WorldWideScience

Sample records for hourly time variability

  1. Non-24-Hour Disorder in Blind Individuals Revisited: Variability and the Influence of Environmental Time Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emens, Jonathan S; Laurie, Amber L; Songer, Jeannie B; Lewy, Alfred J

    2013-07-01

    To assess the interindividual and intraindividual variability in the circadian rhythms of blind individuals with non-24-h disorder and to quantify the influence of environmental time cues in blind subjects lacking entrainment (non-24-h individuals or N-24s). An observational study of 21 N-24s (11 females and 10 males, age 9-78 years) who kept a sleep/wake schedule of their choosing. Circadian phase was determined using the melatonin onset (MO) from plasma or saliva samples that were collected every 2 weeks. Melatonin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. A total of 469 MO assessments were conducted over 5,536 days of study. The rate of drift of circadian phase was calculated using a series of MOs (total number of hours the MO drifted divided by the total number of days studied). Stability of the rest/activity rhythm was calculated using chi-squared periodogram analysis of wrist actigraphy data in 19 subjects. Academic medical center. Paid volunteers. N/A. Subjects lacked entrainment such that circadian phase drifted an average (± standard deviation) of 0.39 ± 0.29 h later per day; however, there was notable intersubject and intrasubject variability in the rate of drift including relative coordination and periods of transient entrainment during which there was little to no drift in the circadian phase. A regular, reproducible, and significant oscillation in the rate of drift was detected in 14 of the 21 subjects. A significant non-24-h rest/activity rhythm was detected in 18 of 19 subjects. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.793, P = 0.0001) between the non-24-h rest/activity rhythm and the rate of drift of the circadian phase. Most N-24s are influenced by unidentified environmental time cues and the non-entrained biological clock in such N-24s is reflected in their rest/activity rhythms. These findings may have diagnostic and treatment implications: this disorder might be diagnosed with actigraphy alone, relative coordination and transient

  2. The mortality burden of hourly temperature variability in five capital cities, Australia: Time-series and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Xu, Zhiwei; Bambrick, Hilary; Su, Hong; Tong, Shilu; Hu, Wenbiao

    2017-12-01

    Unstable weather, such as intra- and inter-day temperature variability, can impair the health and shorten the survival time of population around the world. Climate change will cause Earth's surface temperature rise, but has unclear effects on temperature variability, making it urgent to understand the characteristics of the burden of temperature variability on mortality, regionally and nationally. This paper aims to quantify the mortality risk of exposure to short-term temperature variability, estimate the resulting death toll and explore how the strength of temperature variability effects will vary as a function of city-level characteristics. Ten-year (2000-2009) time-series data on temperature and mortality were collected for five largest Australia's cities (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide), collectively registering 708,751 deaths in different climates. Short-term temperature variability was captured and represented as the hourly temperature standard deviation within two days. Three-stage analyses were used to assess the burden of temperature variability on mortality. First, we modelled temperature variability-mortality relation and estimated the relative risk of death for each city, using a time-series quasi-Poisson regression model. Second, we used meta-analysis to pool the city-specific estimates, and meta-regression to explore if some city-level factors will modify the population vulnerability to temperature variability. Finally, we calculated the city-specific deaths attributable to temperature variability, and applied such estimates to the whole of Australia as a reflection of the nation-wide death burden associated with temperature variability. We found evidence of significant associations between temperature variability and mortality in all cities assessed. Deaths associated with each 1°C rise in temperature variability elevated by 0.28% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.05%, 0.52%) in Melbourne to 1.00% (95%CI: 0.52%, 1.48%) in Brisbane

  3. Photometric variability of the T Tauri star TW Hya on time-scales of hours to years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Pojmański, Grzegorz; Rowe, Jason; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2008-12-01

    Microvariability & Oscillations of STars (MOST) and All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) observations have been used to characterize photometric variability of TW Hya on time-scales from a fraction of a day to 7.5 weeks and from a few days to 8 yr, respectively. The two data sets have very different uncertainties and temporal coverage properties and cannot be directly combined, nevertheless, they suggest a global variability spectrum with `flicker-noise' properties, that is with amplitudes , over >4 decades in frequency, in the range f = 0.0003-10cd-1. A 3.7d period is clearly present in the continuous 11d, 0.07d time resolution, observations by MOST in 2007. Brightness extrema coincide with zero-velocity crossings in periodic (3.56d) radial-velocity variability detected in contemporaneous spectroscopic observations of Setiawan et al. and interpreted as caused by a planet. The 3.56/3.7d periodicity was entirely absent in the second, 4 times longer MOST run in 2008, casting doubt on the planetary explanation. Instead, a spectrum of unstable single periods within the range of 2-9d was observed; the tendency of the periods to progressively shorten was well traced using the wavelet analysis. The evolving periodicities and the overall flicker-noise characteristics of the TW Hya variability suggest a combination of several mechanisms, with the dominant ones probably related to the accretion processes from the disc around the star. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and on data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) conducted by the Warsaw University Observatory, Warsaw, Poland at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca

  4. Associations between diurnal 24-hour rhythm in ambulatory heart rate variability and the timing and amount of meals during the day shift in rotating shift workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yoshizaki

    Full Text Available It has not hitherto been clarified whether there is an association between dietary behavior and circadian variation in autonomic nervous system activity among shift workers. This study examines diurnal 24-h rhythm in heart rate variability (HRV and dietary behavior among rotating shift workers, while taking into account the sleep-wake cycle and physical activity. The subjects were 11 female and 2 male nurses or caregivers working in a rotating 2-shift system at a health care facility. All the subjects were asked to undergo 24-h electrocardiograph and step count recordings, and to record the time of each meal and the amounts of each food and beverage consumed. Coarse graining spectral analysis was used for approximately 10-min segments of HRV to derive the total power (TOT: >0.04 Hz of the periodic components and the integrated power of periodic components in the low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz and high-frequency (HF: >0.15 Hz ranges. Then the ratio of HF power to TOT (HF nu and the ratio of LF power to HF power (LF/HF were calculated to assess cardiac vagal tone and cardiac sympathovagal balance, respectively. Single cosinor analysis was used to obtain 24-h period variations in both variables of HRV. Acrophases of HF nu and LF/HF expressed in time since awakening were significantly (p<0.05 delayed for subjects having breakfast at a later time after awakening. Multivariable regression analysis indicated that the timing of breakfast, the ratio of energy intake at dinner to total energy intake, and total energy intake were correlated to the acrophases of HF nu and/or LF/HF. These results suggest that the phase angle between circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and the sleep-wake cycle may be associated with dietary behavior in shift workers.

  5. Distribution of hourly variability index of sky clearness | Madhlopa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clouds affect the values of insolation for solar technology and other applications. To detect the presence of variability in the sky clearness, an hourly variability index ( 3) is calculated. The present study examined the frequency distribution of this variable as a tool for assessing the utilizability of solar radiation at a site.

  6. Variable camshaft timing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  7. Stochastic modeling of hourly rainfall times series in Campania (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio, M.; Greco, R.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of flowslides and floods in small catchments is uneasy to predict, since it is affected by a number of variables, such as mechanical and hydraulic soil properties, slope morphology, vegetation coverage, rainfall spatial and temporal variability. Consequently, landslide risk assessment procedures and early warning systems still rely on simple empirical models based on correlation between recorded rainfall data and observed landslides and/or river discharges. Effectiveness of such systems could be improved by reliable quantitative rainfall prediction, which can allow gaining larger lead-times. Analysis of on-site recorded rainfall height time series represents the most effective approach for a reliable prediction of local temporal evolution of rainfall. Hydrological time series analysis is a widely studied field in hydrology, often carried out by means of autoregressive models, such as AR, ARMA, ARX, ARMAX (e.g. Salas [1992]). Such models gave the best results when applied to the analysis of autocorrelated hydrological time series, like river flow or level time series. Conversely, they are not able to model the behaviour of intermittent time series, like point rainfall height series usually are, especially when recorded with short sampling time intervals. More useful for this issue are the so-called DRIP (Disaggregated Rectangular Intensity Pulse) and NSRP (Neymann-Scott Rectangular Pulse) model [Heneker et al., 2001; Cowpertwait et al., 2002], usually adopted to generate synthetic point rainfall series. In this paper, the DRIP model approach is adopted, in which the sequence of rain storms and dry intervals constituting the structure of rainfall time series is modeled as an alternating renewal process. Final aim of the study is to provide a useful tool to implement an early warning system for hydrogeological risk management. Model calibration has been carried out with hourly rainfall hieght data provided by the rain gauges of Campania Region civil

  8. Globalization and working time: working hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2009-01-01

    This article challenges popular wisdom that economic globalization uniformly increases working time in industrialized countries. International investment and trade, they argue, have uneven effects for workplace bargaining over standard hours and over work-time flexibility, such as use of temporary

  9. Heterogeneity of prognostic studies of 24-hour blood pressure variability: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S Taylor

    Full Text Available In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2-7.0. Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods.

  10. Heterogeneity of Prognostic Studies of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn S.; Heneghan, Carl J.; Stevens, Richard J.; Adams, Emily C.; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2–7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods. PMID:25984791

  11. Hourly to Decadal variability of sea surface carbon parameters in the north western Mediteranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Merlivat, Liliane; Antoine, David; Beaumont, Laurence; Golbol, Melek; Velluci, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Sea surface CO2 fugacity, fCO2, is recorded hourly in the north western Mediterranean Sea since 2013 by two CARIOCA (Carbon Interface Ocean Atmosphere) sensors installed on the BOUSSOLE (Buoy for the acquisition of long term optical time series, http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/Boussole/html/project/introduction.php) mooring at 3m and 10m depth. fCO2 exhibits a large seasonal cycle, about 150 microatm peak to peak, very consistent with earlier CARIOCA measurements taken in 1995-1999 at the DYFAMED site (located 6km apart from the BOUSSOLE mooring) (Hood and Merlivat, JMR, 2001; Copin-Montegut et al., Mar. Chem., 2004): this seasonal cycle is driven primarily by intense mixing in Winter, biological uptake during Spring and warming during Summer. Interannual variability of these processes leads to interannual variability of monthly mean fCO2 that can reach more than 20 microatm. The short term variability (1 hour to 1 week) is large, especially during Summer 2014 (more than 40 microatm) due to a very strong vertical stratification and to the influence of internal waves. The hourly CARIOCA measurements allow to correctly filter out the high frequency variability while the three year long time series allow to smooth out interannual variability. Hence, for the first time, we get a precise estimate of the change of fCO2 in surface waters within 20 years. Over the 1995-2015 interval, we estimate an increase of fCO2 computed at a constant temperature of 13˚ C equal to 1.8 microatm per year. Given the alkalinity/salinity relationship in this region, we estimate mean annual rates of change of -0.0023+/-0.0001 pH unit and of +1.47+/-0.03 μmol kg-1 for pH and DIC respectively. These results give a quantitative estimate of the penetration of anthropogenic carbon in the surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, about 80% via air-sea exchange and 20% via transport of carbon from the Atlantic across the Strait of Gibraltar as suggested by Palmieri et al (BG, 2015). We estimate

  12. An approach for generating synthetic fine temporal resolution solar radiation time series from hourly gridded datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Perry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A tool has been developed to statistically increase the temporal resolution of solar irradiance time series. Fine temporal resolution time series are an important input into the planning process for solar power plants, and lead to increased understanding of the likely short-term variability of solar energy. The approach makes use of the spatial variability of hourly gridded datasets around a location of interest to make inferences about the temporal variability within the hour. The unique characteristics of solar irradiance data are modelled by classifying each hour into a typical weather situation. Low variability situations are modelled using an autoregressive process which is applied to ramps of clear-sky index. High variability situations are modelled as a transition between states of clear sky conditions and different levels of cloud opacity. The methods have been calibrated to Australian conditions using 1 min data from four ground stations for a 10 year period. These stations, together with an independent dataset, have also been used to verify the quality of the results using a number of relevant metrics. The results show that the method generates realistic fine resolution synthetic time series. The synthetic time series correlate well with observed data on monthly and annual timescales as they are constrained to the nearest grid-point value on each hour. The probability distributions of the synthetic and observed global irradiance data are similar, with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic less than 0.04 at each station. The tool could be useful for the estimation of solar power output for integration studies.

  13. Effects of 4 hours magnesium sulfate infusion on fetal heart rate variability and reactivity in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameshima, H; Ikenoue, T; Kamitomo, M; Sakamoto, H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of magnesium sulfate were investigated on fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline, variability, and reactivity in goats. Six chronically catheterized fetuses of Japanese Saanen goat at 125 to 130 days' gestation (term = 147 days) were used. Magnesium sulfate was directly infused to the fetuses. Short-term variability and long-term variability were obtained according to Huey et al. The baseline, reactivity, short-term variability and long-term variability of the FHR were compared between those receiving magnesium sulfate infusions and those receiving vehicle infusions without magnesium sulfate for 4 hr. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test was applied for statistical significance. Four hours magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased fetal plasma concentration of magnesium from 2.4-6.6 mg/dL, without significant changes in fetal respiratory gases and pH values. The baseline FHR was significantly decreased by magnesium infusion compared with that receiving vehicle infusion. The incidence of acceleration, short-term variability, and long-term variability during the fourth hour of magnesium infusion was also significantly decreased compared to a controlled infusion. The time spent by high amplitude phase of short-term variability and that of long-term variability were also significantly reduced. Significant correlation was obtained between the magnesium concentration and incidence of acceleration at fourth hour of magnesium infusion. Four hours infusion of magnesium sulfate significantly decreases baseline FHR, short-term variability, long-term variability, and reactivity in fetal goats at 0.85 gestation.

  14. Time as a dynamical variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thron, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Since the time of Galileo, the equations of physics have expressed dynamical variables such as particle position or electromagnetic field strength as functions of time. In this paper, we argue that this assumption reflects observational bias, and that there are many good reasons for viewing time also as a dynamical variable. We hypothesize that the spacetime universe is an outcome of a process, rather than a process unfolding in time. This new viewpoint gives rise to a physical interpretation of the wavefunction as a complex vibrational amplitude in a non-spacetime independent variable. It resolves quantum mechanical paradoxes involving wavefunction entanglement, and gives a much simpler solution to the problem of wavefunction collapse than the many-worlds interpretation. The Born rule is also shown to be a natural consequence. We also show that small deviations from conventional quantum probabilities are predicted.

  15. An hourly precipitation dataset for the UK: quality control, climatology, variability and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley; Lewis, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    UK (multi-) daily precipitation records have been comprehensively analysed over recent years, however sub-daily precipitation is less well understood. Sub-daily extremes may be associated with flash flooding, particularly in urban areas, and it is likely that changes to the intensity and frequency of climatic and hydrologic extremes as a result of climate change will have large impacts on UK communities. An improved understanding of observed short-duration extremes is therefore required before future change may be assessed. This paper describes the construction of a dataset of UK hourly precipitation, based on the compilation of three different sources of rain gauge data. Significant problems in the use of tipping bucket rain gauges for the analysis of long term climate and climate variability are recognised, including non-recording of precipitation, high frequency of tipping and the recording of accumulated totals. The quality control procedures undertaken are described along with the validation of accumulated 24h totals against a gridded daily precipitation dataset for the UK which demonstrates the reliability of the data for climatological analysis. The dataset is used to establish an up-to-date, spatially extensive, sub-daily seasonal precipitation climatology for the UK for a range of accumulations from 1h to 24h for the period 1992-2011. Longer term trends and variability are examined over longer periods (>30 years) where sufficiently long records exist. Particular attention is paid to extreme events which are defined using a range of methods including Extreme Rainfall Alert (ERA) thresholds issued by the UK Flood Forecasting Centre, annual maxima, peaks-over-threshold and extreme value theory. Initial analysis of the climatology of extreme events reflects the different mechanisms that generate sub-daily precipitation, for example, in most seasons hourly precipitation is more intense to the west of the UK, decreasing to the east. However, in summer the

  16. Assessment of heart rate variability in breath holding children by 24 hour Holter monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Osman; Ciftel, Murat; Ozturk, Kezban; Kilic, Omer; Kahveci, Hasan; Laloğlu, Fuat; Ceylan, Ozben

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism in children with breath holding may be generalised autonomic dysregulation. Thus, we performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate variability analyses using 24-hour Holter monitoring to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children with breath-holding spells. We performed cardiac rhythm and heart rate analyses using 24-hour Holter monitors to evaluate the cardiac effects of autonomic dysregulation in children during a breath-holding spell. Our study group consisted of 68 children with breath-holding spells - 56 cyanotic type and 12 pallid type - and 39 healthy controls. Clinical and heart rate variability results were compared between each spell type - cyanotic or pallid - and the control group; significant differences (p50 ms, and square root of the mean of the sum of squares of the differences between adjacent NN intervals values were found between the pallid and cyanotic groups. Holter monitoring for 24 hours and heart rate variability parameters, particularly in children with pallid spells, are crucial for evaluation of cardiac rhythm changes.

  17. Effect of the timing of admission upon patient prognosis in the Intensive Care Unit: On-hours versus off-hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, A; Hermosa, C; Enciso, V; Torrejón, I; Molina, R; Díaz, M; Mozo, T; Gordo, F; Salinas, I

    2016-01-01

    To assess the repercussion of the timing of admission to the ICU upon patient prognosis. A prospective, observational, non-interventional cohort study was carried out. A second level hospital with 210 operational beds and a general ICU with 8 operational beds. The study comprised all patients admitted to the ICU during 3 years (January 2010 to December 2012), excluding those subjects admitted from the operating room after scheduled surgery. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the timing of admission (on-hours or off-hours). Non-interventional study. An analysis was made of demographic variables (age, sex), origin (emergency room, hospital ward, operating room), comorbidities and SAPS 3 as severity score upon admission, length of stay in the ICU and hospital ward, and ICU and hospital mortality. A total of 504 patients were included in the on-hours group, versus 602 in the off-hours group. Multivariate analysis showed the factors independently associated to hospital mortality to be SAPS 3 (OR 1.10; 95% CI 1.08-1.12), and off-hours admission (OR 2.00; 95% CI 1.20-3.33). In a subgroup analysis of the off-hours group, the admission of patients on weekends or non-working days compared to daily night shifts was found to be independently associated to hospital mortality (OR 2.30; 95% CI 1.23-4.30). Admission to the ICU in off-hours is independently associated to patient mortality, which is also higher in patients admitted on weekends and non-working days compared to the daily night shifts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing variability of the 24-hour pad weight test in men with post-prostatectomy incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rena D; Cohn, Joshua A; Fedunok, Pauline A; Chung, Doreen E; Bales, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Decision-making regarding surgery for post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) is challenging. The 24-hour pad weight test is commonly used to objectively quantify PPI. However, pad weight may vary based upon activity level. We aimed to quantify variability in pad weights based upon patient-reported activity. 25 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were prospectively enrolled. All patients demonstrated clinical stress urinary incontinence without clinical urgency urinary incontinence. On three consecutive alternating days, patients submitted 24-hour pad weights along with a short survey documenting activity level and number of pads used. Pad weights collected across the three days were well correlated to the individual (ICC 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.93), ppad weight leakage and maximum leakage per patient was 133.4g (95% CI 80.4-186.5). The mean increase in 24-hour leakage for a one-point increase in self-reported activity level was 118.0g (95% CI 74.3-161.7, pPad weights also varied significantly when self-reported activity levels did not differ (mean difference 51.2g (95% CI 30.3-72.1), ppad weight leakage may vary significantly on different days of collection. This variation is more pronounced with changes in activity level. Taking into account patient activity level may enhance the predictive value of pad weight testing.

  19. Relationship between 24- hour Holter variables, chest discomfort and syncope: Does age matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kanti Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and forty four ambulatory, non-emergent human subjects from 20-88 years of age were investigated following routine 24 hour Holter monitoring referred by primary and tertiary care centers primarily for evaluation of palpitations and syncope. The patients were grouped into 3 different age categories: A 20-59 years of age (16%, B 60-69 years of age (26.4% and C > 70 years of age (57.6%. Heart rate profile, RR intervals, symptoms, frequency of premature supra ventricular and ventricular complexes were registered. The data show that though the occurrence and frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions over a period of 24 hours did not differ between the groups, the younger subjects documented more subjective discomforts during the Holter monitoring. Extra-systoles in excess of 1000 beats / 24 hour occured incessantly throughout the registration. Patients with syncope and those without did not differ as regards the Holter variables. However, subjects with atrial fibrillation had acceptable rate control and had significantly lower incidence of syncope than those with sinus rhythm. The findings suggest that in a county setting, Holter monitoring for evaluation of syncope may not be the first hand mode of investigation in a non emergent setting. On the contrary, the modality appears to be valuable for monitoring patients with atrial fibrillation. Even mild symptoms in the elderly population may warrant closer clinical follow up to prevent cardiac events and/or syncope leading to serious physical injury.

  20. Assessing variability of the 24-hour pad weight test in men with post-prostatectomy incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rena D. Malik

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Decision-making regarding surgery for post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI is challenging. The 24-hour pad weight test is commonly used to objectively quantify PPI. However, pad weight may vary based upon activity level. We aimed to quantify variability in pad weights based upon patient-reported activity. Materials and Methods: 25 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were prospectively enrolled. All patients demonstrated clinical stress urinary incontinence without clinical urgency urinary incontinence. On three consecutive alternating days, patients submitted 24-hour pad weights along with a short survey documenting activity level and number of pads used. Results: Pad weights collected across the three days were well correlated to the individual (ICC 0.85 (95% CI 0.74–0.93, p<0.001. The mean difference between the minimum pad weight leakage and maximum leakage per patient was 133.4g (95% CI 80.4–186.5. The mean increase in 24-hour leakage for a one-point increase in self-reported activity level was 118.0g (95% CI 74.3–161.7, p<0.001. Pad weights also varied significantly when self-reported activity levels did not differ (mean difference 51.2g (95% CI 30.3–72.1, p<0.001. Conclusions: 24-hour pad weight leakage may vary significantly on different days of collection. This variation is more pronounced with changes in activity level. Taking into account patient activity level may enhance the predictive value of pad weight testing.

  1. Increasing part-time working hours in the Netherlands. Identifying policy recommendations through Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Fokkinga, B.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    With 73% of women and 19% of men working part-time,the Netherlands is known as the champion of part-time work. In order to increase especially the working hours of women with small part-time jobs (less than 20 hours per week) the Dutch government installed a thinktank of employers, employees

  2. Bullying Behavior, Parents' Work Hours and Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Time Spent with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie-Mizell, C. Andre; Keil, Jacqueline M.; Laske, Mary Therese; Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother's and father's work hours, and early adolescents' perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change…

  3. Understanding Storm Time Poynting Flux Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H. M.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that energy deposited by dayside Earth-directed Poynting flux (S||) is greater during geomagnetic storms; however, S|| spatial and temporal variability are less well understood. Eight years (2000-2008) of data from the WDC for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, were collected to identify thirteen large and five super storms according to specific criteria: "classic" storm structure in which the time interval between sudden storm commencement (SSC) and minimum Dst (Dstmin) was ≤ 24 hours; the main and recovery phases did not experience secondary or tertiary disturbances; large storms where Dst ≤ -93 nT; and, super storms where Dst ≤ -184 nT. Solar wind and magnetospheric data for the 18 storms were collected from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F-15) and NASA OMNI. For all storms, the data were averaged and plotted to identify S|| variability for the mantle, cusp, polar rain, and central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions during geomagnetic storm time. As known for all storms, while Dst decreased, average S|| peaked, as did Kp. The energy deposited per square-meter by precipitating energetic particles (electrons) did not increase, though average hemispheric power increased by nearly a factor of two for the large and super storms between SSC and Dstmin. For the large storms, average S|| from the central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions (on closed field lines) was enhanced by nearly a factor of two between SSC and Dstmin; for the super storms, enhancement was over a factor of three. Average large storm S|| enhancement from the mantle, cusp, and polar rain regions (on open field lines) was significantly more enhanced by a factor of three between SSC and Dstmin. It was enhanced by a factor of over five for the super storms. For the open field line regions, a large, prolonged secondary peak in S|| was observed for large and super storms during the recovery phase. As suggested by this and prior studies, research is needed to better

  4. A rainfall disaggregation scheme for sub-hourly time scales: Coupling a Bartlett-Lewis based model with adjusting procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossieris, Panagiotis; Makropoulos, Christos; Onof, Christian; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2018-01-01

    Many hydrological applications, such as flood studies, require the use of long rainfall data at fine time scales varying from daily down to 1 min time step. However, in the real world there is limited availability of data at sub-hourly scales. To cope with this issue, stochastic disaggregation techniques are typically employed to produce possible, statistically consistent, rainfall events that aggregate up to the field data collected at coarser scales. A methodology for the stochastic disaggregation of rainfall at fine time scales was recently introduced, combining the Bartlett-Lewis process to generate rainfall events along with adjusting procedures to modify the lower-level variables (i.e., hourly) so as to be consistent with the higher-level one (i.e., daily). In the present paper, we extend the aforementioned scheme, initially designed and tested for the disaggregation of daily rainfall into hourly depths, for any sub-hourly time scale. In addition, we take advantage of the recent developments in Poisson-cluster processes incorporating in the methodology a Bartlett-Lewis model variant that introduces dependence between cell intensity and duration in order to capture the variability of rainfall at sub-hourly time scales. The disaggregation scheme is implemented in an R package, named HyetosMinute, to support disaggregation from daily down to 1-min time scale. The applicability of the methodology was assessed on a 5-min rainfall records collected in Bochum, Germany, comparing the performance of the above mentioned model variant against the original Bartlett-Lewis process (non-random with 5 parameters). The analysis shows that the disaggregation process reproduces adequately the most important statistical characteristics of rainfall at wide range of time scales, while the introduction of the model with dependent intensity-duration results in a better performance in terms of skewness, rainfall extremes and dry proportions.

  5. Relationship among morning blood pressure surge, 24-hour blood pressure variability, and cardiovascular outcomes in a white population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Michele; Fodri, Danilo; Toso, Elena; Macchiarulo, Mario; Cairo, Matteo; Facchetti, Rita; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular events have their greatest prevalence in the early morning period. Whether this is attributable to an arousal-dependent blood pressure (BP) increase is far from being clear. It is also not clear to what extent this phenomenon reflects overall 24-hour BP variability. In 2051 subjects (aged 25-74 years) representative of the population of Monza (Italy), we measured 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) and calculated the difference between the 2-hour average values after morning arousal and the lowest 3 or average 2-hour values before arousal (morning BP surge 1 and 2, respectively). For either measure, we sought the relationship with a variety of indices of 24-hour SBP variability and collected information on (1) the occurrence of cardiovascular and all cause deaths during a follow-up of ≈16 years and (2) the appearance of echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy after 10 years from the baseline visit. Morning SBP surge 1 was directly related to indices of 24-hour SBP variability, including those made independent on the magnitude of the day-night SBP difference. There was a weak positive relationship between morning SBP surge 1 and the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause death, which disappeared after adjustment for confounders. This was the case also for development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Morning SBP surge 2 was smaller, inconsistently related to 24-hour SBP variability and not at all related to fatal events or new-onset left ventricular hypertrophy. In a white population, morning BP surge was not found to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular death, all-cause death, or development of high cardiovascular risk (as documented by new-onset cardiac damage) even when appropriately assessed by measures that reflect its association with 24-hour BP variability. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The intra-hour variable quasar J1819+3845: 13-year evolution, jet polarization structure, and interstellar scattering screen properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, A. G.; Macquart, J.-P.

    We examine the long-term evolution of the intra-hour variable quasar, J1819+3845, whose variations have been attributed to interstellar scintillation by extremely local turbulent plasma, located only 1-3 pc from Earth. The variations in this source ceased some time in the period between June 2006

  7. Travel time variability and rational inattention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Jiang, Gege

    2017-01-01

    This paper sets up a rational inattention model for the choice of departure time for a traveler facing random travel time. The traveler chooses how much information to acquire about the travel time out-come before choosing departure time. This reduces the cost of travel time variability compared...

  8. Effects of Statin on Arrhythmia and Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Persons With 48-Hour Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei Ren; Liu, Hong Bin; Sha, Yuan; Shi, Yang; Wang, Hao; Yin, Da Wei; Chen, Yun Dai; Shi, Xiang Min

    2016-10-31

    It has been reported that sleep deprivation is associated with cardiac autonomic disorder, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Statins have significant cardiovascular protective effects in patients with cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of statins on arrhythmia and heart rate variability in young healthy persons after 48-hour sleep deprivation. This study enrolled 72 young healthy participants aged 26.5±3.5 years. All participants received 48-hour continuous ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Arrhythmia, time, and frequency domain parameters were analyzed for all participants. The primary end point, low/high frequency ratio, was significantly lower in the statin group than in the control group (2.48±1.12 versus 3.02±1.23, Psleep deprivation, low frequency-the frequency of premature atrial complexes and premature ventricular complexes-was significantly decreased in the statin group compared with the control group (Psleep deprivation in the statin group compared with the control group (Psleep deprivation. This finding should be confirmed by larger scale trials. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02496962. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Efficacy of split hours part-time patching versus continuous hours part-time patching for treatment of anisometropic amblyopia in children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Gupta, Amit; Rao, Harsha L; Mollah, Joseph; Sontha, Anand; Gunturu, Rekha; Rao, B Venkateshwar

    2013-07-01

    To compare efficacy of 'split hours part-time patching' and 'continuous hours part-time patching' for the treatment of anisometropic amblyopia. We designed a prospective, interventional, non-randomised, comparative pilot study involving children between 4 and 11 years of age with anisometropic amblyopia who were treated with either continuous wear (Group A) or split hours part-time patching (Group B) as per parents wish, after appropriate discussion with the parents. Children were followed-up for the improvement in visual acuity and the compliance at each follow-up visit. 44 and 24 children were recruited in Group A and Group B, respectively (mean ± SD baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye: 0.99 ± 0.32 and 0.95 ± 0.23 logMAR, respectively). BCVA (adjusted for baseline BCVA and age) at 3 months in Group A (0.59 ± 0.24) was comparable (p=0.08) with that in Group B (0.71 ± 0.24). This was same even at 6 months (0.51 ± 0.25 in Group A and 0.59 ± 0.25 in Group B, p=0.25). The improvement in BCVA at 3 months was also comparable (p=0.06) in Group A (0.39 ± 0.23) and Group B (0.26 ± 0.23). The improvement in BCVA at 6 months was also comparable (p=0.14) in Group A (0.47 ± 0.26) and Group B (0.37 ± 0.26). Both patching regimens lead to significant and comparable improvement in BCVA in anisometropic amblyopia up to 6 months of follow-up.

  10. Globalization and working time: Work-place hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how economic globalization affects work-place arrangements regulating working time in industrialized countries. Exposure to foreign direct investment and trade can have off-setting effects for work-place bargaining over standard hours and work-time flexibilization, and can be

  11. Telework: timesaving or time-consuming? An investigation into actual working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.; Wetzels, C.; Tijdens, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the relationship between telework and the actual time employees put into their jobs. One of the reported threats to teleworkers’ personal lives is that in order to finish their work, they not only use up saved commuting time, but also part of their non-working hours, even

  12. Hours of Work and Gender Identity : Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness.We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than

  13. Additive measures of travel time variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives a measure of travel time variability for travellers equipped with scheduling preferences defined in terms of time-varying utility rates, and who choose departure time optimally. The corresponding value of travel time variability is a constant that depends only on preference...... parameters. The measure is unique in being additive with respect to independent parts of a trip. It has the variance of travel time as a special case. Extension is provided to the case of travellers who use a scheduled service with fixed headway....

  14. The cost of travel time variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between three types of measures of the cost of travel time variability: measures based on scheduling preferences and implicit departure time choice, Bernoulli type measures based on a univariate function of travel time, and mean-dispersion measures. We...

  15. 3B.02: 24-HOUR AMBULATORY CENTRAL BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY AND TARGET-ORGAN DAMAGE IN ADOLESCENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntineri, A; Kollias, A; Zeniodi, M; Moyssakis, I; Georgakopoulos, D; Servos, G; Vazeou, A; Stergiou, G S

    2015-06-01

    Some studies suggested that ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) variability may provide useful information beyond that of average ABP levels. This study investigated the relationship between central ABP variability and target-organ damage in young individuals in whom the central-peripheral blood pressure discrepancy might be considerable. Apparently healthy adolescents and young adults referred for elevated blood pressure and healthy volunteers (age 12-26 years) were subjected to: (i) 24-hour monitoring of central ABP using a noninvasive brachial cuff-based oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph 24 h PWA); (ii) 24-hour pulse wave velocity (PWV) monitoring (Mobil-O-Graph 24 h PWA); (iii) echocardiographic determination of left ventricular mass index (LVMI); (iv) measurement (ultrasonography) of the common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). The standard deviation (SD) of ABP (24-hour weighted/awake/asleep), as well as the respective coefficients of variation (CV) were used for assessing variability. The study included 68 individuals (mean age 18.7 ± 4.7 years, 52 males, body mass index [BMI] 24.5 ± 4.7 kg/m, 24 volunteers, 15 with hypertension [24-hour peripheral ABP >=95th percentile for adolescents or >=130/80 mmHg for adults]). LVMI was correlated with 24-hour/awake/asleep central systolic ABP (r=0.50/0.49/0.40, all p ABP (r = 0.40/0.37/0.30, all p ABP (r = 0.94/0.88/0.84, all p ABP and SD/CV of ABP values), LVMI and 24-hour PWV were determined by BMI, age, and 24-hour central systolic ABP, and IMT by male gender and 24-hour weighted SD of central PP. In young individuals, 24-hour central ABP variability appears to be associated only with early carotid damage when accounting for ABP levels, whereas LVMI and PWV are mainly determined by average ABP levels.

  16. Increasing Children's Voluntary Physical Activity Outside of School Hours Through Targeting Social Cognitive Theory Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Walsh, Stephanie M; Greenwood, Brittney L

    2016-10-01

    Volume of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity completed during the elementary school day is insufficient, and associated with health risks. Improvements in theory-based psychosocial factors might facilitate increased out-of-school physical activity. A behaviorally based after-school care protocol, Youth Fit 4 Life, was tested for its association with increased voluntary, out-of-school physical activity and improvements in its theory-based psychosocial predictors in 9- to 12-year-olds. Increases over 12 weeks in out-of-school physical activity, and improvements in self-regulation for physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, and mood, were significantly greater in the Youth Fit 4 Life group (n = 88) when contrasted with a typical care control group (n = 57). Changes in the 3 psychosocial variables significantly mediated the group-physical activity change relationship (R(2) = .31, P activity. In the Youth Fit 4 Life group, occurrence of 300 min/wk of overall physical activity increased from 41% to 71%. Targeting theory-based psychosocial changes within a structured after-school care physical activity program was associated with increases in children's overall time being physically active. After replication, large scale application will be warranted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Travel time variability and airport accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, P.R.; Kroes, E.P.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the cost of access travel time variability for air travelers. Reliable access to airports is important since the cost of missing a flight is likely to be high. First, the determinants of the preferred arrival times at airports are analyzed. Second, the willingness to pay (WTP) for

  18. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-01

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected ‘pixel shimmer’ in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models.

  19. Continuous 24-hour intraocular pressure monitoring for glaucoma--time for a paradigm change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, K; Weinreb, R

    2012-03-28

    Glaucoma is the main cause of irreversible blindness and intraocular pressure (IOP) is its only modifiable risk factor. The importance of robust lowering of IOP for prevention of glaucoma onset and progression is well established. Although IOP is a dynamic parameter with individual circadian rhythms, current management usually relies on single IOP measurements during regular clinic hours performed a few times a year. Recent technological advances have provided clinicians with tools for continuous IOP monitoring during a 24 hour period in an ambulatory setting. There are two approaches being investigated. The first is permanent IOP monitoring through an implantable sensor and the other is temporary monitoring through a contact lens sensor. In this article, we discuss the shortcomings of the current gold standard for tonometry (Goldmann Applanation Tonometry) and the current experience with the first commercially available continuous 24 hour IOP monitoring technology (SENSIMED Triggerfish®); a telemetric contact lens sensor produced by a Swiss start-up company (Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland). Recent studies suggest that 24 hour continuous monitoring of IOP can be integrated into clinical practice and have the potential to contribute to the reduction of glaucoma-related vision loss.

  20. Nonflat time-variable dark energy cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anatoly; Westmoreland, Shawn; Saaidi, Khaled; Ratra, Bharat

    2013-12-01

    We generalize the time-variable dark energy scalar field Φ model (ΦCDM) to nonflat space. We show that even in the space-curvature-dominated epoch the scalar field solution is a time-dependent fixed point or attractor, with scalar field energy density that grows relative to the energy density in spatial curvature. This is the first example of a physically consistent and complete model of dynamical dark energy in a nonflat geometry.

  1. Delaying school starting time by one hour: some effects on attention levels in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufi, Dubi; Tzischinsky, Orna; Hadar, Stav

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the attention level of middle-school students by providing a group of students with the opportunity for an additional one hour of sleep in the morning by delaying school starting time by one hour, as compared to another group received no additional sleep. For the first week of the study, the school starting time was delayed 1 h for the experimental group (N = 26). In the second week, these students returned to their regular school schedule. A control group (N = 21) remained on their regular schedule for these 2 weeks. Both groups were tested at the end of each week with 2 measures to assess their attention. The results showed that in the first week the experimental group slept an average of 55 minutes longer each night, for 5 nights (total 275 minutes). Students who slept longer performed better in measures of attention as assessed by the "Mathematics Continuous Performance Test" and the "d2 Test of Attention," indicating better performance in attention level, impulsivity, and the rate of performance. The study strongly recommends that middle schools should consider delaying the school starting time by at least one hour. Such a change could enhance students' cognitive performance by improving their attention level, increasing rate of performance, as well as reducing their mistakes and impulsivity.

  2. Lean principles optimize on-time vascular surgery operating room starts and decrease resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Walsh, Daniel B; Horvath, Alexander J; Walsh, Teri R; Herrick, Daniel P; Prentiss, Steven J; Powell, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Lean process improvement techniques are used in industry to improve efficiency and quality while controlling costs. These techniques are less commonly applied in health care. This study assessed the effectiveness of Lean principles on first case on-time operating room starts and quantified effects on resident work hours. Standard process improvement techniques (DMAIC methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, control) were used to identify causes of delayed vascular surgery first case starts. Value stream maps and process flow diagrams were created. Process data were analyzed with Pareto and control charts. High-yield changes were identified and simulated in computer and live settings prior to implementation. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of on-time first case starts; secondary outcomes included hospital costs, resident rounding time, and work hours. Data were compared with existing benchmarks. Prior to implementation, 39% of first cases started on time. Process mapping identified late resident arrival in preoperative holding as a cause of delayed first case starts. Resident rounding process inefficiencies were identified and changed through the use of checklists, standardization, and elimination of nonvalue-added activity. Following implementation of process improvements, first case on-time starts improved to 71% at 6 weeks (P = .002). Improvement was sustained with an 86% on-time rate at 1 year (P < .001). Resident rounding time was reduced by 33% (from 70 to 47 minutes). At 9 weeks following implementation, these changes generated an opportunity cost potential of $12,582. Use of Lean principles allowed rapid identification and implementation of perioperative process changes that improved efficiency and resulted in significant cost savings. This improvement was sustained at 1 year. Downstream effects included improved resident efficiency with decreased work hours. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  3. Prelude to a RIF: older workers, part-time hours, and unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jeremy; Wenger, Jeffrey B

    2010-04-01

    Since the beginning of the most recent recession in December 2007, involuntary part-time employment (part-time for economic reasons) in the United States has increased from 4.2 million workers to 9.1 million, more than doubling. In this paper, we examine whether such increases in involuntary part-time employment have helped combat unemployment in the past or placed a disproportionate burden on older workers. Using Current Population Survey (outgoing rotation group) data from 1983 to 2002, we find that increases in involuntary part-time work in an industry raise the industry unemployment rate. Furthermore, the connection between rising rates of involuntary part-time work and unemployment is stronger among older workers than among younger workers. We conclude that reducing work hours through the use of part-time work does not ameliorate the effects of recessions on workers. Rather, it is a harbinger of unemployment, especially among those older than 55.

  4. A coupled weather generator - rainfall-runoff approach on hourly time steps for flood risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Benjamin; Schneeberger, Klaus; Dung Nguyen, Viet; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Huttenlau, Matthias; Merz, Bruno; Stötter, Johann

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of potential monetary damage of flooding is an essential part of flood risk management. One possibility to estimate the monetary risk is to analyze long time series of observed flood events and their corresponding damages. In reality, however, only few flood events are documented. This limitation can be overcome by the generation of a set of synthetic, physically and spatial plausible flood events and subsequently the estimation of the resulting monetary damages. In the present work, a set of synthetic flood events is generated by a continuous rainfall-runoff simulation in combination with a coupled weather generator and temporal disaggregation procedure for the study area of Vorarlberg (Austria). Most flood risk studies focus on daily time steps, however, the mesoscale alpine study area is characterized by short concentration times, leading to large differences between daily mean and daily maximum discharge. Accordingly, an hourly time step is needed for the simulations. The hourly metrological input for the rainfall-runoff model is generated in a two-step approach. A synthetic daily dataset is generated by a multivariate and multisite weather generator and subsequently disaggregated to hourly time steps with a k-Nearest-Neighbor model. Following the event generation procedure, the negative consequences of flooding are analyzed. The corresponding flood damage for each synthetic event is estimated by combining the synthetic discharge at representative points of the river network with a loss probability relation for each community in the study area. The loss probability relation is based on exposure and susceptibility analyses on a single object basis (residential buildings) for certain return periods. For these impact analyses official inundation maps of the study area are used. Finally, by analyzing the total event time series of damages, the expected annual damage or losses associated with a certain probability of occurrence can be estimated for

  5. [Travel time and distances to Norwegian out-of-hours casualty clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raknes, Guttorm; Morken, Tone; Hunskår, Steinar

    2014-11-01

    Geographical factors have an impact on the utilisation of out-of-hours services. In this study we have investigated the travel distance to out-of-hours casualty clinics in Norwegian municipalities in 2011 and the number of municipalities covered by the proposed recommendations for secondary on-call arrangements due to long distances. We estimated the average maximum travel times and distances in Norwegian municipalities using a postcode-based method. Separate analyses were performed for municipalities with a single, permanently located casualty clinic. Altogether 417 out of 430 municipalities were included. We present the median value of the maximum travel times and distances for the included municipalities. The median maximum average travel distance for the municipalities was 19 km. The median maximum average travel time was 22 minutes. In 40 of the municipalities (10 %) the median maximum average travel time exceeded 60 minutes, and in 97 municipalities (23 %) the median maximum average travel time exceeded 40 minutes. The population of these groups comprised 2 % and 5 % of the country's total population respectively. For municipalities with permanent emergency facilities(N = 316), the median average flight time 16 minutes and median average distance 13 km.. In many municipalities, the inhabitants have a long average journey to out-of-hours emergency health services, but seen as a whole, the inhabitants of these municipalities account for a very small proportion of the Norwegian population. The results indicate that the proposed recommendations for secondary on-call duty based on long distances apply to only a small number of inhabitants. The recommendations should therefore be adjusted and reformulated to become more relevant.

  6. Credit Hours with No Set Time: A Study of Credit Policies in Asynchronous Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasuhn, Frederick Carl

    2014-01-01

    U.S. public university system policies were examined to learn how credit hours were determined for asynchronous online education. Findings indicated that (a) credit hour meaning and use are not consistent, (b) primary responsibility for credit hour decisions was at the local level, and (c) no policies exist to guide credit hour application for…

  7. Panel mounted time code reader. [Day of year, hour, minute, second from standard Inter Range Instrumentation Group time codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaum, R. L.

    1978-02-01

    The time code reader described is composed of an assembly of commonly available electronic components logically arranged to minimize component count while reliably achieving the basic function of decoding and displaying the time of year information which is available in each of several standard Inter Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) time codes. The time code reader omits all subsidiary functions of the code except that of retrieving a readable time of year (day, hour, minute, second). The reader can be mounted on any equipment panel having an available flat surface that is 2 by 6 inches in dimensions. IRIG time codes A, B, E, and G can be read without the necessity of switching, and a relatively wide range of input voltages is accommodated.

  8. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovey, Euan R; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L; Oliver, Brian G; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Marks, Guy B

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  9. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan R Tovey

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for

  10. Microlensing makes lensed quasar time delays significantly time variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, S. S.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    The time delays of gravitationally lensed quasars are generally believed to be unique numbers whose measurement is limited only by the quality of the light curves and the models for the contaminating contribution of gravitational microlensing to the light curves. This belief is incorrect - gravitational microlensing also produces changes in the actual time delays on the ∼day(s) light-crossing time-scale of the emission region. This is due to a combination of the inclination of the disc relative to the line of sight and the differential magnification of the temperature fluctuations producing the variability. We demonstrate this both mathematically and with direct calculations using microlensing magnification patterns. Measuring these delay fluctuations can provide a physical scale for microlensing observations, removing the need for priors on either the microlens masses or the component velocities. That time delays in lensed quasars are themselves time variable likely explains why repeated delay measurements of individual lensed quasars appear to vary by more than their estimated uncertainties. This effect is also a new important systematic problem for attempts to use time delays in lensed quasars for cosmology or to detect substructures (satellites) in lens galaxies.

  11. Around Refuse The Hour, Kentridge and his Space-Time of Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Le Borgne

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a creative process born in the intersection of stage, cinema and visual arts: the one of William Kentridge. In the polymorphic work of the South African artist, his movement between different forms of expression holds a key-role in his way of working. Taken between an installation and an exhibition, the progress around his show Refuse The Hour (2012 gives a relevant ground for the analysis of the stakes in a process of creation in movement between various artistic fields. From the studio to rehearsals, and through a rhythm of collective work, this text investigates the genetics of the show crossed by different space-times of creation.

  12. Analysis of relationships between hourly electricity price and load in deregulated real-time power markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.L.; Wu, Y.K. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Power Systems Research Group

    2004-07-01

    Risk management in the electric power industry involves measuring the risk for all instruments owned by a company. The value of many of these instruments depends directly on electricity prices. In theory, the wholesale price in a real-time market should reflect the short-run marginal cost. However, most markets are not perfectly competitive, therefore by understanding the degree of correlation between price and physical drivers, electric traders and consumers can manage their risk more effectively and efficiently. Market data from two power-pool architectures, both pre-2003 ISO-NE and Australia's NEM, have been studied. The dynamic character of electricity price is mean-reverting, and consists of intra-day and weekly variations, seasonal fluctuations, and instant jumps. Parts of them are affected by load demands. Hourly signals on both price and load are divided into deterministic and random components with a discrete Fourier transform algorithm. Next, the real-time price-load relationship for periodic and random signals is examined. In addition, time-varying volatility models are constructed on random price and random load with the GARCH model, and the correlation between them analysed. Volatility plays a critical role on evaluating option pricing and risk management. (author)

  13. Optically addressable nuclear spins in a solid with a six-hour coherence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Manjin; Hedges, Morgan P.; Ahlefeldt, Rose L.; Bartholomew, John G.; Beavan, Sarah E.; Wittig, Sven M.; Longdell, Jevon J.; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Space-like separation of entangled quantum states is a central concept in fundamental investigations of quantum mechanics and in quantum communication applications. Optical approaches are ubiquitous in the distribution of entanglement because entangled photons are easy to generate and transmit. However, extending this direct distribution beyond a range of a few hundred kilometres to a worldwide network is prohibited by losses associated with scattering, diffraction and absorption during transmission. A proposal to overcome this range limitation is the quantum repeater protocol, which involves the distribution of entangled pairs of optical modes among many quantum memories stationed along the transmission channel. To be effective, the memories must store the quantum information encoded on the optical modes for times that are long compared to the direct optical transmission time of the channel. Here we measure a decoherence rate of 8 × 10-5 per second over 100 milliseconds, which is the time required for light transmission on a global scale. The measurements were performed on a ground-state hyperfine transition of europium ion dopants in yttrium orthosilicate (151Eu3+:Y2SiO5) using optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The observed decoherence rate is at least an order of magnitude lower than that of any other system suitable for an optical quantum memory. Furthermore, by employing dynamic decoupling, a coherence time of 370 +/- 60 minutes was achieved at 2 kelvin. It has been almost universally assumed that light is the best long-distance carrier for quantum information. However, the coherence time observed here is long enough that nuclear spins travelling at 9 kilometres per hour in a crystal would have a lower decoherence with distance than light in an optical fibre. This enables some very early approaches to entanglement distribution to be revisited, in particular those in which the spins are transported rather than the light.

  14. Reduction of Antigen Exposure Time in Patch Tests To 24 Hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D K Jayant

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of patch tests obtained with 24 hour and 48 hour occlusion periods using antigen impregnated-discs′ (AID and antigen-containing-saucers(ACS were studied in 168 patients. Of the 411 patches appr, 4 the results in 400 (97.3210/o patch tests were concordant (91 positive and 309 negative reactions with both the 24 hour and the 48 hour occlusions tests, while 10 patch test reactions were positive only with 48 hour occlusion, and 1 patch test reaction were positive only With 24 hour occlusion. Of the 91 patch test reactions positive with both the 24 hour and the 48 hour occlusion tests, 81 patch test reactions were equally severe, while 10 patch test reactions were stronger with the 48 hour occlusion test. The discordant reactions were obtained with Lantana camera (3, inerium variabilis (4, Allium cepa (1, and potassium dichromate. (1, while concordant results were found with Parthenium hysterophorus, Calotropis procera, Argemone meacana, nitrofurazone, neomycin, nickel sulphate an paraphenyl-nediamine. The discordant reactions were obtained almost equally in the summer, winter and rainy seasons.

  15. Medium range forecasting of hourly power system load by time series analysis using the Walsh transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, T.K.; Bhattacharya, T.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Kharagpur (IN). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Purkayastha, P. (Oil India Ltd., Duliajan (IN))

    1991-08-01

    Medium range forecasts of hourly load demand for a span of 24 h to 168h are required for the preparation of short term maintenance schedules of unit auxiliaries and peaking stations apart from maintaining security constraints and minimizing operational costs. Forecasts of the daily load for seven days by the available multiplicative SARIMA model suffer from divergent error levels of multistep ahead forecasts, and to take all the features of any particular day, the order of such models will be prohibitively large. In the present paper a unique approach has been made to the time series analysis of stochastic processes: multigrade periodicities present in the daily load curve have been gainfully exploited by grouping the data in seven subgroups characterizing each week day separately and then each group is replaced by an orthogonal transform known as a Walsh transform. The amplitudes of the transformed spectrum have been time series modelled by the Box-Jenkins approach and forecasts are made by taking inverse (Walsh) transforms. (author).

  16. 48 CFR 52.216-30 - Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition without...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition without Adequate Price Competition. 52.216... Price Competition. As prescribed in 16.601(e)(2), insert the following provision: Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition Without Adequate Price Competition (FEB...

  17. Allocating operating room block time using historical caseload variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Narges; Taaffe, Kevin M

    2015-12-01

    Operating room (OR) allocation and planning is one of the most important strategic decisions that OR managers face. The number of ORs that a hospital opens depends on the number of blocks that are allocated to the surgical groups, services, or individual surgeons, combined with the amount of open posting time (i.e., first come, first serve posting) that the hospital wants to provide. By allocating too few ORs, a hospital may turn away surgery demand whereas opening too many ORs could prove to be a costly decision. The traditional method of determining block frequency and size considers the average historical surgery demand for each group. However, given that there are penalties to the system for having too much or too little OR time allocated to a group, demand variability should play a role in determining the real OR requirement. In this paper we present an algorithm that allocates block time based on this demand variability, specifically accounting for both over-utilized time (time used beyond the block) and under-utilized time (time unused within the block). This algorithm provides a solution to the situation in which total caseload demand can be accommodated by the total OR resource set, in other words not in a capacity-constrained situation. We have found this scenario to be common among several regional healthcare providers with large OR suites and excess capacity. This algorithm could be used to adjust existing blocks or to assign new blocks to surgeons that did not previously have a block. We also have studied the effect of turnover time on the number of ORs that needs to be allocated. Numerical experiments based on real data from a large health-care provider indicate the opportunity to achieve over 2,900 hours of OR time savings through improved block allocations.

  18. Evaluating the impact of flexible alcohol trading hours on violence: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Humphreys

    Full Text Available On November 24(th 2005, the Government of England and Wales removed regulatory restrictions on the times at which licensed premises could sell alcohol. This study tests availability theory by treating the implementation of Licensing Act (2003 as a natural experiment in alcohol policy.An interrupted time series design was employed to estimate the Act's immediate and delayed impact on violence in the City of Manchester (Population 464,200. We collected police recorded rates of violence, robbery, and total crime between the 1st of February 2004 and the 31st of December 2007. Events were aggregated by week, yielding a total of 204 observations (95 pre-, and 109 post-intervention. Secondary analysis examined changes in daily patterns of violence. Pre- and post-intervention events were separated into four three-hour segments 18∶00-20∶59, 21∶00-23.59, 00∶00-02∶59, 03∶00-05∶59.Analysis found no evidence that the Licensing Act (2003 affected the overall volume of violence. However, analyses of night-time violence found a gradual and permanent shift of weekend violence into later parts of the night. The results estimated an initial increase of 27.5% between 03∶00 to 06∶00 (ω = 0.2433, 95% CI = 0.06, 0.42, which increased to 36% by the end of the study period (δ = -0.897, 95% CI = -1.02, -0.77.This study found no evidence that a national policy increasing the physical availability of alcohol affected the overall volume of violence. There was, however, evidence suggesting that the policy may be associated with changes to patterns of violence in the early morning (3 a.m. to 6 a.m..

  19. Relative value of clinical variables, bicycle ergometry, rest radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring at discharge to predict 1 year survival after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Fioretti (Paolo); R.W. Brower (Ronald); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); H.J. ten Katen (Harald); A. Beelen (Anita); T. Baardman (Taco); J. Lubsen (Jacob); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe relative value of predischarge clinical variables, bicycle ergometry, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring for predicting survival during the first year in 351 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction was assessed. Discriminant

  20. Time of day variation in polyp detection rate for colonoscopies performed on a 3-hour shift schedule.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munson, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    Recent research suggests that the colonoscopy polyp detection rate (PDR) varies by time of day, possibly because of endoscopist fatigue. Mayo Clinic Rochester (MCR) schedules colonoscopies on 3-hour shifts, which should minimize fatigue.

  1. PM1 2-hour refined Near Real Time (NRT) Spacecraft Attitude data (MODIS Ancillary Data)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PM1ATTNR is the Aqua 2-hour spacecraft refined attitude data file in native format. The file name format is the following: PM1ATTNR.Pyyyyddd.hhmm.vvv.yyyydddhhmmss...

  2. Diurnal 24-hour rhythm in ambulatory heart rate variability during the day shift in rotating shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, Takahiro; Kawano, Yukari; Tada, Yuki; Hida, Azumi; Midorikawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Kohe; Mitani, Takeshi; Komatsu, Taiki; Togo, Fumiharu

    2013-06-01

    Circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and behavior during the day shifts of shift workers has not hitherto been clarified. This study examined diurnal 24-h variation in heart rate variability (HRV), sleep-wake cycle, physical activity, and food intake during the day shift in rotating shift workers. The subjects were female nurses and caregivers working at a health care facility (14 day workers and 13 rotating shift workers). Each subject was asked to undergo 24-h electrocardiograph and step count recordings. Coarse graining spectral analysis was used for approximately 10-min segments of HRV (600 beats) to derive the total power (TOT: >0.04 Hz), integrated power in the low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF: >0.15 Hz) ranges, the ratio of HF power to TOT (HF nu), and the ratio of LF power to HF power (LF/HF). Double cosinor analysis was used to obtain 24-h and 12-h period variations in variables of HRV and physical activity. While no difference was found in the acrophases of either period for step counts or in the 12-h period of HRV variables between the groups, the acrophases of the 24-h period for HRV variables were delayed by 1.3 to 5.5 h in rotating shift workers, and their differences in HF power, HF nu, and LF/HF reached a significant level (p < 0.05). On the days of the experiment, retiring time, waking up time, total time in bed, sleep efficiency, and mealtimes and energy intake for each diet did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that there is a possibility of an abnormal phase angle between circadian variation in cardiac autonomic nervous system activity and the sleep-wake cycle during the day shift in shift workers.

  3. Daily and Hourly Variability in Global Fire Emissions and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural emissions inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire emissions for the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3). We distributed monthly GFED3 emissions during 2003-2009 on a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) active fire observations. We found that patterns of daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily emissions in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of bunting in savannas. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in emissions moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire emissions developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top-down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from multiple satellite sensors to improve daily emissions estimates.

  4. Daily and 3-hourly Variability in Global Fire Emissions and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural emissions inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire emissions for the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3). We disaggregated monthly GFED3 emissions during 2003.2009 to a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ]derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) active fire observations. Daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily emissions in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of burning in savannas. These patterns were consistent with earlier field and modeling work characterizing fire behavior dynamics in different ecosystems. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES WF_ABBA active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in emissions moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire emissions developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top ]down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from

  5. Office Hours as You Like Them: Integrating Real-Time Chats into the Course Media Mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeage, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Reports on one professor's use of integrated synchronous electronic office hours (i.e., a "chat room") with asynchronous course conferencing (i.e., email) in a class on introductory marketing. Describes its uses, limitations, benefits, potential problems, and results from a student survey. (EV)

  6. Modeling hourly Electricity Spot Market Prices as non stationary functional times series

    OpenAIRE

    Liebl, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    The instantaneous nature of electricity distinguishes its spot prices from spot prices for equities and other commodities. Up to now electricity cannot be stored economically and therefore demand for electricity has an untempered effect on electricity prices. In particular, hourly electricity spot prices show a vast range of dynamics which can change rapidly. In this paper we introduce a robust version of functional principal component analysis for sparse data. The functional perspective inte...

  7. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring shows high accuracy within 6 hours after sensor calibration: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Yue

    Full Text Available Accurate and timely glucose monitoring is essential in intensive care units. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS has been advocated for many years to improve glycemic management in critically ill patients. In order to determine the effect of calibration time on the accuracy of CGMS, real-time subcutaneous CGMS was used in 18 critically ill patients. CGMS sensor was calibrated with blood glucose measurements by blood gas/glucose analyzer every 12 hours. Venous blood was sampled every 2 to 4 hours, and glucose concentration was measured by standard central laboratory device (CLD and by blood gas/glucose analyzer. With CLD measurement as reference, relative absolute difference (mean±SD in CGMS and blood gas/glucose analyzer were 14.4%±12.2% and 6.5%±6.2%, respectively. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was 74.8% in CGMS, and 98.4% in blood gas/glucose analyzer. The relative absolute difference of CGMS obtained within 6 hours after sensor calibration (8.8%±7.2% was significantly less than that between 6 to 12 hours after calibration (20.1%±13.5%, p<0.0001. The percentage of matched points in Clarke error grid zone A was also significantly higher in data sets within 6 hours after calibration (92.4% versus 57.1%, p<0.0001. In conclusion, real-time subcutaneous CGMS is accurate in glucose monitoring in critically ill patients. CGMS sensor should be calibrated less than 6 hours, no matter what time interval recommended by manufacturer.

  8. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Cepheid Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Team

    2018-01-01

    Galactic Cepheid variable stars have been used for over a century as standard candles and as the first rung of the cosmic distance ladder, integral to the calculation of the Hubble constant. However, it is challenging to observe Cepheids within the Milky Way Galaxy because of extinction, and there are still uncertainties in the Cepheid period-luminosity relation (or Leavitt Law) that affect these important distance calculations. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey has provided spectra for a large sample of Galactic Cepheids, but the standard chemical abundance pipeline (ASPCAP) processing is not well-suited to pulsational variables, preventing us from using them to study metallicity effect in the Leavitt Law with standard processing. Using a standalone version of the ASPCAP pipeline, we present an analysis of individual visit spectra from a test sample of nine APOGEE Cepheids, and we compare its output to the stars’ literature abundance values. Based on the results of this comparison, we will be able to improve the standard analysis and process the entirety of APOGEE’s Cepheid catalogue to improve its abundance measurements. The resulting abundance data will allow us to constrain the effect of metallicity on the Leavitt Law and thus allow for more accurate Cepheid distance measurements for the determination of the Hubble constant.

  9. Short time-scale variability in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey on time-scales from 24 min to tens of days. We find that about one per cent of the point sources down to V = 24 are variables. We discuss the variability-detection probabilities for each field

  10. 77 FR 43780 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Changes to Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts and Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ...DoD, GSA, and NASA are proposing to amend the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to provide additional guidance when raising the ceiling price or otherwise changing the scope of work for a time-and-materials (T&M) or labor-hour (LH) contract or order.

  11. 78 FR 13766 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Changes to Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts and Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ...DoD, GSA, and NASA are issuing a final rule amending the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to provide additional guidance when raising the ceiling price or otherwise changing the scope of work for a time-and-materials (T&M) or labor-hour (LH) contract or order.

  12. Cross-National Differences in the Association between Parental Work Hours and Time with Children in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeters, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates cross-national differences in the association between parental work hours and parent-child interaction time and explains differences in this individual-level association on the basis of country characteristics. It extends prior research by testing the moderating effects of country characteristics through multilevel analyses…

  13. Is Reaction Time Variability in ADHD Mainly at Low Frequencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction times (RT variability) has garnered increasing interest as an indicator of cognitive and neurobiological dysfunction in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent theory and research has emphasized specific low-frequency patterns of RT variability. However, whether…

  14. The National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) and the 4-hour rule: time to review the target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew; Khanna, Sankalp; Good, Norm M; Boyle, Justin; Cattell, Rohan; Heiniger, Liam; Griffin, Bronwyn R; Bell, Anthony Jr; Lind, James; Scott, Ian A

    2016-05-16

    We explored the relationship between the National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) compliance rate, defined as the proportion of patients admitted or discharged from emergency departments (EDs) within 4 hours of presentation, and the risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality of patients admitted to hospital acutely from EDs. Retrospective observational study of all de-identified episodes of care involving patients who presented acutely to the EDs of 59 Australian hospitals between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2014. The relationship between the risk-adjusted mortality of inpatients admitted acutely from EDs (the emergency hospital standardised mortality ratio [eHSMR]: the ratio of the numbers of observed to expected deaths) and NEAT compliance rates for all presenting patients (total NEAT) and admitted patients (admitted NEAT). ED and inpatient data were aggregated for 12.5 million ED episodes of care and 11.6 million inpatient episodes of care. A highly significant (P NEAT compliance rates was found; eHSMR declined to a nadir of 73 as total and admitted NEAT compliance rates rose to about 83% and 65% respectively. Sensitivity analyses found no confounding by the inclusion of palliative care and/or short-stay patients. As NEAT compliance rates increased, in-hospital mortality of emergency admissions declined, although this direct inverse relationship is lost once total and admitted NEAT compliance rates exceed certain levels. This inverse association between NEAT compliance rates and in-hospital mortality should be considered when formulating targets for access to emergency care.

  15. Developing a Method to Test the Validity of 24 Hour Time Use Diaries Using Wearable Cameras: A Feasibility Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul; Thomas, Emma; Doherty, Aiden; Harms, Teresa; Burke, Órlaith; Gershuny, Jonathan; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Self-report time use diaries collect a continuous sequenced record of daily activities but the validity of the data they produce is uncertain. This study tests the feasibility of using wearable cameras to generate, through image prompted interview, reconstructed 'near-objective' data to assess their validity. 16 volunteers completed the Harmonised European Time Use Survey (HETUS) diary and used an Autographer wearable camera (recording images at approximately 15 second intervals) for the waking hours of the same 24-hour period. Participants then completed an interview in which visual images were used as prompts to reconstruct a record of activities for comparison with the diary record. 14 participants complied with the full collection protocol. We compared time use and number of discrete activities from the diary and camera records (using 10 classifications of activity). In terms of aggregate totals of daily time use we found no significant difference between the diary and camera data. In terms of number of discrete activities, participants reported a mean of 19.2 activities per day in the diaries, while image prompted interviews revealed 41.1 activities per day. The visualisations of the individual activity sequences reveal some potentially important differences between the two record types, which will be explored at the next project stage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using wearable cameras to reconstruct time use through image prompted interview in order to test the concurrent validity of 24-hour activity time-use budgets. In future we need a suitably powered study to assess the validity and reliability of 24-hour time use diaries. PMID:26633807

  16. Prime-Time Television: Assessing Violence during the Most Popular Viewing Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stacy L.; Nathanson, Amy I.; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses the prevalence and context of violence in prime-time television programming using a random, representative sample. Shows that, regardless of the time of day, viewers are likely to encounter violence in roughly 2 out of 3 programs. Identifies specific channel types and genres that feature potentially harmful depictions of violence during…

  17. Part-time work and work hour preferences : An international comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielers, Rudolf; Münderlein, Maria; Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to explain cross-country differences in over- and under-employment. The focus is on the effects of the growth of part-time work. We argue and demonstrate that the spread and acceptance of part-time work results in a downward adaptation of descriptive norms regulating work

  18. Simulating Flash Floods at Hourly Time-Step Using the SWAT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Boithias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Flash floods are natural phenomena with environmental, social and economic impacts. To date, few numerical models are able to simulate hydrological processes at catchment scale at a reasonable time scale to describe flash events with accurate details. Considering a ~810 km2 Mediterranean river coastal basin (southwestern France as a study case, the objective of the present study was to assess the ability of the sub-daily module of the lumped Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT to simulate discharge (1 time-continuously, by testing two sub-basin delineation schemes, two catchment sizes, and two output time-steps; and (2 at flood time-scale, by comparing the performances of SWAT to the performances of the event-based fully distributed MARINE model when simulating flash flood events. We showed that there was no benefit of decreasing the size of the minimum drainage area (e.g., from ~15 km2 down to ~1 km2 when delineating sub-basins in SWAT. We also showed that both the MARINE and SWAT models were equally able to reproduce peak discharge, flood timing and volume, and that they were both limited by rainfall and soil data. Hence, the SWAT model appears to be a reliable modelling tool to predict discharge over long periods of time in large flash-flood-prone basins.

  19. Postmortem Vitreous Humor Magnesium Does Not Elevate in Salt Water Drowning When the Immersion Time Is Less Than an Hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Rexson; Kuo, Ta-Chen; Kesha, Kilak; Garland, Jack; Garland, Sarah; Anne, Sravan; Elstub, Hannah; Cala, Allan

    2017-12-01

    Elevation in postmortem vitreous humor sodium and chloride (PMVSC) in salt water drowning (SWD) when the immersion time is less than 1 hour (SWD1) is hypothesized to result from electrolyte changes in blood from salt water inhalation/ingestion during drowning. After approximately 1 hour after death, electrolytes may diffuse into the vitreous humor via the eye coverings. Another abundant element in salt water is magnesium, which is approximately 50 times higher in concentration than the blood and vitreous humor magnesium levels. Magnesium is able to diffuse across the eye coverings but not as easily through the blood-ocular barrier. With these properties, we hypothesize that postmortem vitreous magnesium (PMVM) would not be elevated in SWD1 but become elevated in SWD with immersion times greater than 1 hour (SWD>1). The aim of this article was to investigate the differences in PMVM and PMVSC between nonimmersion deaths, SWD1, and SWD>1. This is a 1-year retrospective study comparing PMVM and PMVSC in nonimmersion deaths, SWD1, and SWD>1. Postmortem vitreous magnesium is significantly higher in SWD>1 than SWD1 and nonimmersion deaths, with no significant difference between SWD1 and nonimmersion deaths. Postmortem vitreous humor sodium chloride is statistically higher in SWD1 and SWD>1 than nonimmersion deaths. As a conclusion, PMVSC elevates and PMVM does not elevate in SWD1.

  20. In the wake of the 2003 and 2011 duty hours regulations, how do internal medicine interns spend their time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Lauren; Habicht, Robert; Wu, Albert W; Desai, Sanjay V; Wang, Kevin; Silva, Kathryn Novello; Niessen, Timothy; Oliver, Nora; Feldman, Leonard

    2013-08-01

    The 2003 and 2011 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) common program requirements compress busy inpatient schedules and increase intern supervision. At the same time, interns wrestle with the effects of electronic medical record systems, including documentation needs and availability of an ever-increasing amount of stored patient data. In light of these changes, we conducted a time motion study to determine how internal medicine interns spend their time in the hospital. Descriptive, observational study on inpatient ward rotations at two internal medicine residency programs at large academic medical centers in Baltimore, MD during January, 2012. Twenty-nine interns at the two residency programs. The primary outcome was percent of time spent in direct patient care (talking with and examining patients). Secondary outcomes included percent of time spent in indirect patient care, education, and miscellaneous activities (eating, sleeping, and walking). Results were analyzed using multilevel regression analysis adjusted for clustering at the observer and intern levels. Interns were observed for a total of 873 hours. Interns spent 12 % of their time in direct patient care, 64 % in indirect patient care, 15 % in educational activities, and 9 % in miscellaneous activities. Computer use occupied 40 % of interns' time. There was no significant difference in time spent in these activities between the two sites. Interns today spend a minority of their time directly caring for patients. Compared with interns in time motion studies prior to 2003, interns in our study spent less time in direct patient care and sleeping, and more time talking with other providers and documenting. Reduced work hours in the setting of increasing complexity of medical inpatients, growing volume of patient data, and increased supervision may limit the amount of time interns spend with patients.

  1. A study of the hourly variability of the urban heat island effect in the Greater Athens Area during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Rapsomanikis, S; Amiridis, V; Keramitsoglou, I; Hooyberghs, H; Maiheu, B; Melas, D

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of air temperature and humidity in the urban canopy layer during July 2009 in 26 sites in Athens, Greece, allowed for the mapping of the hourly spatiotemporal evolution of the urban heat island (UHI) effect. City districts neighboring to the mountains to the east were the hottest during the afternoon, while being among the coolest during the early morning hours. While during the early morning some coastal sites were the hottest, the warm air plume slowly moved to the densely urbanized center of the city until 14:00-15:00, moving then further west, to the Elefsis industrial area in the afternoon. Results from the UrbClim model agree fairly well with the observations. Satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) data from AATSR, ASTER, AVHRR and MODIS, for pixels corresponding to ground stations measuring Tair, showed that LST can be up to 5K lower than the respective Tair during nighttime, while it can be up to 15K higher during the rest of the day. Generally, LST during late afternoon as acquired from AATSR is very near to Tair for all stations and all days, i.e., the AATSR LST afternoon retrieval can be used as a very good approximation of Tair. The hourly evolution of the spatial Tair distribution was almost the same during days with NE Etesian flow as in days with sea breeze circulation, indicating that the mean wind flow was not the main factor controlling the diurnal UHI evolution, although it influenced the temperatures attained. No unambiguous observation of the urban moisture excess (UME) phenomenon could be made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 24-hour pattern of work-related injury risk of French firemen: nocturnal peak time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Marc; Berrez, Stéphane; Pelisse, Didier; Brousse, Eric; Forget, Coralie; Marlot, Michel; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain

    2011-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to assess clock-time patterning of work-related injuries (WRIs) of firemen (FM) of Saône et Loire-71 (France) during the 4-yr span of 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2007. FM of this service are legally required to log every WRI and seek its evaluation by the medical service, whether the WRI was the result of worksite duties or exercise/sport activities at the station. WRI was defined specifically as a (nonexercise, nonsport, and nonemotional/stress) work-associated trauma, verified both by log book and medical records. For the corresponding years, the 24-h pattern of emergency calls (Calls) plus road traffic (Traffic) on the main roads of the service area was also assessed. Relative risk (R) of WRI was calculated as the quantity of WRIs/h divided by the quantity of Call responses/h × 1000, which takes into account the number of at-risk FM/unit time, since each dispatched emergency vehicle is staffed with 4 FM. Comparably trained regular (RFM) and volunteer (VFM) FM experienced a total of 187 WRIs. The 24-h WRI curve patterns of RFM and VFM were correlated (r = 0.4, p difference (p > .05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) validated comparable clock-time patterns in WRIs of RFM and VFM each year and each season (all p  .0006; Cosinor analysis, p work performance) of FM of the same service to urgent medical calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Highest R of WRI at 02:00 h corresponded closely to longest LT (raw data at ∼02:00 h and Cosinor derived Ø of 02.54 h ± 71 min [SD]), thereby supporting the hypothesis of a common mechanism underlying the two 24-h profiles. A third aim was to determine the relevance of a new concept in work safety, "chronoprevention," for future FM training programs.

  3. Potent Gastric Acid Inhibition Over 24 Hours by 4-Times Daily Dosing of Esomeprazole 20 mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, Shu; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Yamade, Mihoko; Kagami, Takuma; Hamaya, Yasushi; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Furuta, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    When administered at a standard dose, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) do not always provide sufficient acid inhibition for all subjects, particularly in extensive metabolizers (EMs) of CYP2C19. Whether esomeprazole at a dose of 20 mg four times daily dosing (q.i.d.) can attain sufficient acid inhibition throughout 24 h in EMs remains unclear. We therefore investigated the efficacy of esomeprazole q.i.d. for acid inhibition. In a randomized cross-over design, 30 Helicobacter pylori-negative healthy young Japanese volunteers received esomeprazole at a dose of 20 mg two times a day (b.i.d.) or q.i.d. for 7 days. A pH monitoring was conducted before the trial as a control and on day 7 of both regimens. Median pH values in the q.i.d. regimen were significantly higher than those with the b.i.d. regimen in EMs (b.i.d.: 5.3, q.i.d.: 6.6, p = 0.022), intermediate metabolizer (IM) (b.i.d.: 5.5, q.i.d.: 6.8, p = 0.005) and poor metabolizer (PM) (b.i.d.: 6.2, q.i.d.: 7.0, p = 0.047), respectively. Median pH with the b.i.d. regimen differed significantly by CYP2C19 genotypes (p = 0.004), but not the q.i.d. regimen (p = 0.384). Esomeprazole q.i.d. achieved potent acid inhibition in all Helicobacter pylori-negative subjects, irrespective of CYP2C19 genotype, which might be one of the rescue regimens for patients' refractory to PPI treatment.

  4. Photoelectron counting autoguiding system with variable accumulating time and variable corrective value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi-Jin

    1990-12-01

    This paper discusses three variants of a photoelectron counting autoguiding system based on half-disc light modulator. The first variant operates with constant accumulating time. The second variant operates with variable accumulating time but constant corrective value, which equals the allowable error of the guiding system. The third variant operates with both variable accumulating time and variable corrective value. Guiding errors and time responses of these three variants are compared. Guiders based on the third variant have been successfully used at the 1.56 m astrometrical telescope and the double-tube 40 cm telescope in Shanghai Observatory. The guiding error measured from the plate is about 0″11.

  5. Lunch-time food source is associated with school hour and school day diet quality among Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugault-Lafleur, C N; Black, J L; Barr, S I

    2017-07-31

    There is limited research on the dietary behaviours of Canadian children at school, including where students obtain food from during school hours or whether lunch-time food source influences diet quality. Nationally representative cross-sectional data from 24-h dietary recalls were analysed from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (n = 4589). Dietary outcomes included school hour and school day dietary intakes and School Healthy Eating Index (S-HEI) scores. Survey-weighted covariate-adjusted linear regression models examined differences in dietary outcomes across lunch-time food source groups. The majority of children (72.8%) reported bringing lunch from home, whereas fewer students obtained lunch from off-campus locations (11.6%), schools (9.6%) or skipped lunch (5.9%). Compared to off-campus lunches, home-packed lunches were significantly higher in fibre, vitamins A, D and C, thiamin, magnesium, iron, grains, vegetables and fruit, but lower in total calories, fat and calories from minimally nutritious foods. Average school hour diet quality required improvement for all age groups, although S-HEI scores did not differ significantly by lunch-time food source among 6-8-year-old children. However, for children age 9-17 years, bringing a home-packed lunch was associated with significantly higher S-HEI scores compared to students obtaining lunch from off-campus locations. After adjusting for age and sex, lunch-time food source was also significantly associated with whole day dietary quality. Although the nutritional quality of off-campus lunches was lower than home-packed lunches, the quality of foods was suboptimal, regardless of food source. Strategies are needed to enhance access to nutritious foods on campus and improve the nutritional quality of packed lunches, which supply the majority of lunch-time foods consumed by Canadian children. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Prognostic value of reading-to-reading blood pressure variability over 24 hours in 8938 subjects from 11 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine W; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2010-01-01

    In previous studies, of which several were underpowered, the relation between cardiovascular outcome and blood pressure (BP) variability was inconsistent. We followed health outcomes in 8938 subjects (mean age: 53.0 years; 46.8% women) randomly recruited from 11 populations. At baseline, we asses...

  7. Genetic analysis of reaction time variability : room for improvement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntsi, J.; Frazier-Wood, A. C.; Banaschewski, T.; Gill, M.; Miranda, A.; Oades, R. D.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Steinhausen, H. -C.; van der Meere, J. J.; Faraone, S. V.; Asherson, P.; Rijsdijk, F.

    Background. Increased reaction time variability (RTV) on cognitive tasks requiring a speeded response is characteristic of several psychiatric disorders. In attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the association with RTV is strong phenotypically and genetically, yet high RTV is not a

  8. Variability of Travel Times on New Jersey Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the results of a link and path travel time study conducted on selected New Jersey (NJ) highways to produce estimates of the corresponding variability of travel time (VTT) by departure time of the day and days of the week. The tra...

  9. The cost of travel time variability: three measures with properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between three types of measures of the cost of travel time variability: measures based on scheduling preferences and implicit departure time choice, Bernoulli type measures based on a univariate function of travel time, and mean-dispersion measures. We...

  10. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  11. Ageing modifies the effects of beetroot juice supplementation on 24-hour blood pressure variability: An individual participant meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, M; Lara, J; Jajja, A; Sutyarjoko, A; Ashor, A W; Brandt, K; Qadir, O; Mathers, J C; Benjamin, N; Winyard, P G; Anning, C; Shore, A; Gilchrist, M

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal circadian oscillations of blood pressure (BP) and nocturnal-diurnal BP differences (i.e., dipping) increase cardiovascular risk. Whether inorganic nitrate supplementation influences 24-hr BP variability is currently unknown. We studied the effects of high-nitrate beetroot juice supplementation on BP variability measured by 24-hr ambulatory BP monitoring (24-hr ABPM) in older subjects. Data from four independent randomised clinical trials were collated. Eighty-five older participants (age range: 55-76 years) were included in the final database. Two trials had an open-label, parallel design and two trials had a cross-over, double-blind design. Participants were randomised to either beetroot juice or placebo. Changes in 24-hr ABPM (daily, diurnal, nocturnal), variability (weighted-SDs), night-dipping, morning surge for systolic and diastolic BP were measured. Meta-analysis was conducted to obtain pooled estimates of the effect size for each BP outcome. Sub-group analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence of age, BMI, gender, BP status and changes in nitrite concentrations on the effect size. The pooled effect of beetroot juice on all BP outcomes was not significant. Beetroot juice ingestion determined a significant decrease in nocturnal systolic BP variability in subjects aged less than 65 y (2.8 mmHg, -4.5 -1.0, p = 0.002) compared to the older group (≥ 65 y; 1.0 mmHg, -2.2 4.2, p = 0.54). A greater change in NO2(-) concentrations after beetroot supplementation was associated with significant differences for nocturnal mean (-3.4 mmHg, -0.6 -2.4, p = 0.02) and variability (-0.8 mmHg, -1.5 -0.06, p = 0.03) of systolic BP. The vascular responsiveness to inorganic nitrate may be modified by mechanisms of vascular ageing influencing the reducing capacity to convert inorganic nitrate into nitrite and tissue-specific responses to dietary nitrate supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodicity and stability for variable-time impulsive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongfei; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen

    2017-10-01

    The paper considers a general neural networks model with variable-time impulses. It is shown that each solution of the system intersects with every discontinuous surface exactly once via several new well-proposed assumptions. Moreover, based on the comparison principle, this paper shows that neural networks with variable-time impulse can be reduced to the corresponding neural network with fixed-time impulses under well-selected conditions. Meanwhile, the fixed-time impulsive systems can be regarded as the comparison system of the variable-time impulsive neural networks. Furthermore, a series of sufficient criteria are derived to ensure the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution of variable-time impulsive neural networks, and to illustrate the same stability properties between variable-time impulsive neural networks and the fixed-time ones. The new criteria are established by applying Schaefer's fixed point theorem combined with the use of inequality technique. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. QT variability index on 24-hour Holter independently predicts mortality in patients with heart failure: analysis of Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Craig P; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Goldstein, Robert; Olsen, Cara; Bernardinangeli, Marino; Veniani, Marco; Midi, Paolo; Tavazzi, Luigi; Haigney, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Increased temporal variability of repolarization, as reflected by QT interval variability measured over 10-15 minutes, predicted spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias and death in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients in mild to moderate heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that increased mean QT variability over 24 hours would be associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) mortality in a heterogeneous HF population. The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca-Heart Failure trial prospectively enrolled subjects with HF of any cause. Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings from 268 subjects were analyzed using a template-matching, semiautomatic algorithm to measure QT and heart rate time series in sequential 5-minute epochs over 24 hours. The QT variability index (QTVI) was expressed as the log ratio of the normalized QT variance over normalized heart rate variance. Total and CV mortality were assessed as a function of continuous and dichotomous QTVI (>-0.84) in univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for significant clinical predictors. After a median of 47 months, there were 53 deaths, of which 44 were from CV causes. A significant association with the outcome was found for QTVI both as continuous and dichotomous variables after adjustment for clinical covariates (age >70, New York Heart Association class III-IV, left ventricular ejection fraction, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, creatinine): QTVI hazard ratio (HR) 4.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.8-88; P = .008) for total and 4.4 (CI 1.9-10.1; P = .0006) for CV mortality; QTVI >-0.84 HR 2.0 (CI 1.1-3.6; P = .02) for total and 2.1 (CI 1.1-3.8; P = .02) for CV mortality. Increased repolarization lability, as reflected in QTVI measured over 24 hours, is associated with increased risk for total and CV mortality in a heterogeneous population with chronic HF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. College quality and hourly wages: evidence from the self-revelation model, sibling models and instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Nicolai T

    2014-11-01

    This paper addresses the recent discussion on confounding in the returns to college quality literature using the Norwegian case. The main advantage of studying Norway is the quality of the data. Norwegian administrative data provide information on college applications, family relations and a rich set of control variables for all Norwegian citizens applying to college between 1997 and 2004 (N = 141,319) and their succeeding wages between 2003 and 2010 (676,079 person-year observations). With these data, this paper uses a subset of the models that have rendered mixed findings in the literature in order to investigate to what extent confounding biases the returns to college quality. I compare estimates obtained using standard regression models to estimates obtained using the self-revelation model of Dale and Krueger (2002), a sibling fixed effects model and the instrumental variable model used by Long (2008). Using these methods, I consistently find increasing returns to college quality over the course of students' work careers, with positive returns only later in students' work careers. I conclude that the standard regression estimate provides a reasonable estimate of the returns to college quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of TRMM 3-Hourly Multi-Satellite Precipitation Estimates Computed in Both Real and Post-Real Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Stocker, Erich; Bolvin, David T.; Nelkin, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data form the core of the information available for estimating precipitation on a global basis. While it is possible to create such estimates solely from one sensor, researchers have increasingly moved to using combinations of sensors in an attempt to improve accuracy, coverage, and resolution. This poster updates a long-term project in which the authors are working to provide routine combined-sensor estimates of precipitation over the entire globe at relatively fine time and space intervals. The goal is to produce these globally complete precipitation estimates on a 25-km grid every 3 hours. Since late January 2002 we have been estimating precipitation for the latitude band 50 degrees N-S within about 6 hours of observation time. This work is 1 of only 2 or 3 such efforts in the world. Now we are preparing to provide similar estimates for the last 5 years. All of this work is being carried out as part of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Initially, TRMM was focused on providing excellent long-term averages of precipitation in tropical regions, but since its launch in November 1997 continued research has allowed the same satellite and data system to be used for addressing weather-scale problems as well.

  16. Timing variability in children with early-treated congenital hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Snijders, T.A.B.; Schellekens, J.M.H.; Kalverboer, A.F.; Geuze, R.H.

    This study reports on central and peripheral determinants of timing variability in self-paced tapping by children with early-treated congenital hypothyroidism (CH). A theoretical model of the timing of repetitive movements developed by Wing and Kristofferson was applied to estimate the central

  17. Pulping Variables, Storage Time and Pitch Deposit | Ogunwusi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of pulping variable, wood classification and storage time on pitch deposition during kraft pulping of mixed tropical hardwood species growing in Nigeria were investigated. Storage time has effect on pitch deposition in all the groups. Pulp resin decreased from 0.535% in control experiment to 0.235% after the sixth ...

  18. Predicting travel time variability for cost-benefit analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peer, S.; Koopmans, C.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Unreliable travel times cause substantial costs to travelers. Nevertheless, they are not taken into account in many cost-benefit-analyses (CBA), or only in very rough ways. This paper aims at providing simple rules on how variability can be predicted, based on travel time data from Dutch highways.

  19. Retention of a 24-hour time memory in Syrian hamsters carrying the 20-hour short circadian period mutation in casein kinase-1ε (ck1εtau/tau).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Sean W; Yoon, Jeena; Shrestha, Tenjin C; Ralph, Martin R

    2014-10-01

    Circadian rhythmic expression of conditioned place avoidance (CPA) was produced in Syrian hamsters homozygous for the circadian short period mutation, tau. In constant dim red light neither the 20 h endogenous period, nor a 20 h place conditioning schedule eliminated the 24 h modulation of CPA behavior described previously for wild type (wt) hamsters and other species. Tau mutants exhibited a 20 h rhythm superimposed on the 24 h modulation. The 20 h component was removed selectively with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Wt animals conditioned on a 20 h schedule did not produce a 20 h rhythm, but still expressed the 24 h modulation. The results show that the context entrainable oscillator (CEO) underlying memory for the timing of an unconditioned stimulus, retains a period of about 24 h regardless of clock gene background (tau mutation) and/or the conditioning schedule (24 vs 20 h). Therefore the CEO responsible for time memory is distinct from the biological clock controlling activity; the underlying circadian molecular mechanisms may differ from the ubiquitous transcription-translation feedback oscillator; and time memory itself is not classically conditioned. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Column Generation for a Multitrip Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows, Driver Work Hours, and Heterogeneous Fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Povlovitsch Seixas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a vehicle routing problem with time windows, accessibility restrictions on customers, and a fleet that is heterogeneous with regard to capacity and average speed. A vehicle can perform multiple routes per day, all starting and ending at a single depot, and it is assigned to a single driver whose total work hours are limited. A column generation algorithm is proposed. The column generation pricing subproblem requires a specific elementary shortest path problem with resource constraints algorithm to address the possibility for each vehicle performing multiple routes per day and to address the need to set the workday’s start time within the planning horizon. A constructive heuristic and a metaheuristic based on tabu search are also developed to find good solutions.

  1. Effects of Head Start Hours on Children's Cognitive, Pre-Academic, and Behavioral Outcomes: An Instrumental Variable Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weilin; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Burchinal, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Children from low-income families benefit remarkably from exposure to compensatory education that began with Head Start in 1965 and aimed to improve school readiness skills by design. While empirical evidence has supported more instructional time in elementary and secondary schools for low-income students, little is known that whether increasing…

  2. Relationship between clinical, 24-hour, average day-time and night-time blood pressure and measures of arterial stiffness in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, J; Strauch, B; Petrák, O; Pikus, T; Holaj, R; Zelinka, T; Wichterle, D; Widimský, J

    2008-01-01

    Arterial wall stiffness is considered an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between clinical, 24-hour, average day-time and night-time blood pressure (BP) and measures of arterial stiffness assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV) (using SphygmoCor applanation tonometer) in essential hypertension (severe-resistant (RH, n=29) and moderate hypertension (EH, n=35)) and in normotensive control subjects (n-29) (NCS) matched by age. After multiple regression analysis, PWV remains significantly correlated mainly with night-time pulse pressure and to a lesser extent with age. PWV was significantly higher in RH compared to moderate EH and NCS.

  3. Influence of the time of day and fasting duration on glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panchalli; Lu, Mei-Chun; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Yuan-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the time of day (TD) of glucose measurement and the fasting duration (FD) influence the glucose levels in adults. Few studies have examined the effects of the TD and FD on the glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test (GCT) in pregnant women in screening for or diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the TD (morning, afternoon, night) and the FD (the time of the last food ingestion as follows: ≤1 hour, 1-2 hours, and >2 hours) by examining their combined effects on the glucose levels following a 50-gram GCT in pregnant women. We analyzed the data of 1,454 non-diabetic pregnant Taiwanese women in a prospective study. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression were used to estimate the relationships between the 9 TD-FD groups and the continuous and binary glucose levels (cut-off at 140 mg/dL) following a 50-gram GCT, after adjusting for maternal age, nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain. Different TD and FD groups were associated with variable glucose responses to the 50-gram GCT, some of which were significant. The estimate coefficients (β) of the TD-FD groups "night, ≤1 hr" and "night, 1-2 hr" revealed significantly lower glucose concentrations [β (95% confidence interval [CI]): -6.46 (-12.53, -0.38) and -6.85 (-12.50, -1.20)] compared with the "morning, >2 hr" group. The TD-FD groups "afternoon, ≤1 hr" and "afternoon, 1-2 hr" showed significantly lower odds ratios (OR) of a positive GCT; the adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 0.54 (0.31-0.95) and 0.58 (0.35-0.96), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of standardizing the TD and FD for the 1-hour, 50-gram GCT. In screening for and diagnosing GDM, the TD and FD are modifiable factors that should be considered in clinical practice and epidemiological studies.

  4. Influence of the time of day and fasting duration on glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test in pregnant women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchalli Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the time of day (TD of glucose measurement and the fasting duration (FD influence the glucose levels in adults. Few studies have examined the effects of the TD and FD on the glucose level following a 1-hour, 50-gram glucose challenge test (GCT in pregnant women in screening for or diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the TD (morning, afternoon, night and the FD (the time of the last food ingestion as follows: ≤1 hour, 1-2 hours, and >2 hours by examining their combined effects on the glucose levels following a 50-gram GCT in pregnant women. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the data of 1,454 non-diabetic pregnant Taiwanese women in a prospective study. Multiple linear regression and multiple logistic regression were used to estimate the relationships between the 9 TD-FD groups and the continuous and binary glucose levels (cut-off at 140 mg/dL following a 50-gram GCT, after adjusting for maternal age, nulliparity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain. Different TD and FD groups were associated with variable glucose responses to the 50-gram GCT, some of which were significant. The estimate coefficients (β of the TD-FD groups "night, ≤1 hr" and "night, 1-2 hr" revealed significantly lower glucose concentrations [β (95% confidence interval [CI]: -6.46 (-12.53, -0.38 and -6.85 (-12.50, -1.20] compared with the "morning, >2 hr" group. The TD-FD groups "afternoon, ≤1 hr" and "afternoon, 1-2 hr" showed significantly lower odds ratios (OR of a positive GCT; the adjusted ORs (95% CI were 0.54 (0.31-0.95 and 0.58 (0.35-0.96, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the importance of standardizing the TD and FD for the 1-hour, 50-gram GCT. In screening for and diagnosing GDM, the TD and FD are modifiable factors that should be considered in clinical practice and epidemiological studies.

  5. New approach for optimal electricity planning and dispatching with hourly time-scale air quality and health considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Paul Y; Zhang, Wenxian; Moreno-Cruz, Juan B; Nenes, Athanasios; Realff, Matthew J; Russell, Armistead G; Sokol, Joel; Thomas, Valerie M

    2015-09-01

    Integrating accurate air quality modeling with decision making is hampered by complex atmospheric physics and chemistry and its coupling with atmospheric transport. Existing approaches to model the physics and chemistry accurately lead to significant computational burdens in computing the response of atmospheric concentrations to changes in emissions profiles. By integrating a reduced form of a fully coupled atmospheric model within a unit commitment optimization model, we allow, for the first time to our knowledge, a fully dynamical approach toward electricity planning that accurately and rapidly minimizes both cost and health impacts. The reduced-form model captures the response of spatially resolved air pollutant concentrations to changes in electricity-generating plant emissions on an hourly basis with accuracy comparable to a comprehensive air quality model. The integrated model allows for the inclusion of human health impacts into cost-based decisions for power plant operation. We use the new capability in a case study of the state of Georgia over the years of 2004-2011, and show that a shift in utilization among existing power plants during selected hourly periods could have provided a health cost savings of $175.9 million dollars for an additional electricity generation cost of $83.6 million in 2007 US dollars (USD2007). The case study illustrates how air pollutant health impacts can be cost-effectively minimized by intelligently modulating power plant operations over multihour periods, without implementing additional emissions control technologies.

  6. Verification of models for ballistic movement time and endpoint variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ray F; Drury, Colin G

    2013-01-01

    A hand control movement is composed of several ballistic movements. The time required in performing a ballistic movement and its endpoint variability are two important properties in developing movement models. The purpose of this study was to test potential models for predicting these two properties. Twelve participants conducted ballistic movements of specific amplitudes using a drawing tablet. The measured data of movement time and endpoint variability were then used to verify the models. This study was successful with Hoffmann and Gan's movement time model (Hoffmann, 1981; Gan and Hoffmann 1988) predicting more than 90.7% data variance for 84 individual measurements. A new theoretically developed ballistic movement variability model, proved to be better than Howarth, Beggs, and Bowden's (1971) model, predicting on average 84.8% of stopping-variable error and 88.3% of aiming-variable errors. These two validated models will help build solid theoretical movement models and evaluate input devices. This article provides better models for predicting end accuracy and movement time of ballistic movements that are desirable in rapid aiming tasks, such as keying in numbers on a smart phone. The models allow better design of aiming tasks, for example button sizes on mobile phones for different user populations.

  7. Energy and Reserve under Distributed Energy Resources Management-Day-Ahead, Hour-Ahead and Real-Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Tiago; Silva, Marco; Sousa, Tiago

    2017-01-01

    The increasing penetration of distributed energy resources based on renewable energy sources in distribution systems leads to a more complex management of power systems. Consequently, ancillary services become even more important to maintain the system security and reliability. This paper proposes...... the balance of the distribution system. For each scheduling stage, previous scheduling results and updated forecasts are considered. An illustrative test case of a distribution network with 33 buses, considering a large penetration of distribution energy resources allows demonstrating the benefits...... and evaluates a generic model for day-ahead, intraday (hour-ahead) and real-time scheduling, considering the joint optimization of energy and reserve in the scope of the virtual power player concept. The model aims to minimize the operation costs in the point of view of one aggregator agent taking into account...

  8. Due-Window Assignment Scheduling with Variable Job Processing Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a common due-window assignment scheduling problem jobs with variable job processing times on a single machine, where the processing time of a job is a function of its position in a sequence (i.e., learning effect or its starting time (i.e., deteriorating effect. The problem is to determine the optimal due-windows, and the processing sequence simultaneously to minimize a cost function includes earliness, tardiness, the window location, window size, and weighted number of tardy jobs. We prove that the problem can be solved in polynomial time.

  9. Predictor variables for marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-06-01

    We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-variate analysis in 29 female runners. The marathoners completed the marathon distance within 251 (26) min, running at a speed of 10.2 (1.1) km/h. Body mass (r=0.37), body mass index (r=0.46), the circumferences of thigh (r=0.51) and calf (r=0.41), the skin-fold thicknesses of front thigh (r=0.38) and of medial calf (r=0.40), the sum of eight skin-folds (r=0.44) and body fat percentage (r=0.41) were related to marathon race time. For the variables of training, maximal distance ran per week (r=- 0.38), number of running training sessions per week (r=- 0.46) and the speed of the training sessions (r= - 0.60) were related to marathon race time. In the multi-variate analysis, the circumference of calf (P=0.02) and the speed of the training sessions (P=0.0014) were related to marathon race time. Marathon race time might be partially (r(2)=0.50) predicted by the following equation: Race time (min)=184.4 + 5.0 x (circumference calf, cm) -11.9 x (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational female marathoners. Variables of both anthropometry and training were related to marathon race time in recreational female marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable. For practical applications, a low circumference of calf and a high running speed in training are associated with a fast marathon race time in recreational female runners.

  10. Timing of Palliative Care Consultations and Recommendations: Understanding the Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Carpenter, Brian D; Thorsten, Michael; Heiland, Mark; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-11-01

    Palliative care consultation teams (PCCTs) provide care that enhances quality of life. The effectiveness of PCCTs depends, however, on their timely utilization by other providers. The goal of this study was to examine the timing of palliative care consultation requests and responses at a single Veteran Affairs Medical Center. The median interval between admission and consultation request was 5 days (range = 0-73 days). The median interval between consultation request and death was 23 days (range = 0-847 days). In logistic regressions, timing variables were not significant predictors of whether consultation recommendations were made or implemented. There is substantial variability in when patients receive a palliative care consultation. Many patients receive palliative care within the first week of hospitalization and their final month of life. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Physical attraction to reliable, low variability nervous systems: Reaction time variability predicts attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Emily E; Saville, Christopher W N; Ward, Robert; Ramsey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The human face cues a range of important fitness information, which guides mate selection towards desirable others. Given humans' high investment in the central nervous system (CNS), cues to CNS function should be especially important in social selection. We tested if facial attractiveness preferences are sensitive to the reliability of human nervous system function. Several decades of research suggest an operational measure for CNS reliability is reaction time variability, which is measured by standard deviation of reaction times across trials. Across two experiments, we show that low reaction time variability is associated with facial attractiveness. Moreover, variability in performance made a unique contribution to attractiveness judgements above and beyond both physical health and sex-typicality judgements, which have previously been associated with perceptions of attractiveness. In a third experiment, we empirically estimated the distribution of attractiveness preferences expected by chance and show that the size and direction of our results in Experiments 1 and 2 are statistically unlikely without reference to reaction time variability. We conclude that an operating characteristic of the human nervous system, reliability of information processing, is signalled to others through facial appearance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation of 2 hour, 4 hour, 8 hour and 12 hour urine protein with 24 hour urinary protein in preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Rani Singhal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To find shortest and reliable time period of urine collection for determination of proteinuria.It is a prospective study carried out on 125 pregnant women with preeclampsia after 20 weeks of gestation having urine albumin >1 using dipstick test. Urine was collected in five different time intervals in colors labeled containers with the assistance of nursing staff; the total collection time was 24 hours. Total urine protein of two-hour, four-hour, eight-hour, 12-hour and 24-hour urine was measured and compared with 24-hour collection. Data was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient.There was significant correlation (p value < 0.01 in two, four, eight and 12-hour urine protein with 24-urine protein, with correlation coefficient of 0.97, 0.97, 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. When a cut off value of 25 mg, 50 mg. 100 mg, and 150 mg for urine protein were used for 2-hour, 4-hours, 8-hour and 12-hour urine collection, a sensitivity of 92.45%, 95.28%, 91.51%, and 96.23% and a specificity of 68.42%, 94.74%, 84.21% and 84.21% were obtained, respectively.Two-hour urine proteins can be used for assessment of proteinuria in preeclampsia instead of gold standard 24-hour urine collection for early diagnosis and better patient compliance.

  13. Increased timing variability in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bolbecker

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that impaired time perception and the neural circuitry underlying internal timing mechanisms may contribute to severe psychiatric disorders, including psychotic and mood disorders. The degree to which alterations in temporal perceptions reflect deficits that exist across psychosis-related phenotypes and the extent to which mood symptoms contribute to these deficits is currently unknown. In addition, compared to schizophrenia, where timing deficits have been more extensively investigated, sub-second timing has been studied relatively infrequently in bipolar disorder. The present study compared sub-second duration estimates of schizophrenia (SZ, schizoaffective disorder (SA, non-psychotic bipolar disorder (BDNP, bipolar disorder with psychotic features (BDP, and healthy non-psychiatric controls (HC on a well-established time perception task using sub-second durations. Participants included 66 SZ, 37 BDNP, 34 BDP, 31 SA, and 73 HC who participated in a temporal bisection task that required temporal judgements about auditory durations ranging from 300 to 600 milliseconds. Timing variability was significantly higher in SZ, BDP, and BDNP groups compared to healthy controls. The bisection point did not differ across groups. These findings suggest that both psychotic and mood symptoms may be associated with disruptions in internal timing mechanisms. Yet unexpected findings emerged. Specifically, the BDNP group had significantly increased variability compared to controls, but the SA group did not. In addition, these deficits appeared to exist independent of current symptom status. The absence of between group differences in bisection point suggests that increased variability in the SZ and bipolar disorder groups are due to alterations in perceptual timing in the sub-second range, possibly mediated by the cerebellum, rather than cognitive deficits.

  14. Inverse Ising problem in continuous time: A latent variable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Christian; Opper, Manfred

    2017-12-01

    We consider the inverse Ising problem: the inference of network couplings from observed spin trajectories for a model with continuous time Glauber dynamics. By introducing two sets of auxiliary latent random variables we render the likelihood into a form which allows for simple iterative inference algorithms with analytical updates. The variables are (1) Poisson variables to linearize an exponential term which is typical for point process likelihoods and (2) Pólya-Gamma variables, which make the likelihood quadratic in the coupling parameters. Using the augmented likelihood, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood estimate of network parameters. Using a third set of latent variables we extend the EM algorithm to sparse couplings via L1 regularization. Finally, we develop an efficient approximate Bayesian inference algorithm using a variational approach. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithms on data simulated from an Ising model. For data which are simulated from a more biologically plausible network with spiking neurons, we show that the Ising model captures well the low order statistics of the data and how the Ising couplings are related to the underlying synaptic structure of the simulated network.

  15. Complexity Variability Assessment of Nonlinear Time-Varying Cardiovascular Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Garcia, Ronald G.; Taylor, Jessica Noggle; Toschi, Nicola; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    The application of complex systems theory to physiology and medicine has provided meaningful information about the nonlinear aspects underlying the dynamics of a wide range of biological processes and their disease-related aberrations. However, no studies have investigated whether meaningful information can be extracted by quantifying second-order moments of time-varying cardiovascular complexity. To this extent, we introduce a novel mathematical framework termed complexity variability, in which the variance of instantaneous Lyapunov spectra estimated over time serves as a reference quantifier. We apply the proposed methodology to four exemplary studies involving disorders which stem from cardiology, neurology and psychiatry: Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), Major Depression Disorder (MDD), Parkinson’s Disease (PD), and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) patients with insomnia under a yoga training regime. We show that complexity assessments derived from simple time-averaging are not able to discern pathology-related changes in autonomic control, and we demonstrate that between-group differences in measures of complexity variability are consistent across pathologies. Pathological states such as CHF, MDD, and PD are associated with an increased complexity variability when compared to healthy controls, whereas wellbeing derived from yoga in PTSD is associated with lower time-variance of complexity.

  16. Who gains from hourly time-of-use retail prices on electricity? An analysis of consumption profiles for categories of Danish electricity customers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Larsen, Helge V.; Kitzing, Lena

    2014-01-01

    include a systematic component in the hourly variation, we show that customers with different consumption profiles experience different average cost of their electricity consumption when billed according to hourly time-of-use prices. Thus, some categories of customers stand to gain from time......Studies of the aggregated hourly electricity load in geographical areas typically show a systematic variation over the day, the week, and seasons. With hourly metering of individual customers, data for individual consumption profiles have become available. Looking into these data we show...... that consumption profiles for specific categories of customers are equally systematic but quite distinct for different categories of customers. That is, different categories of customers contribute quite differently to the aggregated load profile. Coupling consumption profiles with hourly market prices which also...

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Time-series of 9 cataclysmic variables (Papadaki+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, C.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Stanishev, V.; Boumis, P.; Akras, S.; Sterken, C.

    2009-05-01

    We present time-series photometry of nine cataclysmic variables: EI UMa, V844 Her, V751 Cyg, V516 Cyg, GZ Cnc, TY Psc, V1315 Aql, ASAS J002511+1217.2, V1315 Aql and LN UMa. The observations were conducted at various observatories, covering 170 hours and comprising 7850 data points in total. For the majority of targets we confirm previously reported periodicities and for some of them we give, for the first time through photometry, their underlying spectroscopic orbital period. For those dwarf-nova systems which we observed during both quiescence and outburst, the increase in brightness was accompanied by a decrease in the level of flickering. For the eclipsing system V1315 Aql we have covered 9 eclipses, and obtained a refined orbital ephemeris. We find that, during its long baseline of observations, no change in the orbital period of this system has occurred. V1315 Aql also shows eclipses of variable depth. (22 data files).

  18. Photometric study of selected cataclysmic variables II. Time-series photometry of nine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, C.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Stanishev, V.; Boumis, P.; Akras, S.; Sterken, C.

    2009-05-01

    We present time-series photometry of nine cataclysmic variables: EI UMa, V844 Her, V751 Cyg, V516 Cyg, GZ Cnc, TY Psc, V1315 Aql, ASAS J002511+1217.2, V1315 Aql and LN UMa. The observations were conducted at various observatories, covering 170 hours and comprising 7,850 data points in total. For the majority of targets we confirm previously reported periodicities and for some of them we give, for the first time through photometry, their underlying spectroscopic orbital period. For those dwarf-nova systems which we observed during both quiescence and outburst, the increase in brightness was accompanied by a decrease in the level of flickering. For the eclipsing system V1315 Aql we have covered 9 eclipses, and obtained a refined orbital ephemeris. We find that, during this long baseline of observations, no change in the orbital period of this system has occurred. V1315 Aql also shows eclipses of variable depth.

  19. Enceladus Plume Structure and Time Variability: Comparison of Cassini Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, Ben D; Perry, Mark E; Hansen, Candice J; Waite, J Hunter; Porco, Carolyn C; Spencer, John R; Howett, Carly J A

    2017-09-01

    During three low-altitude (99, 66, 66 km) flybys through the Enceladus plume in 2010 and 2011, Cassini's ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) made its first high spatial resolution measurements of the plume's gas density and distribution, detecting in situ the individual gas jets within the broad plume. Since those flybys, more detailed Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) imaging observations of the plume's icy component have been reported, which constrain the locations and orientations of the numerous gas/grain jets. In the present study, we used these ISS imaging results, together with ultraviolet imaging spectrograph stellar and solar occultation measurements and modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the vapor cloud, to constrain the magnitudes, velocities, and time variability of the plume gas sources from the INMS data. Our results confirm a mixture of both low and high Mach gas emission from Enceladus' surface tiger stripes, with gas accelerated as fast as Mach 10 before escaping the surface. The vapor source fluxes and jet intensities/densities vary dramatically and stochastically, up to a factor 10, both spatially along the tiger stripes and over time between flyby observations. This complex spatial variability and dynamics may result from time-variable tidal stress fields interacting with subsurface fissure geometry and tortuosity beyond detectability, including changing gas pathways to the surface, and fluid flow and boiling in response evolving lithostatic stress conditions. The total plume gas source has 30% uncertainty depending on the contributions assumed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic gas expansion/acceleration to the high Mach emission. The overall vapor plume source rate exhibits stochastic time variability up to a factor ∼5 between observations, reflecting that found in the individual gas sources/jets. Key Words: Cassini at Saturn-Geysers-Enceladus-Gas dynamics-Icy satellites. Astrobiology 17, 926-940.

  20. Computation of dynamic operating balancing reserve for wind power integration for the time-horizon 1-48 hours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menemenlis, N.; Huneault, M. [IREQ, Varennes, QC (Canada); Robitaille, A. [Hydro-Quebec Production, Dir. Planification de la production eolienne, Direction Generale, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Integrating wind power into the operations-planning horizon of 1 to 48 hours ahead, a challenge facing utilities is how to cope with wind forecast uncertainties, in addition to existing inherent uncertainties of load forecast errors and unavailability of generation. Utilities counter forecast uncertainties by maintaining operational reserves to ensure a high level of reliability to the system. With the advent of wind generation, additional reserves are required to cover the incremental uncertainties. In this paper, we fine tune a methodology for calculating additional balancing reserves which had reproduced accurately only an average scenario. Here, several wind forecast errors distributions are introduced corresponding to different wind forecast levels. These distributions are approximated by gamma-like distributions with time-varying parameters. The results show that modeling uncertainties as a function of wind generation levels impacts significantly the balancing reserves and associated risk, and justifies the necessity to veer towards a dynamic computation of dynamic balancing reserves that consider the imminent wind generation forecast. (orig.)

  1. First-Passage-Time Distribution for Variable-Diffusion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Liberty; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2017-05-01

    First-passage-time distribution, which presents the likelihood of a stock reaching a pre-specified price at a given time, is useful in establishing the value of financial instruments and in designing trading strategies. First-passage-time distribution for Wiener processes has a single peak, while that for stocks exhibits a notable second peak within a trading day. This feature has only been discussed sporadically—often dismissed as due to insufficient/incorrect data or circumvented by conversion to tick time—and to the best of our knowledge has not been explained in terms of the underlying stochastic process. It was shown previously that intra-day variations in the market can be modeled by a stochastic process containing two variable-diffusion processes (Hua et al. in, Physica A 419:221-233, 2015). We show here that the first-passage-time distribution of this two-stage variable-diffusion model does exhibit a behavior similar to the empirical observation. In addition, we find that an extended model incorporating overnight price fluctuations exhibits intra- and inter-day behavior similar to those of empirical first-passage-time distributions.

  2. Interpersonal variability in timing strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception task with variable time-to-contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Tetsuya; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    In rapid interceptive actions such as hitting a baseball, cricket ball or tennis ball, ball speed varies between trials, and players have to compensate the time lag by controlling the moment of movement onset and movement duration. Previous studies have found that these two variables can flexibly co-vary and are robustly influenced by target speed (i.e. velocity-coupling effect: faster movement for faster target). However, some studies reported an interpersonal variability in the timing control strategy and the relationship between the strategy and temporal accuracy in rapid interception is unclear. We used a baseball-simulated rapid interceptive task to assess this issue. Under relatively easy time constraints, there was a large interpersonal variability, and participants were distinctively divided into two groups: those who mainly modulated their movement duration and those who mainly controlled their movement onset. When the time constraint became severe, the second strategy shifted to the first strategy in most of the second group participants. In the both cases, being able to mainly control movement onset resulted in higher temporal accuracy. These results suggest that minimising the velocity-coupling effect is an important factor to achieve high temporal accuracy in rapid interception.

  3. Valuing travel time variability: Characteristics of the travel time distribution on an urban road

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Fukuda, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed empirical investigation of the distribution of travel times on an urban road for valuation of travel time variability. Our investigation is premised on the use of a theoretical model with a number of desirable properties. The definition of the value of travel time...... variability depends on certain properties of the distribution of random travel times that require empirical verification. Applying a range of nonparametric statistical techniques to data giving minute-by-minute travel times for a congested urban road over a period of five months, we show that the standardized...... travel time is roughly independent of the time of day as required by the theory. Except for the extreme right tail, a stable distribution seems to fit the data well. The travel time distributions on consecutive links seem to share a common stability parameter such that the travel time distribution...

  4. EFFECTS OF LONG-TIME COMMUTING AND LONG-HOUR WORKING ON LIFESTYLE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS IN TOKYO, JAPAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Marino; Hara, Akiko; Kikuchi, Kimiyo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of long-time commuting and long-hour working on lifestyle including sleeping, physical exercise, breakfast, smoking, alcohol intake and mental health. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 146 school teachers in Tokyo. The binary associations of commuting time and working hours with lifestyle, mental stress measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and stress coping measured by the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scores were examined. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Our results indicated that the mean commuting time and working hours per week of the respondents were 42.1 (SD 22.5) minutes and 50.4 (SD 8.6) hours, respectively. Longer commuting time was significantly associated with shorter working hours (p = 0.023), less physical exercise (p lifestyle for long-time com- muters or long-hour workers. Key words: stress; stress coping; general health questionnaire; sense of coherence

  5. Quadratic time dependent Hamiltonians and separation of variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaldo-Meneses, A.

    2017-06-01

    Time dependent quantum problems defined by quadratic Hamiltonians are solved using canonical transformations. The Green's function is obtained and a comparison with the classical Hamilton-Jacobi method leads to important geometrical insights like exterior differential systems, Monge cones and time dependent Gaussian metrics. The Wei-Norman approach is applied using unitary transformations defined in terms of generators of the associated Lie groups, here the semi-direct product of the Heisenberg group and the symplectic group. A new explicit relation for the unitary transformations is given in terms of a finite product of elementary transformations. The sequential application of adequate sets of unitary transformations leads naturally to a new separation of variables method for time dependent Hamiltonians, which is shown to be related to the Inönü-Wigner contraction of Lie groups. The new method allows also a better understanding of interacting particles or coupled modes and opens an alternative way to analyze topological phases in driven systems.

  6. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  8. Effects of 9-hour time zone changes on fatigue and circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and core temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, P. H.; Myhre, G.; Graeber, R. C.; Andersen, H. T.; Lauber, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and psychological disruptions caused by transmeridian flights may affect the ability of flight crews to meet operational demands. To study these effects, 9 Royal Norwegian Airforces P3-Orion crewmembers flew from Norway to California (-9 hr), and back (+9 hr). Rectal temperature, heart rate and wrist activity were recorded every 2 min, fatigue and mood were rated every 2 hr during the waking day, and logs were kept of sleep times and ratings. Subjects also completed 4 personality inventories. The time-zone shifts produced negative changes in mood which persisted longer after westward flights. Sleep quality (subjective and objective) and duration were slightly disrupted (more after eastward flights). The circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and temperature both completed the 9-hr delay by day 5 in California, although temperature adjusted more slowly. The size of the delay shift was significantly correlated with scores on extraversion and achievement need personality scales. Response to the 9-hr advance were more variable. One subject exhibited a 15-hr delay in his temperature rhythm, and an atypical sleep/nap pattern. On average, the sleep/wake cycle (but not the temperature rhythm), completed the 9-hr advance by the end of the study. Both rhythms adapted more slowly after the eastward flight.

  9. Use of linear programming to estimate impact of changes in a hospital's operating room time allocation on perioperative variable costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Blake, John T; Penning, Donald H; Sloan, Brian; Chung, Patricia; Lubarsky, David A

    2002-03-01

    Administrators at hospitals with a fixed annual budget may want to focus surgical services on priority areas to ensure its community receives the best health services possible. However, many hospitals lack the detailed managerial accounting data needed to ensure that such a change does not increase operating costs. The authors used a detailed hospital cost database to investigate by how much a change in allocations of operating room (OR) time among surgeons can increase perioperative variable costs. The authors obtained financial data for all patients who underwent outpatient or same-day admit surgery during a year. Linear programming was used to determine by how much changing the mix of surgeons can increase total variable costs while maintaining the same total hours of OR time for elective cases. Changing OR allocations among surgeons without changing total OR hours allocated will likely increase perioperative variable costs by less than 34%. If, in addition, intensive care unit hours for elective surgical cases are not increased, hospital ward occupancy is capped, and implant use is tracked and capped, perioperative costs will likely increase by less than 10%. These four variables predict 97% of the variance in total variable costs. The authors showed that changing OR allocations among surgeons without changing total OR hours allocated can increase hospital perioperative variable costs by up to approximately one third. Thus, at hospitals with fixed or nearly fixed annual budgets, allocating OR time based on an OR-based statistic such as utilization can adversely affect the hospital financially. The OR manager can reduce the potential increase in costs by considering not just OR time, but also the resulting use of hospital beds and implants.

  10. Consequences of mixing assumptions for time-variable travel time distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der Y.; Heidbüchel, I.; Lyon, S.W.; Nyberg, L.; Rodhe, A.; Bishop, K.; Troch, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The current generation of catchment travel time distribution (TTD) research, integrating nearly three decades of work since publication of Water's Journey from Rain to Stream, seeks to represent the full distribution in catchment travel times and its temporal variability. Here, we compare

  11. Improving wear time compliance with a 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer protocol in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Barreira, Tiago V; Schuna, John M; Mire, Emily F; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V; Maher, Carol; Maia, José; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Tim; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S; Zhao, Pei; Church, Timothy S; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2015-02-11

    We compared 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer wear time characteristics of 9-11 year old children in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) to similarly aged U.S. children providing waking-hours waist-worn accelerometer data in the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Valid cases were defined as having ≥4 days with ≥10 hours of waking wear time in a 24-hour period, including one weekend day. Previously published algorithms for extracting total sleep episode time from 24-hour accelerometer data and for identifying wear time (in both the 24-hour and waking-hours protocols) were applied. The number of valid days obtained and a ratio (percent) of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer were computed for both ISCOLE and NHANES. Given the two surveys' discrepant sampling designs, wear time (minutes/day, hours/day) from U.S. ISCOLE was compared to NHANES using a meta-analytic approach. Wear time for the 11 additional countries participating in ISCOLE were graphically compared with NHANES. 491 U.S. ISCOLE children (9.92±0.03 years of age [M±SE]) and 586 NHANES children (10.43 ± 0.04 years of age) were deemed valid cases. The ratio of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer was 76.7% in U.S. ISCOLE and 62.6% in NHANES. Wear time averaged 1357.0 ± 4.2 minutes per 24-hour day in ISCOLE. Waking wear time was 884.4 ± 2.2 minutes/day for U.S. ISCOLE children and 822.6 ± 4.3 minutes/day in NHANES children (difference = 61.8 minutes/day, p < 0.001). Wear time characteristics were consistently higher in all ISCOLE study sites compared to the NHANES protocol. A 24-hour waist-worn accelerometry protocol implemented in U.S. children produced 22.6 out of 24 hours of possible wear time, and 61.8 more minutes/day of waking wear time than a similarly implemented and processed waking wear time waist

  12. Hourly differences in air pollution and risk of respiratory disease in the elderly: a time-stratified case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Suzuki, Etsuji; Kashima, Saori

    2014-08-13

    Epidemiological studies have shown adverse effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory disease outcomes; however, few studies examined this association on an hourly time scale. We evaluated the associations between hourly changes in air pollution and the risk of respiratory disease in the elderly, using the time of the emergency call as the disease onset for each case. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design. Study participants were 6,925 residents of the city of Okayama, Japan, aged 65 or above who were taken to hospital emergency rooms between January 2006 and December 2010 for onset of respiratory disease. We calculated city-representative hourly average concentrations of air pollutants from several monitoring stations. By using conditional logistic regression models, we estimated odds ratios per interquartile-range increase in each pollutant by exposure period prior to emergency call, adjusting for hourly ambient temperature, hourly relative humidity, and weekly numbers of reported influenza cases aged ≥60. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) exposure 24 to <72 hours prior to the onset and ozone exposure 48 to <96 hours prior to the onset were associated with the increased risk of respiratory disease. For example, following one interquartile-range increase, odds ratios were 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.09) for SPM exposure 24 to <48 hours prior to the onset and 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.23) for ozone exposure 72 to <96 hours prior to the onset. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposure 0 to <24 hours prior to onset was associated with the increased risk of pneumonia and influenza: odds ratio was 1.07 per one interquartile-range increase (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.14). Elevated risk for pneumonia and influenza of SO2 was observed at shorter lags (i.e., 8-18 hours) than the elevated risks for respiratory disease of SPM or ozone. Overall, the effect estimates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allied

  13. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: an SMS-based time-use study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, D. van; Velden, L. van der; Bakker, D. de; Batenburg, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who

  14. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: An SMS-based time use study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, D. van; Velden, L.F.J. van der; Bakker, D.H.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who

  15. Effects of working full-time and studying in the evening hours among young apprentices and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Andréa Aparecida; da Silva, Miryam Cristina Mazieiro Vergueiro; Turte, Samantha Lemos; Lopes, Marildo de Oliveira; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-12-01

    This research aims to assess apprentices' and trainees' work conditions, psychosocial factors at work, as well as health symptoms after joining the labor force. Despite the fact that there are over 3.5 million young working students in Brazil,this increasing rate brings with it difficult working conditions such as work pressure, heavy workloads,and lack of safety training. This study was carried out in a nongovernmental organization (NGO) with 40 young members of a first job program in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. They filled out a comprehensive questionnaire focused on sociodemographic variables, working conditions,and health symptoms. Individual and collective semi-structured interviews were conducted. Empirical data analysis was performed using analysis of content. The majority of participants mentioned difficulties in dealing with the pressure and their share of responsibilities at work. Body pains, headaches, sleep deprivation during the workweek, and frequent colds were mentioned. Lack of appropriate task and safety training contributed to the occurrence of work injuries. Having a full-time job during the day coupled with evening high school attendance may jeopardize these people's health and future. This study can make a contribution to the revision and implementation of work training programs for adolescents. It can also help in the creation of more sensible policies regarding youth employment.

  16. Intra-Subject Variability of 5 Km Time Trial Performance Completed by Competitive Trained Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher James

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-trials represent an ecologically valid approach to assessment of endurance performance. Such information is useful in the application of testing protocols and estimation of sample sizes required for research/magnitude based inference methods. The present study aimed to investigate the intra-subject variability of 5 km time-trial running performance in trained runners. Six competitive trained male runners (age = 33.8 ± 10.1 years; stature = 1.78 ± 0.01 m; body mass = 69.0 ± 10.4 kg, V. $\\it V^{.}$ O2max = 62.6 ± 11.0 ml·kg·min-1 completed an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion followed by 5 x 5 km time-trials (including a familiarisation trial, individually spaced by 48 hours. The time taken to complete each trial, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and speed were all assessed. Intra-subject absolute standard error of measurement and the coefficient of variance were calculated for time-trial variables in addition to the intra-class correlation coefficient for time taken to complete the time-trial. For the primary measure time, results showed a coefficient of variation score across all participants of 1.5 ± 0.59% with an intra-class correlation coefficient score of 0.990. Heart rate, rating of perceived exertion and speed data showed a variance range between 0.8 and 3.05%. It was concluded that when compared with related research, there was observed low intra-subject variability in trained runners over a 5 km distance. This supports the use of this protocol for 5 km time-trial performance for assessment of nutritional strategies, ergogenic aids or training interventions on endurance running performance.

  17. Electric Vehicle Routing Problem with Charging Time and Variable Travel Time

    OpenAIRE

    Sai Shao; Wei Guan; Bin Ran; Zhengbing He; Jun Bi

    2017-01-01

    An electric vehicle routing problem with charging time and variable travel time is developed to address some operational issues such as range limitation and charging demand. The model is solved by using genetic algorithm to obtain the routes, the vehicle departure time at the depot, and the charging plan. Meanwhile, a dynamic Dijkstra algorithm is applied to find the shortest path between any two adjacent nodes along the routes. To prevent the depletion of all battery power and ensure safe op...

  18. Synchronizing time delay systems using variable delay in coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambika, G., E-mail: g.ambika@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune 411 021 (India); Amritkar, R.E., E-mail: amritkar@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Delay and anticipation in coupling function varies with system dynamics. > Delay or anticipation of the synchronized state is independent of system delay. > Stability analysis developed is quite general. > We demonstrate enhanced security in communication. > Generalized synchronization possible over a wide range of parameter mismatch. - Abstract: We present a mechanism for synchronizing time delay systems using one way coupling with a variable delay in coupling that is reset at finite intervals. We present the analysis of the error dynamics that helps to isolate regions of stability of the synchronized state in the parameter space of interest for single and multiple delays. We supplement this by numerical simulations in a standard time delay system like Mackey Glass system. This method has the advantage that it can be adjusted to be delay or anticipatory in synchronization with a time which is independent of the system delay. We demonstrate the use of this method in communication using the bi channel scheme. We show that since the synchronizing channel carries information from transmitter only at intervals of reset time, it is not susceptible to an easy reconstruction.

  19. Reconstructing missing hourly real-time precipitation data using a novel intermittent sliding window period technique for automatic weather station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, Nagaraja; Kant, Krishna

    2017-08-01

    Precipitation is the most discontinuous atmospheric parameter because of its temporal and spatial variability. Precipitation observations at automatic weather stations (AWSs) show different patterns over different time periods. This paper aims to reconstruct missing data by finding the time periods when precipitation patterns are similar, with a method called the intermittent sliding window period (ISWP) technique—a novel approach to reconstructing the majority of non-continuous missing real-time precipitation data. The ISWP technique is applied to a 1-yr precipitation dataset (January 2015 to January 2016), with a temporal resolution of 1 h, collected at 11 AWSs run by the Indian Meteorological Department in the capital region of Delhi. The acquired dataset has missing precipitation data amounting to 13.66%, of which 90.6% are reconstructed successfully. Furthermore, some traditional estimation algorithms are applied to the reconstructed dataset to estimate the remaining missing values on an hourly basis. The results show that the interpolation of the reconstructed dataset using the ISWP technique exhibits high quality compared with interpolation of the raw dataset. By adopting the ISWP technique, the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) in the estimation of missing rainfall data—based on the arithmetic mean, multiple linear regression, linear regression, and moving average methods—are reduced by 4.2%, 55.47%, 19.44%, and 9.64%, respectively. However, adopting the ISWP technique with the inverse distance weighted method increases the RMSE by 0.07%, due to the fact that the reconstructed data add a more diverse relation to its neighboring AWSs.

  20. Long Work Hours, Part-Time Work, and Trends in the Gender Gap in Pay, the Motherhood Wage Penalty, and the Fatherhood Wage Premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A. Weeden

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We assess how changes in the social organization and compensation of work hours over the last three decades are associated with changes in wage differentials among mothers, fathers, childless women, and childless men. We find that large differences between gender and parental status groups in long work hours (fifty or more per week, coupled with sharply rising hourly wages for long work hours, contributed to rising gender gaps in wages (especially among parents, motherhood wage penalties, and fatherhood wage premiums. Changes in the representation of these groups in part-time work, by contrast, is associated with a decline in the gender gap in wages among parents and in the motherhood wage penalty, but an increase in the fatherhood wage premium. These findings offer important clues into why gender and family wage differentials still persist.

  1. Core-temperature sensor ingestion timing and measurement variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Joseph W; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2010-01-01

    Telemetric core-temperature monitoring is becoming more widely used as a noninvasive means of monitoring core temperature during athletic events. To determine the effects of sensor ingestion timing on serial measures of core temperature during continuous exercise. Crossover study. Outdoor dirt track at an average ambient temperature of 4.4°C ± 4.1°C and relative humidity of 74.1% ± 11.0%. Seven healthy, active participants (3 men, 4 women; age  =  27.0 ± 7.5 years, height  =  172.9 ± 6.8 cm, body mass  =  67.5 ± 6.1 kg, percentage body fat  =  12.7% ± 6.9%, peak oxygen uptake [Vo(2peak)]  =  54.4 ± 6.9 mL•kg⁻¹•min⁻¹) completed the study. Participants completed a 45-minute exercise trial at approximately 70% Vo(2peak). They consumed core-temperature sensors at 24 hours (P1) and 40 minutes (P2) before exercise. Core temperature was recorded continuously (1-minute intervals) using a wireless data logger worn by the participants. All data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (trial × time), Pearson product moment correlation, and Bland-Altman plot. Fifteen comparisons were made between P1 and P2. The main effect of time indicated an increase in core temperature compared with the initial temperature. However, we did not find a main effect for trial or a trial × time interaction, indicating no differences in core temperature between the sensors (P1  =  38.3°C ± 0.2°C, P2  =  38.3°C ± 0.4°C). We found no differences in the temperature recordings between the 2 sensors. These results suggest that assumed sensor location (upper or lower gastrointestinal tract) does not appreciably alter the transmission of reliable and repeatable measures of core temperature during continuous running in the cold.

  2. Test of synthetic DNA tracers in a periodic hydrodynamic system for time-variable transit time distribution assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Wang, C.; McNew, C.; McLaughlin, S.; Lyon, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research on time-varying transport through hydrologic systems proposed using decomposed over-printed tracer breakthrough curves to directly observe transport through complex flow systems. This method, also known as the PERTH (Periodic Tracer Hierarchy) method requires periodic flow and multiple tracer injections to reveal changes in flow pathways and transport behavior. Time-variable transit time distributions (TTD) estimated from tracer breakthrough curves often vary with the storage state of the system, which in turn is influenced by internal and external variabilities, such as the arrangement of flow pathways and fluctuations in system inputs. Deciphering internal from external variabilities in TTDs might help to advance the use of TTDs for estimating the physical state of a system; however, thus far the finite number of unique conservative tracers available for tracing has limited deeper insights. Synthetic DNA tracers consisting of short strands of synthetic DNA encapsulated by polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres could potentially provide multiple unique tracers with identical transport properties needed to explore time varying transport through hydrologic systems in more detail. An experiment was conducted on the miniLeo hillslope, a 1 m3 sloping lysimeter, within the Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution Observatory near Tucson, AZ to investigate transit time variability. The goal of the experiment was to 1) test the suitability of using synthetic DNA tracers for estimating TTDs in a hydrologic system and 2) to determine the TTDs of individual tracer pulses under periodic steady-state conditions. Five DNA tracers, consisting of four unique, encapsulated DNA sequences and one free/non-encapsulated DNA sequence, were applied as reference and probe tracers together with deuterium, using the PERTH method. The lysimeter received three 2-hour pulses of rainfall at a rate of 30 mm/hr for 10 days. Initial results show that both the encapsulated and free DNA tracers

  3. Impact of in or out of office hours at admission time on outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Viaene, Els; Meex, Ingrid; De Vadder, Katrien; Eertmans, Ward; Boer, Willem; Jans, Frank; De Deyne, Cathy; Dens, Jo; Ferdinande, Bert

    2017-08-01

    In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), neurological outcome is determined by the severity of neurological injury, early percutaneous coronary intervention, and application of neuroprotective temperature management. As this is a very time-intensive and manpower-intensive protocol, we hypothesized that there would be a difference in outcome between OHCA patients admitted during and out of office hours. We prospectively collected demographic data of OHCA patients in two hospitals. All patients included were treated at 33°C for 24 h, followed by a rewarming phase until 36.6°C. During office hours were defined as arriving between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. Neurological outcome at 180 days was assessed following the Cerebral Performance Category scale. Forty-seven (31%) patients were admitted during office hours and 105 (69%) out of office hours (P=0.199). Patients admitted during office hours were significantly older, respectively, 66±14 and 59±15 years (P=0.014). There was no significant difference between both groups in the number of patients who underwent coronary angiography, door to angiography time, and number of affected vessels. The median time spent in the target range of PaO2, PaCO2, and lactate was also not significantly different. We found no significant difference in survival until 180 days between both groups (P=0.599), even after adjustment for age (95% confidence interval: 0.44-1.90, hazard ratio: 0.912). Survival until 180 days between OHCA patients admitted during office hours or out of office hours was not significantly different in two hospitals with a fixed protocol for neuroprotection and 24/7 streamlined access to coronary angiography.

  4. Travel times in the vadose zone: Variability in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Seeger, Stefan; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Water travel times reflect hydrological processes, yet we know little about how travel times in the unsaturated zone vary with time. Using the soil physical model HYDRUS-1D, we derived time variable travel time distributions for 35 study sites within the Attert catchment in Luxembourg. While all sites experience similar climatic forcing, they differ with regard to soil types (16 Cambisols, 12 Arenosols, and 7 Stagnosols) and the vegetation cover (29 forest and 6 grassland). We estimated site specific water flow and transport parameters by fitting the model simulations to observed soil moisture time series and depth profiles of pore water stable isotopes. With the calibrated model, we tracked the water parcels introduced with each rainfall event over a period of several years. Our results show that the median travel time of water from the soil surface to depths down to 200 cm is mainly driven by the subsequent rainfall amounts. The median time until precipitation is taken up by roots is governed by the seasonality of evapotranspiration rates. The ratio between the amount of water that leaves the soil profile by on the one hand and evaporation and transpiration on the other hand also shows an annual cycle. This time variable response due to climatic forcing is furthermore visible in the multimodal nature of the site specific master transit time distribution representing the flow-averaged probability density for rainwater to become recharge. The spatial variability of travel times is mainly driven by soil texture and structure, with significant longer travel times for the clayey Stagnosols than for the loamy to sandy Cambisols and Arenosols.

  5. Expanding space-time and variable vacuum energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes a cosmological model which contemplates the presence of a vacuum energy varying, very slightly (now), with time. The constant part of the vacuum energy generated, some 6 Gyr ago, a deceleration/acceleration transition of the metric expansion; so now, in an aged Universe, the expansion is inexorably accelerating. The vacuum energy varying part is instead assumed to be eventually responsible of an acceleration/deceleration transition, which occurred about 14 Gyr ago; this transition has a dynamic origin: it is a consequence of the general relativistic Einstein-Friedmann equations. Moreover, the vacuum energy (constant and variable) is here related to the zero-point energy of some quantum fields (scalar, vector, or spinor); these fields are necessarily described in a general relativistic way: their structure depends on the space-time metric, typically non-flat. More precisely, the commutators of the (quantum field) creation/annihilation operators are here assumed to depend on the local value of the space-time metric tensor (and eventually of its curvature); furthermore, these commutators rapidly decrease for high momentum values and they reduce to the standard ones for a flat metric. In this way, the theory is ”gravitationally” regularized; in particular, the zero-point (vacuum) energy density has a well defined value and, for a non static metric, depends on the (cosmic) time. Note that this varying vacuum energy can be negative (Fermi fields) and that a change of its sign typically leads to a minimum for the metric expansion factor (a ”bounce”).

  6. Detecting the harmonics of oscillations with time-variable frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Stefanovska, A.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2011-01-01

    A method is introduced for the spectral analysis of complex noisy signals containing several frequency components. It enables components that are independent to be distinguished from the harmonics of nonsinusoidal oscillatory processes of lower frequency. The method is based on mutual information and surrogate testing combined with the wavelet transform, and it is applicable to relatively short time series containing frequencies that are time variable. Where the fundamental frequency and harmonics of a process can be identified, the characteristic shape of the corresponding oscillation can be determined, enabling adaptive filtering to remove other components and nonoscillatory noise from the signal. Thus the total bandwidth of the signal can be correctly partitioned and the power associated with each component then can be quantified more accurately. The method is first demonstrated on numerical examples. It is then used to identify the higher harmonics of oscillations in human skin blood flow, both spontaneous and associated with periodic iontophoresis of a vasodilatory agent. The method should be equally relevant to all situations where signals of comparable complexity are encountered, including applications in astrophysics, engineering, and electrical circuits, as well as in other areas of physiology and biology.

  7. Volume, intensity, and timing of muscle power potentiation are variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Poulos, Nick; Abed, Fathi; Turki, Olfa; Brughelli, Matt; Chamari, Karim; Drinkwater, Eric J; Behm, David G

    2011-10-01

    Whereas muscle potentiation is consistently demonstrated with evoked contractile properties, the potentiation of functional and physiological measures is inconsistent. The objective was to compare a variety of conditioning stimuli volumes and intensities over a 15-min recovery period. Twelve volleyball players were subjected to conditioning stimuli that included 10 repetitions of half squats with 70% of 1-repetition maximum (RM) (10 × 70), 5 × 70, 5 × 85, 3 × 85, 3 × 90, 1 × 90, and control. Jump height, power, velocity, and force were measured at baseline, 1, 3, 5, 10, and 15 min. Data were analysed with a 2-way repeated measure ANOVA and magnitude-based inferences. The ANOVA indicated significant decreases in jump height, power, and velocity during recovery. This should not be interpreted that no potentiation occurred. Each dependent variable reached a peak at a slightly different time: peak jump height (2.8 ± 2.3 min), mean power (3.6 ± 3.01 min), peak power (2.5 ± 1.8 min), and peak velocity (2.5 ± 1.8 min). Magnitude-based inference revealed that both the 5 × 70 and 3 × 85 protocol elicited changes that exceeded 75% likelihood of exceeding the smallest worthwhile change (SWC) for peak power and velocity. The 10 × 70 and the 5 × 70 had a substantial likelihood of potentiating peak velocity and mean power above the SWC, respectively. Magnitude-based inferences revealed that while no protocol had a substantial likelihood of potentiating the peak vertical jump, the 5 × 70 had the most consistent substantial likelihood of increasing the peak of most dependent variables. We were unable to consistently predict if these peaks occurred at 1, 3, or 5 min poststimulation, though declines after 5 min seems probable.

  8. Decoupling Shoreline Behavior Over Variable Time and Space Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, C. J.; Plant, N. G.; Henderson, R.; Schwab, W. C.; Nelson, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of small-scale sediment transport processes and large-scale geologic, oceanographic, and morphologic processes drives shoreline change on time scales ranging from single storm events to decades. The relative importance of storm processes versus geological control on event response and long-term evolution of barrier islands is largely unknown but is important for understanding decadal-scale evolution Here, we investigate the primary controls on shoreline response along Fire Island, NY, a 50-km long barrier island, on timescales that resolve storms and decadal variations over a period of 80 yrs. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis is applied to a time series of shoreline positions to identify coherent patterns of shoreline variability that can be correlated to oceanographic or geologic framework parameters to help identify the controlling short-term or long-term processes. The analysis shows that storm response and recovery dominates the shoreline behavior on the largest spatial scales in the form of alternating episodes of shoreline retreat and advance that have a length scale of 1 km. The shoreline response to and recovery from Hurricane Sandy is included in this EOF analysis and indicates that this historic storm is not notable or distinguishable from several other large storms of the prior decade. This suggests that Fire Island is historically, and continues to be, resilient to severe storms. A secondary mode of the EOF analysis supports that the framework geology of the barrier island system, represented by known variations in inner shelf bathymetry, sediment availability, beach-shoreface morphology, and long-term rates of shoreline change, controls multi-decadal shoreline evolution. The geologic processes that control the long-term morphodynamics result in the ends of the island responding in opposite phase to the central portion. A third mode reveals an intermediate-scale pattern that persists over both long and short-term time scales

  9. Optimizing acceleration-based ethograms: the use of variable-time versus fixed-time segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bom, Roeland A; Bouten, Willem; Piersma, Theunis; Oosterbeek, Kees; van Gils, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Animal-borne accelerometers measure body orientation and movement and can thus be used to classify animal behaviour. To univocally and automatically analyse the large volume of data generated, we need classification models. An important step in the process of classification is the segmentation of acceleration data, i.e. the assignment of the boundaries between different behavioural classes in a time series. So far, analysts have worked with fixed-time segments, but this may weaken the strength of the derived classification models because transitions of behaviour do not necessarily coincide with boundaries of the segments. Here we develop random forest automated supervised classification models either built on variable-time segments generated with a so-called 'change-point model', or on fixed-time segments, and compare for eight behavioural classes the classification performance. The approach makes use of acceleration data measured in eight free-ranging crab plovers Dromas ardeola. Useful classification was achieved by both the variable-time and fixed-time approach for flying (89% vs. 91%, respectively), walking (88% vs. 87%) and body care (68% vs. 72%). By using the variable-time segment approach, significant gains in classification performance were obtained for inactive behaviours (95% vs. 92%) and for two major foraging activities, i.e. handling (84% vs. 77%) and searching (78% vs. 67%). Attacking a prey and pecking were never accurately classified by either method. Acceleration-based behavioural classification can be optimized using a variable-time segmentation approach. After implementing variable-time segments to our sample data, we achieved useful levels of classification performance for almost all behavioural classes. This enables behaviour, including motion, to be set in known spatial contexts, and the measurement of behavioural time-budgets of free-living birds with unprecedented coverage and precision. The methods developed here can be easily adopted in

  10. Morning versus afternoon gymnastic time and diurnal and seasonal changes in psychophysiological variables of school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, G; Touitou, Y; Reinberg, A

    1997-07-01

    The aims of this study were to document time-related (morning versus afternoon) effects of physical activities (gymnastics) on a set of physiological and psychological variables in school children, including diurnal changes. For the study, 61 boys and 69 girls, 6 to 11 years of age, volunteered. They were considered healthy according to routine clinical criteria. They were synchronized with diurnal activity from around 07:00 to 21:00 and nocturnal rest, time of year being taken into account. Tests were performed at school during 4 weeks of 4.5 days of school at fixed clock hours: 09:00, 11:00, 14:00, and 16:00. Gym time was randomized with regard to week order and season. Four different classes (39 boys and 38 girls) were involved in psychophysiological tests, and two different classes (22 boys and 31 girls) collected saliva samples for morning free cortisol determination. Both t-test and three-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analyses. Better performances were obtained in June than in mid-winter with reference to letter cancellation and random number addition tests. As a group phenomenon, morning (09:00 to 10:00) versus afternoon (14:00 to 15:00) gym was not an influential condition with regard to sleep duration, oral temperature, self-rated fatigue and drowsiness, letter cancellation, addition tests, or salivary cortisol. However, gym-time-related differences were observed in classes of younger subjects (e.g., 6-7 years) with regard to self-rated fatigue and the letter cancellation test. Such variability among subgroups suggests that interindividual differences are likely to exist in younger children with regard to manipulation of environmental factors. In addition, gym itself (without gym time consideration) may be an influential factor with regard to diurnal patterns of some variables (e.g., the letter cancellation test).

  11. Protecting chips against hold time violations due to variability

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Gustavo; Reis, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    With the development of Very-Deep Sub-Micron technologies, process variability is becoming increasingly important and is a very important issue in the design of complex circuits. Process variability is the statistical variation of process parameters, meaning that these parameters do not have always the same value, but become a random variable, with a given mean value and standard deviation. This effect can lead to several issues in digital circuit design.The logical consequence of this parameter variation is that circuit characteristics, as delay and power, also become random variables. Becaus

  12. On the time variability of gamma-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; Pessah, Martin Elias; E. Romero, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo analysis of the recently introduced variability indices $\\tau$ (Tompkins 1999) and $I$ (Zhang et al. 2000 & Torres et al. 2001) for $\\gamma$-ray sources. We explore different variability criteria and prove that these two indices, despite the very different approaches used...

  13. Consistency across missions of long time series of global biophysical variables: challenges and lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Roselyne; Smets, Bruno; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Camacho, Fernando; Swinnen, Else; Verger, Aleixandre

    2017-04-01

    The Global component of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CGLS) provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing the dynamics of vegetation, the energy budget at the continental surface, the water cycle and the cryosphere. Products are generated on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data, at a frequency ranging from one hour to 10 days. They are accessible free of charge through the GCLS website (http://land.copernicus.eu/global/), associated with documentation describing the physical methodologies, the technical properties of products, and the quality of variables based on the results of validation exercises. The portfolio of the CGLS contains some Essential Climate Variables (ECV) like the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), the surface albedo, and additional vegetation indices. These products were derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor data till December 2013, are currently derived from PROBA-V sensor data, and will be derived in the future from Sentinel-3 data. This talk will show how challenging is the transition between sensors to ensure the sustainability of the production while keeping the consistency of the time series. We will discuss the various sources of differences from input data, the impact of these differences on the biophysical variables and, in turn, on some final users' applications as such those based upon anomalies or assimilation of time series. We will present the mitigation measures taken to reduce as much as possible this impact. We will conclude with the lessons learnt and how this experience will be exploited to manage the transition towards Sentinel-3.

  14. Reaction time variability and related brain activity in methamphetamine psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Catherine; Lesh, Tyler A; Ursu, Stefan; Salo, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of cognitive control instability in methamphetamine (MA) abuse, as well its relationship to substance-induced psychiatric symptoms and drug use patterns. We used an ex-Gaussian reaction time (RT) distribution to examine intraindividual variability (IIV) and excessively long RTs (tau) in an individual's RT on a Stroop task in 30 currently drug-abstinent (3 months to 2 years) MA abusers compared with 27 nonsubstance-abusing control subjects. All subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing the Stroop task, which allowed us to measure the relationship between IIV and tau to functional brain activity. Elevated IIV in the MA compared with the control group did not reach significance; however, when the MA group was divided into those subjects who had experienced MA-induced psychosis (MAP+) (n = 19) and those who had not (n = 11), the MAP+ group had higher average IIV compared with the other groups (p < .03). In addition, although control subjects displayed a relationship between IIV and conflict-related brain activity in bilateral prefrontal cortex such that increased IIV was associated with increased activity, the MAP+ group displayed this relationship in right prefrontal cortex only, perhaps reflecting elevated vigilance in the MAP+ group. Greater IIV did not correlate with severity of use or months MA abstinent. No group differences emerged in tau values. These results suggest increased cognitive instability in those MA-dependent subjects who had experienced MA-induced psychosis. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial-time variability of particulate material content and its composition: From mesoscale to interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, Oleg; Charkin, Alexander; Semiletov, Igor; Gustafsson, Örjan; Vonk, Jorien; Sánchez-García, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The role of the coastal zone in lateral transport and fate of terrestrial organic carbon in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) has not been well studied to date because most recent activities have focused on onshore geomorphologic and geochemical features, while biogeochemical and sedimentation consequences of coastal erosion and riverine runoff into the sea were not studied sufficiently. Here we present the data obtained on joint Russian-US cruises (NOAA and NSF funded) in 2003, 2004, 2005, and in the International Siberian Shelf Study-2008 (ISSS-2008, supported by the Wallenberg Foundation, FEBRAS, NOAA, and the Russian NSF), which characterized a spatial and interannual variability in distribution of particulate material (PM), and its organic carbon and stable isotopes content. Dynamics and composition of PM were studied twice along the Lena River in summer-fall of 2003. Here, the spatial-time dynamics of PM composition (particulate organic carbon (POC), isotopes and mineralogical composition) is considered in connection with changing river runoff and wind patterns. It has been found that the dominant source of POC into the ESAS is coastal erosion, rather than input from the rivers (Lena, Yana, Indigirka, Kolyma). A sharp PM concentration gradient from "freshened/high PM" to "Pacific/low PM" waters was found across the frontal zone. The position of the frontal zone varies significantly from year to year; this difference is mainly attributed to the difference in atmospheric circulation patterns driving the Arctic Ocean circulation. During storms and surges the PM concentration in a single area was increased by 10 times or more (up to 80-242 mg/l) in 2000 and 2005 compared to the 2003 and 2004 PM concentration.

  16. Simulation of the time-variable gravity field by means of coupled geophysical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Gruber

    2011-10-01

    spherical harmonic series, which is the quantity commonly used to describe the Earth's global gravity field. The result of this study is a twelve-year time-series of 6-hourly time variable gravity field spherical harmonics up to degree and order 180 corresponding to a global spatial resolution of 1 degree in latitude and longitude. In this paper, we outline the input data sets and the process of combining these data sets into a coherent model of temporal gravity field changes. The resulting time series was used in some follow-on studies and is available to anybody interested.

  17. Electric Vehicle Routing Problem with Charging Time and Variable Travel Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Shao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An electric vehicle routing problem with charging time and variable travel time is developed to address some operational issues such as range limitation and charging demand. The model is solved by using genetic algorithm to obtain the routes, the vehicle departure time at the depot, and the charging plan. Meanwhile, a dynamic Dijkstra algorithm is applied to find the shortest path between any two adjacent nodes along the routes. To prevent the depletion of all battery power and ensure safe operation in transit, electric vehicles with insufficient battery power can be repeatedly recharged at charging stations. The fluctuations in travel time are implemented to reflect a dynamic traffic environment. In conclusion, a large and realistic case study with a road network in the Beijing urban area is conducted to evaluate the model performance and the solution technology and analyze the results.

  18. Localized spectral analysis of global satellite gravity fields for recovering time-variable mass redistributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, S.C.; Ditmar, P.

    2007-01-01

    A spatiospectral localization method is discussed for processing the global geopotential coefficients from satellite mission data to investigate time-variable gravity. The time-variable mass variation signal usually appears associated with a particular geographical area yielding inherently regional

  19. 76 FR 44884 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Payments Under Time-and-Materials and Labor-Hour Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ...: Hada Flowers, 1275 First Street, NE., 7th Floor, Washington, DC 20417. Instructions: Please submit...) FAR Case 2003-027, Additional Commercial Contract Types, published in the Federal Register at 71 FR... commercial services under specified conditions. (2) FAR Case 2004-015, Payments Under Time-and-Materials and...

  20. 75 FR 59195 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Time-and-Materials (T&M) and Labor-Hour (LH) Contracts for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... for Commercial Items AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and... Safeguards for Time-and-Materials Contracts for Commercial Services and Safeguards Have Not Been Applied to...), Attn: Hada Flowers, 1800 F Street, NW., Room 4041, Washington, DC 20405. Instructions: Please submit...

  1. A Day in the Life of Millisecond Pulsar J1713+0747: Limits on Timing Precision Over 24 Hours and Implications for Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Timothy; Bailes, M.; Bassa, C.; Bhat, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Champion, D.; Chatterjee, S.; Cognard, I.; Cordes, J. M.; Crowter, K.; Demorest, P.; Finn, L. S.; Fonseca, E.; Hessels, J.; Hobbs, G.; Janssen, G.; Jones, G.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Kraus, A.; Lam, M. T.; Lazarus, P.; Lazio, J.; Lee, K.; Levin, L.; Liu, K.; Lorimer, D.; Manchester, R. N.; McLaughlin, M.; Palliyaguru, N.; Perrodin, D.; Petroff, E.; Rajwade, K.; Rankin, J. M.; Ransom, S. M.; Rosenblum, J.; Roy, J.; Shannon, R.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Stovall, K.; Teixeira, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.; Zhu, W.

    2014-01-01

    A 24-hour global observation of millisecond radio pulsar J1713+0747 was undertaken by the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) collaboration as an effort to better quantify sources of noise in this object, which is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves (GWs). Given an 8-year timing RMS of 30ns, it is regarded as one of the best precision clocks in the PTA. However, sources of timing noise visible on timescales longer than the usual 20-30min biweekly observation may nonetheless be present. Data from the campaign were taken contiguously with the Parkes, Arecibo, Green Bank, GMRT, LOFAR, Effelsberg, WSRT, Lovell, and Nancay radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival provide an estimate of the absolute noise floor, in other words, what unaccounted sources of timing noise impede an otherwise simple sqrt(N) improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses in a single observing session. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusual timescale of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scattering (ISS), and discuss the degree to which ISS affects precision timing. Finally, we examine single pulse information during selected portions of the observation and determine the degree to which the pulse jitter of J1713+0747 varies throughout the course of the day-long dataset.

  2. Multi-time-step ahead daily and hourly intermittent reservoir inflow prediction by artificial intelligent techniques using lumped and distributed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothiprakash, V.; Magar, R. B.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryIn this study, artificial intelligent (AI) techniques such as artificial neural network (ANN), Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and Linear genetic programming (LGP) are used to predict daily and hourly multi-time-step ahead intermittent reservoir inflow. To illustrate the applicability of AI techniques, intermittent Koyna river watershed in Maharashtra, India is chosen as a case study. Based on the observed daily and hourly rainfall and reservoir inflow various types of time-series, cause-effect and combined models are developed with lumped and distributed input data. Further, the model performance was evaluated using various performance criteria. From the results, it is found that the performances of LGP models are found to be superior to ANN and ANFIS models especially in predicting the peak inflows for both daily and hourly time-step. A detailed comparison of the overall performance indicated that the combined input model (combination of rainfall and inflow) performed better in both lumped and distributed input data modelling. It was observed that the lumped input data models performed slightly better because; apart from reducing the noise in the data, the better techniques and their training approach, appropriate selection of network architecture, required inputs, and also training-testing ratios of the data set. The slight poor performance of distributed data is due to large variations and lesser number of observed values.

  3. Variability in stratification and flushing times of the Gautami ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stretch of 36 km, at 500×50 m grid spacing using. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS;. Ceeducer, Australia). The DGPS is a satellite-based. Figure 2. Variability of (a) along channel depth and (b) cross-sectional area at transect locations in the Gautami–. Godavari estuary. The numbers on the top indicate station.

  4. Constraining geometrical, hydrodynamical and mechanical properties of a fault zone at hourly time scales from ground surface tilt data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Burbey, Thomas J.; Boudin, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    Flow through reservoirs such as fractured media is powered by pressure gradients which also generate measurable poroelastic deformation of the rock body. The combined analysis of ground surface deformation and sub-surface fluid pressure provides valuable insights of a reservoir's structure and hydromechanical properties, which are of interest for deep-seated CO2 or nuclear waste storage for instance. Amongst all surveying tools, surface tiltmeters offer the possibility to grasp hydraulically-induced deformation over a broad range of time scales with a remarkable precision (1 nanoradian). Here, we investigate the information content of transient surface tilt generated by flow in a kilometer scale sub-vertical fault zone and its surrounding fractured rock matrix. Our approach involves the combined analysis of field data and results of a fully coupled poroelastic model, where fault and matrix are represented as equivalent homogeneous domains. The signature of pressure changes in the fault zone due to pumping cycles is clearly recognizable in field tilt data and we aim to explain the peculiar features that appear in: 1) tilt time series alone from a set of 4 instruments; 2) the ratio of tilt over pressure. With the model, we evidence that the shape of tilt measurements on both sides of a fault zone is sensitive to its diffusivity and its elastic modulus. In particular, we show a few well placed tiltmeters (on each side of a fault) give more information on the medium's properties than well spatialized surface displacement maps. Furthermore, the ratio of tilt over pressure predominantly encompasses information about the system's dynamic behavior and extent of the fault zone, and allows separating contributions of flow in the different compartments. Hence, tiltmeters are well suited to characterize hydromechanical processes associated to fault zone hydrogeology at short time scales, where space-borne surveying methods fail to seize any deformation signal.

  5. Living hours under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Larsen, Trine Pernille; Felbo-Kolding, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants – and their agreem......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants...... in industrial cleaning includes a minimum floor of 15 weekly working hours – this is not the case in retail, hotels and restaurants. This creates a loophole in the latter two sectors that can be exploited by employers to gain wage flexibility through part-time work. Originality/value The living wage literature...

  6. Diurnal Variation and Twenty-Four Hour Sleep Deprivation Do Not Alter Supine Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Young Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Quintana

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV has become an increasingly popular index of cardiac autonomic control in the biobehavioral sciences due to its relationship with mental illness and cognitive traits. However, the intraindividual stability of HRV in response to sleep and diurnal disturbances, which are commonly reported in mental illness, and its relationship with executive function are not well understood. Here, in 40 healthy adult males we calculated high frequency HRV-an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS activity-using pulse oximetry during brain imaging, and assessed attentional and executive function performance in a subsequent behavioral test session at three time points: morning, evening, and the following morning. Twenty participants were randomly selected for total sleep deprivation whereas the other 20 participants slept as normal. Sleep deprivation and morning-to-night variation did not influence high frequency HRV at either a group or individual level; however, sleep deprivation abolished the relationship between orienting attention performance and HRV. We conclude that a day of wake and a night of laboratory-induced sleep deprivation do not alter supine high frequency HRV in young healthy male adults.

  7. Diurnal Variation and Twenty-Four Hour Sleep Deprivation Do Not Alter Supine Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Daniel S; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Zak, Nathalia; Norbom, Linn B; Pedersen, Per Ø; Quraishi, Sophia H; Bjørnerud, Atle; Malt, Ulrik F; Groote, Inge R; Kaufmann, Tobias; Andreassen, Ole A; Westlye, Lars T

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become an increasingly popular index of cardiac autonomic control in the biobehavioral sciences due to its relationship with mental illness and cognitive traits. However, the intraindividual stability of HRV in response to sleep and diurnal disturbances, which are commonly reported in mental illness, and its relationship with executive function are not well understood. Here, in 40 healthy adult males we calculated high frequency HRV-an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity-using pulse oximetry during brain imaging, and assessed attentional and executive function performance in a subsequent behavioral test session at three time points: morning, evening, and the following morning. Twenty participants were randomly selected for total sleep deprivation whereas the other 20 participants slept as normal. Sleep deprivation and morning-to-night variation did not influence high frequency HRV at either a group or individual level; however, sleep deprivation abolished the relationship between orienting attention performance and HRV. We conclude that a day of wake and a night of laboratory-induced sleep deprivation do not alter supine high frequency HRV in young healthy male adults.

  8. Direct observations in the dusk hours of the characteristics of the storm-time ring current particles during the beginning of magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristic features of the initial enhancement of the storm-time ring current particles in the evening hours are consistent with flow patterns resulting from a combination of inward convection, gradient drift, and corotation which carries plasma sheet protons into low L-values near midnight and the higher energy proton component into the plasmasphere and through the evening hours. Data from four magnetic storms during the early life of Explorer 45, when the local time of apogee was in the afternoon and evening hours, show that protons with lower magnetic moments penetrate deeper into the magnetosphere until a low limit, determined by the corotation and gradient drift forces, is reached. Such particle motions produce the stable energy dependent inner boundary of the ring current protons inside the plasmapause in the dusk sector and also provide the mechanism for energy injection into the ring current region. From the analyses of the pitch angle distributions it is evident that charge exchange and wave particle interactions are not the dominant causes of this inner boundary.

  9. Interlaboratory validation of a real-time PCR 24-hour rapid method for detection of Salmonella in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Van Khanh, T; Lin, Wen; Ruby, Richard M

    2009-05-01

    The efficacy of a 24-h Salmonella real-time, or quantitative, PCR (qPCR) detection method was assessed through a collaborative effort involving eight Federal and state laboratories. Eleven foods including mashed potatoes, soft cheese, chili powder, chocolate, eggs, sprouts, apple juice, fish, shrimp, ground beef, and ground chicken were tested. For each food, seven blind samples were distributed to each participant for testing. These included six samples equivalently inoculated with 1 to 5 CFU/25 g of various serotypes of Salmonella (Gaminara, Weltevreden, Heidelberg, Senftenberg, Enteritidis, Newport, Typhimurium, and Kentucky for each food) and 10 to 50 CFU/25 g of the competitor Enterobacter cloacae. The seventh sample was inoculated with 10 to 50 CFU/25 g of the competitor, E. cloacae, only. These samples were tested for Salmonella by using four methods in parallel: (i) 24-h qPCR method detecting Salmonella from modified buffered peptone water enrichment medium; (ii) 48-h qPCR method detecting Salmonella from a secondary selective enrichment broth; (iii) modified Bacteriological Analytical Manual method; and (iv) VIDAS, an immunoassay system. The results of the statistical analysis showed there was no significant (P > or = 0.05) difference between either of the qPCR methods and the modified Bacteriological Analytical Manual method for 10 of 11 foods. For the one exception, sprouts, detection by qPCR required 48 h. Both qPCR methods showed a detection limit of 0.08 to 0.2 CFU/g. These results provide a solid basis for using this 24-h qPCR rapid screening method to detect Salmonella in foods.

  10. Development of Electronic Medical Record-Based "Rounds Report" Results in Improved Resident Efficiency, More Time for Direct Patient Care and Education, and Less Resident Duty Hour Violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Phillip B; Anderton, Toby; Gallaher, Ryan; Hyrman, Mike; Simmerman, Erika; Ramanathan, Annamalai; Fallaw, David; Holsten, Steven; Howell, Charles Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Surgeons frequently report frustration and loss of efficiency with electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Together, surgery residents and a programmer at Augusta University created a rounds report (RR) summarizing 24 hours of vitals, intake/output, labs, and other values for each inpatient that were previously transcribed by hand. The objective of this study was to evaluate the RR's effect on surgery residents. Surgery residents were queried to assess the RR's impact. Outcome measures were time spent preparing for rounds, direct patient care time, educational activity time, rates of incorrect/incomplete data on rounds, and rate of duty hour violations. Hospital wide, 17,200 RRs were generated in the 1-month study. Twenty-three surgery residents participated. Time spent preparing for rounds decreased per floor patient (15.6 ± 3.0 vs 6.0 ± 1.2, P time increased from 35.2 ± 5.4 to 54.7 ± 7.1 minutes per resident per day (P = 0.0004). Reported duty hour violations decreased 58 per cent (P < 0.0001). American Board of Surgery in Training exam scores trended up, and estimates of departmental annual financial savings range from $66,598 to $273,141 per year. Significant improvements occur with surgeon designed EMR tools like the RR. Hospitals and EMR companies should pair interested surgeons with health information technology developers to facilitate EMR enhancements. Improvements like RRs can have broad ranging, multidisciplinary impact and should be standard in all EMRs used for inpatient care at academic medical centers.

  11. Time variability of cyclonic geostrophic circulation in the Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Guijarro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Interannual variability and trends of the surface geostrophic cyclonic circulation and cyclone frequency in Western and Eastern Mediterranean areas are analyzed, based on a cyclone data base derived from the ERA-40 ECWMF reanalysis (within the MEDEX project tasks, spanning from September/1957 to August/2002. In this 45 years, the cyclonic circulation show a significant decrease in the Western Mediterranean, mostly in winter and spring, and an increase in the Eastern, mainly due to the summer and autumn increase in the frequency of thermal lows.

  12. Variable School Start Times and Middle School Student's Sleep Health and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Daniel S; Wang, Guanghai; Chen, Yao I; Skora, Elizabeth; Hoehn, Jessica; Baylor, Allison; Wang, Jichuan

    2017-08-01

    Improving sleep health among adolescents is a national health priority and implementing healthy school start times (SSTs) is an important strategy to achieve these goals. This study leveraged the differences in middle school SST in a large district to evaluate associations between SST, sleep health, and academic performance. This cross-sectional study draws data from a county-wide surveillance survey. Participants were three cohorts of eighth graders (n = 26,440). The school district is unique because SST ranged from 7:20 a.m. to 8:10 a.m. Path analysis and probit regression were used to analyze associations between SST and self-report measures of weekday sleep duration, grades, and homework controlling for demographic variables (sex, race, and socioeconomic status). The independent contributions of SST and sleep duration to academic performance were also analyzed. Earlier SST was associated with decreased sleep duration (χ(2) = 173, p sleep (≤7 hours) among 45% of students. Students with SST before 7:45 a.m. were at increased risk of decreased sleep duration, academic performance, and academic effort. Path analysis models demonstrated the independent contributions of sleep duration, SST, and variable effects for demographic variables. This is the first study to evaluate the independent contributions of SST and sleep to academic performance in a large sample of middle school students. Deficient sleep was prevalent, and the earliest SST was associated with decrements in sleep and academics. These findings support the prioritization of policy initiatives to implement healthy SST for younger adolescents and highlight the importance of sleep health education disparities among race and gender groups. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight may influence the diurnal rhythm of acute heart attack mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Bódis, József; Boncz, Imre; Koppan, Agnes; Koppan, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours have an effect on the seasonality, or the daily rhythm of heart attack mortality. We analyzed retrospectively data of patients admitted to hospitals with the diagnosis of heart attack (n=32,329) and patients who deceased of a heart attack (n=5142) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 in Hungary. Heart attack mortality was highest during winter, while lowest number of events was recorded during summer . The daily peak of diurnality was between 6:00 am and 12:00 pm (33.77%). A positive correlation was found between the time of sunrise, time of sunset and the mortality caused by myocardial infarction (pheart attack mortality we found a negative correlation (r=-0.105, pheart attack mortality. Our data suggest, that the occurrence and the mortality of heart attack may be related to the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Generating k-independent variables in constant time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, Tobias Lybecker; Pagh, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    The generation of pseudorandom elements over finite fields is fundamental to the time, space and randomness complexity of randomized algorithms and data structures. We consider the problem of generating k-independent random values over a finite field F in a word RAM model equipped with constant...... time addition and multiplication in F, and present the first nontrivial construction of a generator that outputs each value in constant time, not dependent on k. Our generator has period length |F| poly log k and uses k poly (log k) log |F| bits of space, which is optimal up to a poly log k factor. We...

  15. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  16. Practical Implementations of Real-Time Heart Rate Variability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sastre, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    ... interventions, but to date it has not been possible to use it in real-time (RT) . Because HRV reflects homeostasis in thermoregulation and blood pressure control, it provides a non-invasive "window" into these processes...

  17. The Dynamic Optimization of the Departure Times of Metro Users during Rush Hour in an Agent-Based Simulation: A Case Study in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Xi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As serious traffic problems have increased throughout the world, various types of studies, especially traffic simulations, have been conducted to investigate this issue. Activity-based traffic simulation models, such as MATSim (Multi-Agent Transport Simulation, are intended to identify optimal combinations of activities in time and space. It is also necessary to examine commuting-based traffic simulations. Such simulations focus on optimizing travel times by adjusting departure times, travel modes or travel routes to present travel suggestions to the public. This paper examines the optimal departure times of metro users during rush hour using a newly developed simulation tool. A strategy for identifying relatively optimal departure times is identified. This study examines 103,637 person agents (passengers in Shenzhen, China, and reports their average departure time, travel time and travel utility, as well as the numbers of person agents who are late and miss metro trips in every iteration. The results demonstrate that as the number of iterations increases, the average travel time of these person agents decreases by approximately 4 min. Moreover, the latest average departure time with no risk of being late when going to work is approximately 8:04, and the earliest average departure time with no risk of missing metro trips when getting off work is approximately 17:50.

  18. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Drift analysis is one of the state-of-the-art techniques for the runtime analysis of randomized search heuristics (RSHs) such as evolutionary algorithms (EAs), simulated annealing etc. The vast majority of existing drift theorems yield bounds on the expected value of the hitting time for a target...

  19. Stability Criteria for Differential Equations with Variable Time Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, D.; Shail, R.; Gourley, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    Time delays are an important aspect of mathematical modelling, but often result in highly complicated equations which are difficult to treat analytically. In this paper it is shown how careful application of certain undergraduate tools such as the Method of Steps and the Principle of the Argument can yield significant results. Certain delay…

  20. Public Mode Access And Waiting Time Variability In Maiduguri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examines public mode access and waiting time variations in Maiduguri Metropolitan Area. Data for the study were sought through a comprehensive field survey using a travel diary questionnaire. A total of 623 households were surveyed in 342 dwelling units. The results indicate that variations in modal access and ...

  1. Start time variability and predictability in railroad train and engine freight and passenger service employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Start time variability in work schedules is often hypothesized to be a cause of railroad employee fatigue because unpredictable work start times prevent employees from planning sleep and personal activities. This report examines work start time diffe...

  2. Variability of bisphenol-A concentrations in first morning, bedtime, and 24-hour urine samples in 50 North Carolina adults over a six-week period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a high-production volume chemical that is used to make a number of consumer products and packaged goods. Many cross-sectional studies have frequently reported detecting BPA in urine. However, limited data exist on the temporal variability of urinary BPA conce...

  3. Time-Variable Phenomena in the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Michael J. S. (Editor); West, Robert A. (Editor); Rahe, Jurgen (Editor); Pereyda, Margarita

    1989-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of dynamic processes in the Jovian system is assessed and summaries are provided of both theoretical and observational foundations upon which future research might be based. There are three sections: satellite phenomena and rings; magnetospheric phenomena, Io's torus, and aurorae; and atmospheric phenomena. Each chapter discusses time dependent theoretical framework for understanding and interpreting what is observed; others describe the evidence and nature of observed changes or their absence. A few chapters provide historical perspective and attempt to present a comprehensive synthesis of the current state of knowledge.

  4. Is it acceptable to use coagulation plasma samples stored at room temperature and 4°C for 24 hours for additional prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin, and D-dimer testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimac, V; Coen Herak, D

    2017-10-01

    Coagulation laboratories are faced on daily basis with requests for additional testing in already analyzed fresh plasma samples. This prompted us to examine whether plasma samples stored at room temperature (RT), and 4°C for 24 hours can be accepted for additional prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin (AT), and D-dimer testing. We measured PT, aPTT, Fbg in 50 and AT in 30 plasma samples with normal and pathological values, within 4 hours of blood collection (baseline results) and after 24-hours storage at RT (primary tubes), and 4°C (aliquots). D-dimer stability was investigated in 20 samples stored in primary tubes at 4°C. No statistically significant difference between baseline results and results in samples stored at RT and 4°C was observed for PT (P=.938), aPTT (P=.186), Fbg (P=.962), AT (P=.713), and D-dimers (P=.169). The highest median percentage changes were found for aPTT, being more pronounced for samples stored at 4°C (13.0%) than at RT (8.7%). Plasma samples stored both at RT and 4°C for 24 hours are acceptable for additional PT, Fbg, and AT testing. Plasma samples stored 24 hours in primary tubes at 4°C are suitable for D-dimer testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Variability of Capillary Refill Time among Physician Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, David C; Baker, Steven D; Kayser, Susan A; Jones, David; Hansen, Matthew L

    2017-11-01

    The assessment of capillary refill time (CRT) is a common physical examination technique. However, despite its importance and its widespread use, there is little standardization, which can lead to inaccurate assessments. In this article, we assessed how different physicians estimate CRT. We hypothesized that when different physicians are presented with the same recordings of CRT, clinicians will, on average, provide different CRT estimates. Using recordings of different fingertip compressions, physicians assessed and documented when capillary refill had returned to normal. Videos were recorded of the fingertips only, with no other identifying markers or subject characteristics provided. Videos were shown at one-quarter speed to allow time for recognition and response to the capillary refill. The primary outcome was physician estimates of CRT for each video recording. An analysis of variance regression revealed significant differences in physician estimates of CRT when examining the same CRT videos from 34 subjects. Further regression analyses reveal the importance of controlling for the physician that is examining the patient when predicting a patient's CRT. Results indicate that some physicians gave, on average, slower CRT estimates, whereas others gave, on average, faster CRT estimates. Objective approaches and innovations in assessment of capillary refill have the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of this important clinical examination finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. On the stability and convergence of the time-fractional variable order telegraph equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have generalized the time-fractional telegraph equation using the concept of derivative of fractional variable order. The generalized equation is called time-fractional variable order telegraph equation. This new equation was solved numerically via the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Stability and convergence of the numerical solution were presented in details. Numerical simulations of the approximate solution of the time-fractional variable order telegraph equation were presented for different values of the grid point.

  7. On the use of variability time-scales as an early classifier of radio transients and variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietka, M.; Staley, T. D.; Pretorius, M. L.; Fender, R. P.

    2017-11-01

    We have shown previously that a broad correlation between the peak radio luminosity and the variability time-scales, approximately L ∝ τ5, exists for variable synchrotron emitting sources and that different classes of astrophysical sources occupy different regions of luminosity and time-scale space. Based on those results, we investigate whether the most basic information available for a newly discovered radio variable or transient - their rise and/or decline rate - can be used to set initial constraints on the class of events from which they originate. We have analysed a sample of ≈800 synchrotron flares, selected from light curves of ≈90 sources observed at 5-8 GHz, representing a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from flare stars to supermassive black holes. Selection of outbursts from the noisy radio light curves has been done automatically in order to ensure reproducibility of results. The distribution of rise/decline rates for the selected flares is modelled as a Gaussian probability distribution for each class of object, and further convolved with estimated areal density of that class in order to correct for the strong bias in our sample. We show in this way that comparing the measured variability time-scale of a radio transient/variable of unknown origin can provide an early, albeit approximate, classification of the object, and could form part of a suite of measurements used to provide early categorization of such events. Finally, we also discuss the effect scintillating sources will have on our ability to classify events based on their variability time-scales.

  8. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during early Eocene time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Fricke, Henry C.; Humphrey, John D.; Hackett, Logan; Newbrey, Michael G.; Hutchison, J. Howard

    2010-08-01

    As a deep time analog for today's rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (52-53 Ma) rock on Ellesmere Island in Canada's High Arctic (˜ 79°N.) preserves evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions than at present, the quantification of Eocene Arctic climate has been more elusive. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we infer early Eocene Arctic temperatures, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ˜ 8 °C, mean annual range in temperature of ˜ 16.5-19 °C, warm month mean temperature of 19-20 °C, and cold month mean temperature of 0-3.5 °C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, relatively high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and SST by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and isoprenoid tetraether lipids in marine Crenarchaeota fall close to our warm month temperature, suggesting a bias towards summer values. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although for both of these reptilian groups, past temperature tolerances probably were greater than in living descendants.

  9. Variable separation for time fractional advection-dispersion equation with initial and boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, variable separation method combined with the properties of Mittag-Leffler function is used to solve a variable-coefficient time fractional advection-dispersion equation with initial and boundary conditions. As a result, a explicit exact solution is obtained. It is shown that the variable separation method can provide a useful mathematical tool for solving the time fractional heat transfer equations.

  10. Constructing Proxy Variables to Measure Adult Learners' Time Management Strategies in LMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Kim, Dongho; Yoon, Meehyun

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the process of constructing proxy variables from recorded log data within a Learning Management System (LMS), which represents adult learners' time management strategies in an online course. Based on previous research, three variables of total login time, login frequency, and regularity of login interval were selected as…

  11. Evaluation of Online Log Variables That Estimate Learners' Time Management in a Korean Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Park, Yeonjeong; Yoon, Meehyun; Sung, Hanall

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the psychological variables and online behavioral patterns of students, collected through a learning management system (LMS). As the psychological variable, time and study environment management (TSEM), one of the sub-constructs of MSLQ, was chosen to verify a set of time-related…

  12. Calculation of balancing reserves incorporating wind power into the Hydro-Quebec system over the time horizon of 1 to 48 hours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menemenlis, N.; Huneault, M. [IREQ, Varennes, QC (Canada); Bourret, J. [Hydro-Quebec Distribution, Montreal, QC (Canada). Dir. Approvisionnement en Electricite; Robitaille, A. [Hydro-Quebec Production, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dir. Planification de la Production Eolienne

    2009-07-01

    Hydro-Quebec (HQ), the main electricity provider in Quebec, Canada, serves a peak load of 37000 MW, 95% provided by hydroelectric generation. It is in the process of incorporating 3000 MW of wind power into its system, reaching 4000 MW by the year 2015. As wind power generation is accompanied by inherent uncertainties, HQ plans to revise its balancing reserves in order to mitigate the consequences of inherent prediction errors. To this end, HQ has put forward a novel methodology calculating the level of these balancing reserves, over the time horizon of 1-48 hours, based on the risk that the load will exceed the committed generation capacity. The methodology, reported in this paper, requires as input the statistical characteristics of the load and wind generation forecast errors and of the generation outages. The implementation details of this methodology as well as discussion of the nature of the results are given. (orig.)

  13. Staggered Bargaining and Hours Worked

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Danthine; Stephane Auray

    2004-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and staggered bargaining is used to explain (i)differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of rig...

  14. Bargaining frictions and hours worked

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane AURAY; Danthine, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and bargaining frictions is used to explain (i) differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of ri...

  15. Clinical usefulness of a timed overnight (8 hours) Urine Albumin (microalbumin) excretion in monitor-ing treatment in benign essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwatowoju, I O; Ajuluchukwu, J N A; Afonja, O A

    2014-06-01

    This research aims to establish the usefulness of timed over- night (8 hours) Urine Albumin(microalbumin) Excretion (UAE), in monitoring therapy in Nigerian patients with benign essential hypertension. The study population comprised 40 normotensives/controls, (23 males and 17 females) aged between 20-70 years, with a mean blood pressure 116/75mmHg, 30 well-controlled hypertensive patients, diastolic BP 100mmHg or MAP >110mmHg.Urine albumin(microalbumin) was determined on the 8 hours overnight urine samples by ELISA method using kit from Randox Laboratories Limited, N.Ireland Cat No. MA 1410. UAE was calculated from the urine albumin concentration, urine volume and collection time. The intra assay precision was determined by running 20 replicates of two kit controls in a single batch. The coefficient of variation was 6.6% at 10.70mg/L and 4.3% at 51.20mg/L. The average UAE in the three groups were as follows: 12:22 +/-4.65ug/ min, 21.50 +/- 10.5ug/min and 30.10 +/- 24.25 ug/min in the control, well controlled and poorly controlled groups respectively, 12.5% of normotensive subjects, 40% of well controlled and 56.7% of poorly controlled patients were found to have microalbuminuria.The UAE increased significantly with the severity of hypertension (r = 0.32, purine collection for monitoring response to treatment in Nigerian patients with benign essential hypertension.

  16. Comparison of estimated creatinine clearance among five formulae (Cockroft–Gault, Jelliffe, Sanaka, simplified 4-variable MDRD and DAF) and the 24hours-urine-collection creatinine clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, A; Goudas, P; Arvanitis, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: GFR estimation is of major importance in everyday clinical practice. Usually it is done using one of the many eGFR equations available. In this study we compared in our population four widespread eGFR equations and our own empirical eGFR, with creatinine clearance calculated through a timed urine collection. Patients and methods: We collected laboratory data of 907 patients from our clinic and outpatient department through a ten-year period and statistically compared the eGFR results between them and with the timed urine collection creatinine clearances. Results: All eGFR equations gave acceptable approximations to the timed urine collection creatinine clearances. However, in different subpopulations some equations did better than others, without any clear advantage of any equation overall. Surprisingly, our empirical equation named DAF also gave acceptable approximations regardless of age, weight and sex of the patient. Conclusions: In our population our empirical eGFR method (DAF) gave satisfactory results regarding the monitoring of renal function, compared with four other eGFR methods. We suggest that it could provide a very fast and easy to use means of eGFR calculation. PMID:20596264

  17. Comparison of estimated creatinine clearance among five formulae (Cockroft-Gault, Jelliffe, Sanaka, simplified 4-variable MDRD and DAF) and the 24hours-urine-collection creatinine clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, A; Goudas, P; Arvanitis, A

    2010-04-01

    GFR estimation is of major importance in everyday clinical practice. Usually it is done using one of the many eGFR equations available. In this study we compared in our population four widespread eGFR equations and our own empirical eGFR, with creatinine clearance calculated through a timed urine collection. We collected laboratory data of 907 patients from our clinic and outpatient department through a ten-year period and statistically compared the eGFR results between them and with the timed urine collection creatinine clearances. All eGFR equations gave acceptable approximations to the timed urine collection creatinine clearances. However, in different subpopulations some equations did better than others, without any clear advantage of any equation overall. Surprisingly, our empirical equation named DAF also gave acceptable approximations regardless of age, weight and sex of the patient. In our population our empirical eGFR method (DAF) gave satisfactory results regarding the monitoring of renal function, compared with four other eGFR methods. We suggest that it could provide a very fast and easy to use means of eGFR calculation.

  18. 1-hour time resolution data of PM2.5 composition and gaseous precursors in background Milan: pollution sources and atmospheric processes, and their implications for air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Alessandro; Bianchi, Federico; De Gennaro, Gianluigi; Di Gilio, Alessia; Fermo, Paola; Ghermandi, Grazia; Prévôt, André; Urbani, Monia; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Piazzalunga, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Aim of this study is the investigation of processes leading to atmospheric pollutants formation and ageing in Milan, Po valley, i.e. one of the main hotspot region in Europe. Few 1-hour time resolution campaigns were accomplished in Milan urban area and none of these dealt with simultaneous characterization of atmospheric pollutants in both gas and particle phase. The present study is based on a thorough analysis of hourly data of atmospheric pollutants and of main PM2.5 compounds, and it includes several soluble inorganic aerosols (Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, NH4+), gases (HCl, HNO2, HNO3, NH3, NO, NO2, O3, SO2) organic, elemental and black carbon and meteorological parameters. The data proceed from an intensive sampling campaign in urban background Milan in summer 2012 (Bigi et al., 2017). Data analysis methods used include mean diurnal pattern on weekdays and Sundays, pollution roses, bivariate polar plots and statistical models using backtrajectories. Results show how nitrous acid (HONO) was mainly formed heterogeneously at nighttime, with a dependence of its formation rate on NO2 consistent with observations during the last HONO campaign in Milan in summer 1998, although since 1998 a drop in HONO levels occurred following to the decrease of its precursors. Nitrate showed two main formation mechanisms: one occurring through N2O5 at nighttime and leading to nitrate formation onto existing particles; another occurring both daytime and nighttime following the homogeneous reaction of ammonia gas with nitric acid gas. Air masses reaching Milan influenced nitrate formation depending on their content in ammonia and the timing of arrival. Notwithstanding the low level of SO2 in Milan, its peaks were associated to point source emissions in the Po valley or shipping and power plant emissions SW of Milan, beyond the Apennines. A distinctive pattern for HCl was observed, featured by an afternoon peak and a morning minimum, and best correlated to

  19. Permanent play facility provision is associated with children's time spent sedentary and in light physical activity during school hours: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Eirik Dalene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the associations between: 1 number of permanent outdoor play facilities per pupil and 2 the size of the outdoor play area per pupil with sedentary time and physical activity (PA during school hours in six-, nine-, and 15-year olds. We conducted a cross-sectional study of nationally representative samples of Norwegian six- (n = 1071, nine- (n = 1421 and 15-year-olds (n = 1106 in 2011 (the Physical Activity Among Norwegian Children Study. The participation rates were 56.4%, 73.1% and 57.8% for six-, nine- and 15-year olds, respectively. We assessed PA objectively for seven consecutive days using accelerometers, the size of a school's outdoor play area (SOPA using an online map service and the permanent play facility (PPF provision using a standardized form during school site visits. We successfully measured SOPA and PPF in 99 schools, from which 3040 participants provided valid accelerometer data. We used generalized least-squares random-effects models with robust variance estimation to assess associations. Our results indicate that better provision of permanent play facilities may reduce sedentary time and increase time spent in light PA among six-year-olds. Permanent play facility provision was not associated with sedentary time or PA among nine- and 15-year-olds. Associations found between outdoor play area size, physical activity and sedentary time were negligible. Future research should investigate what types of permanent play facilities may be associated with physical activity in both children and adolescents.

  20. Separation of Variables and Exactly Soluble Time-Dependent Potentials in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Efthimiou, Costas John; Spector, Donald

    1993-01-01

    We use separation of variables as a tool to identify and to analyze exactly soluble time-dependent quantum mechanical potentials. By considering the most general possible time-dependent re-definition of the spatial coordinate, as well as general transformations on the wavefunctions, we show that separation of variables applies and exact solubility occurs only in a very restricted class of time-dependent models. We consider the formal structure underlying our findings, and the relationship bet...

  1. Stride-Time Variability and Fall Risk in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yaejin; Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-01-01

    Gait variability is associated with falls in clinical populations. However, gait variability's link to falls in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS) is not well established. This investigation examined the relationship between stride-time variability, fall risk, and physiological fall risk factors in PwMS. 17 PwMS (62.8 ± 7.4 years) and 17 age-matched controls (62.8 ± 5.9 years) performed the 6-minute walk test. Stride-time was assessed with accelerometers attached to the participants' shanks. Stride-time variability was measured by interstride coefficient of variation (CV) of stride-time. The participant's fall risk was measured by the short form physiological profile assessment (PPA). A Spearman correlation analysis was used to determine the relationship between variables. Increased fall risk was strongly associated with increased stride-time CV in both PwMS (ρ = 0.71, p 0.05). In PwMS, stride-time CV was related to postural sway (ρ = 0.74, p < 0.01) while in the control group, it was related to proprioception (ρ = 0.61, p < 0.01) and postural sway (ρ = 0.78, p < 0.01). Current observations suggest that gait variability is maybe more sensitive marker of fall risk than average gait parameters in PwMS. It was also noted that postural sway may be potentially targeted to modify gait variability in PwMS.

  2. Numerical counting ratemeter with variable time constant and integrated circuits; Ictometre numerique a constante de temps variable a circuits integres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J.; Fuan, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    We present here the prototype of a numerical counting ratemeter which is a special version of variable time-constant frequency meter (1). The originality of this work lies in the fact that the change in the time constant is carried out automatically. Since the criterion for this change is the accuracy in the annunciated result, the integration time is varied as a function of the frequency. For the prototype described in this report, the time constant varies from 1 sec to 1 millisec. for frequencies in the range 10 Hz to 10 MHz. This prototype is built entirely of MECL-type integrated circuits from Motorola and is thus contained in two relatively small boxes. (authors) [French] Nous presentons ici le prototype d'un ictometre numerique, celui-ci etant une version speciale d'un frequencemetre a constante de temps variable (1). Le nouvel interet de cette etude est le fait que le changement de la constante de temps se fait automatiquement. Le critere de ce changement etant la precision du resultat a afficher on change alors le temps d'integration en fonction de la frequence. Pour le prototype decrit dans ce rapport la constante de temps varie entre 1 s et 1 ms pour des frequences allant de 10 Hz a 10 MHz. Ce prototype est entierement realise en circuit integre type MECL de Motorola et se presente en consequence dans deux boitiers d'une taille relativement petite. (auteurs)

  3. The time variation in infrared water-vapour bands in Mira variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsuura, M; Yamamura, [No Value; Cami, J; Onaka, T; Murakami, H; Yamamura, I.

    The time variation in the water-vapour bands in oxygen-rich Mira variables has been investigated using multi-epoch ISO/SWS spectra of four Mira variables in the 2.5-4.0 mum region. All four stars show H2O bands in absorption around minimum in the visual light curve. At maximum, H2O emission features

  4. Eleventh Hour Linux+

    CERN Document Server

    Speake, Graham; Happel, Chris; Lillard, Terrence V

    2009-01-01

    The 11th Hour Linux+ Study Guide is keyed to the XK0-003 revision of the CompTIA Linux+exam. This book is streamlined to include only core certification information and is presented for ease of last-minute studying. Main objectives of the exam are covered with key concepts highlighted. ..: ..; Fast Facts quickly review fundamentals ..; Exam Warnings highlight particularly tough sections of the exam ..; Crunch Time sidebars point out key concepts to remember ..; Did You Know? sidebars cover sometimes forgotten details ..; Top Five Toughest Questions and answers help you to prepare .. The 11th H

  5. Short time-scale variables in the Gaia era: detection and characterization by structure function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelens, Maroussia; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Palaversa, Lovro; Süveges, Maria; Charnas, Jonathan; Wevers, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the capabilities of the ESA Gaia mission for detecting and character- izing short timescale variability, from tens of seconds to a dozen hours. We assess the efficiency of the variogram analysis, for both detecting short timescale variability and estimating the underlying characteristic timescales from Gaia photometry, through extensive light-curve simulations for various periodic and transient short timescale variable types. We show that, with this approach, we can detect fast periodic variabil- ity, with amplitudes down to a few millimagnitudes, as well as some M dwarf flares and supernovae explosions, with limited contamination from longer timescale variables or constant sources. Timescale estimates from the variogram give valuable informa- tion on the rapidity of the underlying variation, which could complement timescale estimates from other methods, like Fourier-based periodograms, and be reinvested in preparation of ground-based photometric follow-up of short timescale candidates evi- denced by Gaia. The next step will be to find new short timescale variable candidates from real Gaia data, and to further characterize them using all the Gaia information, including color and spectrum.

  6. Analysis of Modal Travel Time Variability Due to Mesoscale Ocean Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Amy

    1997-01-01

    .... First, for an open ocean environment away from strong boundary currents, the effects of randomly phased linear baroclinic Rossby waves on acoustic travel time are shown to produce a variable overall...

  7. Effects of reaction time variability and age on brain activity during Stroop task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Angela; Luedke, Angela C; Walsh, Jeremy J; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-09-01

    Variability in reaction time during task performance may reflect fluctuations in attention and cause reduced performance in goal-directed tasks, yet it is unclear whether the mechanisms behind this phenomenon change with age. Using fMRI, we tested young and cognitively healthy older adults with the Stroop task to determine whether aging affects the neural mechanisms underlying intra-individual reaction time variability. We found significant between-group differences in BOLD activity modulated by reaction time. In older adults, longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in frontoparietal attentional areas, while in younger adults longer reaction times were associated with greater activity in default mode network areas. Our results suggest that the neural correlates of reaction time variability change with healthy aging, reinforcing the concept of functional plasticity to maintain high cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

  8. TRMM (TMPA-RT) Near Real-Time IR precipitation estimate L3 1-hour 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V7 (TRMM_3B41RT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data are output from the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), the Near Real-Time (RT) processing stream. The latency is about seven hours from...

  9. TRMM (TMPA-RT) Near Real-Time Microwave precipitation estimate L3 3 hour 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V7 (TRMM_3B40RT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data are output from the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), the Near Real-Time (RT) processing stream. The latency is about seven hours from...

  10. TRMM (TMPA-RT) Near Real-Time Precipitation L3 3 hour 0.25 degree x 0.25 degree V7 (TRMM_3B42RT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data are output from the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), the Near Real-Time (RT) processing stream. The latency is about seven hours from...

  11. Estimating the Impact of Time-Invariant Variables on FDI with Fixed Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Ronald B.; Ionascu, Delia Simona; Kristjánsdóttir, Helga

    This paper applies the panel fixed effects with vector decomposition estimator to three FDI datasets to estimate the impact of time-invariant variables on FDI while including fixed effects. We find that the omission of fixed effects significantly biases several of these variables, especially those...... proxying for trade costs and culture. After including fixed effects, we find that many time-invariant variables indicate the importance of vertical FDI. We also find that by eliminating these biases, the differences across datasets largely disappear. Thus, controversies in the literature that are driven...

  12. Exact solutions of time fractional heat-like and wave-like equations with variable coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable-coefficient time fractional heat-like and wave-like equation with initial and boundary conditions is solved by the use of variable separation method and the properties of Mittag-Leffler function. As a result, exact solutions are obtained, from which some known special solutions are recovered. It is shown that the variable separation method can also be used to solve some others time fractional heat-like and wave-like equation in science and engineering.

  13. Solving Time-Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation by Variable Weights Particle Tracking Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaohua; Jiang, Jianguo; Wu, Jichun

    2017-09-01

    Particle tracking method is an efficient and reliable method to solve time-fractional advection-dispersion equation, which can describe anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media. However, this method will lead to severe fluctuation or disappearance of solutions if the concentration value is small. A variable weights method is developed to conquer the shortcoming of particle tracking method. Then, one-dimensional and two-dimensional time-fractional advection-dispersion equations are solved by the variable weights particle tracking method. Compared to traditional particle tracking method, the variable weights version may eliminate the fluctuation and improve the accuracy by orders of magnitude without more computational cost.

  14. Generalized space time autoregressive with exogenous variable model and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Dewi; Nurani Ruchjana, Budi; Soemartini

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we proposed the Generalized Space Time Autoregressive with variable Exogenous, abbreviated GSTARX as GSTAR development with the addition of exogenous variables. GSTARX not only involves the element of time and location, but also the influence of exogenous variables in the model. GSTARX equation can be written as a linear model, so we can estimate parameters of GSTARX model using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method. For our case study, we use GSTARX model with uniform and inverse distance weights to predict an export volume of Crude Palm Oil (CPO) in several locations on the island of Sumatera, where X is the international CPO prices.

  15. Assessment of the methods for determining net radiation at different time-scales of meteorological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When modeling the soil/atmosphere interaction, it is of paramount importance to determine the net radiation flux. There are two common calculation methods for this purpose. Method 1 relies on use of air temperature, while Method 2 relies on use of both air and soil temperatures. Nowadays, there has been no consensus on the application of these two methods. In this study, the half-hourly data of solar radiation recorded at an experimental embankment are used to calculate the net radiation and long-wave radiation at different time-scales (half-hourly, hourly, and daily using the two methods. The results show that, compared with Method 2 which has been widely adopted in agronomical, geotechnical and geo-environmental applications, Method 1 is more feasible for its simplicity and accuracy at shorter time-scale. Moreover, in case of longer time-scale, daily for instance, less variations of net radiation and long-wave radiation are obtained, suggesting that no detailed soil temperature variations can be obtained. In other words, shorter time-scales are preferred in determining net radiation flux.

  16. Importance of variable time-step algorithms in spatial kinetics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles, B.N.

    1994-12-31

    The use of spatial kinetics codes in conjunction with advanced thermal-hydraulics codes is becoming more widespread as better methods and faster computers appear. The integrated code packages are being used for routine nuclear power plant design and analysis, including simulations with instrumentation and control systems initiating system perturbations such as rod motion and scrams. As a result, it is important to include a robust variable time-step algorithm that can accurately and efficiently follow widely varying plant neutronic behavior. This paper describes the variable time-step algorithm in SPANDEX and compares the automatic time-step scheme with a more traditional fixed time-step scheme.

  17. Hourly Comparison of GPM-IMERG-Final-Run and IMERG-Real-Time (V-03) over a Dense Surface Network in Northeastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Ehsan; Steinacker, Reinhold; Saghafian, Bahram

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantitative daily precipitation estimation is key to meteorological and hydrological applications in hazards forecast and management. In-situ observations over mountainous areas are mostly limited, however, currently available satellite precipitation products can potentially provide the precipitation estimation needed for meteorological and hydrological applications. Over the years, blended methods that use multi-satellites and multi-sensors have been developed for estimating of global precipitation. One of the latest satellite precipitation products is GPM-IMERG (Global Precipitation Measurement with 30-minute temporal and 0.1-degree spatial resolutions) which consists of three products: Final-Run (aimed for research), Real-Time early run, and Real-Time late run. The Integrated Multisatellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products built upon the success of TRMM's Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products continue to make improvements in spatial and temporal resolutions and snowfall estimates. Recently, researchers who evaluated IMERG-Final-Run V-03 and other precipitation products indicated better performance for IMERG-Final-Run against other similar products. In this study two GPM-IMERG products, namely final run and real time-late run, were evaluated against a dense synoptic stations network (62 stations) over Northeastern Austria for mid-March 2015 to end of January 2016 period at hourly time-scale. Both products were examined against the reference data (stations) in capturing the occurrence of precipitation and statistical characteristics of precipitation intensity. Both satellite precipitation products underestimated precipitation events of 0.1 mm/hr to 0.4 mm/hr in intensity. For precipitations 0.4 mm/hr and greater, the trend was reversed and both satellite products overestimated than station recorded data. IMERG-RT outperformed IMERG-FR for precipitation intensity in the range of 0.1 mm/hr to 0.4 mm/hr while in the range of 1.1 to 1.8 mm

  18. Knowledge acquisition with domain experts on the aspects of use of visual variables in the Space Time Cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveladze, Irma; Kraak, Menno-Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The prepared touch screens were running on the windows workstation and allowing direct manipulation of the displayed information content for zoom in/out, rotation and panning options. The discussion session lasted within one hour and aimed to gain insight the aspects of the use of visual variables in the STC......The Space – Time Cube (STC) is a visual representation developed at the end of the 20th century for understanding the spatio-temporal aspects in human’s everyday life (Hägerstrand, 1970). Since its introduction, it has been widely used in a various discipline (Kraak, 2003; Demšar and Virrantaus...... to other visual representations. However, the usability metrics of the cartographic design theory for the STC content still remain to be unexplored. Therefore, this study particularly focused on the evaluation of the cartographic design aspects into the STC. This study was conducted in two different...

  19. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the 'Half Marathon Basel' completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD) 103.9 (16.5) min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9) km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56), suprailiacal (r = 0.36) and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53) were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = -0.54) were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150) and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045) were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r(2) = 0.44): Race time (min) = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m(2)) -3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable.

  20. Resting heart rate variability is associated with ex-Gaussian metrics of intra-individual reaction time variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Derek P; Williams, DeWayne P; Speller, Lassiter F; Brooks, Justin R; Thayer, Julian F

    2018-02-02

    The relationships between vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) and the cognitive mechanisms underlying performance can be elucidated with ex-Gaussian modeling-an approach that quantifies two different forms of intra-individual variability (IIV) in reaction time (RT). To this end, the current study examined relations of resting vmHRV to whole-distribution and ex-Gaussian IIV. Subjects (N = 83) completed a 5-minute baseline while vmHRV (root mean square of successive differences; RMSSD) was measured. Ex-Gaussian (sigma, tau) and whole-distribution (standard deviation) estimates of IIV were derived from reaction times on a Stroop task. Resting vmHRV was found to be inversely related to tau (exponential IIV) but not to sigma (Gaussian IIV) or the whole-distribution standard deviation of RTs. Findings suggest that individuals with high vmHRV can better prevent attentional lapses but not difficulties with motor control. These findings inform the differential relationships of cardiac vagal control to the cognitive processes underlying human performance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spontaneous fluctuations in sensory processing predict within-subject reaction time variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When engaged in a repetitive task our performance fluctuates from trial-to-trial. In particular, inter-trial reaction time variability has been the subject of considerable research. It has been claimed to be a strong biomarker of attention deficits, increases with frontal dysfunction, and predicts age-related cognitive decline. Thus, rather than being just a consequence of noise in the system, it appears to be under the control of a mechanism that breaks down under certain pathological conditions. Although the underlying mechanism is still an open question, consensual hypotheses are emerging regarding the neural correlates of reaction time inter-trial intra-individual variability. Sensory processing, in particular, has been shown to covary with reaction time, yet the spatio-temporal profile of the moment-to-moment variability in sensory processing is still poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to characterize the intra-individual variability in the time course of single-trial visual evoked potentials and its relationship with inter-trial reaction time variability. For this, we chose to take advantage of the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG acquired while participants were engaged in a 2-choice reaction time task. We studied the link between single trial event-related potentials (ERPs and reaction time using two different analyses: 1 time point by time point correlation analyses thereby identifying time windows of interest, and 2 correlation analyses between single trial measures of peak latency and amplitude and reaction time. To improve extraction of single trial ERP measures related with activation of the visual cortex, we used an independent component analysis procedure.Our ERP analysis revealed a relationship between the N1 visual evoked potential and reaction time. The earliest time point presenting a significant correlation of its respective amplitude with reaction time occurred 175 ms after stimulus

  2. Spontaneous Fluctuations in Sensory Processing Predict Within-Subject Reaction Time Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Maria J; Paiva, Joana S; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    When engaged in a repetitive task our performance fluctuates from trial-to-trial. In particular, inter-trial reaction time variability has been the subject of considerable research. It has been claimed to be a strong biomarker of attention deficits, increases with frontal dysfunction, and predicts age-related cognitive decline. Thus, rather than being just a consequence of noise in the system, it appears to be under the control of a mechanism that breaks down under certain pathological conditions. Although the underlying mechanism is still an open question, consensual hypotheses are emerging regarding the neural correlates of reaction time inter-trial intra-individual variability. Sensory processing, in particular, has been shown to covary with reaction time, yet the spatio-temporal profile of the moment-to-moment variability in sensory processing is still poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to characterize the intra-individual variability in the time course of single-trial visual evoked potentials and its relationship with inter-trial reaction time variability. For this, we chose to take advantage of the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired while participants were engaged in a 2-choice reaction time task. We studied the link between single trial event-related potentials (ERPs) and reaction time using two different analyses: (1) time point by time point correlation analyses thereby identifying time windows of interest; and (2) correlation analyses between single trial measures of peak latency and amplitude and reaction time. To improve extraction of single trial ERP measures related with activation of the visual cortex, we used an independent component analysis (ICA) procedure. Our ERP analysis revealed a relationship between the N1 visual evoked potential and reaction time. The earliest time point presenting a significant correlation of its respective amplitude with reaction time occurred 175 ms after stimulus onset

  3. Investigation of Dependence between Time-zero and Time-dependent Variability in High-k NMOS Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, Mohammad Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Bias Temperature Instability (BTI) is a major reliability concern in CMOS technology, especially with High dielectric constant (High-\\k{appa}/HK) metal gate (MG) transistors. In addition, the time independent process induced variation has also increased because of the aggressive scaling down of devices. As a result, the faster devices at the lower threshold voltage distribution tail experience higher stress, leading to additional skewness in the BTI degradation. Since time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and stress-induced leakage current (SILC) in NMOS devices are correlated to BTI, it is necessary to investigate the effect of time zero variability on all these effects simultaneously. To that effect, we propose a simulation framework to model and analyze the impact of time-zero variability (in particular, random dopant fluctuations) on different aging effects. For small area devices (~1000 nm2) in 30nm technology, we observe significant effect of Random Dopant Fluctuation (RDF) on BTI induced variabili...

  4. A Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Patients With Acute Spinal Cord Injury and Central Cord Syndrome: Recommendations on the Timing (≤24 Hours Versus >24 Hours) of Decompressive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Lindsay A.; Wilson, Jefferson R.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Anderson, Paul; Arnold, Paul M.; Brodke, Darrel S.; Burns, Anthony S.; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Dettori, Joseph R.; Furlan, Julio C.; Hawryluk, Gregory; Holly, Langston T.; Howley, Susan; Jeji, Tara; Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Kotter, Mark; Kurpad, Shekar; Marino, Ralph J.; Martin, Allan R.; Massicotte, Eric; Merli, Geno; Middleton, James W.; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Nagoshi, Narihito; Palmieri, Katherine; Singh, Anoushka; Skelly, Andrea C.; Tsai, Eve C.; Vaccaro, Alexander; Yee, Albert; Harrop, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop recommendations on the timing of surgical decompression in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and central cord syndrome. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted to address key relevant questions. A multidisciplinary guideline development group used this information, along with their clinical expertise, to develop recommendations for the timing of surgical decompression in patients with SCI and central cord syndrome. Based on GRADE, a strong recommendation is worded as “we recommend,” whereas a weak recommendation is presented as “we suggest.” Results: Conclusions from the systematic review included (1) isolated studies reported statistically significant and clinically important improvements following early decompression at 6 months and following discharge from inpatient rehabilitation; (2) in one study on acute central cord syndrome without instability, a marginally significant improvement in total motor scores was reported at 6 and 12 months in patients managed with early versus late surgery; and (3) there were no significant differences in length of acute care/rehabilitation stay or in rates of complications between treatment groups. Our recommendations were: “We suggest that early surgery be considered as a treatment option in adult patients with traumatic central cord syndrome” and “We suggest that early surgery be offered as an option for adult acute SCI patients regardless of level.” Quality of evidence for both recommendations was considered low. Conclusions: These guidelines should be implemented into clinical practice to improve outcomes in patients with acute SCI and central cord syndrome by promoting standardization of care, decreasing the heterogeneity of management strategies, and encouraging clinicians to make evidence-informed decisions. PMID:29164024

  5. Time to talk about work-hour impact on anesthesiologists: The effects of sleep deprivation on Profile of Mood States and cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Haleh; Bissonnette, Bruno; Tumin, Dmitry; Thung, Arlyne; Rice, Julie; Barry, N'Diris; Tobias, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A physician's fatigue raises significant concerns regarding personal and patient safety. Effects of sleep deprivation on clinical performance and the quality of patient care are major considerations of today's health care environment. To evaluate the impact of partial sleep deprivation after a 17-h overnight call (3 pm-7 am) on the mood status and cognitive skills of anesthesiologists in an academic clinical hospital setting, as compared to these parameters during regular working hours. Taking circadian rhythm into account, the following measures were assessed in 21 pediatric anesthesiologists at two time points over the course of the study; (i) between 7 and 8 am on a regular non call day, and (ii) between 7 and 8 am after a 17-h in-house call (3 pm-7 am). Six mood states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States. A Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) score was obtained as the sum of all mood scores minus vigor. The total score provides a global estimate of affective state. Simple cognitive tests were similarly administered to assess cognitive skills. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to compare data between regular and post call days. A P sleep deprivation affects the total mood status of anesthesiologists and impacts their cognitive skills. These findings are particularly relevant in a context of increased work expectation, particularly on clinical performance in our modern medical system. Such observations suggest that there may be changes that impact the safety of our patients and the quality of health care that is provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The added value of time-variable microgravimetry to the understanding of how volcanoes work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Greco, Filippo; Diament, Michel

    2017-01-01

    During the past few decades, time-variable volcano gravimetry has shown great potential for imaging subsurface processes at active volcanoes (including some processes that might otherwise remain “hidden”), especially when combined with other methods (e.g., ground deformation, seismicity, and gas emissions). By supplying information on changes in the distribution of bulk mass over time, gravimetry can provide information regarding processes such as magma accumulation in void space, gas segregation at shallow depths, and mechanisms driving volcanic uplift and subsidence. Despite its potential, time-variable volcano gravimetry is an underexploited method, not widely adopted by volcano researchers or observatories. The cost of instrumentation and the difficulty in using it under harsh environmental conditions is a significant impediment to the exploitation of gravimetry at many volcanoes. In addition, retrieving useful information from gravity changes in noisy volcanic environments is a major challenge. While these difficulties are not trivial, neither are they insurmountable; indeed, creative efforts in a variety of volcanic settings highlight the value of time-variable gravimetry for understanding hazards as well as revealing fundamental insights into how volcanoes work. Building on previous work, we provide a comprehensive review of time-variable volcano gravimetry, including discussions of instrumentation, modeling and analysis techniques, and case studies that emphasize what can be learned from campaign, continuous, and hybrid gravity observations. We are hopeful that this exploration of time-variable volcano gravimetry will excite more scientists about the potential of the method, spurring further application, development, and innovation.

  7. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  8. TIMING VARIABILITY OF REACH TRAJECTORIES IN LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE STROKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sandra Maria Sbeghen Ferreira; Gera, Geetanjali; Scholz, John Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated trajectory timing variability in right and left stroke survivors and healthy controls when reaching to a centrally located target under a fixed target condition or when the target could suddenly change position after reach onset. Trajectory timing variability was investigated with a novel method based on dynamic programming that identifies the steps required to time warp one trial’s acceleration time series to match that of a reference trial. Greater trajectory timing variability of both hand and joint motions was found for the paretic arm of stroke survivors compared to their non-paretic arm or either arm of controls. Overall, the non-paretic left arm of the LCVA group and the left arm of controls had higher timing variability than the non-paretic right arm of the RCVA group and right arm of controls. The shoulder and elbow joint warping costs were consistent predictors of the hand’s warping cost for both left and right arms only in the LCVA group, whereas the relationship between joint and hand warping costs was relatively weak in control subjects and less consistent across arms in the RCVA group. These results suggest that the left hemisphere may be more involved in trajectory timing, although the results may be confounded by skill differences between the arms in these right hand dominant participants. On the other hand, arm differences did not appear to be related to differences in targeting error. The paretic left arm of the RCVA exhibited greater trajectory timing variability than the paretic right arm of the LCVA group. This difference was highly correlated with the level of impairment of the arms. Generally, the effect of target uncertainty resulted in slightly greater trajectory timing variability for all participants. The results are discussed in light of previous studies of hemispheric differences in the control of reaching, in particular, left hemisphere specialization for temporal control of reaching movements. PMID:21920508

  9. Stability of Delayed Hopfield Neural Networks with Variable-Time Impulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjun Pei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the globally exponential stability criteria of delayed Hopfield neural networks with variable-time impulses are established. The proposed criteria can also be applied in Hopfield neural networks with fixed-time impulses. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  10. Intra-Individual Reaction Time Variability in Schizophrenia, Depression and Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stefan; Roth, Alexander; Rentrop, Mirjam; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Bender, Stephan; Weisbrod, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Intra-individual reaction time variability (IIV) in neuropsychological task performance reflects short term fluctuations in performance. Increased IIV has been reported in patients with schizophrenia and could be related to a deficient neural timing mechanism, but the role of IIV in adult patients with other psychiatric disorders has not been…

  11. Working hours and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collewet, Marion; Sauermann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the link between working hours and productivity using daily information on working hours and performance of a sample of call centre agents. We exploit variation in the number of hours worked by the same employee across days and weeks due to central scheduling, enabling us to

  12. Space-time variability of Indonesian rainfall at inter-annual and multi-decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Zagona, Edith

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the space-time variability of wet (Nov-Apr) and dry (May-Oct) season rainfall over Indonesia, using monthly gridded rainfall data from the University of East Anglia Climatic Research Unit covering the period 1901-2012. Three complimentary techniques were employed—(1) principal component analysis to identify the dominant modes of variability, (2) wavelet spectral analysis to identify the spectral characteristics of the leading modes and their coherence with large scale climate variables and (3) Bayesian Dynamical Linear Model (BDLM) to quantify the temporal variability of the association between rainfall modes and climate variables. In the dry season when the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is to the north of the equator the leading two principal components (PCs) explain close to 50 % of the rainfall. In the wet season the ITCZ moves to the south and the leading PCs explain close to 30 % of the variance. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the driver of the leading modes of rainfall variability during both seasons. We find asymmetry in the teleconnections of ENSO to high and low rainfall years in the dry season. Furthermore, ENSO and the leading PCs of rainfall have spectral coherence in the inter-annual band (2-8 years) over the entire period of record and in the multi-decadal (8-16 years) band in post-1980 years. In addition, during the 1950-1980 period the second mode of variability in both seasons has a strong relationship with Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The association between ENSO and the leading mode of Indonesian rainfall has strengthened in recent decades, more so during dry season. These inter-annual and multi-decadal variability of Indonesian rainfall modulated by Pacific climate drivers has implications for rainfall and hydrologic predictability important for water resources management.

  13. Real-Time Science on Social Media: The Example of Twitter in the Minutes, Hours, Days after the 2015 M7.8 Nepal Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, A.; Bossu, R.; Mazet-Roux, G.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific information on disasters such as earthquakes typically comes firstly from official organizations, news reports and interviews with experts, and later from scientific presentations and peer-reviewed articles. With the advent of the Internet and social media, this information is available in real-time from automated systems and within a dynamic, collaborative interaction between scientific experts, responders and the public. After the 2015 M7.8 Nepal earthquake, Twitter Tweets from earth scientists* included information, analysis, commentary and discussion on earthquake parameters (location, size, mechanism, rupture extent, high-frequency radiation, …), earthquake effects (distribution of felt shaking and damage, triggered seismicity, landslides, …), earthquake rumors (e.g. the imminence of a larger event) and other earthquake information and observations (aftershock forecasts, statistics and maps, source and regional tectonics, seismograms, GPS, InSAR, photos/videos, …).In the future (while taking into account security, false or erroneous information and identity verification), collaborative, real-time science on social media after a disaster will give earlier and better scientific understanding and dissemination of public information, and enable improved emergency response and disaster management.* A sample of scientific Tweets after the 2015 Nepal earthquake: In the first minutes: "mb5.9 Mwp7.4 earthquake Nepal 2015.04.25-06:11:25UTC", "Major earthquake shakes Nepal 8 min ago", "Epicenter between Pokhara and Kathmandu", "Major earthquake shakes Nepal 18 min ago. Effects derived from witnesses' reports". In the first hour: "shallow thrust faulting to North under Himalayas", "a very large and shallow event ... Mw7.6-7.7", "aftershocks extend east and south of Kathmandu, so likely ruptured beneath city", "Valley-blocking landslides must be a very real worry". In the first day: "M7.8 earthquake in Nepal 2hr ago: destructive in Kathmandu Valley and

  14. Efficient conservative ADER schemes based on WENO reconstruction and space-time predictor in primitive variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Olindo; Dumbser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We present a new version of conservative ADER-WENO finite volume schemes, in which both the high order spatial reconstruction as well as the time evolution of the reconstruction polynomials in the local space-time predictor stage are performed in primitive variables, rather than in conserved ones. To obtain a conservative method, the underlying finite volume scheme is still written in terms of the cell averages of the conserved quantities. Therefore, our new approach performs the spatial WENO reconstruction twice: the first WENO reconstruction is carried out on the known cell averages of the conservative variables. The WENO polynomials are then used at the cell centers to compute point values of the conserved variables, which are subsequently converted into point values of the primitive variables. This is the only place where the conversion from conservative to primitive variables is needed in the new scheme. Then, a second WENO reconstruction is performed on the point values of the primitive variables to obtain piecewise high order reconstruction polynomials of the primitive variables. The reconstruction polynomials are subsequently evolved in time with a novel space-time finite element predictor that is directly applied to the governing PDE written in primitive form. The resulting space-time polynomials of the primitive variables can then be directly used as input for the numerical fluxes at the cell boundaries in the underlying conservative finite volume scheme. Hence, the number of necessary conversions from the conserved to the primitive variables is reduced to just one single conversion at each cell center. We have verified the validity of the new approach over a wide range of hyperbolic systems, including the classical Euler equations of gas dynamics, the special relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD) and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) equations, as well as the Baer-Nunziato model for compressible two-phase flows. In all cases we have noticed that the new ADER

  15. A Time-Series Water Level Forecasting Model Based on Imputation and Variable Selection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-He Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reservoirs are important for households and impact the national economy. This paper proposed a time-series forecasting model based on estimating a missing value followed by variable selection to forecast the reservoir’s water level. This study collected data from the Taiwan Shimen Reservoir as well as daily atmospheric data from 2008 to 2015. The two datasets are concatenated into an integrated dataset based on ordering of the data as a research dataset. The proposed time-series forecasting model summarily has three foci. First, this study uses five imputation methods to directly delete the missing value. Second, we identified the key variable via factor analysis and then deleted the unimportant variables sequentially via the variable selection method. Finally, the proposed model uses a Random Forest to build the forecasting model of the reservoir’s water level. This was done to compare with the listing method under the forecasting error. These experimental results indicate that the Random Forest forecasting model when applied to variable selection with full variables has better forecasting performance than the listing model. In addition, this experiment shows that the proposed variable selection can help determine five forecast methods used here to improve the forecasting capability.

  16. A Time-Series Water Level Forecasting Model Based on Imputation and Variable Selection Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun-He; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Chan, Chia-Pan

    2017-01-01

    Reservoirs are important for households and impact the national economy. This paper proposed a time-series forecasting model based on estimating a missing value followed by variable selection to forecast the reservoir's water level. This study collected data from the Taiwan Shimen Reservoir as well as daily atmospheric data from 2008 to 2015. The two datasets are concatenated into an integrated dataset based on ordering of the data as a research dataset. The proposed time-series forecasting model summarily has three foci. First, this study uses five imputation methods to directly delete the missing value. Second, we identified the key variable via factor analysis and then deleted the unimportant variables sequentially via the variable selection method. Finally, the proposed model uses a Random Forest to build the forecasting model of the reservoir's water level. This was done to compare with the listing method under the forecasting error. These experimental results indicate that the Random Forest forecasting model when applied to variable selection with full variables has better forecasting performance than the listing model. In addition, this experiment shows that the proposed variable selection can help determine five forecast methods used here to improve the forecasting capability.

  17. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  18. Numerical Simulations for the Space-Time Variable Order Nonlinear Fractional Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Hassan Sweilam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The explicit finite-difference method for solving variable order fractional space-time wave equation with a nonlinear source term is considered. The concept of variable order fractional derivative is considered in the sense of Caputo. The stability analysis and the truncation error of the method are discussed. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, some numerical test examples are presented.

  19. Instrumental variable method for time-to-event data using a pseudo-observation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken I S; Parner, Erik T

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies are often in peril of unmeasured confounding. Instrumental variable analysis is a method for controlling for unmeasured confounding. As yet, theory on instrumental variable analysis of censored time-to-event data is scarce. We propose a pseudo-observation approach to instrumental variable analysis of the survival function, the restricted mean, and the cumulative incidence function in competing risks with right-censored data using generalized method of moments estimation. For the purpose of illustrating our proposed method, we study antidepressant exposure in pregnancy and risk of autism spectrum disorder in offspring, and the performance of the method is assessed through simulation studies. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  20. Scheduling Jobs with Variable Job Processing Times on Unrelated Parallel Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available m unrelated parallel machines scheduling problems with variable job processing times are considered, where the processing time of a job is a function of its position in a sequence, its starting time, and its resource allocation. The objective is to determine the optimal resource allocation and the optimal schedule to minimize a total cost function that dependents on the total completion (waiting time, the total machine load, the total absolute differences in completion (waiting times on all machines, and total resource cost. If the number of machines is a given constant number, we propose a polynomial time algorithm to solve the problem.

  1. Scheduling jobs with variable job processing times on unrelated parallel machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Qian; Wang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Ya-Jing

    2014-01-01

    m unrelated parallel machines scheduling problems with variable job processing times are considered, where the processing time of a job is a function of its position in a sequence, its starting time, and its resource allocation. The objective is to determine the optimal resource allocation and the optimal schedule to minimize a total cost function that dependents on the total completion (waiting) time, the total machine load, the total absolute differences in completion (waiting) times on all machines, and total resource cost. If the number of machines is a given constant number, we propose a polynomial time algorithm to solve the problem.

  2. An approach for estimating time-variable rates from geodetic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didova, Olga; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Riccardo; Klees, Roland; Roese-Koerner, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    There has been considerable research in the literature focused on computing and forecasting sea-level changes in terms of constant trends or rates. The Antarctic ice sheet is one of the main contributors to sea-level change with highly uncertain rates of glacial thinning and accumulation. Geodetic observing systems such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) are routinely used to estimate these trends. In an effort to improve the accuracy and reliability of these trends, this study investigates a technique that allows the estimated rates, along with co-estimated seasonal components, to vary in time. For this, state space models are defined and then solved by a Kalman filter (KF). The reliable estimation of noise parameters is one of the main problems encountered when using a KF approach, which is solved by numerically optimizing likelihood. Since the optimization problem is non-convex, it is challenging to find an optimal solution. To address this issue, we limited the parameter search space using classical least-squares adjustment (LSA). In this context, we also tested the usage of inequality constraints by directly verifying whether they are supported by the data. The suggested technique for time-series analysis is expanded to classify and handle time-correlated observational noise within the state space framework. The performance of the method is demonstrated using GRACE and GPS data at the CAS1 station located in East Antarctica and compared to commonly used LSA. The results suggest that the outlined technique allows for more reliable trend estimates, as well as for more physically valuable interpretations, while validating independent observing systems.

  3. Time-Frequency Signal Representations Using Interpolations in Joint-Variable Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    nature classification using dynamic time warping ,” IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 1078–1096, Jul. 2010. [12] S. S. Ram, C...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Time -frequency (TF) representations are a powerful tool for analyzing Doppler and micro-Doppler signals. These signals are...applied in the instantaneous autocorrelation domain over the time variable, the low-pass filter characteristic underlying linear interpolators lends

  4. Low-Energy Real-Time OS Using Voltage Scheduling Algorithm for Variable Voltage Processors

    OpenAIRE

    Okuma, Takanori; Yasuura, Hiroto

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time OS based on $ mu $ITRON using proposed voltage scheduling algorithm for variable voltage processors which can vary supply voltage dynamically. The proposed voltage scheduling algorithms assign voltage level for each task dynamically in order to minimize energy consumption under timing constraints. Using the presented real-time OS, running tasks with low supply voltage leads to drastic energy reduction. In addition, the presented voltage scheduling algorithm is ...

  5. Discriminant Analysis of Time Series in the Presence of Within-Group Spectral Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafty, Robert T

    2016-07-01

    Many studies record replicated time series epochs from different groups with the goal of using frequency domain properties to discriminate between the groups. In many applications, there exists variation in cyclical patterns from time series in the same group. Although a number of frequency domain methods for the discriminant analysis of time series have been explored, there is a dearth of models and methods that account for within-group spectral variability. This article proposes a model for groups of time series in which transfer functions are modeled as stochastic variables that can account for both between-group and within-group differences in spectra that are identified from individual replicates. An ensuing discriminant analysis of stochastic cepstra under this model is developed to obtain parsimonious measures of relative power that optimally separate groups in the presence of within-group spectral variability. The approach possess favorable properties in classifying new observations and can be consistently estimated through a simple discriminant analysis of a finite number of estimated cepstral coefficients. Benefits in accounting for within-group spectral variability are empirically illustrated in a simulation study and through an analysis of gait variability.

  6. Who breaches the four-hour emergency department wait time target? A retrospective analysis of 374,000 emergency department attendances between 2008 and 2013 at a type 1 emergency department in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovitz, Niklas; Lasserson, Daniel S; Briggs, Adam D M

    2017-11-02

    The four-hour target is a key hospital emergency department performance indicator in England and one that drives the physical and organisational design of the ED. Some studies have identified time of presentation as a key factor affecting waiting times. Few studies have investigated other determinants of breaching the four-hour target. Therefore, our objective was to describe patterns of emergency department breaches of the four-hour wait time target and identify patients at highest risk of breaching. This was a retrospective cohort study of a large type 1 Emergency department at an NHS teaching hospital in Oxford, England. We analysed anonymised individual level patient data for 378,873 emergency department attendances, representing all attendances between April 2008 and April 2013. We examined patient characteristics and emergency department presentation circumstances associated with the highest likelihood of breaching the four-hour wait time target. We used 374,459 complete cases for analysis. In total, 8.3% of all patients breached the four-hour wait time target. The main determinants of patients breaching the four-hour wait time target were hour of arrival to the ED, day of the week, patient age, ED referral source, and the types of investigations patients receive (p breach the four-hour target were older, presented at night, presented on Monday, received multiple types of investigation in the emergency department, and were not self-referred (p breaching compared to those attending from March to September (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.59 to 1.66). There are a number of independent patient and circumstantial factors associated with the probability of breaching the four-hour ED wait time target including patient age, ED referral source, the types of investigations patients receive, as well as the hour, day, and month of arrival to the ED. Efforts to reduce the number of breaches could explore late-evening/overnight staffing, access to diagnostic tests, rapid discharge

  7. Stride-Time Variability and Fall Risk in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaejin Moon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait variability is associated with falls in clinical populations. However, gait variability’s link to falls in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS is not well established. This investigation examined the relationship between stride-time variability, fall risk, and physiological fall risk factors in PwMS. 17 PwMS (62.8±7.4 years and 17 age-matched controls (62.8±5.9 years performed the 6-minute walk test. Stride-time was assessed with accelerometers attached to the participants’ shanks. Stride-time variability was measured by interstride coefficient of variation (CV of stride-time. The participant’s fall risk was measured by the short form physiological profile assessment (PPA. A Spearman correlation analysis was used to determine the relationship between variables. Increased fall risk was strongly associated with increased stride-time CV in both PwMS (ρ=0.71, p0.05. In PwMS, stride-time CV was related to postural sway (ρ=0.74, p<0.01 while in the control group, it was related to proprioception (ρ=0.61, p<0.01 and postural sway (ρ=0.78, p<0.01. Current observations suggest that gait variability is maybe more sensitive marker of fall risk than average gait parameters in PwMS. It was also noted that postural sway may be potentially targeted to modify gait variability in PwMS.

  8. Modified Pressure-Correction Projection Methods: Open Boundary and Variable Time Stepping

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2014-10-31

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. In this paper, we design and study two modifications of the first order standard pressure increment projection scheme for the Stokes system. The first scheme improves the existing schemes in the case of open boundary condition by modifying the pressure increment boundary condition, thereby minimizing the pressure boundary layer and recovering the optimal first order decay. The second scheme allows for variable time stepping. It turns out that the straightforward modification to variable time stepping leads to unstable schemes. The proposed scheme is not only stable but also exhibits the optimal first order decay. Numerical computations illustrating the theoretical estimates are provided for both new schemes.

  9. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    Acoustical oceanography is one way to study the ocean, its internal layers, boundaries and all processes occurring within using underwater acoustics. Acoustical sensing techniques allows for the measurement of ocean processes from within that logistically or financially preclude traditional in-situ measurements. Acoustic signals propagate as pressure wavefronts from a source to a receiver through an ocean medium with variable physical parameters. The water column physical parameters that change acoustic wave propagation in the ocean include temperature, salinity, current, surface roughness, seafloor bathymetry, and vertical stratification over variable time scales. The impacts of short-time scale water column variability on acoustic wave propagation include coherent and incoherent surface reflections, wavefront arrival time delay, focusing or defocusing of the intensity of acoustic beams and refraction of acoustic rays. This study focuses on high-frequency broadband acoustic waves, and examines the influence of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustics, wavefronts, from 7 to 28 kHz, in shallow water. Short-time scale variability is on the order of seconds to hours and the short-spatial scale variability is on the order of few centimeters. Experimental results were collected during an acoustic experiment along 100 m isobaths and data analysis was conducted using available acoustic wave propagation models. Three main topics are studied to show that acoustic waves are viable as a remote sensing tool to measure oceanographic parameters in shallow water. First, coherent surface reflections forming striation patterns, from multipath receptions, through rough surface interaction of broadband acoustic signals with the dynamic sea surface are analyzed. Matched filtered results of received acoustic waves are compared with a ray tracing numerical model using a sea surface boundary generated from measured water wave spectra at the time of

  10. Electrical Activity in a Time-Delay Four-Variable Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Tang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of electromagnetic induction on the electrical activity of neuron, the variable for magnetic flow is used to improve Hindmarsh–Rose neuron model. Simultaneously, due to the existence of time-delay when signals are propagated between neurons or even in one neuron, it is important to study the role of time-delay in regulating the electrical activity of the neuron. For this end, a four-variable neuron model is proposed to investigate the effects of electromagnetic induction and time-delay. Simulation results suggest that the proposed neuron model can show multiple modes of electrical activity, which is dependent on the time-delay and external forcing current. It means that suitable discharge mode can be obtained by selecting the time-delay or external forcing current, which could be helpful for further investigation of electromagnetic radiation on biological neuronal system.

  11. Understanding the variability of daily travel-time expenditures using GPS trajectory data

    CERN Document Server

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Rambaldi, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Transportation planning is strongly influenced by the assumption that every individual has for his daily mobility a constant daily budget of ~1 hour. However, recent experimental results are proving this assumption as wrong. Here, we study the differences in daily travel-time expenditures among 24 Italian cities, extracted from a large set of GPS data on vehicles mobility. To understand these variations at the level of individual behaviour, we introduce a trip duration model that allows for a description of the distribution of travel-time expenditures in a given city using two parameters. The first parameter reflects the accessibility of desired destinations, whereas the second one can be associated to a travel-time budget and represents physiological limits due to stress and fatigue. Within the same city, we observe variations in the distributions according to home position, number of mobility days and a driver's average number of daily trips. These results can be interpreted by a stochastic time-consumption...

  12. Variability of African Farming Systems from Phenological Analysis of NDVI Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Anton; deBeurs, K. M.; Brown, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    Food security exists when people have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food at all times to meet their dietary needs. The natural resource base is one of the many factors affecting food security. Its variability and decline creates problems for local food production. In this study we characterize for sub-Saharan Africa vegetation phenology and assess variability and trends of phenological indicators based on NDVI time series from 1982 to 2006. We focus on cumulated NDVI over the season (cumNDVI) which is a proxy for net primary productivity. Results are aggregated at the level of major farming systems, while determining also spatial variability within farming systems. High temporal variability of cumNDVI occurs in semiarid and subhumid regions. The results show a large area of positive cumNDVI trends between Senegal and South Sudan. These correspond to positive CRU rainfall trends found and relate to recovery after the 1980's droughts. We find significant negative cumNDVI trends near the south-coast of West Africa (Guinea coast) and in Tanzania. For each farming system, causes of change and variability are discussed based on available literature (Appendix A). Although food security comprises more than the local natural resource base, our results can perform an input for food security analysis by identifying zones of high variability or downward trends. Farming systems are found to be a useful level of analysis. Diversity and trends found within farming system boundaries underline that farming systems are dynamic.

  13. A space-time spectral collocation algorithm for the variable order fractional wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhrawy, A H; Doha, E H; Alzaidy, J F; Abdelkawy, M A

    2016-01-01

    The variable order wave equation plays a major role in acoustics, electromagnetics, and fluid dynamics. In this paper, we consider the space-time variable order fractional wave equation with variable coefficients. We propose an effective numerical method for solving the aforementioned problem in a bounded domain. The shifted Jacobi polynomials are used as basis functions, and the variable-order fractional derivative is described in the Caputo sense. The proposed method is a combination of shifted Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto collocation scheme for the spatial discretization and the shifted Jacobi-Gauss-Radau collocation scheme for temporal discretization. The aforementioned problem is then reduced to a problem consists of a system of easily solvable algebraic equations. Finally, numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed numerical method.

  14. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst1, Beat Knechtle1,2, Patrizia Knechtle2, Ursula Barandun1, Romuald Lepers3, Thomas Rosemann11Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3INSERM U887, University of Burgundy, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Dijon, FranceAbstract: The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the ‘Half Marathon Basel’ completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD 103.9 (16.5 min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9 km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56, suprailiacal (r = 0.36 and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53 were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = –0.54 were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150 and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045 were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r2 = 0.44: Race time (min = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m2 –3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable.Keywords: anthropometry, body fat, skin-folds, training, endurance

  15. Seasonal variability of the Red Sea, from GRACE time-variable gravity and altimeter sea surface height measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahr, John; Smeed, David; Leuliette, Eric; Swenson, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal variability of sea surface height and mass within the Red Sea, occurs mostly through the exchange of heat with the atmosphere and wind-driven inflow and outflow of water through the strait of Bab el Mandab that opens into the Gulf of Aden to the south. The seasonal effects of precipitation and evaporation, of water exchange through the Suez Canal to the north, and of runoff from the adjacent land, are all small. The flow through the Bab el Mandab involves a net mass transfer into the Red Sea during the winter and a net transfer out during the summer. But that flow has a multi-layer pattern, so that in the summer there is actually an influx of cool water at intermediate (~100 m) depths. Thus, summer water in the southern Red Sea is warmer near the surface due to higher air temperatures, but cooler at intermediate depths (especially in the far south). Summer water in the northern Red Sea experiences warming by air-sea exchange only. The temperature profile affects the water density, which impacts the sea surface height but has no effect on vertically integrated mass. Here, we study this seasonal cycle by combining GRACE time-variable mass estimates, altimeter (Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat) measurements of sea surface height, and steric sea surface height contributions derived from depth-dependent, climatological values of temperature and salinity obtained from the World Ocean Atlas. We find good consistency, particularly in the northern Red Sea, between these three data types. Among the general characteristics of our results are: (1) the mass contributions to seasonal SSHT variations are much larger than the steric contributions; (2) the mass signal is largest in winter, consistent with winds pushing water into the Red Sea through the Strait of Bab el Mandab in winter, and out during the summer; and (3) the steric signal is largest in summer, consistent with summer sea surface warming.

  16. Countermovement jump height: gender and sport-specific differences in the force-time variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, Guillaume; Wagner, Phillip P; Tombleson, Tom I L

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess (a) the eccentric rate of force development, the concentric force, and selected time variables on vertical performance during countermovement jump, (b) the existence of gender differences in these variables, and (c) the sport-specific differences. The sample was composed of 189 males and 84 females, all elite athletes involved in college and professional sports (primarily football, basketball, baseball, and volleyball). The subjects performed a series of 6 countermovement jumps on a force plate (500 Hz). Average eccentric rate of force development (ECC-RFD), total time (TIME), eccentric time (ECC-T), Ratio between eccentric and total time (ECC-T:T) and average force (CON-F) were extracted from force-time curves and the vertical jumping performance, measured by impulse momentum. Results show that CON-F (r = 0.57; p height (JH), whereas the time variables are slightly and negatively correlated (r = -0.21-0.23, p sport-specific signatures: volleyball players revealed a temporal-prevailing profile, a weak-force with large ECC-T:T for basketball players and explosive and powerful profiles for football and baseball players.

  17. Observations of entrainment and time variability in the HH 47 jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Morse, Jon A.; Heathcote, Steve; Cecil, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present new Fabry-Perot images of the HH 47 jet that show the first clear evidence for entrainment in a jet from a young star. The material in the jet moves faster down the axis of the flow and slower at the edges, similar to viscous flow in a pipe. The higher excitation lines occur along the edges of the jet, as expected if entrainment accelerates and heats the ambient material. We confirm previous observations of multiple bow shocks in this system. Together, time variability and entrainment produce much of the observed shock-excited gas in this object. Our data show that the 'wiggles' along the jet are not caused by jet material tied to a spiraling magnetic field, but instead result from time variability, variable ejection angles, or inhomogeneities in the flow. The gas entrained in the HH 47 jet may be atomic; our results do not provide direct evidence that stellar jets drive molecular outflows.

  18. Time Series Analysis: A New Methodology for Comparing the Temporal Variability of Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piia Post

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variability of three different temperature time series was compared by the use of statistical modeling of time series. The three temperature time series represent the same physical process, but are at different levels of spatial averaging: temperatures from point measurements, from regional Baltan65+, and from global ERA-40 reanalyses. The first order integrated average model IMA(0, 1, 1 is used to compare the temporal variability of the time series. The applied IMA(0, 1, 1 model is divisible into a sum of random walk and white noise component, where the variances for both white noises (one of them serving as a generator of the random walk are computable from the parameters of the fitted model. This approach enables us to compare the models fitted independently to the original and restored series using two new parameters. This operation adds a certain new method to the analysis of nonstationary series.

  19. Development of a variable time-step transient NEW code: SPANDEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviles, B.N. (Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional, variable time-step transient multigroup diffusion theory code, SPANDEX (space-time nodal expansion method). SPANDEX is based on the static nodal expansion method (NEM) code, NODEX (Ref. 1), and employs a nonlinear algorithm and a fifth-order expansion of the transverse-integrated fluxes. The time integration scheme in SPANDEX is a fourth-order implicit generalized Runge-Kutta method (GRK) with on-line error control and variable time-step selection. This Runge-Kutta method has been applied previously to point kinetics and one-dimensional finite difference transient analysis. This paper describes the application of the Runge-Kutta method to three-dimensional reactor transient analysis in a multigroup NEM code.

  20. A time series analysis of climate variability and its impacts on food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, estimation of the impacts of CC on food production was done using an econometric model; where climate variables together with other factors were set to be determinant of food production over time. The co-integrated Vector Auto Regressive and Error Correction Models were employed to empirically analyse the ...

  1. Mind wandering at the fingertips: automatic parsing of subjective states based on response time variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Mikaël; Sackur, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Research from the last decade has successfully used two kinds of thought reports in order to assess whether the mind is wandering: random thought-probes and spontaneous reports. However, none of these two methods allows any assessment of the subjective state of the participant between two reports. In this paper, we present a step by step elaboration and testing of a continuous index, based on response time variability within Sustained Attention to Response Tasks (N = 106, for a total of 10 conditions). We first show that increased response time variability predicts mind wandering. We then compute a continuous index of response time variability throughout full experiments and show that the temporal position of a probe relative to the nearest local peak of the continuous index is predictive of mind wandering. This suggests that our index carries information about the subjective state of the subject even when he or she is not probed, and opens the way for on-line tracking of mind wandering. Finally we proceed a step further and infer the internal attentional states on the basis of the variability of response times. To this end we use the Hidden Markov Model framework, which allows us to estimate the durations of on-task and off-task episodes. PMID:24046753

  2. Time-dependent exact solutions for Rosenau-Hyman equations with variable coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Wescley Luiz de; Silva, Érica de Mello

    2015-03-01

    In this work we study Rosenau-Hyman-like equations that were obtained by imposing the Lie point symmetry algebra of standard KdV to a general K (m, n) equation with variable coefficients. We present time-dependent exact solutions for suited choices of parameters m and n, including the similarity solution related to rarefaction shock wave phenomena.

  3. Simulation of the time-variable gravity field by means of coupled geophysical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, T.; Bamber, J.L.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Dobslaw, H.; Murböck, M.; Thomas, M.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Dam, T. van; Vermeersen, L.L.A.; Visser, P.

    2011-01-01

    Time variable gravity fields, reflecting variations of mass distribution in the system Earth is one of the key parameters to understand the changing Earth. Mass variations are caused either by redistribution of mass in, on or above the Earth's surface or by geophysical processes in the Earth's

  4. Symmetry Classification and Exact Solutions of a Variable Coefficient Space-Time Fractional Potential Burgers’ Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the symmetry properties of a variable coefficient space-time fractional potential Burgers’ equation. Fractional Lie symmetries and corresponding infinitesimal generators are obtained. With the help of the infinitesimal generators, some group invariant solutions are deduced. Further, some exact solutions of fractional potential Burgers’ equation are generated by the invariant subspace method.

  5. Using Derivative Estimates to Describe Intraindividual Variability at Multiple Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboeck, Pascal R.; Montpetit, Mignon A.; Bergeman, C. S.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The study of intraindividual variability is central to the study of individuals in psychology. Previous research has related the variance observed in repeated measurements (time series) of individuals to traitlike measures that are logically related. Intraindividual measures, such as intraindividual standard deviation or the coefficient of…

  6. Improved theory of time domain reflectometry with variable coaxial cable length for electrical conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although empirical models have been developed previously, a mechanistic model is needed for estimating electrical conductivity (EC) using time domain reflectometry (TDR) with variable lengths of coaxial cable. The goals of this study are to: (1) derive a mechanistic model based on multisection tra...

  7. Error Analysis of a Fractional Time-Stepping Technique for Incompressible Flows with Variable Density

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of a new fractional time-stepping technique for the solution of the variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The main feature of this method is that, contrary to other existing algorithms, the pressure is determined by just solving one Poisson equation per time step. First-order error estimates are proved, and stability of a formally second-order variant of the method is established. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Time–cost tradeoff analysis considering funding variability and time uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Metwally El-kholy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a linear programming model for solution of the time–cost tradeoff problem. Although several analytical models have been developed for time–cost optimization (TCO, some of them mainly focused on projects where the contract duration is fixed. The optimization objective is therefore restricted to identify the minimum total cost only. Another group have primarily focused on project duration minimization. The model presented here considers scheduling characteristics that were ignored simultaneously in prior research. In the new formulation, variability of funding and uncertainty of project duration are considered simultaneously. A chance-constrained programming is used to incorporate the variability of funding, which is quantified by the coefficient of variation. The financial feasibility expressed as a stochastic constraint, which transformed into a deterministic equivalent at a pre-specified confidence level. Also, the project duration uncertainty incorporated into the model by applying PERT in scheduling and then the uncertainty is quantified by the coefficient of variation at a pre-specified confidence level. A system of objective function, which is minimizing direct cost and the group of constraints are solved by means of Lindo software. Two examples are conducted to demonstrate the model performance and its contributions. Four scenarios were adopted in solving the example problems to reflect the effect of each of funding variability and time uncertainty on project cost and duration. The results revealed that with 95% confidence level: 10% variability in funding versus neglecting it, would increase direct cost with 20% approximately for a pre-specified project deadline. Also, 10% variability in time versus neglecting it, would increase duration in range from 16.5% to 30% approximately, for a pre-specified direct cost. Also, considering 10% variability in funding and time would increase direct cost with more than 25% for a

  9. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei at intermediate and long time lags

    OpenAIRE

    Vagnetti, Fausto; Middei, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    We present a variability analysis for a sample of 2700 active galactic nuclei extracted from the latest release of the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue. The structure function of this sample increases up to rest-frame time lags of about 5 years. Moreover, comparing observations performed by the XMM-Newton and ROSAT satellites, we are able to extend the X-ray structure function to 20 years rest-frame, showing a further increase of variability without any evidence of a plateau. Our res...

  10. Online Synthesis for Operation Execution Time Variability on Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul

    2014-01-01

    have assumed that each biochemical operation in an application is characterized by a worst-case execution time (wcet). However, during the execution of the application, due to variability and randomness in biochemical reactions, operations may finish earlier than their wcets. In this paper we propose...... an online synthesis strategy that re-synthesizes the application at runtime when operations experience variability in their execution time, obtaining thus shorter application execution times. The proposed strategy has been evaluated using several benchmarks.......Several approaches have been proposed for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. Researchers...

  11. Synthesis of Biochemical Applications on Digital Microfluidic Biochips with Operation Execution Time Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets. Several...... that each biochemical operation in an application is characterized by a worst-case execution time (wcet). However, during the execution of the application, due to variability and randomness in biochemical reactions, operations may finish earlier than their wcetswcets, resulting in unexploited slack...... in the schedule. In this paper, we first propose an online synthesis strategy that re-synthesizes the application at runtime when operations experience variability in their execution time, exploiting thus the slack to obtain shorter application completion times. We also propose a quasi-static synthesis strategy...

  12. Preferences for travel time variability – A study of Danish car drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Katrine; Rich, Jeppe

    preferences, to exclude non-traders, and to avoid complicated issues related to scheduled public transport services. The survey uses customised Internet questionnaires, containing a series of questions related to the traveller’s most recent morning trip to work, e.g.: • Travel time experienced on this day......Travel time variability (TTV) is a measure of the extent of unpredictability in travel times. It is generally accepted that TTV has a negative effect on travellers’ wellbeing and overall utility of travelling, and valuation of variability is an important issue in transport demand modelling...... and in appraisal of transport and infrastructure projects. The effect of TTV has been analysed in several methodological papers and empirical studies (see, e.g., the review in Carrion and Levinson, 2012). Most methodological research is based on the premise that the value of TTV is closely linked to travellers...

  13. Space-time variability of floods across Germany: Gradual trends, step changes and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Bruno; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Schröter, Kai

    2015-04-01

    The space-time variability of flood magnitude and frequency across Germany at the interannual and decadal time scale is analyzed and interpreted. The analyses are based on flood time series of 68 catchments for a joint period of 74 years. The catchments are distributed across Germany and show different flood regimes. Different statistical tests are applied to investigate different types of flood changes: gradual trends, step changes and fluctuations. In addition, changes in the mean behavior and in the variability are studied. A focus is placed on the spatial stability of changes, i.e. answering the question to which extent flood changes are coherent across Germany. The joint analysis of changes for a large number of catchments allows interpreting the causes of the observed changes. For instance, climate-related flood changes are expected to show a different behavior than changes caused by river training or land-use change.

  14. The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; Villar-Villalba, Carmen; López Sobaler, Ana María; Dal Re Saavedra, María Ángeles; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Santos Sanz, Sara; Robledo de Dios, Teresa; Castrodeza-Sanz, José Javier; Ortega Anta, Rosa María

    2017-01-06

    The frequency of intake of food and beverages depends on a number of ill-defined behaviour patterns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of screen time and sleep duration on food consumption frequency, and to describe frequencies and types of food consumption according to BMI category and parents' level of education. We studied 6287 and 2806 children drawn from the 2011 and 2013 cross-sectional ALADINO studies respectively. Data were collected on number of hours of sleep, screen time, and weekly frequency of consumption of 17 food groups. Weight status was measured, and information was also collected on parents' educational level. Average food consumption frequencies were calculated by reference to hours of sleep and hours of screen time, and were defined as ≥4 times or times per week (once per week for soft drinks and diet soft drinks). Differences in frequency were evaluated for screen times of more and less than 2 h per day, and for sleep durations longer or shorter than the daily average. We fitted logistic regression models to evaluate the independent association between screen exposure and hours of sleep on the one hand, and food consumption frequency on the other. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was lower among children who had parents with no formal or only primary school education. High levels of screen time were associated with a greater frequency of consumption of energy-dense, micronutrient-poor products and a lower frequency of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Sleeping a sufficient number of hours was associated with a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables. The results for 2011 were concordant with those for 2013. If efforts to ensure healthier eating habits among children are to be at all successful, they should focus on promoting a sufficient amount of sleep for children, limiting the time they spend watching television and/or playing with computers or video games, and educating parents accordingly.

  15. More than 50% of players sustained a time-loss injury (>1 day of lost training or playing time) during the 2012 Super Rugby Union Tournament: a prospective cohort study of 17,340 player-hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellnus, Martin P; Thomson, Alan; Derman, Wayne; Jordaan, Esme; Readhead, Clint; Collins, Rob; Morris, Ian; Strauss, Org; Van der Linde, Ewoudt; Williams, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Professional Rugby Union is a contact sport with a high risk of injury. To document the incidence and nature of time-loss injuries during the 2012 Super Rugby tournament. Prospective cohort study. 2012 Super Rugby tournament (Australia, New Zealand, South Africa). 152 players from 5 South African teams. Team physicians collected daily injury data through a secure, web-based electronic platform. Data included size of the squad, type of day, main player position, training or match injury, hours of play (training and matches), time of the match injury, mechanism of injury, main anatomical location of the injury, specific anatomical structure of the injury, the type of injury, the severity of the injury (days lost). The proportion (%) of players sustaining a time-loss injury during the tournament was 55%, and 25% of all players sustained >1 injury. The overall incidence rate (IR/1000 player-hours) of injuries was 9.2. The IR for matches (83.3) was significantly higher than for training (2.1) and the IR was similar for forwards and backs. Muscle/tendon (50%) and joint/ligament (32.7%) injuries accounted for >80% of injuries. Most injuries occurred in the lower (48.1%) and upper limb (25.6%). 42% of all injuries were moderate (27.5%) or severe (14.8%), and tackling (26.3%) and being tackled (23.1%) were the most common mechanisms of injury. The IR of injuries was unrelated to playing at home compared with away (locations ≥6 h time difference). 55% of all players were injured during the 4-month Super Rugby tournament (1.67 injuries/match). Most injuries occurred in the lower (knee, thigh) or upper limb (shoulder, clavicle). 42% of injuries were severe enough for players to not play for >1 week. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Modelling the variability of lag times and the first generation times of single cells of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métris, A; Le Marc, Y; Elfwing, A; Ballagi, A; Baranyi, J

    2005-04-15

    A mathematical model combining deterministic and stochastic elements describes the growth and division of single cells. Its deterministic part is based on the model of Baranyi and Roberts [International Journal of Food Microbiology 23 (1994) 277] modelling the gradual adjustment of the cells to a new environment. The stochastic part assumes a random threshold size for the division of a single cell, which accounts for the variability of the individual generation times. Experimental results of the first division times of thousands of single cells using a microscopic flow system could be reproduced with this model, and it has the potential to be used to study the effects of different stress and environmental factors on the distribution of the lag and generation times of individual cells.

  17. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  18. Three-Factor Market-Timing Models with Fama and French's Spread Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Olbryś

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional performance measurement literature has attempted to distinguish security selection, or stock-picking ability, from market-timing, or the ability to predict overall market returns. However, the literature finds that it is not easy to separate ability into such dichotomous categories. Some researchers have developed models that allow the decomposition of manager performance into market-timing and selectivity skills. The main goal of this paper is to present modified versions of classical market-timing models with Fama and French’s spread variables SMB and HML, in the case of Polish equity mutual funds. (original abstract

  19. Almost periodic solutions of impulsive BAM neural networks with variable delays on time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of impulsive BAM neural networks with variable delays on time scales. Some sufficient conditions are established to ensure the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for such class of impulsive BAM neural networks. The results are essentially new when T=R or T=Z. It is the first time that the existence and exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for impulsive BAM neural networks are obtained on time scales. Furthermore, an example and numerical simulations are given to illustrate our effectiveness of the obtained results.

  20. Genetic and environmental contributions to the associations between intraindividual variability in reaction time and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Deborah; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Intraindividual variability (IIV) in reaction time has been related to cognitive decline, but questions remain about the nature of this relationship. Mean and range in movement and decision time for simple reaction time were available from 241 individuals aged 51-86 years at the fifth testing wave of the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. Cognitive performance on four factors was also available: verbal, spatial, memory, and speed. Analyses indicated that range in reaction time could be used as an indicator of IIV. Heritability estimates were 35% for mean reaction and 20% for range in reaction. Multivariate analysis indicated that the genetic variance on the memory, speed, and spatial factors is shared with genetic variance for mean or range in reaction time. IIV shares significant genetic variance with fluid ability in late adulthood, over and above and genetic variance shared with mean reaction time.

  1. Impact Time Guidance Law Considering Autopilot Dynamics Based on Variable Coefficients Strategy for Maneuvering Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the terminal guidance problem for the missile intercepting a maneuvering target with impact time constraint. An impact time guidance law based on finite time convergence control theory is developed regarding the target motion as an unknown disturbance. To further improve the performance of the guidance law, an autopilot dynamics which is considered as a first-order lag is taken into consideration. In the proposed method, the coefficients change with the relative distance between missile and target. This variable coefficient strategy ensures that the missile impacts the target at the desired time with little final miss distance. Then it is proved that states of the guidance system converge to sliding mode in finite time under the proposed guidance law. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the impact time guidance law with autopilot dynamics (ITGAD.

  2. Hindcasting the Continuum of Dansgaard-Oeschger variability: Mechanisms, Patterns and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L.; Friedrich, T.; England, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Millennial-scale variability associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich events (HE) is arguably one of the most puzzling climate phenomena ever discovered in paleoclimate archives of the last glacial period. With similar variability occurring during other glacial periods, it is very timely to identify the underlying mechanisms. Here, we set out to elucidate the dynamics of millennial-scale climate variability by conducting a transient global hindcast simulation with a 3-dimensional intermediate complexity Earth system model covering the period 50 ka B.P. to 30 ka B.P. The model is forced by time-varying external boundary conditions (greenhouse gases, orbital forcing, and ice-sheet orography and albedo) and anomalous North Atlantic freshwater fluxes, which capture the effects of Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet calving on millennial timescales. Together these forcings generate a realistic global climate trajectory, as demonstrated by an extensive model/paleo data comparison. Our analysis is consistent with the simple idea that variations in ice-sheet calving and related changes of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation were the main driver for the continuum of MIS3 DO and HE variability seen in paleorecords across the globe. According to this scenario, timescale and abruptness of millennial-scale variability are primarily determined by the ice-sheet/ice-shelf calving processes, rather than by the thermohaline circulation. Using a number of high-resolution paleo records from other glacial periods we demonstrate that the proposed ice-sheet calving/AMOC response mechanism can universally explain the continuum of millennial-scale glacial variability during the Late Pleistocene.

  3. Intraindividual variability in reaction time before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Christie; Rich, Jill B; Tirona, Kattleya; Bernstein, Lori J

    2017-12-01

    Women treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer experience subtle cognitive deficits. Research has focused on mean performance level, yet recent work suggests that within-person variability in reaction time performance may underlie cognitive symptoms. We examined intraindividual variability (IIV) in women diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients (n = 28) were assessed at baseline before chemotherapy (T1), approximately 1 month after chemotherapy but prior to surgery (T2), and after surgery about 9 months post chemotherapy (T3). Healthy women of similar age and education (n = 20) were assessed at comparable time intervals. Using a standardized regression-based approach, we examined changes in mean performance level and IIV (eg, intraindividual standard deviation) on a Stroop task and self-report measures of cognitive function from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. At T1, women with breast cancer were more variable than controls as task complexity increased. Change scores from T1 to T2 were similar between groups on all Stroop performance measures. From T1 to T3, controls improved more than women with breast cancer. IIV was more sensitive than mean reaction time in capturing group differences. Additional analyses showed increased cognitive symptoms reported by women with breast cancer from T1 to T3. Specifically, change in language symptoms was positively correlated with change in variability. Women with breast cancer declined in attention and inhibitory control relative to pretreatment performance. Future studies should include measures of variability, because they are an important sensitive indicator of change in cognitive function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. On the effects of small scale space-time variability of rainfall on basin flood response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Athanasios; Fatichi, Simone; Molnar, Peter; Rimkus, Stefan; Burlando, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of rainfall, especially at fine temporal and spatial scales can significantly affect flood generation, leading to a large variability in the flood response and uncertainty in its prediction. In this study we quantify the impact of rainfall spatial and temporal structure on the catchment hydrological response based on a numerical experiment. Rainfall ensembles generated using a state-of-the-art space-time stochastic model are used as input into a distributed process-based hydrological model. The sensitivity of the hydrograph to several structural characteristics of storm rainfall for three soil moisture initial conditions is numerically assessed at the basin outlet of an Alpine catchment in central Switzerland. The results highlight that the flood response is strongly affected by the temporal correlation of rainfall and to a lesser extent by its spatial variability. Initial soil moisture conditions play a paramount role in mediating the response. We identify the underlying mechanistic explanations in terms of runoff generation and connectivity of saturated areas that determine the sensitivity of flood response to the spatio-temporal variability of rainfall. We show that the element that mostly influences both the flood peak and the time of peak occurrence is the clustering of saturated areas in the catchment which leads to local enhanced runoff.

  5. MODELS OF HOURLY DRY BULB TEMPERATURE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hourly meteorological data of both dry bulb temperature and relative humidity for 18 locations in Nigeria for the period 1995 to 2009 were analysed to obtain the mean monthly average and monthly hourly average of each of the two meteorological variables for each month for each location. The difference between the ...

  6. Global-mean surface temperature variability: space-time perspective from rotated EOFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianyao; Tung, Ka-Kit

    2017-10-01

    The observed global-mean surface temperature (GST) has been warming in the presence of increasing atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases, but its rise has not been monotonic. Attention has increasingly been focused on the prominent variations about the linear trend in GST, especially on interdecadal and multidecadal time scales. When the sea-surface temperature (SST) and the land- plus-ocean surface temperature (ST) are averaged globally to yield the global-mean SST (GSST) and the GST, respectively, spatial information is lost. Information on both space and time is needed to properly identify the modes of variability on interannual, decadal, interdecadal and multidecadal time scales contributing to the GSST and GST variability. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis is usually employed to extract the space-time modes of climate variability. Here we use the method of pair-wise rotation of the principal components (PCs) to extract the modes in these time-scale bands and obtain global spatial EOFs that correspond closely with regionally defined climate modes. Global averaging these clearly identified global modes allows us to reconstruct GSST and GST, and in the process identify their components. The results are: Pacific contributes to the global mean variation mostly on the interannual time scale through El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its teleconnections, while the Atlantic contributes strongly to the global mean on the multidecadal time scale through the interhemispheric mode called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) has twice as large a variance as the AMO, but its contribution to GST is only 1/10 that of the AMO because of its compensating patterns of cold and warm SST in northwest and northeast Pacific. Its teleconnection pattern, the Pacific/North America (PNA) pattern over land, is also found to be self-cancelling when globally averaged because of its alternating warm and cold centers. The

  7. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein - 24 hour; Chronic kidney disease - urine protein; Kidney failure - urine protein ... Bladder tumor Heart failure High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ) Kidney disease caused by diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune disorders, ...

  8. Single-Machine Group Scheduling Problems with Variable Job Processing Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers two resource constrained single-machine group scheduling problems. These problems involve variable job processing times (general position-dependent learning effects and deteriorating jobs; that is, the processing time of a job is defined by the function that involves its starting time and position in the group, and groups’ setup time is a positive strictly decreasing continuous function of the amount of consumed resource. Polynomial time algorithms are proposed to optimally solve the makespan minimization problem under the constraint that the total resource consumption does not exceed a given limit and the total resource consumption minimization problem under the constraint that the makespan does not exceed a given limit, respectively.

  9. Trend Change Detection in NDVI Time Series: Effects of Inter-Annual Variability and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Matthias; Carvalhais, Nuno; Verbesselt, Jan; Mahecha, Miguel D.; Neigh, Christopher S.R.; Reichstein, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Changing trends in ecosystem productivity can be quantified using satellite observations of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, the estimation of trends from NDVI time series differs substantially depending on analyzed satellite dataset, the corresponding spatiotemporal resolution, and the applied statistical method. Here we compare the performance of a wide range of trend estimation methods and demonstrate that performance decreases with increasing inter-annual variability in the NDVI time series. Trend slope estimates based on annual aggregated time series or based on a seasonal-trend model show better performances than methods that remove the seasonal cycle of the time series. A breakpoint detection analysis reveals that an overestimation of breakpoints in NDVI trends can result in wrong or even opposite trend estimates. Based on our results, we give practical recommendations for the application of trend methods on long-term NDVI time series. Particularly, we apply and compare different methods on NDVI time series in Alaska, where both greening and browning trends have been previously observed. Here, the multi-method uncertainty of NDVI trends is quantified through the application of the different trend estimation methods. Our results indicate that greening NDVI trends in Alaska are more spatially and temporally prevalent than browning trends. We also show that detected breakpoints in NDVI trends tend to coincide with large fires. Overall, our analyses demonstrate that seasonal trend methods need to be improved against inter-annual variability to quantify changing trends in ecosystem productivity with higher accuracy.

  10. Low Computational Signal Acquisition for GNSS Receivers Using a Resampling Strategy and Variable Circular Correlation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeqing Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For the objective of essentially decreasing computational complexity and time consumption of signal acquisition, this paper explores a resampling strategy and variable circular correlation time strategy specific to broadband multi-frequency GNSS receivers. In broadband GNSS receivers, the resampling strategy is established to work on conventional acquisition algorithms by resampling the main lobe of received broadband signals with a much lower frequency. Variable circular correlation time is designed to adapt to different signal strength conditions and thereby increase the operation flexibility of GNSS signal acquisition. The acquisition threshold is defined as the ratio of the highest and second highest correlation results in the search space of carrier frequency and code phase. Moreover, computational complexity of signal acquisition is formulated by amounts of multiplication and summation operations in the acquisition process. Comparative experiments and performance analysis are conducted on four sets of real GPS L2C signals with different sampling frequencies. The results indicate that the resampling strategy can effectively decrease computation and time cost by nearly 90–94% with just slight loss of acquisition sensitivity. With circular correlation time varying from 10 ms to 20 ms, the time cost of signal acquisition has increased by about 2.7–5.6% per millisecond, with most satellites acquired successfully.

  11. Attenuation effect on seasonal basin-scale water storage changes from GRACE time-variable gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, JL; Wilson, CR; Famiglietti, JS; Rodell, M.

    2007-01-01

    In order to effectively recover surface mass or geoid height changes from the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) time-variable gravity models, spatial smoothing is required to minimize errors from noise. Spatial smoothing, such as Gaussian smoothing, not only reduces the noise but also attenuates the real signals. Here we investigate possible amplitude attenuations and phase changes of seasonal water storage variations in four drainage basins (Amazon, Mississippi, Ganges and Zamb...

  12. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 1018 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m2 s-2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 1018. The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m2 s-2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m2 s-2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m2 s-2, while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m2 s-2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10-17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10-18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage.

  13. Response preparation and intra-individual reaction time variability in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankinas, Denisas; Mėlynytė, Sigita; Šiurkutė, Aldona; Dapšys, Kastytis

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is important to prepare response in advance to increase the efficiency of its execution. The process of response preparation is usually studied using the precueing paradigm. In this paradigm subjects have to employ the preceding information about further imperative stimulus to perform proper response preparation, which shortens the reaction time of subsequent response execution. Previous studies detected the impairment of response preparation in schizophrenia only with the help of electroencephalographic parameters, but not with the assessing of reaction time. Therefore, in this study we attempted to find a behavioural parameter that could detect impairment in response preparation of schizophrenia patients. It was recently found that appropriate response preparation not only shortens the reaction time but also increases its stability, which is measured with the intra-individual reaction time variability. It was also revealed that response stability could better find cognitive dysfunction in some studies of schizophrenia disorder than classical behavioural parameters. Hence, the main goal of this study was to verify if intra-individual reaction time variability could detect the impairment of response preparation in schizophrenia patients. Materials and methods. In order to achieve the main purpose, we carried out a study with 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 control group subjects. We used precueing paradigm in our research, in which participants had to employ information about stimulus probability for the proper response preparation. Results. Our main result showed that despite the responses of schizophrenia patients were faster to the high-probability stimulus than to the low-probability one (F (1, 13) = 30.9, p reaction time variability did not differ in this group between the responses to more and less probable stimuli (F (1, 13) = 0.64, p = 0.44). Conclusions. Results of the study suggest that people with schizophrenia were able to use precueing

  14. Variable Valve Timing Scheduling in a 4-Stroke Internal Combustion Cylinder Utilizing Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr Bapiri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The apparently simple structure of a four-stroke internal combustion cylinder belies the complicated problem of optimizing valve operation in response to a change in crankshaft rotation speed. The objective of this study was to determine the cylinder pressure for valve event angles in order to determine the optimal strategy for the timing of valve events when independently-actuated valves are available. In this work, an artificial neural network is applied to create a prediction matrix to anticipate the best variable valve timing approach according to rotation speed.

  15. Time variability of X-ray sources in the M 31 centre field

    OpenAIRE

    Stiele, H.; Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Freyberg, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present an extension to our XMM-Newton X-ray source catalogue of M 31, containing 39 newly found sources. In order to classify and identify more of the sources we search for X-ray time variability in XMM-Newton archival data of the M 31 centre field. As a source list we used our extended catalogue based on observations covering the time span from June 2000 to July 2004. We then determined the flux or at least an upper limit at the source positions for each observation. Deriving the flux ra...

  16. Continuous-time random-walk model of transport in variably saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoia, Andrea; Néel, Marie-Christine; Cortis, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    We propose a unified physical framework for transport in variably saturated porous media. This approach allows fluid flow and solute migration to be treated as ensemble averages of fluid and solute particles, respectively. We consider the cases of homogeneous and heterogeneous porous materials. Within a fractal mobile-immobile continuous time random-walk framework, the heterogeneity will be characterized by algebraically decaying particle retention times. We derive the corresponding (nonlinear) continuum-limit partial differential equations and we compare their solutions to Monte Carlo simulation results. The proposed methodology is fairly general and can be used to track fluid and solutes particles trajectories for a variety of initial and boundary conditions.

  17. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2018-01-14

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  18. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  19. Theoretical time variability of mobile water on the Moon and its geographic pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; Lucey, Paul; Williams, Jean-Pierre

    2017-12-01

    A lunar water exosphere, if it currently exists, would lead to diurnal variations in surface water concentration. Here we present model calculations that reveal the specific geographic pattern of such diurnal variations as well as the amplitude of these variations relative to an assumed supply rate. Surface temperatures are derived from Diviner data and hence include topographic temperature heterogeneity. In the polar regions, diurnal variation can be one order of magnitude larger than at the equator and two hundred times larger than the monthly globally average water production density. Even so, the absolute size of any diurnal changes in surface concentration is likely too small to be measurable. An episodic source, that delivers the same mass over a sol (lunation) as a steady source, leads to comparable surface concentrations, but to a much denser exosphere with a half-life of a few Earth hours. Such a transient exosphere may already have been detected.

  20. Statistical assessment of DNA extraction reagent lot variability in real-time quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, R.N.; Kephart, C.M.; Koltun, G.F.; Francy, D.S.; Schaefer, F. W.; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability in lots of a DNA extraction kit using real-time PCR assays for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Vibrio cholerae. Methods and Results: Replicate aliquots of three bacteria were processed in duplicate with three different lots of a commercial DNA extraction kit. This experiment was repeated in triplicate. Results showed that cycle threshold values were statistically different among the different lots. Conclusions: Differences in DNA extraction reagent lots were found to be a significant source of variability for qPCR results. Steps should be taken to ensure the quality and consistency of reagents. Minimally, we propose that standard curves should be constructed for each new lot of extraction reagents, so that lot-to-lot variation is accounted for in data interpretation. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the importance of evaluating variability in DNA extraction procedures, especially when different reagent lots are used. Consideration of this variability in data interpretation should be an integral part of studies investigating environmental samples with unknown concentrations of organisms. ?? 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Length of Growing Period over Africa: Variability and Trends from 30 Years of NDVI Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Y. Said

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of crops and farming systems in Africa is determined by the duration of the period during which crop and livestock water requirements are met. The length of growing period (LGP is normally assessed from weather station data—scarce in large parts of Africa—or coarse-resolution rainfall estimates derived from weather satellites. In this study, we analyzed LGP and its variability based on the 1981–2011 GIMMS NDVI3g dataset. We applied a variable threshold method in combination with a searching algorithm to determine start- and end-of-season. We obtained reliable LGP estimates for arid, semi-arid and sub-humid climates that are consistent in space and time. This approach effectively mapped bimodality for clearly separated wet seasons in the Horn of Africa. Due to cloud contamination, the identified bimodality along the Guinea coast was judged to be less certain. High LGP variability is dominant in arid and semi-arid areas, and is indicative of crop failure risk. Significant negative trends in LGP were found for the northern part of the Sahel, for parts of Tanzania and northern Mozambique, and for the short rains of eastern Kenya. Positive trends occurred across western Africa, in southern Africa, and in eastern Kenya for the long rains. Our LGP analysis provides useful information for the mapping of farming systems, and to study the effects of climate variability and other drivers of change on vegetation and crop suitability.

  2. Intelligent real-time CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-ting

    2009-07-01

    In order to meet the need of image shooting with CCD in unmanned aerial vehicles, a real-time high resolution CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate is designed. The system is consisted of three modules: CCD control module, data processing module and data display module. In the CCD control module, real-time flight parameters (e.g. flight height, velocity and longitude) should be received from GPS through UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) and according to the corresponding flight parameters, the variable frame rate is calculated. Based on the calculated variable frame rate, CCD external synchronization control impulse signal is generated in the control of FPGA and then CCD data is read out. In the data processing module, data segmentation is designed to extract ROI (region of interest), whose resolution is equal to valid data resolution of HDTV standard conforming to SMPTE (1080i). On one hand, Ping-pong SRAM storage controller is designed in FPGA to real-time store ROI data. On the other hand, according to the need of intelligent observing, changeable window position is designed, and a flexible area of interest is obtained. In the real-time display module, a special video encoder is used to accomplish data format conversion. Data after storage is packeted to HDTV format by creating corresponding format information in FPGA. Through inner register configuration, high definition video analog signal is implemented. The entire system has been implemented in FPGA and validated. It has been used in various real-time CCD data processing situations.

  3. The Galex Time Domain Survey. I. Selection And Classification of Over a Thousand Ultraviolet Variable Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Huber, M.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in approximately 40 deg(exp 2) of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of approximately 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5 sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to absolute value(?m) = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV less than 23 mag and absolute value(?m) greater than 0.2 mag of approximately 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg(exp -2) for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars

  4. Understanding variability in time spent in selected locations for 7-12-year old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianping; McCurdy, Thomas; Spengler, John; Ozkaynak, Hâluk

    2004-05-01

    This paper summarizes a series of analyses of clustered, sequential activity/location data collected by Harvard University for 160 children aged 7-12 years in Southern California (Geyh et al., 2000). The main purpose of the paper is to understand intra- and inter-variability in the time spent by the sample in the outdoor location, the location exhibiting the most variability of the ones evaluated. The data were analyzed using distribution-free hypothesis-testing (K-S tests of the distributions), generalized linear modeling techniques, and random-sampling schemes that produced "cohorts" whose descriptive statistical characteristics were evaluated against the original dataset. Most importantly, our analyses indicate that subdividing the population into appropriate cohorts better replicates parameters of the original data, including the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), which is a relative measure of the intra- and inter-individual variability inherent in the original data. While the findings of our analyses are consistent with previous assessments of "time budget" and physical activity data, they are constrained by the rather homogeneous sample available to us. Owing to a general lack of longitudinal human activity/location data available for other age/gender cohorts, we are unable to generalize our findings to other population subgroups.

  5. Variable Neighbourhood Search and Mathematical Programming for Just-in-Time Job-Shop Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunxin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a combination of variable neighbourhood search and mathematical programming to minimize the sum of earliness and tardiness penalty costs of all operations for just-in-time job-shop scheduling problem (JITJSSP. Unlike classical E/T scheduling problem with each job having its earliness or tardiness penalty cost, each operation in this paper has its earliness and tardiness penalties, which are paid if the operation is completed before or after its due date. Our hybrid algorithm combines (i a variable neighbourhood search procedure to explore the huge feasible solution spaces efficiently by alternating the swap and insertion neighbourhood structures and (ii a mathematical programming model to optimize the completion times of the operations for a given solution in each iteration procedure. Additionally, a threshold accepting mechanism is proposed to diversify the local search of variable neighbourhood search. Computational results on the 72 benchmark instances show that our algorithm can obtain the best known solution for 40 problems, and the best known solutions for 33 problems are updated.

  6. Sort Term Time-Variability of Galactic High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Hunter, S. D.; Thompson, D. J.; Bloom, S. D.; Wallace, P. M.

    1997-12-01

    Studies of the EGRET high-energy galactic gamma-ray sources have been undertaken in order to examine the possibility of other classes besides the established pulsars. The question is whether the time variability of unidentified sources is characteristically different from that of the pulsars. A secondary issue is that if there is a separate class, what is the nature of the sources and their emission mechanisms? At least one object of a distinctly different class has been established with the gamma-ray source 2CG 135+01, believed to be associated with the radio flaring Be star system LSI 61 303. Another candidate class is AGN, over 50 of which have been seen in gamma-rays and which are known to be variable in gamma rays on a timescale of days and longer. In the absence of better spatial resolution time variability is a key in making additional identifications and classifications. To do this, flux histories have been studied down to one-day timescales. The results are compared with those of the known classes.

  7. Modelling time variable and total eclipses of the millisecond pulsar PSR 1744-24A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Brookshaw, Leigh

    1993-01-01

    The 11 ms pulsar PSR 1744-24A in the globular clusters Terzan 5 is the first and only known example of a binary eclipsing pulsar showing time-variable eclipses with irregular and nonsymmetric eclipse patterns. Occasionally, the pulsar eclipse becomes total, and no radio emission is detected for an extended period of time. We present here numerical results of a hydrodynamical model aimed at explaining the remarkable eclipse properties of PSR 1744-24A. We show that the hydrodynamic time scale for the partial or total pulsar enshrouding is of order of the orbital period for a relatively large mass loss rate, in agreement with observations. The time-variable eclipse egress positions imply that the mass loss rate from the companion varies within one orbital period. Hydrodynamic modelling of the mass outflow of PSR 1744-24A is of crucial importance for the understanding of a class of millisecond pulsars whose radio emission might be occasionally or permanently quenched by mass outflows from their companions. The properties of PSR 1744-24A suggest a new way of studying millisecond pulsars involving radio, X-ray, gamma-ray, and optical observations.

  8. Variability of Cost and Time Delivery of Educational Buildings in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghimien, Douglas Omoregie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cost and time overrun in construction projects has become a reoccurring problem in construction industries around the world especially in developing countries. This situation is unhealthy for public educational buildings which are executed with limited government funds, and are in most cases time sensitive, as they need to cater for the influx of students into the institutions. This study therefore assessed the variability of cost and time delivery of educational buildings in Nigeria, using a study of selected educational buildings within the country. A pro forma was used to gather cost and time data on selected building projects, while structured questionnaire was used to harness information on the possible measures for reducing the variability from the construction participants that were involved in the delivery of these projects. Paired sample t-test, percentage, relative importance index, and Kruskal-Walis test were adopted for data analyses. The study reveals that there is a significant difference between the initial and final cost of delivering educational buildings, as an average of 4.87% deviation, with a sig. p-value of 0.000 was experienced on all assessed projects. For time delivery, there is also a significant difference between the initial estimated time and final time of construction as a whopping 130% averaged deviation with a sig. p-value of 0.000 was discovered. To remedy these problems, the study revealed that prompt payment for executed works, predicting market price fluctuation and inculcating it into the initial estimate, and owner’s involvement at the planning and design phase are some of the possible measures to be adopted.

  9. Bidecadal North Atlantic ocean circulation variability controlled by timing of volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Ortega, Pablo; Mignot, Juliette; Guilyardi, Eric; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Butler, Paul G; Khodri, Myriam; Séférian, Roland

    2015-03-30

    While bidecadal climate variability has been evidenced in several North Atlantic paleoclimate records, its drivers remain poorly understood. Here we show that the subset of CMIP5 historical climate simulations that produce such bidecadal variability exhibits a robust synchronization, with a maximum in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) 15 years after the 1963 Agung eruption. The mechanisms at play involve salinity advection from the Arctic and explain the timing of Great Salinity Anomalies observed in the 1970s and the 1990s. Simulations, as well as Greenland and Iceland paleoclimate records, indicate that coherent bidecadal cycles were excited following five Agung-like volcanic eruptions of the last millennium. Climate simulations and a conceptual model reveal that destructive interference caused by the Pinatubo 1991 eruption may have damped the observed decreasing trend of the AMOC in the 2000s. Our results imply a long-lasting climatic impact and predictability following the next Agung-like eruption.

  10. Time-scale characteristics of Kasai river hydrological regime variability for 1940-1999

    CERN Document Server

    Mbuebue, Jean-Marie Tshitenge; Mwamba, Vincent Lukanda; Phuati, Edmond Phuku; Bantu, Albert Kazadi Mukenga; Keto, Franck Tondozi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with the aim of contributing to the characterization of the nonstationary variability of the hydrological regime of the Kasai River using the wavelet analysis for 1940-1999. The rainfalls and discharge over Kasai Basin have marked fluctuations with a perceptible downward trend and some shift around 1950, 1960, 1970, 1983 and 1994. The results show that rainfalls over Kasai basin and the discharge at Ilebo station patterns exhibit a strong annual oscillation and some intermittent oscillations in 2-8 years (1950-1975, 1983-1995) and 8-16 years (1970-1999) time scales. The wavelet coherence analysis reveals a weak possible connection between hydrological variables (rainfalls, discharge) and climate indices relative to sea surface temperature and atmospheric circulation over Atlantic tropical, Indian and Pacific Oceans (coherence less than 0.55).

  11. Expressing Environment Assumptions and Real-time Requirements for a Distributed Embedded System with Shared Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjell, Simon; Fernandes, João Miguel

    2008-01-01

    In a distributed embedded system, it is often necessary to share variables among its computing nodes to allow the distribution of control algorithms. It is therefore necessary to include a component in each node that provides the service of variable sharing. For that type of component, this paper...... discusses how to create a Colored Petri Nets (CPN) model that formally expresses the following elements in a clearly separated structure: (1) assumptions about the behavior of the environment of the component, (2) real-time requirements for the component, and (3) a possible solution in terms of an algorithm...... for the component. The CPN model can be used to validate the environment assumptions and the requirements. The validation is performed by execution of the model during which traces of events and states are automatically generated and evaluated against the requirements....

  12. The hour-to-hour influence of weather conditions on walking and cycling among Dutch older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Richard G; van Lenthe, F J

    2015-09-01

    physical activity (PA) is an important factor to promote healthy ageing. However, older adults are not physically active enough. Socio-ecological models suggest that weather conditions are determinants of PA and may bias relations between other environmental factors and PA. This may especially be the case for the most vulnerable and inactive older persons. Understanding the role of weather conditions is based on daily or seasonal variation in weather, but it can be improved by using hour-to-hour measured weather conditions. to study the hour-to-hour relationships between weather factors and objectively measured walking and cycling in a sample of Dutch older adults. baseline data (2013) of a sub-sample of older adults (3,248 observations clustered in 43 adults) participating in The Neighborhood Walking in Rotterdam Older ADultS (NEW.ROADS) trial were used. Participants wore a GPS logger for 7 consecutive days. Hour-to-hour weather data (temperature, wind speed, rain and sun time) for the city of Rotterdam were retrieved from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. Multilevel linear regression models were fitted with minutes walked and minutes cycled as dependent variables and the weather variables as independent variables. the time older adults walked increased with higher temperature, higher wind speed and the absence of rain. The time cycled increased with higher temperature. this study improves the evidence of weather factors as a determinant for walking and cycling in older adults. Studies on the relation between environmental factors and PA should consider adjustment for weather factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Variable Charge of Ultisols due to Phosphate Application and Incubation Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mahbub

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The laboratoryexperiment was conducted to study the effect of phosphate (P application and its incubation time on pHo (pH at thepoint of zero charge and variable charge of ultisols . The determined parameters were pHo and variable surfacecharges.Soil samples were added by 0, 375 and 1,125 mg P kg-1 (or 0, 50 and 150% of the P sorption maximum,respectively. Then, they were incubated for 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. The variable surface-charges and pHo weredetermined by using the activity of potential determining ions (H+ and OH- within two salt concentrations as counterions (0.1N and 0.001N CaCl2 through a potentiometric titration method. The results were indicated that the high Psorption and 766 mg P kg-1 in maximum sorption were due to high contents in clay fractions and aluminum as well aslow pH of experimental soil. Application of P and incubation time were able to decrease pHo and to increase negativesurface-charges. Additionals of 375 and 1.125 mg P kg-1 incubated for 8 weeks gave the value of pHo 2.86 and 2.69;as well as the magnitude of negative charges 14.48 and 16.76 cmol(-.kg-1, respectively (both for 0.001N CaCl2.For pH > pHo (the characteristic of variable charge soils, the higher the salt (CaCl2 concentration and pH solution,the higher the negative surface-charge.

  14. Squeezing more information out of time variable gravity data with a temporal decomposition approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Bordoni, A.; Aoudia, A.

    2012-01-01

    A measure of the Earth's gravity contains contributions from solid Earth as well as climate-related phenomena, that cannot be easily distinguished both in time and space. After more than 7years, the GRACE gravity data available now support more elaborate analysis on the time series. We propose...... to design a screening algorithm to identify regions where anomalous gravity variations deserve further investigations. It also allows to raise the amount of information one can obtain exclusively from gravity data, prior and preliminary to any subsequent specifically targeted study. This approach has been...... used to assess the possibility of finding evidence of meaningful geophysical signals different from hydrology over Africa in GRACE data. In this case we conclude that hydrological phenomena are dominant and so time variable gravity data in Africa can be directly used to calibrate hydrological models....

  15. Global robust asymptotic stability of variable-time impulsive BAM neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the global robust asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for a more general class of bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with variable time of impulses is addressed. Unlike most existing studies, the case of non-fix time impulses is focused on in the present study. By means of B-equivalence method, which was introduced in Akhmet (2003, 2005, 2009, 2010), Akhmet and Perestyuk (1990) and Akhmet and Turan (2009), we reduce these networks to a fix time impulsive neural networks system. Sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global robust asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point are obtained by employing an appropriate Lyapunov function and linear matrix inequality (LMI). Finally, we give one illustrative example to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Temperature, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPTDT or tavg3_3d_tdt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional temperature tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels at...

  17. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Turbulence, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPTRB or tavg3_3d_trb_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional turbulence diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  18. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPRAD or tavg3_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  19. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Moist Physics, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPMST or tavg3_3d_mst_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional moist process diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels...

  20. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Cloud Properties, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPCLD or tavg3_3d_cld_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional cloud diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  1. MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Ozone, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPODT or tavg3_3d_odt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional ozone tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  2. MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Wind Components, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPUDT or tavg3_3d_udt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional eastward wind tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels...

  3. MODIS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) 24-hour Spacecraft ephemeris/orbit data files to be read via SDP Toolkit Binary Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PM1EPHND is the Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) daily spacecraft definitive ephemeris data file in native format. This is MODIS Ancillary Data. The data collection...

  4. MERRA Chem 2D IAU Diagnostics, Fluxes and Meteorology, Time Average 3-hourly (surface, 1.25x1L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3FXCHM or tavg3_3d_chm_Fx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System Chemistry 2-Dimensional chemistry that is time averaged, single-level, at reduced...

  5. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Single Level Meteorology, Time Average 1-hourly (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT1NXSLV or tavg1_2d_slv_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional atmospheric single-level diagnostics that is time averaged...

  6. MERRA 3D IAU Tendency, Specific Humidity, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPQDT or tavg3_3d_qdt_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional moisture tendencies that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  7. Spectral variability and reverberation time delays in the Suzaku X-ray spectrum of NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Lobban, A.; Kraemer, S. B.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2010-03-01

    Long-exposure Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4051 from 2005 and 2008 are analysed, in an attempt to reach a self-consistent understanding of both the spectral variability on long time-scales and the broad-band variability at high time resolution. The techniques of principal components analysis and a maximum likelihood method of power spectrum analysis are used. In common with other type I active galactic nuclei (AGN), the spectral variability is dominated by a varying-normalization power-law component together with a quasi-steady, hard-spectrum offset component that contains Fe K atomic features. NGC 4051 displays a strong excess over a power law at energies of above 20keV, some fraction of which also appears to vary with the power-law continuum. The fast time-scale power spectrum has a shape generally consistent with previous determinations, with the previously known dependence on broad-band photon energy, but in the new data significant differences are found between the low and high flux states of the source, demonstrating that the power spectrum is non-stationary. Frequency-dependent time lags between the hard and soft bands of up to 970 +/- 225s are measured. The existence of the observed time lags excludes the possibility that the hard spectral component originates as reflection from the inner accretion disc. We instead show that the time lags and their frequency and energy dependence may be explained simply by the effects of reverberation in the hard band, caused by reflection from a thick shell of material with maximum lags of about 10000s. If the reflecting material surrounds the AGN, it extends to a distance of about 1.5 × 1014cm, 600 gravitational radii, from the illuminating source and the global covering factor is Cg >~ 0.44, confirming previous suggestions that type I AGN have high covering factors of absorbing and reflecting material. Given the spectral and timing similarities with other type I AGN, we infer that this

  8. Age-Based Methods to Explore Time-Related Variables in Occupational Epidemiology Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janice P. Watkins, Edward L. Frome, Donna L. Cragle

    2005-08-31

    Although age is recognized as the strongest predictor of mortality in chronic disease epidemiology, a calendar-based approach is often employed when evaluating time-related variables. An age-based analysis file, created by determining the value of each time-dependent variable for each age that a cohort member is followed, provides a clear definition of age at exposure and allows development of diverse analytic models. To demonstrate methods, the relationship between cancer mortality and external radiation was analyzed with Poisson regression for 14,095 Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. Based on previous analysis of this cohort, a model with ten-year lagged cumulative radiation doses partitioned by receipt before (dose-young) or after (dose-old) age 45 was examined. Dose-response estimates were similar to calendar-year-based results with elevated risk for dose-old, but not when film badge readings were weekly before 1957. Complementary results showed increasing risk with older hire ages and earlier birth cohorts, since workers hired after age 45 were born before 1915, and dose-young and dose-old were distributed differently by birth cohorts. Risks were generally higher for smokingrelated than non-smoking-related cancers. It was difficult to single out specific variables associated with elevated cancer mortality because of: (1) birth cohort differences in hire age and mortality experience completeness, and (2) time-period differences in working conditions, dose potential, and exposure assessment. This research demonstrated the utility and versatility of the age-based approach.

  9. Inattention and Reaction Time Variability Are Linked to Ventromedial Prefrontal Volume in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaugh, Matthew D; Orr, Catherine; Chaarani, Bader; Althoff, Robert R; Allgaier, Nicholas; D'Alberto, Nicholas; Hudson, Kelsey; Mackey, Scott; Spechler, Philip A; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brühl, Rüdiger; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Goodman, Robert; Gowland, Penny; Grimmer, Yvonne; Heinz, Andreas; Kappel, Viola; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Penttila, Jani; Poustka, Luise; Paus, Tomáš; Smolka, Michael N; Struve, Maren; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Schumann, Gunter; Garavan, Hugh; Potter, Alexandra S

    2017-11-01

    Neuroimaging studies of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have most commonly reported volumetric abnormalities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and prefrontal cortices. Few studies have examined the relationship between ADHD symptomatology and brain structure in population-based samples. We investigated the relationship between dimensional measures of ADHD symptomatology, brain structure, and reaction time variability-an index of lapses in attention. We also tested for associations between brain structural correlates of ADHD symptomatology and maps of dopaminergic gene expression. Psychopathology and imaging data were available for 1538 youths. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms were obtained using the Development and Well-Being Assessment and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Self-reports of ADHD symptoms were assessed using the youth version of the SDQ. Reaction time variability was available in a subset of participants. For each measure, whole-brain voxelwise regressions with gray matter volume were calculated. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms (Development and Well-Being Assessment and SDQ), adolescent self-reports of ADHD symptoms on the SDQ, and reaction time variability were each negatively associated with gray matter volume in an overlapping region of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Maps of DRD1 and DRD2 gene expression were associated with brain structural correlates of ADHD symptomatology. This is the first study to reveal relationships between ventromedial prefrontal cortex structure and multi-informant measures of ADHD symptoms in a large population-based sample of adolescents. Our results indicate that ventromedial prefrontal cortex structure is a biomarker for ADHD symptomatology. These findings extend previous research implicating the default mode network and dopaminergic dysfunction in ADHD. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Discrete-time variable structure system synthesis for plants with nonminimum phase zeros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskrenović-Momčilović Olivera I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a discrete variable structure system for control n-th order plants with nonminimum phase zeros in the input-output transfer function. The problem is solved by using the technique of stable system center. The first is a discrete mathematical model of the system in the normal canonical form for a given system. Then the synthesis of state generator and discrete 'time controller using the center of a stable system. The theoretical results are demonstrated in a numerical example.

  11. Variable Penalty Dynamic Time Warping Code for Aligning Mass Spectrometry Chromatograms in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clifford

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of mass spectrometry (MS chromatograms is sometimes required prior to sample comparison and data analysis. Without alignment, direct comparison of chromatograms would lead to inaccurate results. We demonstrate a new method for computing a high quality alignment of full length MS chromatograms using variable penalty dynamic time warping. This method aligns signals using local linear shifts without excessive warping that can alter the shape (and area of chromatogram peaks. The software is available as the R package VPdtw on the Comprehensive R Archive Network and we highlight how one can use this package here. =

  12. Recovering the time-variable gravitational field using satellite gradiometry: requirements and gradiometer concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douch, Karim; Müller, Jürgen; Heinzel, Gerhard; Wu, Hu

    2017-04-01

    The successful GRACE mission and its far-reaching benefits have highlighted the interest to continue and extend the mapping of the Earth's time-variable gravitational field with follow-on missions and ideally a higher spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we would like to put forward satellite gravitational gradiometry as an alternative solution to satellite-to-satellite tracking for future missions. Besides the higher sensitivity to smaller scales compared to GRACE-like missions, a gradiometry mission would only require one satellite and would provide a direct estimation of a functional of the gravitational field. GOCE, the only gradiometry mission launched so far, was not sensitive enough to map the time-variable part of the gravity field. However, the unprecedented precision of the state-of-the-art optical metrology system on-board the LISA PATHFINDER satellite has opened the way to more performant space inertial sensors. We will therefore examine whether it is technically possible to go beyond GOCE performances and to quantify to what extent the time-variable gravitational field could be determined. First, we derive the requirements on the knowledge of the attitude and the position of the satellite and on the measured gradients in terms of sensitivity and calibration accuracy for a typical repeat low-orbit. We conclude in particular that a noise level smaller than 0.1 mE/√Hz- is required in the measurement bandwidth [5x10-4 ; 10-2]Hz so as to be sensitive to the time-variable gravity signal. We introduce then the design and characteristics of the new gradiometer concept and give an assessment of its noise budget. Contrary to the GOCE electrostatic gradiometer, the position of the test-mass in the accelerometer is measured here by laser interferometry rather than by a capacitive readout system, which improves the overall measurement chain. Finally, the first results of a performance analysis carried out thanks to an end-to-end simulator are discussed and compared

  13. Smart Device for the Determination of Heart Rate Variability in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Naranjo-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a first approach to the design, development, and implementation of a smart device for the real-time measurement and detection of alterations in heart rate variability (HRV. The smart device follows a modular design scheme, which consists of an electrocardiogram (ECG signal acquisition module, a processing module and a wireless communications module. From five-minute ECG signals, the processing module algorithms perform a spectral estimation of the HRV. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the smart device and the proposed processing algorithms.

  14. The relationship between hours of sleep, screen time and frequency of food and drink consumption in Spain in the 2011 and 2013 ALADINO: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleón Pérez-Farinós

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of intake of food and beverages depends on a number of ill-defined behaviour patterns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of screen time and sleep duration on food consumption frequency, and to describe frequencies and types of food consumption according to BMI category and parents’ level of education. Methods We studied 6287 and 2806 children drawn from the 2011 and 2013 cross-sectional ALADINO studies respectively. Data were collected on number of hours of sleep, screen time, and weekly frequency of consumption of 17 food groups. Weight status was measured, and information was also collected on parents’ educational level. Average food consumption frequencies were calculated by reference to hours of sleep and hours of screen time, and were defined as ≥4 times or <4 times per week (once per week for soft drinks and diet soft drinks. Differences in frequency were evaluated for screen times of more and less than 2 h per day, and for sleep durations longer or shorter than the daily average. We fitted logistic regression models to evaluate the independent association between screen exposure and hours of sleep on the one hand, and food consumption frequency on the other. Results Consumption of fruit and vegetables was lower among children who had parents with no formal or only primary school education. High levels of screen time were associated with a greater frequency of consumption of energy-dense, micronutrient-poor products and a lower frequency of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Sleeping a sufficient number of hours was associated with a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables. The results for 2011 were concordant with those for 2013. Conclusions If efforts to ensure healthier eating habits among children are to be at all successful, they should focus on promoting a sufficient amount of sleep for children, limiting the time they spend watching television and/or playing with

  15. Temporal and spatial variability in the Guadalquivir estuary: a challenge for real-time telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gabriel; Gutiérrez, Francisco Javier; Díez-Minguito, Manuel; Losada, Miguel Angel; Ruiz, Javier

    2011-06-01

    Meteorological, hydrological, and hydrodynamic data for 3 years (2008-2010) have been used to document and explain the temporal and spatial variability of the physical-biogeochemical interactions in the Guadalquivir River Estuary. A real-time, remote monitoring network has been deployed along the course of the river between its mouth and Seville to study a broad range of temporal scales (semidiurnal, diurnal, fortnightly, and seasonal). This network consists of eight hydrological monitoring stations capable of measuring temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and chlorophyll fluorescence at four depths. In addition, six stations have been deployed to study hydrodynamics, obtaining 20-cell water column current profiles, and there is a meteorological station at the river mouth providing data for understanding atmospheric interactions. Completing this data-gathering network, there are several moorings (tide gauges, current/wave sensors, and a thermistor chain) deployed in the estuary and river mouth. Various sources of physical forcing, such as wind, tide-associated currents, and river discharge, are responsible for the particular temporal and spatial patterns of turbidity and salinity found in the estuary. These variables force the distribution of biogeochemical variables, such as dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll fluorescence. In particular, episodes of elevated turbidity (when suspended particle matter concentration >3,000 mg/l) have been detected by the network, together with episodes of declining values of salinity and dissolved oxygen. All these patterns are related to river discharge and tidal dynamics (spring/neap and high/low tide).

  16. Real-time transmission of digital video using variable-length coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizon, Thomas P.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Huffman coding is a variable-length lossless compression technique where data with a high probability of occurrence is represented with short codewords, while 'not-so-likely' data is assigned longer codewords. Compression is achieved when the high-probability levels occur so frequently that their benefit outweighs any penalty paid when a less likely input occurs. One instance where Huffman coding is extremely effective occurs when data is highly predictable and differential coding can be applied (as with a digital video signal). For that reason, it is desirable to apply this compression technique to digital video transmission; however, special care must be taken in order to implement a communication protocol utilizing Huffman coding. This paper addresses several of the issues relating to the real-time transmission of Huffman-coded digital video over a constant-rate serial channel. Topics discussed include data rate conversion (from variable to a fixed rate), efficient data buffering, channel coding, recovery from communication errors, decoder synchronization, and decoder architectures. A description of the hardware developed to execute Huffman coding and serial transmission is also included. Although this paper focuses on matters relating to Huffman-coded digital video, the techniques discussed can easily be generalized for a variety of applications which require transmission of variable-length data.

  17. An application of fractional differintegration to heart rate variability time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Miguel A; Fernández-Chimeno, Mireya; Capdevila, Lluis; Parrado, Eva; Ramos-Castro, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Fractional differintegration is used as a new tool to characterize heart rate variability time series. This paper proposes and focuses in two indexes (αc and fnQ) derived from the fractional differintegration operator. Both indexes are applied to fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) and actual RR time series in order to test their behavior. In the analysis of monofractal time series, αc is linearly related with the Hurst exponent and the estimation of the exponent by the proposed index has lower variance than by using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) or the periodogram. The other index fnQ quantifies how the time series adjust to a monofractal time series. Age, postural changes and paced breathing cause significant changes on fnQ while αc only shows significant changes due to posture. In the analyzed actual HRV time series, αc shows good correlation with the short term scaling exponent obtained by DFA, LF/HF and RMSSD while no correlations have been found for fnQ. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of agility, reaction time and balance variables at badminton players aged 9-14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydi Ahmet Ağaoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was investigated agility, static and dynamic balance and reaction time variables of badminton players aged between 9-14 and relate with among variables. Material and Methods: In Samsun, 19 males (sport age, 3.42±1.64 years and 12 females (3.00±1.28 years active badminton players were voluntarily participated in who are in 9-14 ages range. Agility was measured by “T” test, CSMI-Tecnobody Pk-252 isokinetic balance system measuring instrument was used to test static balance and dynamic balance and Mozart Lafayette reaction measuring instrument was used to test visual and auditory reaction times of players. Spearman correlation analysis was applied so as to correlation analysis. The level of significance was taken as p<0.05. Results: For female athletes, a positive relation was determined between the agility and the perimeter (mm used (r=0.727; p<0.01 through the static balance measure double foot and eyes are open. For male athletes, a positive relation was determined between the visual reaction time and the perimeter (mm used (r=0.725; p<0.01 through the static balance measure dominant foot and eyes are open. For male and female athletes were not found any correlation between reaction time and dynamic balance. Conclusion: It was determined that audio (ears and visual (eyes reaction time was effective on balance. While badminton players are closed eyes, audio sensors are more influence on balance test through measure dominant foot.

  19. Variability and trends of carbon parameters at a time series in the eastern tropical Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Lefèvre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hourly fCO2 is recorded at a time series at the PIRATA buoy located at 6°S 10°W in the eastern tropical Atlantic since June 2006. This site is located south and west of the seasonal Atlantic cold tongue and is affected by its propagation from June to September. Using an alkalinity–salinity relationship determined for the eastern tropical Atlantic and the observed fCO2, pH and the inorganic carbon concentration are calculated. The time series is investigated to explore the intraseasonal, seasonal and interannual timescales for these parameters, and to detect any long-term trends. At intraseasonal timescales, fCO2 and pH are strongly correlated. On seasonal timescales, the correlation still holds between fCO2 and pH and their variations are in agreement with those of sea surface salinity. At interannual timescales, some important differences appear in 2011–2012: lower fCO2 and fluxes are observed from September to December 2011 and are explained by higher advection of salty waters at the mooring, in agreement with the wind. In early 2012, the anomaly is still present and associated with lower sea surface temperatures. No significant long-term trend is detected over the period 2006–2013 on CO2 and any other physical parameter. However, as atmospheric fCO2 is increasing over time, the outgassing of CO2 is reduced over the period 2006–2013 as the flux is mainly controlled by the difference of fCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. A longer time series is required to determine if any significant trend exists in this region.

  20. MERRA 2D IAU Diagnostic, Land Only States and Diagnostics, Time Average 1-hourly (2/3x1/2L1) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT1NXLND or tavg1_2d_lnd_Nx data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 2-Dimensional land surface diagnostic that is time averaged single-level at the...

  1. MERRA Chem 3D IAU States Cloud Precip, Time average 3-hourly (eta coord, 1.25x1L72) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3FVCHM or tavg3_3d_chm_Fv data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System Chemistry 3-Dimensional chemistry on layers file that is time averaged, 3D model...

  2. MERRA Chem 3D IAU, Precip Mass Flux, Time average 3-hourly (eta coord edges, 1.25X1L73) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3FECHM or tavg3_3d_chm_Fe data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System Chemistry 3-Dimensional chemistry on layers edges that is time averaged, 3D model...

  3. Effects of time-variable exposure regimes of the insecticide chlorpyrifos on freshwater invertebrate communities in microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafar, M.I.; Wijngaarden, van R.; Roessink, I.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of different time-variable exposure regimes having the same time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos on freshwater invertebrate communities to enable extrapolation of effects across exposure regimes. The

  4. [Chemical variability of essential oils in peels collected in different time from Citrus reticulata 'Ponkan'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Hong-ping; Liu, You-ping; Wei, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    To study the chemical variation of essential oils in peels collected from Citrus reticulata' Ponkan' in different time. The volatile oils were extracted by steam distillation and analyzed by GC-MS. The oil components were identified by their mass spectra and Kovats retention indices (RIs) and quantified by the area normalization method. A total of 68 compounds were identified in 6 samples harvested in different time, and the total contents of identified compounds in each sample were from 94.27% to 97.12%. The highest content compounds were d-limonene, gamma-terpinene and linalool representing 56.862%-67.728%, 9.298%-11.081% and 4.792%-7.893%, respectively. There was little difference in the chemical components between different samples, but a great variation in quantitation between the former 2 samples and the latter 4 samples. The chemical variability of essential oils from 6 Citrus reticulata 'Ponkan' peel samples presents a regularity.

  5. A hybrid disturbance rejection control solution for variable valve timing system of gasoline engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Song, Kang; He, Yu

    2014-07-01

    A novel solution for electro-hydraulic variable valve timing (VVT) system of gasoline engines is proposed, based on the concept of active disturbance rejection control (ADRC). Disturbances, such as oil pressure and engine speed variations, are all estimated and mitigated in real-time. A feed-forward controller was added to enhance the performance of the system based on a simple and static first principle model, forming a hybrid disturbance rejection control (HDRC) strategy. HDRC was validated by experimentation and compared with an existing manually tuned proportional-integral (PI) controller. The results show that HDRC provided a faster response and better tolerance of engine speed and oil pressure variations. © 2013 ISA Published by ISA All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical assessment and optimization of discrete-variable time-frequency quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödiger, Jasper; Perlot, Nicolas; Mottola, Roberto; Elschner, Robert; Weinert, Carl-Michael; Benson, Oliver; Freund, Ronald

    2017-05-01

    The discrete-variables (DV) time-frequency (TF) quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol is a BB84-like protocol, which utilizes time and frequency as complementary bases. As orthogonal modulations, pulse position modulation (PPM) and frequency shift keying (FSK) are capable of transmitting several bits per symbol, i.e., per photon. However, unlike traditional binary polarization shift keying, PPM and FSK do not allow perfectly complementary bases. So information is not completely deleted when the wrong-basis filters are applied. Since a general security proof does not yet exist, we numerically assess DV-TF-QKD. We show that the secret key rate increases with a higher number of symbols per basis. Further we identify the optimal pulse relations in the two bases in terms of key rate and resistance against eavesdropping attacks.

  7. The effect of time trial cycling position on physiological and aerodynamic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2015-01-01

    To reduce aerodynamic resistance cyclists lower their torso angle, concurrently reducing Peak Power Output (PPO). However, realistic torso angle changes in the range used by time trial cyclists have not yet been examined. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of torso angle on physiological parameters and frontal area in different commonly used time trial positions. Nineteen well-trained male cyclists performed incremental tests on a cycle ergometer at five different torso angles: their preferred torso angle and at 0, 8, 16 and 24°. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide expiration, minute ventilation, gross efficiency, PPO, heart rate, cadence and frontal area were recorded. The frontal area provides an estimate of the aerodynamic drag. Overall, results showed that lower torso angles attenuated performance. Maximal values of all variables, attained in the incremental test, decreased with lower torso angles (P aerodynamic drag and physiological functioning.

  8. Excitation of Earth Rotation Variations "Observed" by Time-Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ben F.; Cox, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Time variable gravity measurements have been made over the past two decades using the space geodetic technique of satellite laser ranging, and more recently by the GRACE satellite mission with improved spatial resolutions. The degree-2 harmonic components of the time-variable gravity contain important information about the Earth s length-of-day and polar motion excitation functions, in a way independent to the traditional "direct" Earth rotation measurements made by, for example, the very-long-baseline interferometry and GPS. In particular, the (degree=2, order= 1) components give the mass term of the polar motion excitation; the (2,O) component, under certain mass conservation conditions, gives the mass term of the length-of-day excitation. Combining these with yet another independent source of angular momentum estimation calculated from global geophysical fluid models (for example the atmospheric angular momentum, in both mass and motion terms), in principle can lead to new insights into the dynamics, particularly the role or the lack thereof of the cores, in the excitation processes of the Earth rotation variations.

  9. Time-Dependent Tree-Structured Survival Analysis with Unbiased Variable Selection through Permutation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating time-dependent covariates into tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA) may result in more accurate prognostic models than if only baseline values are used. Available time-dependent TSSA methods exhaustively test every binary split on every covariate; however, this approach may result in selection bias towards covariates with more observed values. We present a method that uses unbiased significance levels from newly proposed permutation tests to select the time-dependent or baseline covariate with the strongest relationship with the survival outcome. The specific splitting value is identified using only the selected covariate. Simulation results show that the proposed time-dependent TSSA method produces tree models of equal or greater accuracy as compared to baseline TSSA models, even with high censoring rates and large within-subject variability in the time-dependent covariate. To illustrate, the proposed method is applied to data from a cohort of bipolar youth to identify subgroups at risk for self-injurious behavior. PMID:25043382

  10. Trends and variability in streamflow and snowmelt runoff timing in the southern Tianshan Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan-Jun; Shen, Yanjun; Fink, Manfred; Kralisch, Sven; Chen, Yaning; Brenning, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Streamflow and snowmelt runoff timing of mountain rivers are susceptible to climate change. Trends and variability in streamflow and snowmelt runoff timing in four mountain basins in the southern Tianshan were analyzed in this study. Streamflow trends were detected by Mann-Kendall tests and changes in snowmelt runoff timing were analyzed based on the winter/spring snowmelt runoff center time (WSCT). Pearson's correlation coefficient was further calculated to analyze the relationships between climate variables, streamflow and WSCT. Annual streamflow increased significantly in past decades in the southern Tianshan, especially in spring and winter months. However, the relations between streamflow and temperature/precipitation depend on the different streamflow generation processes. Annual precipitation plays a vital role in controlling recharge in the Toxkon basin, while the Kaidu and Huangshuigou basins are governed by both precipitation and temperature. Seasonally, temperature has a strong effect on streamflow in autumn and winter, while summer streamflow appears more sensitive to changes in precipitation. However, temperature is the dominant factor for streamflow in the glacierized Kunmalik basin at annual and seasonal scales. An uptrend in streamflow begins in the 1990s at both annual and seasonal scales, which is generally consistent with temperature and precipitation fluctuations. Average WSCT dates in the Kaidu and Huangshuigou basins are earlier than in the Toxkon and Kunmalik basins, and shifted towards earlier dates since the mid-1980s in all the basins. It is plausible that WSCT dates are more sensitive to warmer temperature in spring period compared to precipitation, except for the Huangshuigou basin. Taken together, these findings are useful for applications in flood risk regulation, future hydropower projects and integrated water resources management.

  11. Earth time variable gravity from a spaceborne cold atom gravity gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Saif, B.; Black, A.

    2013-12-01

    A gradiometer sensor based on the light-pulse atom (LPA) interferometry provides a technological path forward to significantly improve Earth time variable gravity observations from space. We present the simulated performance of a single -axis space-based Cold Atom Gravity Gradiometer (CAGG) instrument based on the LPA measurement approach. We simulate the instrument on a nadir pointing, 3-axis stabilized satellite in multiple orbit configurations. In our analysis, the CAGG is chosen to have an interrogation time of T = 15s and baseline L=5 m, with a sensor measurement period of 30 s. We use a measurement noise spectrum of the sensor, which is essentially flat over at least the relevant frequency range for Earth applications (1mHz to 0.1 Hz) with a magnitude of 5.4×10-9 E^2/Hz or ~10^-5 E RMS in time series. This sensor noise spectrum was computed from a Monte Carlo sensor simulation analysis with the following error sources included in the model: platform angle jitter, 5 arcsec platform attitude misalignment, intrinsic random sensor phase noise, Raman beam static misalignment of 5 μrad, atom position fluctuations of 10 μm, and atomic mean velocity fluctuations of 1 μm/s. We further include the platform attitude error contribution in rotating the SBF gradient observations to an Earth Centered Fixed Frame for gravity field estimation. The gravity gradient is isolated from the centrifugal forces using a sensor unique rotational correction. We present the performance of the space-based CAGG instrument in recovering Earth time variable gravity. We explore the accuracy, and spatial and temporal resolution of surface mass change observations from several space-based implementations of the CAGG instrument, including various orbit configurations and mult-satellite/multi-orbit configurations.

  12. Coupling Flux Towers and Networks with Proximal and Remote Sensing Data: New Tools to Collect and Share Time-Synchronized Hourly Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Avenson, Tom; Burkart, Andreas; Gamon, John; Guan, Kaiyu; Julitta, Tommaso; Pastorello, Gilberto; Sakowska, Karolina

    2017-04-01

    Multiple hundreds of flux towers are presently operational as standalone projects and as parts of larger networks. However, the vast majority of these towers do not allow straight-forward coupling with satellite data, and even fewer have optical sensors for validation of satellite products and upscaling from field to regional levels. In 2016, new tools to collect, process, and share time-synchronized flux data from multiple towers were developed and deployed globally. Originally designed to automate site and data management, these new tools can also be effective in coupling tower data with satellite data due to the following present capabilities: Fully automated FluxSuite system combines hardware, software and web-services, and does not require an expert to run it It can be incorporated into a new flux station or added to a present station, using weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer, SmartFlux2 It utilizes EddyPro software to calculate fully-processed fluxes and footprints in near-realtime, alongside radiation, optical, weather and soil data All site data are merged into a single quality-controlled file timed using PTP time protocol Data from optical sensors can be integrated into this complete dataset via compatible dataloggers Multiple stations can be linked into time-synchronized network with automated reports and email alerts visible to PIs in real-time Remote sensing researchers without stations can form "virtual networks" of stations by collaborating with tower PIs from different physical networks The present system can then be utilized to couple ground data with satellite data via the following proposed concept: GPS-driven PTP protocol will synchronize instrumentation within the station, different stations with each other, and all of these to satellite data to precisely align optical and flux data in time Footprint size and coordinates computed and stored with flux data will help correctly align footprints and satellite motion to precisely align

  13. Cycling Time Trial Performance 4 Hours After Glycogen-Lowering Exercise Is Similarly Enhanced by Recovery Nondairy Chocolate Beverages Versus Chocolate Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshaw, Adam U; Wong, Tiffany S; Bandegan, Arash; Lemon, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Postexercise chocolate milk ingestion has been shown to enhance both glycogen resynthesis and subsequent exercise performance. To assess whether nondairy chocolate beverage ingestion post-glycogen-lowering exercise can enhance 20-km cycling time trial performance 4 hr later, eight healthy trained male cyclists (21.8 ± 2.3y, VO2max = 61.2 ± 1.4 ml·kg-1·min-1; M ± SD) completed a series of intense cycling intervals designed to lower muscle glycogen (Jentjens & Jeukendrup, 2003) followed by 4 hr of recovery and a subsequent 20-km cycling time trial. During the first 2 hr of recovery, participants ingested chocolate dairy milk (DAIRYCHOC), chocolate soy beverage (SOYCHOC), chocolate hemp beverage (HEMPCHOC), low-fat dairy milk (MILK), or a low-energy artificially sweetened, flavored beverage (PLACEBO) at 30-min intervals in a double-blind, counterbalanced repeated-measures design. All drinks, except the PLACEBO (247 kJ) were isoenergetic (2,107 kJ), and all chocolate-flavored drinks provided 1-g CHO·kg body mass-1·h-1. Fluid intake across treatments was equalized (2,262 ± 148 ml) by ingesting appropriate quantities of water based on drink intake. The CHO:PRO ratio was 4:1, 1.5:1, 4:1, and 6:1 for DAIRYCHOC, MILK, SOYCHOC, and HEMPCHOC, respectively. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures showed time trial performance (DAIRYCHOC = 34.58 ± 2.5 min, SOYCHOC = 34.83 ± 2.2 min, HEMPCHOC = 34.88 ± 1.1 min, MILK = 34.47 ± 1.7 min) was enhanced similarly vs PLACEBO (37.85 ± 2.1) for all treatments (p = .019) These data suggest that postexercise macronutrient and total energy intake are more important for same-day 20-km cycling time trial performance after glycogen-lowering exercise than protein type or protein-to-carbohydrate ratio.

  14. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Knechtle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. METHODS: Observational field study at the 'Half Marathon Basel' in Switzerland. RESULTS: In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60, body mass index (r = 0.48, body fat (r = 0.56, skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61, mid-axilla (r = 0.69, triceps (r = 0.49, subscapular (r = 0.61, abdominal (r = 0.59, suprailiac (r = 0.55 medial calf (r = 0.53 site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68 correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04 and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001 remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r² = 0.71: Race time (min = 166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h. Running speed during training was related to skinfold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31, subscapular (r = -0.38, abdominal (r = -0.44, suprailiacal (r = -0.41, the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36 and percent body fat (r = -0.31. CONCLUSION: Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners.

  15. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. Observational field study at the 'Half Marathon Basel' in Switzerland. In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60), body mass index (r = 0.48), body fat (r = 0.56), skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61), mid-axilla (r = 0.69), triceps (r = 0.49), subscapular (r = 0.61), abdominal (r = 0.59), suprailiac (r = 0.55) medial calf (r = 0.53) site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68) correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04) and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001) remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r² = 0.71): Race time (min) = 166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm) - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h). Running speed during training was related to skinfold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31), subscapular (r = -0.38), abdominal (r = -0.44), suprailiacal (r = -0.41), the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36) and percent body fat (r = -0.31). Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners.

  16. Intraindividual Stepping Reaction Time Variability Predicts Falls in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, David; Haynes, Becky I; Lord, Stephen R; Gschwind, Yves J; Kochan, Nicole A; Reppermund, Simone; Brodaty, Henry; Sachdev, Perminder S; Delbaere, Kim

    2017-06-01

    Reaction time measures have considerable potential to aid neuropsychological assessment in a variety of health care settings. One such measure, the intraindividual reaction time variability (IIV), is of particular interest as it is thought to reflect neurobiological disturbance. IIV is associated with a variety of age-related neurological disorders, as well as gait impairment and future falls in older adults. However, although persons diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) are at high risk of falling, the association between IIV and prospective falls is unknown. We conducted a longitudinal cohort study in cognitively intact (n = 271) and MCI (n = 154) community-dwelling adults aged 70-90 years. IIV was assessed through a variety of measures including simple and choice hand reaction time and choice stepping reaction time tasks (CSRT), the latter administered as a single task and also with a secondary working memory task. Logistic regression did not show an association between IIV on the hand-held tasks and falls. Greater IIV in both CSRT tasks, however, did significantly increase the risk of future falls. This effect was specific to the MCI group, with a stronger effect in persons exhibiting gait, posture, or physiological impairment. The findings suggest that increased stepping IIV may indicate compromised neural circuitry involved in executive function, gait, and posture in persons with MCI increasing their risk of falling. IIV measures have potential to assess neurobiological disturbance underlying physical and cognitive dysfunction in old age, and aid fall risk assessment and routine care in community and health care settings.

  17. Analysis of heart rate variability in the presence of ectopic beats using the heart timing signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Javier; Laguna, Pablo

    2003-03-01

    The time-domain signals representing the heart rate variability (HRV) in the presence of an ectopic beat exhibit a sharp transient at the position of the ectopic beat, which corrupts the signal, particularly the power spectral density (PSD) of the HRV. Consequently, there is a need for correction of this type of beat prior to any HRV analysis. This paper deals with the PSD estimation of the HRV by means of the heart timing (HT) signal when ectopic beats are present. These beat occurrence times are modeled from a generalized, continuous time integral pulse frequency modulation model and, from this point of view, a specific method for minimizing the effect of the presence of ectopic beats is presented to work together with the HT signal. By using both, a white noise driven autoregressive model of the HRV signal with artificially introduced ectopic beats and actual heart rate series including ectopic beats, the more usual methods of HRV spectral estimation are compared. Results of the PSD estimation error function of the number of ectopic beats are presented. These results demonstrate that the proposed method has one order of magnitude lower error than usual ectopic beats removal strategies in preserving PSD, thus, this strategy better recovers the original clinical indexes of interest.

  18. Drivers of Time-Activity Budget Variability during Breeding in a Pelagic Seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishworth, Gavin M.; Tremblay, Yann; Green, David B.; Connan, Maëlle; Pistorius, Pierre A.

    2014-01-01

    During breeding, animal behaviour is particularly sensitive to environmental and food resource availability. Additionally, factors such as sex, body condition, and offspring developmental stage can influence behaviour. Amongst seabirds, behaviour is generally predictably affected by local foraging conditions and has therefore been suggested as a potentially useful proxy to indicate prey state. However, besides prey availability and distribution, a range of other variables also influence seabird behavior, and these need to be accounted for to increase the signal-to-noise ratio when assessing specific characteristics of the environment based on behavioural attributes. The aim of this study was to use continuous, fine-scale time-activity budget data from a pelagic seabird (Cape gannet, Morus capensis) to determine the influence of intrinsic (sex and body condition) and extrinsic (offspring and time) variables on parent behaviour during breeding. Foraging trip duration and chick provisioning rates were clearly sex-specific and associated with chick developmental stage. Females made fewer, longer foraging trips and spent less time at the nest during chick provisioning. These sex-specific differences became increasingly apparent with chick development. Additionally, parents in better body condition spent longer periods at their nests and those which returned later in the day had longer overall nest attendance bouts. Using recent technological advances, this study provides new insights into the foraging behaviour of breeding seabirds, particularly during the post-guarding phase. The biparental strategy of chick provisioning revealed in this study appears to be an example where the costs of egg development to the female are balanced by paternal-dominated chick provisioning particularly as the chick nears fledging. PMID:25551620

  19. Drivers of time-activity budget variability during breeding in a pelagic seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin M Rishworth

    Full Text Available During breeding, animal behaviour is particularly sensitive to environmental and food resource availability. Additionally, factors such as sex, body condition, and offspring developmental stage can influence behaviour. Amongst seabirds, behaviour is generally predictably affected by local foraging conditions and has therefore been suggested as a potentially useful proxy to indicate prey state. However, besides prey availability and distribution, a range of other variables also influence seabird behavior, and these need to be accounted for to increase the signal-to-noise ratio when assessing specific characteristics of the environment based on behavioural attributes. The aim of this study was to use continuous, fine-scale time-activity budget data from a pelagic seabird (Cape gannet, Morus capensis to determine the influence of intrinsic (sex and body condition and extrinsic (offspring and time variables on parent behaviour during breeding. Foraging trip duration and chick provisioning rates were clearly sex-specific and associated with chick developmental stage. Females made fewer, longer foraging trips and spent less time at the nest during chick provisioning. These sex-specific differences became increasingly apparent with chick development. Additionally, parents in better body condition spent longer periods at their nests and those which returned later in the day had longer overall nest attendance bouts. Using recent technological advances, this study provides new insights into the foraging behaviour of breeding seabirds, particularly during the post-guarding phase. The biparental strategy of chick provisioning revealed in this study appears to be an example where the costs of egg development to the female are balanced by paternal-dominated chick provisioning particularly as the chick nears fledging.

  20. Intraindividual variability in basic reaction time predicts middle-aged and older pilots' flight simulator performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Heraldez, Daniel; Noda, Art; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Yesavage, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40-69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%-12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance.

  1. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  2. Exploring Multidimensional Free Energy Landscapes Using Time-Dependent Biases on Collective Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Jérome; Fiorin, Giacomo; Chipot, Christophe; Klein, Michael L

    2010-01-12

    A new implementation of the adaptive biasing force (ABF) method is described. This implementation supports a wide range of collective variables and can be applied to the computation of multidimensional energy profiles. It is provided to the community as part of a code that implements several analogous methods, including metadynamics. ABF and metadynamics have not previously been tested side by side on identical systems. Here, numerical tests are carried out on processes including conformational changes in model peptides and translocation of a halide ion across a lipid membrane through a peptide nanotube. On the basis of these examples, we discuss similarities and differences between the ABF and metadynamics schemes. Both approaches provide enhanced sampling and free energy profiles in quantitative agreement with each other in different applications. The method of choice depends on the dimension of the reaction coordinate space, the height of the barriers, and the relaxation times of degrees of freedom in the orthogonal space, which are not explicitly described by the chosen collective variables.

  3. Eleventh Hour Security+

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrawsky, Ido

    2009-01-01

    This book will focus on just the essentials needed to pass the Security+ certification exam. It will be filled with critical information in a way that will be easy to remember and use for your quickly approaching exam. It will focus on the main objectives of the exam and include the following pedagogy for ease of use in those final hours. The book will include:. •Exam Objectives – Fast Track Review. •Key words/definitions. •Five Toughest questions and their answers. •Exam Warnings – What to pay attention to

  4. Protocol of the sepsivit study : a prospective observational study to determine whether continuous heart rate variability measurement during the first 48 hours of hospitalisation provides an early warning for deterioration in patients presenting with infection or sepsis to the emergency department of a Dutch academic teaching hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinten, Vincent M; van Meurs, Matijs; Renes, Maurits H; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; Ter Maaten, Jan C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: One in five patients with sepsis deteriorates within 48 hours after hospital admission. Regrettably, a clear tool for the early detection of deterioration is still lacking. The SepsiVit study aims to determine whether continuous heart rate variability (HRV) measurement can provide an

  5. Protocol of the sepsivit study : A prospective observational study to determine whether continuous heart rate variability measurement during the first 48 hours of hospitalisation provides an early warning for deterioration in patients presenting with infection or sepsis to the emergency department of a Dutch academic teaching hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinten, Vincent M; van Meurs, Matijs; Renes, Maurits H; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; Ter Maaten, Jan C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: One in five patients with sepsis deteriorates within 48 hours after hospital admission. Regrettably, a clear tool for the early detection of deterioration is still lacking. The SepsiVit study aims to determine whether continuous heart rate variability (HRV) measurement can provide an

  6. Variable interval time/temperature (VITT) defrost-control-system evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-12

    Two variable-interval-time/temperature (VITT) heat pump defrost control systems are analyzed to determine if systems manufactured by Honeywell and Ranco qualify for credit for heat pumps with demand defrost control. The operation of the systems is described. VITT controls are not demand defrost control systems but utilize demand defrost control as backup systems in most Ranco models and all Honeywell models. The evaluations and results, intended to provide DOE information in making its determinations regarding credits for the control systems are discussed. The evaluation methodology utilizes a modified version of the Heat Pump Seasonal Performance Model (HPSPM) and the important modifications are discussed in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a detailed listing and discussion of the HPSPM output. (MCW)

  7. Variable speed wind turbine control by discrete-time sliding mode approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchani, Borhen; Sellami, Anis; Garcia, Germain

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new design variable speed wind turbine control by discrete-time sliding mode approach. This methodology is designed for linear saturated system. The saturation constraint is reported on inputs vector. To this end, the back stepping design procedure is followed to construct a suitable sliding manifold that guarantees the attainment of a stabilization control objective. It is well known that the mechanisms are investigated in term of the most proposed assumptions to deal with the damping, shaft stiffness and inertia effect of the gear. The objectives are to synthesize robust controllers that maximize the energy extracted from wind, while reducing mechanical loads and rotor speed tracking combined with an electromagnetic torque. Simulation results of the proposed scheme are presented. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An Efficient Method for Systems of Variable Coefficient Coupled Burgers’ Equation with Time-Fractional Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aminikhah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new homotopy perturbation method (NHPM is applied to system of variable coefficient coupled Burgers' equation with time-fractional derivative. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo fractional derivative sense. The concept of new algorithm is introduced briefly, and NHPM is examined for two systems of nonlinear Burgers' equation. In this approach, the solution is considered as a power series expansion that converges rapidly to the nonlinear problem. The new approximate analytical procedure depends on two iteratives. The modified algorithm provides approximate solutions in the form of convergent series with easily computable components. Results indicate that the introduced method is promising for solving other types of systems of nonlinear fractional-order partial differential equations.

  9. An efficient method for systems of variable coefficient coupled Burgers' equation with time-fractional derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikhah, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    A new homotopy perturbation method (NHPM) is applied to system of variable coefficient coupled Burgers' equation with time-fractional derivative. The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo fractional derivative sense. The concept of new algorithm is introduced briefly, and NHPM is examined for two systems of nonlinear Burgers' equation. In this approach, the solution is considered as a power series expansion that converges rapidly to the nonlinear problem. The new approximate analytical procedure depends on two iteratives. The modified algorithm provides approximate solutions in the form of convergent series with easily computable components. Results indicate that the introduced method is promising for solving other types of systems of nonlinear fractional-order partial differential equations.

  10. Development of a time-variable nuclear pulser for half life measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Domienikan, Claudio; Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Genezini, Frederico A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP. P.O. Box 11049, Sao Paulo, 05422-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    In this work a time-variable pulser system with an exponentially-decaying pulse frequency is presented, which was developed using the low-cost, open-source Arduino microcontroler plataform. In this system, the microcontroller produces a TTL signal in the selected rate and a pulse shaper board adjusts it to be entered in an amplifier as a conventional pulser signal; both the decay constant and the initial pulse rate can be adjusted using a user-friendly control software, and the pulse amplitude can be adjusted using a potentiometer in the pulse shaper board. The pulser was tested using several combinations of initial pulse rate and decay constant, and the results show that the system is stable and reliable, and is suitable to be used in half-life measurements.

  11. Visualizing microvascular flow variation in OCTA using variable interscan time analysis (VISTA) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Eric M.; Ploner, Stefan A.; Choi, WooJhon; Lee, ByungKun; Husvogt, Lennart A.; Lu, Chen D.; Novais, Eduardo; Cole, Emily D.; Potsaid, Benjamin M.; Duker, Jay S.; Hornegger, Joachim; Meier, Andreas K.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2017-02-01

    OCT angiography (OCTA) has recently garnered immense interest in clinical ophthalmology, permitting ocular vasculature to be viewed in exquisite detail, in vivo, and without the injection of exogenous dyes. However, commercial OCTA systems provide little information about actual erythrocyte speeds; instead, OCTA is typically used to visualize the presence and/or absence of vasculature. This is an important limitation because in many ocular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), alterations in blood flow, but not necessarily only the presence or absence of vasculature, are thought to be important in understanding pathogenesis. To address this limitation, we have developed an algorithm, variable interscan time analysis (VISTA), which is capable of resolving different erythrocyte speeds. VISTA works by acquiring >2 repeated B-scans, and then computing multiple OCTA signals corresponding to different effective interscan times. The OCTA signals corresponding to different effective interscan times contain independent information about erythrocyte speed. In this study we provide a theoretical overview of VISTA, and investigate the utility of VISTA in studying blood flow alterations in ocular disease. OCTA-VISTA images of eyes with choroidal neovascularization, geographic atrophy, and diabetic retinopathy are presented.

  12. TIME VARIABLE BROAD-LINE EMISSION IN NGC 4203: EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR CONTRAILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, Nick, E-mail: devereux@erau.edu [Department of Physics, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Dual epoch spectroscopy of the lenticular galaxy, NGC 4203, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope has revealed that the double-peaked component of the broad H{alpha} emission line is time variable, increasing by a factor of 2.2 in brightness between 1999 and 2010. Modeling the gas distribution responsible for the double-peaked profiles indicates that a ring is a more appropriate description than a disk and most likely represents the contrail of a red supergiant star that is being tidally disrupted at a distance of {approx}1500 AU from the central black hole. There is also a bright core of broad H{alpha} line emission that is not time variable and identified with a large-scale inflow from an outer radius of {approx}1 pc. If the gas number density is {>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, as suggested by the absence of similarly broad [O I] and [O III] emission lines, then the steady state inflow rate is {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which exceeds the inflow requirement to explain the X-ray luminosity in terms of radiatively inefficient accretion by a factor of {approx}6. The central active galactic nucleus (AGN) is unable to sustain ionization of the broad-line region; the discrepancy is particularly acute in 2010 when the broad H{alpha} emission line is dominated by the contrail of the infalling supergiant star. However, ram pressure shock ionization produced by the interaction of the infalling supergiant with the ambient interstellar medium may help alleviate the ionizing deficit by generating a mechanical source of ionization supplementing the photoionization provided by the AGN.

  13. Assessing the Time Variability of Jupiter's Tropospheric Properties from 1996 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, G. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Greco, J.; Wakefield, L.

    2012-01-01

    We acquired and analyzed mid-infrared images of Jupiter's disk at selected wavelengths from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) from 1996 to 2011, including a period of large-scale changes of cloud color and albedo. We derived the 100-300 mbar temperature structure, together with tracers of vertical motion: the thickness of a 600- mbar cloud layer, the 300-mbar abundance of the condensable gas NH3, and the 400- mbar para- vs. ortho-H2 ratio. The biggest visual change was detected in the normally dark South Equatorial Belt (SEB) that 'faded' to a light color in 2010, during which both cloud thickness and NH3 abundance rose; both returned to their pre-fade levels in 2011, as the SEB regained its normal dark color. The cloud thickness in Jupiter's North Temperate Belt (NTB) increased in 2002, coincident with its visible brightening, and its NH3 abundance spiked in 2002-2003. Jupiter's Equatorial Zone (EZ), a region marked by more subtle but widespread color and albedo change, showed high cloud thickness variability between 2007 and 2009. In Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt (NEB), the cloud thickened in 2005, then slowly decreased to a minimum value in 2010-2011. No temperature variations were associated with any of these changes, but we discovered temperature oscillations of approx.2-4 K in all regions, with 4- or 8-year periods and phasing that was dissimilar in the different regions. There was also no detectable change in the para- vs. ortho-H2 ratio over time, leading to the possibility that it is driven from much deeper atmospheric levels and may be time-invariant. Our future work will continue to survey the variability of these properties through the Juno mission, which arrives at Jupiter in 2016, and to connect these observations with those made using raster-scanned images from 1980 to 1993 (Orton et al. 1996 Science 265, 625).

  14. Stable isotope fractionation in response to variable fluid residence time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogeochemical processes governing groundwater quantity and quality are often inferred from fluid samples that are the flux-weighted average of a heterogeneous system. This connection has been demonstrated for solutes subject to transport and equilibrium constraints, in which the steady state concentration - discharge relationship is cast in terms of the choice of expression for residence time distribution (Maher, 2011). Here, we examine the extent to which the spatial correlation of the permeability field, which governs the fluid residence time distribution, exerts a principle control on the partitioning of stable isotopes between reactant and product species during heterogeneous reactions in groundwater systems. We demonstrate this relationship using numerical simulations of δ53Cr fractionation due to abiotic CrO42- reduction by Fe2+, implemented in the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. The chemically homogeneous redox reaction generates Cr3+ with an isotope ratio distinct from the reactant pool, and in turn this product species precipitates as a mineral phase Cr(OH)3(s) through a non-fractionating reaction. The corresponding chromate δ53Cr enrichment across a homogeneous domain varies from a maximum value set by the kinetic fractionation factor (αk) at high mean fluid residence times, to a value reaction-limited to transport-limited regimes. For physically heterogeneous flow fields, the transition in isotopic fractionation from a reaction-limited to a transport-limited regime becomes variable, and falls between the upper and lower bounds set by the homogeneous simulations at slow and fast precipitation rates, respectively. Our results show that while minimal variation occurs in the steady-state isotopic profile of the reactant species (δ53Cr of CrO42-), the combined effects of the precipitation rate and the heterogeneous structure of the porous media lead to a wide range in the steady state isotopic composition of the product species (δ53Cr of Cr3

  15. Time-variable and static gravity field of Mars from MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-04-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) missions have significantly contributed to the determination of global high-resolution global gravity fields of Mars for the last 16 years. All three spacecraft were located in sun-synchronous, near-circular polar mapping orbits for their primary mission phases at different altitudes and Local Solar Time (LST). X-Band tracking data have been acquired from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) providing information on the time-variable and static gravity field of Mars. MGS operated between 1999 and 2006 at 390 km altitude. ODY and MRO are still orbiting Mars with periapsis altitudes of 400 km and 255 km, respectively. Before entering these mapping phases, all three spacecraft collected radio tracking data at lower altitudes (˜170-200 km) that help improve the resolution of the gravity field of Mars in specific regions. We analyzed the entire MGS radio tracking data set, and ODY and MRO radio data until 2015. These observations were processed using a batch least-squares filter through the NASA GSFC GEODYN II software. We combined all 2- and 3-way range rate data to estimate the global gravity field of Mars to degree and order 120, the seasonal variations of gravity harmonic coefficients C20, C30, C40 and C50 and the Love number k2. The gravity contribution of Mars atmospheric pressures on the surface of the planet has been discerned from the time-varying and static gravity harmonic coefficients. Surface pressure grids computed using the Mars-GRAM 2010 atmospheric model, with 2.5° x2.5° spatial and 2-h resolution, are converted into gravity spherical harmonic coefficients. Consequently, the estimated gravity and tides provide direct information on the solid planet. We will present the new Goddard Mars Model (GMM-3) of Mars gravity field in spherical harmonics to degree and order 120. The solution includes the Love number k2 and the 3-frequencies (annual, semi-annual, and tri

  16. Climate Variable is Time-Averaged: Dealing with Uncertainty of Paleoclimatic Record Caused by Smoothening of Noisy Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K.; Ebina, K.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is the average of weather over some time period and shows characteristic behavior in each time scale. In paleoclimatic research, values of climate variables are measured from proxies that give time series of time-averaged variables. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of time-averaged variable is important to investigate climate variations thorough different time scales. In our recent study, we formulated how stochastic dynamics changes corresponding to averaging time intervals using one dimensional first order stochastic differential equation which contains parametrically controlled terms of deterministic single-well or double-well potential force and random force. The dynamics of time-averaged variable is described by conditional probability density function. In the case of single-well, the function is analytically derived as normal distribution with scaling parameters. In the case of double-well potential, the function is obtained as skew generalized normal distribution function through numerical simulations. The mathematical framework of stochastic dynamics of time-averaged variable is general and applicable to analysis of many kinds of climate time series data. In this study, we apply the above framework to the analysis of proxy data from ice core and discuss about time scaling of the past climate variations. We test several models to infer the optimal model description for the data.

  17. Mechanisms of the global electric circuit and lightning variability on the ENSO time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareev, Evgeny; Volodin, Evgeny; Slyunyaev, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    Many studies of lightning activity on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) time scale show increased activity over tropical land areas during the warm El Niño phase (e.g., Satori et al., 2009; Price, 2009). The mechanisms of this variability—particularly in terms of its role in the global electric circuit (GEC)—are still under debate (e.g., Williams and Mareev, 2014). In this study a general circulation model of the atmosphere and ocean INMCM4.0 (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Coupled Model) is used for modelling the GEC variability on the ENSO time scale. The ionospheric potential (IP) and the lightning flash rate are calculated to study regional peculiarities and possible mechanisms of lightning variation. The IP parameterisation is used (Mareev and Volodin, 2014) which takes into account quasi-stationary currents of electrified clouds (including thunderstorms) as principal contributors into the DC global circuit. The account of conductivity variation in the IP parameterisation is suggested based on the approach realised in (Slyunyaev et al., 2014). Comparison of simulation results with the observational data on lightning activity on the ENSO time scale is discussed. Numerical simulations suggest that the inter-annual IP variability is low and does not exceed 1% of the mean value, being tightly correlated with the mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean (180W-100W, 5S-5N—El Niño area). The IP maximum corresponds to the SST minimum. This result can be explained taking into account that during El Niño (positive temperature anomaly) precipitations in the equatorial part of the Pacific increase while in other tropic zones including the land areas they decrease. Comparison of simulation results with the observational data on lightning activity on the ENSO time scale is discussed. During the El Niño period in the model, the mean aerosol content in the atmosphere decrease, which is caused by the weakening of the winds over Sahara and

  18. Spectral analysis of uneven time series of geological variables; Analisis espectral de series temporales de variables geologicas con muestreo irregular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo-Iguzquiza, E.; Rodriguez-Tovar, F. J.

    2013-06-01

    In geosciences the sampling of a time series tends to afford uneven results, sometimes because the sampling itself is random or because of hiatuses or even completely missing data or due to difficulties involved in the conversion of data from a spatial to a time scale when the sedimentation rate was not constant. Whatever the case, the best solution does not lie in interpolation but rather in resorting to a method that deals with the irregular data. We show here how the use of the smoothed Lomb-Scargle periodogram is both a practical and efficient choice. We describe the effects on the estimated power spectrum of the type of irregular sampling, the number of data, interpolation, and the presence of drift. We propose the permutation test as being an efficient way of calculating statistical confidence levels. By applying the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to a synthetic series with a known spectral content we are able to confirm the validity of this method in the face of the difficulties mentioned above. A case study with real data, including hiatuses, representing the thickness of the annual banding in a stalagmite, is chosen to demonstrate an application using the statistical and physical interpretation of spectral peaks. (Author)

  19. Neuroticism Combined With Slower and More Variable Reaction Time: Synergistic Risk Factors for 7-Year Cognitive Decline in Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shickle, Darren A.; Roberts, Beverly A.; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Among adults, slower and more variable reaction times are associated with worse cognitive function and increased mortality risk. Therefore, it is important to elucidate risk factors for reaction time change over the life course. Method. Data from the Health and Lifestyle Survey (HALS) were used to examine predictors of 7-year decline in reaction time (N = 4,260). Regression-derived factor scores were used to summarize general change across 4 reaction time variables: simple mean, 4-choice mean, simple variability, and 4-choice variability (53.52% of variance). Results. Age (B = .02, p reaction time (B = −.10, p = .001) were significant risk factors for males (N = 1,899). In addition to these variables, in females (N = 2,361), neuroticism was significant and interacted synergistically with baseline reaction time (B = .06, p = .04). Adjustment for physiological variables explained the interaction with neuroticism, suggesting that candidate mechanisms had been identified. Discussion. A priority for future research is to replicate interactions between personality and reaction time in other samples and find specific mechanisms. Stratification of population data on cognitive health by personality and reaction time could improve strategies for identifying those at greater risk of cognitive decline. PMID:22367712

  20. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Motor Timing in Adolescents and Their Parents : Familial Characteristics of Reaction Time Variability Vary With Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thissen, Andrieke J. A. M.; Luman, Marjolein; Hartman, Catharina; Hoekstra, Pieter; van Lieshout, Marloes; Franke, Barbara; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    Objective: There is consistent evidence that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is strongly related to impaired motor timing as reflected in decreased accuracy and increased reaction time variability (RTV). It is not known whether motor timing impairments are present in adolescents and

  2. Intra-individual reaction time variability and all-cause mortality over 17 years: a community-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Philip J; Bunce, David; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Christensen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    very few studies have examined the association between intra-individual reaction time variability and subsequent mortality. Furthermore, the ability of simple measures of variability to predict mortality has not been compared with more complex measures. a prospective cohort study of 896 community-based Australian adults aged 70+ were interviewed up to four times from 1990 to 2002, with vital status assessed until June 2007. From this cohort, 770-790 participants were included in Cox proportional hazards regression models of survival. Vital status and time in study were used to conduct survival analyses. The mean reaction time and three measures of intra-individual reaction time variability were calculated separately across 20 trials of simple and choice reaction time tasks. Models were adjusted for a range of demographic, physical health and mental health measures. greater intra-individual simple reaction time variability, as assessed by the raw standard deviation (raw SD), coefficient of variation (CV) or the intra-individual standard deviation (ISD), was strongly associated with an increased hazard of all-cause mortality in adjusted Cox regression models. The mean reaction time had no significant association with mortality. intra-individual variability in simple reaction time appears to have a robust association with mortality over 17 years. Health professionals such as neuropsychologists may benefit in their detection of neuropathology by supplementing neuropsychiatric testing with the straightforward process of testing simple reaction time and calculating raw SD or CV.

  3. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  4. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  5. Space-time LAI variability in Northern Puglia (Italy) from SPOT VGT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balacco, Gabriella; Figorito, Benedetto; Tarantino, Eufemia; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation space-time variability during 1999-2010 in the North of the Apulian region (Southern Italy) was analysed using SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) sensor data. Three bands of VEGETATION (RED, NIR and SWIR) were used to implement the vegetation index named reduced simple ratio (RSR) to derive leaf area index (LAI). The monthly average LAI is an indicator of biomass and canopy cover, while the difference between the annual maximum and minimum LAI is an indicator of annual leaf turnover. The space-time distribution of LAI at the catchment scale was analysed over the examined period to detect the consistency of vegetation dynamics in the study area. A diffuse increase of LAI was observed in the examined years that cannot be directly explained only in terms of increasing water availability. Thus, in order to explain such a general behaviour in terms of climatic factors, the analysis was performed upon stratification of land cover classes, focusing on the most widespread species: forest and wheat. An interesting ascending-descending behaviour was observed in the relationship between inter-annual increments of maximum LAI and rainfall, and in particular, a strong negative correlation was found when the rainfall amount in January and February exceeded a critical threshold of about 100 mm.

  6. Time: an underestimated variable in minimizing the gender gap in medical college admission scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habersack, Marion; Dimai, Hans Peter; Ithaler, Daniel; Reibnegger, Gilbert

    2015-04-01

    Results of medical college admission tests in Austria demonstrate the slightly worse performance of women, and are the basis for discussions around fairness and a basic science knowledge gap among female applicants. The purpose of this article was to investigate a basic science knowledge gap among female candidates of the admission test at the Medical University of Graz, and to evaluate whether the point of time of taking the examination has an influence on the test results. Observational investigations of the results of the admission test at the Medical University of Graz were performed. A total of 3405 applicants were included in the study. Statistical analyses were performed by routine methods. Male Austrian applicants are invariably more successful than female Austrian applicants when they pass the admission test immediately after completing secondary education. When female as well as male candidates pass the admission test 1 year after completion of secondary education, the differences in the results are no longer statistically significant. A basic science knowledge gap in the Austrian applicants can be confirmed. The variable time can be interpreted as an opportunity for the reduction of a basic science knowledge gap.

  7. Elderly toileting: is two hourly too often?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilek, R

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two hourly toileting regimes for the management of urinary incontinence in elderly nursing home residents. A comparison of two hourly regimes with four hourly toileting was undertaken over two eight-week periods to establish the most effective form of continence promotion. No significant difference in the levels of incontinence was noted and the severity of incontinence did not significantly differ between regimes. The author concludes that two hourly regimes are a waste of nurses' time and cause unnecessary discomfort to patients.

  8. Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Veltman, Bart; Berrevoets, Leo M.; Berden, Hubert J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We study how flexibility in workforce capacity can be used to efficiently match capacity and demand. Flexibility in workforce capacity is introduced by the annualized hours regime. Annualized hours allow organizations to measure working time per year, instead of per month or per week. An additional

  9. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aires

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days, sub-acute (7 days and chronic (28 days phases of myocardial infarction (MI in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV and heart rate variability (HRV. Pulsatile blood pressure (BP recordings (30 min were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old with MI (coronary ligature or sham operation (SO. Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF component (n.u. of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P0.05. This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%. The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance.

  10. Increased Intrasubject Variability in Response Time in Youths with Bipolar Disorder and At-Risk Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Melissa A.; Rooney, Melissa H.; Skup, Martha; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Intrasubject variability in response time (ISV-RT) was higher in youths with bipolar disorder (BD) and those with first-degree relatives with BD compared to youths without BD. ISV-RT may be a risk marker for BD.

  11. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  12. Shared timing variability in eye and finger movements increases with interval duration: Support for a distributed timing system below and above one second.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampela, Olympia; Holm, Linus; Madison, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the ability to produce action at will at the hundreds of millisecond to second range remain poorly understood. A central issue is whether such timing is governed by one mechanism or by several different mechanisms, possibly invoked by different effectors used to perform the timing task. If two effectors invoke similar timing mechanisms, then they should both produce similar variability increase with interval duration (interonset interval) and thus adhere to Weber's law (increasing linearly with the duration of the interval to be timed). Additionally, if both effectors invoke the same timing mechanism, the variability of the effectors should be highly correlated across participants. To test these possibilities, we assessed the behavioural characteristics across fingers and eyes as effectors and compared the timing variability between and within them as a function of the interval to be produced (interresponse interval). Sixty participants produced isochronous intervals from 524 to 1431 ms with their fingers and their eyes. High correlations within each effector indicated consistent performance within participants. Consistent with a single mechanism, temporal variability in both fingers and eyes followed Weber's law, and significant correlations between eye and finger variability were found for several intervals. These results can support neither the single clock nor the multiple clock hypotheses but instead suggest a partially overlapping distributed timing system.

  13. Bayesian Variable Selection in High Dimensional Survival Time Cancer Genomic Datasets using Nonlocal Priors

    OpenAIRE

    Nikooienejad, Amir; Wang, Wenyi; Johnson, Valen E.

    2017-01-01

    Variable selection in high dimensional cancer genomic studies has become very popular in the past decade, due to the interest in discovering significant genes pertinent to a specific cancer type. Censored survival data is the main data structure in such studies and performing variable selection for such data type requires certain methodology. With recent developments in computational power, Bayesian methods have become more attractive in the context of variable selection. In this article we i...

  14. Influence of climate variability on anchovy reproductive timing off northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Reyes, Javier E.; Canales, T. Mariella; Rojas, Pablo M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between environmental variables and the Gonadosomatic Monthly Mean (GMM) index of anchovy (Engraulis ringens) to understand how the environment affects the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing. The data examined corresponds to biological information collected from samples of the landings off northern Chile (18°21‧S, 24°00‧S) during the period 1990-2010. We used the Humboldt Current Index (HCI) and the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), which combine several physical-oceanographic factors in the Tropical and South Pacific regions. Using the GMM index, we studied the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing at different intervals of length, specifically females with a length between 11.5 and 14 cm (medium class) and longer than 14 cm (large class). Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Mobile Average (SARIMA) was used to predict missing observations. The trends of the environment and reproductive indexes were explored via the Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) statistical technique and the relationship between these indexes via cross-correlation functions (CCF) analysis. Our results showed that the habitat of anchovy switched from cool to warm condition, which also influenced gonad development. This was revealed by two and three significant changes (breaks) in the trend of the HCI and MEI indexes, and two significant breaks in the GMM of each time series of anchovy females (medium and large). Negative cross-correlation between the MEI index and GMM of medium and large class females was found, indicating that as the environment gets warmer (positive value of MEI) a decrease in the reproductive activity of anchovy can be expected. Correlation between the MEI index and larger females was stronger than with medium females. Additionally, our results indicate that the GMM index of anchovy for both length classes reaches two maximums per year; the first from August to September and the second from December to January. The

  15. Time-resolved diagnostic of an impulse discharge in variable pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Martinez, A.; Sobral, H.; Ruiz-Meza, A.

    2008-09-01

    The effect of gas pressure on the characteristics of a short-gap lightning discharge in air was investigated. For the tests, 70 ns front lightning pulses were applied to a short (11 cm) point-plane gap under variable pressure. The diagnostics employed included electric current and field measurements, spectroscopy in the visible and fast-frame photography. We found that the pressure has a clear effect on the electric field at the plane. For low pressures, the high fields measured (~7 kV cm-1) are comparable to the Laplacian field, indicating that very little ionization takes place in the gap at this pressure; at higher pressures the space charge contributes substantially to the field magnitude. The effect of pressure on the current pulse was, in contrast, minimal; its peak amplitude and shape remained largely unaffected by pressure. Time-resolved spectroscopy allowed the determination of the instantaneous electron density and temperature to be made; the latter, for example, was found to reach 33 000 K at t ~ 1 µs for most of the pressures employed. Using the measured temperature and radius we made estimations of the arc's resistance. We found that the Spitzer resistivity model gives values of resistance that are compatible with the experimental data obtained.

  16. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of a simple flexible rotor system subjected to time-variable base motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liqiang; Wang, Jianjun; Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2017-09-01

    Rotor systems carried in transportation system or under seismic excitations are considered to have a moving base. To study the dynamic behavior of flexible rotor systems subjected to time-variable base motions, a general model is developed based on finite element method and Lagrange's equation. Two groups of Euler angles are defined to describe the rotation of the rotor with respect to the base and that of the base with respect to the ground. It is found that the base rotations would cause nonlinearities in the model. To verify the proposed model, a novel test rig which could simulate the base angular-movement is designed. Dynamic experiments on a flexible rotor-bearing system with base angular motions are carried out. Based upon these, numerical simulations are conducted to further study the dynamic response of the flexible rotor under harmonic angular base motions. The effects of base angular amplitude, rotating speed and base frequency on response behaviors are discussed by means of FFT, waterfall, frequency response curve and orbits of the rotor. The FFT and waterfall plots of the disk horizontal and vertical vibrations are marked with multiplications of the base frequency and sum and difference tones of the rotating frequency and the base frequency. Their amplitudes will increase remarkably when they meet the whirling frequencies of the rotor system.

  17. Visual assessment of breast density using Visual Analogue Scales: observer variability, reader attributes and reading time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Teri; Harkness, Elaine F.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Lim, Yit Y.; Emsley, Richard; Howell, Anthony; Evans, D. Gareth; Astley, Susan; Gadde, Soujanya

    2017-03-01

    Breast density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer and has potential use in breast cancer risk prediction, with subjective methods of density assessment providing a strong relationship with the development of breast cancer. This study aims to assess intra- and inter-observer variability in visual density assessment recorded on Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) among trained readers, and examine whether reader age, gender and experience are associated with assessed density. Eleven readers estimated the breast density of 120 mammograms on two occasions 3 years apart using VAS. Intra- and inter-observer agreement was assessed with Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and variation between readers visualised on Bland-Altman plots. The mean scores of all mammograms per reader were used to analyse the effect of reader attributes on assessed density. Excellent intra-observer agreement (ICC>0.80) was found in the majority of the readers. All but one reader had a mean difference of gender, or with reading time. Overall, the readers were consistent in their scores, although some large variations were observed. Reader evaluation and targeted training may alleviate this problem.

  18. Time series analysis of embodied interaction: Movement variability and complexity matching as dyadic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Zapata-Fonseca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing consensus that a fuller understanding of social cognition depends on more systematic studies of real-time social interaction. Such studies require methods that can deal with the complex dynamics taking place at multiple interdependent temporal and spatial scales, spanning sub-personal, personal, and dyadic levels of analysis. We demonstrate the value of adopting an extended multi-scale approach by re-analyzing movement time series generated in a study of embodied dyadic interaction in a minimal virtual reality environment (a perceptual crossing experiment. Reduced movement variability revealed an interdependence between social awareness and social coordination that cannot be accounted for by either subjective or objective factors alone: it picks out interactions in which subjective and objective conditions are convergent (i.e. elevated coordination is perceived as clearly social, and impaired coordination is perceived as socially ambiguous. This finding is consistent with the claim that interpersonal interaction can be partially constitutive of direct social perception. Clustering statistics (Allan Factor of salient events revealed fractal scaling. Complexity matching defined as the similarity between these scaling laws was significantly more pronounced in pairs of participants as compared to surrogate dyads. This further highlights the multi-scale and distributed character of social interaction and extends previous complexity matching results from dyadic conversation to nonverbal social interaction dynamics. Trials with successful joint interaction were also associated with an increase in local coordination. Consequently, a local coordination pattern emerges on the background of complex dyadic interactions in the PCE task and makes joint successful performance possible.

  19. Health and Disease Imprinted in the Time Variability of the Human Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Teresa; Gracia, César; Peña, Manuel; Latorre, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The animal microbiota (including the human microbiota) plays an important role in keeping the physiological status of the host healthy. Research seeks greater insight into whether changes in the composition and function of the microbiota are associated with disease. We analyzed published 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) data pertaining to the gut microbiotas of 99 subjects monitored over time. Temporal fluctuations in the microbial composition revealed significant differences due to factors such as dietary changes, antibiotic intake, age, and disease. This article shows that a fluctuation scaling law can describe the temporal changes in the gut microbiota. This law estimates the temporal variability of the microbial population and quantitatively characterizes the path toward disease via a noise-induced phase transition. Estimation of the systemic parameters may be of clinical utility in follow-up studies and have more general applications in fields where it is important to know whether a given community is stable or not. IMPORTANCE The human microbiota correlates closely with the health status of its host. This article analyzes the microbial composition of several subjects under different conditions over time spans that ranged from days to months. Using the Langevin equation as the basis of our mathematical framework to evaluate microbial temporal stability, we proved that stable microbiotas can be distinguished from unstable microbiotas. This initial step will help us to determine how temporal microbiota stability is related to a subject’s health status and to develop a more comprehensive framework that will provide greater insight into this complex system. Author Video: An author video summary of this article is available. PMID:28345059

  20. Effect of reader experience on variability, evaluation time and accuracy of coronary plaque detection with computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, Stefan C.; Szekely, Gabor [ETH Zurich, Computer Vision Laboratory, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Group, Boston, MA (United States); Stolzmann, Paul; Baumueller, Stephan; Leschka, Sebastian; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fuchs, Thomas J. [ETH Zurich, Department of Computer Science, Zurich (Switzerland); Cattin, Philippe C. [ETH Zurich, Computer Vision Laboratory, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Basel, Medical Image Analysis Center, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    To assess the effect of reader experience on variability, evaluation time and accuracy in the detection of coronary artery plaques with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Three independent, blinded readers with three different experience levels twice labelled 50 retrospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-gated contrast-enhanced dual-source CTCA data sets (15 female, age 67.3 {+-} 10.4 years, range 46-86 years) indicating the presence or absence of coronary plaques. The evaluation times for the readings were recorded. Intra- and interobserver variability expressed as {kappa} statistics and sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were calculated for plaque detection, with a consensus reading of the three readers taken as the standard of reference. A bootstrap method was applied in the statistical analysis to account for clustering. Significant correlations were found between reader experience and, respectively, evaluation times (r = -0.59, p < 0.05) and intraobserver variability (r = 0.73, p < 0.05). The evaluation time significantly differed among the readers (p < 0.05). The observer variability for plaque detection, compared with the consensus, varied between {kappa} = 0.582 and {kappa} = 0.802. Variability of plaque detection was significantly smaller (p < 0.05) and more accurate (p < 0.05) for the most experienced reader. Reader experience significantly correlated with observer variability, evaluation time and accuracy of coronary plaque detection at CTCA. (orig.)

  1. A Real-Time Spike Classification Method Based on Dynamic Time Warping for Extracellular Enteric Neural Recording with Large Waveform Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingqiu; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Gordon, Philip H.; Shen, Xiling; Kan, Edwin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Computationally efficient spike recognition methods are required for real-time analysis of extracellular neural recordings. The enteric nervous system (ENS) is important to human health but less well-understood with few appropriate spike recognition algorithms due to large waveform variability. New Method Here we present a method based on dynamic time warping (DTW) with high tolerance to variability in time and magnitude. Adaptive temporal gridding for fastDTW in similarity calculation significantly reduces the computational cost. The automated threshold selection allows for real-time classification for extracellular recordings. Results Our method is first evaluated on synthesized data at different noise levels, improving both classification accuracy and computational complexity over the conventional cross-correlation based template-matching method (CCTM) and PCA + k-means clustering without time warping. Our method is then applied to analyze the mouse enteric neural recording with mechanical and chemical stimuli. Successful classification of biphasic and monophasic spikes is achieved even when the spike variability is larger than millisecond in width and millivolt in magnitude. Comparison with Existing Method(s) In comparison with conventional template matching and clustering methods, the fastDTW method is computationally efficient with high tolerance to waveform variability. Conclusions We have developed an adaptive fastDTW algorithm for real-time spike classification of ENS recording with large waveform variability against colony motility, ambient changes and cellular heterogeneity. PMID:26719239

  2. Variable time constant frequency meter with MECL integrated circuits; Frequencemetre numerique a constantes de temps variables et en circuits integres MECL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuan, J.; Kaiser, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The point of interest of this frequency meter is that its accuracy is fixed in advance for the whole frequency range which is to be measured. For this, it is possible for the measurement range to be changed several times by changing the time constant which varies over discrete values and adopts that corresponding to the measured frequency for a given accuracy. The frequency meter which we present here gives three values of the accuracy, i. e. three groups of variable time constants, and operates as a chronometer and as a conventional frequency meter. The object is to describe the construction of a variable time-constant system and it is obvious that further work would lead, because of new industrial circuits, to great improvements in the design of the apparatus. (authors) [French] L'interet de ce frequencemetre est de limiter sa precision a une valeur fixee a l'avance pour toute la gamme de frequence a mesurer. Pour cela, il lui est possible de changer la gamme de mesure plusieurs fois en changeant sa constante de temps qui varie par valeurs discretes pour prendre celle correspondante a la frequence mesuree pour une precision donnee. Le frequencemetre que nous proposons affiche trois valeurs de precision, donc trois groupes de constantes, de temps variables et fonctionne en chronometre et en frequencemetre classique. Son but est de montrer la realisation du systeme a constance de temps variable et il est evident qu'une seconde etude amenerait, de par les circuits industriels nouveaux, de grandes ameliorations, dans la conception de l'appareil. (auteurs)

  3. A study of fluid flow and combustion with variable valve timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederberg, F.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of variable valve timing (VVT) were examined by in-cylinder Laser Doppler Velocimetry flow measurements and heat-release calculations. A single-cylinder Volvo B5254 engine was used for all experiments and the valve timing was altered by phasing or exchanging the camshaft. Special cam lobes were developed for simulation of throttle-less operation. With the standard double camshaft, a tumbling flow was generated and with valve deactivation, a swirling flow was generated. The turbulence was increased with valve deactivation. This increased the combustion rate making lean burn possible. The standard camshaft with inlet valve deactivation and late cam phasing had a faster combustion at {lambda} = 1.8 than the standard camshaft with normal cam phasing at {lambda} = 1.0. Early and late inlet valve closing was used for enabling throttle-less operation. Early inlet valve closing (EIVC) generated a very slow tumble with low turbulence. Late inlet valve closing generated both very high and low turbulence. The net indicated efficiency was improved with up to 10%. Some reduction was observed for the gross indicated efficiency, due to a too large reduction in effective compression ratio. A very stable combustion was obtained for EIVC with gasoline, possibly due to a sheering flow over the inlet valves resulting in improved fuel-air preparation. Wavelet analysis was used for dividing LDV flow measurements into time and frequency resolved information. The technique rendered the same flow results as the moving window technique, but with a separation of the turbulence into different frequencies. The choice of wavelet was shown not to be crucial. The frequency resolved turbulence was studied for tumble and swirl. A tumbling flow had a larger transfer of energy from low frequency turbulence into high frequency turbulence than a swirling flow. This is caused by the tumble breakdown. A correlation against heat-release indicated that high frequency turbulence have a larger

  4. Assessment of noise in non-tectonic displacement derived from GRACE time-variable gravity filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Shen, Yunzhong

    2017-04-01

    Many studies have been focusing on estimating the noises in GNSS monitoring time series. While the noises of GNSS time series after the correction with non-tectonic displacement should be re-estimated. Knowing the noises in the non-tectonic can help to better identify the sources of re-estimated noises. However, there is a lack of knowledge of noises in the non-tectonic displacement. The objective of this work is to assess the noise in the non-tectonic displacement. GRACE time-variable gravity is used to reflect the global mass variation. The GRACE stokes coefficients of the gravity field are used to calculate the non-tectonic surface displacement at any point on the surface. The Atmosphere and Ocean AOD1B de-aliasing model to the GRACE solutions is added because the complete mass variation is requested. The monthly GRACE solutions from CSR, JPL, GFZ and Tongji span from January 2003 to September 2015 are compared. The degree-1 coefficients derived by Swenson et al (2008) are added and also the C20 terms are replaced with those obtained from Satellite Laser Ranging. The P4M6 decorrelation and Fan filter with a radius of 300 km are adopted to reduce the stripe errors. Optimal noise models for the 1054 stations in ITRF2014 are presented. It is found that white noise only take up a small proportion: less than 18% in horizontal and less than 13% in vertical. The dominant models in up and north components are ARMA and flicker, while in east the power law noise shows significance. The local distribution comparison of the optimal noise models among different products is quite similar, which shows that there is little dependence on the different strategies adopted. In addition, the reasons that caused to different distributions of the optimal noise models are also investigated. Meanwhile different filtering methods such as Gaussian filters, Han filters are applied to see whether the noise is related with filters. Keyword: optimal noise model; non-tectonic displacement

  5. [Modelling the effect of local climatic variability on dengue transmission in Medellin (Colombia) by means of time series analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo L; Suárez-Acosta, Carolina; Chauca, José; Ventosilla, Palmira; Almanza, Rita

    2013-09-01

    Dengue fever is a major impact on public health vector-borne disease, and its transmission is influenced by entomological, sociocultural and economic factors. Additionally, climate variability plays an important role in the transmission dynamics. A large scientific consensus has indicated that the strong association between climatic variables and disease could be used to develop models to explain the incidence of the disease. To develop a model that provides a better understanding of dengue transmission dynamics in Medellin and predicts increases in the incidence of the disease. The incidence of dengue fever was used as dependent variable, and weekly climatic factors (maximum, mean and minimum temperature, relative humidity and precipitation) as independent variables. Expert Modeler was used to develop a model to better explain the behavior of the disease. Climatic variables with significant association to the dependent variable were selected through ARIMA models. The model explains 34% of observed variability. Precipitation was the climatic variable showing statistically significant association with the incidence of dengue fever, but with a 20 weeks delay. In Medellin, the transmission of dengue fever was influenced by climate variability, especially precipitation. The strong association dengue fever/precipitation allowed the construction of a model to help understand dengue transmission dynamics. This information will be useful to develop appropriate and timely strategies for dengue control.

  6. Toward the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Amar; Seshasai, Satwik

    2004-01-01

    The term 24-Hour Knowledge Factory connotes a globally distributed work environment in which members of the global team work on a project around the clock; each member of the team works the normal workday hours that pertain to his or her time zone. At the end of such a workday, a fellow team member located in a different time zone continues the same task. This creates the shift-style workforce that was originally conceived in the manufacturing sector. A globally distributed 24-hour call cente...

  7. Time required to determine performance variables and production efficiency of lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, A; Shabtay, A; Haim, A; Aharoni, Y; Miron, J; Adin, G; Tamir, A; Arieli, A; Halachmi, I; Moallem, U; Orlov, A; Brosh, A

    2014-07-01

    Thirty-five lactating dairy cows throughout weeks of lactation (WOL) 16 to 30 were used to determine optimal time needed for reliable measurement of performance variables, and to classify the cows into high-, medium-, and low-efficiency groups. Individual performance variables [body weight (BW), dry matter intake (DMI), and milk production] were measured daily with a computerized monitoring system. Body condition was visually scored weekly and used to calculate retained or depleted body energy as a result of fat content change (REF). Milk composition was analyzed weekly. Body weight, DMI, and total recovered energy (RE), which represents energy in milk production plus REF, were summarized weekly. Efficiency was calculated as RE/DMI and as residual feed intake (RFI; i.e., the difference between actual and expected DMI), which was calculated from multiple linear regression of DMI dependence on BW(0.75) and RE. Unexpectedly, it was found that BW did not affect DMI and RE/DMI. Changes and relative changes in phenotypic coefficient of variation and correlations among data from shortened tests ranging from 1 wk (WOL 16) to a sequence of 15-wk tests were used to determine optimal test period durations for 5 traits: BW, DMI, RE, RE/DMI, and RFI. Traits were fitted into a mixed model with repeated measures. For each week, the traits were summarized as a sequence of cumulative data, starting from WOL 16 and cumulated over periods that increased in 1-wk steps up to WOL 16 to 29. Weekly cumulations were compared with those for entire test period (WOL 16 to 30). Consistency of each cow's efficiency classification as high, medium, or low was tested by the total-agreement procedure; the kappa index P-value was used. Throughout WOL 16 to 30, the effects of increasing test period duration on between-animal coefficient of variation differed with respect to the various performance variables and RE/DMI: it tended to change with respect to BW, did not change with respect to DMI, and

  8. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  9. Instrumental variables estimation of exposure effects on a time-to-event response using structural cumulative survival models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, T.; Vansteelandt, S.; Tchetgen, E. J. Tchetgen

    2016-01-01

    The use of instrumental variables for estimating the effect of an exposure on an outcome is popular in econometrics, and increasingly so in epidemiology. This increasing popularity may be attributed to the natural occurrence of instrumental variables in observational studies that incorporate...... elements of randomization, either by design or by nature (e.g., random inheritance of genes). Instrumental variables estimation of exposure effects is well established for continuous outcomes and to some extent for binary outcomes. It is, however, largely lacking for time-to-event outcomes because......-parametric variant of the instrumental variables additive hazards model. We propose a class of recursive instrumental variable estimators for these exposure effects, and derive their large sample properties along with inferential tools. We examine the performance of the proposed method in simulation studies...

  10. Effects of a lag schedule of reinforcement with progressive time delay on topographical mand variability in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbaugh, Bryant C; Falcomata, Terry S; Ferguson, Raechal H

    2017-09-28

    Evaluate the effects of a Lag 1 schedule of reinforcement and progressive time delay (TD) on topographical mand variability in children with autism. Using single-subject design methodology, a multiple baseline across behaviors with embedded reversal design was employed. During Lag 0, reinforcement was delivered contingent on any independent instances of manding. During Lag 1 + TD, prompts were faded and reinforcement was delivered contingent on independent or prompted variant mand topographies. Higher levels of topographical mand variability were observed during Lag 1 + TD for both participants. A Lag 1 schedule of reinforcement with progressive TD increased variability across functionally equivalent vocal mand topographies for both participants. This finding extends prior literature by providing a novel model for studying reinforced mand variability in children, and by demonstrating how practitioners could use prompts and differential reinforcement to increase topographical mand variability in children with autism.

  11. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  12. Influence of biological and social-historical variables on the time taken to describe an angiosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallin, Evelin K S; Munhoz, Cássia B R; Harris, Stephen A; Villarroel, Daniel; Proença, Carolyn E B

    2016-11-01

    By convention, scientific naming of angiosperm species began in 1753; it is estimated that 10-20% of species remain undescribed. To complete this task before rare, undescribed species go extinct, a better understanding of the description process is needed. The South American Cerrado biodiversity hotspot was considered a suitable model due to a high diversity of plants, habitats, and social history of species description. A randomized sample of 214 species (2% of the angiosperm flora) and 22 variables were analyzed using multivariate analyses and analysis of variance. Plants with wide global distributions, recorded from many areas, and above 2.6 m were described significantly earlier than narrowly distributed, uncommon species of smaller stature. The beginning of the career of the botanist who first collected the species was highly significant, with an average delay between first collection and description of 29 yr, and between type collection and description 19 yr; standard deviations were high and rose over time. Over a third of first collections were not cited in descriptions. Trends such as scientific specialization and decline of undescribed species were highlighted. Descriptions that involved potential collaboration between collectors and authors were significantly slower than those that did not. Results support four recommendations to hasten discovery of new species: (1) preferential collecting of plants below 2.6 m, at least in the Cerrado; (2) access to undetermined material in herbaria; (3) fieldwork in areas where narrow-endemic species occur; (4) fieldwork by knowledgeable botanists followed by descriptive activity by the same. © 2016 Proenca et al. Published by the Botanical Society of America. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY-NC).

  13. Solving the puzzle of discrepant quasar variability on monthly time-scales implied by SDSS and CRTS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suberlak, Krzysztof; Ivezić, Željko; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Graham, Matthew; Sesar, Branimir

    2017-12-01

    We present an improved photometric error analysis for the 7 100 CRTS (Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey) optical light curves for quasars from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 catalogue. The SDSS imaging survey has provided a time-resolved photometric data set, which greatly improved our understanding of the quasar optical continuum variability: Data for monthly and longer time-scales are consistent with a damped random walk (DRW). Recently, newer data obtained by CRTS provided puzzling evidence for enhanced variability, compared to SDSS results, on monthly time-scales. Quantitatively, SDSS results predict about 0.06 mag root-mean-square (rms) variability for monthly time-scales, while CRTS data show about a factor of 2 larger rms, for spectroscopically confirmed SDSS quasars. Our analysis has successfully resolved this discrepancy as due to slightly underestimated photometric uncertainties from the CRTS image processing pipelines. As a result, the correction for observational noise is too small and the implied quasar variability is too large. The CRTS photometric error correction factors, derived from detailed analysis of non-variable SDSS standard stars that were re-observed by CRTS, are about 20-30 per cent, and result in reconciling quasar variability behaviour implied by the CRTS data with earlier SDSS results. An additional analysis based on independent light curve data for the same objects obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory provides further support for this conclusion. In summary, the quasar variability constraints on weekly and monthly time-scales from SDSS, CRTS and PTF surveys are mutually compatible, as well as consistent with DRW model.

  14. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  15. US Naval Observatory Hourly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations journal from the National Observatory in Washington DC. The observatory is the first station in the United States to produce hourly observations...

  16. Long working hours and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Madsen, Ida E. H.

    2016-01-01

    ; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working greater than or equal to55 h...... per week was associated with 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval 1.12–2.29) increase in female breast cancer risk independently of age, socioeconomic position, shift- and night-time work and lifestyle factors, but this observation may have been influenced by residual confounding from parity......Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk...

  17. Time-dependent prediction and evaluation of variable importance using superlearning in high-dimensional clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alan; Munoz, Ivan Diaz; Decker, Anna; Holcomb, John B; Schreiber, Martin A; Bulger, Eileen M; Brasel, Karen J; Fox, Erin E; del Junco, Deborah J; Wade, Charles E; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Cotton, Bryan A; Phelan, Herb A; Myers, John G; Alarcon, Louis H; Muskat, Peter; Cohen, Mitchell J

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of outcome after injury is fraught with uncertainty and statistically beset by misspecified models. Single-time point regression only gives prediction and inference at one time, of dubious value for continuous prediction of ongoing bleeding. New statistical machine learning techniques such as SuperLearner (SL) exist to make superior prediction at iterative time points while evaluating the changing relative importance of each measured variable on an outcome. This then can provide continuously changing prediction of outcome and evaluation of which clinical variables likely drive a particular outcome. PROMMTT data were evaluated using both naive (standard stepwise logistic regression) and SL techniques to develop a time-dependent prediction of future mortality within discrete time intervals. We avoided both underfitting and overfitting using cross validation to select an optimal combination of predictors among candidate predictors/machine learning algorithms. SL was also used to produce interval-specific robust measures of variable importance measures (VIM resulting in an ordered list of variables, by time point) that have the strongest impact on future mortality. Nine hundred eighty patients had complete clinical and outcome data and were included in the analysis. The prediction of ongoing transfusion with SL was superior to the naive approach for all time intervals (correlations of cross-validated predictions with the outcome were 0.819, 0.789, 0.792 for time intervals 30-90, 90-180, 180-360, >360 minutes). The estimated VIM of mortality also changed significantly at each time point. The SL technique for prediction of outcome from a complex dynamic multivariate data set is superior at each time interval to standard models. In addition, the SL VIM at each time point provides insight into the time-specific drivers of future outcome, patient trajectory, and targets for clinical intervention. Thus, this automated approach mimics clinical practice, changing

  18. 7 positions in 2 hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ackerman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 7 positions in 2 hours (2013 is a drawing that documents the process of making the short film Role Reversal Rehearsal. It became quickly apparent that the process of making the work was more dynamic and interesting than the finished piece itself. Relationships between the childcare arrangements of the participants and the collective working process brought about the necessity of collaboration for parent artists. Each participant gave their time, energy and creative insight towards filming a series of birthing positions with roles reversed. The male performer became the central figure in an attempt to prompt empathy, humour, and to embody the importance of the male role in childbirth. There were two hours to choreograph, rehearse, and film the sequence. The drawing by Ackerman encapsulates the 'rhizomatic' approach to producing creative work under the constraints of parenthood. The 'arborescent' structure of hierarchy encouraged in industrial filmmaking is subsumed in favour of a horizontal structure. This new structure allows for the creative input, and flow of collaboration between all people involved - including the 3 and 5 year olds, who contributed ideas for camera and soundtrack in situ.

  19. Temporal variability of vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Lavigne, Héloïse; Migon, Christophe; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Estournel, Claude; Coppola, Laurent; Miquel, Juan-Carlos

    2013-12-01

    The temporal evolution of the vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Ligurian Sea) over the last 20 years reveals a strong interannual variability. Winter convection allows particulate (and dissolved) matter to be vertically exported (“flush-down” effect). The efficiency of this process determines also the concentration of nutrients brought to surface waters and, therefore, the intensity of the subsequent phytoplankton bloom. The sequence “convection-bloom” is the main driving force of vertical export flux in this region. The present work attempts to better identify the parameters that control vertical export flux dynamics by observing a 20 year time-series in relation with the temporal variability of mixed layer depth and surface primary production. The consequences of a more stratified water column in the future on biological productivity and vertical export flux are pointed out. In winter, the cooling of surface water, combined with evaporation, increases its density and determines the vertical convection. This allows for a rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter, yielding high vertical export flux. This “flush-down effect” results from a combination of convection and gravitational flux, since the diving of dense surface waters breaks the stratification of the water column and carries all material (particulate + dissolved) accumulated in the surface layer to depth. The rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter by this “flush-down effect” yields high vertical export fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes may vary according to the amount of atmospheric material accumulated in surface waters during the preceding stratified period. In the present data set, highest vertical export fluxes were observed in 1999, 2003 and 2004. In those years, the MLD was greater (Fig. 2), suggesting a causal relationship between the efficiency of vertical mixing and the subsequent vertical export flux. In spring

  20. COMPUTING HELPDESK OPENING HOURS

    CERN Multimedia

    Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina,; User Support Group

    1999-01-01

    In the past months the helpdesk staff have been reduced to one person in Building513 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday in order to staff the new helpdesk in Building 40. We have the pleasure to announce that as of this week both desks will be open simultaneously and there will be two persons in 513 so we will again be able to deal with personal visits during that time.Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina, Roger WoolnoughUser Support Group

  1. Neighborhood walkability, income, and hour-by-hour physical activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Daniel; Eriksson, Ulf; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate both the mean daily physical activity and the hour-by-hour physical activity patterns across the day using accelerometry and how they are associated with neighborhood walkability and individual income. Moderate physical activity (MPA) was assessed by accelerometry in 2252 adults in the city of Stockholm, Sweden. Neighborhood walkability (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) was objectively assessed within 1000m network buffers around the participants' residence and individual income was self-reported. Living in a high walkability neighborhood was associated with more mean daily MPA compared with living in a low walkability neighborhood on weekdays and weekend days. Hour-by-hour analyses showed that this association appeared mainly in the afternoon/early evening during weekdays, whereas it appeared across the middle of the day during weekend days. Individual income was associated with mean daily MPA on weekend days. On weekdays, the hour-by-hour analyses showed that high income was associated with more MPA around noon and in late afternoon/early evening, whereas low income was associated with more MPA at the hours before noon and in the early afternoon. During the weekend, high income was more consistently associated with higher MPA. Hour-by-hour accelerometry physical activity patterns provides a more comprehensive picture of the associations between neighborhood walkability and individual income and physical activity and the variability of these associations across the day.

  2. Associations between participation in organised physical activity in the school or community outside school hours and neighbourhood play with child physical activity and sedentary time: a cross-sectional analysis of primary school-aged children from the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Solomon-Moore, Emma; Thompson, Janice L; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sebire, Simon J

    2017-09-14

    To assess the extent to which participation in organised physical activity in the school or community outside school hours and neighbourhood play was associated with children's physical activity and sedentary time. Cross-sectional study. Children were recruited from 47 state-funded primary schools in South West England. 1223 children aged 8-9 years old. Accelerometer-assessed moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. Children wore an accelerometer, and the mean minutes of MVPA and sedentary time per day were derived. Children reported their attendance at organised physical activity in the school or community outside school hours and neighbourhood play using a piloted questionnaire. Cross-sectional linear and logistic regression were used to examine if attendance frequency at each setting (and all settings combined) was associated with MVPA and sedentary time. Multiple imputation methods were used to account for missing data and increase sample size. Children who attended clubs at school 3-4 days per week obtained an average of 7.58 (95% CI 2.7 to 12.4) more minutes of MVPA per day than children who never attended. Participation in the three other non-school-based activities was similarly associated with MVPA. Evidence for associations with sedentary time was generally weaker. Associations were similar in girls and boys. When the four different contexts were combined, each additional one to two activities participated in per week increased participants' odds (OR: 1.18, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.25) of meeting the government recommendations for 60 min of MVPA per day. Participating in organised physical activity at school and in the community is associated with greater physical activity and reduced sedentary time among both boys and girls. All four types of activity contribute to overall physical activity, which provides parents with a range of settings in which to help their child be active. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  3. Dated eclogitic diamond growth zones reveal variable recycling of crustal carbon through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, S.; Koornneef, J. M.; Chinn, I. L.; Davies, G. R.

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline diamonds commonly record complex internal structures reflecting episodic growth linked to changing carbon-bearing fluids in the mantle. Using diamonds to trace the evolution of the deep carbon cycle therefore requires dating of individual diamond growth zones. To this end Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data are presented from individual eclogitic silicate inclusions from the Orapa and Letlhakane diamond mines, Botswana. δ13 C values are reported from the host diamond growth zones. Heterogeneous 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7033-0.7097) suggest inclusion formation in multiple and distinct tectono-magmatic environments. Sm-Nd isochron ages were determined based on groups of inclusions with similar trace element chemistry, Sr isotope ratios, and nitrogen aggregation of the host diamond growth zone. Diamond growth events at 0.14 ± 0.09, 0.25 ± 0.04, 1.1 ± 0.09, 1.70 ± 0.34 and 2.33 ± 0.02 Ga can be directly related to regional tectono-magmatic events. Individual diamonds record episodic growth with age differences of up to 2 Ga. Dated diamond zones have variable δ13 C values (-5.0 to -33.6‰ vs PDB) and appear to imply changes in subducted material over time. The studied Botswanan diamonds are interpreted to have formed in different tectono-magmatic environments that involve mixing of carbon from three sources that represent: i) subducted biogenic sediments (lightest δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr); ii) subducted carbonate-rich sediments (heavy δ13 C, high 87Sr/86Sr) and iii) depleted upper mantle (heavy δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr). We infer that older diamonds from these two localities are more likely to have light δ13 C due to greater subduction of biogenic sediments that may be related to hotter and more reduced conditions in the Archaean before the Great Oxidation Event at 2.3 Ga. These findings imply a marked temporal change in the nature of subducted carbon beneath Botswana and warrant further study to establish if this is a global phenomenon.

  4. Hypocretin measurement: shelf age of radioimmunoassay kit, but not freezer time, influences assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Glenda; Bliwise, Donald L; Saini, Prabhjyot; Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2017-09-01

    The hypothalamic peptide hypocretin 1 (orexin A) may be assayed in cerebrospinal fluid to diagnose narcolepsy type 1. This testing is not commercially available, and factors contributing to assay variability have not previously been comprehensively explored. In the present study, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin concentrations were determined in duplicate in 155 patient samples, across a range of sleep disorders. Intra-assay variability of these measures was analyzed. Inter-assay correlation between samples tested at Emory and at Stanford was high (r = 0.79, p freezer (r = 0.16, p = 0.04) and age of the kit used for assay (t = 3.64, p = 0.0004) were significant predictors of intra-kit variability in univariate analyses, only age of kit was significant in multivariate linear regression (F = 4.93, p = 0.03). Age of radioimmunoassay kit affects intra-kit variability of measured hypocretin values, such that kits closer to expiration exhibit significantly more variability.

  5. Drivers and potential predictability of summer time North Atlantic polar front jet variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J.; Jones, Julie M.; Hanna, Edward; Scaife, Adam A.; Erdélyi, Róbert

    2017-06-01

    The variability of the North Atlantic polar front jet stream is crucial in determining summer weather around the North Atlantic basin. Recent extreme summers in western Europe and North America have highlighted the need for greater understanding of this variability, in order to aid seasonal forecasting and mitigate societal, environmental and economic impacts. Here we find that simple linear regression and composite models based on a few predictable factors are able to explain up to 35 % of summertime jet stream speed and latitude variability from 1955 onwards. Sea surface temperature forcings impact predominantly on jet speed, whereas solar and cryospheric forcings appear to influence jet latitude. The cryospheric associations come from the previous autumn, suggesting the survival of an ice-induced signal through the winter season, whereas solar influences lead jet variability by a few years. Regression models covering the earlier part of the twentieth century are much less effective, presumably due to decreased availability of data, and increased uncertainty in observational reanalyses. Wavelet coherence analysis identifies that associations fluctuate over the study period but it is not clear whether this is just internal variability or genuine non-stationarity. Finally we identify areas for future research.

  6. Time-Lapse Geophysical Measurements targeting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Production from Peat Soils in a Hydrologically Controlled Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W. J.; Shahan, T.; Sharp, N.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release globally significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most research on peatland gas dynamics has traditionally been focused on high latitude peatlands. Therefore, understanding gas dynamics in low-latitude peatlands (e.g. the Florida Everglades) is key to global climate research. Recent studies in the Everglades have demonstrated that biogenic gas flux values may vary when considering different temporal and spatial scales of measurements. The work presented here targets spatial variability in gas production and release at the plot scale in an approximately 85 m2 area, and targets temporal variability with data collected during the spring months of two different years. This study is located in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 Ha) model of the Florida Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used in the past to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils, and is used in this study to monitor changes of in situ gas storage. Each year, a grid of GPR profiles was collected to image changes in gas distribution in 2d on a weekly basis, and several flux chambers outfitted with time-lapse cameras captured high resolution (hourly) gas flux measurements inside the GPR grid. Combining these methods allows us to use a mass balance approach to estimate spatial variability in gas production rates, and capture temporal variability in gas flux rates.

  7. Climate variability, weather and enteric disease incidence in New Zealand: time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Aparna; Ikeda, Takayoshi; French, Nigel; Baker, Michael G; Hales, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the influence of climate variability on enteric disease incidence may improve our ability to predict how climate change may affect these diseases. To examine the associations between regional climate variability and enteric disease incidence in New Zealand. Associations between monthly climate and enteric diseases (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis) were investigated using Seasonal Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) models. No climatic factors were significantly associated with campylobacteriosis and giardiasis, with similar predictive power for univariate and multivariate models. Cryptosporidiosis was positively associated with average temperature of the previous month (β =  0.130, SE =  0.060, p climate variables and national communicable disease incidence data can contribute to disease prediction models and early warning systems.

  8. Red blood cell components: time to revisit the sources of variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2017-03-01

    Quality and safety of red blood cell (RBC) components is managed by screening of donors and strict regulatory controls of blood collection, processing and storage procedures. Despite these efforts, variations in RBC component quality exist as exemplified by the wide range in storage-induced haemolysis. This article provides a brief overview of the variables that contribute or potentially contribute to the quality of stored RBC components, including blood collection, processing, and donor-related variables. Particular focus is made on donor health and lifestyle factors that are not specifically screened and may impact on the physicobiochemical properties of RBCs and their storability. Inflammatory and oxidative stress states may be especially relevant as RBCs are susceptible to oxidative injury. Few studies have investigated the effect of specific donor-related variables on the quality of stored RBC components. Donor-related variables may be unaccounted confounders in the "age of blood" clinical studies that compared outcomes following transfusion of fresher or longer-stored RBC components. The conclusion is drawn that the blood donor is the greatest source of RBC component variability and the least "regulated" aspect of blood component production. It is proposed that more research is needed to better understand the connection between donor-related variables and quality consistency of stored RBC components. This could be very important given the impact of modern lifestyles that sees escalating rates of non-communicable health conditions that are associated with increased oxidative stress, such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes in children and adults, as well as an ageing population in many countries. The effect of these changes to global health and population demographics will impact on blood donor panels, and without significant new research, the consequences on the quality of stored blood components and transfusion outcomes are unknown.

  9. [DYNAMICS OF TWENTY-FOUR HOUR MONITORING OF BLOOD PRESSURE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orakova, F H; Inarokova, A M; Ramazanova, K A; Semenova, I L

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-four hour blood pressure monitoring in groups of patients of elderly age with bronchial asthma and hypertension was conducted. The study showed an increased variability of blood pressure and insufficient reduction in night time that leads to development of cardiovascular complications.

  10. Too Fast or Too Slow? Time and Neuronal Variability in Bipolar Disorder-A Combined Theoretical and Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg; Magioncalda, Paola; Martino, Matteo; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Lane, Timothy

    2017-05-19

    Time is an essential feature in bipolar disorder (BP). Manic and depressed BP patients perceive the speed of time as either too fast or too slow. The present article combines theoretical and empirical approaches to integrate phenomenological, psychological, and neuroscientific accounts of abnormal time perception in BP. Phenomenology distinguishes between perception of inner time, ie, self-time, and outer time, ie, world-time, that desynchronize or dissociate from each other in BP: inner time speed is abnormally slow (as in depression) or fast (as in mania) and, by taking on the role as default-mode function, impacts and modulates the perception of outer time speed in an opposite way, ie, as too fast in depression and too slow in mania. Complementing, psychological investigation show opposite results in time perception, ie, time estimation and reproduction, in manic and depressed BP. Neuronally, time speed can be indexed by neuronal variability, ie, SD. Our own empirical data show opposite changes in manic and depressed BP (and major depressive disorder [MDD]) with abnormal SD balance, ie, SD ratio, between somatomotor and sensory networks that can be associated with inner and outer time. Taken together, our combined theoretical-empirical approach demonstrates that desynchronization or dissociation between inner and outer time in BP can be traced to opposite neuronal variability patterns in somatomotor and sensory networks. This opens the door for individualized therapeutic "normalization" of neuronal variability pattern in somatomotor and sensory networks by stimulation with TMS and/or tDCS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Phytohormones level in the leaves of Hyoscyamus niger L. during variable photoperiods at the time of flower initiation and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kopcewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concern changes in the content of endogenous phytohormones in the leaves of the long-day plant Hyoscyamus niger L. during variable photoperiods applied before and after flower initiation. The results show that alternation of inductive photoperiods with short days leads to quantitative changes in the content of phytohormones. The changeable photoperiod leads to a general decrease in the contents of gibberellins, cytokinins and auxins during the short noninductive days both before and after flower initiation. Alternation of the inductive photoperiod with short days does not influence the content of abscisic acid-like substances before flower initiation and causes an increase of the amount of inhibitors in the postinductive period. The content of hormonal substances is subjected to rhytmical changes related to the periods of light and darkness in the twenty-four hours' cycle.

  12. A Discrete-time Variable Structure Disturbance Observer for Compensating Cutting Load Disturbances in CNC AC Servo Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Y.E.; Kim, K.S.; Cho, D.I. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    This paper develops an AC motor controller for CNC applications. The AC motor controller design is based on the variable structure system method; particularly, it adds a variable structure disturbance observer to a standard variable structure controller. The combined variable structure controller and disturbance observer approach is formulated in the discrete time to maximize the controller performance in digital implementation. In order to guarantee robust stability, a new separation principle that decouples the observer dynamics from the tracking error dynamics is derived. The designed controller is installed on the z-axis of a CNC machining center and milling experiments were performed. The results show excellent disturbance estimation properties, and improved performance on both position and speed tracking, when compared to the factory-designed servo controller. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  13. UNDERSTANDING VARIABILITY IN TIME SPENT IN SELECTED LOCATIONS FOR 7-12 YEAR OLD CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper summarizes a series of analyses of clustered, sequential activity/location data collected by Harvard University for 160 children aged 7-12 in Southern California (Geyh et al., 2000). The main purpose of the paper is to understand intra- and inter-variability in the ti...

  14. Prospective Relationship between Social Cognitive Variables and Leisure Time Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortz, Brian; Winters, Eric; Grim, Melissa L.; Petosa, R. Lingyak

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that health promotion interventions that are based on behavioral theories are more effective than those lacking a theoretical base. Recent studies have begun to look at the relationship between social cognitive variables and physical activity in varied populations. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine…

  15. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Wright

    Full Text Available CT Perfusion (CTP derived cerebral blood flow (CBF thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11 through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  16. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; d'Esterre, Christopher D; Morrison, Laura B; Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  17. Estimating inter-annual variability in winter wheat sowing dates from satellite time series in Camargue, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfron, Giacinto; Delmotte, Sylvestre; Busetto, Lorenzo; Hossard, Laure; Ranghetti, Luigi; Brivio, Pietro Alessandro; Boschetti, Mirco

    2017-05-01

    Crop simulation models are commonly used to forecast the performance of cropping systems under different hypotheses of change. Their use on a regional scale is generally constrained, however, by a lack of information on the spatial and temporal variability of environment-related input variables (e.g., soil) and agricultural practices (e.g., sowing dates) that influence crop yields. Satellite remote sensing data can shed light on such variability by providing timely information on crop dynamics and conditions over large areas. This paper proposes a method for analyzing time series of MODIS satellite data in order to estimate the inter-annual variability of winter wheat sowing dates. A rule-based method was developed to automatically identify a reliable sample of winter wheat field time series, and to infer the corresponding sowing dates. The method was designed for a case study in the Camargue region (France), where winter wheat is characterized by vernalization, as in other temperate regions. The detection criteria were chosen on the grounds of agronomic expertise and by analyzing high-confidence time-series vegetation index profiles for winter wheat. This automatic method identified the target crop on more than 56% (four-year average) of the cultivated areas, with low commission errors (11%). It also captured the seasonal variability in sowing dates with errors of ±8 and ±16 days in 46% and 66% of cases, respectively. Extending the analysis to the years 2002-2012 showed that sowing in the Camargue was usually done on or around November 1st (±4 days). Comparing inter-annual sowing date variability with the main local agro-climatic drivers showed that the type of preceding crop and the weather conditions during the summer season before the wheat sowing had a prominent role in influencing winter wheat sowing dates.

  18. Correction of real-time satellite precipitation with multi-sensor satellite observations of land surface variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/364253940; Pan, M.; Wood, E. F.

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation is an important hydro-meteorological variable, and is a primary driver of the water cycle. In large parts of the world, real-time ground-based observations of precipitation are sparse and satellite-derived precipitation products are the only information source.We used changes in

  19. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  20. Work hours, weight status, and weight-related behaviors: a study of metro transit workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan Peter J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Associations between hours worked per week and Body Mass Index (BMI, food intake, physical activity, and perceptions of eating healthy at work were examined in a sample of transit workers. Methods Survey data were collected from 1086 transit workers. Participants reported hours worked per week, food choices, leisure-time physical activity and perceptions of the work environment with regard to healthy eating. Height and weight were measured for each participant. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations between work hours and behavioral variables. Associations were examined in the full sample and stratified by gender. Results Transit workers working in the highest work hour categories had higher BMI and poorer dietary habits, with results differing by gender. Working 50 or more hours per week was associated with higher BMI among men but not women. Additionally, working 50 or more hours per week was significantly associated with higher frequency of accessing cold beverage, cold food, and snack vending machines among men. Working 40 or more hours per week was associated with higher frequency of accessing cold food vending machines among women. Reported frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was highest among women working 50 or more hours per week. Intake of sweets, sugar sweetened beverages, and fast food did not vary with work hours in men or women. Physical activity and perception of ease of eating healthy at work were not associated with work hours in men or women. Conclusions Long work hours were associated with more frequent use of garage vending machines and higher BMI in transit workers, with associations found primarily among men. Long work hours may increase dependence upon food availability at the worksite, which highlights the importance of availability of healthy food choices.

  1. Time-Domain Sub-mm Astronomy. Measuring the Accretion Variability of Deeply Embedded Protostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    During the protostellar phase of stellar evolution, accretion is expected to be variable, but this variability has been difficult to detect because protostars are deeply embedded. We have undertaken a 3-year dedicated JCMT/SCUBA-2 monitoring program of eight nearby star-forming regions (Herczeg et al. 2017) to search for sub-mm brightness variations as a proxy of episodic accretion. Here, we describe a sub-mm luminosity burst of the Class I protostar EC 53 in Serpens Main (Yoo et al. 2017). The change in sub-mm brightness of EC 53 is interpreted as dust heating in the envelope, generated by a luminosity increase of the protostar. The sub-mm lightcurve resembles the historical K-band lightcurve, which varies by a factor of ˜6 with a 543 period and is interpreted as accretion variability excited by interactions between the accretion disk and a close binary system. We further compare archival SCUBA-2 observations against the first year of our survey (Mairs et al. 2017) and perform a statistical analysis of the first eighteen months of the survey (Johnstone et al. 2017). We conclude that greater than 5% of the known deeply embedded protostars are found to vary in the sub-mm.

  2. Pretreatment Differences in Intraindividual Variability in Reaction Time between Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Christie; Rich, Jill B; Tannock, Ian F; Seruga, Bostjan; Tirona, Kattleya; Bernstein, Lori J

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy has adverse effects on cognitive performance in women treated for breast cancer, but less is known about the period before chemotherapy. Studies have focused on mean level of performance, yet there is increasing recognition that variability in performance within an individual is also an important behavioral indicator of cognitive functioning and underlying neural integrity. We examined intraindividual variability (IIV) before chemotherapy and surgery in women diagnosed with breast cancer (n=31), and a healthy control group matched on age and education (n=25). IIV was calculated across trials of a computerized Stroop task, including an examination of the slowest and fastest trials of reaction time (RT) responses. The groups were equivalent on overall accuracy and speed, and participants in both groups were less accurate and slower on incongruent trials compared with congruent trials. However, women with breast cancer became more variable with increased task difficulty relative to healthy controls. Among the slowest RT responses, women with breast cancer were significantly more variable than healthy controls on incongruent trials. This suggests that a specific variability-producing process (e.g., attentional lapses) occurs in task conditions that require executive control (e.g., incongruent trials). Results are consistent with other evidence of executive dysfunction among women treated for breast cancer. These findings highlight the importance of pretreatment assessment and show that variability in performance provides information about cognition that measures of central tendency do not.

  3. Instrumental variables estimation of exposure effects on a time-to-event endpoint using structural cumulative survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Torben; Vansteelandt, Stijn; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Zucker, David M

    2017-12-01

    The use of instrumental variables for estimating the effect of an exposure on an outcome is popular in econometrics, and increasingly so in epidemiology. This increasing popularity may be attributed to the natural occurrence of instrumental variables in observational studies that incorporate elements of randomization, either by design or by nature (e.g., random inheritance of genes). Instrumental variables estimation of exposure effects is well established for continuous outcomes and to some extent for binary outcomes. It is, however, largely lacking for time-to-event outcomes because of complications due to censoring and survivorship bias. In this article, we make a novel proposal under a class of structural cumulative survival models which parameterize time-varying effects of a point exposure directly on the scale of the survival function; these models are essentially equivalent with a semi-parametric variant of the instrumental variables additive hazards model. We propose a class of recursive instrumental variable estimators for these exposure effects, and derive their large sample properties along with inferential tools. We examine the performance of the proposed method in simulation studies and illustrate it in a Mendelian randomization study to evaluate the effect of diabetes on mortality using data from the Health and Retirement Study. We further use the proposed method to investigate potential benefit from breast cancer screening on subsequent breast cancer mortality based on the HIP-study. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  4. Analysis of the variability and of the lengthening of intercleavage times during the cleavage stages of Nothobranchius guentheri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haarlem, R; Van Wijk, R; Konings, J G

    1983-03-01

    By means of time-lapse cinematography the early development of the annual fish Nothobranchius guentheri was recorded on 16-mm film up to the tenth cleavage round. Analysis of the films showed that the mean intercleavage time is much the same up to the seventh cleavage. Thereafter, intercleavage times increase, with steps of about 30 min or a multiple of it, at each subsequent cleavage. As development proceeds, the variability in intercleavage times increases. A positive correlation of sister intercleavage times exists from the seventh generation, whereas intercleavage times of mother-daughter cells are positively correlated in the ninth generation. The results suggest that the lengthening of the cell cycle after the seventh cleavage is due to the insertion of a time period in a programmable mitotic clock. The duration of this time period differs between the different cell lines of a pedigree, probably because of a difference in cell volume. Variability in intercleavage times might also arise as a result of some random transition which the cells traverse only once per 5 min with a transition probability of 0.67/5 min.

  5. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania: Examining for associations with weather variables over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Parker, Gordon

    2016-11-15

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a seasonal pattern with emerging evidence that weather conditions may trigger symptoms. Thus, our aims were to investigate if year-to-year variations in admissions with mania correlated with year-to-year variations in key meteorological variables, if there was a secular trend in light of climate change and if gender or admission status influenced the seasonal pattern. We undertook a Danish register-based nationwide historical cohort study. We included all adults hospitalized to psychiatric care from 1995 to 2012 with mania using the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The Danish Meteorological Institute provided the meteorological variables. The association between weather and admissions was tested using linear regression. Our database comprised 24,313 admissions with mania. There was a seasonal pattern with admission rates peaking in summer. Higher admission rates were associated with more sunshine, more ultraviolet radiation, higher temperature and less snow but were unassociated with rainfall. We did not find a secular trend in the seasonal pattern. Finally, neither gender nor admission status impacted on the overall seasonal pattern of admissions with mania. Only patients in psychiatric care were included. We could not subdivide by type of bipolar disorder. This cohort study based on more than 24,000 admissions identified a distinct seasonal pattern in hospital admissions for those with mania. We found no secular trend. This could indicate that the climate change is not impacting on seasonal patterns, that there is no link between the proposed variables or that change is currently not sufficiently distinctive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Climate variability, weather and enteric disease incidence in New Zealand: time series analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Lal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evaluating the influence of climate variability on enteric disease incidence may improve our ability to predict how climate change may affect these diseases. OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations between regional climate variability and enteric disease incidence in New Zealand. METHODS: Associations between monthly climate and enteric diseases (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis were investigated using Seasonal Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA models. RESULTS: No climatic factors were significantly associated with campylobacteriosis and giardiasis, with similar predictive power for univariate and multivariate models. Cryptosporidiosis was positively associated with average temperature of the previous month (β =  0.130, SE =  0.060, p <0.01 and inversely related to the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI two months previously (β =  -0.008, SE =  0.004, p <0.05. By contrast, salmonellosis was positively associated with temperature (β  = 0.110, SE = 0.020, p<0.001 of the current month and SOI of the current (β  = 0.005, SE = 0.002, p<0.050 and previous month (β  = 0.005, SE = 0.002, p<0.05. Forecasting accuracy of the multivariate models for cryptosporidiosis and salmonellosis were significantly higher. CONCLUSIONS: Although spatial heterogeneity in the observed patterns could not be assessed, these results suggest that temporally lagged relationships between climate variables and national communicable disease incidence data can contribute to disease prediction models and early warning systems.

  7. Climate variability and the timing of breeding and reproduction in seabirds

    OpenAIRE

    綿貫, 豊

    2011-01-01

    Timing of breeding in terrestrial birds has been progressed with the global warming trend during recent decades. This paper reviewed the inter-annual trends of the timing of breeding in seabirds and potential mechanisms driving these changes. Their timing of breeding was progressed in 3 of 4 cases in the Arctic at the rates of 0.3-1.5 d/year, but it was delayed in 6 of 10 cases in the Antarctic at slower rates (<0.1 d/year). In cooltemperate areas, timing of seabird’s breeding tended to delay...

  8. A time series analysis of climate variability and its impacts on food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le Nord du Shewa en Ethiopie est parmi les régions les plus affectées par les effets du changement climatique (CC), comme les inondations, principalement par ... l'impact du CC sur la production vivrière était estimé sur base d'un modèle économétrique où les variables-climat étaient intégrées comme déterminants de la ...

  9. NGC3516: SPECTRAL FEATURES AND THEIR RELATION WITH X-RAY VARIABILITY IN TIME

    OpenAIRE

    E. M. Huerta; Krongold, Y.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.

    2011-01-01

    La galaxia NGC3516, Seyfert 1.5, presenta una variabilidad de rayos X compleja temporalmente. Analizamos todos los espectros de 2006 de los telescopios XMM-Newton y Chandra en el intervalo 0.3-10 keV. Se encontró un modelo aceptable que consiste en la emisión del continuo variable, absorbida por 3 fases ionizadas -absorbedores tibios- con diferentes grados de ionización. Una de las fases absorbedoras está respondiendo a la variabilidad de la emisión del continuo. Presentamos nuestros resultad...

  10. Modeling category-level purchase timing with brand-level marketing variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); R. Paap (Richard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPurchase timing of households is usually modeled at the category level. Marketing efforts are however only available at the brand level. Hence, to describe category-level interpurchase times using marketing efforts one has to construct a category-level measure of marketing efforts from

  11. The first-passage time distribution for the diffusion model with variable drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blurton, Steven Paul; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Gondan, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The Ratcliff diffusion model is now arguably the most widely applied model for response time data. Its major advantage is its description of both response times and the probabilities for correct as well as incorrect responses. The model assumes a Wiener process with drift between two constant abs...

  12. Speed, variability, and timing of motor output in ADHD: which measures are useful for endophenotypic research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Altink, Marieke E.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Beem, Leo; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Buitelaar, Jan; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) shares a genetic basis with motor coordination problems and probably motor timing problems. In line with this, comparable problems in motor timing should be observed in first degree relatives and might, therefore, form a suitable endophenotypic

  13. Fe–K LINE TIME VARIABILITY AND Ni ABUNDANCE OF DISTANT REFLECTORS IN SEYFERT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furui, Shun’ya; Hayashi, Kazuma; Ohno, Masanori; Hiragi, Kazuyoshi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Noda, Hirofumi, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Nishina Center, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We have performed systematic studies of narrow Fe–K line (6.4 keV) flux variability and Ni–K line intensity for Seyfert galaxies, using Suzaku and XMM-Newton archival data. Significant Fe–K line variability of several tens of percent was detected for a pair of observations separated by 1000–2000 days (Cen A, IC 4329 A, NGC 3516, and NGC 4151) and 158 days (NGC 3516). These timescales are larger by a factor of 10–100 than the inner radius of the torus, consistent with the view that X-ray reflection by a torus is a main origin for a narrow Fe–K line. The Ni–K line was detected with a >2σ level for the Circinus galaxy, Cen A, MRK 3, NGC 4388, and NGC 4151. A mean and variance of the Ni–Kα to Fe–Kα line intensity ratios are 0.066 and 0.026, respectively. Comparing this with the Monte-Carlo simulation of reflection, the Ni to Fe abundance ratio is 1.9 ± 0.8 solar. We discuss the results and the possibility of Ni abundance enhancement.

  14. Repairable queue with non-exponential service time and variable breakdown rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khew, Koh Siew; Hin, Pooi Ah; Fei, Tan Yi

    2015-05-01

    Consider a single server queue in which the service station may breakdown according to a Poisson process with rates γ in busy time and γ' in idle time respectively. After a breakdown, the service station will be repaired immediately and the repair time is assumed to have an exponential distribution with rate δ. Suppose the arrival time has an exponential distribution with rate λ, and the probability density function g(t) and the cumulative distribution function G(t) of the service time are such that the rate g(t)/[1 - G(t)] tends to a constant as t tends to infinity. When the queue is in a stationary state, we derive a set of equations for the probabilities of the queue length and the states of the arrival and service processes. Solving the equations, we obtain approximate results for the stationary probabilities which can be used to obtain the stationary queue length distribution of the system.

  15. Variable-Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: I. Time-Optimized Sedimentation Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jia; Metrick, Michael; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2015-08-18

    Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a gold standard for the rigorous determination of macromolecular buoyant molar masses and the thermodynamic study of reversible interactions in solution. A significant experimental drawback is the long time required to attain SE, which is usually on the order of days. We have developed a method for time-optimized SE (toSE) with defined time-varying centrifugal fields that allow SE to be attained in a significantly (up to 10-fold) shorter time than is usually required. To achieve this, numerical Lamm equation solutions for sedimentation in time-varying fields are computed based on initial estimates of macromolecular transport properties. A parameterized rotor-speed schedule is optimized with the goal of achieving a minimal time to equilibrium while limiting transient sample preconcentration at the base of the solution column. The resulting rotor-speed schedule may include multiple over- and underspeeding phases, balancing the formation of gradients from strong sedimentation fluxes with periods of high diffusional transport. The computation is carried out in a new software program called TOSE, which also facilitates convenient experimental implementation. Further, we extend AUC data analysis to sedimentation processes in such time-varying centrifugal fields. Due to the initially high centrifugal fields in toSE and the resulting strong migration, it is possible to extract sedimentation coefficient distributions from the early data. This can provide better estimates of the size of macromolecular complexes and report on sample homogeneity early on, which may be used to further refine the prediction of the rotor-speed schedule. In this manner, the toSE experiment can be adapted in real time to the system under study, maximizing both the information content and the time efficiency of SE experiments. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Variable-Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: I. Time-Optimized Sedimentation Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jia; Metrick, Michael; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a gold standard for the rigorous determination of macromolecular buoyant molar masses and the thermodynamic study of reversible interactions in solution. A significant experimental drawback is the long time required to attain SE, which is usually on the order of days. We have developed a method for time-optimized SE (toSE) with defined time-varying centrifugal fields that allow SE to be attained in a significantly (up to 10-fold) shorter time than is usually required. To achieve this, numerical Lamm equation solutions for sedimentation in time-varying fields are computed based on initial estimates of macromolecular transport properties. A parameterized rotor-speed schedule is optimized with the goal of achieving a minimal time to equilibrium while limiting transient sample preconcentration at the base of the solution column. The resulting rotor-speed schedule may include multiple over- and underspeeding phases, balancing the formation of gradients from strong sedimentation fluxes with periods of high diffusional transport. The computation is carried out in a new software program called TOSE, which also facilitates convenient experimental implementation. Further, we extend AUC data analysis to sedimentation processes in such time-varying centrifugal fields. Due to the initially high centrifugal fields in toSE and the resulting strong migration, it is possible to extract sedimentation coefficient distributions from the early data. This can provide better estimates of the size of macromolecular complexes and report on sample homogeneity early on, which may be used to further refine the prediction of the rotor-speed schedule. In this manner, the toSE experiment can be adapted in real time to the system under study, maximizing both the information content and the time efficiency of SE experiments. PMID:26287634

  17. Real time heart rate variability assessment from android smartphone camera photoplethysmography: postural and device influences

    OpenAIRE

    Guede Fernández, Federico; Ferrer Mileo, Víctor; Ramos Castro, Juan José; Fernández Chimeno, Mireya; García González, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a smartphone based system for real-time pulse-to-pulse (PP) interval time series acquisition by frame-to-frame camera image processing. The developed smartphone application acquires image frames from built-in rear-camera at the maximum available rate (30 Hz) and the smartphone GPU has been used by Renderscript API for high performance frame-by-frame image acquisition and computing in order to obtain PPG signal and PP interval time se...

  18. Investigation of the short-time variability of tropical tropospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Randriambelo

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, a ground-based tropospheric ozone lidar has been running at Reunion Island and has been involved with a daily measurement campaign that was performed in the latter part of the biomass burning season, during November–December 1999. The averaged ozone profile obtained during November–December 1999 agrees well with the averaged ozone profile obtained from the ozonesondes launch at Reunion during November–December (1992– 2001. Comparing weekly sonde launches (part of the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes: SHADOZ program with the daily ground-based lidar observations shows that some striking features of the day-to-day variability profiles are not observed in the sonde measurements. Ozone profiles respond to the nature of disturbances which vary from one day to the next. The vertical ozone distribution at Reunion is examined as a function of prevailing atmospheric circulation. Back trajectories show that most of the enhanced ozone crossed over biomass burning and convectively active regions in Madagascar and the southern African continent. The analyses of the meteorological data show that ozone stratification profiles are in agreement with the movement of the synoptic situations in November–December 1999. Three different sequences of transport are explained using wind fields. The first sequence from 23 to 25 November is characterized by northerly transport; during the second sequence from 26 to 30 November, the air masses are influenced by meridional transport. The third sequence from 2 to 6 December is characterized by westerly transport associated with the sub-tropical jet stream. The large, standard deviations of lidar profiles in the middle and upper troposphere are in agreement with the upper wind variabilities which evidence passing ridge and trough disturbances. During the transition period between the dry season and the wet season, multiple ozone sources including stratosphere-troposphere exchanges, convection

  19. Investigation of the short-time variability of tropical tropospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Randriambelo

    Full Text Available Since 1998, a ground-based tropospheric ozone lidar has been running at Reunion Island and has been involved with a daily measurement campaign that was performed in the latter part of the biomass burning season, during November–December 1999. The averaged ozone profile obtained during November–December 1999 agrees well with the averaged ozone profile obtained from the ozonesondes launch at Reunion during November–December (1992– 2001. Comparing weekly sonde launches (part of the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes: SHADOZ program with the daily ground-based lidar observations shows that some striking features of the day-to-day variability profiles are not observed in the sonde measurements. Ozone profiles respond to the nature of disturbances which vary from one day to the next. The vertical ozone distribution at Reunion is examined as a function of prevailing atmospheric circulation. Back trajectories show that most of the enhanced ozone crossed over biomass burning and convectively active regions in Madagascar and the southern African continent. The analyses of the meteorological data show that ozone stratification profiles are in agreement with the movement of the synoptic situations in November–December 1999. Three different sequences of transport are explained using wind fields. The first sequence from 23 to 25 November is characterized by northerly transport; during the second sequence from 26 to 30 November, the air masses are influenced by meridional transport. The third sequence from 2 to 6 December is characterized by westerly transport associated with the sub-tropical jet stream. The large, standard deviations of lidar profiles in the middle and upper troposphere are in agreement with the upper wind variabilities which evidence passing ridge and trough disturbances. During the transition period between the dry season and the wet season, multiple ozone sources including stratosphere-troposphere exchanges, convection

  20. Rapid detection of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia using combined three-hour short-incubation matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS identification and Alere Culture Colony PBP2a detection test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delport, Johannes Andries; Mohorovic, Ivor; Burn, Sandi; McCormick, John Kenneth; Schaus, David; Lannigan, Robert; John, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection is responsible for significant morbidity, with mortality rates as high as 60 % if not treated appropriately. We describe a rapid method to detect MRSA in blood cultures using a combined three-hour short-incubation BRUKER matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS BioTyper protocol and a qualitative immunochromatographic assay, the Alere Culture Colony Test PBP2a detection test. We compared this combined method with a molecular method detecting the nuc and mecA genes currently performed in our laboratory. One hundred and seventeen S. aureus blood cultures were tested of which 35 were MRSA and 82 were meticillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). The rapid combined test correctly identified 100 % (82/82) of the MSSA and 85.7 % (30/35) of the MRSA after 3 h. There were five false negative results where the isolates were correctly identified as S. aureus, but PBP2a was not detected by the Culture Colony Test. The combined method has a sensitivity of 87.5 %, specificity of 100 %, a positive predictive value of 100 % and a negative predictive value of 94.3 % with the prevalence of MRSA in our S. aureus blood cultures. The combined rapid method offers a significant benefit to early detection of MRSA in positive blood cultures.

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery for pediatric patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations: variables that may affect obliteration time and probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván De la Cruz, O O; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P; Moreno-Jiménez, S; Celis, M A; García-Garduño, O A

    2015-02-01

    It is debatable whether pediatric patients diagnosed with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) should be treated as adults. Several indexes to classify AVMs have been proposed in the literature, and most try to predict the outcome for each specific treatment. The indexes differ in the variables considered, but they are all based in adult populations. In this study, we analyzed the variables that influence the obliteration time and probability of occurrence in a Mexican pediatric population diagnosed with an AVM and treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We analyzed 45 pediatric patients (eloquent region, there was a tendency of a shorter obliteration time (p=0.071). None of the previously proposed indexes for adults predict obliteration in this pediatric population. Treatment technique, eloquence and follow up time were the only variables that showed influence in obliteration. Since the highest probability of obliteration occurs during the first three years, if the nidus has not been obliterated after this time then another treatment option could be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the measurement and valuation of travel time variability due to incidents on freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Incidents on freeways frequently cause long, unanticipated delays, increasing the economic cost of travel to motorists. This paper provides a simple model for estimating the mean and variance of time lost due to incidents on freeways. It also reviews...

  3. The Effect of Formulation, Process, and Method Variables on the Reconstitution Time in Dual Chamber Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werk, Tobias; Ludwig, Imke S; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Luemkemann, Joerg; Huwyler, Joerg; Hafner, Mathias

    Reconstitution time of dried products is influenced by various factors including formulation, process, and reconstitution method itself. This manuscript describes factors affecting reconstitution in a dual chamber syringe using highly concentrated human monoclonal antibody and bovine serum albumin model formulations. Freezing and drying conditions had only minor impact on the reconstitution time, whereas the primary container and thus the geometry of the lyophilization cake played a major role. Prewarmed diluent and agitation decreased reconstitution time. For effective agitation, short displacements and high agitation frequencies were found to be desirable conditions to minimize reconstitution time for a given lyophilization cake while foam formation was minimized. The article also provides general strategies (e.g., reduction of lyophilized cake density, use of an optimized fill finish process, and suitable method parameters) to reduce reconstitution time, especially for drug product presented in a dual chamber syringe configuration. Dried drug products need to be reconstituted to a liquid form before being applied parenteral. Reconstitution time is an important attribute and needs to be as fast as possible in order to serve patients' compliance. Reconstitution time is influenced by various factors including formulation, process, and the reconstitution method itself. The article provides general strategies (e.g., reduction of dried drug product cake density, use of an optimized fill finish process, and suitable method parameters) to reduce reconstitution time, especially for drug product presented in a dual chamber syringe. Fast reconstitution of lyophilisates in dual chamber syringe can be achieved by a combination of optimized manufacturing procedures and clear instructions for the end-user (e.g., roll syringe between palms to warm and agitate it to accelerate reconstitution). © PDA, Inc. 2016.

  4. Variability of scaling time series in the Arctic sea-ice drift dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The motion of an individual ice floe in the Arctic Ocean was monitored at the Russian research station North Pole 35 established on the ice pack in 2008. The ice floe speed (V was found to be correlated with wind speed (v in main features, such as the positions of maxima and minima of V and v. However, the fine structure of the V-variation cannot be explained by the wind forcing alone. There were periods of time when the floe drift was affected by the interactions of ice floes between each other or by the periodical forcing due to either the Coriolis inertia effect or the tidal activity. These data were compared with the "waiting times" statistics that are the distributions of time intervals between subsequent, sufficiently strong changes in the kinetic energy of drifting ice floe. These distributions were measured in several time windows differing in the average wind speed and wind direction, and/or in the mechanical state of the ice pack. The distribution functions N (t>τ, where N is the number of successive events of energy change separated by the time interval t that exceeds τ, constructed in different time windows demonstrate fractal or a multifractal nature of the time series during motion in the consolidated ice pack but were truly random when the ice floe drifted in the highly fragmented sea ice. The latter result shows the existence of a relationship between the long-range mechanical interactions in the pack and long-term memory (time scaling behaviour of the sea-ice motion.

  5. Flexible and scalable methods for quantifying stochastic variability in the era of massive time-domain astronomical data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Brandon C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Sobolewska, Malgosia [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Siemiginowska, Aneta [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Uttley, Phil [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-10

    We present the use of continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models as a method for estimating the variability features of a light curve, and in particular its power spectral density (PSD). CARMA models fully account for irregular sampling and measurement errors, making them valuable for quantifying variability, forecasting and interpolating light curves, and variability-based classification. We show that the PSD of a CARMA model can be expressed as a sum of Lorentzian functions, which makes them extremely flexible and able to model a broad range of PSDs. We present the likelihood function for light curves sampled from CARMA processes, placing them on a statistically rigorous foundation, and we present a Bayesian method to infer the probability distribution of the PSD given the measured light curve. Because calculation of the likelihood function scales linearly with the number of data points, CARMA modeling scales to current and future massive time-domain data sets. We conclude by applying our CARMA modeling approach to light curves for an X-ray binary, two active galactic nuclei, a long-period variable star, and an RR Lyrae star in order to illustrate their use, applicability, and interpretation.

  6. Optimal sleep duration in the subarctic with respect to obesity risk is 8-9 hours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Trude Johnsen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sleep duration, chronotype and social jetlag have been associated with body mass index (BMI and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables. The aims of our study were to examine the associations between sleep variables and body composition for people living in the subarctic, taking a range of variables into consideration, including lifestyle variables, health variables and biological factors. METHODS: The cross sectional population Tromsø Study was conducted in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle. 6413 persons aged 30-65 years completed questionnaires including self-reported sleep times, lifestyle and health. They also measured height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and biological factors (non-fasting serum level of cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The study period was from 1 October 2007 to 19 December 2008. RESULTS: The optimal sleep length regarding BMI and waist circumference was found to be 8-9 hours. Short sleepers (<6 h had about 80% increased risk of being in the BMI≥25 kg/m2 group and male short sleepers had doubled risk of having waist circumference ≥102 cm compared to 8-9 hours sleepers. We found no impact of chronotype or social jetlag on BMI or abdominal obesity after controlling for health, lifestyle, and biological parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In our subarctic population, the optimal sleep duration time regarding risk of overweight and abdominal obesity was 8-9 hours, which is one hour longer compared to findings from other studies. Short sleepers had 80% increased risk of being overweight, and men had a doubled risk of having abdominal obesity. We found no associations between chronotype or social jetlag and BMI or abdominal obesity, when we took a range of life-style, health and biological variables into

  7. Optimal sleep duration in the subarctic with respect to obesity risk is 8-9 hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, May Trude; Wynn, Rolf; Bratlid, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Sleep duration, chronotype and social jetlag have been associated with body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity. The optimal sleep duration regarding BMI has previously been found to be 7-8 hours, but these studies have not been carried out in the subarctic or have lacked some central variables. The aims of our study were to examine the associations between sleep variables and body composition for people living in the subarctic, taking a range of variables into consideration, including lifestyle variables, health variables and biological factors. The cross sectional population Tromsø Study was conducted in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle. 6413 persons aged 30-65 years completed questionnaires including self-reported sleep times, lifestyle and health. They also measured height, weight, waist and hip circumference, and biological factors (non-fasting serum level of cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose). The study period was from 1 October 2007 to 19 December 2008. The optimal sleep length regarding BMI and waist circumference was found to be 8-9 hours. Short sleepers (hours sleepers. We found no impact of chronotype or social jetlag on BMI or abdominal obesity after controlling for health, lifestyle, and biological parameters. In our subarctic population, the optimal sleep duration time regarding risk of overweight and abdominal obesity was 8-9 hours, which is one hour longer compared to findings from other studies. Short sleepers had 80% increased risk of being overweight, and men had a doubled risk of having abdominal obesity. We found no associations between chronotype or social jetlag and BMI or abdominal obesity, when we took a range of life-style, health and biological variables into consideration.

  8. Plasma Beta-Trace Protein as a Marker of Residual Renal Function: The Effect of Different Hemodialysis Modalities and Intra-Individual Variability over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaryllis H. van Craenenbroeck

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Beta-trace protein (BTP is a low-molecular-weight molecule, which may be used to assess residual renal function (RRF in dialysis patients. Here we evaluated the influence of hemodialysis (HD and hemodiafiltration (HDF on plasma BTP, and analyzed the inter- and intra-individual variability of plasma BTP over time in HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Methods: In 12 prevalent HD patients, the effect of a single session of low-flux HD, high-flux HD and HDF on plasma BTP was studied. Blood samples were taken at baseline, after 120 and 240 minutes, and at the start of the next dialysis session. In 13 HD patients and 10 PD patients, inter- and intra-individual variability over three months was studied (monthly and weekly, respectively. Plasma BTP was measured using a nephelometric method. Results: No significant decrease in plasma BTP was seen following a session of low-flux HD. Both high-flux HD and HDF resulted in a significant decrease immediately after dialysis (22% and 61% median decrease, respectively. A significant reduction of the molecule persisted only in HDF and a significant decrease (-15% was still found immediately before the start of the next dialysis session. In both HD and PD patients, the reproducibility over time was excellent with intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.96 (0.93-0.99 and 0.92 (0.86-0.99 respectively. In a small cohort of PD patients, fair agreement existed between mGFR (average of renal urea and creatinine clearance from a 24 hours urine collection and the BTP-based GFR estimation. Conclusion: BTP is a stable marker and a promising tool for RRF estimations in PD and HD patients. In patients receiving HDF, plasma levels of BTP should be interpreted with caution.

  9. Space-time soil moisture variability for two different land use types: analysis at the plot scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuecco, Giulia; Borga, Marco; Penna, Daniele; Canone, Davide; Ferraris, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Understanding space-time soil moisture variability at various scales is a key issue in hydrological research. At the plot scale soil moisture variability is expected to be explained by physical factors such as soil hydraulic properties, local topography and vegetation cover. This study aims to: i) characterize the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture at the plot scale at two soil depths and for two different types of land use (meadow and vineyard); ii) investigate the role of vegetation cover on the seasonal variability of soil moisture; iii) assess the capability of a dynamic model to explain soil moisture variability and the control exerted by land use. The work is based on soil moisture data collected on a plot (about 200 m2) in Grugliasco (Po River basin, Northern Italy) by means of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements. The plot is divided into two subplots: one covered by grapevine plants, the other covered homogeneously by grass. The soil is sandy, the slope is about 1%, and there is a buffer grass area about 20 m wide around the measurement field. The characteristics of the site allow to isolate the contribution of soil hydraulic properties and land use to space-time soil moisture variability. We used the data of 40 probes distributed in the two subplots, vertically inserted into the soil at 0-30 cm and 0-60 cm depths. Precipitation and temperature are recorded continuously on site. Statistics were computed based on soil moisture measurements collected continuously at daily time step over three years (2006-2008). Results show that soil moisture spatial patterns at the two sampling depths are highly correlated for both land uses. Higher values of mean soil moisture at 0-60 cm depth with respect to 0-30 cm for both types of land use likely reflect the evaporation processes affecting more the surface layer. Spatial mean soil moisture is always higher in the vineyard than in the meadow (especially at 0-30 cm depth), implying the influence of

  10. Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xue, Liang; Vargas, Rodrigo; Noakes, Scott; Hu, Xinping; Signorini, Sergio R.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Feely, Richard A.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Sabine, Christopher; Musielewicz, Sylvia; Chen, Baoshan; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2017-08-01

    Marine carbonate system monitoring programs often consist of multiple observational methods that include underway cruise data, moored autonomous time series, and discrete water bottle samples. Monitored parameters include all, or some of the following: partial pressure of CO2 of the water (pCO2w) and air, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and pH. Any combination of at least two of the aforementioned parameters can be used to calculate the others. In this study at the Gray's Reef (GR) mooring in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) we: examine the internal consistency of pCO2w from underway cruise, moored autonomous time series, and calculated from bottle samples (DIC-TA pairing); describe the seasonal to interannual pCO2w time series variability and air-sea flux (FCO2), as well as describe the potential sources of pCO2w variability; and determine the source/sink for atmospheric pCO2. Over the 8.5 years of GR mooring time series, mooring-underway and mooring-bottle calculated-pCO2w strongly correlate with r-values > 0.90. pCO2w and FCO2 time series follow seasonal thermal patterns; however, seasonal non-thermal processes, such as terrestrial export, net biological production, and air-sea exchange also influence variability. The linear slope of time series pCO2w increases by 5.2 ± 1.4 μatm y-1 with FCO2 increasing 51-70 mmol m-2 y-1. The net FCO2 sign can switch interannually with the magnitude varying greatly. Non-thermal pCO2w is also increasing over the time series, likely indicating that terrestrial export and net biological processes drive the long term pCO2w increase.

  11. Variability of Green Time to Discharge a Specified Number of Queued Vehicles at a Signalized Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the headway distribution of queued vehicles (less than 16 vehicles at signalized intersections. Existing studies usually take the average statistics of headway at any queuing place. When different percentile points of statistical data are assigned to headway, the passing rate (the rate of all queued vehicles passing the stop line under the ideal signal timing scheme varies. When selecting the mean value, the passing rate of a queue of fewer than 16 vehicles is no more than 65%. When selecting 75% as the percentile, the passing rate is up to 94%. The queue length also decides the assigned percentile of headway to ensure the passing rate reaches a certain level. The value assignation of headway directly affects lane capacity and start-up loss time. This paper provides a new perspective on parameter calibration and will make the signal timing algorithm method more effective.

  12. Time Variable Gravity from Weekly Solutions from 1993 to 2010 using SLR and DORIS data and Comparisons with GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, D. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Le Bail, K.; Luthcke, S. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    GRACE has been routinely monitoring the time-variable gravity field of the Earth since 2003 with either periodic solutions expressed as spherical harmonics or mascons. GRACE can resolve time-variable gravity to between degree 40 and 60, however the time series may be interrupted prior to the launch of a GRACE-2 spacecraft. A suite of satellites tracked by SLR, DORIS and also GPS has been in orbit for many years, and with these satellites it is possible to construct a time series of low degree spherical harmonics over several decades. We have recently reprocessed SLR and DORIS data from 1993 to 2010 using ITRF2008 and have developed weekly solutions based on SLR data to Lageos1, Lageos2, Starlette, Stella, Ajisai, Larets, TOPEX/Poseidon, Envisat, the SPOT satellites, and Jason-2. The new C20 solutions compare favorably to independent SLR solutions, however the annual amplitude in the SLR solutions is greater than in the annual amplitude of the C20 recoveries from GRACE-derived solutions. For non-zonal low degree coefficients, the GRACE and SLR time series seem in reasonable agreement over the time period where the data are in common. We summarize the current status of the processing, and the quality of the solutions that have been obtained thus far, and provide a perspective on future work that remains to be done.

  13. Fast Determination of Distribution-Connected PV Impacts Using a Variable Time-Step Quasi-Static Time-Series Approach: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, Barry

    2017-08-24

    The increasing deployment of distribution-connected photovoltaic (DPV) systems requires utilities to complete complex interconnection studies. Relatively simple interconnection study methods worked well for low penetrations of photovoltaic systems, but more complicated quasi-static time-series (QSTS) analysis is required to make better interconnection decisions as DPV penetration levels increase. Tools and methods must be developed to support this. This paper presents a variable-time-step solver for QSTS analysis that significantly shortens the computational time and effort to complete a detailed analysis of the operation of a distribution circuit with many DPV systems. Specifically, it demonstrates that the proposed variable-time-step solver can reduce the required computational time by as much as 84% without introducing any important errors to metrics, such as the highest and lowest voltage occurring on the feeder, number of voltage regulator tap operations, and total amount of losses realized in the distribution circuit during a 1-yr period. Further improvement in computational speed is possible with the introduction of only modest errors in these metrics, such as a 91 percent reduction with less than 5 percent error when predicting voltage regulator operations.

  14. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  15. Pure radiation in space-time models that admit integration of the eikonal equation by the separation of variables method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osetrin, Evgeny; Osetrin, Konstantin

    2017-11-01

    We consider space-time models with pure radiation, which admit integration of the eikonal equation by the method of separation of variables. For all types of these models, the equations of the energy-momentum conservation law are integrated. The resulting form of metric, energy density, and wave vectors of radiation as functions of metric for all types of spaces under consideration is presented. The solutions obtained can be used for any metric theories of gravitation.

  16. Space-time variability of hydrological drought and wetness in Iran using NCEP/NCAR and GPCC datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raziei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Space-time variability of hydrological drought and wetness over Iran is investigated using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC dataset for the common period 1948–2007. The aim is to complement previous studies on the detection of long-term trends in drought/wetness time series and on the applicability of reanalysis data for drought monitoring in Iran. Climate conditions of the area are assessed through the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI on 24-month time scale, while Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Varimax rotation are used for investigating drought/wetness variability, and drought regionalization, respectively. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA is applied to the time series of interest to extract the leading nonlinear components and compare them with linear fittings.

    Differences in drought and wetness area coverage resulting from the two datasets are discussed also in relation to the change occurred in recent years. NCEP/NCAR and GPCC are in good agreement in identifying four sub-regions as principal spatial modes of drought variability. However, the climate variability in each area is not univocally represented by the two datasets: a good agreement is found for south-eastern and north-western regions, while noticeable discrepancies occur for central and Caspian sea regions. A comparison with NCEP Reanalysis II for the period 1979–2007, seems to exclude that the discrepancies are merely due to the introduction of satellite data into the reanalysis assimilation scheme.

  17. Comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational male marathoners and 24-hour ultramarathoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Patrizia Knechtle,2 Thomas Rosemann11Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, SwitzerlandBackground: Of the anthropometry and training variables used to predict race performance in a 24-hour ultrarun, the personal best marathon time is the strongest predictor in recreational male 24-hour ultramarathoners. This finding raises the question of whether similarities exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners.Methods: The association between age, anthropometric variables (ie, body mass, body height, body mass index, percent body fat, skeletal muscle mass, limb circumference, and skinfold thickness at the pectoral, mid axillary, triceps, subscapular, abdominal, suprailiac, front thigh, and medial calf sites, previous experience and training characteristics (ie, volume, speed, and personal best time, and race time for 79 male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and 126 male recreational marathoners was investigated using bivariate and multivariate analysis.Results: The 24-hour ultramarathoners were older (P < 0.05, had a lower circumference at both the upper arm (P < 0.05 and thigh (P < 0.01, and a lower skinfold thickness at the pectoral, axillary, and suprailiac sites (P < 0.05 compared with the marathoners. During training, the 24-hour ultramarathoners were running for more hours per week (P < 0.001 and completed more kilometers (P < 0.001, but were running slower (P < 0.01 compared with the marathoners. In the 24-hour ultramarathoners, neither anthropometric nor training variables were associated with kilometers completed in the race (P > 0.05. In the marathoners, percent body fat (P < 0.001 and running speed during training (P < 0.0001 were related to marathon race times.Conclusion: In summary, differences in anthropometric and training predictor variables do

  18. Inter and intra-observer variability of time-lapse annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundvall Germeys, Linda Karin M; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Knudsen, Ulla Breth

    Study question: How consistent is the time-lapse annotation of dynamic and static morphologic parameters of embryo development, within and between observers? Summary answer: The assessment of dynamic parameters is characterized by almost perfect agreement within and between observers. What is kno...

  19. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB080310

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vreeswijk, P.M.; De Cia, A.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    .42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied...

  20. Continuous Descent Approaches with Variable Flight-Path Angles under Time Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sopjes, R.; De Jong, P.M.A.; Borst, C.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce noise nuisance around Schiphol Airport, a Continuous Descent Approach procedure was introduced in the late ’90s. Unfortunately, because unpredictable individual aircraft behavior lead to increased landing intervals for this procedure, it is currently only applied during night time

  1. Triclustering Georeferenced Time Series for Analyzing Patterns of Intra-Annual Variability in Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zurita-Milla, R.; Izquierdo Verdiguier, E.; Kraak, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Clustering is often used to explore patterns in georeferenced time series (GTS). Most clustering studies, however, only analyze GTS from one or two dimension(s) and are not capable of the simultaneous analysis of the data from three dimensions: spatial, temporal, and any third (e.g., attribute)

  2. Optimal conservation resource allocation under variable economic and ecological time discounting rates in boreal forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Montesino Pouzols, Federico; Mönkkönen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    an optimal resource allocation by accounting for budget size and habitat availability of indicator species in different forest types. We also accounted for the perspective adopted towards sustainability, modeled via temporal preference and economic and ecological time discounting. Controversially, we found...

  3. Estimating space-time mean concentrations of nutrients in surface waters of variable depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knotters, M.; Brus, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    A monitoring scheme has been designed to test whether the space-time mean concentration total Nitrogen (N-total) in the surface water in the Northern Frisian Woodlands (NFW, The Netherlands) complies with standards of the European Water Framework directive. Since in statistical testing for

  4. Time-variable gravity fields derived from GPS tracking of Swarm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; de Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Klokočnik, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Since 2002 Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides monthly gravity fields from K-band ranging (KBR) between two GRACE satellites. These KBR gravity monthlies have enabled the global observation of time-varying Earth mass signal at a regional scale (about 400 km resolution). Apart

  5. Real time heart rate variability assessment from Android smartphone camera photoplethysmography: Postural and device influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guede-Fernandez, F; Ferrer-Mileo, V; Ramos-Castro, J; Fernandez-Chimeno, M; Garcia-Gonzalez, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a smartphone based system for real-time pulse-to-pulse (PP) interval time series acquisition by frame-to-frame camera image processing. The developed smartphone application acquires image frames from built-in rear-camera at the maximum available rate (30 Hz) and the smartphone GPU has been used by Renderscript API for high performance frame-by-frame image acquisition and computing in order to obtain PPG signal and PP interval time series. The relative error of mean heart rate is negligible. In addition, measurement posture and the employed smartphone model influences on the beat-to-beat error measurement of heart rate and HRV indices have been analyzed. Then, the standard deviation of the beat-to-beat error (SDE) was 7.81 ± 3.81 ms in the worst case. Furthermore, in supine measurement posture, significant device influence on the SDE has been found and the SDE is lower with Samsung S5 than Motorola X. This study can be applied to analyze the reliability of different smartphone models for HRV assessment from real-time Android camera frames processing.

  6. Assessing temperature changes in cortical bone using variable flip-angle ultrashort echo-time MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misung; Scott, Serena J.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonakar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Krug, Roland

    2017-03-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation is a promising, noninvasive method for treatment of bone tumors and palliation of pain. During thermal therapy, temperature mapping is necessary to ensure proper heat deposition in targeted tumors as well as to prevent unnecessary heating in surrounding tissues. Conventional MR thermometry exploits the proton resonant frequency shift of water protons, which normally requires a long echo time; therefore, this method is not appropriate for cortical bone due to its short T2* relaxation time. This work demonstrates that ultrashort echo-time MRI can characterize T1 changes in cortical bone caused by temperature changes. Ex vivo experiments were performed to heat diaphysis segments of bovine femurs with an interstitial ultrasound applicator. The T1 increase in the heated parts of cortical bone was observed. The temerature dependence of T1 in cortical born was also assessed by heating bovine bone samples in a temperature-controlled water bath. T1 mapping of cortical bone enabled by ultrashort echo-time MRI might allow for more accurate characterization of thermal dose during treatment of bone tumors.

  7. a time series analysis of climate variability and its impacts on food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    North Shewa is among the areas in Ethiopia hardest hit by climate change (CC), mainly through frequent occurrence of CC induced hazards like flooding, insect outbreaks, hailstorm, alien weeds, disease and pests, droughts and all others which are a result of CC. Time series data collected from the Central Statistical ...

  8. Variability in the Composition of Floating Microplastics by Region and in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, J. L.; Pavlekovsky, K.; Collins, T.; Andrady, A. L.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Lavender Law, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Floating microplastics have been documented in all the subtropical oceans and in many regional seas, yet their origin and weathering history are largely unknown. To identify potential indicators of sources of microplastic debris and changes in input over time, we analyzed nearly 3,000 plastic particles collected using a surface-towing plankton net between 1991 and 2014, collected in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, in the Mediterranean Sea, and across the western North Atlantic basin including the subtropical gyre and coastal locations near urban areas. For each particle we analyzed particle form, size (longest dimension and 2-D surface area), mass, color characteristics and polymer type. We hypothesize that regional differences in average or median particle mass and size are a relative indicator of age (time of exposure), where accumulation zones that retain particles for long periods of time have statistically smaller fragments compared to regions closer to presumed sources. Differences in particle form (i.e., fragment, pellet, foam, line/fiber, film) might also reflect proximity to sources as well as form-dependent removal mechanisms such as density increase and sinking (Ryan 2015). Finally, changes in particle composition over time in subtropical gyre reservoirs could provide clues about changes in input as well as mechanisms and time scale of removal. Understanding the inputs, reservoirs, and sinks of open ocean microplastics is a necessary first step to evaluating their risks and impacts to marine life. Ryan, P., 2015. Does size and buoyancy affect the long-distance transport of floating debris? Environ. Res. Lett. 10 084019.

  9. The effect of atmospheric variability at intra-seasonal time scale on the SST of the Southwestern Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simionato, Claudia; Clara, Moira Luz; Jaureguizar, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    The Southwestern Atlantic Continental Shelf is characterized by large SST variability which origin remains unknown. In this work, we use blended SST data provided by NOAA CoastWatch Program, which combine the information coming from infrared and microwave sensors to provide daily images of an intermediate spatial resolution (11 km) with a noise floor of less than 0.2 °C. The data base starts at the middle of 2002, when an increase in signal variance is observed due to the fact that the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer became available and as a consequence to its near all-weather coverage. Several years of observations are thus available, and even though the temporal and spatial resolution of these data is intermediate, they are reasonable for observing and characterizing the most significant patterns of SST variability in the (atmospheric) synoptic to intra-seasonal time scales, so as to help on understanding the physical processes which occur in the area and their forcing mechanisms. As we hypothesize that most of the variability in those time scales is wind forced, the study is complemented with the use of atmospheric observations -coming from remote sensing and reanalysis-. To perform the analysis, the long-term trend, inter-annual and seasonal variability are subtracted to the SST data to obtain the signal on intra-seasonal time scales. Then, Principal Components (EOF) analysis is applied to the data and composites of SST and several meteorological variables (wind, sea level pressure, air temperature, OLR, etc.) are computed for the days when the leading modes are active. It is found that the first three modes account for more than 70% of the variance. Modes 1 and 2 seem to be related to atmospheric waves generated in the tropical Pacific. Those waves, through atmospheric teleconnections, affect the SST on the southwestern South Atlantic Continental Shelf very rapidly. The oceanic anomalies exceed 0.7°C and are quite persistent. Mode 2 seems to be

  10. Ozone Nonattainment Areas - 1 Hour

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone - 1hour (Legacy...

  11. Health and psychosocial effects of flexible working hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Janssen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine whether any impairments in health and social lives can be found under different kinds of flexible working hours, and whether such effects are related to specific characteristics of these working hours. METHODS: Two studies - a company based survey (N=660 and an internet survey (N=528 - have been conducted. The first one was a questionnaire study (paper and pencil on employees working under some 'typical' kinds of different flexible working time arrangements in different companies and different occupational fields (health care, manufacturing, retail, administration, call centres. The second study was an internet-based survey, using an adaptation of the questionnaire from the first study. RESULTS: The results of both studies consistently show that high variability of working hours is associated with increased impairments in health and well-being and this is especially true if this variability is company controlled. These effects are less pronounced if variability is self-controlled; however, autonomy does not compensate the effects of variability. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for an appropriate design of flexible working hours should be developed in order to minimize any impairing effects on health and psychosocial well-being; these recommendations should include - besides allowing for discretion in controlling one's (flexible working hours - that variability in flexible working hours should be kept low (or at least moderate, even if this variability is self-controlled.OBJETIVO: Investigar se ocorre prejuízo à saúde e à vida social com diferentes tipos de horas de trabalho flexíveis e se há relação entre estes efeitos e características específicas das horas de trabalho. MÉTODOS: Foram realizados dois estudos, uma pesquisa em uma empresa (N=660 e outra pela Internet (N=528. O primeiro estudo consistiu de um questionário (papel e lápis aplicado a funcionários sujeitos a diferentes ajustes "típicos" de horas de

  12. Variable Viscosity Effects on Time Dependent Magnetic Nanofluid Flow past a Stretchable Rotating Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Paras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to describe the effects of geothermal viscosity with viscous dissipation on the three dimensional time dependent boundary layer flow of magnetic nanofluids due to a stretchable rotating plate in the presence of a porous medium. The modelled governing time dependent equations are transformed a from boundary value problem to an initial value problem, and thereafter solved by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method in MATLAB with a shooting technique for the initial guess. The influences of mixed temperature, depth dependent viscosity, and the rotation strength parameter on the flow field and temperature field generated on the plate surface are investigated. The derived results show direct impact in the problems of heat transfer in high speed computer disks (Herrero et al. [1] and turbine rotor systems (Owen and Rogers [2].

  13. The effect of time variable stress shadows on rates of induced seismicity (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, T.; Becker, D.; Hainzl, S.; Fischer, T.

    2013-12-01

    Stress shadows, i.e. regions where stress is temporarily decreased and not increased, are difficult to identify for natural seismicity, since the overall rate of seismicity is typically small. Fluid injection experiments or mining operations often generate very high rates of induced seismicity, so that stress shadow effects are easily recognized. Well known examples comprise the backfront of seismicity observed during the shut-in phase of hydrofracture experiments, or the Kaiser effect in mining environments if the stress loading is periodic. We present examples of stress shadow effects on induced seismicity. We study the theoretical variation of seismicity rates from time dependent stressing models by means of rate and state frictional models. The controlling parameter are discussed at different reservoir and mining areas, and we discuss the predictability of seismicity rates and decay times. DB has been supported by the German research Foundation under Be4602/1-1.

  14. Accounting for Timing Drift and Variability in Contemporary Electroencepholography (EEG) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    between actual and reported trigger onset time) measured with the Emotiv Epoc EEG headset......................................................10...11 Figure 6. Data recorded using the Emotiv Epoc system in conjunction with a phantom head device. Natively reported data...Alert 2.45*), Biosemi Active2 (ActiView 6.05), Emotiv Epoc (TestBench 1.5.0.3), and Quasar Helmet-Mounted System (HMS) (QStreamer 1.5.1046). All

  15. On a random area variable arising in discrete-time queues and compact directed percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Michael J.

    2004-09-01

    A well-known discrete-time, single-server queueing system with mean arrival rate lgr and mean departure rate mgr is considered from the perspective of the area, A, swept out by the queue occupation process during a busy period. We determine the exact form of the tail of the distribution, Pr(A > x); in particular, we show that Pr(A > x) ~ Cx-1/4 exp(-Dx1/2) for all rgr \

  16. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  17. Achieving Autonomic Computing through the Use of Variability Models at Run-time

    OpenAIRE

    Cetina Englada, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, software needs to dynamically adapt its behavior at run-time in response to changing conditions in the supporting computing infrastructure and in the surrounding physical environment. Adaptability is emerging as a necessary underlying capability, particularly for highly dynamic systems such as context-aware or ubiquitous systems. By automating tasks such as installation, adaptation, or healing, Autonomic Computing envisions computing environments that evolve wi...

  18. Essential Oil Variability and Biological Activities of Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Mast. Wood According to the Extraction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouahri, Abderrahmane; Saka, Boualem; Boudarene, Lynda; Baaliouamer, Aoumeur

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the hydrodistillation (HD) and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) kinetics of essential oil (EO) extracted from Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Mast. wood was conducted, in order to assess the impact of extraction time and technique on chemical composition and biological activities. Gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry analyses showed significant differences between the extracted EOs, where each family class or component presents a specific kinetic according to extraction time, technique and especially for the major components: camphene, linalool, cedrol, carvacrol and α-acorenol. Furthermore, our findings showed a high variability for both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, where each activity has a specific effect according to extraction time and technique. The highlighted variability reflects the high impact of extraction time and technique on chemical composition and biological activities, which led to conclude that we should select EOs to be investigated carefully depending on extraction time and technique, in order to isolate the bioactive components or to have the best quality of EO in terms of biological activities and preventive effects in food. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  19. Strikingly variable divergence times inferred across an Amazonian butterfly ‘suture zone’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnett, Alaine; Zimmermann, Marie; Willmott, Keith R; Herrera, Nimiadina; Mallarino, Ricardo; Simpson, Fraser; Joron, Mathieu; Lamas, Gerardo; Mallet, James

    2005-01-01

    ‘Suture zones’ are areas where hybrid and contact zones of multiple taxa are clustered. Such zones have been regarded as strong evidence for allopatric divergence by proponents of the Pleistocene forest refugia theory, a vicariance hypothesis frequently used to explain diversification in the Amazon basin. A central prediction of the refugia and other vicariance theories is that the taxa should have a common history so that divergence times should be coincident among taxa. A suture zone for Ithomiinae butterflies near Tarapoto, NE Peru, was therefore studied to examine divergence times of taxa in contact across the zone. We sequenced 1619 bp of the mitochondrial COI/COII region in 172 individuals of 31 species from across the suture zone. Inferred divergence times differed remarkably, with divergence between some pairs of widespread species (each of which may have two or more subspecies interacting in the zone, as in the genus Melinaea) being considerably less than that between hybridizing subspecies in other genera (for instance in Oleria). Our data therefore strongly refute a simple hypothesis of simultaneous vicariance and suggest that ongoing parapatric or other modes of differentiation in continuous forest may be important in driving diversification in Amazonia. PMID:16271979

  20. Application of six sigma and AHP in analysis of variable lead time calibration process instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimantho, Dino; Rahman, Tomy Abdul; Cahyadi, Bambang; Tina Hernawati, S.

    2017-02-01

    Calibration of instrumentation equipment in the pharmaceutical industry is an important activity to determine the true value of a measurement. Preliminary studies indicated that occur lead-time calibration resulted in disruption of production and laboratory activities. This study aimed to analyze the causes of lead-time calibration. Several methods used in this study such as, Six Sigma in order to determine the capability process of the calibration instrumentation of equipment. Furthermore, the method of brainstorming, Pareto diagrams, and Fishbone diagrams were used to identify and analyze the problems. Then, the method of Hierarchy Analytical Process (AHP) was used to create a hierarchical structure and prioritize problems. The results showed that the value of DPMO around 40769.23 which was equivalent to the level of sigma in calibration equipment approximately 3,24σ. This indicated the need for improvements in the calibration process. Furthermore, the determination of problem-solving strategies Lead Time Calibration such as, shortens the schedule preventive maintenance, increase the number of instrument Calibrators, and train personnel. Test results on the consistency of the whole matrix of pairwise comparisons and consistency test showed the value of hierarchy the CR below 0.1.