gives much attention to the dependencies of FE solutions from the parameter set of the model.

  17. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  18. Methane Propulsion Elements for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Tom; Polsgrove, Tara; Thomas, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Human exploration beyond LEO relies on a suite of propulsive elements to: (1) Launch elements into space, (2) Transport crew and cargo to and from various destinations, (3) Provide access to the surface of Mars, (4) Launch crew from the surface of Mars. Oxygen/Methane propulsion systems meet the unique requirements of Mars surface access. A common Oxygen/Methane propulsion system is being considered to reduce development costs and support a wide range of primary & alternative applications.

  19. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  20. Exonization of the LTR transposable elements in human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been shown to contribute to evolution of both structure and regulation of protein coding genes. It has been postulated that the primary mechanism by which retrotransposons contribute to structural gene evolution is through insertion into an intron or a gene flanking region, and subsequent incorporation into an exon. Results We found that Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons are associated with 1,057 human genes (5.8%. In 256 cases LTR retrotransposons were observed in protein-coding regions, while 50 distinct protein coding exons in 45 genes were comprised exclusively of LTR RetroTransposon Sequence (LRTS. We go on to reconstruct the evolutionary history of an alternatively spliced exon of the Interleukin 22 receptor, alpha 2 gene (IL22RA2 derived from a sequence of retrotransposon of the Mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLR family. Sequencing and analysis of the homologous regions of genomes of several primates indicate that the LTR retrotransposon was inserted into the IL22RA2 gene at least prior to the divergence of Apes and Old World monkeys from a common ancestor (~25 MYA. We hypothesize that the recruitment of the part of LTR as a novel exon in great ape species occurred prior to the divergence of orangutans and humans from a common ancestor (~14 MYA as a result of a single mutation in the proto-splice site. Conclusion Our analysis of LRTS exonization events has shown that the patterns of LRTS distribution in human exons support the hypothesis that LRTS played a significant role in human gene evolution by providing cis-regulatory sequences; direct incorporation of LTR sequences into protein coding regions was observed less frequently. Combination of computational and experimental approaches used for tracing the history of the LTR exonization process of IL22RA2 gene presents a promising strategy that could facilitate further studies of transposon initiated gene evolution.

  1. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  2. New elements - approaching Z=114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S.

    1998-03-01

    The search for new elements is part of the broader field of investigations of nuclei at the limits of stability. In two series of experiments at SHIP, six new elements (Z=107-112) were synthesized via fusion reactions using 1n-deexcitation channels and lead or bismuth targets. The isotopes were unambiguously identified by means of {alpha}-{alpha} correlations. Not fission, but alpha decay is the dominant decay mode. The collected decay data establish a means of comparison with theoretical data. This aids in the selection of appropriate models that describe the properties of known nuclei. Predictions based on these models are useful in the preparation of the next generation of experiments. Cross-sections decrease by two orders of magnitude from bohrium (Z=107) to element 112, for which a cross-section of 1 pb was measured. The development of intense beam currents and sensitive detection methods is essential for the production and identification of still heavier elements and new isotopes of already known elements, as well as the measurement of small {alpha}-, {beta}- and fission-branching ratios. An equally sensitive set-up is needed for the measurement of excitation functions at low cross-sections. Based on our results, it is likely that the production of isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical super heavy elements (SHE) could be achieved by fusion reactions using {sup 208}Pb targets. Systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that the transfer of nucleons is an important process for the initiation of fusion. The data allow for the fixing of a narrow energy window for the production of SHE using 1n-emission channels. (orig.)

  3. New Perspectives on the Essential Trace Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieden, Earl

    1985-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the 19 essential trace elements, examining: the concept of essentiality; evolution of these elements; possible future essential elements; the lanthanides and actinides; how essential trace elements work; the metalloenzymes; the nonmetals; iodine and the thyroid hormones; and antagonism among these elements. (JN)

  4. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper

  5. The untranslated leader sequence of the barley lipoxygenase 1 (Lox1) gene confers embryo-specific expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouster, J.; Mechelen J. van; Cameron-Mills, V.

    1998-01-01

    The barley lipoxygenase 1 (Lox1) gene encodes a protein expressed in embryos during grain development and germination and in leaves after methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. Transient gene expression assays in germinating barley embryos were used to identify cis-regulatory elements involved in the

  6. Epigenomic annotation of gene regulatory alterations during evolution of the primate brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermunt, Marit W; Tan, Sander C; Castelijns, Bas; Geeven, Geert; Reinink, Peter; de Bruijn, Ewart; Kondova, Ivanela; Persengiev, Stephan; Bontrop, Ronald; Cuppen, Edwin; de Laat, Wouter; Creyghton, Menno P

    Although genome sequencing has identified numerous noncoding alterations between primate species, which of those are regulatory and potentially relevant to the evolution of the human brain is unclear. Here we annotated cis-regulatory elements (CREs) in the human, rhesus macaque and chimpanzee

  7. The RNAsnp web server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The function of many non-coding RNA genes and cis-regulatory elements of messenger RNA largely depends on the structure, which is in turn determined by their sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other mutations may disrupt the RNA structure, interfere with the molecular function a...

  8. RNAsnp: efficient detection of local RNA secondary structure changes induced by SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights into stru...

  9. Multiple steps in the regulation of transcription-factor level and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Ab, G

    1996-01-01

    This review focuses on the regulation of transcription factors, many of which are DNA-binding proteins that recognize cis-regulatory elements of target genes and are the most direct regulators of gene transcription. Transcription factors serve as integration centres of the different

  10. Fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) promoter as a candidate for genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As an important cis-regulatory element, a promoter plays a key role in plant gene expression and regulation, and has been widely used in plant genetic engineering. The fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) promoter was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence analysis showed that the FAE1 promoter contains two Skn-1 ...

  11. Cis- and trans-regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in the ASJ sensory neuron of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. González-Barrios (María); J.C. Fierro-González (Juan Carlos); E. Krpelanova (Eva); J.A. Mora-Lorca (José Antonio); J. Rafael Pedrajas (José); X. Peñate (Xenia); S. Chavez (Sebastián); P. Swoboda (Peter); G. Jansen (Gert); A. Miranda-Vizuet (Antonio)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe identity of a given cell type is determined by the expression of a set of genes sharing common cis-regulatory motifs and being regulated by shared transcription factors. Here, we identify cis and trans regulatory elements that drive gene expression in the bilateral sensory neuron

  12. Pan-cancer analysis of somatic copy-number alterations implicates IRS4 and IGF2 in enhancer hijacking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Dubash, Taronish; Drainas, Alexandros P

    2017-01-01

    Extensive prior research focused on somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) affecting cancer genes, yet the extent to which recurrent SCNAs exert their influence through rearrangement of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) remains unclear. Here we present a framework for inferring cancer-related gene ...

  13. Lysets rytme som belysningsarkitektonisk element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja

    2007-01-01

    I afhandlingen "Lysets rytme som belysningsarkitektonisk element" optræder lysstofrør, neonrør, billygter og LED som lyskilder, der markerer et sted ved hjælp af et rytmisk tema. Motivationen for afhandlingen var at indkredse lyskilders rytmiske optræden som et arkitektonisk potentiale og udvide...... opfattelsen af belysningsarkitekturens virkefelt. Ofte betragtes arkitektonisk belysning som et element, der 'modulerer' - former - et stykke arkitektur visuelt, så det fremstår tydeligt i mørket. Her er lyskilden en stille statist, der sørger for at belyse omgivelserne. I den rytmiske tilgang til...... arkitektonisk belysning betragtes lyskilder, dagslys som kunstige, som agerende elementer i et landskab hvor en iagttager interagerer med lyset fra lyskilden. Denne tilgang giver mulighed for ikke kun at betragte arkitektonisk belysning som visuel repræsentation af omgivelserne, men også som en sammensætning af...

  14. Elements of spatial data quality

    CERN Document Server

    Guptill, SC

    1995-01-01

    Elements of Spatial Data Quality outlines the need and suggests potential categories for the content of a comprehensive statement of data quality that must be imbedded in the metadata that accompanies the transfer of a digital spatial data file or is available in a separate metadata catalog. Members of the International Cartographic Association's Commission on Spatial Data Quality have identified seven elements of data quality: positional accuracy, attribute accuracy, completeness, logical consistency, lineage, semantic accuracy and temporal information. In the book the authors describe: compo

  15. Fractal elements and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gil’mutdinov, Anis Kharisovich; El-Khazali, Reyad

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a new type of passive electronic components, called fractal elements, from a theoretical and practical point of view. The authors discuss in detail the physical implementation and design of fractal devices for application in fractional-order signal processing and systems. The concepts of fractals and fractal signals are explained, as well as the fundamentals of fractional calculus. Several implementations of fractional impedances are discussed, along with comparison of their performance characteristics. Details of design, schematics, fundamental techniques and implementation of RC-based fractal elements are provided. .

  16. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  17. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, John Tinsley

    1972-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  18. Multiphoton spectroscopy in heavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solarz, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Worden, E.F.

    1977-05-03

    Some recently discovered regularities in the spectra of heavy elements which are also applicable to the analysis of the spectra of lighter atoms are described. It is pointed out that stepwise resonant multiphoton methods are irreplaceable tools in the study of high lying states in a complex atomic system. Systematic applications of these methods has permitted regularities to be observed which also hold for the lighter elements. It is noted that greatly increased understanding of the excited state structure of heavy atoms is not possible. 8 references. (JFP)

  19. Transposable elements and circular DNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Mourier, Tobias

    2016-09-26

    Circular DNAs are extra-chromosomal fragments that become circularized by genomic recombination events. We have recently shown that yeast LTR elements generate circular DNAs through recombination events between their flanking long terminal repeats (LTRs). Similarly, circular DNAs can be generated by recombination between LTRs residing at different genomic loci, in which case the circular DNA will contain the intervening sequence. In yeast, this can result in gene copy number variations when circles contain genes and origins of replication. Here, I speculate on the potential and implications of circular DNAs generated through recombination between human transposable elements.

  20. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  1. Spectral element simulation of ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Barker, Vincent A.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity ve....... The performance of the spectral element code when applied to several ultrafiltration problems is reported. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.......A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity...... vector in the transport equation, the system is coupled by the dependency of the fluid viscosity on the solute concentration and by a concentration-dependent boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations at the membrane surface. The spectral element discretization yields a nonlinear algebraic system...

  2. Names of the Heavier Elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Names of the Heavier Elements. Jitendra K Bera. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 53-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0053-0061. Author Affiliations.

  3. Main Elements for Upscaling Recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Termansen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information on the main elements used to scale up modelled local visitor flow data to regional level based on recreational de-mand models. These models are described in Report #1. This report also provides information on data sources such as spatial data (e.g. land cov...

  4. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  5. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Superheavy elements and decay properties. K P Santhosh. Volume 85 Issue 3 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  6. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  7. Backfire antennas with dipole elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Dragø; Pontoppidan, Knud

    1970-01-01

    A method is set up for a theoretical investigation of arbitrary backfire antennas based upon dipole structures. The mutual impedance between the dipole elements of the antenna is taken into account, and the field radiated due to a surface wave reflector of finite extent is determined by calculating...

  8. Actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poele, Evelien M. te; Bolhuis, Henk; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    This paper reviews current knowledge on actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements (AICEs). The best characterised AICEs, pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens (10.9 kb), SLP1 (17.3 kb) of Streptomyces coelicolor and pMEA300 of Amycolatopsis methanolica (13.3 kb), are present as integrative

  9. Actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Poele, E.M.; Bolhuis, H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge on actinomycete integrative and conjugative elements (AICEs). The best characterised AICEs, pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens (10.9 kb), SLP1 (17.3 kb) of Streptomyces coelicolor and pMEA300 of Amycolatopsis methanolica (13.3 kb), are present as integrative

  10. Names of the Heavier Elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of. Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) to look into the problem of pri ori ty of discovery of the elements with nuclear charge number. Z > 100. The two Unions selected the members of the group consisting of nine scientists in nuclear physics and chemistry in. 1987.

  11. Trace elements: implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, J

    1980-01-01

    Although most were unknown a few years ago, present evidence indicates that at least 25 trace elements have some pertinence to health. Unlike vitamins, they cannot be synthesized. Some trace elements are now considered important only because of their harmful effects but traces of them may be essential. Zinc is especially important during puberty, pregnancy and menopause and is related to protein metabolism. Both fluoride and cadmium accumulate in the body year after year. Cadmium is positively correlated with several chronic diseases, especially hypertension. It is obtained from smoking and drinking soft water. Silicon, generally associated with silicosis, may be necessary for healthy bone and connective tissue. Chromium, believed to be the glucose tolerance factor, is obtained from brewer's yeast, spices, and whole wheat products. Copper deficiency may be implicated in a wide range of cardiovascular and blood related disorders. Either marginal deficiencies or slight excesses of most trace elements are harmful. Nurses should instruct patients to avoid highly refined foods, fad diets, or synthetic and fabricated foods. A well balanced and varied diet is the best safeguard against trace element excesses or deficiencies.

  12. Power flow for Josephson elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    General relations are presented for the power flow at the frequencies of interest in a Josephson element. These general power flow relations depend upon whether the autonomous frequency is phase-locked, either harmonically or subharmonically, to a frequency in the system or is unlocked. The results presented generalize those given previously by Russer (1971) for the harmonically locked case.

  13. Kinematic support using elastic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geirsson, Arni; Debra, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    The design of kinematic supports using elastic elements is reviewed. The two standard methods (cone, Vee and flat and three Vees) are presented and a design example involving a machine tool metrology bench is given. Design goals included thousandfold strain attenuation in the bench relative to the base when the base strains due to temperature variations and shifting loads. Space applications are also considered.

  14. Scarcity of rare earth elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.A.; Lammertsma, K.

    2013-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other

  15. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (I(sub sp)) and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average I(sub sp). Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) capable of high I(sub sp) thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3,000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high melting point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high-temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via noncontact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen for typical mission durations has been developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This Technical Memorandum details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  16. sources of the chemical elements

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Major and trace element compositions of samples ofBanded. Iron Formations (BIF) from the Neoarchaean Sukumaland. Greenstone Belt of Geita in northern Tanzania reveal that the. BIF precipitated from hydrothermal solutions. Fe-Ti-Al-Mn systematics suggest that the hydrothermal deposits have been.

  17. Presidential elements in government: introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reestman, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    The editorial board of the European Constitutional Law Review has solicited a number of contributions on presidential elements in government systems in Europe. At the origin of the project are some recent sweeping interventions of heads of state in the political arena. These are notably the

  18. Superheavy-element spectroscopy: Correlations along element 115 decay chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a brief summary of the region of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory, data on more than hundred α-decay chains associated with the production of element 115 are combined to investigate time and energy correlations along the observed decay chains. Several of these are analysed using a new method for statistical assessments of lifetimes in sets of decay chains.

  19. Superheavy-element spectroscopy: Correlations along element 115 decay chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D.; Forsberg, U.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Golubev, P.; Fahlander, C.

    2016-05-01

    Following a brief summary of the region of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory, data on more than hundred α-decay chains associated with the production of element 115 are combined to investigate time and energy correlations along the observed decay chains. Several of these are analysed using a new method for statistical assessments of lifetimes in sets of decay chains.

  20. Superheavy-element spectroscopy: Correlations along element 115 decay chains

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph D.; Forsberg U.; Sarmiento L.G.; Golubev P.; Fahlander C.

    2016-01-01

    Following a brief summary of the region of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory, data on more than hundred α-decay chains associated with the production of element 115 are combined to investigate time and energy correlations along the observed decay chains. Several of these are analysed using a new method for statistical assessments of lifetimes in sets of decay chains.

  1. 49 CFR 563.7 - Data elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data elements. 563.7 Section 563.7 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.7 Data elements. (a) Data elements required for all vehicles. Each vehicle equipped with an EDR must record all of the data elements listed in Table I, during...

  2. Reliability-Based Optimization of Structural Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    In this paper structural elements from an optimization point of view are considered, i.e. only the geometry of a structural element is optimized. Reliability modelling of the structural element is discussed both from an element point of view and from a system point of view. The optimization...

  3. Stress relaxation of constructions elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A relaxation of stress in the elements of constructions is considered and an approach is proposed for solution of corresponding problems. It is notable that this approach is based on a modification Boltzmann’s principle superposition of fraction creep deformations. This modification reduces the noted problems to solution of linear relative to so-called structural stress integral equations. Next a desired stress is defined by solution of algebraic equations. It should be underline that a material (concrete, steel, graph of elements a considered as a union of its fractions with statistical disturbed strengths. This ascending to Weibull conception [1] permits to modify Boltzmann’s principle superposition [2]. As a result this principle is applicable when a dependence on deformations from the stresses is nonlinear [3-7].

  4. Transposable elements and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, Guia; Gaudi, Simona; Fallon, James H; Sobell, Janet; Potkin, Steven G; Pato, Carlos; Macciardi, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Transposable Elements (TEs) or transposons are low-complexity elements (e.g., LINEs, SINEs, SVAs, and HERVs) that make up to two-thirds of the human genome. There is mounting evidence that TEs play an essential role in genomic architecture and regulation related to both normal function and disease states. Recently, the identification of active TEs in several different human brain regions suggests that TEs play a role in normal brain development and adult physiology and quite possibly in psychiatric disorders. TEs have been implicated in hemophilia, neurofibromatosis, and cancer. With the advent of next-generation whole-genome sequencing approaches, our understanding of the relationship between TEs and psychiatric disorders will greatly improve. We will review the biology of TEs and early evidence for TE involvement in psychiatric disorders. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  6. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  7. Representation Elements of Spatial Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiantika, F. R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to add a reference in revealing spatial thinking. There several definitions of spatial thinking but it is not easy to defining it. We can start to discuss the concept, its basic a forming representation. Initially, the five sense catch the natural phenomenon and forward it to memory for processing. Abstraction plays a role in processing information into a concept. There are two types of representation, namely internal representation and external representation. The internal representation is also known as mental representation; this representation is in the human mind. The external representation may include images, auditory and kinesthetic which can be used to describe, explain and communicate the structure, operation, the function of the object as well as relationships. There are two main elements, representations properties and object relationships. These elements play a role in forming a representation.

  8. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  9. Linear and Nonlinear Finite Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Yang, Matrix displacement solution to elastica problems of beams and frames , Internat. J. Solids Structures 9 (1973) 829-842. [51 W.F. Schmidt...nonlinear finite element analysis of beams, frames . arches and axisymmetric shells. Comput. and Structures 7 (1977) 725-735. 171 1. Fried. The Numerical...extension. Near inexten bility is achieved with a high dostic constant . ,p -P+(.(l-)+Q? (3) Lare axial stilness gives rise to strong oscmations in

  10. Elements of Bayesian experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivia, D.S. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    We consider some elements of the Bayesian approach that are important for optimal experimental design. While the underlying principles used are very general, and are explained in detail in a recent tutorial text, they are applied here to the specific case of characterising the inferential value of different resolution peakshapes. This particular issue was considered earlier by Silver, Sivia and Pynn (1989, 1990a, 1990b), and the following presentation confirms and extends the conclusions of their analysis.

  11. Blade-element/momentum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    Although there exists a large variety of methods for predicting performance and loadings of wind turbines, the only approach used today by wind turbine manufacturers is based on the blade-element/momentum (BEM) theory by Glauert (Aerodynamic theory. Springer, Berlin, pp. 169-360, 1935). A basic...... assumption in the BEM theory is that the flow takes place in independent stream tubes and that the loading is determined from two-dimensional sectional airfoil characteristics....

  12. Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 unleash the hidden performance of Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Galer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Master the most powerful photo editing tools and techniques that Elements has to offer! Using step-by-step projects, Mark Galer will have you creating stunning images in no time at all. Whether you want to create impressive, seamless montages, optimize your photos for perfect print quality, or simply enhance your images for maximum impact, Maximum Performance will give you the skills and know-how you need to create professional quality results. Featured projects teach you how to work with multilayered 16 bit/channel files, as well as convert to black and white using Adobe Camera Raw, create

  13. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  14. Element-by-element and implicit-explicit finite element formulations for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    Preconditioner algorithms to reduce the computational effort in FEM analyses of large-scale fluid-dynamics problems are presented. A general model problem is constructed on the basis of the convection-diffusion equation and the two-dimensional vorticity/stream-function formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations; this problem is then analyzed using element-by-element, implicit-explicit, and adaptive implicit-explicit approximation schemes. Numerical results for the two-dimensional advection and rigid-body rotation of a cosine hill, flow past a circular cylinder, and driven cavity flow are presented in extensive graphs and shown to be in good agreement with those obtained using implicit methods.

  15. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin

    2017-09-28

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint tomography. Here, we introduce an element-by-element parallel spectral-element method (EBE-SEM) for the efficient modeling of teleseismic wave field propagation in a reduced geology model. Under the plane-wave assumption, the frequency-wavenumber (FK) technique is implemented to compute the boundary wave field used to construct the boundary condition of the teleseismic wave incidence. To reduce the memory required for the storage of the boundary wave field for the incidence boundary condition, a strategy is introduced to efficiently store the boundary wave field on the model boundary. The perfectly matched layers absorbing boundary condition (PML ABC) is formulated using the EBE-SEM to absorb the scattered wave field from the model interior. The misfit gradient can easily be constructed in each time step during the calculation of the adjoint wave field. Three synthetic examples demonstrate the validity of the EBE-SEM for use in teleseismic wave field modeling and the misfit gradient calculation.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): Element-by-Element Analysis for Advanced Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-14

    WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO 11. TITLE (Include Y’ecurity Classification) Computational Fluid Dynamics ( CFD ): Element-by-Element...All other editions are obsolete. V L ?, AFOSR Report Grant #AFOSR-87-0153 Computational Fluid Dynamics ( CFD ): Element-by-Element Analysis for Advanced

  17. 7 CFR 29.6081 - Elements of quality and degrees of each element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of quality and degrees of each element. 29... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Elements of Quality § 29.6081 Elements of quality and degrees of each element. These standardized words or terms are used to describe tobacco...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1101 - Elements of quality and degrees of each element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of quality and degrees of each element. 29... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Elements of Quality § 29.1101 Elements of quality and degrees of each element. These standardized words or terms are used to describe tobacco...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3586 - Elements of quality and degrees of each element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of quality and degrees of each element. 29... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Elements of Quality § 29.3586 Elements of quality and degrees of each element. These standardized words or terms are used to describe tobacco...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2351 - Elements of quality and degrees of each element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of quality and degrees of each element. 29... STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Elements of Quality § 29.2351 Elements of quality and degrees of each element. Tobacco attributes or characteristics which constitute quality are...