WorldWideScience

Sample records for hotspot field evaluation

  1. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  2. Hotspots Detection from Trajectory Data Based on Spatiotemporal Data Field Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, K.; Zhou, Q.; Wu, T.; Xu, Y. Q.

    2017-09-01

    City hotspots refer to the areas where residents visit frequently, and large traffic flow exist, which reflect the people travel patterns and distribution of urban function area. Taxi trajectory data contain abundant information about urban functions and citizen activities, and extracting interesting city hotspots from them can be of importance in urban planning, traffic command, public travel services etc. To detect city hotspots and discover a variety of changing patterns among them, we introduce a data field-based cluster analysis technique to the pick-up and drop-off points of taxi trajectory data and improve the method by introducing the time weight, which has been normalized to estimate the potential value in data field. Thus, in the light of the new potential function in data field, short distance and short time difference play a powerful role. So the region full of trajectory points, which is regarded as hotspots area, has a higher potential value, while the region with thin trajectory points has a lower potential value. The taxi trajectory data of Wuhan city in China on May 1, 6 and 9, 2015, are taken as the experimental data. From the result, we find the sustaining hotspots area and inconstant hotspots area in Wuhan city based on the spatiotemporal data field method. Further study will focus on optimizing parameter and the interaction among hotspots area.

  3. HOTSPOTS DETECTION FROM TRAJECTORY DATA BASED ON SPATIOTEMPORAL DATA FIELD CLUSTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available City hotspots refer to the areas where residents visit frequently, and large traffic flow exist, which reflect the people travel patterns and distribution of urban function area. Taxi trajectory data contain abundant information about urban functions and citizen activities, and extracting interesting city hotspots from them can be of importance in urban planning, traffic command, public travel services etc. To detect city hotspots and discover a variety of changing patterns among them, we introduce a data field-based cluster analysis technique to the pick-up and drop-off points of taxi trajectory data and improve the method by introducing the time weight, which has been normalized to estimate the potential value in data field. Thus, in the light of the new potential function in data field, short distance and short time difference play a powerful role. So the region full of trajectory points, which is regarded as hotspots area, has a higher potential value, while the region with thin trajectory points has a lower potential value. The taxi trajectory data of Wuhan city in China on May 1, 6 and 9, 2015, are taken as the experimental data. From the result, we find the sustaining hotspots area and inconstant hotspots area in Wuhan city based on the spatiotemporal data field method. Further study will focus on optimizing parameter and the interaction among hotspots area.

  4. Application of SVM on satellite images to detect hotspots in Jharia coal field region of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, R.S.; Singh, D.; Mittal, A.; Sajin, P. [Indian Institute for Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2008-07-01

    The present paper deals with the application of Support Vector Machine (SVM) and image analysis techniques on NOAA/AVHRR satellite image to detect hotspots on the Jharia coal field region of India. One of the major advantages of using these satellite data is that the data are free with very good temporal resolution; while, one drawback is that these have low spatial resolution (i.e., approximately 1.1 km at nadir). Therefore, it is important to do research by applying some efficient optimization techniques along with the image analysis techniques to rectify these drawbacks and use satellite images for efficient hotspot detection and monitoring. For this purpose, SVM and multi-threshold techniques are explored for hotspot detection. The multi-threshold algorithm is developed to remove the cloud coverage from the land coverage. This algorithm also highlights the hotspots or fire spots in the suspected regions. SVM has the advantage over multi-thresholding technique that it can learn patterns from the examples and therefore is used to optimize the performance by removing the false points which are highlighted in the threshold technique. Both approaches can be used separately or in combination depending on the size of the image. The RBF (Radial Basis Function) kernel is used in training of three sets of inputs: brightness temperature of channel 3, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI), respectively. This makes a classified image in the output that highlights the hotspot and non-hotspot pixels. The performance of the SVM is also compared with the performance obtained from the neural networks and SVM appears to detect hotspots more accurately (greater than 91% classification accuracy) with lesser false alarm rate. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with the ground based observations of the hotspots.

  5. Simulated impact of self-generated magnetic fields in the hot-spot of NIF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, M. A.; Haan, S. W.; Koning, J.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    Deviations from sphericity in an imploded hot-spot result in magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery effect. The magnetic field can reduce thermal conductivity, affect α transport, change instability growth, and cause magnetic pressure. Previous estimates of these effects have indicated that they are not of great consequence, but have suggested that they could plausibly affect NIF observables such as yield and ion temperature by 5-25%. Using the MHD capability in the Hydra code, we evaluated the impact of these processes in a post-shot model for a typical NIF implosion. Various implosion asymmetries were implemented, with the goal of surveying plausible implosion configurations to find the geometry in which the MHD effects were the most significant. Magnetic fields are estimated to approach 104 Tesla, and to affect conductivity locally by more than 50%, but global impact on observables is small in most cases. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Sam; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information-inside hotspots or in search of them-based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km2. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96.

  7. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of Crozet hotspot alkali basalts : evaluation of the source mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segard, M.; Bezos, A.; La, C.

    2011-12-01

    The isotopic and trace elements compositions of hotspot lavas have clearly shown the presence of distinct mantle reservoirs. However, the sources lithologies responsible for their major elements compositions still remain unclear. This study addresses this issue using a new sample collection from the Crozet hotspot in the Southern Indian Ocean (CAPGEOS field trips 2009-2010). Despite the scarcity of isotopic data for this hotspot (13 samples), previous studies have identified HIMU and/or EM-type end-members in the source of Crozet lavas. This poorly constrained result certainly reflects the lack of a complete geochemical data set. For the first time we report a new and comprehensive set of major and trace elements data for 54 lavas from Crozet hotspot (Possession island). Major elements variations, which define an alkali silica-saturated magmatic suite, are best explained by fractional crystallization, accumulation (ol+cpx), and to a lesser extent magma mixing processes. Primitive lavas (MgO>9 wt.%) display CaO/Al2O3 ratios >1 and low SiO2 contents (45 wt.%), suggesting that these compositions were produced by the partial melting of a garnet bearing peridotitic source or a pyroxenitic source. In order to provide additional constraints on phase equilibria and on the nature of the source, we propose to invert the REE concentrations of Crozet lavas following the method from Hofmann and Feigenson (1983). Variations in LaN/SmN ratio range from 2.5 to 4.7 (for samples with MgO>5 wt.%) suggesting subsequent heterogeneities within the source. We first select samples with MgO contents varying between 5 and 10 wt.% to minimize the effects of crystal fractionation and crystal accumulation. The cogenetic origin of the lavas was ensure by screening their chemical compositions for constant LaN/SmN (here, 3.4±0.4). Primary melts compositions are then calculated by removing the effect of fractional crystallization in two steps. First, by correcting our data set to a common value

  9. Eikonal Simulations for the Energy Transfer in the Deep Ocean Internal Wave Field near Mixing Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijichi, T.; Hibiya, T.

    2016-02-01

    In the proximity of mixing hotspots, the observed internal wave spectra are usually distorted from the Garrett-Munk (GM) spectrum and are characterized by the high energy level E as well as the shear/strain ratio Rω quite different from the corresponding value for the GM spectrum (Rω = 3). Accurate parameterization of the energy transfer toward dissipation scales that takes into account the effects of E and Rω is therefore indispensable to quantify the deep ocean mixing. In this study, a series of eikonal simulations are carried out to examine energy transfer within such distorted internal wave spectra. The obtained results are used to assess the recently proposed parameterization for energy dissipation in the distorted internal wave field near mixing hotspots (Ijichi and Hibiya, 2015). In particular, several factors neglected by these authors in formulating the parameterization such as the background vertical divergence and the WKB horizontal scale-separation between small-scale test waves and the background waves are all taken into account throughout the eikonal simulations. It is shown that the calculated energy transfer rate ɛ is fairly consistent with the scaling ɛ E2N2f with N the local buoyancy frequency and f the local inertial frequency. Furthermore, the calculated results exhibit strong Rω dependence quite similar to that predicted from the parameterization by Ijichi and Hibiya (2015), suggesting the validity of their formulation.

  10. Re-evaluating the NO 2 hotspot over the South African Highveld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S.M. Lourens

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, numerous pollution hotspots have been identified using satellite-based instruments. One of these hotspots is the prominent NO2hotspot over the South African Highveld. The tropospheric NO2column density of this area is comparable to that observed for central and northern Europe, eastern North America and south-east Asia. The most well-known pollution source in this area is a large array of coal-fired power stations. Upon closer inspection, long-term means of satellite observations also show a smaller area, approximately 100 km west of the Highveld hotspot, with a seemingly less substantial NO2column density. This area correlates with the geographical location of the Johannesburg–Pretoria conurbation or megacity, one of the 40 largest metropolitan areas in the world. Ground-based measurements indicate that NO2concentrations in the megacity have diurnal peaks in the early morning and late afternoon, which coincide with peak traffic hours and domestic combustion. During these times, NO2concentrations in the megacity are higher than those in the Highveld hotspot. These diurnal NO2 peaks in the megacity have generally been overlooked by satellite observations because the satellites have fixed local overpass times that do not coincide with these peak periods. Consequently, the importance of NO2 over the megacity has been underestimated. We examined the diurnal cycles of NO2 ground-based measurements for the two areas – the megacity and the Highveld hotspot – and compared them with the satellite-based NO2 observations. Results show that the Highveld hotspot is accompanied by a second hotspot over the megacity, which is of significance for the more than 10 million people living in this megacity.

  11. Remediation of metal polluted hotspot areas through enhanced soil washing--evaluation of leaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Yillin, Li; Strömvall, Ann-Margret

    2013-10-15

    Soil washing offers a permanent remediation alternative for metal polluted sites. In addition, the washed out metals can be recovered from the leachate and re-introduced into the social material cycle instead of landfilled. In this paper, soil, bark and bark-ash washing was tested on four different metal polluted soil and bark samples from hotspots at former industrial sites. Six different leaching agents; HCl, NH4Cl, lactic acid, EDDS and two acidic process waters from solid waste incineration, were tested, discussed and evaluated. For the soil washing processes, the final pH in the leachate strongly influences the metal leachability. The results show that a pH leaching yield, while metals were leached when the pH was higher than 2 or below 10. The acidic process waste waters were generally the most efficient at leaching metals from all the samples studied, and as much as 90-100 w% of the Cu was released from some samples. Initial experiments show that from one of these un-purified leachates, Cu metal (>99% purity) could be recovered. After a single leaching step, the metal contents of the soil residues still exceed the maximum limits according to the Swedish guidelines. An additional washing step is needed to reduce the contents of easy soluble metal compounds in the soil residues. The overall results from this study show that soil and bark-ash washing followed by metal recovery is a promising on-site permanent alternative to remediate metal polluted soils and to utilize non-used metal resources.

  12. Particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification in hotspots of FR II galaxies: The case study 4C74.26

    CERN Document Server

    Araudo, Anabella T; Blundell, Katherine M

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that relativistic shocks in extragalactic sources may accelerate the most energetic cosmic rays. However, recent theoretical advances indicating that relativistic shocks are probably unable to accelerate particles to energies much larger than a PeV cast doubt on this. In the present contribution we model the radio to X-ray emission in the southern hotspot of the quasar 4C74.26. The synchrotron radio emission is resolved near the shock with the MERLIN radio-interferometer, and the rapid decay of this emission behind the shock is interpreted as the decay of the downstream magnetic field as expected for small scale turbulence. If our result is confirmed by analyses of other radiogalaxies, it provides firm observational evidence that relativistic shocks at the termination region of powerful jets in FR II radiogalaxies do not accelerate ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  13. X-ray Hotspot Flares and Implications for Cosmic Ray Acceleration and Magnetic Field amplification in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Yousaf; Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    For more than fifty years, it has been believed that cosmic ray (CR) nuclei are accelerated to high energies in the rapidly expanding shockwaves created by powerful supernova explosions. Yet observational proof of this conjecture is still lacking. Recently, Uchiyama and collaborators reported the detection of small-scale X-ray flares in one such supernova remnant, dubbed 'RX J1713-3946' (a.k.a. G347.3-0.5), which also emits very energetic, TeV (10^12 eV) range, gamma-rays. They contend that the variability of these X-ray 'hotspots' implies that the magnetic field in the remnant is about a hundred times larger than normally assumed; and this, they say, means that the detected TeV range photons were produced in energetic nuclear interactions, providing 'a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10^15 eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.' We point out here that the existing multiwavelength data on this object certainly do not support such conclusions. Though intriguing...

  14. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  15. 69 Hotspot Advance Speed - Hotspot Size/Core-Hotspot distance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kagoyire

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/rj.v1i1S.6D. 69. Rwanda ... these hotspots advance away from the AGN core, where is the bulk advance speed of the hotspot in units .... 0.2,0.4 0.1and 0.3 0.1 for the large size FR II, MSO and CSO sources respectively.

  16. Oxygen isotope evolution of the Lake Owyhee volcanic field, Oregon, and implications for low-δ18O magmas of the Snake River Plain - Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, T.; Kitajima, K.; Nakashima, D.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Snake River Plain - Yellowstone (SRP-Y) hotspot trend is one of the largest known low-δ18O magmatic provinces, yet the timing and distribution of hydrothermal alteration relative to hotspot magmatism remains incompletely understood. Existing models for SRP-Y low-δ18O magma genesis differ regarding the timing of protolith alteration (e.g. Eocene vs. present), depth at which alteration occurs (e.g. 15 km vs. Owyhee volcanic field (LOVF) of east central Oregon to further identify magmatic oxygen isotope trends within the field. These data offer insight into the timing of alteration and the extent of the greater SRP-Y low-δ18O province, as well as the conditions that generate large low-δ18O provinces. 16-14 Ma silicic volcanism in the LOVF is linked to the pre-14 Ma SRP-Y hotspot, with volcanism partially overlapping extension in the north-south trending Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG). Ion microprobe analyses of zircons from 16 LOVF silicic lavas and tuffs reveal homogeneous zircons on both the single grain and hand sample scales: individual samples have 2 S.D. for δ18O ranging from 0.27 to 0.96‰ (SMOW), and sample averages ranging from 1.8 to 6.0‰, excluding texturally chaotic and/or porous zircons which have δ18O values as low as 0.0‰. All low-δ18O LOVF magmas, including the caldera-forming Tuff of Leslie Gulch and Tuff of Spring Creek, are confined to the OIG, although not all zircons from within the OIG have low δ18O values. The presence and sequence of low-δ18O magmas in the LOVF and adjacent central Snake River Plain (CSRP) cannot be explained by existing caldera subsidence or pre-hotspot source models. These data, however, combined with volumetrically limited low-δ18O material in the adjacent Idaho Batholith and Basin and Range, are consistent with low-δ18O magmas generated by the superposition of high hotspot-derived thermal fluxes on active extensional structures (OIG extension in the LOVF, and Basin and Range rifting in the CSRP) thereby

  17. Biogeography of Mediterranean Hotspot Biodiversity: Re-Evaluating the 'Tertiary Relict' Hypothesis of Macaronesian Laurel Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kondraskov

    Full Text Available The Macaronesian laurel forests (MLF are dominated by trees with a laurophyll habit comparable to evergreen humid forests which were scattered across Europe and the Mediterranean in the Paleogene and Neogene. Therefore, MLF are traditionally regarded as an old, 'Tertiary relict' vegetation type. Here we address the question if key taxa of the MLF are relictual. We evaluated the relict hypothesis consulting fossil data and analyses based on molecular phylogenies of 18 representative species. For molecular dating we used the program BEAST, for ancestral trait reconstructions BayesTraits and Lagrange to infer ancestral areas. Our molecular dating showed that the origins of four species date back to the Upper Miocene while 14 originated in the Plio-Pleistocene. This coincides with the decline of fossil laurophyllous elements in Europe since the middle Miocene. Ancestral trait and area reconstructions indicate that MLF evolved partly from pre-adapted taxa from the Mediterranean, Macaronesia and the tropics. According to the fossil record laurophyllous taxa existed in Macaronesia since the Plio- and Pleistocene. MLF are composed of species with a heterogeneous origin. The taxa dated to the Pleistocene are likely not 'Tertiary relicts'. Some species may be interpreted as relictual. In this case, the establishment of most species in the Plio-Pleistocene suggests that there was a massive species turnover before this time. Alternatively, MLF were largely newly assembled through global recruitment rather than surviving as relicts of a once more widespread vegetation. This process may have possibly been triggered by the intensification of the trade winds at the end of the Pliocene as indicated by proxy data.

  18. Evaluation of local media surveillance for improved disease recognition and monitoring in global hotspot regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Schwind

    Full Text Available Digital disease detection tools are technologically sophisticated, but dependent on digital information, which for many areas suffering from high disease burdens is simply not an option. In areas where news is often reported in local media with no digital counterpart, integration of local news information with digital surveillance systems, such as HealthMap (Boston Children's Hospital, is critical. Little research has been published in regards to the specific contribution of local health-related articles to digital surveillance systems. In response, the USAID PREDICT project implemented a local media surveillance (LMS pilot study in partner countries to monitor disease events reported in print media. This research assessed the potential of LMS to enhance digital surveillance reach in five low- and middle-income countries. Over 16 weeks, select surveillance system attributes of LMS, such as simplicity, flexibility, acceptability, timeliness, and stability were evaluated to identify strengths and weaknesses in the surveillance method. Findings revealed that LMS filled gaps in digital surveillance network coverage by contributing valuable localized information on disease events to the global HealthMap database. A total of 87 health events were reported through the LMS pilot in the 16-week monitoring period, including 71 unique reports not found by the HealthMap digital detection tool. Furthermore, HealthMap identified an additional 236 health events outside of LMS. It was also observed that belief in the importance of the project and proper source selection from the participants was crucial to the success of this method. The timely identification of disease outbreaks near points of emergence and the recognition of risk factors associated with disease occurrence continue to be important components of any comprehensive surveillance system for monitoring disease activity across populations. The LMS method, with its minimal resource commitment, could

  19. Assessment of microscale spatio-temporal variation of air pollution at an urban hotspot in Madrid (Spain) through an extensive field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Artíñano, Begoña; Yagüe, Carlos; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco Javier; de la Paz, David; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Díaz, Elías; Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Quaassdorff, Christina; Dimitroulopoulou, Chrysanthi; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2016-09-01

    Poor urban air quality is one of the main environmental concerns worldwide due to its implications for population exposure and health-related issues. However, the development of effective abatement strategies in cities requires a consistent and holistic assessment of air pollution processes, taking into account all the relevant scales within a city. This contribution presents the methodology and main results of an intensive experimental campaign carried out in a complex pollution hotspot in Madrid (Spain) under the TECNAIRE-CM research project, which aimed at understanding the microscale spatio-temporal variation of ambient concentration levels in areas where high pollution values are recorded. A variety of instruments were deployed during a three-week field campaign to provide detailed information on meteorological and micrometeorological parameters and spatio-temporal variations of the most relevant pollutants (NO2 and PM) along with relevant information needed to simulate pedestrian fluxes. The results show the strong dependence of ambient concentrations on local emissions and meteorology that turns out in strong spatial and temporal variations, with gradients up to 2 μg m-3 m-1 for NO2 and 55 μg m-3 min-1 for PM10. Pedestrian exposure to these pollutants also presents strong variations temporally and spatially but it concentrates on pedestrian crossings and bus stops. The analysis of the results show that the high concentration levels found in urban hotspots depend on extremely complex dynamic processes that cannot be captured by routinely measurements made by air quality monitoring stations used for regulatory compliance assessment. The large influence from local traffic in the concentration fields highlights the need for a detailed description of specific variables that determine emissions and dispersion at microscale level. This also indicates that city-scale interventions may be complemented with local control measures and exposure management, to improve

  20. Identification of soil contamination hotspots with veterinary antibiotics using heavy metal concentrations and leaching data--a field study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Anne; Gao, Jing; Welp, Gerhard; Siemens, Jan; Roelcke, Marco; Heimann, Lisa; Nieder, Rolf; Xue, Qiaoyun; Lin, Xianyong; Sandhage-Hofmann, Alexandra; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-11-01

    In regions with high livestock densities, the usage of antibiotics and metals for veterinary purposes or as growth promoters poses a risk in manured soils. We investigated to which degree the concentrations and depth distributions of Cu, Zn, Cr and As could be used as a tracer to discover contaminations with sulfonamides, tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. Besides, we estimated the potential vertical translocation of antibiotics and compared the results to measured data. In the peri-urban region of Beijing, China, soil was sampled from agricultural fields and a dry riverbed contaminated by organic waste disposal. The antibiotic concentrations reached 110 μg kg(-1) sulfamethazine, 111 μg kg(-1) chlortetracycline and 62 μg kg(-1) enrofloxacin in the topsoil of agricultural fields. Intriguingly, total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cr and As were smaller than 65, 130, 36 and 10 mg kg(-1) in surface soil, respectively, therewith fulfilling Chinese quality standards. Correlations between sulfamethazine concentrations and Cu or Zn suggest that in regions with high manure applications, one might use the frequently existing monitoring data for metals to identify potential pollution hotspots for antibiotics in topsoils. In the subsoils, we found sulfamethazine down to ≥2 m depth on agricultural sites and down to ≥4 m depth in the riverbed. As no translocation of metals was observed, subsoil antibiotic contamination could not be predicted from metal data. Nevertheless, sulfonamide stocks in the subsoil could be estimated with an accuracy of 35-200 % from fertilisation data and potential leaching rates. While this may not be sufficient for precise prediction of antibiotic exposure, it may very well be useful for the pre-identification of risk hotspots for subsequent in-depth assessment studies.

  1. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  2. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  3. Location of rut stands vs.mating opportunities in Przewalski's gazelle: A field test of the "Resource-based Hypothesis" and "Female Traffic Version of the Hotspot Hypothesis"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangqiang YOU; Zhigang JIANG; Chunwang LI

    2011-01-01

    We studied the mating tactics of Przewalski's gazelle on the Qinghal-Tibetan Plateau from 2002 to 2005.Przewalski's gazelle is a cluster mating animal whereby female groups,including juveniles,travel to and from their resting grounds along luted routes and dominant males stand on or near these travel routes during rut.To explain rut patterns in male gazelles,we tested predictions arising from the "Resource-based Hypothesis" and "Female Traffic Version of the Hotspot Hypothesis".We marked the location of each rut stand and female travel route,measured food availability in each rut stand and recorded the mating opportunities of rut stand owners.We also conducted a field experiment to force female groups to change their daily travel route,and observed whether males abandon their original rut stands and shift their rut stands to new travel routes of females during the 3rd rut.We found that:(1) male gazelle defending rut stands closer to a female travel route had a higher chance of mating; (2) food resources within rut stands had no effect on mating opportunities of the rut stand owner; (3) when the female travel route was obstructed,female groups changed grazing sites,and all males abandoned their original rut stands and defended new rut stands along the new female travel route.In conclusion,the location of rut stands in relation to female travel routes is the ultimate factor for consolidating mating opportunities in male gazelle,supporting the "Female Route Version of Hotspot Hypothesis"[Current Zoology 57 (6):701-708,2011].

  4. Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information from a Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods for Brain Tissue Preservation Validated by Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, and X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Hughes

    Full Text Available Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological, genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between structure and function, and revealed constraints and selective pressures that provide context about the evolution of complex behavior. Here, we report our field-testing of two commonly used laboratory-based techniques for brain preservation while on a collecting expedition in the Congo Basin and Albertine Rift, two poorly known regions associated with the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot. First, we found that transcardial perfusion fixation and long-term brain storage, conducted in remote field conditions with no access to cold storage laboratory equipment, had no observable impact on cytoarchitectural features of lizard brain tissue when compared to lizard brain tissue processed under laboratory conditions. Second, field-perfused brain tissue subjected to prolonged post-fixation remained readily compatible with subsequent immunohistochemical detection of neural antigens, with immunostaining that was comparable to that of laboratory-perfused brain tissue. Third, immersion-fixation of lizard brains, prepared under identical environmental conditions, was readily compatible with subsequent iodine-enhanced X-ray microcomputed tomography, which facilitated the non-destructive imaging of the intact brain within its skull. In summary, we

  5. Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information from a Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods for Brain Tissue Preservation Validated by Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, and X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Daniel F; Walker, Ellen M; Gignac, Paul M; Martinez, Anais; Negishi, Kenichiro; Lieb, Carl S; Greenbaum, Eli; Khan, Arshad M

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological, genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between structure and function, and revealed constraints and selective pressures that provide context about the evolution of complex behavior. Here, we report our field-testing of two commonly used laboratory-based techniques for brain preservation while on a collecting expedition in the Congo Basin and Albertine Rift, two poorly known regions associated with the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot. First, we found that transcardial perfusion fixation and long-term brain storage, conducted in remote field conditions with no access to cold storage laboratory equipment, had no observable impact on cytoarchitectural features of lizard brain tissue when compared to lizard brain tissue processed under laboratory conditions. Second, field-perfused brain tissue subjected to prolonged post-fixation remained readily compatible with subsequent immunohistochemical detection of neural antigens, with immunostaining that was comparable to that of laboratory-perfused brain tissue. Third, immersion-fixation of lizard brains, prepared under identical environmental conditions, was readily compatible with subsequent iodine-enhanced X-ray microcomputed tomography, which facilitated the non-destructive imaging of the intact brain within its skull. In summary, we have validated

  6. Hotspots in text mining of biomedical field%生物医学文本挖掘研究热点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史航; 高雯珺; 崔雷

    2016-01-01

    The high frequency subject terms were extracted from the PubMed-covered papers published from January 2000 to March 2015 on text mining of biomedical field to generate the matrix of high frequency subject terms and their source papers.The co-occurrence of high frequency subject terms in a same paper was analyzed by clustering analysis.The hotspots in text mining of biomedical field were analyzed according to the clustering analysis of high frequency subject terms and their corresponding class labels, which showed that the hotspots in text mining of bio-medical field were the basic technologies of text mining, application of text mining in biomedical informatics and in extraction of drugs-related facts.%为了解生物医学文本挖掘的研究现状和评估未来的发展方向,以美国国立图书馆 PubMed中收录的2000年1月-2015年3月发表的生物医学文本挖掘研究文献记录为样本来源,提取文献记录的主要主题词进行频次统计后截取高频主题词,形成高频主题词-论文矩阵,根据高频主题词在同一篇论文中的共现情况对其进行聚类分析,根据高频主题词聚类分析结果和对应的类标签文献,分析当前生物医学文本挖掘研究的热点。结果显示,当前文本挖掘在生物医学领域应用的主要研究热点为文本挖掘的基本技术研究、文本挖掘在生物信息学领域里的应用、文本挖掘在药物相关事实抽取中的应用3个方面。

  7. Report of Field Test Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Regional Instructional Materials Center for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    Reported by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center are field test evaluation of 18 auditory instructional materials for use with handicapped children who learn best through the auditory modality. Among materials evaluated are a taped program on use of the abacus and a cassette audiotape on bird habits and sounds.…

  8. Using ecological thresholds to evaluate the costs and benefits of set-asides in a biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks-Leite, Cristina; Pardini, Renata; Tambosi, Leandro R; Pearse, William D; Bueno, Adriana A; Bruscagin, Roberta T; Condez, Thais H; Dixo, Marianna; Igari, Alexandre T; Martensen, Alexandre C; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2014-08-29

    Ecological set-asides are a promising strategy for conserving biodiversity in human-modified landscapes; however, landowner participation is often precluded by financial constraints. We assessed the ecological benefits and economic costs of paying landowners to set aside private land for restoration. Benefits were calculated from data on nearly 25,000 captures of Brazilian Atlantic Forest vertebrates, and economic costs were estimated for several restoration scenarios and values of payment for ecosystem services. We show that an annual investment equivalent to 6.5% of what Brazil spends on agricultural subsidies would revert species composition and ecological functions across farmlands to levels found inside protected areas, thereby benefiting local people. Hence, efforts to secure the future of this and other biodiversity hotspots may be cost-effective.

  9. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  10. Hotspot swells revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott D.; Adam, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    The first attempts to quantify the width and height of hotspot swells were made more than 30 years ago. Since that time, topography, ocean-floor age, and sediment thickness datasets have improved considerably. Swell heights and widths have been used to estimate the heat flow from the core-mantle boundary, constrain numerical models of plumes, and as an indicator of the origin of hotspots. In this paper, we repeat the analysis of swell geometry and buoyancy flux for 54 hotspots, including the 37 considered by Sleep (1990) and the 49 considered by Courtillot et al. (2003), using the latest and most accurate data. We are able to calculate swell geometry for a number of hotspots that Sleep was only able to estimate by comparison with other swells. We find that in spite of the increased resolution in global bathymetry models there is significant uncertainty in our calculation of buoyancy fluxes due to differences in our measurement of the swells’ width and height, the integration method (volume integration or cross-sectional area), and the variations of the plate velocities between HS2-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 1990) and HS3-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 2002). We also note that the buoyancy flux for Pacific hotspots is in general larger than for Eurasian, North American, African and Antarctic hotspots. Considering that buoyancy flux is linearly related to plate velocity, we speculate that either the calculation of buoyancy flux using plate velocity over-estimates the actual vertical flow of material from the deep mantle or that convection in the Pacific hemisphere is more vigorous than the Atlantic hemisphere.

  11. Relativistic Hotspots in FR II Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Alex M.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Gawronski, M. P.; Cederbloom, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a list of six FR II radio sources that are candidates to possess hotspots with modestly relativistic (v/c > 0.2) bulk velocities, in contrast to the vast majority of FR II radio sources that possess non-relativistic hotspot bulk velocities (e.g., v/c = 0.03+/- 0.02 from Scheuer 1995). These objects display arm- length and flux-ratio asymmetries between lobes that self-consistently indicate relativistic motion. The candidates are selected from the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey (including but not limited to the catalog of FR II quasars of de Vries et al. 2006) with the requirement that the radio core have a spectroscopic SDSS counterpart. We find no significant difference in the number of neighboring sources within 300 projected kpc of the candidate sources and randomly selected nearby regions. The deprojected and light travel-time corrected lobe distances are not abnormal for FR II sources, and neither are the core-to-lobe flux ratios after correcting for lobe beaming. We briefly consider four possibilities for these type of objects: (i) environmental interactions randomly mimicking relativistic effects, (ii) a restarted jet causing the near hotspot to brighten while the far hotspot still appears faint, (iii) observation during a short interval common to FR II lifetimes during which the hotspot decelerates from relativistic to non-relativistic velocities, and (iv) innately unusual characteristics (e.g., a mass-loaded jet) driving relativistic bulk velocities in the hotspots of a small fraction (< 1%) of FR II objects. We favor the last interpretation but cannot rule out the alternatives. We also comment on the useful external constraints such objects provide to the evaluation of hotspot X-ray emission mechanisms.

  12. An optical inverse-Compton hotspot in 3C196?

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J

    2001-01-01

    Several hotspots of FRII radio sources have previously been detected in the X-ray at a flux level consistent with the X-rays being due to inverse-Compton scattering of radio synchrotron photons (`synchrotron self-Compton'), if the magnetic fields in the hotspots are close to their equipartition values. However, the number of hotspots compact and bright enough to exhibit detectable X-ray emission is small, so it is worth searching for synchrotron self-Compton emission in the optical, in spite of the obvious observational difficulties of such an approach. In this note I report on a possible detection of an optical inverse-Compton hotspot in a deep Hubble Space Telescope observation of the distant quasar 3C196, at a level which implies a hotspot magnetic field strength close to equipartition if the electrons have a low-energy cutoff around gamma ~ 500.

  13. An optical inverse-Compton hotspot in 3C 196?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2001-07-01

    Several hotspots of FRII radio sources have previously been detected in the X-ray at a flux level consistent with the X-rays being due to inverse-Compton scattering of radio ``synchrotron photons synchrotron self-Compton'', if the magnetic fields in the hotspots are close to their equipartition values. However, the number of hotspots compact and bright enough to exhibit detectable X-ray emission is small, so it is worth searching for synchrotron self-Compton emission in the optical, in spite of the obvious observational difficulties of such an approach. In this note I report on a possible detection of an optical inverse-Compton hotspot in a deep Hubble Space Telescope observation of the distant quasar 3C 196, at a level which implies a hotspot magnetic field strength close to equipartition if the electrons have a low-energy cutoff around gamma ~ 500.

  14. Evolutionary Hotspots in the Mojave Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn B. Marks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity within species provides the raw material for adaptation and evolution. Just as regions of high species diversity are conservation targets, identifying regions containing high genetic diversity and divergence within and among populations may be important to protect future evolutionary potential. When multiple co-distributed species show spatial overlap in high genetic diversity and divergence, these regions can be considered evolutionary hotspots. We mapped spatial population genetic structure for 17 animal species across the Mojave Desert, USA. We analyzed these in concurrence and located 10 regions of high genetic diversity, divergence or both among species. These were mainly concentrated along the western and southern boundaries where ecotones between mountain, grassland and desert habitat are prevalent, and along the Colorado River. We evaluated the extent to which these hotspots overlapped protected lands and utility-scale renewable energy development projects of the Bureau of Land Management. While 30–40% of the total hotspot area was categorized as protected, between 3–7% overlapped with proposed renewable energy project footprints, and up to 17% overlapped with project footprints combined with transmission corridors. Overlap of evolutionary hotspots with renewable energy development mainly occurred in 6 of the 10 identified hotspots. Resulting GIS-based maps can be incorporated into ongoing landscape planning efforts and highlight specific regions where further investigation of impacts to population persistence and genetic connectivity may be warranted.

  15. Evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Inman, Richard D.; Barr, Kelly R.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wood, Dustin A.; Medica, Philip A.; Breinholt, Jesse W.; Stephen, Catherine L.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Marks, Sharyn B.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity within species provides the raw material for adaptation and evolution. Just as regions of high species diversity are conservation targets, identifying regions containing high genetic diversity and divergence within and among populations may be important to protect future evolutionary potential. When multiple co-distributed species show spatial overlap in high genetic diversity and divergence, these regions can be considered evolutionary hotspots. We mapped spatial population genetic structure for 17 animal species across the Mojave Desert, USA. We analyzed these in concurrence and located 10 regions of high genetic diversity, divergence or both among species. These were mainly concentrated along the western and southern boundaries where ecotones between mountain, grassland and desert habitat are prevalent, and along the Colorado River. We evaluated the extent to which these hotspots overlapped protected lands and utility-scale renewable energy development projects of the Bureau of Land Management. While 30–40% of the total hotspot area was categorized as protected, between 3–7% overlapped with proposed renewable energy project footprints, and up to 17% overlapped with project footprints combined with transmission corridors. Overlap of evolutionary hotspots with renewable energy development mainly occurred in 6 of the 10 identified hotspots. Resulting GIS-based maps can be incorporated into ongoing landscape planning efforts and highlight specific regions where further investigation of impacts to population persistence and genetic connectivity may be warranted.

  16. Oxygen isotope evolution of the Lake Owyhee volcanic field, Oregon, and implications for the low-δ18O magmatism of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone hotspot and other low-δ18O large igneous provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Tyler B.; Kitajima, Kouki; Nakashima, Daisuke; Strickland, Ariel; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Valley, John W.

    2016-11-01

    The Snake River Plain-Yellowstone (SRP-Y) hotspot track represents the largest known low-δ18O igneous province; however, debate persists regarding the timing and distribution of meteoric hydrothermal alteration and subsequent melting/assimilation relative to hotspot magmatism. To further constrain alteration relations for SRP-Y low-δ18O magmatism, we present in situ δ18O and U-Pb analyses of zircon, and laser fluorination δ18O analyses of phenocrysts, from the Lake Owyhee volcanic field (LOVF) of east-central Oregon. U-Pb data place LOVF magmatism between 16.3 and 15.4 Ma, and contain no evidence for xenocrystic zircon. LOVF δ18O(Zrc) values demonstrate (1) both low-δ18O and high-δ18O caldera-forming and pre-/post-caldera magmas, (2) relative increases in δ18O between low-δ18O caldera-forming and post-caldera units, and (3) low-δ18O magmatism associated with extension of the Oregon-Idaho Graben. The new data, along with new compilations of (1) in situ zircon δ18O data for the SRP-Y, and (2) regional δ18O(WR) and δ18O(magma) patterns, further constrain the thermal and structural associations for hydrothermal alteration in the SRP-Y. Models for low-δ18O magmatism must be compatible with (1) δ18O(magma) trends within individual SRP-Y eruptive centers, (2) along axis trends in δ18O(magma), and (3) the high concentration of low-δ18O magmas relative to the surrounding regions. When considered with the structural and thermal evolution of the SRP-Y, these constraints support low-δ18O magma genesis originating from syn-hotspot meteoric hydrothermal alteration, driven by hotspot-derived thermal fluxes superimposed on extensional tectonics. This model is not restricted to continental hotspot settings and may apply to several other low-δ18O igneous provinces with similar thermal and structural associations.

  17. Characteristics of suicide hotspots on the Belgian railway network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbaut, Kevin; Krysinska, Karolina; Andriessen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, railway suicide accounted for 5.3% of all suicides in Belgium. In 2008, Infrabel (Manager of the Belgian Railway Infrastructure) introduced a railway suicide prevention programme, including identification of suicide hotspots, i.e., areas of the railway network with an elevated incidence of suicide. The study presents an analysis of 43 suicide hotspots based on Infrabel data collected during field visits and semi-structured interviews conducted in mental health facilities in the vicinity of the hotspots. Three major characteristics of the hotspots were accessibility, anonymity, and vicinity of a mental health institution. The interviews identified several risk and protective factors for railway suicide, including the training of staff, introduction of a suicide prevention policy, and the role of the media. In conclusion, a comprehensive railway suicide prevention programme should continuously safeguard and monitor hotspots, and should be embedded in a comprehensive suicide prevention programme in the community.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Dye and Thiol Molecules Adsorbed on Triangular Silver Nanostructures: A Study of Near-Field Enhancement, Localization of Hot-Spots, and Passivation of Adsorbed Carbonaceous Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS of thiols and dye molecules adsorbed on triangular silver nanostructures was investigated. The SERS hot-spots are localized at the edges and corners of the silver triangular particles. AFM and SEM measurements permit to observe many small clusters formed at the edges of triangular particles fabricated by nanosphere lithography. Finite-element calculations show that near-field enhancements can reach values of more than 200 at visible wavelengths, in the gaps between small spherical particles and large triangular particles, although for the later no plasmon resonance was found at the wavelengths investigated. The regions near the particles showing strong near-field enhancement are well correlated with spatial localization of SERS hot-spots done by confocal microscopy. Silver nanostructures fabricated by thermal evaporation present strong and fast fluctuating SERS activity, due to amorphous carbon contamination. Thiols and dye molecules seem to be able to passivate the undesired SERS activity on fresh evaporated silver.

  19. New Manning System Field Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    our Analytic hodel (see Chapter 5, New Manning Svestem Field Evaluacion . Technical Revore No. I, RAJL-, November c t, e number or soldiers retaking...and meaningful performance measures are not only crucial to the WRAIR N Field Evaluacion but also to the Army. To know which unit does betzer than

  20. DNA barcoding the floras of biodiversity hotspots

    OpenAIRE

    Lahaye, Renaud; van der Bank, Michelle; Bogarin, Diego; Warner, Jorge; Pupulin, Franco; Gigot, Guillaume; Maurin, Olivier; Duthoit, Sylvie; Barraclough, Timothy G.; Savolainen, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a technique in which species identification is performed by using DNA sequences from a small fragment of the genome, with the aim of contributing to a wide range of ecological and conservation studies in which traditional taxonomic identification is not practical. DNA barcoding is well established in animals, but there is not yet any universally accepted barcode for plants. Here, we undertook intensive field collections in two biodiversity hotspots (Mesoamerica and southern A...

  1. The spatial regulation of meiotic recombination hotspots: are all DSB hotspots crossover hotspots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2012-07-15

    A key step for the success of meiosis is programmed homologous recombination, during which crossovers, or exchange of chromosome arms, take place. Crossovers increase genetic diversity but their main function is to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. Defects in crossover number and position produce aneuploidies that represent the main cause of miscarriages and chromosomal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome. Recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs), which occur preferentially at places called DSB hotspots. Among all DSBs generated, only a small fraction is repaired by crossover, the other being repaired by other homologous recombination pathways. Crossover maps have been generated in a number of organisms, defining crossover hotspots. With the availability of genome-wide maps of DSBs as well as the ability to measure genetically the repair outcome at several hotspots, it is becoming more and more clear that not all DSB hotspots behave the same for crossover formation, suggesting that chromosomal features distinguish different types of hotspots.

  2. An Advanced Deep Learning Approach for Ki-67 Stained Hotspot Detection and Proliferation Rate Scoring for Prognostic Evaluation of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Monjoy; Chakraborty, Chandan; Arun, Indu; Ahmed, Rosina; Chatterjee, Sanjoy

    2017-06-12

    Being a non-histone protein, Ki-67 is one of the essential biomarkers for the immunohistochemical assessment of proliferation rate in breast cancer screening and grading. The Ki-67 signature is always sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Due to random morphological, color and intensity variations of cell nuclei (immunopositive and immunonegative), manual/subjective assessment of Ki-67 scoring is error-prone and time-consuming. Hence, several machine learning approaches have been reported; nevertheless, none of them had worked on deep learning based hotspots detection and proliferation scoring. In this article, we suggest an advanced deep learning model for computerized recognition of candidate hotspots and subsequent proliferation rate scoring by quantifying Ki-67 appearance in breast cancer immunohistochemical images. Unlike existing Ki-67 scoring techniques, our methodology uses Gamma mixture model (GMM) with Expectation-Maximization for seed point detection and patch selection and deep learning, comprises with decision layer, for hotspots detection and proliferation scoring. Experimental results provide 93% precision, 0.88% recall and 0.91% F-score value. The model performance has also been compared with the pathologists' manual annotations and recently published articles. In future, the proposed deep learning framework will be highly reliable and beneficial to the junior and senior pathologists for fast and efficient Ki-67 scoring.

  3. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

  4. Validation of the DIFFAL, HPAC and HotSpot Dispersion Models Using the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials Witness Plate Deposition Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Murray; Parkes, David

    2016-05-01

    Three atmospheric dispersion models--DIFFAL, HPAC, and HotSpot--of differing complexities have been validated against the witness plate deposition dataset taken during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials. The small-scale nature of these trials in comparison to many other historical radiological dispersion trials provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the near-field performance of the models considered. This paper performs validation of these models using two graphical methods of comparison: deposition contour plots and hotline profile graphs. All of the models tested are assessed to perform well, especially considering that previous model developments and validations have been focused on larger-scale scenarios. Of the models, HPAC generally produced the most accurate results, especially at locations within ∼100 m of GZ. Features present within the observed data, such as hot spots, were not well modeled by any of the codes considered. Additionally, it was found that an increase in the complexity of the meteorological data input to the models did not necessarily lead to an improvement in model accuracy; this is potentially due to the small-scale nature of the trials.

  5. VT Biodiversity Project - Biological Hotspots

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This dataset is the result of an effort to map biological "hotspots" in Vermont based on the "element occurrences" in the Nongame and Natural...

  6. Evaluative Practices in the Culinary Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo; Strandgaard, Jesper

    This paper is concerned with evaluative practices within the culinary field. The focus is on the evaluative practices performed by two restaurant ranking systems, respectively the Michelin Red Guide system handled by the French tire manufacturer Michelin and the San Pellegrino ’World’s 50 Best...

  7. Analysis of miRNA market trends reveals hotspots of research activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosta, Gary; Razvi, Enal

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted an analysis of the miRNA research marketplace by evaluating the publication trends in the field. In this article, we present the results of our analysis which reveals that hotspots exist in terms of research activities in the miRNA space--these hotspots illustrate the areas in the miRNA research space where specific miRNAs have been extensively studied, and other areas that represent new territory. We frame these data into the context of areas of opportunity for miRNA content harvest versus segments of opportunity for the development of research tools. Also presented in this article are the primary market data from online surveys we have performed with researchers involved in miRNA research around the world. Taken together, these data frame the current state of the miRNA marketplace and provide niches of opportunity for new entrants into this space.

  8. Image quality evaluation of light field photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Zhiliang; Yuan, Yan; Xiangli, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Light field photography captures 4D radiance information of a scene. Digital refocusing and digital correction of aberrations could be done after the photograph is taken. However, capturing 4D light field is costly and tradeoffs between different image quality metrics should be made and evaluated. This paper explores the effects of light field photography on image quality by quantitatively evaluating some basic criteria for an imaging system. A simulation approach was first developed by ray-tracing a designed light field camera. A standard testing chart followed by ISO 12233 was provided as the input scene. A sequence of light field raw images were acquired and processed by light field rendering methods afterwards. Through-focus visual resolution and MTF were calculated and analyzed. As a comparison, the same tests were taken for the same main lens system as the results of conventional photography. An experimental light field system was built up and its performance was tested. This work helps better understanding the pros and cons of light field photography in contrast with conventional imaging methods and perceiving the way to optimize the joint digital-optical design of the system.

  9. Detecting Biosphere anomalies hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Mahecha, Miguel; Flach, Milan; Denzler, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The current amount of satellite remote sensing measurements available allow for applying data-driven methods to investigate environmental processes. The detection of anomalies or abnormal events is crucial to monitor the Earth system and to analyze their impacts on ecosystems and society. By means of a combination of statistical methods, this study proposes an intuitive and efficient methodology to detect those areas that present hotspots of anomalies, i.e. higher levels of abnormal or extreme events or more severe phases during our historical records. Biosphere variables from a preliminary version of the Earth System Data Cube developed within the CAB-LAB project (http://earthsystemdatacube.net/) have been used in this study. This database comprises several atmosphere and biosphere variables expanding 11 years (2001-2011) with 8-day of temporal resolution and 0.25° of global spatial resolution. In this study, we have used 10 variables that measure the biosphere. The methodology applied to detect abnormal events follows the intuitive idea that anomalies are assumed to be time steps that are not well represented by a previously estimated statistical model [1].We combine the use of Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models with a distance metric like Mahalanobis distance to detect abnormal events in multiple biosphere variables. In a first step we pre-treat the variables by removing the seasonality and normalizing them locally (μ=0,σ=1). Additionally we have regionalized the area of study into subregions of similar climate conditions, by using the Köppen climate classification. For each climate region and variable we have selected the best ARMA parameters by means of a Bayesian Criteria. Then we have obtained the residuals by comparing the fitted models with the original data. To detect the extreme residuals from the 10 variables, we have computed the Mahalanobis distance to the data's mean (Hotelling's T^2), which considers the covariance matrix of the joint

  10. Evaluation of near-field earthquake effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1994-11-01

    Structures and equipment, which are qualified for the design basis earthquake (DBE) and have anchorage designed for the DBE loading, do not require an evaluation of the near-field earthquake (NFE) effects. However, safety class 1 acceleration sensitive equipment such as electrical relays must be evaluated for both NFE and DBE since they are known to malfunction when excited by high frequency seismic motions.

  11. Africa's hotspots of biodiversity redefined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küper, W.; Sommer, J.H.; Lovett, J.C.; Beentje, H.J.; Rompaey, van R.S.A.R.; Chatelain, C.; Sosef, M.S.M.; Barthlott, W.

    2004-01-01

    A key problem for conservation is the coincidence of regions of high biodiversity with regions of high human impact. Twenty-five of the most threatened centers of plant diversity were identified by Myers et al., and these "hotspots" play a crucial role in international conservation strategies. The p

  12. Farm nitrogen balances in six European agricultural landscapes – a method for farming system assessment, emission hotspot identification, and mitigation measure evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Bienkowski, J.; Bleeker, A.

    2012-01-01

    Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm nitrogen (N) balances and N surplus from the in total 222 farms and...... with other methods for the assessment of landscape N emissions and farm N efficiency, including more detailed N sink and N source hotspot mapping, measurements and modelling.......Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm nitrogen (N) balances and N surplus from the in total 222 farms...... and 11 440 ha of farmland. In all landscapes, a large variation in the farm N surplus was found, and thereby a large potential for reductions. The highest average N surpluses were found in the most livestock-intensive landscapes of IT, FR, and NL; on average 202 ± 28, 179 ± 63 and 178 ± 20 kg N ha−1yr−1...

  13. Sampling effects on the identification of roadkill hotspots: Implications for survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara M; Marques, J Tiago; Lourenço, André; Medinas, Denis; Barbosa, A Márcia; Beja, Pedro; Mira, António

    2015-10-01

    Although locating wildlife roadkill hotspots is essential to mitigate road impacts, the influence of study design on hotspot identification remains uncertain. We evaluated how sampling frequency affects the accuracy of hotspot identification, using a dataset of vertebrate roadkills (n = 4427) recorded over a year of daily surveys along 37 km of roads. "True" hotspots were identified using this baseline dataset, as the 500-m segments where the number of road-killed vertebrates exceeded the upper 95% confidence limit of the mean, assuming a Poisson distribution of road-kills per segment. "Estimated" hotspots were identified likewise, using datasets representing progressively lower sampling frequencies, which were produced by extracting data from the baseline dataset at appropriate time intervals (1-30 days). Overall, 24.3% of segments were "true" hotspots, concentrating 40.4% of roadkills. For different groups, "true" hotspots accounted from 6.8% (bats) to 29.7% (small birds) of road segments, concentrating from 60% (lizards, lagomorphs, carnivores) of roadkills. Spatial congruence between "true" and "estimated" hotspots declined rapidly with increasing time interval between surveys, due primarily to increasing false negatives (i.e., missing "true" hotspots). There were also false positives (i.e., wrong "estimated" hotspots), particularly at low sampling frequencies. Spatial accuracy decay with increasing time interval between surveys was higher for smaller-bodied (amphibians, reptiles, small birds, small mammals) than for larger-bodied species (birds of prey, hedgehogs, lagomorphs, carnivores). Results suggest that widely used surveys at weekly or longer intervals may produce poor estimates of roadkill hotspots, particularly for small-bodied species. Surveying daily or at two-day intervals may be required to achieve high accuracy in hotspot identification for multiple species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Where are the lightning hotspots on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Goodman, S. J.; Buechler, D. E.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The first lightning observations from space date from the early 1960s and more than a dozen spacecraft orbiting the Earth have flown instruments that recorded lightning signals from thunderstorms over the past 45 years. In this respect, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), having just completed its mission (1997-2015), provides the longest and best total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning data base over the tropics.We present a 16 year (1998-2013) reprocessed data set to create very high resolution (0.1°) TRMM LIS total lightning climatology. This detailed very high resolution climatology is used to identify the Earth's lightning hotspots and other regional features. Earlier studies located the lightning hotspot within the Congo Basin in Africa, but our very high resolution lightning climatology found that the highest lightning flash rate on Earth actually occurs in Venezuela over Lake Maracaibo, with a distinct maximum during the night. The higher resolution dataset clearly shows that similar phenomenon also occurs over other inland lakes with similar conditions, i.e., locally forced convergent flow over a warm lake surface which drives deep nocturnal convection. Although Africa does not have the top lightning hotspot, it comes in a close second and it is the continent with the highest number of lightning hotspots, followed by Asia, South America, North America, and Oceania. We also present climatological maps for local hour and month of lightning maxima, along with a ranking of the highest five hundred lightning maxima, focusing discussion on each continent's 10 highest lightning maxima. Most of the highest continental maxima are located near major mountain ranges, revealing the importance of local topography in thunderstorm development. These results are especially relevant in anticipation of the upcoming availability of continuous total lightning observations from the Geostationary Lightning Mapping (GLM

  15. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  16. Evaluation of PV Module Field Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, John; Silverman, Timothy; Miller, David C.; McNutt, Peter; Kempe, Michael; Deceglie, Michael

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes an effort to inspect and evaluate PV modules in order to determine what failure or degradation modes are occurring in field installations. This paper will report on the results of six site visits, including the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Hedge Array, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Springerville, Central Florida Utility, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification.

  17. Identifying biodiversity hotspots for threatened mammal species in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farashi, Azita; Shariati Najafabadi, Mitra; Hosseini, Mahshid

    2017-01-01

    Conservation biology has much more attention for biodiversity hot spots than before. In order to recognize the hotspots for Iranian terrestrial mammal species that are listed in any red list, nationally or globally, ten Species Distribution Models (SDMs) have been applied. The SDMs evaluation

  18. Laboratory and field based evaluation of chromatography ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA) is an on-line ion-chromatography-based instrument designed for speciation of the inorganic gas and aerosol ammonium-nitrate-sulfate system. Previous work to characterize the performance of the MARGA has been primarily based on field comparison to other measurement methods to evaluate accuracy. While such studies are useful, the underlying reasons for disagreement among methods are not always clear. This study examines aspects of MARGA accuracy and precision specifically related to automated chromatography analysis. Using laboratory standards, analytical accuracy, precision, and method detection limits derived from the MARGA chromatography software are compared to an alternative software package (Chromeleon, Thermo Scientific Dionex). Field measurements are used to further evaluate instrument performance, including the MARGA’s use of an internal LiBr standard to control accuracy. Using gas/aerosol ratios and aerosol neutralization state as a case study, the impact of chromatography on measurement error is assessed. The new generation of on-line chromatography-based gas and particle measurement systems have many advantages, including simultaneous analysis of multiple pollutants. The Monitor for Aerosols and Gases in Ambient Air (MARGA) is such an instrument that is used in North America, Europe, and Asia for atmospheric process studies as well as routine monitoring. While the instrument has been evaluat

  19. Study of shape evaluation for mask and silicon using large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Mito, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Shinichi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a highly integrated method of mask and silicon metrology. The aim of this integration is evaluating the performance of the silicon corresponding to Hotspot on a mask. It can use the mask shape of a large field, besides. The method adopts a metrology management system based on DBM (Design Based Metrology). This is the high accurate contouring created by an edge detection algorithm used in mask CD-SEM and silicon CD-SEM. Currently, as semiconductor manufacture moves towards even smaller feature size, this necessitates more aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) to drive the super-resolution technology (RET). In other words, there is a trade-off between highly precise RET and mask manufacture, and this has a big impact on the semiconductor market that centers on the mask business. As an optimal solution to these issues, we provide a DFM solution that extracts 2-dimensional data for a more realistic and error-free simulation by reproducing accurately the contour of the actual mask, in addition to the simulation results from the mask data. On the other hand, there is roughness in the silicon form made from a mass-production line. Moreover, there is variation in the silicon form. For this reason, quantification of silicon form is important, in order to estimate the performance of a pattern. In order to quantify, the same form is equalized in two dimensions. And the method of evaluating based on the form is popular. In this study, we conducted experiments for averaging method of the pattern (Measurement Based Contouring) as two-dimensional mask and silicon evaluation technique. That is, observation of the identical position of a mask and a silicon was considered. The result proved its detection accuracy and reliability of variability on two-dimensional pattern (mask and silicon) and is adaptable to following fields of mask quality management. •Discrimination of nuisance defects for fine pattern. •Determination of two-dimensional variability of

  20. Cloud Computing Application for Hotspot Clustering Using Recursive Density Based Clustering (RDBC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Aries; Khiyarin Nisa, Karlina

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia has vast areas of tropical forest, but are often burned which causes extensive damage to property and human life. Monitoring hotspots can be one of the forest fire management. Each hotspot is recorded in dataset so that it can be processed and analyzed. This research aims to build a cloud computing application which visualizes hotspots clustering. This application uses the R programming language with Shiny web framework and implements Recursive Density Based Clustering (RDBC) algorithm. Clustering is done on hotspot dataset of the Kalimantan Island and South Sumatra Province to find the spread pattern of hotspots. The clustering results are evaluated using the Silhouette's Coefficient (SC) which yield best value 0.3220798 for Kalimantan dataset. Clustering pattern are displayed in the form of web pages so that it can be widely accessed and become the reference for fire occurrence prediction.

  1. Applying Hotspot Detection Methods in Forestry: A Case Study of Chestnut Oak Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songlin Fei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot detection has been widely adopted in health sciences for disease surveillance, but rarely in natural resource disciplines. In this paper, two spatial scan statistics (SaTScan and ClusterSeer and a nonspatial classification and regression trees method were evaluated as techniques for identifying chestnut oak (Quercus Montana regeneration hotspots among 50 mixed-oak stands in the central Appalachian region of the eastern United States. Hotspots defined by the three methods had a moderate level of conformity and revealed similar chestnut oak regeneration site affinity. Chestnut oak regeneration hotspots were positively associated with the abundance of chestnut oak trees in the overstory and a moderate cover of heather species (Vaccinium and Gaylussacia spp. but were negatively associated with the abundance of hayscented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula and mountain laurel (Kalmia latiforia. In general, hotspot detection is a viable tool for assisting natural resource managers with identifying areas possessing significantly high or low tree regeneration.

  2. Conservation of recombination hotspots in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Isheng J.; Burt, Austin; Koufopanou, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Meiotic recombination does not occur randomly along a chromosome, but instead tends to be concentrated in small regions, known as “recombination hotspots.” Recombination hotspots are thought to be short-lived in evolutionary time due to their self-destructive nature, as gene conversion favors recombination-suppressing alleles over recombination-promoting alleles during double-strand repair. Consistent with this expectation, hotspots in humans are highly dynamic, with little correspondence in ...

  3. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Namshin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region, which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy, CGD (chronic granulomatous disease and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS and combined (2401 VIS resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap

  4. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-01

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  5. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-21

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  6. Putting 'Local' Back into Public Wifi Hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    Public Wifi hotspots in cafes and public places are based on wireless local area network technology (WLAN). In contrast to the common understanding of connecting directly to the internet when connecting to a Wifi hotspot, we are proposing to bring the original notion of connecting to a local netw...

  7. Capturing Hotspots For Constrained Indoor Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Finding the hotspots in large indoor spaces is very important for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation and guidance. The tracking data coming from indoor tracking are huge in volume and not readily available for finding hotspots. This paper presents a graph-...

  8. Detecting Hotspots from Taxi Trajectory Data Using Spatial Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P. X.; Qin, K.; Zhou, Q.; Liu, C. K.; Chen, Y. X.

    2015-07-01

    A method of trajectory clustering based on decision graph and data field is proposed in this paper. The method utilizes data field to describe spatial distribution of trajectory points, and uses decision graph to discover cluster centres. It can automatically determine cluster parameters and is suitable to trajectory clustering. The method is applied to trajectory clustering on taxi trajectory data, which are on the holiday (May 1st, 2014), weekday (Wednesday, May 7th, 2014) and weekend (Saturday, May 10th, 2014) respectively, in Wuhan City, China. The hotspots in four hours (8:00-9:00, 12:00-13:00, 18:00-19:00 and 23:00-24:00) for three days are discovered and visualized in heat maps. In the future, we will further research the spatiotemporal distribution and laws of these hotspots, and use more data to carry out the experiments.

  9. Threats from climate change to terrestrial vertebrate hotspots in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Maiorano

    Full Text Available We identified hotspots of terrestrial vertebrate species diversity in Europe and adjacent islands. Moreover, we assessed the extent to which by the end of the 21(st century such hotspots will be exposed to average monthly temperature and precipitation patterns which can be regarded as extreme if compared to the climate experienced during 1950-2000. In particular, we considered the entire European sub-continent plus Turkey and a total of 1149 species of terrestrial vertebrates. For each species, we developed species-specific expert-based distribution models (validated against field data which we used to calculate species richness maps for mammals, breeding birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Considering four global circulation model outputs and three emission scenarios, we generated an index of risk of exposure to extreme climates, and we used a bivariate local Moran's I to identify the areas with a significant association between hotspots of diversity and high risk of exposure to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot for biodiversity and especially for threatened species for all taxa. In particular, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas host particularly high species richness as measured over all groups, while the eastern Mediterranean basin is particularly rich in amphibians and reptiles; the islands (both Macaronesian and Mediterranean host the highest richness of threatened species for all taxa occurs. Our results suggest that the main hotspots of biodiversity for terrestrial vertebrates may be extensively influenced by the climate change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing serious concerns for biodiversity conservation.

  10. Microbial hotspots and hot moments in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes within nano- to macroscales. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of input of labile organics by plants creates microbial hotspots over short periods of time - the hot moments. We define microbial hotspots as small soil volumes with much faster process rates and much more intensive interactions compared to the average soil conditions. Such hotspots are found in the rhizosphere, detritusphere, biopores (including drilosphere) and on aggregate surfaces, but hotspots are frequently of mixed origin. Hot moments are short-term events or sequences of events inducing accelerated process rates as compared to the averaged rates. Thus, hotspots and hot moments are defined by dynamic characteristics, i.e. by process rates. For this hotspot concept we extensively reviewed and examined the localization and size of hotspots, spatial distribution and visualization approaches, transport of labile C to and from hotspots, lifetime and process intensities, with a special focus on process rates and microbial activities. The fraction of active microorganisms in hotspots is 2-20 times higher than in the bulk soil, and their specific activities (i.e. respiration, microbial growth, mineralization potential, enzyme activities, RNA/DNA ratio) may also be much higher. The duration of hot moments in the rhizosphere is limited and is controlled by the length of the input of labile organics. It can last a few hours up to a few days. In the detritusphere, however, the duration of hot moments is regulated by the output - by decomposition rates of litter - and lasts for weeks and months. Hot moments induce succession in microbial communities and intense intra- and interspecific competition affecting C use efficiency, microbial growth and turnover. The faster turnover and lower C use efficiency in hotspots counterbalances the high C inputs, leading to the absence of strong

  11. Magnetic hot-spots in hollow silicon cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Evlyukhin, A. B.; Shalin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanoparticles can possess magnetic Mie-resonant response in the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges. In this paper, we consider numerically the features of magnetic hot-spots realized inside silicon nanocylinders at the conditions of the optical magnetic resonances, and show that the intensity of the magnetic field inside nanoparticles with a coaxial through hole can be much stronger than the intensity of incident light waves.

  12. Research on Hotspot Discovery in Internet Public Opinions Based on Improved K-Means

    OpenAIRE

    Gensheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    How to discover hotspot in the Internet public opinions effectively is a hot research field for the researchers related which plays a key role for governments and corporations to find useful information from mass data in the Internet. An improved K-means algorithm for hotspot discovery in internet public opinions is presented based on the analysis of existing defects and calculation principle of original K-means algorithm. First, some new methods are designed to preprocess website texts, sele...

  13. Crustal-scale recycling in caldera complexes and rift zones along the Yellowstone hotspot track: O and Hf isotopic evidence in diverse zircons from voluminous rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Dana L.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fu, Bin; McCurry, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rhyolites of the Picabo volcanic field (10.4–6.6 Ma) in eastern Idaho are preserved as thick ignimbrites and lavas along the margins of the Snake River Plain (SRP), and within a deep (>3 km) borehole near the central axis of the Yellowstone hotspot track. In this study we present new O and Hf isotope data and U–Pb geochronology for individual zircons, O isotope data for major phenocrysts (quartz, plagioclase, and pyroxene), whole rock Sr and Nd isotope ratios, and whole rock geochemistry for a suite of Picabo rhyolites. We synthesize our new datasets with published Ar–Ar geochronology to establish the eruptive framework of the Picabo volcanic field, and interpret its petrogenetic history in the context of other well-studied caldera complexes in the SRP. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44±0.27 Ma (U–Pb) Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned and normal-δ18O (δ18O magma=7.9‰) unit with high, zoned 87Sr/86Sri (0.71488–0.72520), and low-εNd(0) (−18) and εHf(0) (−28). The TAV and an associated post caldera lava flow possess the lowest εNd(0) (−23), indicating ∼40–60% derivation from the Archean upper crust. Normal-δ18O rhyolites were followed by a series of lower-δ18O eruptions with more typical (lower crustal) Sr–Nd–Hf isotope ratios and whole rock chemistry. The voluminous 8.25±0.26 Ma West Pocatello rhyolite has the lowest δ18O value (δ18Omelt=3.3‰), and we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff present in the INEL-1 borehole (with published zircon ages 8.04–8.35 Ma, and similarly low-δ18O zircon values). The significant (4–5‰) decrease in magmatic-δ18O values in Picabo rhyolites is accompanied by an increase in zircon δ18O heterogeneity from ∼1‰ variation in the TAV to >5‰ variation in the late-stage low-δ18O rhyolites, a trend similar to what is characteristic of Heise and Yellowstone, and which indicates remelting of variably hydrothermally altered tuffs

  14. The consequences of hotspots on continental lithosphere : a thermal case study on the Arabian Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente De Gouveia, S.; Besse, J.; Greff-Lefftz, M.; Frizon de Lamotte, D.; Leparmentier, F.; Lescanne, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hotspots are thermal instabilities coming from various depths in the mantle. Their activity is often revealed by surface and sub-surface phenomena such as volcanic trapps or oceanic plateaus, and volcanic island tracks on the seafloor. The two first are often linked to the eruption of a hotspot head, while the third is due to the volcanic material fed by the subsequent tail. Consequences of a hotspot tail on the oceanic lithosphere are well known, while its effect on the continental lithosphere is most often masked by the thickness of the lithosphere. The aim of our study is to try and link hotspot tracks with geological events in the continental lithosphere. Hotspot tracks are first built using a modified version of the hybrid reference frame of Seton et al. (2012), and their effect on the continental lithosphere is then evaluated using geological markers issued from petroleum wells, in particular the sedimentary record, backstripping, heat flux anomaly and temperature data. A case study is performed on the Arabian Plate, potentially crossed by two hotspots (Afar and Comores). Several W-E heat flux profiles display a large thermal anomaly close to the Red Sea, while a smaller N-S elongated heat flow anomaly more to the E suggests that a hotspot track could impact the thermal history of the Arabian plate.

  15. Analysis of microstructure-dependent shock dissipation and hot-spot formation in granular metalized explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Sunada; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2016-07-01

    Variations in the microstructure of granular explosives (i.e., particle packing density, size, shape, and composition) can affect their shock sensitivity by altering thermomechanical fields at the particle-scale during pore collapse within shocks. If the deformation rate is fast, hot-spots can form, ignite, and interact, resulting in burn at the macro-scale. In this study, a two-dimensional finite and discrete element technique is used to simulate and examine shock-induced dissipation and hot-spot formation within low density explosives (68%-84% theoretical maximum density (TMD)) consisting of large ensembles of HMX (C4H8N8O8) and aluminum (Al) particles (size ˜ 60 -360 μm). Emphasis is placed on identifying how the inclusion of Al influences effective shock dissipation and hot-spot fields relative to equivalent ensembles of neat/pure HMX for shocks that are sufficiently strong to eliminate porosity. Spatially distributed hot-spot fields are characterized by their number density and area fraction enabling their dynamics to be described in terms of nucleation, growth, and agglomeration-dominated phases with increasing shock strength. For fixed shock particle speed, predictions indicate that decreasing packing density enhances shock dissipation and hot-spot formation, and that the inclusion of Al increases dissipation relative to neat HMX by pressure enhanced compaction resulting in fewer but larger HMX hot-spots. Ensembles having bimodal particle sizes are shown to significantly affect hot-spot dynamics by altering the spatial distribution of hot-spots behind shocks.

  16. Evaluation of candidate stromal epithelial cross-talk genes identifies association between risk of serous ovarian cancer and TERT, a cancer susceptibility "hot-spot".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon E Johnatty

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC. In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n=675 and controls (n=1,162 were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-alleleor=0.5. However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03. Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24 p=0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus.

  17. Conservation priorities in a biodiversity hotspot: analysis of narrow endemic plant species in New Caledonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien S Wulff

    Full Text Available New Caledonia is a global biodiversity hotspot facing extreme environmental degradation. Given the urgent need for conservation prioritisation, we have made a first-pass quantitative assessment of the distribution of Narrow Endemic Species (NES in the flora to identify species and sites that are potentially important for conservation action. We assessed the distributional status of all angiosperm and gymnosperm species using data from taxonomic descriptions and herbarium samples. We characterised species as being NES if they occurred in 3 or fewer locations. In total, 635 of the 2930 assessed species were classed as NES, of which only 150 have been subjected to the IUCN conservation assessment. As the distributional patterns of un-assessed species from one or two locations correspond well with assessed species which have been classified as Critically Endangered or Endangered respectively, we suggest that our distributional data can be used to prioritise species for IUCN assessment. We also used the distributional data to produce a map of "Hotspots of Plant Narrow Endemism" (HPNE. Combined, we used these data to evaluate the coincidence of NES with mining activities (a major source of threat on New Caledonia and also areas of conservation protection. This is to identify species and locations in most urgent need of further conservation assessment and subsequent action. Finally, we grouped the NES based on the environments they occurred in and modelled the habitat distribution of these groups with a Maximum Entropy Species Distribution Model (MaxEnt. The NES were separable into three different groups based primarily on geological differences. The distribution of the habitat types for each group coincide partially with the HPNE described above and also indicates some areas which have high habitat suitability but few recorded NES. Some of these areas may represent under-sampled hotspots of narrow endemism and are priorities for further field work.

  18. Conservation priorities in a biodiversity hotspot: analysis of narrow endemic plant species in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Adrien S; Hollingsworth, Peter M; Ahrends, Antje; Jaffré, Tanguy; Veillon, Jean-Marie; L'Huillier, Laurent; Fogliani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    New Caledonia is a global biodiversity hotspot facing extreme environmental degradation. Given the urgent need for conservation prioritisation, we have made a first-pass quantitative assessment of the distribution of Narrow Endemic Species (NES) in the flora to identify species and sites that are potentially important for conservation action. We assessed the distributional status of all angiosperm and gymnosperm species using data from taxonomic descriptions and herbarium samples. We characterised species as being NES if they occurred in 3 or fewer locations. In total, 635 of the 2930 assessed species were classed as NES, of which only 150 have been subjected to the IUCN conservation assessment. As the distributional patterns of un-assessed species from one or two locations correspond well with assessed species which have been classified as Critically Endangered or Endangered respectively, we suggest that our distributional data can be used to prioritise species for IUCN assessment. We also used the distributional data to produce a map of "Hotspots of Plant Narrow Endemism" (HPNE). Combined, we used these data to evaluate the coincidence of NES with mining activities (a major source of threat on New Caledonia) and also areas of conservation protection. This is to identify species and locations in most urgent need of further conservation assessment and subsequent action. Finally, we grouped the NES based on the environments they occurred in and modelled the habitat distribution of these groups with a Maximum Entropy Species Distribution Model (MaxEnt). The NES were separable into three different groups based primarily on geological differences. The distribution of the habitat types for each group coincide partially with the HPNE described above and also indicates some areas which have high habitat suitability but few recorded NES. Some of these areas may represent under-sampled hotspots of narrow endemism and are priorities for further field work.

  19. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2014-05-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N2 and H2O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  20. A micro-epidemiological analysis of febrile malaria in Coastal Kenya showing hotspots within hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejon, Philip; Williams, Thomas N; Nyundo, Christopher; Hay, Simon I; Benz, David; Gething, Peter W; Otiende, Mark; Peshu, Judy; Bashraheil, Mahfudh; Greenhouse, Bryan; Bousema, Teun; Bauni, Evasius; Marsh, Kevin; Smith, David L; Borrmann, Steffen

    2014-04-24

    Malaria transmission is spatially heterogeneous. This reduces the efficacy of control strategies, but focusing control strategies on clusters or 'hotspots' of transmission may be highly effective. Among 1500 homesteads in coastal Kenya we calculated (a) the fraction of febrile children with positive malaria smears per homestead, and (b) the mean age of children with malaria per homestead. These two measures were inversely correlated, indicating that children in homesteads at higher transmission acquire immunity more rapidly. This inverse correlation increased gradually with increasing spatial scale of analysis, and hotspots of febrile malaria were identified at every scale. We found hotspots within hotspots, down to the level of an individual homestead. Febrile malaria hotspots were temporally unstable, but 4 km radius hotspots could be targeted for 1 month following 1 month periods of surveillance.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02130.001. Copyright © 2014, Bejon et al.

  1. Studies of plasmonic hot-spot translation by a metal-dielectric layered superlens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoreson, Mark D.; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; West, Paul R.;

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ability of a lamellar near-field superlens to transfer an enhanced electromagnetic field to the far side of the lens. In this work, we have experimentally and numerically investigated superlensing in the visible range. By using the resonant hot-spot field enhancements from opt...

  2. Coral Reef Watch, Hotspots, 50 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Coral Reef Watch provides Coral Bleaching hotspot maps derived from NOAA's Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). This data provides global area...

  3. Ultraconfined Plasmonic Hotspots Inside Graphene Nanobubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Foley, J J; Gannett, W; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Ni, G X; Zettl, A; Fogler, M M; Wiederrecht, G P; Gray, S K; Basov, D N

    2016-12-14

    We report on a nanoinfrared (IR) imaging study of ultraconfined plasmonic hotspots inside graphene nanobubbles formed in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. The volume of these plasmonic hotspots is more than one-million-times smaller than what could be achieved by free-space IR photons, and their real-space distributions are controlled by the sizes and shapes of the nanobubbles. Theoretical analysis indicates that the observed plasmonic hotspots are formed due to a significant increase of the local plasmon wavelength in the nanobubble regions. Such an increase is attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene plasmons to its dielectric environment. Our work presents a novel scheme for plasmonic hotspot formation and sheds light on future applications of graphene nanobubbles for plasmon-enhanced IR spectroscopy.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATION OF LIQUID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-02-26

    Feb 26, 2016 ... ... were evaluated. In microcosm assays, plants inoculated with these .... soil, where they will be introduced (Jardim-Freire,. 1997; Denton ..... in a study carried out in Chile, in which peanut ..... Australian Centre for International.

  5. Hotspots identification and ranking for road safety improvement: an alternative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Bronagh; Moutari, Salissou; Marshall, Adele H

    2013-10-01

    During the last decade, the concept of composite performance index, brought from economic and business statistics, has become a popular practice in the field of road safety, namely for the identification and classification of worst performing areas or time slots also known as hotspots. The overall quality of a composite index depends upon the complexity of phenomena of interest as well as the relevance of the methodological approach used to aggregate the various indicators into a single composite index. However, current aggregation methods used to estimate the composite road safety performance index suffer from various deficiencies at both the theoretical and operational level; these include the correlation and compensability between indicators, the weighting of the indicators as well as their high "degree of freedom" which enables one to readily manipulate them to produce desired outcomes (Munda and Nardo, 2003, 2005, 2009). The objective of this study is to contribute to the ongoing research effort on the estimation of road safety composite index for hotspots' identification and ranking. The aggregation method for constructing the composite road safety performance index introduced in this paper, strives to minimize the aforementioned deficiencies of the current approaches. Furthermore, this new method can be viewed as an intelligent decision support system for road safety performance evaluation, in order to prioritize interventions for road safety improvement.

  6. Computational evaluation oa a neutron field facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Jose Julio de O.; Pazianotto, Mauricio T., E-mail: jjfilos@hotmail.com, E-mail: mpazianotto@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Passaro, Angelo, E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: angelo@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a study based on computer simulation for a realistic 3D model of Ionizing Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code, in order to guide the installing a neutron generator, produced by reaction {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He. The equipment produces neutrons with energy of 14.1 MeV and 2 x 10{sup 8} n/s production rate in 4 πgeometry, which can also be used for neutron dosimetry studies. This work evaluated the spectra and neutron fluence provided on previously selected positions inside the facility, chosen due to the interest to evaluate the assessment of ambient dose equivalent so that they can be made the necessary adjustments to the installation to be consistent with the guidelines of radiation protection and radiation safety, determined by the standards of National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). (author)

  7. BENCHMARKING UPGRADED HOTSPOT DOSE CALCULATIONS AGAINST MACCS2 RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotherton, Kevin

    2009-04-30

    The radiological consequence of interest for a documented safety analysis (DSA) is the centerline Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) incurred by the Maximally Exposed Offsite Individual (MOI) evaluated at the 95th percentile consequence level. An upgraded version of HotSpot (Version 2.07) has been developed with the capabilities to read site meteorological data and perform the necessary statistical calculations to determine the 95th percentile consequence result. These capabilities should allow HotSpot to join MACCS2 (Version 1.13.1) and GENII (Version 1.485) as radiological consequence toolbox codes in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Central Registry. Using the same meteorological data file, scenarios involving a one curie release of {sup 239}Pu were modeled in both HotSpot and MACCS2. Several sets of release conditions were modeled, and the results compared. In each case, input parameter specifications for each code were chosen to match one another as much as the codes would allow. The results from the two codes are in excellent agreement. Slight differences observed in results are explained by algorithm differences.

  8. Field evaluation of herbal mosquito repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, N G; Nath, D R; Baruah, I; Talukdar, P K; Das, S C

    1999-12-01

    Repellent properties of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. Syn. Z. alatum Roxb. (Timur), Curcuma aromatica (Jungli haldi) and Azadirachta indica (Neem) oils were evaluated against mosquitoes in mustard (Brassica sp.) and coconut (Cocos sp.) oil base and compared with synthetic repellent. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) as standard. Timur and jungli haldi afforded better protection in the both the base at all the concentrations. Tepellents in mustard oil gave longer protection time than those in coconut oil. At 0.57 mg/cm2 concentration timur oil gave significantly higher protection both in mustard (445 min) as well as coconut oil (404 min) than the other repellents and DMP.

  9. Field-Based Concerns about Fourth-Generation Evaluation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Morris K.

    Some aspects of fourth generation evaluation procedures that have been advocated by E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln were examined empirically, with emphasis on areas where there have been discrepancies between theory and field-based experience. In fourth generation evaluation, the product of an evaluation is not a set of conclusions, recommendations,…

  10. Evaluation of the Field Gradient Lattice Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072983

    A novel Micro Pattern Gas Detector, named the Field Gradient Lattice Detector, has been implemented using technologies available to CERN’s Printed Circuit Workshop. Numerous prototypes based on various materials were constructed in different geometries and their gain performance has been studied using 55Fe and 109Cd X-ray sources in Argon-CO2 gas mixtures. Two axis (2D) prototype structures have been shown to provide stable gains of around 1000 while a 3D design, based on the same polyimide foils used in other MPGD elements, holds a gain of 5000 for 8.9 keV X-rays even at high rates of 22 kHz/mm2. At a gain of 3100, the device has been tested up to 1 MHz/mm2 and shows no signs of degradation in performance. The energy resolution of the 3D-in-polyimide is modest, around 40% for 5.9 keV X-rays and 30% if the source is collimated indicating a variation in gain over the 3x3 cm2 active area. Having the most promise for future applications, the 3D-in-polyimide design has been selected for testing with a custom-bu...

  11. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Winter

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T. For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T to 600 MHz (14.0T. The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50% hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32mm(3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  12. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  13. Flood risk assessment of land pollution hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Matteo; Arrighi, Chiara; Iannelli, Renato

    2017-04-01

    Among the risks caused by extreme events, the potential spread of pollutants stored in land hotspots due to floods is an aspect that has been rarely examined with a risk-based approach. In this contribution, an attempt to estimate pollution risks related to flood events of land pollution hotspots was carried out. Flood risk has been defined as the combination of river flood hazard, hotspots exposure and vulnerability to contamination of the area, i.e. the expected severity of the environmental impacts. The assessment was performed on a geographical basis, using geo-referenced open data, available from databases of land management institutions, authorities and agencies. The list of land pollution hotspots included landfills and other waste handling facilities (e.g., temporary storage, treatment and recycling sites), municipal wastewater treatment plants, liquid waste treatment facilities and contaminated sites. The assessment was carried out by combining geo-referenced data of pollution hotspots with flood hazard maps. We derived maps of land pollution risk based on geographical and geological properties and source characteristics available from environmental authorities. These included information about soil particle size, soil hydraulic conductivity, terrain slope, type of stored pollutants, the type of facility, capacity, size of the area, land use, etc. The analysis was carried out at catchment scale. The case study of the Arno river basin in Tuscany (central Italy) is presented.

  14. Predator diversity hotspots in the blue ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Boris; Lotze, Heike K; Myers, Ransom A

    2003-08-19

    Concentrations of biodiversity, or hotspots, represent conservation priorities in terrestrial ecosystems but remain largely unexplored in marine habitats. In the open ocean, many large predators such as tunas, sharks, billfishes, and sea turtles are of current conservation concern because of their vulnerability to overfishing and ecosystem role. Here we use scientific-observer records from pelagic longline fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to show that oceanic predators concentrate in distinct diversity hotspots. Predator diversity consistently peaks at intermediate latitudes (20-30 degrees N and S), where tropical and temperate species ranges overlap. Individual hotspots are found close to prominent habitat features such as reefs, shelf breaks, or seamounts and often coincide with zooplankton and coral reef hotspots. Closed-area models in the northwest Atlantic predict that protection of hotspots outperforms other area closures in safeguarding threatened pelagic predators from ecological extinction. We conclude that the seemingly monotonous landscape of the open ocean shows rich structure in species diversity and that these features should be used to focus future conservation efforts.

  15. Plate tectonics and hotspots: the third dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L; Tanimoto, T; Zhang, Y S

    1992-06-19

    High-resolution seismic tomographic models of the upper mantle provide powerful new constraints on theories of plate tectonics and hotspots. Midocean ridges have extremely low seismic velocities to a depth of 100 kilometers. These low velocities imply partial melting. At greater depths, low-velocity and high-velocity anomalies record, respectively, previous positions of migrating ridges and trenches. Extensional, rifting, and hotspot regions have deep (> 200 kilometers) low-velocity anomalies. The upper mantle is characterized by vast domains of high temperature rather than small regions surrounding hotspots; the asthenosphere is not homogeneous or isothermal. Extensive magmatism requires a combination of hot upper mantle and suitable lithospheric conditions. High-velocity regions of the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle correlate with Archean cratons.

  16. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the High Surface Brightness Hotspot in PKS1421-490

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, L E H; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Gelbord, J; Schwartz, D A; Marshall, H L; Birkinshaw, M; Georganopoulos, M; Murphy, D W; Perlman, E S; Worrall, D M

    2009-01-01

    Long Baseline Array imaging of the z=0.663 broad line radio galaxy PKS1421-490 reveals a 400 pc diameter high surface brightness hotspot at a projected distance of approximately 40kpc from the active galactic nucleus. The isotropic X-ray luminosity of the hotspot, L_{2-10 keV} = 3 10^{44} ergs/s, is comparable to the isotropic X-ray luminosity of the entire X-ray jet of PKS0637-752, and the peak radio surface brightness is hundreds of times greater than that of the brightest hotspot in Cygnus A. We model the radio to X-ray spectral energy distribution using a one-zone synchrotron self Compton model with a near equipartition magnetic field strength of 3 mG. There is a strong brightness asymmetry between the approaching and receding hotspots and the hot spot spectrum remains flat (alpha ~ 0.5) well beyond the predicted cooling break for a 3 mG magnetic field, indicating that the hotspot emission may be Doppler beamed. A high plasma velocity beyond the terminal jet shock could be the result of a dynamically impo...

  17. Evaluation of the 1st DIGIT field trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mass Soldal; Bogya, Emese Lujza

    2008-01-01

    This report evaluates the 1st DIGIT field trial, a security risk analysis conducted for Santander in the autumn of 2007. The evaluation includes lessons learned from the analysis and an empirical investigation into the use of the CORAS language in the analysis.

  18. Juniper Pollen Hotspots in the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, L. D.; VandeWater, P.; Luvall, J.; Levetin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Juniperus pollen is a major allergen in Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. While the bulk of pollen may be released in rural areas, large amounts of pollen can be transported to urban areas. Major juniper species in the region include: Juniperus ashei, J. virginiana, J. pinchotii, and J. monosperma. Pollen release is virtually continuous beginning in late September with J. pinchotii and ending in May with J. monosperma. Urban areas in the region were evaluated for the potential of overlapping seasons in order to inform sensitive individuals. Methods: Burkard volumetric pollen traps were established for two consecutive spring seasons at 6 sites in northern New Mexico and 6 sites for two consecutive winter and fall seasons in Texas and Oklahoma Standard methods were used in the preparation and analysis of slides. Results: The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is home to over 6 million people. It is adjacent to populations of J. pinchotii, J. virginiana, and J. ashei. Peak concentration near Dallas for J. ashei in 2011 was 5891 pollen grains/m3 in January 7th. The peak date for J. pinchotii at an upwind sampling location in San Marcos, TX was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was November 1, 2010 and peak for J. virginiana at a nearby station in Tulsa, OK was February 20, 2011. Amarillo, TX is adjacent to J. pinchotii, J. ashei, and J. monosperma populations and may be subject to juniper pollen from September through May. Conclusions: Considering the overlapping distributions of juniper trees and the overlapping temporal release of pollen, sensitive patients may benefit from avoiding hotspots.

  19. A Method for Evaluating the Magnetic Field Homogeneity of a Radiofrequency Coil by Its Field Histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q. X.; Li, S. H.; Smith, M. B.

    The magnetic field homogeneity of a radiofrequency coil is very important in both magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. In this report, a method is proposed for quantitatively evaluating the RF magnetic field homogeneity from its histogram, which is obtained by either experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. The experimental histogram and theoretical histogram can be compared directly to verify the theoretical findings. The RF field homogeneities of the bird-cage coil, slotted-tube resonator, cosine wire coil, and a new radial plate coil design were evaluated using this method. The results showed that the experimental histograms and the corresponding theoretical histograms are consistent. This method provides an easy and sensitive way of evaluating the magnetic field homogeneity and facilitates the design and evaluation of new RF coil configurations.

  20. Creating Hotspots for the Knowledge Economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Klundert, M.; Van Winden, W.

    2012-01-01

    The emerging knowledge economy alters the expectations for contemporary work environments. Everywhere, we see the development of campuses and other types of “knowledge hotspots”. In this article, the authors discuss the emergence of these hotspots, and provide a number of examples. They identify a n

  1. Ridges and hotspots: perspectives from global tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Shen; Tanimoto, Toshiro

    1991-01-01

    Resolution in global tomography has improved to a level of about 1000 km due to a rapid increase of digital data during the last decade. We have started to see various important tectonic features in some detail. We will attempt to summarize our current observations for ridges and hotspots.

  2. Eliminating "Hotspots" in Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    Signals from defective picture elements rejected. Image processing program for use with charge-coupled device (CCD) or other mosaic imager augmented with algorithm that compensates for common type of electronic defect. Algorithm prevents false interpretation of "hotspots". Used for robotics, image enhancement, image analysis and digital television.

  3. Hotspot Mainport Schiphol : midterm review report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Döpp, S.; Brink, van den P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Jacobs, A.; Homan, C.; Sondij, J.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of Knowledge for Climate (KfC) research in Hotspot Schiphol Mainport is to optimize the contribution of meteorological services to a sustainable operation and reliable operation of Schiphol airport. Three research projects have been carried out in the first tranche of the Knowledge for Cli

  4. Super-resolution chemical imaging with dynamic placement of plasmonic hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aeli P.; Ertsgaard, Christopher T.; McKoskey, Rachel M.; Rich, Isabel S.; Lindquist, Nathan C.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate dynamic placement of plasmonic "hotspots" for super-resolution chemical imaging via Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). A silver nanohole array surface was coated with biological samples and illuminated with a laser. Due to the large plasmonic field enhancements, blinking behavior of the SERS hotspots was observed and processed using a Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) algorithm enabling localization to within 10 nm. However, illumination of the sample with a single static laser beam (i.e., a slightly defocused Gaussian beam) only produced SERS hotspots in fixed locations on the surface, leaving noticeable gaps in any final image. But, by using a spatial light modulator (SLM), the illumination profile of the beam could be altered, shifting any hotspots across the nanohole array surface in sub-wavelength steps. Therefore, by properly structuring an illuminating light field with the SLM, we show the possibility of positioning plasmonic hotspots over a metallic nanohole surface on-the-fly. Using this and our SERS-STORM imaging technique, we show potential for high-resolution chemical imaging without the noticeable gaps that were present with static laser illumination. Interestingly, even illuminating the surface with randomly shifting SLM phase profiles was sufficient to completely fill in a wide field of view for super-resolution SERS imaging of a single strand of 100-nm thick collagen protein fibrils. Images were then compared to those obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally, we explored alternative methods of phase shifting other than holographic illumination through the SLM to create localization of hotspots necessary for SERS-STORM imaging.

  5. Hotspots of species richness, threat and endemism for terrestrial vertebrates in SW Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, López-López; Luigi, Maiorano; Alessandra, Falcucci; Emilio, Barba; Luigi, Boitani

    2011-09-01

    The Mediterranean basin, and the Iberian Peninsula in particular, represent an outstanding "hotspot" of biological diversity with a long history of integration between natural ecosystems and human activities. Using deductive distribution models, and considering both Spain and Portugal, we downscaled traditional range maps for terrestrial vertebrates (amphibians, breeding birds, mammals and reptiles) to the finest possible resolution with the data at hand, and we identified hotspots based on three criteria: i) species richness; ii) vulnerability, and iii) endemism. We also provided a first evaluation of the conservation status of biodiversity hotspots based on these three criteria considering both existing and proposed protected areas (i.e., Natura 2000). For the identification of hotspots, we used a method based on the cumulative distribution functions of species richness values. We found no clear surrogacy among the different types of hotspots in the Iberian Peninsula. The most important hotspots (considering all criteria) are located in the western and southwestern portions of the study area, in the Mediterranean biogeographical region. Existing protected areas are not specifically concentrated in areas of high species richness, with only 5.2% of the hotspots of total richness being currently protected. The Natura 2000 network can potentially constitute an important baseline for protecting vertebrate diversity in the Iberian Peninsula although further improvements are needed. We suggest taking a step forward in conservation planning in the Mediterranean basin, explicitly considering the history of the region as well as its present environmental context. This would allow moving from traditional reserve networks (conservation focused on "patterns") to considerations about the "processes" that generated present biodiversity.

  6. Post-occupancy evaluation and field studies of thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, F.; Roaf, S.

    2005-08-01

    The similarities and differences are explored in both the aims and the methods between post-occupancy evaluations and field studies of thermal comfort in buildings. The interpretations of the field study results are explored, especially the ways the results differ from laboratory experiments. Particular attention is drawn to the dynamic nature of the interaction between buildings and their occupants. Answers to questions of the type used in post-occupancy evaluations are compared with results from field studies of thermal comfort, and the implications of these findings for the evaluation of buildings and the conduct of post-occupancy evaluation are explored. Field studies of thermal comfort have shown that the way in which occupants evaluate the indoor thermal environment is context-dependent and varies with time. In using occupants as part of the means of measuring buildings, post-occupancy evaluations should be understood as reflecting the changing nature of the relationship between people, the climate and buildings. Surveys are therefore measuring a moving target, and close comparison based on such surveys need to take this in to account. (author)

  7. Research on Hotspot Discovery in Internet Public Opinions Based on Improved -Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to discover hotspot in the Internet public opinions effectively is a hot research field for the researchers related which plays a key role for governments and corporations to find useful information from mass data in the Internet. An improved -means algorithm for hotspot discovery in internet public opinions is presented based on the analysis of existing defects and calculation principle of original -means algorithm. First, some new methods are designed to preprocess website texts, select and express the characteristics of website texts, and define the similarity between two website texts, respectively. Second, clustering principle and the method of initial classification centers selection are analyzed and improved in order to overcome the limitations of original -means algorithm. Finally, the experimental results verify that the improved algorithm can improve the clustering stability and classification accuracy of hotspot discovery in internet public opinions when used in practice.

  8. Research on hotspot discovery in internet public opinions based on improved K-means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gensheng

    2013-01-01

    How to discover hotspot in the Internet public opinions effectively is a hot research field for the researchers related which plays a key role for governments and corporations to find useful information from mass data in the Internet. An improved K-means algorithm for hotspot discovery in internet public opinions is presented based on the analysis of existing defects and calculation principle of original K-means algorithm. First, some new methods are designed to preprocess website texts, select and express the characteristics of website texts, and define the similarity between two website texts, respectively. Second, clustering principle and the method of initial classification centers selection are analyzed and improved in order to overcome the limitations of original K-means algorithm. Finally, the experimental results verify that the improved algorithm can improve the clustering stability and classification accuracy of hotspot discovery in internet public opinions when used in practice.

  9. Identifying Erosional Hotspots in Streams Along the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota using High-Resolution Elevation and Soils Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Molly J.

    Many streams on the North Shore of Lake Superior, Minnesota, USA, are impaired for turbidity driven by excess fine sediment loading. The goal of this project was to develop a GIS-based model using new, openly-available, high-resolution remote datasets to predict erosional hotspots at a reach scale, based on three study watersheds: Amity Creek, the Talmadge River, and the French River. The ability to identify erosional hotspots, or locations that are highly susceptible to erosion, using remote data would be helpful for watershed managers in implementing practices to reduce turbidity in these streams. Erosion in streams is a balance between driving forces, largely controlled by topography; and resisting forces, controlled by the materials that make up a channel's bed and banks. New high-resolution topography and soils datasets for the North Shore provide the opportunity to extract these driving and resisting forces from remote datasets and possibly predict erosion potential and identify erosional hotspots. We used 3-meter LiDAR-derived DEMs to calculate a stream power-based erosion index, to identify stream reaches with high radius of curvature, and to identify stream reaches proximal to high bluffs. We used the Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database to investigate changes in erodibility along the channel. Because bedrock exposure significantly limits erodibility, we investigated bedrock exposure using bedrock outcrop maps made available by the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS, Hobbs, 2002; Hobbs, 2009), and by using a feature extraction tool to remotely map bedrock exposure using high-resolution air photos and LiDAR data. Predictions based on remote data were compared with two datasets. Bank Erosion Hazard Index surveys, which are surveys designed to evaluate erosion susceptibility of banks, were collected along the three streams. In addition, a 500-year flood event during our field season gave us the opportunity to collect erosion data after a major event and

  10. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services.

  11. First Results from HOTSPOT: The Snake River Plain Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Shervais

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available HOTSPOT is an international collaborative effort to understand the volcanic history of the Snake River Plain (SRP. The SRP overlies a thermal anomaly, the Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot, that is thought to represent a deep-seated mantle plume under North America. Theprimary goal of this project is to document the volcanic and stratigraphic history of the SRP, which represents the surface expression of this hotspot, and to understand how it affected the evolution of continental crust and mantle. An additional goal is to evaluate the geothermal potential of southern Idaho.Project HOTSPOT has completed three drill holes. (1 The Kimama site is located along the central volcanic axis of the SRP; our goal here was to sample a long-term record of basaltic volcanism in the wake of the SRP hotspot. (2 The Kimberly site is located near the margin of the plain; our goal here was to sample a record of high-temperaturerhyolite volcanism associated with the underlying plume. This site was chosen to form a nominally continuous record of volcanism when paired with the Kimama site. (3 The Mountain Home site is located in the western plain; our goal here was to sample the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition in lake sediments at this site and to sample older basalts that underlie the sediments.We report here on our initial results for each site, and on some of the geophysical logging studies carried out as part of this project.

  12. Hotspot Cooling with Self-Propelled Jumping Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaopeng; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Liu, Fangjie; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic hotspots are prevalent in electronic systems including microprocessors and power electronics with constantly changing computing tasks or payloads. Here, we report a new adaptive hotspot cooling technique that rapidly responds to moving hotspots in a passive manner independent of external forces. The hotspot cooling is based upon the self-propelled jumping of dropwise condensate, which directly returns the working fluid from a superhydrophobic condenser to an opposing superhydrophilic evaporator. The adaptive thermal management is accomplished by the preferential evaporation of water at the hotspots and the rapid jumping return of the condensate across the very short inter-plate distance. The proof-of-concept for this hotspot cooling technique will be demonstrated by the adaptive response to hotspots at increasing heat fluxes. Corresponding author.

  13. Factors Influencing Divergent Patterns of Phosphorus Availability in NY and PA Biogeochemical `Hotspots'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, S. M.; Hofmeister, K.; Regan, J. M.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Walter, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the soil phosphorus (P) cycle leads to subsequent water quality issues in agricultural dominated watersheds. In the humid Northeastern United States (NE US), variably saturated areas can generate surface runoff that transports P and stimulates biogeochemical processes; these hydrologically dynamic locations are often called biogeochemical `hotspots'. Many studies have evaluated nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesized seasonally wet parts of the landscape (i.e., hotspots) have smaller biologically available P pools because runoff events frequently carry away nutrients like P. To test this hypothesis, we generated soil wetness index (SWI) maps from soil (SURRGO) and elevation (LiDAR rescaled to 3 m) data and used these maps to direct seasonal soil sampling near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania (PA) and Ithaca, New York (NY). We collected 5cm deep soil samples in PA (bimonthly) and NY (monthly) along soil moisture gradients for a range of land cover types (forest, fallow, and cropped) from May through October. We measured soil moisture in the field and percent organic matter (OM), pH, and three increasingly strong soil P extractions (dilute-salt-extractable P, oxalate-extractable P, and total-extractable P) in the laboratory. Our results indicated a negative relationship between dilute-salt-extractable P concentrations and SWI in PA and no relationship between these same variables in NY. We also found positive relationships between each of the three P extractions in PA but only a positive relationship between oxalate-extractable P and total-extractable P in NY. Our findings in PA support our hypothesis; namely, less biologically available P (i.e. dilute-salt-extractable P) is found in wetter areas of the landscape. However, divergent P availability patterns in NY point to further complexities and confounding variables in our understanding in soil P processes. Further studies will look

  14. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  15. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  16. Performance Study of Multilayered Multistage Interconnection Networks under Hotspot Traffic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Vasiliadis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Multistage Interconnection Networks (MINs under hotspot traffic, where some percentage of the traffic is targeted at single nodes, which are also called hot spots, is of crucial interest. The prioritizing of packets has already been proposed at previous works as alleviation to the tree saturation problem, leading to a scheme that natively supports 2-class priority traffic. In order to prevent hotspot traffic from degrading uniform traffic we expand previous studies by introducing multilayer Switching Elements (SEs at last stages in an attempt to balance between MIN performance and cost. In this paper the performance evaluation of dual-priority, double-buffered, multilayer MINs under single hotspot setups is presented and analyzed using simulation experiments. The findings of this paper can be used by MIN designers to optimally configure their networks.

  17. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray hotspots from tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Daniel N.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-04-01

    We consider the possibility that tidal disruption events (TDEs) caused by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in nearby galaxies can account for the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) hotspot reported recently by the Telescope Array (TA) and the warm spot by Pierre Auger Observatory. We describe the expected cosmic ray signal from a TDE and derive the constraints set by the time-scale for dispersion due to Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields and the accretion time of the SMBH. We find that TDEs in M82 can explain the hotspot detected by the TA regardless of whether the UHECRs are composed of protons or heavier nuclei. We then check for consistency of the hot and warm spots from M82 and Cen A with the full-sky isotropic signal from all SMBHs within the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) radius. This analysis applies to any scenario in which the hot/warm spots are real and due to M82 and Cen A, regardless of whether TDEs are the source of UHECRs. We find that the isotropic flux implied by the luminosity density inferred from M82 and Cen A is bigger than that observed by roughly an order of magnitude, but we provide several possible explanations, including the possibility of a local overdensity and the possibility of intermediate-mass nuclei in UHECRs, to resolve the tension.

  18. Forecasting hotspots using predictive visual analytics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Ross; Hafen, Ryan; Rudolph, Stephen; Cleveland, William; Ebert, David

    2014-12-30

    A method for forecasting hotspots is provided. The method may include the steps of receiving input data at an input of the computational device, generating a temporal prediction based on the input data, generating a geospatial prediction based on the input data, and generating output data based on the time series and geospatial predictions. The output data may be configured to display at least one user interface at an output of the computational device.

  19. Integration and Evaluation of Nanophotonic Devices Using Optical Near Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Nomura, Wataru; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    In this chapter, we review the optical near-field phenomena and their applications to realize the nanophotonic device. To realize the nanometer-scale controllability in size and position, we demonstrate the feasibility of nanometer-scale chemical vapor deposition using optical near-field techniques (see Sect. 15.2). In which, the probe-less fabrication method for mass production is also demonstrated. To confirm the promising optical properties of individual ZnO for realizing nanophotonic devices, we performed the near-field evaluation of the ZnO quantum structure (see Sect. 15.3). To drive the nanophotonic device with external conventional diffraction-limited photonic device, the far-/near-field conversion device is required. Section 15.4 reviews nanometer-scale waveguide to be used as such a conversion device of the nanophotonic ICs.

  20. SENTIMENT ANALYSIS FOR ONLINE FORUMS HOTSPOT DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nirmala Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The user generated content on the web grows rapidly in this emergent information age. The evolutionary changes in technology make use of such information to capture only the user’s essence and finally the useful information are exposed to information seekers. Most of the existing research on text information processing, focuses in the factual domain rather than the opinion domain. Text mining plays a vital role in online forum opinion mining. But opinion mining from online forum is much more difficult than pure text process due to their semi structured characteristics. In this paper we detect online hotspot forums by computing sentiment analysis for text data available in each forum. This approach analyzes the forum text data and computes value for each piece of text. The proposed approach combines K-means clustering and Support Vector Machine (SVM classification algorithm that can be used to group the forums into two clusters forming hotspot forums and non-hotspot forums within the current time span. The experiment helps to identify that K-means and SVM together achieve highly consistent results. The prediction result of SVM is also compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision tree and among them SVM performs the best.

  1. Numerical evaluation of E-fields induced by body motion near high-field MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, S; Liu, F

    2004-01-01

    In modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both patients and radiologists are exposed to strong, nonuniform static magnetic fields inside or outside of the scanner, in which the body movement may be able to induce electric currents in tissues which could be possibly harmful. This paper presents theoretical investigations into the spatial distribution of induced E-fields in the human model when moving at various positions around the magnet. The numerical calculations are based on an efficient, quasistatic, finite-difference scheme and an anatomically realistic, full-body, male model. 3D field profiles from an actively-shielded 4 T magnet system are used and the body model projected through the field profile with normalized velocity. The simulation shows that it is possible to induce E-fields/currents near the level of physiological significance under some circumstances and provides insight into the spatial characteristics of the induced fields. The results are easy to extrapolate to very high field strengths for the safety evaluation at a variety of field strengths and motion velocities.

  2. HOTSPOT: The Snake River Scientifi c Drilling Project— Tracking the Yellowstone Hotspot Through Space and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas F. Williams

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The project “HOTSPOT: Scientifi c Drilling of the Snake River Plain” held its inaugural workshop in Twin Falls, Idaho, U.S.A. on 18–21 May 2006. This inter-disciplinary workshop, sponsored by the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP, explored the major scientifi c and logistical issues central to a transect of boreholes along the hotspot track and addressing the geochemical evolution of continental lithosphere in response to interaction with deepseated mantle hotspots or plumes. A series of four to six bore holes is envisioned, each about 1.5–2.0 km deep and located along the axis of the Snake River Plain. The holes will specific ally target the origin and evolution of hotspot-related volcanism in space and time. To accomplish scientific and logistical planning, sixty scientists from six countries attended the workshop.

  3. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  4. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$, that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  5. On multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, G.; Molas-Gallart, J.; De Rijcke, S.; Meijer, I.; Van der Weijden, I.; Wouters, P.

    2016-07-01

    This special session forms part of a larger program aimed at the multiplication and integration of methodological approaches in the research evaluation and innovation policy field. The session builds on previous initiatives by Gemma Derrick and colleagues at CWTS, INGENIO, the Rathenau Instituut and SPRU, exploring the advantages of qualitative methodological tools at the STI/ENID conference in Lugano, and an international workshop in London in October 2015. The program is highly topical: the research evaluation field is currently reconsidering its methodological foundations in light of new research questions arising from policy initiatives regarding a) the move toward open science; b) a reconceptualization of research excellence to include societal relevance; c) diversification of academic careers, and d) the search for indicators showcasing responsible research behavior and innovation. This new special session at STI2016 will advance and broaden the scope of previous initiatives by building bridges between cutting edge research involving quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodological research designs. Bringing together leading experts and promising researchers with distinctive methodological skill-sets, the session will demonstrate the advantages of cross-fertilization between ‘core’ and ‘peripheral’ methodological approaches for the research evaluation and science indicators field. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of the field size in dental diagnostic radiology system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, P.S.; Potiens, M.P.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work the field size of a dental X rays machine was evaluated considering the recommendation of the Brazilian Health Ministry Regulation 453 which established basic lines of radiological protection in medical and dental diagnostic radiology. The diameter of the field should not be superior to 6 cm in the localized end point, limiting the radiated area and protecting the head-neck region. The measurements were carried out in a dental X rays machine, Dabi Atlante, model Spectro 70X Seletronic. For the field size or useful beam determination, the intra-oral films were positioned on a plain surface to be exposed in four stages and two focus-film distances (FFD), 20 cm and 27.5 cm: 1) with spacer cone; 2) without spacer cone; 3) with spacer cone and film-holding device; 4) without spacer cone and film-holding device. The results show that the diameter of the field size is satisfactory only for FFD = 20 cm. When the film-holding device is used, which is recommended by the Regulation 453, item 5.8 d(ii), the diameter of the field size exceeds the maximum recommended value of 6 cm. (authors)

  7. Hotspot Prevention Through Runtime Reconfiguration in Network-On-Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Link, G M

    2011-01-01

    Many existing thermal management techniques focus on reducing the overall power consumption of the chip, and do not address location-specific temperature problems referred to as hotspots. We propose the use of dynamic runtime reconfiguration to shift the hotspot-inducing computation periodically and make the thermal profile more uniform. Our analysis shows that dynamic reconfiguration is an effective technique in reducing hotspots for NoCs.

  8. Relativistic Flows at the Hotspots of Radio Galaxies and Quasars?

    CERN Document Server

    Georganopoulos, M; Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2003-01-01

    We review the broad band properties of X-ray detected hotspots in radio galaxies and quasars. We show that their collective properties can be unified in a framework involving frequency dependent relativistic beaming and varying orientations to the observer's line of sight. The simplest dynamic model consistent with this picture is a slowing-down relativistic flow downstream from the hotspot shock, suggesting that the jet flow remains relativistic to the hotspot distances.

  9. Suicides on the Austrian railway network: hotspot analysis and effect of proximity to psychiatric institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Markus J; Klimek, Peter; Sonneck, Gernot; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Railway suicide is a significant public health problem. In addition to the loss of lives, these suicides occur in public space, causing traumatization among train drivers and passengers, and significant public transport delays. Prevention efforts depend upon accurate knowledge of clustering phenomena across the railway network, and spatial risk factors. Factors such as proximity to psychiatric institutions have been discussed to impact on railway suicides, but analytic evaluations are scarce and limited. We identify 15 hotspots on the Austrian railway system while taking case location uncertainties into account. These hotspots represent 0.9% of the total track length (5916 km/3676 miles) that account for up to 17% of all railway suicides (N=1130). We model suicide locations on the network using a smoothed inhomogeneous Poisson process and validate it using randomization tests. We find that the density of psychiatric beds is a significant predictor of railway suicide. Further predictors are population density, multitrack structure and-less consistently-spatial socio-economic factors including total suicide rates. We evaluate the model for the identified hotspots and show that the actual influence of these variables differs across individual hotspots. This analysis provides important information for suicide prevention research and practice. We recommend structural separation of railway tracks from nearby psychiatric institutions to prevent railway suicide.

  10. Suicides on the Austrian railway network: hotspot analysis and effect of proximity to psychiatric institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Peter; Sonneck, Gernot

    2017-01-01

    Railway suicide is a significant public health problem. In addition to the loss of lives, these suicides occur in public space, causing traumatization among train drivers and passengers, and significant public transport delays. Prevention efforts depend upon accurate knowledge of clustering phenomena across the railway network, and spatial risk factors. Factors such as proximity to psychiatric institutions have been discussed to impact on railway suicides, but analytic evaluations are scarce and limited. We identify 15 hotspots on the Austrian railway system while taking case location uncertainties into account. These hotspots represent 0.9% of the total track length (5916 km/3676 miles) that account for up to 17% of all railway suicides (N=1130). We model suicide locations on the network using a smoothed inhomogeneous Poisson process and validate it using randomization tests. We find that the density of psychiatric beds is a significant predictor of railway suicide. Further predictors are population density, multitrack structure and—less consistently—spatial socio-economic factors including total suicide rates. We evaluate the model for the identified hotspots and show that the actual influence of these variables differs across individual hotspots. This analysis provides important information for suicide prevention research and practice. We recommend structural separation of railway tracks from nearby psychiatric institutions to prevent railway suicide. PMID:28405359

  11. Hotspot tracks and the early rifting of the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason Morgan, W.

    1983-05-01

    Many hotspot tracks appear to become the locus of later rifting, as though the heat of the hotspot weakens the lithosphere and tens of millions of years later the continents are split along these weakened lines. Examples are the west coast of Greenland-east coast of Labrador (Madeira hotspot), the south coast of Mexico-north coast of Honduras (Guyana hotspot), and the south coast of West Africa-north coast of Brazil (St. Helena hotspot). A modern day analog of a possible future rift is the Snake River Plain, where the North American continent is being "pre-weakened" by the Yellowstone hotspot track. This conclusion is based on reconstructions of the motions of the continents over hotspots for the past 200 million years. The relative motions of the plates are determined from magnetic anomaly isochrons in the oceans and the motion of one plate is chosen ad hoc to best fit the motions of the plates over the hotspots. However, once the motion of this one plate is chosen, the motions of all the other plates are prescribed by the relative motion constraints. In addition to the correlation between the predicted tracks and sites of later continental breakup, exposed continental shields correlate with the tracks. Their exposure may be the result of hotspot induced uplift which has led to erosion of their former platform sediment cover.

  12. Isokinetic knee joint evaluation in track and field events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Paschalis, Vassilis; Theodorou, Anastasios A; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate maximal torque of the knee flexors and extensors, flexor/extensor ratios, and maximal torque differences between the 2 lower extremities in young track and field athletes. Forty male track and field athletes 13-17 years old and 20 male nonathletes of the same age participated in the study. Athletes were divided into 4 groups according to their age and event (12 runners and 10 jumpers 13-15 years old, 12 runners and 6 jumpers 16-17 years old) and nonathletes into 2 groups of the same age. Maximal torque evaluation of knee flexors and extensors was performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s(-1). At the age of 16-17 years, jumpers exhibited higher strength values at extension than did runners and nonathletes, whereas at the age of 13-15 years, no significant differences were found between events. Younger athletes were weaker than older athletes at flexion. Runners and jumpers were stronger than nonathletes in all relative peak torque parameters. Nonathletes exhibited a higher flexor/extensor ratio compared with runners and jumpers. Strength imbalance in athletes was found between the 2 lower extremities in knee flexors and extensors and also at flexor/extensor ratio of the same extremity. Young track and field athletes exhibit strength imbalances that could reduce their athletic performance, and specific strength training for the weak extremity may be needed.

  13. Hotspots of soil N2O emission enhanced through water absorption by plant residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, A.N.; Toosi, E.R.; Guber, A.K.; Ostrom, N.E.; Yu, J.; Azeem, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Robertson , G.P. (UAF Pakistan); (UC); (Hubei); (MSU)

    2017-06-05

    N2O is a highly potent greenhouse gas and arable soils represent its major anthropogenic source. Field-scale assessments and predictions of soil N2O emission remain uncertain and imprecise due to the episodic and microscale nature of microbial N2O production, most of which occurs within very small discrete soil volumes. Such hotspots of N2O production are often associated with decomposing plant residue. Here we quantify physical and hydrological soil characteristics that lead to strikingly accelerated N2O emissions in plant residue-induced hotspots. Results reveal a mechanism for microscale N2O emissions: water absorption by plant residue that creates unique micro-environmental conditions, markedly different from those of the bulk soil. Moisture levels within plant residue exceeded those of bulk soil by 4–10-fold and led to accelerated N2O production via microbial denitrification. The presence of large (Ø >35 μm) pores was a prerequisite for maximized hotspot N2O production and for subsequent diffusion to the atmosphere. Understanding and modelling hotspot microscale physical and hydrologic characteristics is a promising route to predict N2O emissions and thus to develop effective mitigation strategies and estimate global fluxes in a changing environment.

  14. Hotspots of soil N2O emission enhanced through water absorption by plant residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, A. N.; Toosi, E. R.; Guber, A. K.; Ostrom, N. E.; Yu, J.; Azeem, K.; Rivers, M. L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2017-07-01

    N2O is a highly potent greenhouse gas and arable soils represent its major anthropogenic source. Field-scale assessments and predictions of soil N2O emission remain uncertain and imprecise due to the episodic and microscale nature of microbial N2O production, most of which occurs within very small discrete soil volumes. Such hotspots of N2O production are often associated with decomposing plant residue. Here we quantify physical and hydrological soil characteristics that lead to strikingly accelerated N2O emissions in plant residue-induced hotspots. Results reveal a mechanism for microscale N2O emissions: water absorption by plant residue that creates unique micro-environmental conditions, markedly different from those of the bulk soil. Moisture levels within plant residue exceeded those of bulk soil by 4-10-fold and led to accelerated N2O production via microbial denitrification. The presence of large (∅ >35 μm) pores was a prerequisite for maximized hotspot N2O production and for subsequent diffusion to the atmosphere. Understanding and modelling hotspot microscale physical and hydrologic characteristics is a promising route to predict N2O emissions and thus to develop effective mitigation strategies and estimate global fluxes in a changing environment.

  15. Evaluation of Depth of Field for depth perception in DVR

    KAUST Repository

    Grosset, A.V.Pascal

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a user study on the use of Depth of Field for depth perception in Direct Volume Rendering. Direct Volume Rendering with Phong shading and perspective projection is used as the baseline. Depth of Field is then added to see its impact on the correct perception of ordinal depth. Accuracy and response time are used as the metrics to evaluate the usefulness of Depth of Field. The onsite user study has two parts: static and dynamic. Eye tracking is used to monitor the gaze of the subjects. From our results we see that though Depth of Field does not act as a proper depth cue in all conditions, it can be used to reinforce the perception of which feature is in front of the other. The best results (high accuracy & fast response time) for correct perception of ordinal depth occurs when the front feature (out of the two features users were to choose from) is in focus and perspective projection is used. © 2013 IEEE.

  16. Geographic Hotspots of Critical National Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Scott; Barr, Stuart; Pant, Raghav; Hall, Jim W; Alderson, David

    2017-06-12

    Failure of critical national infrastructures can result in major disruptions to society and the economy. Understanding the criticality of individual assets and the geographic areas in which they are located is essential for targeting investments to reduce risks and enhance system resilience. Within this study we provide new insights into the criticality of real-life critical infrastructure networks by integrating high-resolution data on infrastructure location, connectivity, interdependence, and usage. We propose a metric of infrastructure criticality in terms of the number of users who may be directly or indirectly disrupted by the failure of physically interdependent infrastructures. Kernel density estimation is used to integrate spatially discrete criticality values associated with individual infrastructure assets, producing a continuous surface from which statistically significant infrastructure criticality hotspots are identified. We develop a comprehensive and unique national-scale demonstration for England and Wales that utilizes previously unavailable data from the energy, transport, water, waste, and digital communications sectors. The testing of 200,000 failure scenarios identifies that hotspots are typically located around the periphery of urban areas where there are large facilities upon which many users depend or where several critical infrastructures are concentrated in one location. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Upscaling methane emission hotspots in boreal peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cresto Aleina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Upscaling the properties and the effects of small-scale surface heterogeneities to larger scales is a challenging issue in land surface modeling. We developed a novel approach to upscale local methane emissions in a boreal peatland from the micro-topographic scale to the landscape-scale. We based this new parameterization on the analysis of the water table pattern generated by the Hummock–Hollow model, a micro-topography resolving model for peatland hydrology. We introduce this parameterization of methane hotspots in a global model-like version of the Hummock–Hollow model, that underestimates methane emissions. We tested the robustness of the parameterization by simulating methane emissions for the next century forcing the model with three different RCP scenarios. The Hotspot parameterization, despite being calibrated for the 1976–2005 climatology, mimics the output of the micro-topography resolving model for all the simulated scenarios. The new approach bridges the scale gap of methane emissions between this version of the model and the configuration explicitly resolving micro-topography.

  18. Quick Evaluation of the Annual Heliostat Field Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F. J.; Monne, C.; Garcia, M.

    2006-07-01

    The recent world wide interest in solar tower power justifies the presentation of a simplified model which allows quick evaluations of the annual energy collected by a surrounding heliostat field. The model is the combination of an analytical model of the flux density produced by a heliostat from Zaragoza University and a optimized mirror density distribution developed by Houston University. The abilities of the combined model are successfully compared against the limited open data about the project Solar Tres. However, the density model should be refined in some aspects and shadowing and blocking should be reviewed in depth using discrete distributions. (Author)

  19. Quick evaluation of the annual heliostat field efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Univ. Zaragoza, CPS-B, Dpto de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    The recent world wide interest in solar power tower justifies the presentation of a simplified model that allows quick evaluations of the annual overall energy collected by a surrounding heliostat field, which is sent to the electric power generating system (EPGS). The model is the combination of an analytical model of the flux density produced by a heliostat from Zaragoza University, an optimized mirror density distribution developed by University of Houston for the Solar One project and molten salt receiver efficiencies measured during the Solar Two project. The abilities of the model are successfully compared against the scarce open data about the next Solar Tres demonstration plant-a 15 MWe solar tower with molten salts storage. This simplified model could be valid for rather preliminary optimizations, although it should not substitute much more accurate discrete evaluations that manage thousands of individual heliostats with their actual shadowing and blockings, performed every few minutes using actual meteorological data. (author)

  20. Field study evaluation of diffuse ceiling ventilation in classroom during real operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin Heine; Jensen, Jakob Søland; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort.......Highlights •Field experimental measurements during real operating conditions. •Evaluation of pressure chamber effect. •Evaluation of displacement effect. •Evaluation of thermal comfort....

  1. The Impact of Hotspot-Targeted Interventions on Malaria Transmission in Rachuonyo South District in the Western Kenyan Highlands: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teun Bousema

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous, generating malaria hotspots that can fuel malaria transmission across a wider area. Targeting hotspots may represent an efficacious strategy for reducing malaria transmission. We determined the impact of interventions targeted to serologically defined malaria hotspots on malaria transmission both inside hotspots and in surrounding communities.Twenty-seven serologically defined malaria hotspots were detected in a survey conducted from 24 June to 31 July 2011 that included 17,503 individuals from 3,213 compounds in a 100-km2 area in Rachuonyo South District, Kenya. In a cluster-randomized trial from 22 March to 15 April 2012, we randomly allocated five clusters to hotspot-targeted interventions with larviciding, distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets, indoor residual spraying, and focal mass drug administration (2,082 individuals in 432 compounds; five control clusters received malaria control following Kenyan national policy (2,468 individuals in 512 compounds. Our primary outcome measure was parasite prevalence in evaluation zones up to 500 m outside hotspots, determined by nested PCR (nPCR at baseline and 8 wk (16 June-6 July 2012 and 16 wk (21 August-10 September 2012 post-intervention by technicians blinded to the intervention arm. Secondary outcome measures were parasite prevalence inside hotpots, parasite prevalence in the evaluation zone as a function of distance from the hotspot boundary, Anopheles mosquito density, mosquito breeding site productivity, malaria incidence by passive case detection, and the safety and acceptability of the interventions. Intervention coverage exceeded 87% for all interventions. Hotspot-targeted interventions did not result in a change in nPCR parasite prevalence outside hotspot boundaries (p ≥ 0.187. We observed an average reduction in nPCR parasite prevalence of 10.2% (95% CI -1.3 to 21.7% inside hotspots 8 wk post-intervention that was

  2. Evaluation of free-field transfer functions in anomalous reverberant fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guo; He, Lin; Xu, Rongwu

    2017-01-01

    The structural-acoustic transfer functions of complex structures are often measured in anomalous reverberant environments. Aiming to eliminating the influences of these reverberant fields on structural-acoustic transfer functions, an impulse-based synchronization average evaluation method is proposed. Structures are actuated according to an impulse signal, and the response signals are synchronized in time and averaged in space. This method does not require complex data processing, and the free-field transfer functions can be obtained based on the measurements in reverberant fields and the transfer characteristics of the structures are preserved. Moreover, in combination with the principle of reciprocity, the proposed method does not require the installation of impulse actuators in structures. The proposed method is verified numerically and validated in a deep lake experiment using a cylindrical model. The results show that the structural-acoustic transfer functions in the profundal zone can be effectively evaluated using the data collected in the shallow zone, and the error is less than 3 dB at most frequencies.

  3. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  4. The emergence of motives in liminal hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten; Sørensen, Kathrine Solgaard

    2017-01-01

    The concept of “motivation” commonly constructs as a psychological essence what is really the paradoxical imposition of a required desire. While the resulting impasse blocked theoretical development for around four decades, pragmatic motivational techniques evolved regardless. These could...... be (probably to no avail) dismissed for not taking account of the deep theoretical problems. This article suggests instead to rearticulate them with the conceptual repertoire of liminal hotspots, which directs attention to the emergent nature of activities and collectives, and thus motives. This is done...... as part of an ongoing collaboration with counselors who experiment with different ways of helping young drug users without taking motivation as premise, in the sense of a prerequisite, for interventions. Data from recorded counseling sessions are analyzed and rearticulated, first in terms of the classical...

  5. Regional Climate Change Hotspots over Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anber, U.; Zakey, A.; Abd El Wahab, M.

    2009-04-01

    Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI), is developed based on regional mean precipitation change, mean surface air temperature change, and change in precipitation and temperature interannual variability. The RCCI is a comparative index designed to identify the most responsive regions to climate change, or Hot- Spots. The RCCI is calculated for Seven land regions over North Africa and Arabian region from the latest set of climate change projections by 14 global climates for the A1B, A2 and B1 IPCC emission scenarios. The concept of climate change can be approaches from the viewpoint of vulnerability or from that of climate response. In the former case a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region for which potential climate change impacts on the environment or different activity sectors can be particularly pronounced. In the other case, a Hot-Spot can be defined as a region whose climate is especially responsive to global change. In particular, the characterization of climate change response-based Hot-Spot can provide key information to identify and investigate climate change Hot-Spots based on results from multi-model ensemble of climate change simulations performed by modeling groups from around the world as contributions to the Fourth Assessment Report of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI) is defined based on four variables: change in regional mean surface air temperature relative to the global average temperature change ( or Regional Warming Amplification Factor, RWAF ), change in mean regional precipitation (P % , of present day value ), change in regional surface air temperature interannual variability (T % ,of present day value), change in regional precipitation interannual variability (P % ,of present day value ). In the definition of the RCCI it is important to include quantities other than mean change because often mean changes are not the only important factors for specific impacts. We thus also include inter

  6. The Emergence of Motives in Liminal Hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten; Sørensen, Kathrine Solgaard

    2016-01-01

    The concept of ‘motivation’ commonly constructs as a psychological essence what is really the paradoxical imposition of a required desire. While the resulting impasse blocked theoretical development for around four decades, pragmatic motivational techniques evolved regardless. These could...... be (probably to no avail) dismissed for not taking account of the deep theoretical problems. This article suggests instead to re-articulate them with the conceptual repertoire of liminal hotspots, which directs attention to the emergent nature of activities and collectives, and thus motives. This is done...... as part of an ongoing collaboration with counsellors who experiment with different ways of helping young drug users without taking motivation as premise, in the sense of a pre-requisite, for interventions. Data from recorded counselling situations are analyzed and rearticulated, first in terms...

  7. Key Biodiversity Areas identification in Japan Hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Natori

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Priority sites within Japan Hotspot were identified using Key Biodiversity Area (KBA criteria, based on vulnerability and irreplaceability. The identification process considered 217 trigger species from mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, freshwater and brackish water fishes and odonates, and focused on identifying gaps in Japan’s protected-area system. We identified 228 sites as KBAs and 50 rivers as candidate KBAs. Collectively, KBAs occupy 18% of the land, about half is not protected. Sites selected include natural and semi-natural environments, and appropriate form of protection is site-dependent. Twenty percent of Japanese terrestrial area is already protected, although to varying degrees, but additional 8% should also receive protection or proper management to strengthen the conservation of biodiversity in Japan.

  8. An underappreciated hotspot of antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-Lin; Li, Hu; Zhou, Xin-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Landfills are so far the most common practice for the disposals of municipal solid waste (MSW) worldwide. Since MSW landfill receives miscellaneous wastes, including unused/expired antibiotics and bioactive wastes, it gradually becomes a huge potential bioreactor for breeding antibiotic resistance....... Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in landfill can flow to the environment through leakage of landfill leachate and pose a risk to public health. Using high throughput quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (HT-qPCR), we investigated the prevalence, diversity of ARGs and its association with various mobile...... be the potential hosts of ARGs. These findings provide evidence that groundwater near MSW landfill is an underappreciated hotspot of antibiotic resistance and contribute to the spread of ARGs via the flowing contaminated groundwater....

  9. Overlooked mountain rock pools in deserts are critical local hotspots of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida Gomes Vale

    Full Text Available The world is undergoing exceptional biodiversity loss. Most conservation efforts target biodiversity hotspots at large scales. Such approach overlooks small-sized local hotspots, which may be rich in endemic and highly threatened species. We explore the importance of mountain rock pools (gueltas as local biodiversity hotspots in the Sahara-Sahel. Specifically, we considered how many vertebrates (total and endemics use gueltas, what factors predict species richness, and which gueltas are of most priority for conservation. We expected to provide management recommendations, improve local biodiversity conservation, and simultaneously contribute with a framework for future enhancement of local communities' economy. The identification of local hotspots of biodiversity is important for revaluating global conservation priorities.We quantified the number of vertebrate species from each taxonomic group and endemics present in 69 gueltas in Mauritania, then compared these with species present in a surrounding area and recorded in the country. We evaluated the predictors of species number's present in each guelta through a multiple regression model. We ranked gueltas by their priority for conservation taking into account the percentage of endemics and threats to each guelta. Within a mere aggregate extent of 43 ha, gueltas hold about 32% and 78% of the total taxa analysed and endemics of Mauritania, respectively. The number of species present in each guelta increased with the primary productivity and area of gueltas and occurrence of permanent water. Droughts and human activities threaten gueltas, while 64% of them are currently unprotected.Gueltas are crucial for local biodiversity conservation and human activities. They require urgent management plans in Mauritania's mountains. They could provide refugia under climate change being important for long-term conservation of Sahara-Sahel biodiversity. Given their disproportional importance in relation to their

  10. Overlooked mountain rock pools in deserts are critical local hotspots of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Cândida Gomes; Pimm, Stuart L; Brito, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The world is undergoing exceptional biodiversity loss. Most conservation efforts target biodiversity hotspots at large scales. Such approach overlooks small-sized local hotspots, which may be rich in endemic and highly threatened species. We explore the importance of mountain rock pools (gueltas) as local biodiversity hotspots in the Sahara-Sahel. Specifically, we considered how many vertebrates (total and endemics) use gueltas, what factors predict species richness, and which gueltas are of most priority for conservation. We expected to provide management recommendations, improve local biodiversity conservation, and simultaneously contribute with a framework for future enhancement of local communities' economy. The identification of local hotspots of biodiversity is important for revaluating global conservation priorities. We quantified the number of vertebrate species from each taxonomic group and endemics present in 69 gueltas in Mauritania, then compared these with species present in a surrounding area and recorded in the country. We evaluated the predictors of species number's present in each guelta through a multiple regression model. We ranked gueltas by their priority for conservation taking into account the percentage of endemics and threats to each guelta. Within a mere aggregate extent of 43 ha, gueltas hold about 32% and 78% of the total taxa analysed and endemics of Mauritania, respectively. The number of species present in each guelta increased with the primary productivity and area of gueltas and occurrence of permanent water. Droughts and human activities threaten gueltas, while 64% of them are currently unprotected. Gueltas are crucial for local biodiversity conservation and human activities. They require urgent management plans in Mauritania's mountains. They could provide refugia under climate change being important for long-term conservation of Sahara-Sahel biodiversity. Given their disproportional importance in relation to their size, they are

  11. Hotspots of land use change in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuemmerle, Tobias; Levers, Christian; Erb, Karlheinz; Estel, Stephan; Jepsen, Martin R.; Müller, Daniel; Plutzar, Christoph; Stürck, Julia; Verkerk, Pieter J.; Verburg, Peter H.; Reenberg, Anette

    2016-06-01

    Assessing changes in the extent and management intensity of land use is crucial to understanding land-system dynamics and their environmental and social outcomes. Yet, changes in the spatial patterns of land management intensity, and thus how they might relate to changes in the extent of land uses, remains unclear for many world regions. We compiled and analyzed high-resolution, spatially-explicit land-use change indicators capturing changes in both the extent and management intensity of cropland, grazing land, forests, and urban areas for all of Europe for the period 1990-2006. Based on these indicators, we identified hotspots of change and explored the spatial concordance of area versus intensity changes. We found a clear East-West divide with regard to agriculture, with stronger cropland declines and lower management intensity in the East compared to the West. Yet, these patterns were not uniform and diverging patterns of intensification in areas highly suitable for farming, and disintensification and cropland contraction in more marginal areas emerged. Despite the moderate overall rates of change, many regions in Europe fell into at least one land-use change hotspot during 1990-2006, often related to a spatial reorganization of land use (i.e., co-occurring area decline and intensification or co-occurring area increase and disintensification). Our analyses highlighted the diverse spatial patterns and heterogeneity of land-use changes in Europe, and the importance of jointly considering changes in the extent and management intensity of land use, as well as feedbacks among land-use sectors. Given this spatial differentiation of land-use change, and thus its environmental impacts, spatially-explicit assessments of land-use dynamics are important for context-specific, regionalized land-use policy making.

  12. Future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Piero; Pressey, Robert L.; Giorgini, Daniele; Maiorano, Luigi; Bakkenes, Michel; Boitani, Luigi; Alkemade, Rob; Falcucci, Alessandra; Chiozza, Federica; Rondinini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Current levels of endangerment and historical trends of species and habitats are the main criteria used to direct conservation efforts globally. Estimates of future declines, which might indicate different priorities than past declines, have been limited by the lack of appropriate data and models. Given that much of conservation is about anticipating and responding to future threats, our inability to look forward at a global scale has been a major constraint on effective action. Here, we assess the geography and extent of projected future changes in suitable habitat for terrestrial mammals within their present ranges. We used a global earth-system model, IMAGE, coupled with fine-scale habitat suitability models and parametrized according to four global scenarios of human development. We identified the most affected countries by 2050 for each scenario, assuming that no additional conservation actions other than those described in the scenarios take place. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the countries with the largest predicted losses of suitable habitat for mammals are in Africa and the Americas. African and North American countries were also predicted to host the most species with large proportional global declines. Most of the countries we identified as future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss have little or no overlap with the present global conservation priorities, thus confirming the need for forward-looking analyses in conservation priority setting. The expected growth in human populations and consumption in hotspots of future mammal loss mean that local conservation actions such as protected areas might not be sufficient to mitigate losses. Other policies, directed towards the root causes of biodiversity loss, are required, both in Africa and other parts of the world. PMID:21844048

  13. HIV-1 vaccine-induced T-cell responses cluster in epitope hotspots that differ from those induced in natural infection with HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Hertz

    Full Text Available Several recent large clinical trials evaluated HIV vaccine candidates that were based on recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd-5 vectors expressing HIV-derived antigens. These vaccines primarily elicited T-cell responses, which are known to be critical for controlling HIV infection. In the current study, we present a meta-analysis of epitope mapping data from 177 participants in three clinical trials that tested two different HIV vaccines: MRKAd-5 HIV and VRC-HIVAD014-00VP. We characterized the population-level epitope responses in these trials by generating population-based epitope maps, and also designed such maps using a large cohort of 372 naturally infected individuals. We used these maps to address several questions: (1 Are vaccine-induced responses randomly distributed across vaccine inserts, or do they cluster into immunodominant epitope hotspots? (2 Are the immunodominance patterns observed for these two vaccines in three vaccine trials different from one another? (3 Do vaccine-induced hotspots overlap with epitope hotspots induced by chronic natural infection with HIV-1? (4 Do immunodominant hotspots target evolutionarily conserved regions of the HIV genome? (5 Can epitope prediction methods be used to identify these hotspots? We found that vaccine responses clustered into epitope hotspots in all three vaccine trials and some of these hotspots were not observed in chronic natural infection. We also found significant differences between the immunodominance patterns generated in each trial, even comparing two trials that tested the same vaccine in different populations. Some of the vaccine-induced immunodominant hotspots were located in highly variable regions of the HIV genome, and this was more evident for the MRKAd-5 HIV vaccine. Finally, we found that epitope prediction methods can partially predict the location of vaccine-induced epitope hotspots. Our findings have implications for vaccine design and suggest a framework by which

  14. Impacts of people and tigers on leopard spatiotemporal activity patterns in a global biodiversity hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Carter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leopard population declines largely occur in areas where leopards and people frequently interact. Research on how leopards respond to human presence and competitors, like other predators, can provide important insights on leopard ecology and conservation in human-dominated regions; however, such research is lacking. Here we used data from field cameras in 2010 and 2011 to examine how human presence, prey, and tigers influence leopard spatiotemporal activity patterns in and around Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, part of a global biodiversity hotspot. We found that leopards were adjusting their spatiotemporal activity patterns to both tigers and people, but by different mechanisms. Leopards spatially avoided tigers in 2010, but were generally active at the same times of day that tigers were. Despite pervasive human presence, people on foot and vehicles had no significant effect on leopard detection and space use, but leopard temporal activity was displaced from those periods of time with highest human activity. Temporal displacement from humans was especially pronounced outside the park, where there is a much greater prevalence of natural resource collection by local people. Continuing to evaluate the interconnections among leopards, tigers, prey, and people across different land management regimes is needed to develop robust landscape-scale conservation strategies.

  15. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fouriki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods: non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results: Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion: In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™.

  16. Retraction: Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Bakir

    2010-11-01

    The Editor-in-chief of the Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences has decided to retract the article from Bayazit V et al. [1] entitled as: "Evaluation of carcinogenic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF)" published in Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2010 Aug;10(3):245-50. After the editorial office was alerted of possible plagiarism in the article, it conducted thorough investigation and concluded that the article apparently represents plagiarized material from two World Health Organization reports, one European Commission report and other sources. Since this is considered scientific plagiarism and scientific misconduct, Editor-in-chief has decided to withdraw the article. The authors have agreed with the editorial office decision.

  17. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  18. Evaluation of an electric field sensor for nondestructive material inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, Kayatri; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2013-01-01

    An electric field sensor is fabricated on a 125 micron thick flexible dielectric substrate for electromagnetic (EM) nondestructive material inspection at 915 MHz. The sensor consists of an electrically short dipole antenna and a radio frequency (RF) diode detector connected to a pair of high impedance screen printed carbon lines. The DC component of the rectified diode voltage conveyed across the high impedance lines is measured using a data acquisition circuit. Sensor measurements are validated with simulated data for a conformal patch antenna operating at 915 MHz. Sensor performance for EM nondestructive testing (NDT) is evaluated using phantom defects in low loss dielectric slabs. Preliminary results indicate sensor utility for EM NDT and support further testing on realistic defects.

  19. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses field evaluations of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles performed by NREL. The project provides medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis, including 3rd party unbiased data (data that would not normally be shared by industry in an aggregated and detailed manner). Over 5.6 million miles of advanced technology MD and HD truck data have been collected, documented, and analyzed on over 240 different vehicles since 2002. Data, analysis, and reports are shared within DOE, national laboratory partners, and industry for R&D planning and strategy. The results help guide R&D for new technology development, help define intelligent usage of newly developed technology, and help fleets/users understand all aspects of advanced technology.

  20. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Adhikari

    Full Text Available Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF. The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species.

  1. Modelling Hotspots for Invasive Alien Plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Dibyendu; Tiwary, Raghuvar; Barik, Saroj Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Identification of invasion hotspots that support multiple invasive alien species (IAS) is a pre-requisite for control and management of invasion. However, till recently it remained a methodological challenge to precisely determine such invasive hotspots. We identified the hotspots of alien species invasion in India through Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) using species occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). The predicted area of invasion for selected species were classified into 4 categories based on number of model agreements for a region i.e. high, medium, low and very low. About 49% of the total geographical area of India was predicted to be prone to invasion at moderate to high levels of climatic suitability. The intersection of anthropogenic biomes and ecoregions with the regions of 'high' climatic suitability was classified as hotspot of alien plant invasion. Nineteen of 47 ecoregions of India, harboured such hotspots. Most ecologically sensitive regions of India, including the 'biodiversity hotspots' and coastal regions coincide with invasion hotspots, indicating their vulnerability to alien plant invasion. Besides demonstrating the usefulness of ENM and open source data for IAS management, the present study provides a knowledge base for guiding the formulation of an effective policy and management strategy for controlling the invasive alien species.

  2. Reactive vaccination in the presence of disease hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Andrew S; Lessler, Justin

    2015-01-07

    Reactive vaccination has recently been adopted as an outbreak response tool for cholera and other infectious diseases. Owing to the global shortage of oral cholera vaccine, health officials must quickly decide who and where to distribute limited vaccine. Targeted vaccination in transmission hotspots (i.e. areas with high transmission efficiency) may be a potential approach to efficiently allocate vaccine, however its effectiveness will likely be context-dependent. We compared strategies for allocating vaccine across multiple areas with heterogeneous transmission efficiency. We constructed metapopulation models of a cholera-like disease and compared simulated epidemics where: vaccine is targeted at areas of high or low transmission efficiency, where vaccine is distributed across the population, and where no vaccine is used. We find that connectivity between populations, transmission efficiency, vaccination timing and the amount of vaccine available all shape the performance of different allocation strategies. In highly connected settings (e.g. cities) when vaccinating early in the epidemic, targeting limited vaccine at transmission hotspots is often optimal. Once vaccination is delayed, targeting the hotspot is rarely optimal, and strategies that either spread vaccine between areas or those targeted at non-hotspots will avert more cases. Although hotspots may be an intuitive outbreak control target, we show that, in many situations, the hotspot-epidemic proceeds so fast that hotspot-targeted reactive vaccination will prevent relatively few cases, and vaccination shared across areas where transmission can be sustained is often best.

  3. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-03-01

    With the advancement of VLSI technology nodes, light diffraction caused lithographic hotspots have become a serious problem affecting manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with extreme scaling of transistor feature size and more and more complicated layout patterns, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. In this paper, we present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) targeting representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyper-parameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always minorities in VLSI mask design, the training data set is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from high false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply minority upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves highly comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  4. Performance Analysis of Small Cells' Deployment under Imperfect Traffic Hotspot Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Jaziri, Aymen; Nasri, Ridha; Chahed, Tijani

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets), long been considered in operators' roadmaps for macrocells' network improvements, still continue to attract interest for 5G network deployments. Understanding the efficiency of small cell deployment in the presence of traffic hotspots can further draw operators' attention to this feature. In this context, we evaluate the impact of imperfect small cell positioning on the network performances. We show that the latter is mainly impacted by the position of the ho...

  5. Hydrologic and Undernourisment Trends In Food Insecurity Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. C.; Mishra, V.; Davenport, F.

    2011-12-01

    As food prices rise, per capita harvested area diminishes and competition for limited resources mounts, the number of undernourished people has risen to more than a billion people. In this study, we target 80 potentially food insecure countries, examining hydrologic and undernourishment trends. For each country, primary cultivation areas are identified, and hydrologic variables extracted from simulations based on the Variable Infiltration Capacity model driven with the Princeton University climate data. Trends in runoff, soil moisture, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and temperature are evaluated. In addition to precipitation driven-aridity, the analysis also evaluates possible temperature-related shifts in sensible versus latent heat fluxes during energy-limited portions of the growing seasons. Changes in the timing and magnitude of streamflow are also investigated. The undernourishment trends are explored using the FAO percent under-nourished formulation, which determines the fraction of the population falling below a critical caloric threshold by using national food balance sheets (quantity) and a caloric distribution based on economic equality. Trends in quantity and equity, and their effects on undernourishment are evaluated, and vulnerability to price volatility quantified. Finally, a sub-set of countries facing both hydrologic declines and undernourishment increases are identified as food security hotspots.

  6. Quantification of NOx emissions from NO2 hotspots over China: A satellite perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Beirle, Steffen; Zhang, Qiang; Wagner, Thomas; He, Kebin

    2014-05-01

    China is the primary contributor of global anthropogenic NOx emissions, owing to its massive energy demand driven by strong economic growth. Most of the emissions are emitted by power plants or/and from urban areas, from which have been placed considerable emphasis on promoting emission reduction by Chinese government. Better knowledge of their emissions could help to assess the achieved emission reductions and provide perspectives as to the future effectiveness, which is also a valuable aid for taking regulatory steps. Thus we have developed an unit-based emission inventory of China's coal-fired power plants with high spatial and temporal resolution for the period 1990-2010 in our previous work (Liu et al., in preparation), but developing an emission inventory for each city at the same resolution and accuracy is much more challenging. Strong power plants and large cities can be identified as NO2 "hotspots" using satellite-based instruments. It has been demonstrated in previous studies (Beirle et al., Science, 2011) that OMI products can be applied for the determination of megacity NOx emissions and their lifetime by analyzing the downwind decay of the NO2 plume. In addition, from the analysis of the OMI time-series, the construction of new, large power plants in China can clearly be identified (Zhang et al, GRL, 2009). We are working on determining Chinese hotspots emissions and lifetimes of NOx simultaneously from the observed downwind plume evolution and ECMWF wind fields using the latest OMI product (DOMINO V2.0). However, the method applied to isolated megacities like Riyadh needs to be modified in order to take interferences of several strong NOx sources within small distances into account.We will present and discuss different approaches to deal with this challenge. The derived power plant emission will be compared to the bottom-up unit-based emission inventory. The found relation between bottom-up and top-down emissions will be used for the evaluation of top

  7. Health risks of electromagnetic fields. Part I: Evaluation and assessment of electric and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Brodsky, Lynn M; Leiss, William; Krewski, Daniel; Repacholi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) emanating from the generation, distribution, and utilization of electricity is widespread. The major debate in recent years has focused on the possibility that exposure to EMF may result in adverse health consequences, including the development of cancer. This article provides a review and evaluation of potential health risks associated with residential and occupational exposure to EMF. In addition to reviewing data from laboratory, epidemiology, and clinical studies, we examine exposure data from field measurement surveys and exposure guidelines that have been established for EMF. Currently, the evidence in support of an association between EMF and childhood cancer is limited, although this issue warrants further investigation. Evidence of an association between EMF exposure and adult cancers, derived largely from occupational settings, is inconsistent, precluding clear conclusions. There is little evidence of an association between EMF and noncancer health effects. Epidemiological studies of EMF and population health are limited by exposure measurement error and the lack of a clear dose/response relationship in studies suggesting possible health risks. Further research is needed to clarify the ambiguous findings from present studies and to determine if EMF exposure poses a health risk.

  8. Aircraft taxiing route planning based on airport hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Zuo, Qinghai

    2017-05-01

    In order to avoid airport surface hotspots, taxiing route planned for aircraft based on surface hotspots is proposed in this paper. Firstly, airport is abstracted into node-link model and aircraft taxiing avoidance mechanism is established. Then, a ground taxiing route optimization model which minimizes total taxiing time is proposed. A simulation is conducted based on a practical setting of 9 flights on runway 02L at a central-south airport. Simulation results indicate that total taxiing time is reduced by 243s after optimization and no taxiing conflict occurs. Meanwhile, the number of flight that taxi through hotspots area is reduced f, which effectively alleviates the risk level of hotspots and improves airport operation safety.

  9. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh;

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...... footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite...... motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate...

  10. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate......Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...... footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite...

  11. Detection prospects of the TA hotspot by space observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Semikoz, D; Zotov, M

    2016-01-01

    In the present-day cosmic ray data, the strongest indication of anisotropy of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is the 20-degree hotspot observed by the Telescope Array with the statistical significance of 3.4{\\sigma}. In this work, we study the possibility of detection of such a spot by space-based all-sky observatories. We show that if the detected luminosity of the hotspot is attributed to a physical effect and not a statistical fluctuation, the KLYPVE and JEM-EUSO experiments would need to collect ~300 events with E>57 EeV in order to detect the hotspot at the 5{\\sigma} confidence level with the 68% probability. We also study the dependence of the detection prospects on the hotspot luminosity.

  12. Detection prospects of the Telescope Array hotspot by space observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semikoz, D.; Tinyakov, P.; Zotov, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present-day cosmic ray data, the strongest indication of anisotropy of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays is the 20-degree hotspot observed by the Telescope Array with the statistical significance of 3.4 σ . In this work, we study the possibility of detecting such a spot by space-based all-sky observatories. We show that if the detected luminosity of the hotspot is attributed to a physical effect and not a statistical fluctuation, the KLYPVE and JEM-EUSO experiments would need to collect ˜300 events with E >57 EeV in order to detect the hotspot at the 5 σ confidence level with the 68% probability. We also study the dependence of the detection prospects on the hotspot luminosity.

  13. Stability predicts genetic diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Hickerson, Michael J; Haddad, Célio F B; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Moritz, Craig

    2009-02-06

    Biodiversity hotspots, representing regions with high species endemism and conservation threat, have been mapped globally. Yet, biodiversity distribution data from within hotspots are too sparse for effective conservation in the face of rapid environmental change. Using frogs as indicators, ecological niche models under paleoclimates, and simultaneous Bayesian analyses of multispecies molecular data, we compare alternative hypotheses of assemblage-scale response to late Quaternary climate change. This reveals a hotspot within the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot. We show that the southern Atlantic forest was climatically unstable relative to the central region, which served as a large climatic refugium for neotropical species in the late Pleistocene. This sets new priorities for conservation in Brazil and establishes a validated approach to biodiversity prediction in other understudied, species-rich regions.

  14. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  15. Evolution of midplate hotspot swells: Numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mian; Chase, Clement G.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of midplate hotspot swells on an oceanic plate moving over a hot, upwelling mantle plume is numerically simulated. The plume supplies a Gaussian-shaped thermal perturbation and thermally-induced dynamic support. The lithosphere is treated as a thermal boundary layer with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The two fundamental mechanisms of transferring heat, conduction and convection, during the interaction of the lithosphere with the mantle plume are considered. The transient heat transfer equations, with boundary conditions varying in both time and space, are solved in cylindrical coordinates using the finite difference ADI (alternating direction implicit) method on a 100 x 100 grid. The topography, geoid anomaly, and heat flow anomaly of the Hawaiian swell and the Bermuda rise are used to constrain the models. Results confirm the conclusion of previous works that the Hawaiian swell can not be explained by conductive heating alone, even if extremely high thermal perturbation is allowed. On the other hand, the model of convective thinning predicts successfully the topography, geoid anomaly, and the heat flow anomaly around the Hawaiian islands, as well as the changes in the topography and anomalous heat flow along the Hawaiian volcanic chain.

  16. Investigating avian influenza infection hotspots in old-world shorebirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Gaidet

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in the transmission rates of pathogens across hosts or environments may produce disease hotspots, which are defined as specific sites, times or species associations in which the infection rate is consistently elevated. Hotspots for avian influenza virus (AIV in wild birds are largely unstudied and poorly understood. A striking feature is the existence of a unique but consistent AIV hotspot in shorebirds (Charadriiformes associated with a single species at a specific location and time (ruddy turnstone Arenaria interpres at Delaware Bay, USA, in May. This unique case, though a valuable reference, limits our capacity to explore and understand the general properties of AIV hotspots in shorebirds. Unfortunately, relatively few shorebirds have been sampled outside Delaware Bay and they belong to only a few shorebird families; there also has been a lack of consistent oropharyngeal sampling as a complement to cloacal sampling. In this study we looked for AIV hotspots associated with other shorebird species and/or with some of the larger congregation sites of shorebirds in the old world. We assembled and analysed a regionally extensive dataset of AIV prevalence from 69 shorebird species sampled in 25 countries across Africa and Western Eurasia. Despite this diverse and extensive coverage we did not detect any new shorebird AIV hotspots. Neither large shorebird congregation sites nor the ruddy turnstone were consistently associated with AIV hotspots. We did, however, find a low but widespread circulation of AIV in shorebirds that contrast with the absence of AIV previously reported in shorebirds in Europe. A very high AIV antibody prevalence coupled to a low infection rate was found in both first-year and adult birds of two migratory sandpiper species, suggesting the potential existence of an AIV hotspot along their migratory flyway that is yet to be discovered.

  17. Fish-derived nutrient hotspots shape coral reef benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, Andrew A; Ladd, Mark C; Schrack, Elizabeth; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-12-01

    Animal-derived nutrients play an important role in structuring nutrient regimes within and between ecosystems. When animals undergo repetitive, aggregating behavior through time, they can create nutrient hotspots where rates of biogeochemical activity are higher than those found in the surrounding environment. In turn, these hotspots can influence ecosystem processes and community structure. We examined the potential for reef fishes from the family Haemulidae (grunts) to create nutrient hotspots and the potential impact of these hotspots on reef communities. To do so, we tracked the schooling locations of diurnally migrating grunts, which shelter at reef sites during the day but forage off reef each night, and measured the impact of these fish schools on benthic communities. We found that grunt schools showed a high degree of site fidelity, repeatedly returning to the same coral heads. These aggregations created nutrient hotspots around coral heads where nitrogen and phosphorus delivery was roughly 10 and 7 times the respective rates of delivery to structurally similar sites that lacked schools of these fishes. In turn, grazing rates of herbivorous fishes at grunt-derived hotspots were approximately 3 times those of sites where grunts were rare. These differences in nutrient delivery and grazing led to distinct benthic communities with higher cover of crustose coralline algae and less total algal abundance at grunt aggregation sites. Importantly, coral growth was roughly 1.5 times greater at grunt hotspots, likely due to the important nutrient subsidy. Our results suggest that schooling reef fish and their nutrient subsidies play an important role in mediating community structure on coral reefs and that overfishing may have important negative consequences on ecosystem functions. As such, management strategies must consider mesopredatory fishes in addition to current protection often offered to herbivores and top-tier predators. Furthermore, our results suggest that

  18. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  19. Absence of the TAP2 human recombination hotspot in chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Ptak

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments using sperm typing have demonstrated that, in several regions of the human genome, recombination does not occur uniformly but instead is concentrated in "hotspots" of 1-2 kb. Moreover, the crossover asymmetry observed in a subset of these has led to the suggestion that hotspots may be short-lived on an evolutionary time scale. To test this possibility, we focused on a region known to contain a recombination hotspot in humans, TAP2, and asked whether chimpanzees, the closest living evolutionary relatives of humans, harbor a hotspot in a similar location. Specifically, we used a new statistical approach to estimate recombination rate variation from patterns of linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 24 western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus. This method has been shown to produce reliable results on simulated data and on human data from the TAP2 region. Strikingly, however, it finds very little support for recombination rate variation at TAP2 in the western chimpanzee data. Moreover, simulations suggest that there should be stronger support if there were a hotspot similar to the one characterized in humans. Thus, it appears that the human TAP2 recombination hotspot is not shared by western chimpanzees. These findings demonstrate that fine-scale recombination rates can change between very closely related species and raise the possibility that rates differ among human populations, with important implications for linkage-disequilibrium based association studies.

  20. Roots shaping their microbiome: global hotspots for microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Bünger, Wiebke; Burbano, Claudia Sofía; Sabale, Mugdha; Hurek, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Land plants interact with microbes primarily at roots. Despite the importance of root microbial communities for health and nutrient uptake, the current understanding of the complex plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere is still in its infancy. Roots provide different microhabitats at the soil-root interface: rhizosphere soil, rhizoplane, and endorhizosphere. We discuss technical aspects of their differentiation that are relevant for the functional analysis of their different microbiomes, and we assess PCR (polymerase chain reaction)-based methods to analyze plant-associated bacterial communities. Development of novel primers will allow a less biased and more quantitative view of these global hotspots of microbial activity. Based on comparison of microbiome data for the different root-soil compartments and on knowledge of bacterial functions, a three-step enrichment model for shifts in community structure from bulk soil toward roots is presented. To unravel how plants shape their microbiome, a major research field is likely to be the coupling of reductionist and molecular ecological approaches, particularly for specific plant genotypes and mutants, to clarify causal relationships in complex root communities.

  1. Lead Polluted Hotspot: Environmental Implication of Unplanned Industrial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikta Sharmin Yousuf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Rayer Bazaar, different industries like tannery, plastic, textile, battery recycling industry etc. are increasing rapidly without considering the environmental issues and deterioration. Since chromium (Cr pollution of this area has been widely investigated due to the presence of tannery industries, this study was focused on examining other environmental factors. Field visits and analytical results of semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis as well as three dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy (3DEEM of water, soil and vegetative tissues indicated that, the area is highly polluted in term of different environmental parameters and metal content. The extremely high lead (Pb content of the soil (1171.7 mg/kg in summer, 2157.1 mg/kg in winter and blackish materials of vegetative tissues (6585.6 mg/kg in summer, 1974.1 mg/kg in winter indicates excessive lead deposition of this area that makes it a lead polluted hotspot. One of the possible sources of the extremely high lead concentration is adjacent battery recycling industry and/or other industries surrounding this area. So it is urgent to take necessary steps to find out immediate options for possible mitigation.

  2. Leg 197 synthesis: Southward motion and geochemical variability of the Hawaiian hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R.A.; Tarduno, J.A.; Scholl, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    The bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain is an often-cited example of a change in plate motion with respect to a stationary hotspot. Growing evidence, however, suggests that the bend might instead record variable drift of the Hawaiian hotspot within a convecting mantle. Paleomagnetic and radiometric age data from samples recovered during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197 define an age-progressive paleolatitude history, indicating that the Emperor Seamounts volcanic trend was formed principally by rapid (4-5 cm/yr) southward motion of the Hawaiian hotspot during Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary time (81-47 Ma). Paleointensity data derived from Leg 197 suggest an inverse relationship between field strength and reversal frequency, consistent with an active lower mantle that controls the efficiency of the geodynamo. Petrochemical data and observations of volcanic products (lava flows and volcaniclastic sediments) from Detroit, Nintoku, and Koko Seamounts provide records of the evolution of these volcanic systems for comparison with recent activity in the Hawaiian Islands. We find that the Emperor Seamounts formed from similar mantle sources for melting (plume components and lithosphere) and in much the same stages of volcanic activity and time span as the Hawaiian volcanoes. Changes in major and trace element and Sr isotopic compositions of shield lavas along the lineament can be related to variations in thickness of the lithosphere overlying the hotspot that control the depth and extent of partial melting. Other geochemical tracers, such as He, Pb, and Hf isotopic compositions, indicate persistent contributions to melting from the plume throughout the volcanic chain.

  3. Field evaluation of a modified intervention for overhead drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, David; Star, Demetra; Barr, Alan; Blanco, Marco Mendoza; Janowitz, Ira

    2010-04-01

    Drilling holes into concrete or metal ceilings is one of the most physically demanding tasks performed in construction. The work is done overhead with rotary impact hammer drills that weigh up to 40 N. The task is associated with pain and musculoskeletal disorders at the wrist, forearm, shoulder, and back. The mechanism of injury is thought to be the high forces and non-neutral shoulder and wrist postures applied during drilling. Previously, we described a field study of a foot lever and inverted drill press intervention devices that received poor usability ratings compared with the usual method for overhead drilling based on problems with mobility and productivity. Using a participatory intervention model, feedback from construction workers (N = 13) was used to develop a new intervention design that incorporated a wheeled tripod base and a unique method of aligning the drilling column to vertical. A different group of construction workers (N = 23) evaluated usability and fatigue of the new device during their regular overhead drilling in comparison with the usual method. Four of 12 usability ratings were significantly better with the intervention device compared with the usual method. Subjective shoulder fatigue was less with the new intervention (1.1 vs. 3.3; scale 0 to 5; p drilling were 26 N with the intervention compared with 245 N with the usual method. The percentage of time with the shoulder flexed or abducted to more than 60 degrees was less with the intervention compared with the usual method (21 vs. 40%; p = 0.007). There was significantly less head extension with the intervention compared with the usual method. There were no significant differences in overall productivity between the two methods. This study demonstrates that a new intervention device for overhead drilling has improved usability and subjective fatigue ratings compared with the usual method. These improvements are most likely due to the reduced hand forces, reduced shoulder abduction and

  4. Evaluation of completeness of selected poison control center data fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jeanie E; Marchbanks, Brenda; Willis, Branch; Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-08-01

    Poison control center data are used in research and surveillance. Due to the large volume of information, these efforts are dependent on data being recorded in machine readable format. However, poison center records include non-machine readable text fields and machine readable coded fields, some of which are duplicative. Duplicating this data increases the chance of inaccurate/incomplete coding. For surveillance efforts to be effective, coding should be complete and accurate. Investigators identified a convenience sample of 964 records and reviewed the substance code determining if it matched its text field. They also reviewed the coded clinical effects and treatments determining if they matched the notes text field. The substance code matched its text field for 91.4% of the substances. The clinical effects and treatments codes matched their text field for 72.6% and 82.4% of occurrences respectively. This under-reporting of clinical effects and treatments has surveillance and public health implications.

  5. On Ambition, Learning, and Co-Evolution: Building Evaluation as a Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; De Silva, Soma

    2010-01-01

    The papers in this dialogue help develop evaluation as a field (both in South Asia and other regions). What comes through in all of the papers is both humility of where evaluation is as a field and imagination and ambition of where evaluators could be in the near future. Reading the papers in this forum makes them enthusiastic about being…

  6. CRAF Phase 1, a framework to identify coastal hotspots to storm impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-frequency high-impact storms can cause flood and erosion over large coastal areas, which in turn can lead to a significant risk to coastal occupation, producing devastation and immobilising cities and even countries. It is therefore paramount to evaluate risk along the coast at a regional scale through the identification of storm impact hotspots. The Coastal Risk Assessment Framework Phase 1 (CRAF1 is a screening process based on a coastal-index approach that assesses the potential exposure of every kilometre along the coast to previously identified hazards. CRAF1 integrates both hazard (e.g. overwash, erosion and exposure indicators to create a final Coastal Index (CI. The application of CRAF1 at two contrasting case studies (Ria Formosa, Portugal and the Belgian coast, validated against existing information, demonstrates the utility and reliability of this framework on the identification of hotspots. CRAF1 represents a powerful and useful instrument for coastal managers and/or end-users to identify and rank potential hotspot areas in order to define priorities and support disaster reduction plans.

  7. Climate change hotspots over South America: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 multi-model datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Roger Rodrigues; Marengo, Jose Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This study identifies possible hotspots of climate change in South America through an examination of the spatial pattern of the Regional Climate Change Index (RCCI) over the region by the end of the twenty-first century. The RCCI is a qualitative index that can synthesize a large number of climate model projections, and it is suitable for identifying those regions where climate change could be more pronounced in a warmer climate. The reliability and uncertainties of the results are evaluated by using numerous state-of-the-art general circulation models (GCMs) and forcing scenarios from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5. The results show that southern Amazonia and the central-western region and western portion of Minas Gerais state in Brazil are persistent climate change hotspots through different forcing scenarios and GCM datasets. In general, as the scenarios vary from low- to high-level forcing, the area of high values of RCCI increase and the magnitude intensify from central-western and southeast Brazil to northwest South America. In general, the climatic hotspots identified in this study are characterized by an increase of mean surface air temperature, mainly in the austral winter; by an increase of interannual temperature variability, predominantly in the austral summer; and by a change in the mean and interannual variability of precipitation during the austral winter.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of Field Trips on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Norval L.

    To determine the effect of field trips on student achievement in each of four subject matter areas in vocational agriculture, 12 schools offering approved programs were randomly selected and divided into a treatment group and a control group. Uniform teaching outlines and reference materials were provided to each group. While no field trips were…

  9. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  10. Field Test Evaluation Report on Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kenneth; Fleming, Janice

    1981-01-01

    After describing a continuing education course in polymer chemistry, summarizes materials, methods, and results of an extensive evaluation of the course. Includes a discussion of benefits for participants and a list of 14 recommendations based on the evaluation. (JN)

  11. Electromagnetic Scattered Field Evaluation and Data Compression Using Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report on Project #727625 between The Ohio State University and NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Under this project, a data compression technique for scattered field data of electrically large targets is developed. The technique was applied to the scattered fields of two targets of interest. The backscattered fields of the scale models of these targets were measured in a ra compact range. For one of the targets, the backscattered fields were also calculated using XPATCH computer code. Using the technique all scattered field data sets were compressed successfully. A compression ratio of the order 40 was achieved. In this report, the technique is described briefly and some sample results are included.

  12. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Cushing, C.E.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1983-04-01

    The goals were: (1) determine the variability (both within and between laboratories) for the various bioassay procedures using contaminated soil samples from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA); (2) assess variability within and between plots for several assessment techniques (for sampling small mammals, plants, insects including honeybees and microarthropods) so that field studies could be designed to detect a defined biotic change; (3) establish three field plant transects which are apparently (a) contaminated, (b) appear contaminated and (c) could serve as a control; (4) assess the feasibility (in the laboratory) of using Basin F water to contaminate RMA soil artificially, and to supply information for the design of a field plot study in 1983; (5) attempt to obtain preliminary data on any promising field or laboratory bioassessment techniques not currently mentioned in the statement of work; and (6) obtain field data to assess the ecological status of RMA lakes and compare these observations to results from bioassessment testing.

  13. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was agreed in December 2009 by a task force appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD. New spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2005.0 (DGRF...... coefficients is also reported. Maps of differences in the vertical field intensity at Earth’s surface between the candidates and weighted mean models are presented. Candidates with anomalous aspects are identified and efforts made to pinpoint both troublesome coefficients and geographical regions where large...... vector satellite data is demonstrated; based on internal consistency DGRF-2005 has a formal root mean square vector field error over Earth’s surface of 1.0 nT. Difficulties nevertheless remain in accurately forecasting field evolution only five years into the future....

  14. Identification of chromosomal translocation hotspots via scan statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Israel T.; Rosales, Rafael A.; Holanda, Adriano J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Jankovic, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The detection of genomic regions unusually rich in a given pattern is an important undertaking in the analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Recent studies of chromosomal translocations in activated B lymphocytes have identified regions that are frequently translocated to c-myc oncogene. A quantitative method for the identification of translocation hotspots was crucial to this study. Here we improve this analysis by using a simple probabilistic model and the framework provided by scan statistics to define the number and location of translocation breakpoint hotspots. A key feature of our method is that it provides a global chromosome-wide nominal control level to clustering, as opposed to previous methods based on local criteria. While being motivated by a specific application, the detection of unusual clusters is a widespread problem in bioinformatics. We expect our method to be useful in the analysis of data from other experimental approaches such as of ChIP-seq and 4C-seq. Results: The analysis of translocations from B lymphocytes with the method described here reveals the presence of longer hotspots when compared with those defined previously. Further, we show that the hotspot size changes substantially in the absence of DNA repair protein 53BP1. When 53BP1 deficiency is combined with overexpression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, the hotspot length increases even further. These changes are not detected by previous methods that use local significance criteria for clustering. Our method is also able to identify several exclusive translocation hotspots located in genes of known tumor supressors. Availability and implementation: The detection of translocation hotspots is done with hot_scan, a program implemented in R and Perl. Source code and documentation are freely available for download at https://github.com/itojal/hot_scan. Contact: isilva@rockefeller.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  15. Study on evaluation of photoelectric jamming effectiveness on ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jinxi; Yang, Haiqiang; Gao, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Range) is a brand-new field and research hotspot. Ranging lidar is studied in this paper. Specifically, its basic working principle and photoelectric jamming mechanism are introduced. Then, the ranging error jamming success rate rule is developed for laser distance deception jamming. And the effectiveness evaluation of laser blinding jamming is based on the influence level on ranging accuracy and ranging function. The results have some reference value to evaluation of jamming test effectiveness.

  16. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Gano, K.A.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The overall goal of the plan was to demonstrate that honeybees could be used in detecting likely areas of chemical pollution, to demonstrate the usefulness of microbial and plant phytoassays, and to demonstrate a relationship between laboratory derived phytotoxicity results and field observations of plant community structure and diversity. Field studies were conducted through a cooperative arrangement with the US Army arsenal in Commerce City, Colorado.

  17. Evaluation of the denitrification rate of terraced paddy fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Takeo; Nakamura, Kimihito; Horino, Haruhiko; Adachi, Toru; Mitsuno, Toru

    2012-05-01

    SummaryRice is one of the most important staple foods in the world. Lowland paddy fields are well known for functioning as denitrification areas, but few studies have been conducted of paddy fields situated on hill slopes (terraced paddy fields). These terraced paddy fields have a characteristic artificial stepped shape, and this unique shape and periodic ponding from rice production may configure unique hydrological properties that might be different from lowland paddy fields. The shape and hydrological properties may also affect transport of nutrients such as nitrogen. This study is particularly focused on the denitrification rate in terraced paddy fields. To understand the hydrological properties of terraced paddy fields, a detailed water budget including the subsurface flow components was calculated. Combining the water budget components and chemical measurements of surface and subsurface water, a nitrogen budget was calculated. The results showed that about 10% of the total nitrogen input, mainly from fertilizers, was lost, suggesting the occurrence of denitrification in the area. The average denitrification rate of the study site was estimated at about 0.53-0.67 g N m-2 year-1. Spatial variations in the measured groundwater nitrate concentration suggest that denitrification is important in both the plough layer and the sloping area. The denitrification rate in the sloping area was estimated at 0.67-0.78 g N m-2 year-1, which is slightly higher than the estimates of denitrification rate in paddy lots, i.e., 0.56-0.61 g N m-2 year-1. The result indicates the importance of sloping areas for denitrification in terraced paddy fields.

  18. A magnetic field exposure facility for evaluation of animal carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruvada, P S; Harvey, S M; Jutras, P; Goulet, D; Mandeville, R

    2000-09-01

    Several animal studies have been carried out at the Institut Armand Frappier (IAF) to determine whether chronic exposure to 60 Hz linearly polarized sinusoidal magnetic fields might increase the risk of cancer development of female Fisher rats. The magnetic field exposure facility was developed to meet the requirements of the study protocol for chronic exposure of large number of animals to field intensities of sham < 0.2 microT, 2 microT, 20 microT, 200 microT, and 2000 microT. At each exposure level, including sham, the animals are distributed in a group of four exposure units. Each exposure unit contains two exposure volumes having uniform distribution of magnetic fields for the animals, while the magnetic field external to the unit falls off rapidly due to the "figure-eight" coil topography used. A program of "shake down" tests, followed by verification and calibration of the exposure facility, was carried out prior to starting the animal experiments. Continuous monitoring of the magnetic field and other environmental parameters was an important part in the overall quality assurance program adopted.

  19. Hydrothermal Manganese Mineralization Near the Samoan Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S. R.; Dunham, R.

    2006-12-01

    The thickest beds of hydrothermal manganese oxides recovered to date from the global ocean were collected from a volcanic cone in the south Pacific. In April 2005, samples were dredged aboard the R.V. Kilo Moana from a volcanic cone on the lower flank of Tulaga seamount (about 2,700 m water depth; 14° 39.222' S; 170° 1.730' W), located 115 km SW of Vailulu'u, the volcanically and hydrothermally active center of the Samoan hotspot. Additional hydrothermal manganese samples were collected off Ofu Island (dredge Alia 107), 72 km to the WSW of Vailulu'u. Manganese-oxide beds up to 9 cm thick are composed of birnessite and 10 Å manganates. Some layers consist of Mn-oxide columnar structures 4 cm long and 1 cm wide, which have not been described previously. The mean Mn and Fe contents of 18 samples are 51 weight percent and 0.76 weight percent, respectively. Elevated concentrations of Li (mean 0.11 wt. percent) are indicators of a hydrothermal origin, and distinguishes these samples, along with the high Mn and low Fe contents, from hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. Other enriched elements include Ba (mean 0.14 percent), Cu (249 ppm), Mo (451 ppm), Ni (400 ppm), Zn (394 ppm), V (214 ppm), and W (132 ppm). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show large negative Ce anomalies and LREE enrichments, both characteristic of hydrothermal Mn deposits. Small negative Eu anomalies are not typical of hydrothermal deposits and can be explained either by the absence of leaching of plagioclase by the hydrothermal fluids or by the precipitation of Eu-rich minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, at depth. The high base-metal contents indicate that sulfides are not forming deeper in the hydrothermal system or that such deposits are being leached by the ascending fluids. Textures of the thickest Mn deposits indicate that the Mn oxides formed below the seabed from ascending fluids during multiple phases of waxing and waning hydrothermal pulses. The deposits were later exposed at the seafloor by

  20. Limited latitudinal mantle plume motion for the Louisville hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gee, Jeffrey S.; Pressling, Nicola; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gee, Jeffrey S.; Pressling, Nicola; Hoshi, Hiroyuki; Anderson, L.; Beier, C.; Buchs, D. M.; Chen, L.-H.; Cohen, B. E.; Deschamps, F.; Dorais, M. J.; Ebuna, D.; Ehmann, S.; Fitton, J. G.; Fulton, P. M.; Ganbat, E.; Hamelin, C.; Hanyu, T.; Kalnins, L.; Kell, J.; Machida, S.; Mahoney, J. J.; Moriya, K.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Rausch, S.; Sano, S.-I.; Sylvan, J. B.; Williams, R.

    2012-12-01

    Hotspots that form above upwelling plumes of hot material from the deep mantle typically leave narrow trails of volcanic seamounts as a tectonic plate moves over their location. These seamount trails are excellent recorders of Earth's deep processes and allow us to untangle ancient mantle plume motions. During ascent it is likely that mantle plumes are pushed away from their vertical upwelling trajectories by mantle convection forces. It has been proposed that a large-scale lateral displacement, termed the mantle wind, existed in the Pacific between about 80 and 50 million years ago, and shifted the Hawaiian mantle plume southwards by about 15° of latitude. Here we use 40Ar/39Ar age dating and palaeomagnetic inclination data from four seamounts associated with the Louisville hotspot in the South Pacific Ocean to show that this hotspot has been relatively stable in terms of its location. Specifically, the Louisville hotspot--the southern hemisphere counterpart of Hawai'i--has remained within 3-5° of its present-day latitude of about 51°S between 70 and 50 million years ago. Although we cannot exclude a more significant southward motion before that time, we suggest that the Louisville and Hawaiian hotspots are moving independently, and not as part of a large-scale mantle wind in the Pacific.

  1. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions.

  2. Dynamically supported geoid highs over hotspots: Observation and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, M. A.; Hager, B. H.; Sleep, N. H.

    1986-01-01

    Hotspots are associated with long wavelength geoid highs, an association that is even stronger when the geoid highs associated with subduction zones are removed. These associations are quantified by expanding the hotspot distribution in spherical harmonics and calculating correlation coefficients as a function of harmonic degree. The hotspot distribution spectrum is essentially white, with peaks at degrees 2 and 6. It is correlated positively with the slab residual geoid for degrees 2 to 6, with low seismic velocity in the lower mantle at degree 2, and with low seismic velocity in the upper mantle at degree 6. A variety of fluid mechanical models were tested for hotspots, including lithospheric delamination and hot plumes, by calculating their predicted dynamic geoid responses and comparing them to the observations. These models include the effects of temperature dependent rheology. The preferred hotspot model, based on observations of the geoid and seismic tomography, has plumes preferentially occurring in regions of large scale background temperature highs in a mantle with substantial viscosity increase with depth, although other models are possible.

  3. Dynamically supported geoid highs over hotspots - Observation and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark A.; Hager, Bradford H.; Sleep, Norman H.

    1988-01-01

    Hotspots are associated with long wavelength geoid highs, an association that is even stronger when the geoid highs associated with subduction zones are removed. These associations are quantified by expanding the hotspot distribution in spherical harmonics and calculating correlation coefficients as a function of harmonic degree. The hotspot distribution spectrum is essentially white, with peaks at degrees 2 and 6. It is correlated positively with the slab residual geoid for degrees 2 to 6, with low seismic velocity in the lower mantle at degree 2, and with low seismic velocity in the upper mantle at degree 6. A variety of fluid mechanical models were tested for hotspots, including lithospheric delamination and hot plumes, by calculating their predicted dynamic geoid responses and comparing them to the observations. These models include the effects of temperature dependent rheology. The preferred hotspot model, based on observations of the geoid and seismic tomography, has plumes preferentially occurring in regions of large scale background temperature highs in a mantle with substantial viscosity increase with depth, although other models are possible.

  4. Nonprofits and Evaluation: Empirical Evidence from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Joanne G.; Fredericks, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore what evaluation looks like, in practice, among today's nonprofit organizations on the basis of their survey results. The types of evaluation activities nonprofit organizations are engaging in on a regular basis, as well as the types of data they are collecting and how they are using these data, are described. How nonprofits…

  5. Reasearch and Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields of Refrigerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Baltrėnas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of refrigerators causes the occurence of electromagnetic fields that are invisible and intangible, which therefore makes difficulties in protecting ourselves from them. A refrigerator is an irreplaceable item in domestic household and thus can be hardly ignored by a modern way of human life. In order to preserve the characteristics of products, the refrigerator must operate continuously (24 hrs a day, regardless of the time of the year. This results in a huge increase in electricity consumption, which leads to energy consumption related pollution of the environment emitting CO2 gas. On these grounds, it is necessary to assess electromagnetic fields created by the refrigerator. Studies on electromagnetic fields produced by refrigerators were conducted in domestic premises where people spent a significant part of the day. For comparison purposes, five different power refrigerators were chosen (1 – 0.20 kW; 2 – 0.25 kW; 3 – 0.30 kW; 4 – 0.35 kW; 5 – 0.40 kW. The obtained results, according to the parameters of their electromagnetic fields, were presented in graphs and charts and showed that the values of electric and magnetic intensity of refrigerators depended on the distance and the power of the refrigerator. The conducted research also disclosed that none of tested refrigerators exceeded the permissible limits of electromagnetic fields.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Evaluation of environmental control technologies for magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The peripheral magnetic fields of several energy-related technologies are calculated, and shielding options are studied for three field intensities as possible exposure levels: 200 G, 10 G, and 0.3 G. Seven fusion reactor designs are studied. For a 200-G field level, shielding is not required. For the 10- and 0.3-G levels, land is the most economical shielding method, with shield coils an acceptable alternative at 0.3 G. Nonnuclear technologies studied are superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electric generators, magnetically levitated vehicles, superconducting ac generators, and underground transmission lines. Superconducting ac generators and underground transmission lines require no shielding. The superconducting magnetic energy storage coil requires no shielding for 200 G. Both a shield coil and land are needed to meet 10 G or 0.3 G. The MHD generator needs no shielding to 200 G and 10 G. Land is the most economical means of meeting the 0.3 G level. Most of the magnetically levitated vehicles require no shielding to 200 G. The field on-board can be reduced from 200 to 25 G, depending upon the vehicle design, with shield coils. The use of iron, or another permeable material, is necessary to reduce the field to 10 G or 0.3 G. However, iron introduces too much added weight to allow efficient operation.

  7. Spherical disharmonics in the Earth sciences and the spatial solution: Ridges, hotspots, slabs, geochemistry and tomography correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Anderson, Don L.

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing use of statistical correlations between geophysical fields and between geochemical and geophysical fields in attempts to understand how the Earth works. Typically, such correlations have been based on spherical harmonic expansions. The expression of functions on the sphere as spherical harmonic series has many pitfalls, especially if the data are nonuniformly and/or sparsely sampled. Many of the difficulties involved in the use of spherical harmonic expansion techniques can be avoided through the use of spatial domain correlations, but this introduces other complications, such as the choice of a sampling lattice. Additionally, many geophysical and geochemical fields fail to satisfy the assumptions of standard statistical significance tests. This is especially problematic when the data values to be correlated with a geophysical field were collected at sample locations which themselves correlate with that field. This paper examines many correlations which have been claimed in the past between geochemistry and mantle tomography and between hotspot, ridge, and slab locations and tomography using both spherical harmonic coefficient correlations and spatial domain correlations. No conclusively significant correlations are found between isotopic geochemistry and mantle tomography. The Crough and Jurdy (short) hotspot location list shows statistically significant correlation with lowermost mantle tomography for degree 2 of the spherical harmonic expansion, but there are no statistically significant correlations in the spatial case. The Vogt (long) hotspot location list does not correlate with tomography anywhere in the mantle using either technique. Both hotspot lists show a strong correlation between hotspot locations and geoid highs when spatially correlated, but no correlations are revealed by spherical harmonic techniques. Ridge locations do not show any statistically significant correlations with tomography, slab locations, or the geoid; the

  8. Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina R; Owens, Christabel; Robinson, Jo; Nicholas, Angela; Lockley, Anne; Williamson, Michelle; Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Pirkis, Jane

    2013-03-09

    'Suicide hotspots' include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: 'What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?' There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base.

  9. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Kenneth J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Prohaska, Robert S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-11

    This presentation provides information about NREL's real-world evaluations of commercial vehicle technologies, which compare the performance of advanced medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles to conventional vehicles. NREL conducts these customized evaluations in partnership with commercial and government fleets across the nation. Current fleet and industry partners include UPS, Workhorse, Parker Hannifin, Proterra, Foothill Transit, Long Beach Transit, BYD, Odyne, Duke Energy, Miami-Dade, TransPower, Eaton, Cummins, Bosch, and Clean Cities/National Clean Fleet Partnership. The presentation focuses on two particular vehicle evaluation projects -- hydraulic hybrid refuse haulers operated by Miami-Dade and electric transit buses operated by Foothill Transit.

  10. Developing and evaluating rapid field methods to estimate peat carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney A. Chimner; Cassandra A. Ott; Charles H. Perry; Randall K. Kolka

    2014-01-01

    Many international protocols (e.g., REDD+) are developing inventories of ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes at country and regional scales, which can include peatlands. As the only nationally implemented field inventory and remeasurement of forest soils in the US, the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA) samples the top 20 cm of organic soils...

  11. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  12. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Chris; Alken, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 12th revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was issued in December 2014 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/IAGA/vmod/igrf.html). This revision comprises new spherical...

  13. Photothermal probing of plasmonic hotspots with nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures (hotspots) are key components e.g. in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, plasmonic solar cells, or as nano heat sources. The characterization of single hotspots is still challenging due to a lack of experimental tools. We present the direct photothermal probing and mapping...... of single plasmonic nanoslits via the thermally induced detuning of nanomechanical string resonators. A maximum relative frequency detuning of 0.5 % was measured for a single plasmonic nanoslit for a perpendicularly polarized laser with a power of 1350 nW. Finally, we show the photothermal scan over...

  14. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Ram K; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G F; Groot, Steven P C; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding.

  15. Early Yellowstone hotspot magmatism and gold metallogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Willis; Unger, Derick; Saunders, James; Kamenov, George

    2009-11-01

    compatible with regional crustal units that host the gold ores, or the silicic igneous lithologies of the region, but have the same lead isotopic composition as basalts of the earliest Yellowstone plume (represented by the earliest lavas of the Columbia River basalt province, the Steens basalts, and Stonyford Volcanic Complex; Hanan et al., 2008). We propose that the gold studied and its traces of alloyed lead were derived together from the mantle, released from basaltic magma chambers of the province, and carried by low-density fluids into shallow geothermal systems during the earliest stages of Yellowstone hotspot magmatism.

  16. Subjective preference evaluation of sound fields by performing singers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noson, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    A model of the auditory process is proposed for performing singers, which incorporates the added signal from bone conduction, as well as the psychological distance for subjective preference of the performer from the acoustic sound field of the stage. The explanatory power of previous scientific studies of vocal stage acoustics has been limited by a lack of an underlying theory of performer preference. Ando's theory, using the autocorrelation function (ACF) for parametrizing temporal factors, was applied to interpretation of singer sound field preference determined by the pair comparison method. Melisma style singing (no lyrics) was shown to increase the preferred delay time of reflections from a mean of 14 ms with lyrics to 23 ms without (pThesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis are available from the author by inquiry at BRC Acoustics, 1741 First Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98134 USA. E-mail address: dnoson@brcacoustics.com

  17. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Mafalda; Mulryne, David J; Seery, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the...

  18. Rotating field collector subsystem phase 1 study and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.; Eibling, J. A.

    1982-10-01

    The rotating field collector system is an alternative concept in which all heliostats are mounted on a single large platform which rotates around a tower to track the azumuthal angle of the Sun. Each heliostat is mounted to the platform with appropriate pivots, linkage, and controls to provide the additional positioning required to properly direct the solar radiation onto the receiver. The results are presented of the first phase of a study to investigate the technical and economic merits of a particular type of rotating field collector subsystem. The large pie-shaped platform would revolve over an array of support pedestals by means of a roller at the top of each pedestal. Several heliostats were built to demonstrate their construction features, and the operation of both flat and amphitheater rotating fields was studied. Work included an analysis of the concepts, development of modifications and additions to make the system comply with design criteria, and cost estimates to be used for comparison with other heliostat subsystems. Because of considerably high cost estimates, the focus of a large part of the study was directed toward developing lower cost designs of major components.

  19. Efficient Assessment of Social Hotspots in the Supply Chains of 100 Product Categories Using the Social Hotspots Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Benoît Norris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data collection, or the inventory step, is often the most labor-intensive phase of any Life Cycle Assessment (LCA study. The S-LCA Guidelines and numerous authors have recommended generic assessment in this first phase of an S-LCA. In an effort to identify the social hotspots in the supply chains of 100 product categories during just a few months’ time, adopting a streamlined approach was essential. The Social Hotspots Database system was developed by New Earth over 5 years. It includes a Global Input Output (IO model derived from the Global Trade Analysis Project, a Worker Hours Model constructed using annual wage payments and wage rates by country and sector, and Social Theme Tables covering 22 themes within five Social Impact Categories—Labor Rights and Decent Work, Health and Safety, Human Rights, Governance and Community Impacts. The data tables identify social risks for over 100 indicators. Both the ranking of worker hour intensity and the risk levels across multiple social themes for the Country Specific Sectors (CSS within a product category supply chain are used to calculate Social Hotspots Indexes (SHI using an additive weighting method. The CSS with the highest SHI are highlighted as social hotspots within the supply chain of the product in question. This system was tested in seven case studies in 2011. In order to further limit the number of hotspots, a set of prioritization rules was applied. This paper will review the method implemented to study the social hotspots of the 100 product categories and provide one detailed example. Limitations of the approach and recommended research avenues will be outlined.

  20. Performance and consistency of indicator groups in two biodiversity hotspots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Trindade-Filho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a world limited by data availability and limited funds for conservation, scientists and practitioners must use indicator groups to define spatial conservation priorities. Several studies have evaluated the effectiveness of indicator groups, but still little is known about the consistency in performance of these groups in different regions, which would allow their a priori selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically examined the effectiveness and the consistency of nine indicator groups in representing mammal species in two top-ranked Biodiversity Hotspots (BH: the Brazilian Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest. To test for group effectiveness we first found the best sets of sites able to maximize the representation of each indicator group in the BH and then calculated the average representation of different target species by the indicator groups in the BH. We considered consistent indicator groups whose representation of target species was not statistically different between BH. We called effective those groups that outperformed the target-species representation achieved by random sets of species. Effective indicator groups required the selection of less than 2% of the BH area for representing target species. Restricted-range species were the most effective indicators for the representation of all mammal diversity as well as target species. It was also the only group with high consistency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that several indicator groups could be applied as shortcuts for representing mammal species in the Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest to develop conservation plans, however, only restricted-range species consistently held as the most effective indicator group for such a task. This group is of particular importance in conservation planning as it captures high diversity of endemic and endangered species.

  1. Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-08-01

    The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

  2. Dietary use and conservation concern of edible wetland plants at indo-burma hotspot: a case study from northeast India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh HB; Kanjilal PB; Kotoky R; Roshnibala S; Sundriyal M; Jain A; Sundriyal RC

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The wetlands of the North East India fall among the global hotspots of biodiversity. However, they have received very little attention with relation to their intrinsic values to human kind; therefore their conservation is hardly addressed. These wetlands are critical for the sustenance of the tribal communities. Methods Field research was conducted during 2003 to 2006 in seven major wetlands of four districts of Manipur state, Northeast India (viz. Imphal-East, Imphal-West...

  3. Evaluation of field trials of innovative practices in science education

    OpenAIRE

    Gerloff-Gasser, C; Büchel, K

    2012-01-01

    Science and technology (S&T) education is vital to increase the science literacy in modern societies and to stimulate more young people to opt for careers in S&T. Because there are considerable differences in S&T education among and sometimes within countries, it is promising to adopt an adaptive strategy to its innovation that allows a fit to the specific conditions of each of the countries. In this report, we present first results of field trials with innovative practices in S&T educatio...

  4. Evaluations of Occupational Exposure and Magnetic Field Levels at Hospital Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Şükrü Özen; Selçuk Helhel; Gizem Kahya; Mehmet Çakır; Samet Yalçın

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic field levels at the typical hospital environments analyzed with this study. Typical center laboratory has been selected for the research. There are a lot of devices at this center such as Centrifugal, biochemistry auto-analyzer, Hemogram units etc. Electromagnetic fields at the laboratory environment are the Extremely Low Frequency field. Therefore, occupants that they may be exposed to the electromagnetic field levels were measured, and the results are evaluated in the light ...

  5. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effec...

  6. Evaluation of occupational cold environments: field measurements and subjective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A Virgílio M; Gaspar, Adélio R; Raimundo, António M; Quintela, Divo A

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study.

  7. Generation of infant anatomical models for evaluating electromagnetic field exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congsheng; Chen, Zhiye; Yang, Lei; Lv, Bin; Liu, Jianzhe; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Wiart, Joe; Xie, Yi; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-01-01

    Realistic anatomical modeling is essential in analyzing human exposure to electromagnetic fields. Infants have significant physical and anatomical differences compared with other age groups. However, few realistic infant models are available. In this work, we developed one 12-month-old male whole body model and one 17-month-old male head model from magnetic resonance images. The whole body and head models contained 28 and 30 tissues, respectively, at spatial resolution of 1 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm. Fewer identified tissues in the whole body model were a result of the low original image quality induced by the fast imaging sequence. The anatomical and physical parameters of the models were validated against findings in published literature (e.g., a maximum deviation as 18% in tissue mass was observed compared with the data from International Commission on Radiological Protection). Several typical exposure scenarios were realized for numerical simulation. Dosimetric comparison with various adult and child anatomical models was conducted. Significant differences in the physical and anatomical features between adult and child models demonstrated the importance of creating realistic infant models. Current safety guidelines for infant exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields may not be conservative.

  8. Standard practice for production and evaluation of field metallographic replicas

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers recognized methods for the preparation and evaluation of cellulose acetate or plastic film replicas which have been obtained from metallographically prepared surfaces. It is designed for the evaluation of replicas to ensure that all significant features of a metallographically prepared surface have been duplicated and preserved on the replica with sufficient detail to permit both LM and SEM examination with optimum resolution and sensitivity. 1.2 This practice may be used as a controlling document in commercial situations. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. Inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. QUALITY EVALUATION OF STEVIA REBAUDIANA CULTIVATED IN FARMERS FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Nirpendra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the potential industrial crops Stevia rebaudiana introduce in newly develop state Uttarakand for cultivated as well as quality evaluations of farmers produced and its comparative assessment with other parts of northern areas. Stevia rebaudiana is a natural, non-caloric, sweet-tasting plant used globally for its sweeter properties. Stevia rebaudiana cultivated in different region of north India, stevioside vary 6.0- 9.5%, rebaudioside vary ranging 1.60-3.90 % within different location.

  10. Field environmental evaluation plan for sulfur use in pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylak, D.; Deuel, L. E.; Izatt, J. O.; Jacobs, C.; Zahray, R.; Ham, S.

    1982-07-01

    The use of sulfur in highway paving mixtures is discussed. The evaluation procedures deal with the safety and environmental aspects of storage and handling, formulation, construction, operation and maintenance of highway pavements containing sulfur, including the possible generation of noxious and abnoxious fumes, dust and gases. Methods and equipment for monitoring potential emissions and pollutants are recommended and safety practices for the handling of sulfur and sulfur-modified asphalt mixtures and pavements are discussed.

  11. Field evaluation of personal sampling methods for multiple bioaerosols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsun Wang

    Full Text Available Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min. Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols.

  12. Field evaluation of personal sampling methods for multiple bioaerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Bean T; Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, Andrew Chi-Yeu; Hung, Po-Chen; Chen, Chih-Yong; Chao, Hsing Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Ambient bioaerosols are ubiquitous in the daily environment and can affect health in various ways. However, few studies have been conducted to comprehensively evaluate personal bioaerosol exposure in occupational and indoor environments because of the complex composition of bioaerosols and the lack of standardized sampling/analysis methods. We conducted a study to determine the most efficient collection/analysis method for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols. The sampling efficiencies of three filters and four samplers were compared. According to our results, polycarbonate (PC) filters had the highest relative efficiency, particularly for bacteria. Side-by-side sampling was conducted to evaluate the three filter samplers (with PC filters) and the NIOSH Personal Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. According to the results, the Button Aerosol Sampler and the IOM Inhalable Dust Sampler had the highest relative efficiencies for fungi and bacteria, followed by the NIOSH sampler. Personal sampling was performed in a pig farm to assess occupational bioaerosol exposure and to evaluate the sampling/analysis methods. The Button and IOM samplers yielded a similar performance for personal bioaerosol sampling at the pig farm. However, the Button sampler is more likely to be clogged at high airborne dust concentrations because of its higher flow rate (4 L/min). Therefore, the IOM sampler is a more appropriate choice for performing personal sampling in environments with high dust levels. In summary, the Button and IOM samplers with PC filters are efficient sampling/analysis methods for the personal exposure assessment of multiple bioaerosols.

  13. The Yellowstone hotspot, Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and human geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Despain, D.G.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Good, John M.; Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann.

    2007-01-01

    Active geologic processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are fundamental in shaping the landscapes of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE), a high volcanic plateau flanked by a crescent of still higher mountainous terrain. The processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are volcanism, faulting, and uplift and are observed in the geology at the surface. We attribute the driving forces responsible for the northeastward progression of these processes to a thermal plume rising through the Earth’s mantle into the base of the southwest-moving North American plate. This progression began 16 million years ago (Ma) near the Nevada-Oregon border and arrived at Yellowstone about 2 Ma. Before arrival of the hotspot, an older landscape existed, particularly mountains created during the Laramide orogeny about 70–50 Ma and volcanic terrain formed by Absaroka andesitic volcanism mostly between 50–45 Ma. These landscapes were more muted than the present, hotspot-modified landscape because the Laramide-age mountains had worn down and an erosion surface of low relief had developed on the Absaroka volcanic terrain.

  14. A Glance at Recombination Hotspots in the Domestic Cat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Alhaddad

    Full Text Available Recombination has essential roles in increasing genetic variability within a population and in ensuring successful meiotic events. The objective of this study is to (i infer the population-scaled recombination rate (ρ, and (ii identify and characterize regions of increased recombination rate for the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus. SNPs (n = 701 were genotyped in twenty-two East Asian feral cats (random bred. The SNPs covered ten different chromosomal regions (A1, A2, B3, C2, D1, D2, D4, E2, F2, X with an average region size of 850 Kb and an average SNP density of 70 SNPs/region. The Bayesian method in the program inferRho was used to infer regional population recombination rates and hotspots localities. The regions exhibited variable population recombination rates and four decisive recombination hotspots were identified on cat chromosome A2, D1, and E2 regions. As a description of the identified hotspots, no correlation was detected between the GC content and the locality of recombination spots, and the hotspots enclosed L2 LINE elements and MIR and tRNA-Lys SINE elements.

  15. Handwritten Character Classification using the Hotspot Feature Extraction Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surinta, Olarik; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Feature extraction techniques can be important in character recognition, because they can enhance the efficacy of recognition in comparison to featureless or pixel-based approaches. This study aims to investigate the novel feature extraction technique called the hotspot technique in order to use it

  16. Are hotspots of evolutionary potential adequately protected in southern California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.; Hathaway, S.A.; Boys, J.; Fisher, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Reserves are often designed to protect rare habitats, or "typical" exemplars of ecoregions and geomorphic provinces. This approach focuses on current patterns of organismal and ecosystem-level biodiversity, but typically ignores the evolutionary processes that control the gain and loss of biodiversity at these and other levels (e.g., genetic, ecological). In order to include evolutionary processes in conservation planning efforts, their spatial components must first be identified and mapped. We describe a GIS-based approach for explicitly mapping patterns of genetic divergence and diversity for multiple species (a "multi-species genetic landscape"). Using this approach, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA datasets from 21 vertebrate and invertebrate species in southern California to identify areas with common phylogeographic breaks and high intrapopulation diversity. The result is an evolutionary framework for southern California within which patterns of genetic diversity can be analyzed in the context of historical processes, future evolutionary potential and current reserve design. Our multi-species genetic landscapes pinpoint six hotspots where interpopulation genetic divergence is consistently high, five evolutionary hotspots within which genetic connectivity is high, and three hotspots where intrapopulation genetic diversity is high. These 14 hotspots can be grouped into eight geographic areas, of which five largely are unprotected at this time. The multi-species genetic landscape approach may provide an avenue to readily incorporate measures of evolutionary process into GIS-based systematic conservation assessment and land-use planning.

  17. The making of a productivity hotspot in the coastal ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K Wingfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly productive hotspots in the ocean often occur where complex physical forcing mechanisms lead to aggregation of primary and secondary producers. Understanding how hotspots persist, however, requires combining knowledge of the spatio-temporal linkages between geomorphology, physical forcing, and biological responses with the physiological requirements and movement of top predators. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we integrate remotely sensed oceanography, ship surveys, and satellite telemetry to show how local geomorphology interacts with physical forcing to create a region with locally enhanced upwelling and an adjacent upwelling shadow that promotes retentive circulation, enhanced year-round primary production, and prey aggregation. These conditions provide an area within the upwelling shadow where physiologically optimal water temperatures can be found adjacent to a region of enhanced prey availability, resulting in a foraging hotspot for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta off the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: We have identified the set of conditions that lead to a persistent top predator hotspot, which increases our understanding of how highly migratory species exploit productive regions of the ocean. These results will aid in the development of spatially and environmentally explicit management strategies for marine species of conservation concern.

  18. Rainfall-induced landslides in Europe: hotspots and thresholds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, J.; Jaedicke, C.; Nadim, F.; Kalsnes, B.

    2010-12-01

    This contribution presents preliminary results of the European project SafeLand. SafeLand is a large-scale integrating collaborative research project on landslide risks in Europe, funded by the Seventh Framework Programme for research and technological development (FP7) of the European Commission. SafeLand was launched in May 2009 and will run for three years. The project team, which comprises 27 institutions from 12 European countries, is coordinated by the International Centre for Geohazards (ICG) in Norway. SafeLand aims to develop and implement an integrated and comprehensive approach to help and guide decision-making in connection with mitigation of landslide risks. Quantifying the effects of global change (changes in demography and climate change) on evolution of landslide risk in Europe is one of the main goals of SafeLand. The methodologies are tested in selected hazard and risk "hotspots” in Europe, in turn improving knowledge, methodologies and integration strategies for the management of landslide risk. The present contribution is focused on two components of SafeLand: (1) the identification of landslide hazard and risk hotspots and (2) the estimation and assessment of rainfall thresholds for triggering of landslides. Hotspots of landslide hazard and risk were identified by an objective GIS-based analysis. The results show clearly where landslide pose the largest hazard in Europe and the objective approach allows a ranking of the countries by exposed area and population. In absolute numbers, Italy is the country with the highest amount of area and population exposed. Relative to absolute number of inhabitants and area, small alpine countries such as Lichtenstein and Montenegro score highest where as much as 40% of the population could be exposed. It is obvious that the type and quality of the input data are decisive for the quality of the results. Especially the estimation of extreme precipitation events needs improvement. These preliminary results are

  19. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  20. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  1. Electron Energy Distribution in Hotspots of Cygnus A:Filling the Gap with Spitzer Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-03-06

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera at 4.5 {micro}m and 8.0 {micro}m, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected (and re-analyzed) from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band (radio-to-X-ray) emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity B {approx} 170 {micro}G in spot A, and B {approx} 270 {micro}G in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100MeV up to {approx} 100GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds almost exactly to the proton rest energy of {approx} 1GeV. We argue that the shape of the electron continuum most likely reflects two different regimes of the electron acceleration process taking place at mildly relativistic shocks, rather than resulting from radiative cooling and/or absorption e.ects. In this picture the protons inertia defines the critical energy for the hotspot electrons above which Fermi-type acceleration processes may play a major role, but below which the operating acceleration mechanism has to be of a different type. At energies {approx}> 100 GeV, the electron spectra cut-off/steepen again, most likely as a result of spectral aging due to radiative loss effects. We discuss several implications of the presented analysis for the physics of extragalactic jets.

  2. Electron Energy Distribution in Hotspots of Cygnus A:Filling the Gap with Spitzer Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-03-06

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera at 4.5 {micro}m and 8.0 {micro}m, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected (and re-analyzed) from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band (radio-to-X-ray) emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity B {approx} 170 {micro}G in spot A, and B {approx} 270 {micro}G in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100MeV up to {approx} 100GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds almost exactly to the proton rest energy of {approx} 1GeV. We argue that the shape of the electron continuum most likely reflects two different regimes of the electron acceleration process taking place at mildly relativistic shocks, rather than resulting from radiative cooling and/or absorption e.ects. In this picture the protons inertia defines the critical energy for the hotspot electrons above which Fermi-type acceleration processes may play a major role, but below which the operating acceleration mechanism has to be of a different type. At energies {approx}> 100 GeV, the electron spectra cut-off/steepen again, most likely as a result of spectral aging due to radiative loss effects. We discuss several implications of the presented analysis for the physics of extragalactic jets.

  3. Design and evaluation of a computer tutorial on electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeanne Jackson

    Research has shown that students do not fully understand electric fields and their interactions with charged particles after completing traditional classroom instruction. The purpose of this project was to develop a computer tutorial to remediate some of these difficulties. Research on the effectiveness of computer-delivered instructional materials showed that students would learn better from media incorporating user-controlled interactive graphics. Two versions of the tutorial were tested. One version used interactive graphics and the other used static graphics. The two versions of the tutorial were otherwise identical. This project was done in four phases. Phases I and II were used to refine the topics covered in the tutorial and to test the usability of the tutorial. The final version of the tutorial was tested in Phases III and IV. The tutorial was tested using a pretest-posttest design with a control group. Both tests were administered in an interview setting. The tutorial using interactive graphics was more effective at remediating students' difficulties than the tutorial using static graphics for students in Phase III (p = 0.001). In Phase IV students who viewed the tutorial with static graphics did better than those viewing interactive graphics. The sample size in Phase IV was too small for this to be a statistically meaningful result. Some student reasoning errors were noted during the interviews. These include difficulty with the vector representation of electric fields, treating electric charge as if it were mass, using faulty algebraic reasoning to answer questions involving ratios and proportions, and using Coulomb's law in situations in which it is not appropriate.

  4. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  5. Field evaluation of broiler gait score using different sampling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AFS Cordeiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is today the world's largest broiler meat exporter; however, in order to keep this position, it must comply with welfare regulations while maintaining low production costs. Locomotion problems restrain bird movements, limiting their access to drinking and feeding equipment, and therefore their survival and productivity. The objective of this study was to evaluate locomotion deficiency in broiler chickens reared under stressful temperature conditions using three different sampling methods of birds from three different ages. The experiment consisted in determining the gait score of 28, 35, 42 and 49-day-old broilers using three different known gait scoring methods: M1, birds were randomly selected, enclosed in a circle, and then stimulated to walk out of the circle; M2, ten birds were randomly selected and gait scored; and M3, birds were randomly selected, enclosed in a circle, and then observed while walking away from the circle without stimulus to walking. Environmental temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity inside the poultry houses were recorded. No evidence of interaction between scoring method and age was found however, both method and age influenced gait score. Gait score was found to be lower at 28 days of age. The evaluation using the ten randomly selected birds within the house was the method that presented the less reliable results. Gait score results when birds were stimulated to walk were lower than when they were not simulated, independently of age. The gait scores obtained with the three tested methods and ages were higher than those considered acceptable. The highest frequency of normal gait score (0 represented 50% of the flock. These results may be related to heat stress during rearing. Average gait score incresead with average ambient temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity. The evaluation of gait score to detect locomotion problems of broilers under rearing conditions seems subjective and

  6. Can We Reconcile the TA Excess and Hotspot with Auger Observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Noemie; Allard, Denis; Parizot, Etienne; Lachaud, Cyril; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-02-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) shows a 20° hotspot as well as an excess of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECRs) above 50 EeV when compared with the Auger spectrum. We consider the possibility that both the TA excess and hotspot are due to a dominant source in the northern sky. We carry out detailed simulations of UHECR propagation in both the intergalactic medium and the Galaxy, using different values for the intergalactic magnetic field. We consider two general classes of sources: transients and steady, adopting a mixed UHECR composition that is consistent with the one found by Auger. The spatial location of the sources is drawn randomly. We generate Auger-like and TA-like data sets from which we determine the spectrum, the sky maps, and the level of anisotropy. We find that, while steady sources are favored over transients, it is unlikely to account for all the currently available observational data. While we reproduce fairly well the Auger spectrum for the vast majority of the simulated data sets, most of the simulated data sets with a spectrum compatible with that of TA (at most a few percent depending on density model tested) show a much stronger anisotropy than the one observed. We find that the rare cases in which both the spectrum and the anisotropy are consistent require a steady source within ˜10 Mpc, to account for the flux excess, and a strong extragalactic magnetic field ˜10 nG, to reduce the excessive anisotropy.

  7. Global warming and extinctions of endemic species from biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Jay R; Liu, Canran; Neilson, Ronald P; Hansen, Lara; Hannah, Lee

    2006-04-01

    Global warming is a key threat to biodiversity, but few researchers have assessed the magnitude of this threat at the global scale. We used major vegetation types (biomes) as proxies for natural habitats and, based on projected future biome distributions under doubled-CO2 climates, calculated changes in habitat areas and associated extinctions of endemic plant and vertebrate species in biodiversity hotspots. Because of numerous uncertainties in this approach, we undertook a sensitivity analysis of multiple factors that included (1) two global vegetation models, (2) different numbers of biome classes in our biome classification schemes, (3) different assumptions about whether species distributions were biome specific or not, and (4) different migration capabilities. Extinctions were calculated using both species-area and endemic-area relationships. In addition, average required migration rates were calculated for each hotspot assuming a doubled-CO2 climate in 100 years. Projected percent extinctions ranged from global vegetation model and then by migration and biome classification assumptions. Bootstrap comparisons indicated that effects on hotpots as a group were not significantly different from effects on random same-biome collections of grid cells with respect to biome change or migration rates; in some scenarios, however, botspots exhibited relatively high biome change and low migration rates. Especially vulnerable hotspots were the Cape Floristic Region, Caribbean, Indo-Burma, Mediterranean Basin, Southwest Australia, and Tropical Andes, where plant extinctions per hotspot sometimes exceeded 2000 species. Under the assumption that projected habitat changes were attained in 100 years, estimated global-warming-induced rates of species extinctions in tropical hotspots in some cases exceeded those due to deforestation, supporting suggestions that global warming is one of the most serious threats to the planet's biodiversity.

  8. Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Newbery, J.D.H. [Conoco, UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

  9. Joint research and evaluation work in the field of fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.; Such, J.M.; Casselman, C. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laborde, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Prevention et d' Etudes des Accidents, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bertrand, R.; Blot, M.; Chaussard, M.; Lacoue, J.; Mattei, J.M. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept d' Evaluation de Surete, 92 (France)

    2001-07-01

    In general, any assessment concerning the safety of nuclear facilities is based on acquired scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, some areas related to safety remain still inadequately explored, knowledge in these areas needs to be further developed either through the results obtained from studies or from experimental research. With the aim of achieving an optimal safety level, one of IPSN's main tasks is to highlight these gags in current knowledge and point out to nuclear facility operators the need to fill them. These general considerations are pertinent to the particular field of fire. At IPSN, safety assessment activities and research are carried out side-by-side, thus facilitating the implementation of corresponding research programs. This ability to orient research with respect to safety assessment requirements, the contribution of research scientists to safety assessment or the formulation of safety problems, are today counted among the strong points of IPSN operation. This paper presents also the present main fire risk safety concerns for Nuclear Power Plants and the associated research carried out by IPSN (past, underway and future) to improve the scientific knowledge in the related areas. (authors)

  10. Field evaluation of gas well stimulation methods, Sutton County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.F.; Murphy, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    Attempts to stimulate marginal gas producers in Sutton County, Texas, has provided an opportunity to evaluate several types of stimulation fluids on a comparative basis. The fluids used included water-base, oil-base, and acid-base fluids. A thorough study of the production history of wells following treatment demonstrates the effectiveness of the different fluids on a long term basis. Conclusions drawn from this study provide a guide to selection of fracture fluids for tight gas sands. Cost-performance factors are explored as they apply to stimulation of marginal gas production and further conclusions are drawn concerning the importance of formation damage as a function of formation petrophysical properties. Examples are shown to indicate formation damage is a factor to consider in fracturing tight sands but performance comprises may be made in the choice of fluid to obtain maximum frac penetration.

  11. Field evaluation of an acid rain-drought stress interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwart, W L

    1988-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to simulate natural field conditions for growing agricultural crops while controlling conditions to study specific environmental effects. This report briefly describes the use of moveable rain exclusion shelters (10.4 x 40.9 m) to study the results of the interaction of acid rain and drought stress on corn and soybean yields. The rain exclusion shelters are constructed of galvanized pipe framing and covered with polyethylene film. Movement is automated by a rain switch to protect crops from ambient rainfall and to treat them with simulated acid rain The facility simulates a real environment with respect to variables such as solar exposure, wind movement, dew formation, and insect exposure, while allowing careful control of moisture regimes. Soybeans and corn were treated with average rainfall amounts, and with one-half and one-quarter of these rainfall amounts (drought stress) at two levels of rainfall acidity, pH 5.6 and 3.0. While drought stress resulted in considerable yield reduction for Amsoy and Williams soybeans, no additional reduction in yield was observed with rainfall of pH 3.0, as compared to rainfall of approximately pH 5.6. Similar results were observed for one corn cultivar, Pioneer 3377. For one year of the study however, yield of B73 x Mo17 (corn) was reduced 3139 kg ha(-1) by the most severe drought, and an additional 1883 kg ha(-1) by acid rain of pH 3.0, as compared to the control (pH 5.6). Yield reduction from acidic rain was considerably less at full water rates, resulting in a significant pH by drought stress interaction. However, during the second year of the experiment, no pH effect or drought by pH interaction was observed for this cultivar. The reason for the difference in the two years was not identified.

  12. Experimental evaluation and field implementation of FRP bridge deck modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot Prachasaree

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Construction of highway bridge decks using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite deck and superstructuremodules in lieu of concrete decks has proven to be feasible. However, FRP’s are not widely accepted yet despite theirbenefits such as non-corrosiveness, higher strength to weight ratio, and better fatigue resistance than conventional materials.Lack of wider usage of FRP material is mainly attributed to the absence of: 1 standardized test procedures, 2 designspecifications, and 3 construction procedures. The higher initial cost is also inhibiting bridge engineers in selecting FRPmodules as highway bridge super structural systems.Implementation of FRP composites technology for highway bridge decks leads to higher safety and lower life cyclecosts. Significant ongoing research and development of FRP deck modules as illustrated herein, has proven to enhancedeck module properties in developing FRP modules with enhanced structural performance.Prodeck 4 is one such multicellular deck that was recently developed, and extensively evaluated for static and fatigueloads, and its response results are presented herein. From rigorous testing, it was concluded that Prodeck 4 could resistAASHTO HS 25 loading with maximum stringer spacing of 48 inches. This led to construction of two bridges (one in Ohioand other in West Virginia using Prodeck 4 as decking.

  13. Some Hotspots Concerned with Smart Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang

    2010-01-01

    The smart grid has been such a hot topic recently. In this paper the hot topics in this field, such as the definition and features of smart grid, key technical problems to be addressed such as new system components, new types of transducers and measurement technologies, advanced interfaces, event-driven fast-simulated decision-making and coordination, and adaptive control, etc., and difficulties are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields at various frequencies. Exposure of workers operating a plastic sealer have been taken as an example scenario of electromagnetic field exposure at the workplace for discussion of those difficulties in applying numerical simulations. The following difficulties in reliable numerical simulations of workers' exposure to the electromagnetic field have been considered: workers' body models (posture, dimensions, shape and grounding conditions), working environment models (objects most influencing electromagnetic field distribution) and an analysis of parameters for which exposure limitations are specified in international guidelines and standards.

  15. Evaluation of magnetic field due to ferromagnetic vacuum vessel in Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Takeshi; Abe, Mitsushi; Tadokoro, Takahiro [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan). Power and Industrial Systems R and D Div.; Miura, Yukitoshi; Suzuki, Norio; Sato, Masayasu; Sengoku, Seio

    1998-03-01

    We evaluated magnetic fields due to the ferromagnetic vacuum vessel (FVV) in the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 experimentally and computationally, the results were extrapolated to the JFT-2M and ITER. The maximum amount of local poloidal field on the magnetic axis induced by the FVV port was about 5 mT in the HT-2. This is the allowable amount of the field to discharge plasma in the HT-2. The proportion of external poloidal field shielded by FVV is in inverse proportion to external toroidal field. The stronger the field induced by FVV, the smaller the distance between plasma center and vacuum vessel wall. The delay time of poloidal field penetration due to the FVV is small, as long as the toroidal field is supplied. (author)

  16. The Electron Energy Distribution in the Hotspots of Cygnus A: Filling the Gap with the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Stawarz, L; Harris, D E; Ostrowski, M

    2007-01-01

    Here we present Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of Cyg A with the Infrared Array Camera, resulting in the detection of the high-energy tails or cut-offs in the synchrotron spectra for all four hotspots of this archetype radio galaxy. When combined with the other data collected from the literature, our observations allow for detailed modeling of the broad-band emission for the brightest spots A and D. We confirm that the X-ray flux detected previously from these features is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton radiation for the magnetic field intensity 170 muG in spot A, and 270 muG in spot D. We also find that the energy density of the emitting electrons is most likely larger by a factor of a few than the energy density of the hotspots' magnetic field. We construct energy spectra of the radiating ultrarelativistic electrons. We find that for both hotspots A and D these spectra are consistent with a broken power-law extending from at least 100 MeV up to 100 GeV, and that the spectral break corresponds ...

  17. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Long-Term Evaluation of SSL Field Performance in Select Interior Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The GATEWAY program evaluated the long-term performance characteristics (chromaticity change, maintained illuminance, and operations and maintenance) of LED lighting systems in four field installations previously documented in separate DOE GATEWAY reports.

  18. GATEWAY Report Brief: SSL Demonstration: Long-Term Evaluation of Indoor Field Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-02-28

    Report brief summarizing a GATEWAY program evaluation of the long-term performance characteristics (chromaticity change, maintained illuminance, and operations and maintenance) of LED lighting systems in four field installations previously documented in separate DOE GATEWAY reports.

  19. Fostering transfer of websearchers’ evaluation skills: a field test of two transfer theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, Amber; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Boshuizen, Els

    2010-01-01

    Walraven, A., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2010). Fostering transfer of web searchers’ evaluation skills: A field test of two transfer theories. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 716-728.

  20. Evaluation of Horizontal Electric Field Under Different Lightning Current Models by Perfect Ground Assumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jianfeng; LI Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Lightning electromagnetics can affect the reliability of the power system or communication system.Therefore,evaluation of electromagnetic fields generated by lightning return stroke is indispensable.Arnold sommerfeld proposed a model to calculate the electromagnetic field,but it involved the time-consuming sommerfeld integral.However,perfect conductor ground assumption can account for fast calculation,thus this paper reviews the perfect ground equation for evaluation of lightning electromagnetic fields,presents three engineering lightning return stroke models,and calculates the horizontal electric field caused by three lightning return stroke models.According to the results,the amplitude of lightning return stroke has a strong impact on horizontal electric fields,and the steepness of lightning return stroke influences the horizontal electric fields.Moreover,the perfect ground method is faster than the sommerfeld integral method.

  1. Field evaluation of biolarvicides in Surat city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haq, R.M. Bhatt, K.G. Vaishnav & R.S. Yadav

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Two bacterial larvicide (bio-larvicide formulations— Bacticide® and VectoBac® containing viable endospores and delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensisH-14 were evaluated in 2001 for their mosquito larvicidal efficacy under the operational conditions ofurban malaria control programme in Surat city, India.Methods : Larvicides were applied at the recommended dose in selected breeding habitats of Anopheles(An. stephensi, Aedes (Ae. aegypti and Culex (Cx. quinquefasciatus and reductions in thedensities of III and IV instars were compared with that of untreated matched controls.Results : At the construction sites in cemented tanks/chambers VectoBac produced reduction in thedensity of III and IV instar larvae of An. stephensi (98–100% and Ae. aegypti (100% in the first weekof application whereas Bacticide produced 71–100% reduction in An. stephensi and 100% in Ae.aegypti. Re-application of VectoBac on Day 10 caused better control up to Day 20 when comparedwith Bacticide. In stagnant water pools, VectoBac produced 27.6–85.3% reduction in the larvae of An.subpictus and 18.5–83.8% in those of Cx. quinquefasciatus whereas Bacticide produced 23.3–30.3%and 39–97.2% reduction in An. subpictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus larval densities in the first weekpost application, respectively. Bacticide application gave better impact on Cx. quinquefasciatuslarvae in the second week after re-application as compared to VectoBac. In storm water drains, Vecto-Bac caused respectively 6.2–100% and 6.4–97.6% reduction in An. subpictus and Cx. quinquefasciatuslarvae in the first week of application whereas Bacticide produced 100% and 13.3–98.8% reductionin An. subpictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus larval densities, respectively.Interpretation & conclusion : Both the formulations were equally effective on An. subpictus and Cx.quinquefasciatus larvae after a second application. The results showed that application of

  2. Fast evaluation of polynomials over binary finite fields and application to side-channel countermeasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coron, Jean-Sébastien; Roy, Arnab; Vivek, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new technique for evaluating polynomials over binary finite fields. This is useful in the context of anti-DPA countermeasures when an S-box is expressed as a polynomial over a binary finite field. For n-bit S-boxes, our new technique has heuristic complexity O(2n/2/√n) instead of O(...

  3. Clinical evaluation of the effective use of magnetic fields in podology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, L; Giuriati, L; Giannini, S

    2001-01-01

    The use of magnetic fields in medicine has obtained encouraging results and it has stimulated the research conducted so that the use of this method of treatment may be better and more widespread. A double blind study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the generation of magnetic fields on edema and on pain in patients submitted to surgery for bilateral hallux valgus.

  4. Edge-of-field evaluation of the Ohio phosphorus risk index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Phosphorus Index (PI) has been the cornerstone for phosphorus (P)-based management and planning over the past twenty years; yet, field-scale evaluation of many state PIs has been limited. In this study, measured P loads in surface runoff and tile discharge from 40 agricultural fields in Ohio wit...

  5. Evaluation of electrical capacitance tomography sensor based on the coupling of fluid field and electrostatic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiamin; Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is based on capacitance measurements from electrode pairs mounted outside of a pipe or vessel. The structure of ECT sensors is vital to image quality. In this paper, issues with the number of electrodes and the electrode covering ratio for complex liquid-solids flows in a rotating device are investigated based on a new coupling simulation model. The number of electrodes is increased from 4 to 32 while the electrode covering ratio is changed from 0.1 to 0.9. Using the coupling simulation method, real permittivity distributions and the corresponding capacitance data at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8 s with a rotation speed of 96 rotations per minute (rpm) are collected. Linear back projection (LBP) and Landweber iteration algorithms are used for image reconstruction. The quality of reconstructed images is evaluated by correlation coefficient compared with the real permittivity distributions obtained from the coupling simulation. The sensitivity for each sensor is analyzed and compared with the correlation coefficient. The capacitance data with a range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 45, 50, 55 and 60 dB are generated to evaluate the effect of data noise on the performance of ECT sensors. Furthermore, the SNRs of experimental data are analyzed for a stationary pipe with permittivity distribution. Based on the coupling simulation, 16-electrode ECT sensors are recommended to achieve good image quality.

  6. Can we reconcile the TA excess and hotspot with Auger observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, Noemie; Parizot, Etienne; Lachaud, Cyril; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) shows a 20$^{\\circ}$ hotspot as well as an excess of UHECRs above 50 EeV when compared with the Auger spectrum. We consider the possibility that both the TA excess and hotspot are due to a dominant source in the Northern sky. We carry out detailed simulations of UHECR propagation in both the intergalactic medium and the Galaxy, using different values for the intergalactic magnetic field. We consider two general classes of sources: transients and steady, adopting a mixed UHECR composition that is consistent with the one found by Auger. The spatial location of the sources is draw randomly. We generate Auger-like and TA-like data sets from which we determine the spectrum, the sky maps and the level of anisotropy. We find that, while steady sources are favoured over transients, the probability to account for all the currently available observational data is very low ($\\sim 0.1\\%$). While we reproduce fairly well the Auger spectrum for the vast majority of the simulated data sets, most of ...

  7. Recent hotspot volcanism on Venus from VIRTIS emissivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E; Stofan, Ellen R; Mueller, Nils; Treiman, Allan; Elkins-Tanton, Linda; Helbert, Joern; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    2010-04-30

    The questions of whether Venus is geologically active and how the planet has resurfaced over the past billion years have major implications for interior dynamics and climate change. Nine "hotspots"--areas analogous to Hawaii, with volcanism, broad topographic rises, and large positive gravity anomalies suggesting mantle plumes at depth--have been identified as possibly active. This study used variations in the thermal emissivity of the surface observed by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer on the European Space Agency's Venus Express spacecraft to identify compositional differences in lava flows at three hotspots. The anomalies are interpreted as a lack of surface weathering. We estimate the flows to be younger than 2.5 million years and probably much younger, about 250,000 years or less, indicating that Venus is actively resurfacing.

  8. Decongestion of urban areas with hotspot-pricing

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of population in urban areas is jeopardizing the mobility and air quality worldwide. One of the most notable problems arising is that of traffic congestion which in turn affects air pollution. With the advent of technologies able to sense real-time data about cities, and its public distribution for analysis, we are in place to forecast scenarios valuable to ameliorate and control congestion. Here, we propose a local congestion pricing scheme, hotspot-pricing, that surcharges vehicles traversing congested junctions. The proposed tax is computed from the estimation of the evolution of congestion at local level, and the expected response of users to the tax (elasticity). Results on cities' road networks, considering real-traffic data, show that the proposed hotspot-pricing scheme would be more effective than current mechanisms to decongest urban areas, and paves the way towards sustainable congestion in urban areas.

  9. Global hotspots of water scarcity impacts due to human interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, T.; Wada, Y.; Aerts, J.; Ward, P.; Satoh, Y.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Masaki, Y.; Doll, P. M.; Ostberg, S.; Oki, T.; Gosling, S.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Water scarcity is rapidly increasing in many global river basins, due to both local increases in water demand and human interventions affecting stream flow. In a novel multi-model multi-forcing assessment over the period 1971-2010, we examine how several human interventions have affected water scarcity, namely land use change, reservoir operations, and upstream water withdrawals. We show that these human interventions have caused increased water scarcity for 16% of the global population, and decreased water scarcity for 13%, and have contributed to distinct patterns of water scarcity hotspots. We also show that a combination of human interventions and changes in local water demands have led to an increase in the duration of extreme water scarcity events in 30% of the global land area, inhabited by 49% of the global population. Upstream human interventions are the main dominant driver (in 86% of the cases) of negative impacts on downstream fresh water resources and water scarcity. Therefore, adaptation measures should be embedded in integrated river basin management plans, addressing upstream effects on downstream water scarcity.This study is the first in its kind to evaluate how human interventions affected water scarcity conditions as well as the exposure to and persistence of water scarcity events, using an ensemble of five global water impact models (H08, LPJmL, MATSIRO, PCR-GLOBWB, WaterGAP) driven by three global state-of-the art observations-based historical climate data-sets (PGFv2, GSWP3, WFD/WFDEI) and a set of socio-economic proxies (GDP, population density, livestock density, land use and land cover) to model historical demands. A novelty of this research is the use of the HYDE 3.1 - MIRCA dataset for simulating the time-varying effects of changes in irrigation and/or cropland patterns. With the incorporation of a spatially and temporally explicit indicator to describe minimum environmental flow requirements, i.e. the amount of water that ecosystems need

  10. Regional differences in recombination hotspots between two chicken populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooijmans Richard PMA

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although several genetic linkage maps of the chicken genome have been published, the resolution of these maps is limited and does not allow the precise identification of recombination hotspots. The availability of more than 3.2 million SNPs in the chicken genome and the recent advances in high throughput genotyping techniques enabled us to increase marker density for the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the chicken genome. This high-resolution linkage map allowed us to study recombination hotspots across the genome between two chicken populations: a purebred broiler line and a broiler × broiler cross. In total, 1,619 animals from the two different broiler populations were genotyped with 17,790 SNPs. Results The resulting linkage map comprises 13,340 SNPs. Although 360 polymorphic SNPs that had not been assigned to a known chromosome on chicken genome build WASHUC2 were included in this study, no new linkage groups were found. The resulting linkage map is composed of 31 linkage groups, with a total length of 3,054 cM for the sex-average map of the combined population. The sex-average linkage map of the purebred broiler line is 686 cM smaller than the linkage map of the broiler × broiler cross. Conclusions In this study, we present a linkage map of the chicken genome at a substantially higher resolution than previously published linkage maps. Regional differences in recombination hotspots between the two mapping populations were observed in several chromosomes near the telomere of the p arm; the sex-specific analysis revealed that these regional differences were mainly caused by female-specific recombination hotspots in the broiler × broiler cross.

  11. Analysis of structural hot-spot stress in orthotropic plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ce; Ji Bohai; Xu Hanjiang

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the actual steel deck structure of Taizhou Bridge, this paper carries out hot-spot stress analysis on some key spots by using the finite element model which simulates local structure of orthotropic steel bridge decks. A finite element model is established for local structure of orthotropic steel bridge decks, and in the analysis of linear elasticity of the structure, face load is employed to simulate the loads from vehicle wheels. Analysis results show that main stresses are relatively heavy at the joints between diaphragm plates, top plates and U-shaped ribs and the joints between diaphragm plates and U-shaped ribs. These joints shall be regarded as key points for hot-spot stress analysis. Different mesh densities are adopted in the finite element model and the main stresses at different hot spots are contrasted and linear extrapolation is carried out using extrapolation formulae. Results show that different mesh densities have different influences on the hot-spot stresses at the welded seams of U-shaped ribs. These influences shall be considered in calculation and analysis.

  12. On localised hotspots of an urban crime model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J. B.; O'Farrell, Hayley

    2013-06-01

    We investigate stationary, spatially localised crime hotspots on the real line and the plane of an urban crime model of Short et al. [M. Short, M. DÓrsogna, A statistical model of criminal behavior, Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences 18 (2008) 1249-1267]. Extending the weakly nonlinear analysis of Short et al., we show in one-dimension that localised hotspots should bifurcate off the background spatially homogeneous state at a Turing instability provided the bifurcation is subcritical. Using path-following techniques, we continue these hotspots and show that the bifurcating pulses can undergo the process of homoclinic snaking near the singular limit. We analyse the singular limit to explain the existence of spike solutions and compare the analytical results with the numerical computations. In two-dimensions, we show that localised radial spots should also bifurcate off the spatially homogeneous background state. Localised planar hexagon fronts and hexagon patches are found and depending on the proximity to the singular limit these solutions either undergo homoclinic snaking or act like “multi-spot” solutions. Finally, we discuss applications of these localised patterns in the urban crime context and the full agent-based model.

  13. Tracing global supply chains to air pollution hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Daniel; Kanemoto, Keiichiro

    2016-09-01

    While high-income countries have made significant strides since the 1970s in improving air quality, air pollution continues to rise in many developing countries and the world as a whole. A significant share of the pollution burden in developing countries can be attributed to production for export to consumers in high-income nations. However, it remains a challenge to quantify individual actors’ share of responsibility for pollution, and to involve parties other than primary emitters in cleanup efforts. Here we present a new spatially explicit modeling approach to link SO2, NO x , and PM10 severe emissions hotspots to final consumers via global supply chains. These maps show developed countries reducing their emissions domestically but driving new pollution hotspots in developing countries. This is also the first time a spatially explicit footprint inventory has been established. Linking consumers and supply chains to emissions hotspots creates opportunities for other parties to participate alongside primary emitters and local regulators in pollution abatement efforts.

  14. Exploring Spatial-Temporal Patterns of Urban Human Mobility Hotspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiping Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human mobility patterns provides us with knowledge about human mobility in an urban context, which plays a critical role in urban planning, traffic management and the spread of disease. Recently, the availability of large-scale human-sensing datasets enables us to analyze human mobility patterns and the relationships between humans and their living environments on an unprecedented spatial and temporal scale to improve decision-making regarding the quality of life of citizens. This study aims to characterize the urban spatial-temporal dynamic from the perspective of human mobility hotspots by using mobile phone location data. We propose a workflow to identify human convergent and dispersive hotspots that represent the status of human mobility in local areas and group these hotspots into different classes according to clustering their temporal signatures. To illustrate our proposed approach, a case study of Shenzhen, China, has been conducted. Six typical spatial-temporal patterns in the city are identified and discussed by combining the spatial distribution of these identified patterns with urban functional areas. The findings enable us to understand the human dynamics in a different area of the city, which can serve as a reference for urban planning and traffic management.

  15. Phosphorus Accumulating Organisms and Biogeochemical Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, J.; Walter, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Despite extensive research, many of the processes that control phosphorus (P) movement from agricultural fields to streams and lakes are not well understood. This limits our ability to develop management strategies that will mediate P contamination of freshwater ecosystems and subsequent eutrophication. Recent advances in molecular microbiology have prompted a paradigm shift in wastewater treatment that recognizes and exploits the ways specific microbial processes influence P solubility. Central to this enhanced biological phosphorus removal in wastewater treatment plants is a relatively recently discovered microorganism, Candidatus accumulibacter, which takes-up P and stores it internally as polyphosphate under alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Within the past few months we have discovered this organism in the natural environment and its role in P biogeochemistry is unclear. We speculate that it may function similarly in variable source areas, which experience cycles of saturation and desaturation, as it does in the anaerobic- aerobic cycles in a wastewater treatment plant. If so, there may be potential opportunities to realize similarly new perspectives and advancements in the watershed context as have been seen in wastewater technologies. Here we present some of our preliminary findings.

  16. The highly-cited Electrocardiogram-related articles in science citation index expanded: characteristics and hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianglin; Gu, Jiaojiao; Yan, Hong; Xu, Zhi; Ren, Bing; Yang, Yaming; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Qi; Tan, Shaohua

    2014-01-01

    We used bibliometric analysis methodology in the expanded Science Citation Index to identify highly-cited electrocardiogram (ECG)-related articles with total citations (TC2012) exceeding 100 from the publication year to 2012. Web of Science search tools were used to identify the highly-cited articles. The aspects analyzed for highly cited publications included effect of time on citation analysis, journals and Web of Science categories, number of authors per publication, originating institutions and countries, total citation and total citation per year life cycles of articles (C2012) and research hotspots. Results showed that a total of 467 electrocardiogram-related publications were regarded as the highly-cited publications. TC2012 ranged from 101 to 2879, with 215 as the average number of citations. No highly-cited publications have emerged yet during the first two years of the present 2010 Decade. All 11 countries and institutions originating highly-cited ECG-related publications were developed countries, USA in 9 of them. Four subject categories were identified as hotspots by total citations TC2012 and C2012: atrial fibrillation, long QT syndrome, angina and myocardial infarction, and risk factor analysis and health evaluation.

  17. Drastic underestimation of amphipod biodiversity in the endangered Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katouzian, Ahmad-Reza; Sari, Alireza; Macher, Jan N; Weiss, Martina; Saboori, Alireza; Leese, Florian; Weigand, Alexander M

    2016-03-01

    Biodiversity hotspots are centers of biological diversity and particularly threatened by anthropogenic activities. Their true magnitude of species diversity and endemism, however, is still largely unknown as species diversity is traditionally assessed using morphological descriptions only, thereby ignoring cryptic species. This directly limits evidence-based monitoring and management strategies. Here we used molecular species delimitation methods to quantify cryptic diversity of the montane amphipods in the Irano-Anatolian and Caucasus biodiversity hotspots. Amphipods are ecosystem engineers in rivers and lakes. Species diversity was assessed by analysing two genetic markers (mitochondrial COI and nuclear 28S rDNA), compared with morphological assignments. Our results unambiguously demonstrate that species diversity and endemism is dramatically underestimated, with 42 genetically identified freshwater species in only five reported morphospecies. Over 90% of the newly recovered species cluster inside Gammarus komareki and G. lacustris; 69% of the recovered species comprise narrow range endemics. Amphipod biodiversity is drastically underestimated for the studied regions. Thus, the risk of biodiversity loss is significantly greater than currently inferred as most endangered species remain unrecognized and/or are only found locally. Integrative application of genetic assessments in monitoring programs will help to understand the true magnitude of biodiversity and accurately evaluate its threat status.

  18. High frequency of microsatellites in S. cerevisiae meiotic recombination hotspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Joel PW

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites are highly abundant in eukaryotic genomes but their function and evolution are not yet well understood. Their elevated mutation rate makes them ideal markers of genetic difference, but high levels of unexplained heterogeneity in mutation rates among microsatellites at different genomic locations need to be elucidated in order to improve the power and accuracy of the many types of study that use them as genetic markers. Recombination could contribute to this heterogeneity, since while replication errors are thought to be the predominant mechanism for microsatellite mutation, meiotic recombination is involved in some mutation events. There is also evidence suggesting that microsatellites could function as recombination signals. The yeast S. cerevisiae is a useful model organism with which to further explore the link between microsatellites and recombination, since it is very amenable to genetic study, and meiotic recombination hotspots have been mapped throughout its entire genome. Results We examined in detail the relationship between microsatellites and hotspots of meiotic double-strand breaks, the precursors of meiotic recombination, throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. We included all tandem repeats with motif length (repeat period between one and six base pairs. Long, short and two-copy arrays were considered separately. We found that long, mono-, di- and trinucleotide microsatellites are around twice as frequent in hot than non-hot intergenic regions. The associations are weak or absent for repeats with less than six copies, and also for microsatellites with 4–6 base pair motifs, but high-copy arrays with motif length greater than three are relatively very rare throughout the genome. We present evidence that the association between high-copy, short-motif microsatellites and recombination hotspots is not driven by effects on microsatellite distribution of other factors previously linked to both

  19. Development of Ca2+ hotspots between Lymnaea neurons during synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhong-Ping; Grigoriev, Nikita; Munno, David; Lukowiak, Ken; MacVicar, Brian A; Goldberg, Jeffrey I; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-02-15

    Calcium (Ca2+) channel clustering at specific presynaptic sites is a hallmark of mature synapses. However, the spatial distribution patterns of Ca2+ channels at newly formed synapses have not yet been demonstrated. Similarly, it is unclear whether Ca2+ 'hotspots' often observed at the presynaptic sites are indeed target cell contact specific and represent a specialized mechanism by which Ca2+ channels are targeted to select synaptic sites. Utilizing both soma-soma paired (synapsed) and single neurons from the mollusk Lymnaea, we have tested the hypothesis that differential gradients of voltage-dependent Ca2+ signals develop in presynaptic neuron at its contact point with the postsynaptic neuron; and that these Ca2+ hotspots are target cell contact specific. Fura-2 imaging, or two-photon laser scanning microscopy of Calcium Green, was coupled with electrophysiological techniques to demonstrate that voltage-induced Ca2+ gradients (hotspots) develop in the presynaptic cell at its contact point with the postsynaptic neuron, but not in unpaired single cells. The incidence of Ca2+ hotspots coincided with the appearance of synaptic transmission between the paired cells, and these gradients were target cell contact specific. In contrast, the voltage-induced Ca2+ signal in unpaired neurons was uniformly distributed throughout the somata; a similar pattern of Ca2+ gradient was observed in the presynaptic neuron when it was soma-soma paired with a non-synaptic partner cell. Moreover, voltage clamp recording techniques, in conjunction with a fast, optical differential perfusion system, were used to demonstrate that the total whole-cell Ca2+ (or Ba2+) current density in single and paired cells was not significantly different. However, the amplitude of Ba2+ current was significantly higher in the presynaptic cell at its contact side with the postsynaptic neurons, compared with non-contacted regions. In summary, this study demonstrates that voltage-induced Ca2+ hotspots develop

  20. Towards biodiversity hotspots effective for conserving mammals with small geographic ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; San Blas, Germán; Agrain, Federico; Roig-Juñent, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of using global biodiversity hotspots for conservation purposes is to protect taxa with small geographic ranges because these are highly vulnerable to extinction. However, the extent to what different hotspots types are effective for meeting this goal remains controversial because hotspots have been previously defined as either the richest or most threatened and richest sites in terms of total, endemic or threatened species. In this regard, the use of species richness to set conservation priorities is widely discussed because strategies focused on this diversity measure tend to miss many of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Here we use data on global terrestrial mammal distributions to show that, hotspots of total species, endemism and threat defined in terms of species richness are effective in including 27%, 29% and 11% respectively, of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Whilst, the same hotspot types defined in terms of a simple diversity index, which is a function of species richness and range-size rarity, include 68%, 44% and 90% respectively, of these taxa. In addition, we demonstrate that index hotspot types are highly efficient because they conserve 79% of mammal species (21% more species than richness hotspot types), with 59% of species shared by three hotspot types (31% more than richness hotspot types). These results suggest that selection of different diversity measures to define hotspots may strongly affect the achievement of conservation goals.

  1. Evaluation of models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) comprises a definitive main-field model for 1985.0, a main-field model for 1990.0, and a forecast secular-variation model for the period 1990-1995. The five 1985.0 main-field models and five 1990.0 main-field models that were proposed have been evaluated by comparing them with one another, with magnetic observatory data, and with Project MAGNET aerial survey data. The comparisons indicate that the main-field models proposed by IZMIRAN, and the secular-variation model proposed jointly by the British Geological Survey and the US Naval Oceanographic Office, should be assigned relatively lower weight in the derivation of the new IGRF models. -Author

  2. Electromagnetic Field Evaluation of a 500kV High Voltage Overhead Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many scientific articles have been written about electromagnetic field distributions under high voltage overhead transmission lines. However, some readers are still left wondering just how exactly the distribution curves formed by the fields are related to the mathematical models used. This paper presents case study results of a 500 kV alternating current overhead transmission line, and explicitly shows how the fields vary under high voltage lines by employing easily understood mathematical models. The numerical simulations, done using MATLAB, can help anyone willing to evaluate the amount of electromagnetic fields available under any other high voltage overhead transmission line. The magnitudes of the fields obtained are compared with the standard values set by the International Radiation Protection Agency so as to assess the integrity of external insulation of the line. Thus, the technical staff can easily attend to complaints that may arise about the electromagnetic field effects from the line.

  3. Derivation and evaluation of the fourth moment of NMR lineshape in zero-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Kahol, Pawan K

    2008-10-01

    An expression for the fourth moment in zero-field NMR has been analytically derived and numerically evaluated for a rigid cubic lattice. Model simulations have been performed to calculate the second moment, the fourth moment, the ratio of the fourth moment to the square of the second moment, and the width of the resonance line for a crystal and a polycrystalline material in high-field as well as in zero-field NMR. The simulation results allow us to draw two conclusions: (1) zero-field NMR gives sharper and better defined spectra than the high-field NMR and (2) the ratio of the high- to zero-field resonance line-widths is 4 for a crystal, whereas it is 11 for a polycrystalline material.

  4. Hotspots within the Transboundary Selenga River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimov, Nikolay; Lychagin, Mikhail; Chalov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    Gathering the efficient information on water pollution of transboundary river systems remains the crucial task in international water management, environmental pollution control and prevention health problems. Countries, located in the low parts of the river basins, depend on the water strategy and water use in the adjacent countries, located upstream. Surface water pollution is considered to be the most serious problem, facing the above-mentioned countries. Large efforts in terms of field measurement campaigns and (numerical) transport modeling are then typically needed for relevant pollution prediction and prevention. Russian rivers take inflow from 8 neighboring countries. Among them there are 2 developing economies - People Republic of China and Mongolia, which are located in water-scarce areas and thus solve their water-related problems through the consumption of international water. Negative change of water runoff and water quality in the foreign part of transboundary river is appeared inside Russian territory with more or less delay. The transboundary river system of Selenga is particularly challenging, being the biggest tributary of Lake Baikal which is the largest freshwater reservoir in the world. Selenga River contributes about 50 % of the total inflow into Baikal. It originates in the mountainous part of Mongolia and then drains into Russia. There are numerous industries and agricultural activities within the Selenga drainage basin that affect the water quality of the river system. Absence of the single monitoring system and predictive tools for pollutants transport in river system requires large efforts in understanding sources of water pollution and implemented data on the relevant numerical systems for the pollution prediction and prevention. Special investigations in the Selenga river basin (Mongolia and Russia) were done to assess hot spots and understand state-of-the art in sediment load, water chemistry and hydrobiology of transboundary systems

  5. Mesoscale structure and oceanographic determinants of krill hotspots in the California Current: Implications for trophic transfer and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santora, Jarrod A.; Sydeman, William J.; Schroeder, Isaac D.; Wells, Brian K.; Field, John C.

    2011-12-01

    Krill (crustaceans of the family Euphausiacea) comprise an important prey field for vast array of fish, birds, and marine mammals in the California Current and other large marine ecosystems globally. In this study, we test the hypothesis that mesoscale spatial organization of krill is related to oceanographic conditions associated with coastal upwelling. To test this, we compiled a climatology of krill distributions based on hydroacoustic surveys off California in May-June each year between 2000 and 2009 (missing 2007). Approximately 53,000 km of ocean habitat was sampled, resulting in a comprehensive geo-spatial data set from the Southern California Bight to Cape Mendocino. We determined the location and characteristics of eight definite and two probable krill “hotspots” of abundance. Directional-dependence analysis revealed that krill hotspots were oriented in a northwest-southeast (135°) direction, corresponding to the anisotropy of the 200-2000 m isobath. Krill hotspots were disassociated (inversely correlated) with three upwelling centers, Point Arena, Point Sur, and Point Conception, suggesting that krill may avoid locations of strong offshore transport or aggregate downstream from these locations. While current fisheries management considers the entire coast out to the 2000 m isobath critical habitat for krill in this ecosystem, we establish here smaller scale structuring of this critical mid-trophic level prey resource. Identifying mesoscale krill hotspots and their oceanographic determinants is significant as these smaller ecosystem divisions may warrant protection to ensure key ecosystem functions (i.e., trophic transfer) and resilience. Furthermore, delineating and quantifying krill hotspots may be important for conservation of krill-predators in this system.

  6. Evaluation of pesticide toxicity at their field recommended doses to honeybees, Apis cerana and A. mellifera through laboratory, semi-field and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Johnson; Sah, Khushboo; Jain, S K; Bhatt, J C; Sushil, S N

    2015-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the acute toxicity of pesticides in the laboratory, toxicity through spray on flowering plants of mustard (Tier II evaluation) and field on both Apis cerana and A. mellifera bees. The overall mortality of honey bees through topical (direct contact) were found significantly higher than that of indirect filter paper contamination assays. Insecticides viz., chlorpyriphos, dichlorvos, malathion, profenofos, monocrotophos and deltamethrin when exposed directly or indirectly at their field recommended doses caused very high mortality up to 100% to both the bees at 48 HAT. The insecticides that caused less mortality through filter paper contamination viz., flubendiamide, methyl demeton, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused very high morality through direct exposure. Apart from all the fungicides tested, carbendazim, mancozeb, chlorothalonil and propiconazole, insecticides acetamiprid and endosulfan were found safer to both the bees either by direct or indirect exposures. Tier II evaluation by spray of pesticides at their field recommended doses on potted mustard plants showed monocrotophos as the highly toxic insecticide with 100% mortality even with 1h of exposure followed by thiamethoxam, dichlorvos, profenofos and chlorpyriphos which are not to be recommended for use in pollinator attractive flowering plants. Acetamiprid and endosulfan did not cause any repellent effect on honey bees in the field trials endorse the usage of acetamiprid against sucking pest in flowering plants.

  7. Evaluation of the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mahmoud; K Elshahat; H. William; M.Barsum; Amr Gaber

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: Thirty patients with prostate cancer of different grades and stages were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy to minimize the dose to bladder, rectum and head of both femora using four fields (4F), five fields (5F), six fields (6F) and ARC techniques to minimize the risk of over dose to bladder, rectum and femoral heads. Patients received a total dose between 76 to 78 Gy given in 38 to 39 fractions over 7.5 to 8 weeks. Results: It was observed that V95, D95, D50 and D5 values for planning target volume (PTV) were comparatively higher when planned by 5 fields technique than when planned by fixed field technique (91%, 91%, 90% and 91.4% for skip-scan technique versus 85%, 87%, 86% and 88% by fixed field). The organs like rectum and urinary bladder get much higher dose when treated by fixed field techniques than rotation or 5 fields technique, when comparison was made for V95, V50 and DM values for rectum and urinary bladder obtained by 5 fields technique planning and 4/6 field planning, the value for 5 fields technique was found to be lower than 4/6 field technique (1%, 70% and 51% versus 13%, 91% and 55% for rectum and 4%, 25% and 51% versus 16%, 38% and 56% for urinary bladder respectively). Conclusion: Similarly for femoral heads, planning by full rotational technique had been observed to be beneficial as compared to when planning was done by fixed field technique (0%, 0% and 29% versus 0%, 1% and 28%).

  8. Development of a Visual Inspection Data Collection Tool for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packard, C. E.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    A visual inspection data collection tool for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate describing the condition of PV modules with regard to field performance. The proposed data collection tool consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This report instructs on how to use the collection tool and defines each attribute to ensure reliable and valid data collection. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from such a single data collection tool has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  9. Identifying hotspots and management of critical ecosystem services in rapidly urbanizing Yangtze River Delta Region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenbo; Gibbs, David; Zhang, Lang; Ferrier, Graham; Cai, Yongli

    2017-04-15

    Rapid urbanization has altered many ecosystems, causing a decline in many ecosystem services, generating serious ecological crisis. To cope with these challenges, we presented a comprehensive framework comprising five core steps for identifying and managing hotspots of critical ecosystem services in a rapid urbanizing region. This framework was applied in the case study of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) Region. The study showed that there was large spatial heterogeneity in the hotspots of ecosystem services in the region, hotspots of supporting services and regulating services aggregately distributing in the southwest mountainous areas while hotspots of provisioning services mainly in the northeast plain, and hotspots of cultural services widespread in the waterbodies and southwest mountainous areas. The regionalization of the critical ecosystem services was made through the hotspot analysis. This study provided valuable information for environmental planning and management in a rapid urbanizing region and helped improve China's ecological redlines policy at regional scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Spatio-Temporal Landslide Hotspots on North Island, New Zealand, by Analyzing Historical and Recent Aerial Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hölbling

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of landslides and the reliable identification of areas most affected by landslides are essential for advancing the understanding of landslide erosion processes. Remote sensing data provides a valuable source of information on the spatial distribution and location of landslides. In this paper we present an approach for identifying landslide-prone “hotspots” and their spatio-temporal variability by analyzing historical and recent aerial photography from five different dates, ranging from 1944 to 2011, for a study site near the town of Pahiatua, southeastern North Island, New Zealand. Landslide hotspots are identified from the distribution of semi-automatically detected landslides using object-based image analysis (OBIA, and compared to hotspots derived from manually mapped landslides. When comparing the overlapping areas of the semi-automatically and manually mapped landslides the accuracy values of the OBIA results range between 46% and 61% for the producer’s accuracy and between 44% and 77% for the user’s accuracy. When evaluating whether a manually digitized landslide polygon is only intersected to some extent by any semi-automatically mapped landslide, we observe that for the natural-color images the landslide detection rate is 83% for 2011 and 93% for 2005; for the panchromatic images the values are slightly lower (67% for 1997, 74% for 1979, and 72% for 1944. A comparison of the derived landslide hotspot maps shows that the distribution of the manually identified landslides and those mapped with OBIA is very similar for all periods; though the results also reveal that mapping landslide tails generally requires visual interpretation. Information on the spatio-temporal evolution of landslide hotspots can be useful for the development of location-specific, beneficial intervention measures and for assessing landscape dynamics.

  11. Methods of evaluating tomato susceptibility to late blight (Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Horodecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigations carried out in 1983-1985 was to assess the usefulness of natural and artificial infections under field conditions for evaluating tomato resistance to late blight in Poland. It was found, that the degree of natural infection by this fungus was a better indicator of tomato resistance than the degree of artificial infection obtained under field conditions.

  12. Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus

    OpenAIRE

    Michael K. Stoskopf; Daniel M. Mulcahy; Daniel Esler

    2010-01-01

    A portable analytical chemistry analyzer was used to make field assessments of wild harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) inassociation with telemetry studies of winter survival in Prince William Sound, Alaska. We compared serum chemistry resultsobtained on-site with results from a traditional laboratory. Particular attention was paid to serum glucose and potassiumconcentrations as potential indicators of high-risk surgical candidates based on evaluation of the field data. Themedian dif...

  13. Photovoice as an evaluation tool for student learning on a field trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Marc; Machtmes, Krisanna

    2016-05-01

    Background: Photovoice is one method that enables an educator to view an experience from a student's perspective. This study examined how teachers might use photovoice during an informal learning experience to understand the students' experiences and experiential gain. Design and methods: Participants in this study consisted of six students, three male and three female, ranging from ninth through twelfth grade at a rural Ohio high school, who attended a field trip to a biological field station for a four-day immersive science experience. Students were provided cameras to photograph what they believed was important, interesting, or significant during an immersive four-day science trip to a biological field station, individualizing their observations in ways meaningful to them, and enabling them to assimilate or accommodate the experiences to their schema. Results: Analysis identified five positive benefits to use photovoice as an evaluation tool: teachers were provided qualitative evidence to evaluate student interaction on the field trip; teachers could evaluate the students' photographs and captions to determine if the field trip met the learning objectives; students were empowered to approach the goals and objectives of the field trip by making the field trip personally relevant; students assimilated and accommodated the new observations and experiences to their own schema; students automatically reflected upon the learning experience as they captioned the photos. Conclusions: Through photovoice, the teachers were enabled to qualitatively assess each student's experience and learning from the field trip by illustrating what the students experienced and thought was significant; providing the teachers a method to evaluate all participating students, including those who are secretive or do not normally contribute to class discussions.

  14. Field evaluation of effective microorganisms (EM) application for growth, nodulation, and nutrition of mung bean

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid, Arshad; BAJWA, Rukhsana

    2011-01-01

    Effective microorganisms (EM) is a commercial biofertilizer that contains a mixture of co-existing beneficial microorganisms collected from natural environments. Predominantly it consists of species of photosynthetic and lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and actinomycetes. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of EM application on growth, nodulation, yield, and nutrient uptake in mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] var. NIAB Mung 98 under field conditions. Field soil was amende...

  15. Field evaluation of effective microorganisms (EM) application for growth, nodulation, and nutrition of mung bean

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid, Arshad; BAJWA, Rukhsana

    2014-01-01

    Effective microorganisms (EM) is a commercial biofertilizer that contains a mixture of co-existing beneficial microorganisms collected from natural environments. Predominantly it consists of species of photosynthetic and lactic acid bacteria, yeast, and actinomycetes. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of EM application on growth, nodulation, yield, and nutrient uptake in mung bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] var. NIAB Mung 98 under field conditions. Field soil was amende...

  16. Precise full-field distortion rectification and evaluation method for a digital projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangying; Liu, Miao; Yang, Shourui; Huang, Shujun; Bai, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jigui; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zonghua

    2016-10-01

    Digital projectors have been widely used in many accuracy-sensitive fields. Although some calibration methods have been proposed to obtain the intrinsic parameters for a digital projector, especially the radial and tangential distortion, there are few studies on how to rectify the projected image to obtain an ideal projection pattern and further evaluate the results. In this paper, a precise full-field image rectification technique is proposed based on the principle of projector calibration. The pixel remapping and interpolation techniques are detailed step by step. All of the method's steps maintain subpixel accuracy. Moreover, a full-field verification method is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the projector distortion procedure using a full-field phase map. A full-field non-linear distortion distribution map can be generated to represent distortion characteristics of nearly all the pixels of a projector in a very intuitive way. The experimental results validate and show the effectiveness of the proposed full-field rectification technique and evaluation method.

  17. Field Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Water Systems for Runway Rubber Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 14 -1 1 Field Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Water Systems for Runway Rubber Removal G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr...Field Evaluation of Ultra-High Pressure Water Systems for Runway Rubber Removal Aaron B. Pullen Applied Research Associates, Inc. 421 Oak Avenue...Engineer Center Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403-5319 ERDC/GSL TR-14-11 ii Abstract Runway rubber removal is a maintenance function employed to

  18. Climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S; Giorgi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We use a statistical metric of multi-dimensional climate change to quantify the emergence of global climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 climate model ensemble. Our hotspot metric extends previous work through the inclusion of extreme seasonal temperature and precipitation, which exert critical influence on climate change impacts. The results identify areas of the Amazon, the Sahel and tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and the Tibetan Plateau as persistent regional climate change hotspots thro...

  19. Testing the Efficacy of Global Biodiversity Hotspots for Insect Conservation: The Case of South African Katydids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelet, Corinna S.; Thompson, Aileen C.; Naskrecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The use of endemism and vascular plants only for biodiversity hotspot delineation has long been contested. Few studies have focused on the efficacy of global biodiversity hotspots for the conservation of insects, an important, abundant, and often ignored component of biodiversity. We aimed to test five alternative diversity measures for hotspot delineation and examine the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots for conserving a non-typical target organism, South African katydids. Using a 1° fishnet grid, we delineated katydid hotspots in two ways: (1) count-based: grid cells in the top 10% of total, endemic, threatened and/or sensitive species richness; vs. (2) score-based: grid cells with a mean value in the top 10% on a scoring system which scored each species on the basis of its IUCN Red List threat status, distribution, mobility and trophic level. We then compared katydid hotspots with each other and with recognized biodiversity hotspots. Grid cells within biodiversity hotspots had significantly higher count-based and score-based diversity than non-hotspot grid cells. There was a significant association between the three types of hotspots. Of the count-based measures, endemic species richness was the best surrogate for the others. However, the score-based measure out-performed all count-based diversity measures. Species richness was the least successful surrogate of all. The strong performance of the score-based method for hotspot prediction emphasizes the importance of including species’ natural history information for conservation decision-making, and is easily adaptable to other organisms. Furthermore, these results add empirical support for the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots in conserving non-target organisms. PMID:27631131

  20. A Measure Based on Beamforming Power for Evaluation of Sound Field Reproduction Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Ji-ho; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    to the difference in the amplitude decay rate, whereas the degradation of human localization performance is limited. The measure proposed in this study is based on the beamforming powers of the desired and the reproduced fields. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed measure is less sensitive......This paper proposes a measure to evaluate sound field reproduction systems with an array of loudspeakers. The spatially-averaged squared error of the sound pressure between the desired and the reproduced field, namely the spatial error, has been widely used, which has considerable problems in two...

  1. Evaluation of carbohydrate molecular mechanical force fields by quantum mechanical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Madsen, D.E.; Esbensen, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative evaluation of 20 second-generation carbohydrate force fields was carried out using ab initio and density functional methods. Geometry-optimized structures (B3LYP/6-31G(d)) and relative energies using augmented correlation consistent basis sets were calculated in gas phase...... for monosaccharide carbohydrate benchmark systems. Selected results are: (i) The interaction energy of the alpha-D-alucopyranose-H2O heterodimer is estimated to be 4.9 kcal/mol, using a composite method including terms at highly correlated (CCSD(T)) level. Most molecular mechanics force fields are in error......-generation carbohydrate force fields. No single force field is consistently better than the others for all the test cases. A statistical assessment of the performance of the force fields indicates that CHEAT(95), CFF, certain versions of Amber and of MM3 have the best overall performance, for these gas phase...

  2. Evaluation of team lifting on work demands, workload and workers' evaluation: an observational field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Steven; van der Molen, Henk F; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in work demands, energetic workload and workers' discomfort and physical effort in two regularly observable workdays in ironwork; one where loads up to 50kg were handled with two persons manually (T50) and one where loads up to 100kg were handled manually with four persons (T100). Differences between these typical workdays were assessed with an observational within-subject field study of 10 ironworkers. No significant differences were found for work demands, energetic workload or discomfort between T50 and T100 workdays. During team lifts, load mass exceeded 25kg per person in 57% (T50 workday) and 68% (T100 workday) of the lifts. Seven ironworkers rated team lifting with two persons as less physically demanding compared with lifting with four persons. When loads heavier than 25kg are lifted manually with a team, regulations of the maximum mass weight are frequently violated. Loads heavier than 25kg are frequently lifted during concrete reinforcement work and should be lifted by a team of persons. However, the field study showed that loads above 25kg are most of the time not lifted with the appropriate number of workers. Therefore, loads heavier than 25kg should be lifted mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Contralateral Breast Surface Dose in FIF (Field In Field) Tangential Irradiation Technique for Patients Undergone Breast Conservative Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Moon; Bang, Dong Wan; Bae, Yong Ki; Lee, Jeong Woo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate contra-lateral breast (CLB) surface dose in Field-in-Field (FIF) technique for breast conserving surgery patients. For evaluation of surface dose in FIF technique, we have compared with other techniques, which were open fields (Open), metal wedge (MW), and enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) techniques under same geometrical condition and prescribed dose. The three dimensional treatment planning system was used for dose optimization. For the verification of dose calculation, measurements using MOSFET detectors with Anderson Rando phantom were performed. The measured points for four different techniques were at the depth of 0 cm (epidermis) and 0.5 cm bolus (dermis), and spacing toward 2 cm, 4 cm, 6 cm, 8 cm, 10 cm apart from the edge of tangential medial beam. The dose calculations were done in 0.25 cm grid resolution by modified Batho method for inhomogeneity correction. In the planning results, the surface doses were differentiated in the range of 19.6-36.9, 33.2-138.2 for MW, 1.0-7.9, 1.6-37.4 for EDW, and for FIF at the depth of epidermis and dermis as compared to Open respectively. In the measurements, the surface doses were differentiated in the range of 11.1-71, 22.9-161 for MW, 4.1-15.5, 8.2-37.9 for EDW, and 4.9% for FIF at the depth of epidermis and dermis as compared to Open respectively. The surface doses were considered as underestimating in the planning calculation as compared to the measurement with MOSFET detectors. Was concluded as the lowest one among the techniques, even if it was compared with Open method. Our conclusion could be stated that the FIF technique could make the optimum dose distribution in Breast target, while effectively reduce the probability of secondary carcinogenesis due to undesirable scattered radiation to contra-lateral breast.

  4. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  5. Validation of Hotspots Detected by Satellites in Sentinel Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, K.; Kushida, K.; Fukuda, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Sentinel Asia (SA) initiative is a collaboration between space agencies and disaster management agencies, applying remote sensing and Web-GIS technologies to assist disaster management in the Asia- Pacific region. It aims to: "EImprove safety in society by ICT and space technology "EImprove speed and accuracy of disaster preparedness and early warning "EMinimize the number of victims and social/economic losses. SA is a voluntary initiative led by the Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum (APRSAF) to share disaster information in near-real-time across the Asia-Pacific region. Wildfire is a major and recurring phenomenon that has a serious impact on property and human health, affecting many countries in the Asia region. Compared to other disasters in the area, it does not necessarily cause many immediate fatalities. However, it causes serious impact on property and human health due to smoke. Furthermore, its effects are of great relevance both at a regional and global level, and accordingly bear substantial influence on global warming. Responding to requirements from Asian countries, under Sentinel Asia a dedicated Wildfire Working Group (WG) has been established to apply remote sensing technology to the management of wildfire. Having accurate information on the location and intensity of the fires, and subsequent control of wildfire, are therefore very important and urgent tasks across the region. SA primarily addresses the issue of near-real-time information distribution on wildfires in the region. Concerning hotspot data obtained by satellites, it is essential to validate and improve its accuracy. In the framework of Sentinel Asia Wildfire WG, various approaches to hotspot detection, including MOD14 algorithm for MODIS hotspots, were studied, and their validations were carried out, comparing them with active fires extracted from satellite imagery and ground truth data in Chiengmai, Thailand and in Kalimantan, Indonesia.

  6. Uncovering zoonoses awareness in an emerging disease 'hotspot'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Sarah B; Malavé, Carly; Mbabazi, Edith; Mayer, Jonathan; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases from animals pose significant and increasing threats to human health; places of risk are simultaneously viewed as conservation and emerging disease 'hotspots'. The One World/One Health paradigm is an 'assemblage' discipline. Extensive research from the natural and social sciences, as well as public health have contributed to designing surveillance and response policy within the One World/One Health framework. However, little research has been undertaken that considers the lives of those who experience risk in hotspots on a daily basis. As a result, policymakers and practitioners are unable to fully comprehend the social and ecological processes that catalyze cross-species pathogen exchange. This study examined local populations' comprehension of zoonotic disease. From October 2008-May 2009 we collected data from people living on the periphery of Kibale National Park, in western Uganda. We administered a survey to 72 individuals and conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 14 individuals. Results from the survey showed respondents had statistically significant awareness that transmission of diseases from animals was possible compared to those who did not think such transmission was possible (x(2) = 30.68, df = 1, p zoonoses and provided biomedically accurate examples of possible infections and corresponding animal sources (e.g., worm infection from pigs and Ebola from primates). Qualitative data also revealed expectations about the role of the State in managing the prevention of zoonoses from wildlife. As a result of this research, we recommend meaningful discourse with people living at the frontlines of animal contact in emerging disease and conservation hotspots in order to develop informed and relevant zoonoses prevention practices that take into account local knowledge and perceptions.

  7. A fuzzy pattern matching method based on graph kernel for lithography hotspot detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Izumi; Kanazawa, Yuzi; Ishida, Tsutomu; Banno, Koji

    2017-03-01

    In advanced technology nodes, lithography hotspot detection has become one of the most significant issues in design for manufacturability. Recently, machine learning based lithography hotspot detection has been widely investigated, but it has trade-off between detection accuracy and false alarm. To apply machine learning based technique to the physical verification phase, designers require minimizing undetected hotspots to avoid yield degradation. They also need a ranking of similar known patterns with a detected hotspot to prioritize layout pattern to be corrected. To achieve high detection accuracy and to prioritize detected hotspots, we propose a novel lithography hotspot detection method using Delaunay triangulation and graph kernel based machine learning. Delaunay triangulation extracts features of hotspot patterns where polygons locate irregularly and closely one another, and graph kernel expresses inner structure of graphs. Additionally, our method provides similarity between two patterns and creates a list of similar training patterns with a detected hotspot. Experiments results on ICCAD 2012 benchmarks show that our method achieves high accuracy with allowable range of false alarm. We also show the ranking of the similar known patterns with a detected hotspot.

  8. Evaluations of methodology and tools used during the 8th SECURIS field trail

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the risk analysis in the 8th SECURIS field trial carried out the autumn 2006 and early 2007. FLO/IKT was the client and the target of the analysis was work with/handling of information with security level up to BEGRENSET outside controlled areas. The CORAS methodology and the CORAS tool were evaluated in addition to the CORAS modelling language. Oppdragsgiver: FLO/IKT

  9. Generation of mutation hotspots in ageing bacterial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekowska, Agnieszka; Wendel, Sofie; Christian Fischer, Emil

    2016-01-01

    How do ageing bacterial colonies generate adaptive mutants? Over a period of two months, we isolated on ageing colonies outgrowing mutants able to use a new carbon source, and sequenced their genomes. This allowed us to uncover exquisite details on the molecular mechanism behind their adaptation......: most mutations were located in just a few hotspots in the genome, and over time, mutations increasingly were consistent with the involvement of 8-oxo-guanosine, formed exclusively on the transcribed strand. This work provides strong support for retromutagenesis as a general process creating adaptive...... mutations during ageing....

  10. A diagram for evaluating multiple aspects of model performance in simulating vector fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Hou, Zhaolu; Han, Ying; Guo, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    Vector quantities, e.g., vector winds, play an extremely important role in climate systems. The energy and water exchanges between different regions are strongly dominated by wind, which in turn shapes the regional climate. Thus, how well climate models can simulate vector fields directly affects model performance in reproducing the nature of a regional climate. This paper devises a new diagram, termed the vector field evaluation (VFE) diagram, which is a generalized Taylor diagram and able to provide a concise evaluation of model performance in simulating vector fields. The diagram can measure how well two vector fields match each other in terms of three statistical variables, i.e., the vector similarity coefficient, root mean square length (RMSL), and root mean square vector difference (RMSVD). Similar to the Taylor diagram, the VFE diagram is especially useful for evaluating climate models. The pattern similarity of two vector fields is measured by a vector similarity coefficient (VSC) that is defined by the arithmetic mean of the inner product of normalized vector pairs. Examples are provided, showing that VSC can identify how close one vector field resembles another. Note that VSC can only describe the pattern similarity, and it does not reflect the systematic difference in the mean vector length between two vector fields. To measure the vector length, RMSL is included in the diagram. The third variable, RMSVD, is used to identify the magnitude of the overall difference between two vector fields. Examples show that the VFE diagram can clearly illustrate the extent to which the overall RMSVD is attributed to the systematic difference in RMSL and how much is due to the poor pattern similarity.

  11. The numeric evaluation of the magnetic field produced by a rotor with alternating poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greconici Marian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic field produced by a rotor with alternating magnetic poles in a magnetic fluid hydrostatic bearing is numerically evaluated. There has been used a 3D program based on the finite element method (3D-FEM.

  12. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  13. Field validation of protocols developed to evaluate in-line mastitis detection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, C.; Dela Rue, B.T.; Eastwood, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a field validation of previously developed protocols for evaluating the performance of in-line mastitis-detection systems. The protocols outlined 2 requirements of these systems: (1) to detect cows with clinical mastitis (CM) promptly and accurately to enable timely and

  14. Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

    1999-01-21

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

  15. Stellar Systems Inc. Series 800/5000 E-Field sensor evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follis, R.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report concerns the evaluation of the Stellar Systems Inc. E-Field intrusion detection system Series 800 control unit and the 5000 Series hardware components. Included are functional descriptions, installation procedures, testing procedures, and testing/operational results. 35 figs.

  16. Field evaluation of fungicides in controlling chickpea Ascochyta blight in Washington, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field evaluation of five fungicides of different fungicide classes showed that the fungicides can reduce disease severity and increase yield of chickpea. Alternative fungicides to traditional strobilurin fungicides were identified, and can be used to prevent development of strobilurin resistance in...

  17. A topological evaluation procedure to assess the integrity of a PIV vector field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, J. F.; Hedden, M.; Barros, J. M.; Christensen, K. T.

    2016-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) provides a field of discrete vectors to represent a continuum velocity field. Various methods have been adopted to evaluate the integrity of the discrete vectors. In contrast, the present communication provides a systematic technique whereby the integrity of the measured field can be assessed using basic topological principles. Starting with the recognition that PIV provides a vector field overlaid on a planar surface, the analyst can identify the holes (to be punched through the surface of a sphere) and the handles (to be added to the sphere’s surface) that will represent the appropriate surface for the topological analysis. These operations define the a priori Euler characteristic (χ A ) for the subject PIV image. The experimental Euler characteristic (χ E ) will be known from the properties of the measured vector field: nodes, saddles, etc. A necessary condition for the integrity of the measured vector field is that χ E   =  χ A . The topological bases for the integrity evaluation, including the important constraint of ensuring a smooth collapsed sphere, are carefully explained and described with examples.

  18. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  19. Field evaluation of the effectiveness of engineered soil covers for reactive tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanful, E.K.; Woyshner, M.R.; Aube, B.C.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose is to design, construct, and evaluate the effectiveness of soil covers and a geomembrane, or plastic cover, to reduce acid generation in reactive mine tailings. The evaluation involves performance monitoring of field test plots at the decommissioned Waite Amulet tailings site and laboratory experiments. Gaseous oxygen concentrations, water content, suction, temperature, and pore water quality at various depths were measured at plots set up to test two soil covers, the geomembrane cover, and as a control. The results from the four tests are reported and evaluated. 43 refs., 98 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Biodiversity hotspots: A shortcut for a more complicated concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Marchese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an era of human activities, global environmental changes, habitat loss and species extinction, conservation strategies are a crucial step toward minimizing biodiversity loss. For instance, oceans acidification and land use are intensifying in many places with negative and often irreversible consequences for biodiversity. Biodiversity hotspots, despite some criticism, have become a tool for setting conservation priorities and play an important role in decision-making for cost-effective strategies to preserve biodiversity in terrestrial and, to some extent, marine ecosystems. This area-based approach can be applied to any geographical scale and it is considered to be one of the best approaches for maintaining a large proportion of the world’s biological diversity. However, delineating hotspots includes quantitative criteria along with subjective considerations and the risk is to neglect areas, such as coldspots, with other types of conservation value. Nowadays, it is widely acknowledged that biodiversity is much more than just the number of species in a region and a conservation strategy cannot be based merely on the number of taxa present in an ecosystem. Therefore, the idea that strongly emerges is the need to reconsider conservation priorities and to go toward an interdisciplinary approach through the creation of science-policy partnerships.

  1. Can we detect oceanic biodiversity hotspots from space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Monte, Silvia; Soccodato, Alice; Alvain, Séverine; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the variability of marine biodiversity is a central issue in microbiology. Current observational programs are based on in situ studies, but their implementation at the global scale is particularly challenging, owing to the ocean extent, its temporal variability and the heterogeneity of the data sources on which compilations are built. Here, we explore the possibility of identifying phytoplanktonic biodiversity hotspots from satellite. We define a Shannon entropy index based on patchiness in ocean color bio-optical anomalies. This index provides a high resolution (1 degree) global coverage. It shows a relation to temperature and mid-latitude maxima in accordance with those previously evidenced in microbiological biodiversity model and observational studies. Regional maxima are in remarkable agreement with several known biodiversity hotspots for plankton organisms and even for higher levels of the marine trophic chain, as well as with some in situ planktonic biodiversity estimates (from Atlantic Meridional Transect cruise). These results encourage to explore marine biodiversity with a coordinated effort of the molecular, ecological and remote sensing communities.

  2. An Orexin Hotspot in Ventral Pallidum Amplifies Hedonic ‘Liking' for Sweetness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Yi; Berridge, Kent C

    2013-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) is implicated in stimulating appetite as well as arousal, and in both food reward and drug reward. The ventral pallidum (VP) receives orexin projections from lateral hypothalamus neurons (LH), and orexin terminals are especially dense in the posterior half of VP, which is also the location of an opioid hedonic hotspot. The VP hotspot is a roughly cubic-millimeter site where mu opioid stimulation can amplify the hedonic impact of sweetness, expressed as an increase in ‘liking' reactions to sucrose taste. The anatomical overlap in posterior VP between opioid hotspot and orexin inputs raises the possibility that the hedonic hotspot might allow orexin to amplify ‘liking' too. We examined whether microinjections of orexin-A into the VP hotspot enhance the hedonic impact of sucrose, as assessed via affective taste reactivity measures of ‘liking' reactions, and additionally compared effects at nearby sites in adjacent LH and extended amygdala. Taste reactivity results indicated that orexin stimulation specifically in the VP hotspot nearly doubled the magnitude of positive ‘liking' reactions elicited by the taste of sucrose. Mapping results for localization of function, aided by Fos plume measures of the local spread of orexin impact, suggested that hedonic enhancement was generated by essentially the same cubic-millimeter of posterior VP previously identified as the opioid hotspot. By contrast, microinjection sites in the anterior half of VP, or in LH or extended amygdala, generally failed to produce any hedonic enhancement. We conclude that an orexin hedonic hotspot exists in posterior VP, with similar boundaries to the opioid hotspot. An orexin hedonic hotspot may permit regulatory hypothalamic circuitry to make foods more ‘liked' during hunger by acting through VP. Dysfunction in a VP orexin hotspot in addiction or mood disorders might also contribute to some types of affective psychopathology. PMID:23463152

  3. Magnetic fields as triggers of microalga growth: evaluation of its effect on Spirulina sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamici, Kricelle Mosquera; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Santos, Lucielen Oliveira

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the influence of magnetic field on the growth and biomass composition of Spirulina sp., cultivated in vertical tubular photobioreactors. Magnetic fields of 5, 30 and 60mT generated by electric current and ferrite magnets were applied at different lengths of time. The magnetic field of 30 and 60mT for 1hd(-1) stimulated the growth, thus leading to higher biomass concentration by comparison with the control culture. Increase in productivity, protein and carbohydrate contents were 105.1% (60mT for 1hd(-1)), 16.6% (60mT for 24hd(-1)) and 133.2% (30mT for 24hd(-1)), respectively. These values were higher than the ones of the control. Results showed that magnetic field may influence the growth of Spirulina sp., since it triggers a stimulating effect and can leads to twofold biomass concentration in equal cultivation time periods.

  4. Evaluation of high spatial resolution imaging of magnetic stray fields for early damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Pelkner, Matthias; Lyamkin, Viktor; Sonntag, Nadja; Bruno, Giovanni; Skrotzki, Birgit; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The paper discusses the evaluation of elastic and plastic strain states in two low-carbon steels of the same steel group with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors. The residual stress distributions of tungsten inert gas welded plates were determined by means of neutron diffraction as a reference. The normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields arise in the vicinity of the positions of maximum stress. The experiments performed on flat tensile specimen indicate that the boundaries of plastic deformations are a source of stray fields. The spatial variations of magnetic stray fields for both the weld and the tensile samples are in the order of the earths magnetic field.

  5. A Simple and Reliable Method for the Evaluation of the Exposed Field Near the GSM Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algenti Lala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a simple, accurate and very efficient method for the evaluation of the field in the vicinity of GSM antennas of the radio base-station in urban areas. The method is based on the replacement of the antenna panel with a group of discrete source emitters. A geometrical approximation is used for the evaluation of the environment’s influence also. The calculated results are compared with results taken from the use of NARDA SRM 3000 measuring equipment. The presented method could be successfully used for the exposure evaluation of the electromagnetic field emitted by GSM antennas of the base-station in urban areas.

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Railway Bridge by System Identification Using Field Vibration Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Duc Duy; Hong, Dong Soo; Kim, Jeong Tae [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a nondestructive evaluation approach for system identification (SID) of real railway bridges using field vibration test results. First, a multi-phase SID scheme designed on the basis of eigenvalue sensitivity concept is presented. Next, the proposed multi-phase approach is evaluated from field vibration tests on a real railway bridge (Wondongcheon bridge) located in Yangsan, Korea. On the steel girder bridge, a few natural frequencies and mode shapes are experimentally measured under the ambient vibration condition. The corresponding modal parameters are numerically calculated from a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model established for the target bridge. Eigenvalue sensitivities are analyzed for potential model-updating parameters of the FE model. Then, structural subsystems are identified phase-by-phase using the proposed model-updating procedure. Based on model-updating results, a baseline model and a nondestructive evaluation of test bridge are identified

  7. Spoof surface plasmon based planar antennas for the realization of Terahertz hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yusheng; Han, Zhanghua

    2015-12-22

    Novel spoof surface plasmon based terahertz (THz) antennas are realized using a few number of rectangular grooves perforated in ultrathin metal stripes and the properties of them, including both scattering cross sections and field enhancement, are numerically analyzed. The dependence of these properties on the incident angle and groove number is discussed and the results show that sharp resonances in scattering cross section spectra associated with strong local field enhancement can be achieved. These resonances are due to the formation of Fabry-Perot resonances of the spoof surface plasmon mode and it is found that the order of resonance exhibiting strongest field enhancements is found to coincide with the number of grooves at normal incidence, due to hybridization of the antenna resonance with the individual groove resonance. The terahertz hotspots within the grooves at resonances due to the local field enhancement may open up new possibilities for the investigation of terahertz-matter interactions and boost a variety of THz applications including novel sensing and THz detections. The planar stripe antennas with sharper resonances than dipolar-like resonances, together with their ease of fabrication may also promise new design methodology for metamaterials.

  8. Spoof surface plasmon based planar antennas for the realization of Terahertz hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yusheng; Han, Zhanghua

    2015-12-01

    Novel spoof surface plasmon based terahertz (THz) antennas are realized using a few number of rectangular grooves perforated in ultrathin metal stripes and the properties of them, including both scattering cross sections and field enhancement, are numerically analyzed. The dependence of these properties on the incident angle and groove number is discussed and the results show that sharp resonances in scattering cross section spectra associated with strong local field enhancement can be achieved. These resonances are due to the formation of Fabry-Perot resonances of the spoof surface plasmon mode and it is found that the order of resonance exhibiting strongest field enhancements is found to coincide with the number of grooves at normal incidence, due to hybridization of the antenna resonance with the individual groove resonance. The terahertz hotspots within the grooves at resonances due to the local field enhancement may open up new possibilities for the investigation of terahertz-matter interactions and boost a variety of THz applications including novel sensing and THz detections. The planar stripe antennas with sharper resonances than dipolar-like resonances, together with their ease of fabrication may also promise new design methodology for metamaterials.

  9. SU-E-T-406: Evaluation of the Stealth Chamber by IBA Under Large Field Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quino, L Vazquez; Hernandez, C Huerta; DeWeese, M [Alyzen Medical Physics, Paragould, AR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the stealth chamber by IBA under large field conditions. Methods: Measurement of PDDs and profiles for fields of 10×10, 15×15, 20×20 and 25×25 cm2 were acquired in a blue phantom2 scanning system for 6 and 15 MV beams in a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The stealth chamber has a field size limit of 25×25 cm2. Measurements with two different detector set were performed. First a cc13 chamber as field and reference chamber was acquired. And with a cc13 chamber as field detector and the stealth chamber as the reference chamber. PDDs for the fields mentioned above were conducted and profiles with the same fields at depth of dmax, 5, 10 and 20 cm were acquired for comparison. Results: Examination of the PDDs and profile comparison with a criterion of 1% and 1 mm agreement was performed. Very good agreement between the cc13 and stealth chamber set was observed within the chosen criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the comparable results obtained with the use of the stealth chamber and cc13 as the reference chamber in relative dosimetry measurements.

  10. Paleocene on-spreading-axis hotspot volcanism along the Ninetyeast Ridge: An interaction between the Kerguelen hotspot and the Wharton spreading center

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Gopala Rao, D.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Chaubey, A.K.; Shcherbakov, V.S.; Pilipenko, A.I.; Murthy, I.V.R.

    spanning 11 degrees latitude beneath the Ninetyeast Ridge. The Ninetyeast Ridge was originated when the spreading centres of the Wharton Ridge were absolutely moving northward with respect to a relatively stationery Kerguelen hotspot with multiple southward...

  11. Impacts of Dams and Global Warming on Fish Biodiversity in the Indo-Burma Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Yuichi; Dudgeon, David; Nam, So; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Grudpan, Chaiwut; Grudpan, Jarungjit; Magtoon, Wichan; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Praxaysonbath, Bounthob; Sato, Tomoyuki; Shibukawa, Koichi; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Suvarnaraksha, Apinun; Tanaka, Wataru; Thach, Phanara; Tran, Dac Dinh; Yamashita, Tomomi; Utsugi, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    Both hydropower dams and global warming pose threats to freshwater fish diversity. While the extent of global warming may be reduced by a shift towards energy generation by large dams in order to reduce fossil-fuel use, such dams profoundly modify riverine habitats. Furthermore, the threats posed by dams and global warming will interact: for example, dams constrain range adjustments by fishes that might compensate for warming temperatures. Evaluation of their combined or synergistic effects is thus essential for adequate assessment of the consequences of planned water-resource developments. We made projections of the responses of 363 fish species within the Indo-Burma global biodiversity hotspot to the separate and joint impacts of dams and global warming. The hotspot encompasses the Lower Mekong Basin, which is the world's largest freshwater capture fishery. Projections for 81 dam-building scenarios revealed progressive impacts upon projected species richness, habitable area, and the proportion of threatened species as generating capacity increased. Projections from 126 global-warming scenarios included a rise in species richness, a reduction in habitable area, and an increase in the proportion of threatened species; however, there was substantial variation in the extent of these changes among warming projections. Projections from scenarios that combined the effects of dams and global warming were derived either by simply adding the two threats, or by combining them in a synergistic manner that took account of the likelihood that habitat shifts under global warming would be constrained by river fragmentation. Impacts on fish diversity under the synergistic projections were 10-20% higher than those attributable to additive scenarios, and were exacerbated as generating capacity increased-particularly if CO2 emissions remained high. The impacts of dams, especially those on river mainstreams, are likely to be greater, more predictable and more immediately pressing for

  12. Impacts of Dams and Global Warming on Fish Biodiversity in the Indo-Burma Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, So; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Grudpan, Chaiwut; Grudpan, Jarungjit; Magtoon, Wichan; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Praxaysonbath, Bounthob; Sato, Tomoyuki; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Suvarnaraksha, Apinun; Tanaka, Wataru; Thach, Phanara; Tran, Dac Dinh; Yamashita, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Both hydropower dams and global warming pose threats to freshwater fish diversity. While the extent of global warming may be reduced by a shift towards energy generation by large dams in order to reduce fossil-fuel use, such dams profoundly modify riverine habitats. Furthermore, the threats posed by dams and global warming will interact: for example, dams constrain range adjustments by fishes that might compensate for warming temperatures. Evaluation of their combined or synergistic effects is thus essential for adequate assessment of the consequences of planned water-resource developments. We made projections of the responses of 363 fish species within the Indo-Burma global biodiversity hotspot to the separate and joint impacts of dams and global warming. The hotspot encompasses the Lower Mekong Basin, which is the world’s largest freshwater capture fishery. Projections for 81 dam-building scenarios revealed progressive impacts upon projected species richness, habitable area, and the proportion of threatened species as generating capacity increased. Projections from 126 global-warming scenarios included a rise in species richness, a reduction in habitable area, and an increase in the proportion of threatened species; however, there was substantial variation in the extent of these changes among warming projections. Projections from scenarios that combined the effects of dams and global warming were derived either by simply adding the two threats, or by combining them in a synergistic manner that took account of the likelihood that habitat shifts under global warming would be constrained by river fragmentation. Impacts on fish diversity under the synergistic projections were 10–20% higher than those attributable to additive scenarios, and were exacerbated as generating capacity increased—particularly if CO2 emissions remained high. The impacts of dams, especially those on river mainstreams, are likely to be greater, more predictable and more immediately

  13. Reef fishes in biodiversity hotspots are at greatest risk from loss of coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Sally J; Schmitt, Russell J; Messmer, Vanessa; Brooks, Andrew J; Srinivasan, Maya; Munday, Philip L; Jones, Geoffrey P

    2015-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are under a variety of threats from global change and anthropogenic disturbances that are reducing the number and type of coral species on reefs. Coral reefs support upwards of one third of all marine species of fish, so the loss of coral habitat may have substantial consequences to local fish diversity. We posit that the effects of habitat degradation will be most severe in coral regions with highest biodiversity of fishes due to greater specialization by fishes for particular coral habitats. Our novel approach to this important but untested hypothesis was to conduct the same field experiment at three geographic locations across the Indo-Pacific biodiversity gradient (Papua New Guinea; Great Barrier Reef, Australia; French Polynesia). Specifically, we experimentally explored whether the response of local fish communities to identical changes in diversity of habitat-providing corals was independent of the size of the regional species pool of fishes. We found that the proportional reduction (sensitivity) in fish biodiversity to loss of coral diversity was greater for regions with larger background species pools, reflecting variation in the degree of habitat specialization of fishes across the Indo-Pacific diversity gradient. This result implies that habitat-associated fish in diversity hotspots are at greater risk of local extinction to a given loss of habitat diversity compared to regions with lower species richness. This mechanism, related to the positive relationship between habitat specialization and regional biodiversity, and the elevated extinction risk this poses for biodiversity hotspots, may apply to species in other types of ecosystems.

  14. Reef fishes in biodiversity hotspots are at greatest risk from loss of coral species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally J Holbrook

    Full Text Available Coral reef ecosystems are under a variety of threats from global change and anthropogenic disturbances that are reducing the number and type of coral species on reefs. Coral reefs support upwards of one third of all marine species of fish, so the loss of coral habitat may have substantial consequences to local fish diversity. We posit that the effects of habitat degradation will be most severe in coral regions with highest biodiversity of fishes due to greater specialization by fishes for particular coral habitats. Our novel approach to this important but untested hypothesis was to conduct the same field experiment at three geographic locations across the Indo-Pacific biodiversity gradient (Papua New Guinea; Great Barrier Reef, Australia; French Polynesia. Specifically, we experimentally explored whether the response of local fish communities to identical changes in diversity of habitat-providing corals was independent of the size of the regional species pool of fishes. We found that the proportional reduction (sensitivity in fish biodiversity to loss of coral diversity was greater for regions with larger background species pools, reflecting variation in the degree of habitat specialization of fishes across the Indo-Pacific diversity gradient. This result implies that habitat-associated fish in diversity hotspots are at greater risk of local extinction to a given loss of habitat diversity compared to regions with lower species richness. This mechanism, related to the positive relationship between habitat specialization and regional biodiversity, and the elevated extinction risk this poses for biodiversity hotspots, may apply to species in other types of ecosystems.

  15. Remote-Sensing-Based Evaluation of Relative Consumptive Use Between Flood- and Drip-Irrigated Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Jordan, D. L.; Whittaker, A. T.; Allen, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Governments and water authorities are compelled to evaluate the impacts of agricultural irrigation on economic development and sustainability as water supply shortages continue to increase in many communities. One of the strategies commonly used to reduce such impacts is the conversion of traditional irrigation methods towards more water-efficient practices. As part of a larger effort by the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission to understand the environmental and economic impact of converting from flood irrigation to drip irrigation, this study evaluates the water-saving effectiveness of drip irrigation in Deming, New Mexico, using a remote-sensing-based technique combined with ground data collection. The remote-sensing-based technique used relative temperature differences as a proxy for water use to show relative differences in crop consumptive use between flood- and drip-irrigated fields. Temperature analysis showed that, on average, drip-irrigated fields were cooler than flood-irrigated fields, indicating higher water use. The higher consumption of water by drip-irrigated fields was supported by a determination of evapotranspiration (ET) from all fields using the METRIC Landsat-based surface energy balance model. METRIC analysis yielded higher instantaneous ET for drip-irrigated fields when compared to flood-irrigated fields and confirmed that drip-irrigated fields consumed more water than flood-irrigated fields planted with the same crop. More water use generally results in more biomass and hence higher crop yield, and this too was confirmed by greater relative Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for the drip irrigated fields. Results from this study confirm previous estimates regarding the impacts of increased efficiency of drip irrigation on higher water consumption in the area (Ward and Pulido-Velazquez, 2008). The higher water consumption occurs with drip because, with the limited water supplies and regulated maximum limits on pumping amounts, the

  16. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  17. Using simulated rainfall to evaluate field and indoor surface runoff phosphorus relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, A R; Schindler, F V; German, D R; Gelderman, R H; Gerwing, J R

    2006-01-01

    While numerous studies have evaluated the efficacy of outdoor rainfall simulations to predict P concentrations in surface runoff, few studies have linked indoor rainfall simulations to P concentrations in surface runoff from agricultural fields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of indoor rainfall simulation to predict total dissolved P concentrations [TP(runoff for four dominant agricultural soils in South Dakota. Surface runoff from 10 residue-free field plots (2 m wide by 2 m long, 2-3% slope) and packed soil boxes (1 m long by 20 cm wide by 7.5 cm high, 2-3% slope) was compared. Surface runoff was generated via rainfall simulation at an intensity of 65 mm h(-1) and was collected for 30 min. Packed boxes produced approximately 24% more runoff (range = 2.8-3.4 cm) than field plots (range = 2.3-2.7 cm) among all soils. No statistical differences in either TP(runoff from packed boxes and field plots among soil series (0.17 runoff from field plots can be predicted from TP(runoff from the packed boxes (0.68 runoff using surface runoff TP(runoff can adequately predict TP(runoff for select soils.

  18. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  19. Evaluating Field Spectrometer Performance with Transmission Standards: Examples from the USGS Spectral Library and Research Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, T. M.; Kokaly, R. F.; Swayze, G. A.; Livo, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Collection of spectroscopic data has expanded with the development of field-portable spectrometers. The most commonly available spectrometers span one or several wavelength ranges: the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) region from approximately 400 to 1000 nm, and the shortwave infrared (SWIR) region from approximately 1000-2500 nm. Basic characteristics of spectrometer performance are the wavelength position and bandpass of each channel. Bandpass can vary across the wavelength coverage of an instrument, due to spectrometer design and detector materials. Spectrometer specifications can differ from one instrument to the next for a given model and between manufacturers. The USGS Spectroscopy Lab in Denver has developed a simple method to evaluate field spectrometer wavelength accuracy and bandpass values using transmission measurements of materials with intense, narrow absorption features, including Mylar* plastic, praseodymium-doped glass, and National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2035. The evaluation procedure has been applied in laboratory and field settings for 19 years and used to detect deviations from cited manufacturer specifications. Tracking of USGS spectrometers with transmission standards has revealed several instances of wavelength shifts due to wear in spectrometer components. Since shifts in channel wavelengths and differences in bandpass between instruments can impact the use of field spectrometer data to calibrate and analyze imaging spectrometer data, field protocols to measure wavelength standards can limit data loss due to spectrometer degradation. In this paper, the evaluation procedure will be described and examples of observed wavelength shifts during a spectrometer field season will be presented. The impact of changing wavelength and bandpass characteristics on spectral measurements will be demonstrated and implications for spectral libraries will be discussed. *Any use of trade, firm, or product names

  20. Hotspot sequential pattern visualization in peatland of Sumatera and Kalimantan using shiny framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriantini, G.; Sitanggang, I. S.; Trisminingsih, R.

    2017-01-01

    Fires on peatland frequently occurred in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Fires on peatland can be identified by hotspot sequential patterns. Sequential pattern mining is one of data mining techniques that can be used to analyse hotspot sequential patterns. Sequential pattern discovery equivalent classes (SPADE) algorithm can be applied to extract hotspot sequential patterns. The objectives of this work are: 1) to obtain hotspot sequential pattern in Sumatra and Kalimantan in 2014 and 2015, and 2) to develop a web based application using Shiny framework that is available in R package for hotspot sequential pattern visualization in peatland of Sumatra and Kalimantan. Hotspot sequential patterns were obtained using minimum support of 0.01 with the focus of analysis is the hotspot sequences with length two or more events. This work generated as many 89 sequences with length 2 or more in Sumatra in 2014, 147 sequences in Sumatra in 2015, 48 sequences in Kalimantan in 2014, and 51 sequences in Kalimantan in 2015. Hotspot sequential patterns are visualized based on peatland’s characteristics, weather, and social economy. The features in this web based application have been tested and the results show that all features work properly according to the test scenario.

  1. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  2. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal

    OpenAIRE

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  3. Evaluation of landmine detection performance applying two different algorithms to GPR field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Rial, Roi; Uschkerat, U.; Rial, F. I.; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria A.

    2013-06-01

    This paper evaluates and compares the performance of two algorithms that have previously demonstrated their potential in underground target detection. Field data was obtained on specially prepared test fields, where various mine simulants, reference objects, and mine-like clutter where placed at precise locations in different soil types. The efficiency of both algorithms in terms of detection accuracies (ROC curves) and computational burden is compared, as well as the impact of preprocessing strategies. Based on the results, we discuss the convenience of both methods to be integrated in a real - time signal processing system considering their benefits and drawbacks.

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of attitude and orbit estimation using real earth magnetic field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack

    1997-01-01

    A single, augmented extended Kalman filter (EKF) which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit was developed and tested with simulated and real magnetometer and rate data. Since the earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is accurately known, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft's orbit, are a function of orbit and attitude errors. These differences can be used to estimate the orbit and attitude. The test results of the EKF with magnetometer and gyro data from three NASA satellites are presented and evaluated.

  5. Dosimetric Evaluation of Linac Photon Small Fields using MAGIC Polymer Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hasani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In radiotherapy, methods of treatment planning are becoming increasingly more complicated. This requires verification of the doses delivered to increasingly smaller and more precise regions. Radiotherapy techniques are continuously employing smaller and smaller field sizes to deliver tighter radiation doses with higher therapeutic ratios, generating interest among researchers to provide reliable dosimetry for beams and treatment plans collimated to small field sizes. In this study, the dosimetry of these fields was evaluated in clinical applications by using polymer gel dosimetry. Material and Methods: The MAGIC polymer gel was used in this study. The gel samples were manufactured and poured into phantoms and calibration vials and were irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray beam. The R2 maps of the dose distributions were obtained from the gel MR images. The depth dose distributions and dose profile measurements were measured in different fields at a depth of 5 cm in gel, and were compared against another technique using a pinpoint chamber. Results: Comparison of the results of gel and pinpoint chamber measurements showed largest differences between the dose profile measurements in the low dose regions (near the edges. In these regions, the pinpoint-chamber measured penumbra width was at most 3.2 mm wider than those given by gel dosimeters. For a 30 × 30 mm2 field, maximum difference between gel and pinpoint chamber was 2 mm within the depth of maximum dose region, and were 2 mm, 3 mm and 2 mm for 20 × 20 mm2, 10 × 10 mm2 and 5 × 5 mm2 fields, respectively. The maximum differences within the buildup region for 30 × 30 mm2, 20 × 20 mm2, 10 × 10 mm2 and 5 × 5 mm2 fields were 9%, 4.5%, 2% and 9%, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: The differences in the depth dose distributions and dose profile measurements between MAGIC polymer gel and pinpoint chamber are attributable to different factors. The dosimetry of these fields using

  6. Paleo-drainage basin connectivity predicts evolutionary relationships across three Southeast Asian biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Mark; Rüber, Lukas; Nylinder, Stephan; Stelbrink, Björn; Lovejoy, Nathan R; Lavoué, Sébastien; Tan, Heok Hui; Nugroho, Estu; Wowor, Daisy; Ng, Peter K L; Siti Azizah, M N; Von Rintelen, Thomas; Hall, Robert; Carvalho, Gary R

    2013-05-01

    Understanding factors driving diversity across biodiversity hotspots is critical for formulating conservation priorities in the face of ongoing and escalating environmental deterioration. While biodiversity hotspots encompass a small fraction of Earth's land surface, more than half the world's plants and two-thirds of terrestrial vertebrate species are endemic to these hotspots. Tropical Southeast (SE) Asia displays extraordinary species richness, encompassing four biodiversity hotspots, though disentangling multiple potential drivers of species richness is confounded by the region's dynamic geological and climatic history. Here, we use multilocus molecular genetic data from dense multispecies sampling of freshwater fishes across three biodiversity hotspots, to test the effect of Quaternary climate change and resulting drainage rearrangements on aquatic faunal diversification. While Cenozoic geological processes have clearly shaped evolutionary history in SE Asian halfbeak fishes, we show that paleo-drainage re-arrangements resulting from Quaternary climate change played a significant role in the spatiotemporal evolution of lowland aquatic taxa, and provide priorities for conservation efforts.

  7. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennick Michael

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75 into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity.

  8. International evaluation of Swedish research projects in the field of short rotation forestry for energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, W.M. [N.I. Horticulture and Plant Breeding Station, Armagh (Ireland); Isebrands, J. [USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, Rhinelander, WI (United States); Namkoong, G. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Forest Sciences; Tahvanainen, J. [Univ. of Joensuu (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to inform NUTEK of the scientific quality of the research projects, as seen in an international context. The projects were therefore the main elements considered in the evaluation. The main basis of the evaluation was the scientific quality of the research and its relevance to NUTEK`s aims in the application of industrial research and development. The present report is based on the information contained in the written reports submitted by the grant holders, site visits and discussions between the grant holders and the Committee. The report first gives an overview and general recommendations concerning the overall programme in the field of Short Rotation Forestry for Energy. Thereafter, the 16 projects are evaluated separately

  9. Applicability of slug interference tests under Hanford Site test conditions: Analytical assessment and field test evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Slug interference testing may be a useful technique for characterizing the hydraulic properties of high conductivity formations where problems associated with disposal of contaminated ground water make pumping tests undesirable. The suitability of the slug interference method for characterizing the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site was evaluated in a two-phase investigation. The first phase consisted of an analytical assessment. Slug interference responses were predicted over the range of conditions expected for the aquifer. The effects of partial penetration, delayed-yield and aquifer anisotropy on expected test results were also evaluated and possible analytical corrections are presented. The field test evaluation was conducted at a site with two observation wells and a stress well. Results verified the analytical evaluation and gave reasonable values of hydraulic conductivity and storativity. Test design considerations that optimize the observed response are discussed.

  10. Translation of lithography variability into after-etch performance: monitoring of golden hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finders, Jo; Kiers, Ton; Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Lakcher, Amine

    2016-10-01

    In the early phases of technology development, designers and process engineers have to converge toward efficient design rules. Their calculations are based on process assumptions and result in a design rule based on known process variability capabilities while taking into account enough margin to be safe not only for yield but especially for reliability. Unfortunately, even if designs tend to be regular, efficient design densities are still requiring aggressive configurations from which it is difficult to estimate dimension variabilities. Indeed, for a process engineer it is rather straightforward to estimate or even measure simple one-dimensional features (arrays of Lines & Spaces at various CD and pitches), but it starts to be less obvious for complex multidimensional features. After a context description related to the process assumptions, we will outline the work flow which is under evaluation to enable robust metrology of 2 dimensional complex features. Enabling new metrology possibilities reveals that process hotspots are showing complex behavior from lithography to etch pattern transfer. In this work we studied the interaction of lithography variability and etching for a mature 28 nm CMOS process. To study this interaction we used a test feature that has been found very sensitive to lithography process variations. This so-called "golden" hotspot shows edge-to-edge geometries from 88nm to 150nm, thus comprising all the through pitch physics in the lithography pattern transfer [1, 2]. It consists of three trenches. From previous work it was known that through trench there is a systematic variation in best focus due to the Mask 3D effects. At a given chosen focus, there is a distinct difference in profiles for the three trenches that will lead to pattern displacement effects during the etch transfer.

  11. Track of the Yellowstone hotspot: young and ongoing geologic processes from the Snake River Plain to the Yellowstone Plateau and Tetons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lisa A.; Pierce, Kenneth L.; Shanks, Pat; Raynolds, Robert G.H.

    2008-01-01

    This field trip highlights various stages in the evolution of the Snake River Plain–Yellowstone Plateau bimodal volcanic province, and associated faulting and uplift, also known as the track of the Yellowstone hotspot. The 16 Ma Yellowstone hotspot track is one of the few places on Earth where time-transgressive processes on continental crust can be observed in the volcanic and tectonic (faulting and uplift) record at the rate and direction predicted by plate motion. Recent interest in young and possible renewed volcanism at Yellowstone along with new discoveries and synthesis of previous studies, i.e., tomographic, deformation, bathymetric, and seismic surveys, provide a framework of evidence of plate motion over a mantle plume. This 3-day trip is organized to present an overview into volcanism and tectonism in this dynamically active region. Field trip stops will include the young basaltic Craters of the Moon, exposures of 12–4 Ma rhyolites and edges of their associated collapsed calderas on the Snake River Plain, and exposures of faults which show an age progression similar to the volcanic fields. An essential stop is Yellowstone National Park, where the last major caldera-forming event occurred 640,000 years ago and now is host to the world's largest concentration of hydrothermal features (>10,000 hot springs and geysers). This trip presents a quick, intensive overview into volcanism and tectonism in this dynamically active region. Field stops are directly linked to conceptual models related to hotspot passage through this volcano-tectonic province. Features that may reflect a tilted thermal mantle plume suggested in recent tomographic studies will be examined. The drive home will pass through Grand Teton National Park, where the Teton Range is currently rising in response to the passage of the North American plate over the Yellowstone hotspot.

  12. Trans-regulation of mouse meiotic recombination hotspots by Rcr1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Parvanov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is required for the orderly segregation of chromosomes during meiosis and for providing genetic diversity among offspring. Among mammals, as well as yeast and higher plants, recombination preferentially occurs at highly delimited chromosomal sites 1-2 kb long known as hotspots. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles various proteins play in carrying out the molecular events of the recombination process, relatively little is understood about the factors controlling the location and relative activity of mammalian recombination hotspots. To search for trans-acting factors controlling the positioning of recombination events, we compared the locations of crossovers arising in an 8-Mb segment of a 100-Mb region of mouse Chromosome 1 (Chr 1 when the longer region was heterozygous C57BL/6J (B6 x CAST/EiJ (CAST and the remainder of the genome was either similarly heterozygous or entirely homozygous B6. The lack of CAST alleles in the remainder of the genome resulted in profound changes in hotspot activity in both females and males. Recombination activity was lost at several hotspots; new, previously undetected hotspots appeared; and still other hotspots remained unaffected, indicating the presence of distant trans-acting gene(s whose CAST allele(s activate or suppress the activity of specific hotspots. Testing the activity of three activated hotspots in sperm samples from individual male progeny of two genetic crosses, we identified a single trans-acting regulator of hotspot activity, designated Rcr1, that is located in a 5.30-Mb interval (11.74-17.04 Mb on Chr 17. Using an Escherichia coli cloning assay to characterize the molecular products of recombination at two of these hotspots, we found that Rcr1 controls the appearance of both crossover and noncrossover gene conversion events, indicating that it likely controls the sites of the double-strand DNA breaks that initiate the recombination process.

  13. Using perceivable light fields to evaluate the amount of information that autostereoscopic displays need to cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Adrian; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-05-01

    Recently we introduced the notion of "perceivable light field" (PLF) as an efficient tool for the analysis and design of three dimensional (3D) displays. The PLF is used with a 3D display analysis approach that puts the viewer in the center of the model; that is, first the human visual system requirements are defined through the PLF and then they are back-propagated to the display devices to evaluate its specifications. Here we use such an analysis to evaluate the information requirements that autostereoscopic 3D display devices need to provide for ideal visual conditions.

  14. Long-Term Evaluation of SSL Field Performance in Select Interior Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, Tess E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-02-28

    This GATEWAY project evaluated four field installations to better understand the long-term performance of a number of LED products, which can hopefully stimulate improvements in designing, manufacturing, specifying, procuring, and installing LED products. Field studies provide the opportunity to discover and investigate issues that cannot be simulated or uncovered in a laboratory, but the installed performance over time of commercially available LED products has not been well documented. Improving long-term performance can provide both direct energy savings by reducing the need to over-light to account for light loss and indirect energy savings through better market penetration due to SSL’s competitive advantages over less-efficient light source technologies. The projects evaluated for this report illustrate that SSL use is often motivated by advantages other than energy savings, including maintenance savings, easier integration with control systems, and improved lighting quality.

  15. An integrated evaluation of formation inhomogeneity, accounting for the field ''trend''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultanov, C.A.; Akhmodov, A.M.; Allakhverdieva, L.I.

    1979-01-01

    It is recommended that the degree of characteristic variation in the geological parameters by area be accounted for using the ''trend'' characteristic when evaluating the geological inhomogeneity of formations; this characteristic denotes any systematic variations which are noted in the diagram of the target under study. A method for solving these problems is proposed. A problem is solved using a sample study of the ruggedness factor of several beds in the 16th formation and the series of the 15th formation in the Starii field and the Bukhti Ilch field in Bibi-Eibat. The ''regression analysis'' program was used in drafting these models; this program was developed at the computer center of the Academy of Sciences of the Estonian SSR. A multiple correlation coefficient for square-law models was used to evaluate the ''trend''.

  16. Evaluation for Small Visual Difference Between Conforming Meshes on Strain Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Bian; Shi-Min Hu; Ralph R. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a method of quantifying small visual differences between 3D mesh models with conforming topology, based on the theory of strain fields. Strain field is a geometric quantity in elasticity which is used to describe the deformation of elastomer. In this paper we consider the 3D models as objects with elasticity. The further demonstrations are provided: the first is intended to give the reader a visual impression of how our measure works in practice; and the second is to give readers a visual impression of how our measure works in evaluating filter algorithms. Our experiments show that our difference estimates are well correlated with human perception of differences. This work has applications in the evaluation of 3D mesh watermarking, 3D mesh compression reconstruction, and 3D mesh filtering.

  17. Evaluation of the small field of for the detector type medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Woon; Jung, Kang Kyo; Cho, Pyong Kon [Dept. of Radiological Science, Catholic University of DaeGu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gwi Soon [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Songho College, Hoengseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Recently linear accelerator of radiation therapy intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic radiation therapy are widely used. Such radiation treatment techniques are generally difficult to exclude the small field by using the inverse treatment plan. It is necessary to dose an accurate measurement of characteristics of the small field. Thus, using different detectors to measure the volume of the effective percentage depth dose, beam profile, and the output factor of the small field was to evaluate the dose characteristics of each detector. Experimental results for the X-ray beam 6 MV energy beam quality(PDD20/PDD10) is 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} Diode detector is as high as 2.4% compared to Pinpoint detector. All field size to lesser effective volume of Diode detector shows that it is far better than other detectors by more than 50% of small penumbra, therefore spatial resolution far excellent. In field size 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} Semiflex detector was measured about 2% less than the other detector. Field size 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} is that there is no judgment about the validity show the difference between 20%. Field size 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} from the measured values of the Diode detector and Pinpoint detector showed a 13% difference. Less than field size 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} the feed to the difference between the output factor of the effective volume of the detector to be used for the effective volume available to the detector.

  18. Effects of temperature on bacterial transport and destruction in bioretention media: field and laboratory evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Seagren, Eric A; Davis, Allen P; Karns, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Microbial activities are significantly influenced by temperature. This study investigated the effects of temperature on the capture and destruction of bacteria from urban stormwater runoff in bioretention media using 2-year field evaluations coupled with controlled laboratory column studies. Field data from two bioretention cells show that the concentration of indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli) was reduced during most storm events, and that the probability of meeting specific water quality criteria in the discharge was increased. Indicator bacteria concentration in the input flow typically increased with higher daily temperature. Although bacterial removal efficiency was independent of temperature in the field and laboratory, column tests showed that bacterial decay coefficients in conventional bioretention media (CBM) increase exponentially with elevated temperature. Increases in levels of protozoa and heterotrophic bacteria associated with increasing temperature appear to contribute to faster die-off of trapped E. coli in CBM via predation and competition.

  19. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  20. A clinical chemistry analyzer evaluated by NCCLS guidelines for use in a military field laboratory unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullinger, J; Garrett, P E

    1989-11-01

    In a previous comparison study of "dry chemistry" desktop analyzers, the ChemPro 1000 (Arden Medical Systems) was one of several instruments found suitable for field use. We have now evaluated the linearity, accuracy, and precision of the ChemPro 1000, according to NCCLS Document EP 10-P. We also compared results with those by the SMAC (Technicon) and the Nova 9 (Nova Biomedical) for electrolytes, serum urea nitrogen, and ionized calcium in field and laboratory environments. The precision (CV) of the ChemPro was within acceptable ranges for dry chemistry desktop analyzers for all analytes tested. This instrument is a suitable and reasonable alternative to manual chemistry or to large, automated instrumentation in a field environment.

  1. Evaluation of Cyantraniliprole and Other Commercial Fly Baits under Laboratory and Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Parker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and field trials were performed to evaluate the attractiveness and efficacy of commercial baits (cyantraniliprole; methomyl + (Z-9-tricosene; dinotefuran + (Z-9-tricosene; imidacloprid granular + (Z-9-tricosene; and imidacloprid liquid + (Z-9-tricosene. In choice tests; flies were most attracted to cyantraniliprole bait > dinotefuran + (Z-9 > methomyl + (Z-9 bait > imidacloprid granular + (Z-9 bait > imidacloprid liquid + (Z-9 bait. Significant degradation in bait efficacy was observed after two weeks of aging excluding imidacloprid granular; which began to degrade in field conditions after one week. Cyantraniliprole; the new fly bait active ingredient in Zyrox®; had the longest time to knockdown in the laboratory tests; but on susceptible flies; achieved 95%–100% knockdown within an hour of exposure. Zyrox® was resistant to weathering for a week; and was more attractive to flies in the field when compared to methomyl + (Z-9 bait.

  2. Evaluation of fresh and preserved herbaceous field crops for biogas and ethanol production

    OpenAIRE

    Pakarinen, Annukka

    2012-01-01

    In the future, various forms of bioenergy will be increasingly required to replace fossil energy. Globally, transportation uses almost one third of fossil energy resources, and it is thus of great importance to find ethically, economically, and environmentally viable biofuels in near future. Field-grown biomass, including energy crops and crop residues, are alternatives to supplement other non-food biofuel raw materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of five crops, maize ...

  3. Field Evaluation of the Sidestream Sensors for Filter/Separators and Clay Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Report No. 552 OTC FILE COPY S ApOV FOR pffBU WAMES DISTRIBUTION UNUMITED FIELD EVALUATION OF THE SIDESTREAM SENSORS FOR FILTER/SEPARATORS AND CLAY FILTERS...SIDESTREA SENSORS FOR FILTER/SEPARATORS AND CLAY FILTERS (CRC PROJECT No. CA-47-70) IN FORMULATING AND APPROVING REPCRTS, THE APPROPRIATE COMMITTEE OF THE...noted that the filter/separator unit at Basle operated at an unusually high pressure drop. The deactivated coalescer was found to contain gummy

  4. Field Evaluation of Four Spatial Repellent Devices Against Arkansas Rice-Land Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    FIELD EVALUATION OF FOUR SPATIAL REPELLENT DEVICES AGAINST ARKANSAS RICE-LAND MOSQUITOES DAVID A. DAME,1 MAX V. MEISCH,2 CAROLYN N. LEWIS,2 DANIEL L... mosquitoes to locate a host. There are many commercially available spatial repellent products currently on the market. These products include...a large rice growing area where late-spring and summer agricultural irriga- tion generates dense mosquito populations. Spatial repellent devices

  5. Field Evaluation of Advances in Energy-Efficiency Practices for Manufactured Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dentz, J. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Barker, G. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dadia, D. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Through field-testing and analysis, this project evaluated whole-building approaches and estimated the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use related to space conditioning in new manufactured homes. Three lab houses of varying designs were built and tested side-by-side under controlled conditions in Russellville, Alabama. The tests provided a valuable indicator of how changes in the construction of manufactured homes can contribute to significant reductions in energy use.

  6. Urban rivers as hotspots of regional nitrogen pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wu, Yiyun; Gu, Baojing

    2015-10-01

    Excess nitrogen inputs to terrestrial ecosystems via human activities have deteriorated water qualities on regional scales. Urban areas as settlements of over half global population, however, were usually not considered in the analysis of regional water pollution. Here, we used a 72-month monitoring data of water qualities in Hangzhou, China to test the role of urban rives in regional nitrogen pollution and how they response to the changes of human activities. Concentrations of ammonium nitrogen in urban rivers were 3-5 times higher than that in regional rivers. Urban rivers have become pools of reactive nitrogen and hotspots of regional pollution. Moreover, this river pollution is not being measured by current surface water monitoring networks that are designed to measure broader regional patterns, resulting in an underestimation of regional pollution. This is crucial to urban environment not only in China, but also in other countries, where urban rivers are seriously polluted.

  7. Hotspots of mite new species discovery: Trombidiformes (2013-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-12-14

    This paper reveals the hotspots of new mite discovery through of a survey of type localities of new Trombidiformes species described in two journals (Systematic & Applied Acarology and Zootaxa) during the last three years (2013-2015). Taxonomically, the 491 new species of the Trombidiformes are highly unevenly distributed among 55 families with top 10 families accounting for over 66% of the total. The Eriophyidae is the top-ranked family. Geographically, these 491 new species are from 55 countries around the world and their distribution among the countries is highly uneven. The majority of these new species (69%) are from the top 10 countries and six of the top ten countries are also megadiversity countries. The top three countries are all from Asia (Iran, China and Malaysia) and they together accounted for over one third of all new species of the Trombidiformes described in the two journals during 2013-2015.

  8. Evaluation of hemostatic field dressing for bacteria, mycobacteria, or fungus contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clinton K; Brunstetter, Tyson; Beckius, Miriam; Dunne, James R; Mende, Katrin

    2013-03-01

    Infectious complications have a major impact on wounded warriors. Pathogens causing infections include multidrug-resistant bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. The potential sources for these pathogens include nosocomial transmission, the environment (e.g., dirt), or the patients (skin flora) themselves. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the possibility that hemostatic field dressings might act as an inoculation source of pathogens into wounds. To accomplish this, hemostatic field dressings were assessed for the presence of bacterial, fungal, or mycobacterial contamination. We evaluated two samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze and two samples of CELOX Gauze subjected to normal stresses associated with storage after receipt from the manufacturer. We then evaluated 16 samples of QuikClot Combat Gauze that were collected from personnel deployed in Afghanistan and had undergone routine mechanical stress. Samples underwent screening with Trypticase Soy Broth, blood agar plates, MacConkey agar plates, CHROMagar Staphylococcus aureus plates, chocolate agar plates, Potato Flake agar, Lowenstein-Jensen media, and Middlebrook 7H11 media. No bacteria, fungi, or mycobacteria were recovered from the dressings. It does not appear that hemostatic field dressings are contaminated, even after subjected to field conditions. Further research is needed to identify inoculation sources of fungi and mycobacteria, which cause infections.

  9. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  10. Population growth, human development, and deforestation in biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S; Bawa, K S

    2006-06-01

    Human population and development activities affect the rate of deforestation in biodiversity hotspots. We quantified the effect of human population growth and development on rates of deforestation and analyzed the relationship between these causal factors in the 1980s and 1990s. We compared the averages of population growth, human development index (HDI, which measures income, health, and education), and deforestation rate and computed correlations among these variables for countries that contain biodiversity hotspots. When population growth was high and HDI was low there was a high rate of deforestation, but when HDI was high, rate of deforestation was low, despite high population growth. The correlation among variables was significant for the 1990s but not for the 1980s. The relationship between population growth and HDI had a regional pattern that reflected the historical process of development. Based on the changes in HDI and deforestation rate over time, we identified two drivers of deforestation: policy choice and human-development constraints. Policy choices that disregard conservation may cause the loss of forests even in countries that are relatively developed. Lack of development in other countries, on the other hand, may increase the pressure on forests to meet the basic needs of the human population. Deforestation resulting from policy choices may be easier to fix than deforestation arising from human development constraints. To prevent deforestation in the countries that have such constraints, transfer of material and intellectual resources from developed countries may be needed. Popular interest in sustainable development in developed countries can facilitate the transfer of these resources.

  11. Future of endemic flora of biodiversity hotspots in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Vishwas Sudhir; Behera, Mukund Dev; Roy, Partha Sarthi

    2014-01-01

    India is one of the 12 mega biodiversity countries of the world, which represents 11% of world's flora in about 2.4% of global land mass. Approximately 28% of the total Indian flora and 33% of angiosperms occurring in India are endemic. Higher human population density in biodiversity hotspots in India puts undue pressure on these sensitive eco-regions. In the present study, we predict the future distribution of 637 endemic plant species from three biodiversity hotspots in India; Himalaya, Western Ghats, Indo-Burma, based on A1B scenario for year 2050 and 2080. We develop individual variable based models as well as mixed models in MaxEnt by combining ten least co-related bioclimatic variables, two disturbance variables and one physiography variable as predictor variables. The projected changes suggest that the endemic flora will be adversely impacted, even under such a moderate climate scenario. The future distribution is predicted to shift in northern and north-eastern direction in Himalaya and Indo-Burma, while in southern and south-western direction in Western Ghats, due to cooler climatic conditions in these regions. In the future distribution of endemic plants, we observe a significant shift and reduction in the distribution range compared to the present distribution. The model predicts a 23.99% range reduction and a 7.70% range expansion in future distribution by 2050, while a 41.34% range reduction and a 24.10% range expansion by 2080. Integration of disturbance and physiography variables along with bioclimatic variables in the models improved the prediction accuracy. Mixed models provide most accurate results for most of the combinations of climatic and non-climatic variables as compared to individual variable based models. We conclude that a) regions with cooler climates and higher moisture availability could serve as refugia for endemic plants in future climatic conditions; b) mixed models provide more accurate results, compared to single variable based

  12. Future of endemic flora of biodiversity hotspots in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas Sudhir Chitale

    Full Text Available India is one of the 12 mega biodiversity countries of the world, which represents 11% of world's flora in about 2.4% of global land mass. Approximately 28% of the total Indian flora and 33% of angiosperms occurring in India are endemic. Higher human population density in biodiversity hotspots in India puts undue pressure on these sensitive eco-regions. In the present study, we predict the future distribution of 637 endemic plant species from three biodiversity hotspots in India; Himalaya, Western Ghats, Indo-Burma, based on A1B scenario for year 2050 and 2080. We develop individual variable based models as well as mixed models in MaxEnt by combining ten least co-related bioclimatic variables, two disturbance variables and one physiography variable as predictor variables. The projected changes suggest that the endemic flora will be adversely impacted, even under such a moderate climate scenario. The future distribution is predicted to shift in northern and north-eastern direction in Himalaya and Indo-Burma, while in southern and south-western direction in Western Ghats, due to cooler climatic conditions in these regions. In the future distribution of endemic plants, we observe a significant shift and reduction in the distribution range compared to the present distribution. The model predicts a 23.99% range reduction and a 7.70% range expansion in future distribution by 2050, while a 41.34% range reduction and a 24.10% range expansion by 2080. Integration of disturbance and physiography variables along with bioclimatic variables in the models improved the prediction accuracy. Mixed models provide most accurate results for most of the combinations of climatic and non-climatic variables as compared to individual variable based models. We conclude that a regions with cooler climates and higher moisture availability could serve as refugia for endemic plants in future climatic conditions; b mixed models provide more accurate results, compared to single

  13. Fifty-one Years of Hawaiian Hotspot Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Farnetani, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Tuzo Wilson's ground breaking realization that the progressively increasing ages of volcanism along linear chains of Pacific islands are best explained by movement of the Pacific plate over a stationary heat source was followed by Jason Morgan's physically more plausible plume theory. Hawaii, the "mother" of all plumes/hotspots, has become the focus of a continuing burden-of-proof battle about the existence of mantle plumes. The monotonic age progression of this island chain has been amply confirmed, but the hotspot locus is not perfectly fixed, and this has been taken to be a failed test of the plume model. Numerous numerical experiments in bottom-heated settings have demonstrated that plumes are a physically natural mode of convection, but antiplumers focus on the fact that in internally heated media, plumes are unlikely. Early proposals of propagating lithospheric fractures with magma tapped from the underlying asthenosphere have never been sufficiently developed to seriously compete with the convection models. Geochemists eagerly adopted the plume model and developed highly model-dependent criteria for identifying mantle plumes, but these are easily knocked down, because most geochemical tracers carry no information about the specific mantle depth being sampled. Conversely, petrological-geochemical models invoking exclusively asthenospheric magma sources have not explained how, in the absence of a Bunsen burner, high melt production can be localized in one geographic spot for 108 years. Our work has focussed on using dynamic modelling to trace the path of geochemical heterogeneities from the base of the mantle to the volcanoes. We find that large-scale heterogeneities existing in the lower thermal boundary layer are drawn into close proximity in the plume conduit and in the erupting volcanoes. Geochemistry cannot prove mantle plumes, but plumes offer a promising path to understanding the geochemistry of the deep mantle.

  14. Hotspots, Lifelines, and the Safrr Haywired Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. L.; Porter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Though California has experienced many large earthquakes (San Francisco, 1906; Loma Prieta, 1989; Northridge, 1994), the San Francisco Bay Area has not had a damaging earthquake for 25 years. Earthquake risk and surging reliance on smartphones and the Internet to handle everyday tasks raise the question: is an increasingly technology-reliant Bay Area prepared for potential infrastructure impacts caused by a major earthquake? How will a major earthquake on the Hayward Fault affect lifelines (roads, power, water, communication, etc.)? The U.S. Geological Survey Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) program's Haywired disaster scenario, a hypothetical two-year earthquake sequence triggered by a M7.05 mainshock on the Hayward Fault, addresses these and other questions. We explore four geographic aspects of lifeline damage from earthquakes: (1) geographic lifeline concentrations, (2) areas where lifelines pass through high shaking or potential ground-failure zones, (3) areas with diminished lifeline service demand due to severe building damage, and (4) areas with increased lifeline service demand due to displaced residents and businesses. Potential mainshock lifeline vulnerability and spatial demand changes will be discerned by superimposing earthquake shaking, liquefaction probability, and landslide probability damage thresholds with lifeline concentrations and with large-capacity shelters. Intersecting high hazard levels and lifeline clusters represent potential lifeline susceptibility hotspots. We will also analyze possible temporal vulnerability and demand changes using an aftershock shaking threshold. The results of this analysis will inform regional lifeline resilience initiatives and response and recovery planning, as well as reveal potential redundancies and weaknesses for Bay Area lifelines. Identified spatial and temporal hotspots can provide stakeholders with a reference for possible systemic vulnerability resulting from an earthquake sequence.

  15. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale laboratory microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces

  16. Blind Field Test Evaluation of Raman Spectroscopy as a Forensic Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Scott D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vucelick, Mark E.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Lee, Richard N.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Bob W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    Analytical instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy has advanced rapidly in recent years to the point where commercial field-portable instruments are available. Raman analysis with portable instrumentation is a new capability that can provide emergency response teams with on-site evaluation of hazardous materials. Before Raman analysis is accepted and implemented in the field, realistic studies applied to unknown samples need to be performed to define the reliability of this technique. Studies described herein provide a rigorous blind field test that utilizes 2 instruments and 2 operators to analyze a matrix that consists of 58 unknown samples. Samples were searched against a custom hazardous materials reference library[Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) Spectral Library Database]. Experimental design included a number of intentionally difficult situations including binary solvent mixtures and a variety of compounds that yield medium quality spectra that were not contained in the HMRU library. Results showed that over 97% of the samples were correctly identified with no occurrences of false positive identifications (compounds that were not in the library were never identified as library constituents). Statistical analysis indicated equivalent performance for both the operators and instruments. These results indicate a high level of performance that should extrapolate to actual field situations. Implementation of Raman techniques to emergency field situations should proceed with a corresponding level of confidence.

  17. A field screening method using earthworms (Eisenia foetida andrei) to evaluate contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilborn, D.C.; Bollman, M.A.; Gillett, C.S.; Ott, S.L.; Linder, G.L. [Takena Ecological Services, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1997-09-01

    An on-site biological assessment for soil toxicity was performed using a lumbricid earthworm, Eisenia foetida andrei, at the Milltown Reservoir Superfund Site on the Clark Fork River near Missoula, MT. The assessment provided an opportunity to evaluate test containers and methodologies. Sixty-four field test stations, each consisting of three test containers of site soil, a control container of artificial soil, and a container to house soil moisture and temperature recording devices, were used. Laboratory tests were conducted on soil samples from selected field stations. The test containers were constructed from sections of polyvinyl chloride pipe and were found to be suitable in preventing escape of test organisms and damage by animals. The site soils had levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc higher than those in surrounding watersheds. Combined mortality for exposure to the site soil was similar in both the laboratory and field tests. Combined sublethal responses to the site soil were also similar in both laboratory and field tests. Artificial soil controls in both field and laboratory tests resulted in combined mortality rates of 1% or less. The methodologies employed proved successful in maintaining an adequate soil moisture level and allowed for measurement of soil temperature.

  18. Laboratory and field evaluation of hot mix asphalt with high contents of reclaimed asphalt pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, Clinton Isaac

    Currently in Iowa, the amount of RAP materials allowed for the surface layer is limited to 15% by weight. The objective of this project was to develop quality standards for inclusion of RAP content higher than 15% in asphalt mixtures. To meet Superpave mix design requirements, it was necessary to fractionate the RAP materials. Based on the extensive sieve-by-sieve analysis of RAP materials, the optimum sieve size to fractionate RAP materials was identified. To determine if the higher percentage of RAP materials than 15% can be used in Iowa's state highway, three test sections with 30.0%, 35.5% and 39.2% of RAP materials were constructed on Highway 6 in Iowa City. The construction of the field test sections was monitored and the cores were obtained to measure field densities of test sections. Field mixtures collected from test sections were compacted in the laboratory in order to test the moisture sensitivity using a Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device. The binder was extracted from the field mixtures with varying amounts of RAP materials and tested to determine the effects of RAP materials on the PG grade of a virgin binder. Field cores were taken from the various mix designs to determine the percent density of each test section. A condition survey of the test sections was then performed to evaluate the short-term performance.

  19. Novel Approaches for Delineating and Studying "Hotspots" and "Hot Moments" in Fluvial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. H.; Bücker, M.; Flores Orozco, A.; Hobson, C.; Robbins, M.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle, CO (USA) field site have long focused on stimulated biogeochemical pathways arising from organic carbon injection. While reductive pathways and their relation to uranium immobilization have been a focus since 2002, ongoing studies are exploring oxidative pathways and their role in mediating fluxes of C, N, S, and aqueous metals. Insights gained from 'stimulation' experiments are providing insight into analogous natural biogeochemical pathways that mediate elemental cycling in the absence of exogenous carbon. Such reactions are instead mediated by endogenous pools of natural organic matter (NOM) deposited during aggradation of aquifer sediments associated with fluvial processes within the Colorado River floodplain. Discrete lenses of fine-grained, organic-rich sediments enriched in reduced species, such as Fe(II) and iron sulfides have been identified along the active margin of the floodplain. Referred to as "naturally reduced zones" (NRZs), these localities constitute a distinct facies type within an otherwise gravel-dominated, largely NOM-deficient matrix. NRZs represent 'hotspots' of seasonally intense C, N, S, and U cycling during excursions in groundwater elevation. Air bubble imbibition within the capillary fringe is inferred to contribute to seasonally oxic groundwater, with its puntuated, 'hot moment' like impact on redox-mediated reactions exhibiting close correspondence to those induced through the intentional introduction of oxidants. Reactions induce sharp gradients in nitrate and sulfate resulting from elevated rates of nitrification and oxidation of reduced sulfur as dissolved oxygen becomes non-limiting. Given their outsized role in constraining the location and timing of critcal element cycling pathways, delineating the distribution of NRZs across scales of relevance to natural field systems is of great importance. Novel mapping approaches borrowed from the field of exploration geophysics provide one

  20. Magnetotransport of multiple-band nearly antiferromagnetic metals due to hot-spot scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple-band electronic structure and proximity to antiferromagnetic (AF) instability are the key properties of iron-based superconductors. We explore the influence of scattering by the AF spin fluctuations on transport of multiple-band metals above the magnetic transition. A salient feature of scattering on the AF fluctuations is that it is strongly enhanced at the Fermi surface locations where the nesting is perfect ("hot spots" or "hot lines"). We review derivation of the collision integral for the Boltzmann equation due to AF-fluctuations scattering. In the paramagnetic state, the enhanced scattering rate near the hot lines leads to anomalous behavior of electronic transport in magnetic field. We explore this behavior by analytically solving the Boltzmann transport equation with approximate transition rates. This approach accounts for return scattering events and is more accurate than the relaxation-time approximation. The magnetic-field dependences are characterized by two very different field scales: the lower scale is set by the hot-spot width and the higher scale is set by the total scattering amplitude. A conventional magnetotransport behavior is limited to magnetic fields below the lower scale. In the wide range in-between these two scales, the longitudinal conductivity has linear dependence on the magnetic field and the Hall conductivity has quadratic dependence. The linear dependence of the diagonal component reflects growth of the Fermi-surface area affected by the hot spots proportional to the magnetic field. We discuss applicability of this theoretical framework for describing of anomalous magnetotransport properties in different iron pnictides and chalcogenides in the paramagnetic state.

  1. Readability evaluation of Internet-based patient education materials related to the anesthesiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Jung, Michael; Mccaffery, Kirsten J; McCarthy, Robert J; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of the current investigation was to assess the readability of Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology. We hypothesized that the majority of patient education materials would not be written according to current recommended readability grade level. Online patient education materials describing procedures, risks, and management of anesthesia-related topics were identified using the search engine Google (available at www.google.com) using the terms anesthesia, anesthesiology, anesthesia risks, and anesthesia care. Cross-sectional evaluation. None. Assessments of content readability were performed using validated instruments (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Formulae, the Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, the New Dale-Chall Test, the Fry graph, and the Flesch Reading Ease score). Ninety-six Web sites containing Internet patient education materials (IPEMs) were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) readability grade level for all evaluated IPEMs was 13.5 (12.0-14.6). All the evaluated documents were classified at a greater readability level than the current recommended readability grade, P materials related to the field of anesthesiology are currently written far above the recommended readability grade level. High complexity of written education materials likely limits access of information to millions of American patients. Redesign of online content of Web sites that provide patient education material regarding anesthesia could be an important step in improving access to information for patients with poor health literacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Critical Development? Using a Critical Theory Lens to Examine the Current Role of Evaluation in the Youth-Development Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller-Berkman, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A critical theory lens is used to explore the role of evaluation in youth development, a field aimed at recognizing youth as assets. A theory of change in the field is questioned for its emphasis on individual youth outcomes as programmatic outcome measures. A review of 209 evaluations of 131 programs in the Harvard Family Research Project's…

  3. Field validation of protocols developed to evaluate in-line mastitis detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, C; Dela Rue, B T; Eastwood, C R

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on a field validation of previously developed protocols for evaluating the performance of in-line mastitis-detection systems. The protocols outlined 2 requirements of these systems: (1) to detect cows with clinical mastitis (CM) promptly and accurately to enable timely and appropriate treatment and (2) to identify cows with high somatic cell count (SCC) to manage bulk milk SCC levels. Gold standard measures, evaluation tests, performance measures, and performance targets were proposed. The current study validated the protocols on commercial dairy farms with automated in-line mastitis-detection systems using both electrical conductivity (EC) and SCC sensor systems that both monitor at whole-udder level. The protocol for requirement 1 was applied on 3 commercial farms. For requirement 2, the protocol was applied on 6 farms; 3 of them had low bulk milk SCC (128×10(3) cells/mL) and were the same farms as used for field evaluation of requirement 1. Three farms with high bulk milk SCC (270×10(3) cells/mL) were additionally enrolled. The field evaluation methodology and results were presented at a workshop including representation from 7 international suppliers of in-line mastitis-detection systems. Feedback was sought on the acceptance of standardized performance evaluation protocols and recommended refinements to the protocols. Although the methodology for requirement 1 was relatively labor intensive and required organizational skills over an extended period, no major issues were encountered during the field validation of both protocols. The validation, thus, proved the protocols to be practical. Also, no changes to the data collection process were recommended by the technology supplier representatives. However, 4 recommendations were made to refine the protocols: inclusion of an additional analysis that ignores small (low-density) clot observations in the definition of CM, extension of the time window from 4 to 5 milkings for timely alerts for CM

  4. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  5. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  6. Wavelet-based spatial comparison technique for analysing and evaluating two-dimensional geophysical model fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saux Picart

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex numerical models of the Earth's environment, based around 3-D or 4-D time and space domains are routinely used for applications including climate predictions, weather forecasts, fishery management and environmental impact assessments. Quantitatively assessing the ability of these models to accurately reproduce geographical patterns at a range of spatial and temporal scales has always been a difficult problem to address. However, this is crucial if we are to rely on these models for decision making. Satellite data are potentially the only observational dataset able to cover the large spatial domains analysed by many types of geophysical models. Consequently optical wavelength satellite data is beginning to be used to evaluate model hindcast fields of terrestrial and marine environments. However, these satellite data invariably contain regions of occluded or missing data due to clouds, further complicating or impacting on any comparisons with the model. A methodology has recently been developed to evaluate precipitation forecasts using radar observations. It allows model skill to be evaluated at a range of spatial scales and rain intensities. Here we extend the original method to allow its generic application to a range of continuous and discontinuous geophysical data fields, and therefore allowing its use with optical satellite data. This is achieved through two major improvements to the original method: (i all thresholds are determined based on the statistical distribution of the input data, so no a priori knowledge about the model fields being analysed is required and (ii occluded data can be analysed without impacting on the metric results. The method can be used to assess a model's ability to simulate geographical patterns over a range of spatial scales. We illustrate how the method provides a compact and concise way of visualising the degree of agreement between spatial features in two datasets. The application of the new method, its

  7. Field cage studies and progressive evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Facchinelli

    Full Text Available A genetically-engineered strain of the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, designated OX3604C, was evaluated in large outdoor cage trials for its potential to improve dengue prevention efforts by inducing population suppression. OX3604C is engineered with a repressible genetic construct that causes a female-specific flightless phenotype. Wild-type females that mate with homozygous OX3604C males will not produce reproductive female offspring. Weekly introductions of OX3604C males eliminated all three targeted Ae. aegypti populations after 10-20 weeks in a previous laboratory cage experiment. As part of the phased, progressive evaluation of this technology, we carried out an assessment in large outdoor field enclosures in dengue endemic southern Mexico.OX3604C males were introduced weekly into field cages containing stable target populations, initially at 10:1 ratios. Statistically significant target population decreases were detected in 4 of 5 treatment cages after 17 weeks, but none of the treatment populations were eliminated. Mating competitiveness experiments, carried out to explore the discrepancy between lab and field cage results revealed a maximum mating disadvantage of up 59.1% for OX3604C males, which accounted for a significant part of the 97% fitness cost predicted by a mathematical model to be necessary to produce the field cage results.Our results indicate that OX3604C may not be effective in large-scale releases. A strain with the same transgene that is not encumbered by a large mating disadvantage, however, could have improved prospects for dengue prevention. Insights from large outdoor cage experiments may provide an important part of the progressive, stepwise evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

  8. Field trials of a novel toolkit for evaluating 'intangible' values-related dimensions of projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Gemma; Velasco, Ismael; Janoušková, Svatava; Zahradnik, Martin; Hak, Tomas; Podger, Dimity; Piggot, Georgia; Harder, Marie K

    2013-02-01

    A novel toolkit has been developed, using an original approach to develop its components, for the purpose of evaluating 'soft' outcomes and processes that have previously been generally considered 'intangible': those which are specifically values based. This represents a step-wise, significant, change in provision for the assessment of values-based achievements that are of absolutely key importance to most civil society organisations (CSOs) and values-based businesses, and fills a known gap in evaluation practice. In this paper, we demonstrate the significance and rigour of the toolkit by presenting an evaluation of it in three diverse scenarios where different CSOs use it to co-evaluate locally relevant outcomes and processes to obtain results which are both meaningful to them and potentially comparable across organisations. A key strength of the toolkit is its original use of a prior generated, peer-elicited 'menu' of values-based indicators which provides a framework for user CSOs to localise. Principles of participatory, process-based and utilisation-focused evaluation are embedded in this toolkit and shown to be critical to its success, achieving high face-validity and wide applicability. The emerging contribution of this next-generation evaluation tool to other fields, such as environmental values, development and environmental sustainable development, shared values, business, education and organisational change is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Aqua-Ammonia Chiller Technologies and Field Site Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) has sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review, select, and evaluate advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia, chiller technologies. The selection criteria was that units have COP values of 0.67 or better at Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) 95 F outdoor rating conditions, an active refrigerant flow control, and a variable-speed condenser fan. These features are expected to allow these units to operate at higher ambient temperatures (up to the maximum operating temperature of 110 F) with minimal degradation in performance. ORNL evaluated three potential manufacturers of advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia chillers-Robur, Ambian, and Cooling Technologies. Unfortunately, Robur did not meet the COP requirements and Cooling Technologies could not deliver a unit to be tested at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-ORNL environmental chamber testing facility for thermally activated heat pumps. This eliminated these two technologies from further consideration, leaving only the Ambian chillers for evaluation. Two Ambian chillers were evaluated at the DOE-ORNL test facility. Overall these chillers operated well over a wide range of ambient conditions with minimal degradation in performance due to several control strategies used such as a variable speed condenser fan, a modulating burner, and active refrigerant flow control. These Ambian pre-commercial units were selected for installation and field testing at three federal facilities. NFESC worked with ORNL to assist with the site selection for installation and evaluation of these chillers. Two sites (ORNL and Naval Surface Warfare Center [NSWC] Corona) had a single chiller unit installed; and at one site (Naval Amphibious Base [NAB] Little Creek), two 5-ton chillers linked together were installed to provide 10 tons of cooling. A chiller link controller developed under this project was evaluated in the field test at Little Creek.

  10. Two Mechanisms Produce Mutation Hotspots at DNA Breaks in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Shee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutation hotspots and showers occur across phylogeny and profoundly influence genome evolution, yet the mechanisms that produce hotspots remain obscure. We report that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs provoke mutation hotspots via stress-induced mutation in Escherichia coli. With tet reporters placed 2 kb to 2 Mb (half the genome away from an I-SceI site, RpoS/DinB-dependent mutations occur maximally within the first 2 kb and decrease logarithmically to ∼60 kb. A weak mutation tail extends to 1 Mb. Hotspotting occurs independently of I-site/tet-reporter-pair position in the genome, upstream and downstream in the replication path. RecD, which allows RecBCD DSB-exonuclease activity, is required for strong local but not long-distance hotspotting, indicating that double-strand resection and gap-filling synthesis underlie local hotspotting, and newly illuminating DSB resection in vivo. Hotspotting near DSBs opens the possibility that specific genomic regions could be targeted for mutagenesis, and could also promote concerted evolution (coincident mutations within genes/gene clusters, an important issue in the evolution of protein functions.

  11. Advanced in-production hotspot prediction and monitoring with micro-topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, P.; Hasan, T.; Lakcher, A.; Le-Gratiet, B.; Prentice, C.; Simiz, J.-G.; La Greca, R.; Depre, L.; Hunsche, S.

    2017-03-01

    At 28nm technology node and below, hot spot prediction and process window control across production wafers have become increasingly critical to prevent hotspots from becoming yield-limiting defects. We previously established proof of concept for a systematic approach to identify the most critical pattern locations, i.e. hotspots, in a reticle layout by computational lithography and combining process window characteristics of these patterns with across-wafer process variation data to predict where hotspots may become yield impacting defects [1,2]. The current paper establishes the impact of micro-topography on a 28nm metal layer, and its correlation with hotspot best focus variations across a production chip layout. Detailed topography measurements are obtained from an offline tool, and pattern-dependent best focus (BF) shifts are determined from litho simulations that include mask-3D effects. We also establish hotspot metrology and defect verification by SEM image contour extraction and contour analysis. This enables detection of catastrophic defects as well as quantitative characterization of pattern variability, i.e. local and global CD uniformity, across a wafer to establish hotspot defect and variability maps. Finally, we combine defect prediction and verification capabilities for process monitoring by on-product, guided hotspot metrology, i.e. with sampling locations being determined from the defect prediction model and achieved prediction accuracy (capture rate) around 75%

  12. Factors influencing recombination frequency and distribution in a human meiotic crossover hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffreys, Alec J; Neumann, Rita

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination events within human crossover hotspots. We now describe the detailed analysis of sperm recombination in the NID1 hotspot. Like the neighbouring MS32 hotspot, the NID1 hotspot is associated with a minisatellite, suggesting that hotspots predispose DNA to tandem repetition. Unlike MS32, crossover resolution breakpoints in NID1 avoid the minisatellite, producing a cold spot within the hotspot. This avoidance may be related to the palindromic nature of the minisatellite interfering with the generation and/or processing of recombination intermediates. The NID1 hotspot also contains a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) close to the centre, which appears to directly influence the frequency of crossover initiation. Quantitative gene conversion assays show that this SNP affects the frequency of gene conversion and crossover to a very similar extent, providing evidence that conversions and crossovers are triggered by the same recombination initiating events. The recombination-suppressing allele is over-transmitted to recombinant progeny, and provides the most dramatic example to date of recombination-mediated meiotic drive, of a magnitude sufficient to virtually guarantee that the recombination suppressor will eventually replace the more active allele in human populations.

  13. Shock response of single crystal and nanocrystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate: Implications to hotspot formation in energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y; Zhao, F P; An, Q; Wu, H A; Goddard, W A; Luo, S N

    2013-10-28

    We investigate shock response of single crystal and nanocrystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with a coarse-grained model and molecular dynamics simulations, as regards mechanical hotspot formation in the absence or presence of grain boundaries (GBs). Single crystals with different orientations, and columnar nanocrystalline PETN with regular hexagonal, irregular hexagonal, and random GB patterns, are subjected to shock loading at different shock strengths. In single crystals, shock-induced plasticity is consistent with resolved shear stress calculations and the steric hindrance model, and this deformation leads to local heating. For regular-shaped hexagonal columnar nanocrystalline PETN, different misorientation angles lead to activation of different/same slip systems, different deformation in individual grains and as a whole, different GB friction, different temperature distributions, and then, different hotspot characteristics. Compared to their regular-shaped hexagonal counterpart, nanocrystalline PETN with irregular hexagonal GB pattern and that with random GBs, show deformation and hotspot features specific to their GBs. Driven by stress concentration, hotspot formation is directly related to GB friction and GB-initiated crystal plasticity, and the exact deformation is dictated by grain orientations and resolved shear stresses. GB friction alone can induce hotspots, but the hotspot temperature can be enhanced if it is coupled with GB-initiated crystal plasticity, and the slip of GB atoms has components out of the GB plane. The magnitude of shearing can correlate well with temperature, but the slip direction of GB atoms relative to GBs may play a critical role. Wave propagation through varying microstructure may also induce differences in stress states (e.g., stress concentrations) and loading rates, and thus, local temperature rise. GB-related friction and plasticity induce local heating or mechanical hotspots, which could be precursors to chemical

  14. Guidelines for the field evaluation of desert tortoise health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kristin H.; Christopher, Mary M.

    2001-01-01

    Field evaluation of free-ranging wildlife requires the systematic documentation of a variety of environmental conditions and individual parameters of health and disease, particularly in the case of rare or endangered species. In addition, defined criteria are needed for the humane salvage of ill or dying animals. The purpose of this paper is to describe, in detail, the preparation, procedures, and protocols we developed and tested for the field evaluation of wild desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii). These guidelines describe: preparations for the field, including developing familiarity with tortoise behavior and ecology, and preparation of standardized data sheets; journal notes to document background data on weather conditions, temperature, rainfall, locality, and historic and recent human activities; procedures to prevent the spread of disease and parasites; data sheets for live tortoises to record tortoise identification, location, sex, body measurements and activity; health profile forms for documenting and grading physical abnormalities of tortoise posture and movements, general condition (e.g., lethargy, cachexia), external parasites, and clinical abnormalities associated with shell and upper respiratory diseases; permanent photographic records for the retrospective analysis of progression and regression of upper respiratory and eye diseases, analysis of shell lesions and evaluation of growth and age; and indications and methods for salvaging ill or dying tortoises for necropsy evaluation. These guidelines, tested on 5,000 to 20,000 tortoises over a 10 to 27 yr period, were designed to maximize acquisition of data for demographic, ecological, health and disease research projects; to reduce handling and stress of individual animals; to avoid spread of infectious disease; to promote high quality and consistent data sets; and to reduce the duration and number of field trips. The field methods are adapted for desert tortoise life cycle, behavior, anatomy

  15. Evaluating Parametrization Protocols for Hydration Free Energy Calculations with the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Richard T; Essex, Jonathan W

    2016-08-09

    Hydration free energy (HFE) calculations are often used to assess the performance of biomolecular force fields and the quality of assigned parameters. The AMOEBA polarizable force field moves beyond traditional pairwise additive models of electrostatics and may be expected to improve upon predictions of thermodynamic quantities such as HFEs over and above fixed-point-charge models. The recent SAMPL4 challenge evaluated the AMOEBA polarizable force field in this regard but showed substantially worse results than those using the fixed-point-charge GAFF model. Starting with a set of automatically generated AMOEBA parameters for the SAMPL4 data set, we evaluate the cumulative effects of a series of incremental improvements in parametrization protocol, including both solute and solvent model changes. Ultimately, the optimized AMOEBA parameters give a set of results that are not statistically significantly different from those of GAFF in terms of signed and unsigned error metrics. This allows us to propose a number of guidelines for new molecule parameter derivation with AMOEBA, which we expect to have benefits for a range of biomolecular simulation applications such as protein-ligand binding studies.

  16. Evaluation of field triage decision scheme educational resources: audience research with emergency medical service personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Eckstein, Daniel; Zambon, Allison

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to encourage appropriate field triage procedures, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma, convened the National Expert Panel on Field Triage to update the Field Triage Decision Scheme: The National Trauma Triage Protocol (Decision Scheme). In support of the Decision Scheme, CDC developed educational resources for emergency medical service (EMS) professionals, one of CDC's first efforts to develop and broadly disseminate educational information for the EMS community. CDC wanted to systematically collect information from the EMS community on what worked and what did not with respect to these educational materials and which materials were of most use. An evaluation was conducted to obtain feedback from EMS professionals about the Decision Scheme and use of Decision Scheme educational materials. The evaluation included a survey and a series of focus groups. Findings indicate that a segment of the Decision Scheme's intended audience is using the materials and learning from them, and they have had a positive influence on their triage practices. However, many of the individuals who participated in this research are not using the Decision Scheme and indicated that the materials have not affected their triage practices. Findings presented in this article can be used to inform development and distribution of additional Decision Scheme educational resources to ensure they reach a greater proportion of EMS professionals and to inform other education and dissemination efforts with the EMS community.

  17. Evaluation of Formation Damage and Assessment of Well Productivity of Oredo Field, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotara O. Oluwagbenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Formation damage canincurconsiderable cost for remediation and deferred production. Thorough understanding of the formation damage mechanisms, stringent measures for its control and prevention, and effective and efficient treatments are the keys for optimum production strategies for oil and gas fields. WELL 4X was investigated in this study to properly diagnosed and evaluate productivity in OREDO FIELD and Bottom Hole Pressure survey was used from Bottom Hole Pressure analysis in addition to the information of the well production history and reservoir data available to determine and assess the extent of the formation damage in the well. The WELL 4X was stimulated using Acid Foam Diversion Techniques to enhance reservoir productivity and increase economic operations. The stimulation job done on the well showed a peak increase of production from 850 bbl/day to 3200 b/d before it declined to 2150 bbl/day, and finally maintained an average stabilized rate of 2000 bbl/day. It has to be established that the treatment method on WELL 4X using Acid Foam Diversion Techniques and the Bottom Hole Pressure survey conducted on the WELL 4X in OREDO FIELD is found to be efficient in the determination and evaluation of formation damage.

  18. Evaluation of Scattered Wave and Stress Concentration Field in a Damaged Solder Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineva, P.; Gross, D.; Rangelov, T.

    1999-06-01

    Two different, but equally important problems for solder joint reliability are solved. The evaluation of the dynamic stress concentration field in the thin base layer of a damaged solder joint is the first one. It is considered as a rectangular plate with a central macro-crack surrounded with randomly distributed micro-cracks, subjected to uniform time-harmonic tension. The damaged solder joint state is described by the model of Gross and Zhang [1] (International Journal of Solids and Structures29, 1763-1779). The information of the stress concentration field in a damaged solder joint is important to understand the mechanisms in the base components of all electronic packages.The second problem is ultrasonic wave scattering in a solder joint damaged by micro-cracks, considered as a two-dimensional finite multi-layered system. The solution of this problem may aid the creation of the modern non-destructive evaluation method (NDEM) for a high quality control of products in electronic industry.The method of the solution of both boundary-value problems is a direct BIEM (boundary integral equation method). The numerical results obtained for a solder joint with real geometry and physical properties show how the acoustic and stress concentration fields depend on the solder joint damage state. The character of this dependence is discussed.

  19. A freshwater biodiversity hotspot under pressure - assessing threats and identifying conservation needs for ancient Lake Ohrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostoski, G.; Albrecht, C.; Trajanovski, S.; Wilke, T.

    2010-12-01

    Immediate conservation measures for world-wide freshwater resources are of eminent importance. This is particularly true for so-called ancient lakes. While these lakes are famous for being evolutionary theatres, often displaying an extraordinarily high degree of biodiversity and endemism, in many cases these biota are also experiencing extreme anthropogenic impact. Lake Ohrid, a major European biodiversity hotspot situated in a trans-frontier setting on the Balkans, is a prime example for a lake with a magnitude of narrow range endemic taxa that are under increasing anthropogenic pressure. Unfortunately, evidence for a "creeping biodiversity crisis" has accumulated over the last decades, and major socio-political changes have gone along with human-mediated environmental changes. Based on field surveys, monitoring data, published records, and expert interviews, we aimed to (1) assess threats to Lake Ohrids' (endemic) biodiversity, (2) summarize existing conservation activities and strategies, and (3) outline future conservation needs for Lake Ohrid. We compiled threats to both specific taxa (and in cases to particular species) as well as to the lake ecosystems itself. Major conservation concerns identified for Lake Ohrid are: (1) watershed impacts, (2) agriculture and forestry, (3) tourism and population growth, (4) non-indigenous species, (5) habitat alteration or loss, (6) unsustainable exploitation of fisheries, and (7) global climate change. Among the major (well-known) threats with high impact are nutrient input (particularly of phosphorus), habitat conversion and silt load. Other threats are potentially of high impact but less well known. Such threats include pollution with hazardous substances (from sources such as mines, former industries, agriculture) or climate change. We review and discuss institutional responsibilities, environmental monitoring and ecosystem management, existing parks and reserves, biodiversity and species measures, international

  20. Deagrarianisation and forest revegetation in a biodiversity hotspot on the Wild Coast, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleton, Ross; Shackleton, Charlie; Shackleton, Sheona; Gambiza, James

    2014-01-01

    Deagraianisation is a worldwide phenomenon with widespread social, ecological and economic effects yet with little consensus on the local or higher level causes. There have been contested views on the causes and consequences of deagrarianisation on South Africa's Wild Coast, which is an international biodiversity hotspot. Using GIS, household interviews and ecological sampling, we compared the perspectives of current and former cultivators as to why some have abandoned farming, whilst also tracking the uses and woody plant cover and composition of fields abandoned at different periods. The GIS analysis showed that field abandonment had been ongoing over several decades, with a decline from 12.5 % field cover in 1961 to 2.7 % in 2009. The area of forests and woodlands almost doubled in the corresponding period. There was a distinct peak in field abandonment during the time of political transition at the national level in the early 1990 s. This political change led to a decrease in government support for livestock farming, which in turn resulted in reduced animal draught power at the household and community level, and hence reduced cropping. The study showed it is largely the wealthier households that have remained in arable agriculture and that the poorer households have abandoned farming. The abandoned fields show a distinct trend of increasing woody biomass and species richness with length of time since abandonment, with approximately three woody plant species added per decade. Most local respondents dislike the increases in forest and woodland extent and density because of anxiety about wild animals causing harm to crops and even humans, and the loss of an agricultural identity to livelihoods and the landscape.

  1. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-03

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime.

  2. Visualization analysis of research hotspots based on CiteSpace II: taking medical devices as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dong-Dong Liu, Sheng-Lin Liu, Jia-Hua Zhang Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China Abstract: Biomedical engineering has been one of the hottest fields in biology and engineering. As an important branch, the medical device has achieved significant progress in the past decades. As a useful method in evaluative bibliometrics, mapping knowledge has been used to explore the trend of one field. In the present study, we retrieve literatures about the medical device from the Web of Science™ (2004–2013, and acquire 26,793 related records, then analyze time range, region distribution, and main research directions of the literatures, and try to use keywords combined with mapping knowledge to explore the main trends of the medical device, and then aim to provide more information for medical device research. Through the study, we discover: 1 the publications regarding medical devices show an upward trend over the past decade in general; 2 the percentage of publications in the USA (38.49% is the highest all over the world; 3 engineering (20.64% is the hottest research direction, and takes up about one-fifth of the total publications; 4 the Journal of the American Medical Association and The New England Journal of Medicine are among the two journals that are the most highly cited, followed by Science and The Lancet; and 5 keywords of the medical device include in vitro, quality-of-life, outcomes, management, mortality, depression, and so on. With the help of mapping knowledge, we dig out some hot topics of medical devices and provide more information through trend analysis, and we discover that our findings are related to previous research and further research can enlarge the number of records and optimize the algorithm. We provide a systematic approach for researchers to keep abreast of the development and state of the research of

  3. Wave Energy Assessment and Performance Estimation of State of the Art Wave Energy Converters in Italian Hotspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vannucchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment of offshore wave energy potential at the scale of the whole Mediterranean Sea. The offshore wave data were propagated, by means of numerical modeling, toward four Italian coastal areas, namely stretches of coast of Tuscany, Liguria, Sardinia and Sicily. For each area, the wave power and the monthly, seasonal and annual variability at water depths of 50 m and 15 m were analyzed and hotspots were located. The results show strong variability of the wave energy potential from point to point of the same area thus highlighting the need for spatially detailed analysis. The higher values of wave energy potential are located in the hotspots of Sardinia and Sicily, at 11.4 kW/m and 9.1 kW/m, respectively. The Tuscany and the Liguria hotspots are characterized, respectively, by 4.7 kW/m and 2.0 kW/m. In order to point out which state of the art WEC is best suited for the Italian areas, the performances of six different state of the art Wave Energy Converters (WECs were evaluated. Finally, a comparison of the performances of each WEC in the selected Italian sites and in some European (EU oceanic sites was conducted. The energy potential in the most energetic EU oceanic site, among those here investigated, is up to 38-times greater than the potentials in the studied Italian areas but the power output, of the best WEC technology, is no more than nine times greater.

  4. Evaluation of Mode Field Diameter of Step-Index Fibers and Comparison Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available After detailed reviews of the exact mode field distribution of Single Mode Step-Index (SMSI fibers and relevant definitions of Mode Field Diameter (MFD and a careful comparison between them, a new approximate equation to calculate the mode field diameter is presented in this study. This equation is more accurate and flexible to determine MFD of Peterman I than Gaussian spot size with that of 1/e and Marcuse empirical equation, and what’s more, have a analytic solution of its inverse problem that can be used to directly calculate normalized frequency, Numerical Aperture (NA and the cut-off wavelength. In order to evaluate the new equation, a beam propagation method that simulates the distribution of fundamental mode field is adopted. Numerical simulation results indicate that the new equation is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The new approximation function of MFD is a high level functional equation for the theoretical study of the characteristics of the single-mode fibers and construction of new special fibers.

  5. Evaluation of sound fields in a concert hall involving scattered reflections applying the subjective preference theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumura, Yukio

    2003-08-01

    Convex tilted rear walls in a stage enclosure, an array of circular columns installed in front of walls, and triangular reflectors above the stage were newly adopted as scattering obstacles in an acoustic design of Tsuyama Music Cultural Hall, called ``Bell Fole‸t Tsuyama.'' The fundamental shape of the hall was designed using the theory of subjective preference. To calculate the effects of scattered reflections on a sound field in a real concert hall is extremely laborious. For this reason, the evaluation of effects of scattered reflections on the sound field in the hall was made experimentally by use of a 110 acoustical scale. After construction of the hall, therefore, sound fields of the hall, which involves scattered reflections caused by the tilted convex rear, by the array of circular columns, and by the triangular reflectors, were measured using four orthogonal physical factors (LL, Δt1, Tsub, IACC) described in the theory and the acoustical character of these scattering obstacles was clarified. Results clearly showed that these new attempts on scattered reflections substantially improved the quality of the sound field in the hall. Thesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from Yukio Suzumura. E-mail address: ysuzu11@lapis.plala.or.jp

  6. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  7. Beyond 'flood hotspots': co-production of knowledge between academia and stakeholders for improved resilience of emergency response to flood disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D.; Green, D. L.; Wilby, R.; Pattison, I.; Yang, L.; Bosher, L.; Ryley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Emergency responders such as the Fire & Rescue and Ambulance Services often face the challenging task of having to respond to or operate in dynamic weather conditions, including floods. In the UK, in order to meet government legislation and improve resilience of their operation, emergency responders, coordinated by Local Resilience Forums actively seek to identify areas which are most vulnerable to flooding, as well as the potential impacts of flood events on the critical infrastructure nodes and networks upon which their operations rely. This has been facilitated by the recent advances in flood modelling which provides country-wide publicly accessible flood risk mapping. Whilst in the possession of a wealth of data and abundant local knowledge, emergency responders often find it challenging to apply existing flood 'hotspot' data to assist strategic planning and operational response. This abstract describes a recently completed project funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council, which combined an interdisciplinary team of researchers based at Loughborough University with a group of project partners working in the field of flood resilience within the City of Leicester, UK, to evaluate the resilience of emergency response during extreme flood events. One key piece of work which stakeholders found useful and effective was the accessibility of the city to emergency responders during extreme flooding. The figure below maps the areas of the City accessible within 8 minutes, the response time required for serious, high-priority incidents by legislation, for the Fire & Rescue Service stations under a 1 in 20 year pluvial flood event. This goes beyond what the stakeholders are already aware of in terms of direct impacts of flooding, i.e. the 'hotspot' areas which would directly become inundated, and highlights the indirect, cascading impacts of flood events of different magnitudes on emergency response times at the city-scale. This also provides stakeholders with

  8. Field Evaluation of the System Identification Approach for Tension Estimation of External Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hyun Noh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of external tendons are considered to verify the applicability of tension estimation method based on the finite element model with system identification technique. The proposed method is applied to estimate the tension of benchmark numerical example, model structure, and field structure. The numerical and experimental results show that the existing methods such as taut string theory and linear regression method show large error in the estimated tension when the condition of external tendon is different with the basic assumption used during the derivation of relationship between tension and natural frequency. However, the proposed method gives reasonable results for all of the considered external tendons in this study. Furthermore, the proposed method can evaluate the accuracy of estimated tension indirectly by comparing the measured and calculated natural frequencies. Therefore, the proposed method can be effectively used for field application of various types of external tendons.

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation of Attitude and Orbit Estimation Using Actual Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie K.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2000-01-01

    A single, augmented Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), which simultaneously and autonomously estimates spacecraft attitude and orbit has been developed and successfully tested with real magnetometer and gyro data only. Because the earth magnetic field is a function of time and position, and because time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computed and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both orbit and attitude errors. Thus, conceivably these differences could be used to estimate both orbit and attitude; an observability study validated this assumption. The results of testing the EKF with actual magnetometer and gyro data, from four satellites supported by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center, are presented and evaluated. They confirm the assumption that a single EKF can estimate both attitude and orbit when using gyros and magnetometers only.

  10. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  11. The sex attractant pheromone of the oak processionary, Thaumetopoea processionea a field evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, M; Kontzog, H G; De Loof, A

    2003-01-01

    The sex pheromone of Thaumetopoea processionea has recently been described as a mixture of different isomers with (Z,Z)-11,13-hexadecadien-1-yl acetate as the major active compound. First trials have shown that traps baited with this compound attract male moths in the field. In the present paper we evaluate the use of pheromone traps under practical aspects. The traps can be very well applied to monitor the pest, but the devices have to be installed in the upper crown of the oak trees. It is possible to determine the seasonal flight pattern of the moths. Results of field trials in Germany suggest that the traps can be used to roughly estimate the degree of infestation.

  12. Goal functional evaluations for phase-field fracture using PU-based DWR mesh adaptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a posteriori error estimation and goal-oriented mesh adaptivity are developed for phase-field fracture propagation. Goal functionals are computed with the dual-weighted residual (DWR) method, which is realized by a recently introduced novel localization technique based on a partition-of-unity (PU). This technique is straightforward to apply since the weak residual is used. The influence of neighboring cells is gathered by the PU. Consequently, neither strong residuals nor jumps over element edges are required. Therefore, this approach facilitates the application of the DWR method to coupled (nonlinear) multiphysics problems such as fracture propagation. These developments then allow for a systematic investigation of the discretization error for certain quantities of interest. Specifically, our focus on the relationship between the phase-field regularization and the spatial discretization parameter in terms of goal functional evaluations is novel.

  13. Locality and Efficient Evaluation of Lattice Composite Fields: Overlap-Based Gauge Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel general approach to locality of lattice composite fields, which in case of QCD involves locality in both quark and gauge degrees of freedom. The method is applied to gauge operators based on the overlap Dirac matrix elements, showing for the first time their local nature on realistic path-integral backgrounds. The framework entails a method for efficient evaluation of such non-ultralocal operators, whose computational cost is volume-indepenent at fixed accuracy, and only grows logarithmically as this accuracy approaches zero. This makes computation of useful operators, such as overlap-based topological density, practical. The key notion underlying these features is that of exponential insensitivity to distant fields, made rigorous by introducing the procedure of statistical regularization. The scales associated with insensitivity property are useful characteristics of non-local continuum operators.

  14. New device for corrosion monitoring and flow effect evaluation in oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigual, Yobiris; Hernandez, Samuel; Biomorgi, Jose [PDVSA-INTEVEP. Departamento de Tecnologia de Infraestructura, Apartado 76343, Caracas 1070A (Venezuela)

    2004-07-01

    The monitoring and control of corrosion represent high interest in oil industry to keep the physical installations and prevent future corrosion-related failures. Efficiency and efficacy of the action assigned to reduce these problems are supported by an exhaustive evaluation of corrosion processes. In the Venezuelan oil industry, different techniques of corrosion monitoring have been used as for example weight loss coupons, electrochemical techniques, etc, with the purpose of estimate the useful lifetime of numerous components used in the industry. At the same time, laboratory techniques have been used at static or dynamic conditions, to evaluate the corrosiveness of the different fluids. Because of these techniques have shown certain limitations for field studies, where the flow patterns play an important role; it is necessary to develop new methodologies that allow to take into the account of the fluid dynamics. influence The objective of this work is to show a device, which permit to evaluate the internal corrosion under field operational conditions. This monitoring device consists in a spool placed between pipelines. The inner diameter of the spool is larger compare with the inner diameter of the line. Several teflon rings can be used to allowed the use of different kinds of corrosion specimens and keep the inner diameter of the pipe connected before and after the spool. The specimens (weight loss coupons that permit to carry out further pitting studies) are placed inside the teflon rings in order to evaluate the corrosion process and flow dynamics effect on the material of interest. The utilization of the Online Corrosion Evaluation System (SECLI by the spanish initials) allowed a deep evaluation of the fluid corrosiveness and the corrosion mechanism characterization. In fact, a comparison between two different inner diameter device (4 inches and 6 inches) permits to establish a flow effect on some Venezuelan crude oil corrosiveness, which form a pitting

  15. Evaluation of detectors for the small field measurements used for clinical radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Miljenko

    goal of the Specific Aim 2 was to characterize a 2-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy. Different sets of measurements were performed and results compared with other detectors. The lateral response function of a single detector has been determined. Although it was the most advanced detector for the dosimetry measurements of the small field at the present time, it has been shown that certain limitations in angular dependence and the array resolution are present. The Specific Aim 3 was clinical evaluation of a 2-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of high modulation small fields in radiotherapy. Data acquisition from measurements in setup environment commonly used for quality assurance of the radiation treatments quantified the detector's energy resolution and accuracy of the profile representation with sampling frequency and gamma criterion passing rate for the absolute dose measurements. The results indicated appropriateness of the detector for the small field dosimetry. The limitation in detectors sampling resolution left the clear path for improvements in future generations of the similar detectors.

  16. The SQUIRE Guidelines: an evaluation from the field, 5 years post release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Louise; Batalden, Paul; Davidoff, Frank; Stevens, David; Ogrinc, Greg

    2015-12-01

    The Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE) Guidelines were published in 2008 to increase the completeness, precision and accuracy of published reports of systematic efforts to improve the quality, value and safety of healthcare. Since that time, the field has expanded. We asked people from the field to evaluate the Guidelines, a novel approach to a first step in revision. Evaluative design using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 29 end users and an advisory group of 18 thinkers in the field. Sampling of end users was purposive to achieve variation in work setting, geographic location, area of expertise, manuscript writing experience, healthcare improvement and research experience. Study participants reported that SQUIRE was useful in planning a healthcare improvement project, but not as helpful during writing because of redundancies, uncertainty about what was important to include and lack of clarity in items. The concept "planning the study of the intervention" (item 10) was hard for many participants to understand. Participants varied in their interpretation of the meaning of item 10b "the concept of the mechanism by which changes were expected to occur". Participants disagreed about whether iterations of an intervention should be reported. Level of experience in writing, knowledge of the science of improvement and the evolving meaning of some terms in the field are hypothesised as the reasons for these findings. The original SQUIRE Guidelines help with planning healthcare improvement work, but are perceived as complicated and unclear during writing. Key goals of the revision will be to clarify items where conflict was identified and outline the key components necessary for complete reporting of improvement work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. An Evaluation of Tropical Cyclogenesis Theories through Intercomparison of Field Experiment Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, C. N.; Hart, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The process by which tropical cyclones evolve from loosely organized convective clusters into well organized systems is still poorly understood. A number of theories have been proposed to explain this evolution based on vortex dynamics, adiabatic processes, and diabatic processes. Due to the data sparse location in which many of these systems develop, many studies of tropical cyclogenesis theory are limited to either a few case studies or are forced to rely on simulations to critically evaluate the theories. The recent PREDICT and GRIP field experiments have provided a new opportunity to examine these theories using unusually dense observations. The present study aims at using this new data in conjunction with data from previous field experiments, such as NAMMA, GATE, and TOGA COARE, to evaluate three existing theories: top-down vortex merger (Ritchie and Holland, 1997; Simpson et al., 1997), top-down shower-head (Emanuel, 1993; Bister and Emanuel, 1997), and bottom-up vortex merger (Montgomery and Enagonio, 1998; Enagonio and Montgomery, 2001). Additionally, these observations are used to briefly examine the newer marsupial framework for tropical cyclogenesis in African easterly waves (Dunkerton et al. 2009). The processes associated with each of these theories create unique signatures in wind, vorticity, potential temperature, and humidity fields. Timelines of these fields, created from composited mean dropsonde soundings, are used to determine the system-wide evolution. Further, the temporal evolution of sub-system processes, which are minimized or removed as a result of the compositing process, are identified in isobaric surface plot series. While previous studies have shown that no theory completely explains tropical cyclogenesis, it is hoped that a thorough analysis of these data sets will highlight both consistencies and inconsistencies between theory and observation.

  18. Topographic/isostatic evaluation of new-generation GOCE gravity field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, C.; Kuhn, M.; Featherstone, W. E.; GöTtl, F.

    2012-05-01

    We use gravity implied by the Earth's rock-equivalent topography (RET) and modeled isostatic compensation masses to evaluate the new global gravity field models (GGMs) from European Space Agency (ESA)'s Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite gravimetry mission. The topography is now reasonably well-known over most of the Earth's landmasses, and also where conventional GGM evaluation is prohibitive due to the lack (or unavailability) of ground-truth gravity data. We construct a spherical harmonic representation of Earth's RET to derive band-limited topography-implied gravity, and test the somewhat simplistic Airy/Heiskanen and Pratt/Hayford hypotheses of isostatic compensation, but which did not improve the agreement between gravity from the uncompensated RET and GOCE. The third-generation GOCE GGMs (based on 12 months of space gravimetry) resolve the Earth's gravity field effectively up to spherical harmonic degree ˜200-220 (˜90-100 km resolution). Such scales could not be resolved from satellites before GOCE. From the three different GOCE processing philosophies currently in use by ESA, the time-wise and direct approaches exhibit the highest sensitivity to short-scale gravity recovery, being better than the space-wise approach. Our topography-implied gravity comparisons bring evidence of improvements from GOCE to gravity field knowledge over the Himalayas, Africa, the Andes, Papua New Guinea and Antarctic regions. In attenuated form, GOCE captures topography-implied gravity signals up to degree ˜250 (˜80 km resolution), suggesting that other signals (originating, e.g., from the crust-mantle boundary and buried loads) are captured as well, which might now improve our knowledge on the Earth's lithosphere structure at previously unresolved spatial scales.

  19. Self-contained self-rescuer long term field evaluation: combined eighth and ninth phase results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-10-15

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) conduct a Long Term Field Evaluation (LTFE) program to evaluate deployed self-contained self rescuers (SCSRs). The objective of the program is to evaluate how well SCSRs endure the underground coal mining environment with regard to both physical damage and aging when they are deployed in accordance with Federal regulations (30 CFR 75.1714). This report presents findings of the combined eighth and ninth phases of the LTFE. For these phases, over four hundred SCSRs were evaluated. The units tested include the CSE SR-100, Draeger Oxy K-Plus, MSA Life-saver 60, and the OCENCO EBA 6.5. The OCENCO 20 was evaluated only in Phase 9. Testing was performed between December 2000 and April 2004. Results of the evaluation indicate that all SCSRs experience some performance degradation due to the mining environment. Observed degradation varies from elevated levels of carbon dioxide, high breathing resistance, and reduced capacity. Mechanical degradation to the SCSR components included breathing hoses, chemical beds, outer cases and seals. The LTFE tests discussed in this report are different from tests performed for SCSR certification to the requirements of 42 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 84 (42 CFR, Part 84). LTFE tests reported here are conducted to an end point, oxygen depletion, to enable comparison of the duration of new and deployed SCSRs. The method for obtaining deployed SCSRs for this evaluation was not a random selection from the deployed population of SCSRs. Although the results of these tests are useful for observing performance of the tested SCSRs, they are not representative of all deployed SCSRs. 9 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs., 3 apps.

  20. Implications of salinity pollution hotspots on agricultural production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerke, Martina; Fink, Julia; Malsy, Marcus; Voelker, Jeanette; Alcamo, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    , large metropolitan regions are initially loading hotspots and pollution, too, and prevention becomes important as point sources are dependent on sewer connection rates and treatment levels. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal distribution of salinity pollution and identifies hotspot areas as well as the dominant sources. Furthermore, impacts of water quality degradation on agricultural production and food security are quantified, which aim for a better understanding of the risks for food security caused by water quality impairment.

  1. Numerical evaluation of electromagnetic fields due to dipole antennas in the presence of stratified media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Brown, R.; Kong, J. A.; Simmons, G.

    1974-01-01

    Two numerical methods are used to evaluate the integrals that express the em fields due to dipole antennas radiating in the presence of a stratified medium. The first method is a direct integration by means of Simpson's rule. The second method is indirect and approximates the kernel of the integral by means of the fast Fourier transform. In contrast to previous analytical methods that applied only to two-layer cases the numerical methods can be used for any arbitrary number of layers with general properties.

  2. Field analytical techniques for mercury in soils technology evaluation. Topical report, November 1994--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solc, J.; Harju, J.A.; Grisanti, A.A.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the four field analytical techniques for mercury detection in soils, namely (1) an anodic stripping voltametry technique (ASV) developed and tested by General Electric Corporation; (2) a static headspace analysis (SHSA) technique developed and tested by Dr. Ralph Turner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (3) the BiMelyze{reg_sign} Mercury Immunoassay (Bio) developed and tested by BioNebraska, Inc.; and (4) a transportable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument/technique developed and tested by Spectrace, Inc.

  3. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Fracture toughness and evaluation of coating strength with an initial residual stress field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byakova, A.V.; Gorbach, V.G. [Polytechnic Institute, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-09-01

    The effect of residual elastic stresses on the geometry of cracks which arise with contact and spontaneous failure of brittle coatings made of high-strength compounds is studied. Conditions are established for the correctness of fracture toughness K{sub lc} tests with indentation of a standard Vickers pyramid as applied to surface layers with an inhomogeneous structure and an initial residual stress field. Taking account of the anisotropy of fracture toughness established by experiment a reliable approach is suggested for evaluating the brittle strength of coatings in the presence of residual stresses.

  5. Returning from the deep: Archean atmospheric fingerprints in modern hotspot lavas (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. G.; Cabral, R. A.; Rose-Koga, E. F.; Koga, K. T.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Antonelli, M. A.; Farquhar, J.; Day, J. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean plates transport surface materials, including oceanic crust and sediment, into the mantle at subduction zones. However, the fate of the subducted package--oceanic crust and sediment--in the mantle is poorly understood. A long-standing hypothesis maintains that subducted materials reside in the mantle for an extended, but unknown, period of time and are then recycled back to the Earth's surface in regions of buoyantly upwelling mantle and melted beneath hotspots. Sulfur isotopes provide an important new tool to evaluate the presence of ancient recycled materials in hotspot lavas. Widespread terrestrial mass independently fractionated sulfur (MIF-S) isotope signatures were generated exclusively through atmospheric photochemical reactions until ~2.45 Ga. In fact, the only significant reservoirs of MIF-S containing rocks documented so far are sediments and hydrothermal rocks older than ~2.45 Ga. Armed with this insight, we examined sulfur isotopes in olivine phenocrysts and olivine-hosted sulfides in lavas from the island of Mangaia, Cook Islands. Lavas from this location host unusually radiogenic Pb-isotopic compositions--referred to as a HIMU (high U/Pb) component--and this has been attributed to ancient recycled oceanic crust in the mantle source. In Cabral et al. (2013), we report MIF-S in olivine phenocrysts and olivine-hosted sulfides. The discovery of MIF-S isotopic signatures in young hotspot lavas appears to provide a "timestamp" and "signature" for preservation of subducted Archean surface materials in the mantle sourcing Mangaia lavas. We report new sulfur isotope data on olivine-hosted sulfides from the Mangaia lavas that reinforce our discovery of MIF-S anomalies reported in Cabral et al. (2013). We also report new sulfur isotopic data on Mangaia whole rock powders, and we find no evidence of MIF-S signatures. It is not yet clear why the individual Mangaia sulfides and the olivine separates have more extreme MIF-S than the whole rocks. We consider it

  6. Evaluation of the reliability of two field hockey specific sprint and dribble tests in young field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.; Elferink-Gemser, M.T.; Visscher, C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the reliability of two field hockey specific tests: the shuttle sprint and dribble test (ShuttleSDT) and the slalom sprint and dribble test (SlalomSDT). METHODS: The shuttle sprint and dribble performances of 22 young male and 12 young female field hockey players were

  7. Evaluation of the reliability of two field hockey specific sprint and dribble tests in young field hockey players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.; Elferink-Gemser, M.T.; Visscher, C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the reliability of two field hockey specific tests: the shuttle sprint and dribble test (ShuttleSDT) and the slalom sprint and dribble test (SlalomSDT). METHODS: The shuttle sprint and dribble performances of 22 young male and 12 young female field hockey players were assess

  8. Laboratory and field magnetic evaluation of the heavy metal contamination on Shilaoren Beach, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghong; Huang, Qinghui; Lemckert, Charles; Ma, Ying

    2017-02-09

    This study uses magnetic measurements to evaluate the heavy metal contamination of the surface sediments on Shilaoren Beach. The values of the laboratory magnetic measurements have a positive relationship with the concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni, As and Pb. The field magnetic parameter provides an effective and rapid method for evaluating the distribution and dispersal of heavy metal. Sediments with higher heavy metal contents generally accumulate near higher and lower tide lines on the beach, reflecting the control of waves and tides. The sewage and stormwater outlets are the primary sources of the heavy metal contamination. Variations in seasonal waves and winds affect the sediment transport and the heavy metal distribution patterns. Based on the Australian ISQG-Low sediment quality criteria, Fe, Mn and Cr generally exhibit intermediate accumulation levels, whereas Pb and Zn exhibit higher accumulation levels because of the socioeconomic status of the area surrounding the beach.

  9. Evaluation of micro-behavior of strain field in Chinese mainland with the GPS time series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Shao-qun; WANG Jia-wei; WU Yun; ZHOU Shuo-yu; SHI Shun-ying

    2006-01-01

    Based on the time series of GPS station coordinate in the international Earth reference frame (ITRF), we evaluate annual micro-behavior of strain field in Chinese mainland with the triangle method. The results show that the annual micro-behavior of strain field is divided into two parts by the north-south earthquake belt in the research region. The prevailing direction of compressive principal strain field is nearly consistent in the western region. From west to east,the direction varies from NS to NE. It is in accordance with the direction of the modern compressive principal strain field. This suggests that geologic deformation in western region was mainly caused by that India tectonic plate pushes the research region northward and the Siberia plate pushes it southward relatively. It is an inheritance of new tectonic motion. The prevailing direction of the compressive principal strain field does not exist in the eastern region .The annual biggest shear strain is different greatly in every grid-cell. The values varies from 4.13×10-8 to 7.0×10-10. By and large the annual biggest shear strain in the western region is bigger than that in the eastern region. And so is the variation between any two consecutive biggest annual shear strains in the same grid-cell. The annual surface dilatation show that in most grid-cells of the research region the surface dilatation is in compressibility, and the variation between any two consecutive annual surface dilatation in the same grid-cell is small.

  10. Results and analysis of the hot-spot temperature experiment for a cable-in-conduit conductor with thick conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Kamil; Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-12-01

    In the design of future DEMO fusion reactor a long time constant (∼23 s) is required for an emergency current dump in the toroidal field (TF) coils, e.g. in case of a quench detection. This requirement is driven mainly by imposing a limit on forces on mechanical structures, namely on the vacuum vessel. As a consequence, the superconducting cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) of the TF coil have to withstand heat dissipation lasting tens of seconds at the section where the quench started. During that time, the heat will be partially absorbed by the (massive) steel conduit and electrical insulation, thus reducing the hot-spot temperature estimated strictly from the enthalpy of the strand bundle. A dedicated experiment has been set up at CRPP to investigate the radial heat propagation and the hot-spot temperature in a CICC with a 10 mm thick steel conduit and a 2 mm thick glass epoxy outer electrical insulation. The medium size, ∅ = 18 mm, NbTi CICC was powered by the operating current of up to 10 kA. The temperature profile was monitored by 10 temperature sensors. The current dump conditions, namely the decay time constant and the quench detection delay, were varied. The experimental results show that the thick conduit significantly contributes to the overall enthalpy balance, and consequently reduces the amount of copper required for the quench protection in superconducting cables for fusion reactors.

  11. Forest cockchafer larvae as methane production hotspots in soils and their importance for net soil methane fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Murphy, Paul; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Certain groups of soil invertebrates, namely scarab beetles and millipedes, are capable of emitting considerable amounts of methane due to methanogens inhabiting their gut system. It was already pointed out in the early 1990's, that these groups of invertebrates may represent a globally important source of methane. However, apart from termites, the importance of invertebrates for the soil methane budget is still unknown. Here, we present preliminary results of a laboratory soil incubation experiment elucidating the influence of forest cockchafer larvae (Melolontha hippocastani FABRICIUS) on soil methane cycling. In January/February 2016, two soils from two different management systems - one from a pine forest (extensive use) and one from a vegetable field (intensive use) - were incubated for 56 days either with or without beetle larvae. Net soil methane fluxes and larvae methane emissions together with their stable carbon isotope signatures were quantified at regular intervals to estimate gross methane production and gross methane oxidation in the soils. The results of this experiment will contribute to testing the hypothesis of whether methane production hotspots can significantly enhance the methane oxidation capacity of soils. Forest cockchafer larvae are only found in well-aerated sandy soils where one would usually not suspect relevant gross methane production. Thus, besides quantifying their contribution to net soil methane fluxes, they are also ideal organisms to study the effect of methane production hotspots on overall soil methane cycling. Funding support: Reintegration grant of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) (#57185798).

  12. 40 CFR 93.123 - Procedures for determining localized CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ratio of future to current traffic and the ratio of future to current emission factors. (3) Hot-spot... CO, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations (hot-spot analysis). 93.123 Section 93.123 Protection of... concentrations (hot-spot analysis). (a) CO hot-spot analysis. (1) The demonstrations required by §...

  13. Application of PCARES in locating the soil erosion Hotspots in the Manupali River Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Paningbatan, E.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation the author covers: GIS mapping of land attributes, dynamic modeling of soil erosion at watershed scale using PCARES (Predicting Catchment Runoff and Soil Erosion for Sustainability), identifying soil erosion "hotspots" in the Manupali River watershed

  14. Transcription factor cooperativity in early adipogenic hotspots and super-enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Rabiee, Atefeh; Nielsen, Ronni;

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that transcription factors operate in complex networks through thousands of genomic binding sites, many of which bind several transcription factors. However, the extent and mechanisms of crosstalk between transcription factors at these hotspots remain unclear....... Using a combination of advanced proteomics and genomics approaches, we identify ∼12,000 transcription factor hotspots (∼400 bp) in the early phase of adipogenesis, and we find evidence of both simultaneous and sequential binding of transcription factors at these regions. We demonstrate that hotspots...... are highly enriched in large super-enhancer regions (several kilobases), which drive the early adipogenic reprogramming of gene expression. Our results indicate that cooperativity between transcription factors at the level of hotspots as well as super-enhancers is very important for enhancer activity...

  15. Poverty, livelihoods and the conservation of nature in biodiversity hotspots around the world

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bouma, J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of poverty in biodiversity hotspots around the world has given rise to a debate about the potential of integrated development-conservation approaches to help alleviate poverty and protect biodiversity at the same time...

  16. Orchid conservation in the biodiversity hotspot of southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T; Fan, XuLi; Yu, DongLi; Yang, HongPei; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    Xishuangbanna is on the northern margins of tropical Asia in southwestern China and has the largest area of tropical forest remaining in the country. It is in the Indo-Burma hotspot and contains 16% of China's vascular flora in China. Species richness was highest at 1000-1200 m elevation. Three orchid species were assessed as possibly extinct in the wild, 15 as critically endangered, 82 as endangered, 124 as vulnerable, 186 as least concern, and 16 as data deficient. Declines over 20 years in harvested species suggested over-collection was the major threat, and utility value (i.e., medicinal or ornamental value) was significantly related to endangerment. Expansion of rubber tree plantations was less of a threat to orchids than to other taxa because only 75 orchid species (17.6%) occurred below the 1000-m-elevation ceiling for rubber cultivation, and most of these (46) occurred in nature reserves. However, climate change is projected to lift this ceiling to around 1300 m by 2050, and the limited area at higher elevations reduces the potential for upslope range expansion. The Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden is committed to achieving zero plant extinctions in Xishuangbanna, and orchids are a high priority. Appropriate in and ex situ conservation strategies, including new protected areas and seed banking, have been developed for every threatened orchid species and are being implemented.

  17. Isotopic identification of nitrogen hotspots across natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N influences local biological processes, ecosystem productivity, the composition of the atmospheric-climate system, and the human endeavour as a whole. Here we use natural variations in N isotopes, coupled with two models, to trace global pathways of N loss from the land to the water and atmosphere. We show that denitrification accounts for approximately 35 % of total N losses from the natural soil, with NO, N2O, and N2 fluxes equal to 15.7 ± 4.7 Tg N yr−1, 10.2 ± 3.0 Tg N yr−1, and 21.0 ± 6.1 Tg N yr−1, respectively. Our analysis points to tropical regions as the major "hotspot" of nitrogen export from the terrestrial biosphere, accounting for 71 % of global N losses from the natural land surface. The poorly studied Congo Basin is further identified as one of the major natural sources of atmospheric N2O. Extra-tropical areas, by contrast, lose a greater fraction of N via leaching pathways (~77 % of total N losses than do tropical biomes, likely contributing to N limitations of CO2 uptake at higher latitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on global models of the N cycle among different regions of the unfertilized biosphere.

  18. Conservation businesses and conservation planning in a biological diversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minin, Enrico; Macmillan, Douglas Craig; Goodman, Peter Styan; Escott, Boyd; Slotow, Rob; Moilanen, Atte

    2013-08-01

    The allocation of land to biological diversity conservation competes with other land uses and the needs of society for development, food, and extraction of natural resources. Trade-offs between biological diversity conservation and alternative land uses are unavoidable, given the realities of limited conservation resources and the competing demands of society. We developed a conservation-planning assessment for the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biological diversity hotspot. Our objective was to enhance biological diversity protection while promoting sustainable development and providing spatial guidance in the resolution of potential policy conflicts over priority areas for conservation at risk of transformation. The conservation-planning assessment combined spatial-distribution models for 646 conservation features, spatial economic-return models for 28 alternative land uses, and spatial maps for 4 threats. Nature-based tourism businesses were competitive with other land uses and could provide revenues of >US$60 million/year to local stakeholders and simultaneously help meeting conservation goals for almost half the conservation features in the planning region. Accounting for opportunity costs substantially decreased conflicts between biological diversity, agricultural use, commercial forestry, and mining. Accounting for economic benefits arising from conservation and reducing potential policy conflicts with alternative plans for development can provide opportunities for successful strategies that combine conservation and sustainable development and facilitate conservation action. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Atmospheric gravity waves in the Red Sea: a new hotspot

    KAUST Repository

    Magalhaes, J. M.

    2011-02-03

    The region of the Middle East around the Red Sea (between 32° E and 44° E longitude and 12° N and 28° N latitude) is a currently undocumented hotspot for atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence that this region is prone to relatively high occurrence of AGWs compared to other areas in the world, and reveals the spatial characteristics of these waves. The favorable conditions for wave propagation in this region are illustrated with three typical cases of AGWs propagating in the lower troposphere over the sea. Using weakly nonlinear long wave theory and the observed characteristic wavelengths we obtain phase speeds which are consistent with those observed and typical for AGWs, with the Korteweg-de Vries theory performing slightly better than Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono theory as far as phase speeds are concerned. ERS-SAR and Envisat-ASAR satellite data analysis between 1993 and 2008 reveals signatures consistent with horizontally propagating large-scale internal waves. These signatures cover the entire Red Sea and are more frequently observed between April and September, although they also occur during the rest of the year. The region\\'s (seasonal) propagation conditions for AGWs, based upon average vertical atmospheric stratification profiles suggest that many of the signatures identified in the satellite images are atmospheric internal waves. © Author(s) 2011.

  20. Regulatory hotspots in the malaria parasite genome dictate transcriptional variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Gonzales

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of transcriptional regulation in malaria parasites remain elusive. The presence of a well-characterized gene expression cascade shared by different Plasmodium falciparum strains could imply that transcriptional regulation and its natural variation do not contribute significantly to the evolution of parasite drug resistance. To clarify the role of transcriptional variation as a source of stain-specific diversity in the most deadly malaria species and to find genetic loci that dictate variations in gene expression, we examined genome-wide expression level polymorphisms (ELPs in a genetic cross between phenotypically distinct parasite clones. Significant variation in gene expression is observed through direct co-hybridizations of RNA from different P. falciparum clones. Nearly 18% of genes were regulated by a significant expression quantitative trait locus. The genetic determinants of most of these ELPs resided in hotspots that are physically distant from their targets. The most prominent regulatory locus, influencing 269 transcripts, coincided with a Chromosome 5 amplification event carrying the drug resistance gene, pfmdr1, and 13 other genes. Drug selection pressure in the Dd2 parental clone lineage led not only to a copy number change in the pfmdr1 gene but also to an increased copy number of putative neighboring regulatory factors that, in turn, broadly influence the transcriptional network. Previously unrecognized transcriptional variation, controlled by polymorphic regulatory genes and possibly master regulators within large copy number variants, contributes to sweeping phenotypic evolution in drug-resistant malaria parasites.

  1. Hotspots of human nutrition: Micronutrient supply, demand, and pollinator dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombeck, E.; Chaplin-Kramer, R.; Mueller, M.; Mueller, N. D.; Foley, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    While our caloric needs can mostly be met by wind-pollinated crops such as cereals, a recent analysis of USDA data shows that animal-pollinated crops contain the vast majority of many essential nutrients, including vitamins A and C, calcium, fluoride, and folic acid. In this work we combined global crop yield data with data on nutritional content in each crop to map nutrient production around the world, and to illustrate the value of pollination services to human nutrition. Spatially explicit crop yields (at 5 min resolution) were multiplied by crop nutrient content and by crop dependence on pollination to map where reductions in total nutrient production would occur if pollination services were removed. Nutrient demand maps (human nutrient requirements multiplied by population density) were generated to identify regions where local reduction in pollination services could threaten nutritional security. Nutrient deficiency maps (nutrient supply minus nutrient demand) were also created to identify hotspots where local crop production is not adequate to meet local nutritional needs.

  2. Pervasive defaunation of forest remnants in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo R Canale

    Full Text Available Tropical deforestation and forest fragmentation are among the most important biodiversity conservation issues worldwide, yet local extinctions of millions of animal and plant populations stranded in unprotected forest remnants remain poorly explained. Here, we report unprecedented rates of local extinctions of medium to large-bodied mammals in one of the world's most important tropical biodiversity hotspots. We scrutinized 8,846 person-years of local knowledge to derive patch occupancy data for 18 mammal species within 196 forest patches across a 252,669-km(2 study region of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We uncovered a staggering rate of local extinctions in the mammal fauna, with only 767 from a possible 3,528 populations still persisting. On average, forest patches retained 3.9 out of 18 potential species occupancies, and geographic ranges had contracted to 0-14.4% of their former distributions, including five large-bodied species that had been extirpated at a regional scale. Forest fragments were highly accessible to hunters and exposed to edge effects and fires, thereby severely diminishing the predictive power of species-area relationships, with the power model explaining only ~9% of the variation in species richness per patch. Hence, conventional species-area curves provided over-optimistic estimates of species persistence in that most forest fragments had lost species at a much faster rate than predicted by habitat loss alone.

  3. Pervasive defaunation of forest remnants in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Gustavo R; Peres, Carlos A; Guidorizzi, Carlos E; Gatto, Cassiano A Ferreira; Kierulff, Maria Cecília M

    2012-01-01

    Tropical deforestation and forest fragmentation are among the most important biodiversity conservation issues worldwide, yet local extinctions of millions of animal and plant populations stranded in unprotected forest remnants remain poorly explained. Here, we report unprecedented rates of local extinctions of medium to large-bodied mammals in one of the world's most important tropical biodiversity hotspots. We scrutinized 8,846 person-years of local knowledge to derive patch occupancy data for 18 mammal species within 196 forest patches across a 252,669-km(2) study region of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We uncovered a staggering rate of local extinctions in the mammal fauna, with only 767 from a possible 3,528 populations still persisting. On average, forest patches retained 3.9 out of 18 potential species occupancies, and geographic ranges had contracted to 0-14.4% of their former distributions, including five large-bodied species that had been extirpated at a regional scale. Forest fragments were highly accessible to hunters and exposed to edge effects and fires, thereby severely diminishing the predictive power of species-area relationships, with the power model explaining only ~9% of the variation in species richness per patch. Hence, conventional species-area curves provided over-optimistic estimates of species persistence in that most forest fragments had lost species at a much faster rate than predicted by habitat loss alone.

  4. Incorporating evolutionary history into conservation planning in biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerki, Sven; Callmander, Martin W; Bachman, Steven; Moat, Justin; Labat, Jean-Noël; Forest, Félix

    2015-02-19

    There is increased evidence that incorporating evolutionary history directly in conservation actions is beneficial, particularly given the likelihood that extinction is not random and that phylogenetic diversity (PD) is lost at higher rates than species diversity. This evidence is even more compelling in biodiversity hotspots, such as Madagascar, where less than 10% of the original vegetation remains. Here, we use the Leguminosae, an ecologically and economically important plant family, and a combination of phylogenetics and species distribution modelling, to assess biodiversity patterns and identify regions, coevolutionary processes and ecological factors that are important in shaping this diversity, especially during the Quaternary. We show evidence that species distribution and community PD are predicted by watershed boundaries, which enable the identification of a network of refugia and dispersal corridors that were perhaps important for maintaining community integrity during past climate change. Phylogenetically clustered communities are found in the southwest of the island at low elevation and share a suite of morphological characters (especially fruit morphology) indicative of coevolution with their main dispersers, the extinct and extant lemurs. Phylogenetically over-dispersed communities are found along the eastern coast at sea level and may have resulted from many independent dispersal events from the drier and more seasonal regions of Madagascar.

  5. Isotopic identification of global nitrogen hotspots across natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N influences local biological processes, ecosystem productivity, the composition of the atmospheric-climate system, and the human endeavour as a whole. Here we use natural variations in N's isotopes, coupled with two models, to trace global pathways of N loss from the land to the water and atmosphere. We show that denitrification accounts for approximately 35% of total N losses from natural soil, with NO, N2O, and N2 fluxes equal to 15.7 ± 4.7 Tg N yr−1, 10.2 ± 3.0 Tg N yr−1, and 21.0 ± 6.1 Tg N yr−1, respectively. Our analysis points to tropical regions as the major "hotspot" of nitrogen export from the terrestrial biosphere, accounting for 71% of global N losses from the natural land surface. The poorly studied Congo basin is further identified as one of the major natural sources of atmospheric N2O. Extra-tropical areas, by contrast, lose a greater fraction of N via leaching pathways (~77% of total N losses, than do tropical biomes, likely contributing to N limitations of CO2 uptake at higher latitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on global models of the N cycle among different regions of the unmanaged biosphere.

  6. Predicting foraging hotspots for Yelkouan Shearwater in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ortega, María; İsfendiyaroğlu, Süreyya

    2017-07-01

    The Yelkouan shearwater (Puffinus yelkouan) is a vulnerable species endemic to the Mediterranean Region, but there is little information of its ecology particularly when at sea. In this study, we assessed the habitat use by Yelkouan shearwater in the Black Sea during the breeding (March-July) and non-breeding (August-February) periods of 2013, using boat-based surveys and shore-based counts. We created a species distribution model (SDM) based on the environmental variables that most accurately reflected the oceanographic habitat of this species in order to delineate foraging hotspots. Our habitat modelling analyses suggest that Yelkouan shearwaters respond to complex bio-physical coupling, as evidenced by their association with oceanographic variables. Foraging Yelkouan shearwaters mainly occurred on the western Black Sea continental shelf, indicating that Yelkouan shearwaters were foraging in shallow, cold and coastal waters. In the non-breeding period, Yelkouan Shearwater occurred beyond the Black Sea continental shelf, a wide pelagic extension of sea, indicating that shearwaters foraged in deep, warm and pelagic waters. These results are consistent with earlier studies, which identified the Black Sea as an important congregation site for Mediterranean Yelkouan shearwater populations outside the breeding season. This study demonstrates how the integration of boat-based survey data, shore-based counts and modelling can provide a wider understanding of the linkage between marine ecosystems that is mediated by marine megafauna such as pelagic seabirds.

  7. Kitobo Forest of Kenya, a unique hotspot of herpetofaunal diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick K. Malonza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpetologically, the remoteness of Kitobo forest in south-eastern Kenya has partly contributed to it remaining virtually un-explored until 2007. Three surveys were conducted in December 2007, December 2009 and April 2010 aimed at generating a comprehensive list of the forest amphibians and reptiles. Using largely timed-species count method, 13 species of amphibians representing eight families and 32 reptiles belonging to 11 families were recorded. Overall species diversity was highest during the 2007 sampling. The richness and abundance of amphibians was highest during the April 2010 sampling period when the amount of rainfall was also highest. The results of species accumulation curves of the three sampling periods did not plateau demonstrating that more species occur in this forest. Pressure on this forest fragment from the adjacent local people is high which in addition to the annual floods threatens its long-term survival. For example the distribution and abundance of some forest associated species such as the tree frogs Leptopelis flavomaculatus and Hyperolius puncticulatus appear to fluctuate with flood events and may decline in future. Considering the forest associated herpetofanua recorded, Kitobo forest is zoogeographically assignable to the East African coastal forest biodiversity hotspot. The documentation of high species richness and diversity in this small forest fragment strongly highlight its biodiversity importance and place it among the most important sites for the conservation of reptiles and amphibians in Kenya.

  8. Hotspot-mediated non-dissipative and ultrafast plasmon passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Eva-Maria; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Pupp, Claudia; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Govorov, Alexander O.; Liedl, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles hold great promise as photon handling elements and as channels for coherent transfer of energy and information in future all-optical computing devices. Coherent energy oscillations between two spatially separated plasmonic entities via a virtual middle state exemplify electron-based population transfer, but their realization requires precise nanoscale positioning of heterogeneous particles. Here, we show the assembly and optical analysis of a triple-particle system consisting of two gold nanoparticles with an inter-spaced silver island. We observe strong plasmonic coupling between the spatially separated gold particles, mediated by the connecting silver particle, with almost no dissipation of energy. As the excitation energy of the silver island exceeds that of the gold particles, only quasi-occupation of the silver transfer channel is possible. We describe this effect both with exact classical electrodynamic modelling and qualitative quantum-mechanical calculations. We identify the formation of strong hotspots between all particles as the main mechanism for the lossless coupling and thus coherent ultrafast energy transfer between the remote partners. Our findings could prove useful for quantum gate operations, as well as for classical charge and information transfer processes.

  9. Field

    OpenAIRE

    Whitworth, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates ‘Field’, a Citizenship project researching the theme of Community, run with Year 2 B.A. Primary Education students at the School of Lifelong Learning and Education, Middlesex University. It outlines the intentions behind the course and gives examples of activities undertaken and presentations made by the students. It reflects on the contribution made to an understanding and delivery of Citizenship and the impact of the course on trainees and tutors.

  10. Evaluation of PCR Systems for Field Screening of Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Colburn, Heather A.; Victry, Kristin D.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Arce, Jennifer S.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Jarman, Kristin; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2017-02-01

    There is little published data on the performance of hand-portable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) instruments that could be used by first responders to determine if a suspicious powder contains a potential biothreat agent. We evaluated five commercially available hand-portable PCR instruments for detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba). We designed a cost-effective, statistically-based test plan that allows instruments to be evaluated at performance levels ranging from 0.85-0.95 lower confidence bound (LCB) on the probability of detection (POD) at confidence levels of 80-95%. We assessed specificity using purified genomic DNA from 13 Ba strains and 18 Bacillus near neighbors, interference with 22 common hoax powders encountered in the field, and PCR inhibition when Ba spores were spiked into these powders. Our results indicated that three of the five instruments achieved >0.95 LCB on the POD with 95% confidence at test concentrations of 2,000 genome equivalents/mL (comparable to 2,000 spores/mL), displaying more than sufficient sensitivity for screening suspicious powders. These instruments exhibited no false positive results or PCR inhibition with common hoax powders, and reliably detected Ba spores spiked into common hoax powders, though some issues with instrument controls were observed. Our testing approach enables efficient instrument performance testing to a statistically rigorous and cost-effective test plan to generate performance data that will allow users to make informed decisions regarding the purchase and use of biodetection equipment in the field.

  11. Evaluation of N2—Fixing Capacites of Herbaceous and Shrub Legumes Under Field Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XJINGGUANGXI; SHISHULIAN; 等

    1998-01-01

    Natural 15N abundance method was used in this study to investigate the N2-fiing capacities of several herbaceous and shrub legumes by a field experiment,For herbaceous legumes,the results were in consistent with those obtained by a pot experiment .Crotalaria mucronata Desv.had a higher,N2-fixing capacity than Vigna sinensis(L.)Savi.For shurub legumes,N2-fixing Capacity under field condition was slightly different from that in pot experiment.These results demonstrated that the natural 15N abundance method was applicable to evaluating N2-fixing capacities of herbaceous and shrub legumes,and that pot experiment was suitable for evaluating the N2-fixing capacities of not only herbaceous legumes but also shrub legumes. Leguminous N2-fixing plants differed in response to phosphorus fertilization,Phosphorus fertilizer appication greatly increased the percentage of nitrogen derived from air (% N dfa)and total amount of N2 fixed by Lespedez formosa(Vog.)Koehne (Jiangxi),Phosphorus fertilizer showed no signifcant effect on the N2-fixing percentage of Cajanus cajan(L.)Millsp.but increased its total biomass,thus increasing the total amount of N2 fixed.

  12. Evaluation of a Portable Automated Serum Chemistry Analyzer for Field Assessment of Harlequin Ducks, Histrionicus histrionicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoskopf, Michael K; Mulcahy, Daniel M; Esler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A portable analytical chemistry analyzer was used to make field assessments of wild harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in association with telemetry studies of winter survival in Prince William Sound, Alaska. We compared serum chemistry results obtained on-site with results from a traditional laboratory. Particular attention was paid to serum glucose and potassium concentrations as potential indicators of high-risk surgical candidates based on evaluation of the field data. The median differential for glucose values (N = 82) between methods was 0.6 mmol/L (quartiles 0.3 and 0.9 mmol/L) with the median value higher when assayed on site. Analysis of potassium on site returned a median of 2.7 mmol/L (N = 88; quartiles 2.4 and 3.0 mmol/L). Serum potassium values were too low for quantitation by the traditional laboratory. Changes in several serum chemistry values following a three-day storm during the study support the value of on site evaluation of serum potassium to identify presurgical patients with increased anesthetic risk.

  13. Laboratory evaluation and field application of a water swellable polymer for fracture shutoff in injection wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, Prentice [Kinder Morgan, Houston, TX (United States); Vasquez, Julio; Eoff, Larry [Halliburton, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the laboratory evaluation and field application of a water swelling polymer (WSP) that can be bullheaded to shut off fractures in injection wells. The WSP is capable of absorbing 30 to 400 times its own weight in water. The material was evaluated for its effectiveness in providing controllable swelling rates, shutting off the flow of water in synthetic cores with simulated fractures, and providing long-term stability in H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} environments. In addition, this paper presents the field implementation of this technology along with successful case histories in west Texas. The water swellable material is mixed on the fly, entering fissures and fracture systems as they swell without invading the matrix of the rock. The rate of absorption can be controlled based on the specified particle size ranging from 600-mesh size up to 14 mm and the type of carrier fluid. This WSP presents an innovative technology for fracture, fissure, and highly eroded out permeability shutoff to improve the sweep efficiency of water and gas injection. In addition, the WSP is resistant to acid contamination and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S environments. To date, more than 200 jobs have been performed with this technology. (author)

  14. Field validation of road roughness evaluation using in-pavement strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Deng, F.; Huang, Y.; Bridgelall, R.

    2016-04-01

    Most transportation agencies now collect pavement roughness data using the inertial profilers, which requires instrumented vehicles and technicians with specialized training to interpret the results. The extensive labor requirements of the profiling activities limit data collection for portions of the national highway system to at most once per year, resulting in outdated roughness data for decision making of maintenance needs. In this paper, a real-time roughness evaluation method was developed by linking the output of durable in-pavement strain sensors to road roughness level. The durable in-pavement sensors will continuously provide information of road roughness in real time after they are installed and calibrated during the road construction until the service life of the associated pavement. Field tests validated the developed strain method by comparison with standard inertial profiling method and the connected-vehicle method. The comparison of the results from the field tests approves the effectiveness of the developed road roughness evaluation method using in-pavement strain sensors, which can be further applied practically for needed concrete pavements.

  15. CKD hotspots around the world: where, why and what the lessons are. A CKJ review series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the three causes of death that has had the highest increase in the last 20 years. The increasing CKD burden occurs in the context of lack of access of most of the world population to adequate healthcare and an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. However, CKD is not homogeneously distributed. CKD hotspots are defined as countries, region, communities or ethnicities with higher than average incidence of CKD. Analysis of CKD hotspots has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of kidney disease and to improve the life expectancy of the affected communities. Examples include ethnicities such as African Americans in the USA or Aboriginals in Australia, regions such as certain Balkan valleys or Central America and even groups of people sharing common activities or interests such as young women trying to lose weight in Belgium. The study of these CKD hotspots has identified underlying genetic factors, such as ApoL1 gene variants, environmental toxins, such as aristolochic acid and socioeconomic factors leading to nutritional deprivation and inflammation/infection. The CKD hotspots series of CKJ reviews will explore the epidemiology and causes in CKD hotspots, beginning with Australian Aboriginals in this issue. An online map of CKD hotspots around the world will feature the reviewed hotspots, highlighting known or suspected causes as well as ongoing projects to unravel the cause and providing a directory of public health officials, physicians and basic scientists involved in these efforts. Since the high prevalence of CKD in a particular region or population may only be known to local physicians, we encourage readers to propose further CKD hotspots to be reviewed.

  16. New strategy toward dioxin risk reduction for local residents surrounding severe dioxin hotspots in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Tran, Tuyet-Hanh; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Le, Vu-Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background: A public health intervention program with active involvement of local related stakeholders was piloted in the Bien Hoa dioxin hotspot (2007-2009), and then expanded to the Da Nang dioxin hotspot in Vietnam (2009-2011). It aimed to reduce the risk of dioxin exposure through foods for local residents. This article presents the results of the intervention in Da Nang.Methodology: To assess the results of this intervention program, pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitude, and pr...

  17. Sites for priority biodiversity conservation in the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    V. Anadon-Irizarry; D.C. Wege; A. Upgren; Young, R.; Boom, B; Leon, Y.M.; Y. Arias; Koenig, K.; Morales, A. L.; Burke, W.

    2012-01-01

    The Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot is exceptionally important for global biodiversity conservation due to high levels of species endemism and threat. A total of 755 Caribbean plant and vertebrate species are considered globally threatened, making it one of the top Biodiversity Hotspots in terms of threat levels. In 2009, Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) were identified for the Caribbean Islands through a regional-level analysis of accessible data and literature, followed by extensive nat...

  18. The M26 hotspot of Schizosaccharomyces pombe stimulates meiotic ectopic recombination and chromosomal rearrangements.

    OpenAIRE

    Virgin, J B; Bailey, J P

    1998-01-01

    Homologous recombination is increased during meiosis between DNA sequences at the same chromosomal position (allelic recombination) and at different chromosomal positions (ectopic recombination). Recombination hotspots are important elements in controlling meiotic allelic recombination. We have used artificially dispersed copies of the ade6 gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe to study hotspot activity in meiotic ectopic recombination. Ectopic recombination was reduced 10-1000-fold relative to a...

  19. An Orexin Hotspot in Ventral Pallidum Amplifies Hedonic ‘Liking' for Sweetness

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Chao-Yi; Berridge, Kent C

    2013-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) is implicated in stimulating appetite as well as arousal, and in both food reward and drug reward. The ventral pallidum (VP) receives orexin projections from lateral hypothalamus neurons (LH), and orexin terminals are especially dense in the posterior half of VP, which is also the location of an opioid hedonic hotspot. The VP hotspot is a roughly cubic-millimeter site where mu opioid stimulation can amplify the hedonic impact of sweetness, expressed as an increase in ‘liki...

  20. Evaluation and Field Assessment of Bifacial Photovoltaic Module Power Rating Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, Chris; MacAlpine, Sara; Marion, Bill; Toor, Fatima; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Stein, Joshua S.

    2016-11-21

    1-sun power ratings for bifacial modules are currently undefined. This is partly because there is no standard definition of rear irradiance given 1000 Wm-2 on the front. Using field measurements and simulations, we evaluate multiple deployment scenarios for bifacial modules and provide details on the amount of irradiance that could be expected. A simplified case that represents a single module deployed under conditions consistent with existing 1-sun irradiance standards leads to a bifacial reference condition of 1000 Wm-2 Gfront and 130-140 Wm-2 Grear. For fielded systems of bifacial modules, Grear magnitude and spatial uniformity will be affected by self-shade from adjacent modules, varied ground cover, and ground-clearance height. A standard measurement procedure for bifacial modules is also currently undefined. A proposed international standard is under development, which provides the motivation for this work. Here, we compare outdoor field measurements of bifacial modules with irradiance on both sides with proposed indoor test methods where irradiance is only applied to one side at a time. The indoor method has multiple advantages, including controlled and repeatable irradiance and thermal environment, along with allowing the use of conventional single-sided flash test equipment. The comparison results are promising, showing that the indoor and outdoor methods agree within 1%-2% for multiple rear-irradiance conditions and bifacial module types.

  1. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for the 10th generation of IGRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Stefan; Macmillan, Susan; Lowes, Frank; Bondar, Tatjana

    2005-12-01

    The recent satellite magnetic missions, combined with high quality ground observatory measurements, have provided excellent data for main field modelling. Four different groups submitted seven main-field and eight secular-variation candidate models for IGRF-10. These candidate models were evaluated using several different strategies. Comparing models with independent data was found to be difficult. Valuable information was gained by mapping model differences, computing root mean square differences between all pairs of models and between models and the common mean, and by studying power spectra and azimuthal distributions of coefficient power. The resulting adopted IGRF main-field model for 2005.0, an average of three selected candidate models, is estimated to have a formal root mean square error over the Earth's surface of only 5 nT, though it is likely that the actual error is somewhat larger than this. Due to the inherent uncertainty in secular variation forecasts, the corresponding error of the adopted secular-variation model for 2005.0-2010.0, an average of four selected candidate models, is estimated at 20 nT/a.

  2. Performance evaluation of SiPM photodetectors for PET imaging in the presence of magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S., E-mail: samuel@nuclear.fis.ucm.e [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L.M.; Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M.; Vaquero, J.J. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) or silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), recently introduced as a solid-state photodetector, consists of an array of Geiger-mode photodiodes (microcells). It is a promising device for PET due to its potential for high photon detection efficiency (PDE) and its foreseeable immunity to magnetic fields. It is also easy to use with simple read-outs, has a high gain and a small size. In this work we evaluate the in field performance of three 1x1 mm{sup 2} (with 100, 400 and 1600 microcells, respectively) and one 6x6 mm{sup 2} (arranged as a 2x2 array) Hamamatsu MPPCs for their use in PET imaging. We examine the dependence of the energy resolution and the gain of these devices on the temperature and reverse bias voltage, when coupled to LYSO scintillator crystals under conditions that one would find in a PET system. We find that the 400 and 1600 microcells models and the 2x2 array are suitable for small-size crystals, like those employed in high resolution small animal scanners. We have confirmed the good performance of these devices up to magnetic fields of 7 T as well as their suitability for performing PET acquisitions in the presence of fast switching gradients and high duty radiofrequency MRI sequences.

  3. PIV for the characterization of focused field induced acoustic streaming: seeding particle choice evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haj Slama, Rafika; Gilles, Bruno; Ben Chiekh, Maher; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2017-04-01

    This research evaluates the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for characterizing acoustic streaming flow generated by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). PIV qualification tests, focusing on the seeding particle size (diameter of 5, 20 and 50μm) were carried out in degassed water subjected to a focused field of 550kHz-frequency with an acoustic pressure amplitude of 5.2, 10.5 and 15.7bar at the focus. This study shows that the ultrasonic field, especially the radiation force, can strongly affect seeding particle behavior. Large particles (50μm-diameter) are repelled from the focal zone and gathered at radiation pressure convergence lines on either side of the focus. The calculation of the acoustic radiation pressure applied on these particles explains the observed phenomenon. PIV measurements do not, therefore, properly characterize the streaming flow in this case. On the contrary, small particles (5μm-diameter) velocity measurements were in good agreement with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the water velocity field. A simple criterion approximating the diameter threshold below which seeding particles are qualified for PIV in presence of focused ultrasound is then proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Simplified Polarimetric Decomposition for Soil Moisture Retrieval over Vegetated Agricultural Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongquan Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a simplified polarimetric decomposition for soil moisture retrieval over agricultural fields. In order to overcome the coherent superposition of the backscattering contributions from vegetation and underlying soils, a simplification of an existing polarimetric decomposition is proposed in this study. It aims to retrieve the soil moisture by using only the surface scattering component, once the volume scattering contribution is removed. Evaluation of the proposed simplified algorithm is performed using extensive ground measurements of soil and vegetation characteristics and the time series of UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar data collected in the framework of SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12. The retrieval process is tested and analyzed in detail for a variety of crops during the phenological stages considered in this study. The results show that the performance of soil moisture retrieval depends on both the crop types and the crop phenological stage. Soybean and pasture fields present the higher inversion rate during the considered phenological stage, while over canola and wheat fields, the soil moisture can be retrieved only partially during the crop developing stage. RMSE of 0.06–0.12 m3/m3 and an inversion rate of 26%–38% are obtained for the soil moisture retrieval based on the simplified polarimetric decomposition.

  5. Evaluation and Field Assessment of Bifacial Photovoltaic Module Power Rating Methodologies: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, Chris; MacAlpine, Sara; Marion, Bill; Toor, Fatima; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Stein, Joshua S.

    2016-06-16

    1-sun power ratings for bifacial modules are currently undefined. This is partly because there is no standard definition of rear irradiance given 1000 Wm-2 on the front. Using field measurements and simulations, we evaluate multiple deployment scenarios for bifacial modules and provide details on the amount of irradiance that could be expected. A simplified case that represents a single module deployed under conditions consistent with existing 1-sun irradiance standards leads to a bifacial reference condition of 1000 Wm-2 Gfront and 130-140 Wm-2 Grear. For fielded systems of bifacial modules, Grear magnitude and spatial uniformity will be affected by self-shade from adjacent modules, varied ground cover, and ground-clearance height. A standard measurement procedure for bifacial modules is also currently undefined. A proposed international standard is under development, which provides the motivation for this work. Here, we compare outdoor field measurements of bifacial modules with irradiance on both sides with proposed indoor test methods where irradiance is only applied to one side at a time. The indoor method has multiple advantages, including controlled and repeatable irradiance and thermal environment, along with allowing the use of conventional single-sided flash test equipment. The comparison results are promising, showing that the indoor and outdoor methods agree within 1%-2% for multiple rear-irradiance conditions and bifacial module types.

  6. Evaluation of room-scattered neutrons at the JNC Tokai neutron reference field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Tsujimura, Norio [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Oyanagi, Katsumi [Japan Radiation Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Neutron reference fields for calibrating neutron-measuring devices in JNC Tokai Works are produced by using radionuclide neutron sources, {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources. The reference field for calibration includes scattered neutrons from the material surrounding sources, wall, floor and ceiling of the irradiation room. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the scattered neutrons contribution and their energy spectra at reference points. Spectral measurements were performed with a set of Bonner multi-sphere spectrometers and the reference fields were characterized in terms of spectral composition and the fractions of room-scattered neutrons. In addition, two techniques stated in ISO 10647, the shadow-cone method and the polynomial fit method, for correcting the contributions from the room-scattered neutrons to the readings of neutron survey instruments were compared. It was found that the two methods gave an equivalent result within a deviation of 3.3% at a source-to-detector distance from 50cm to 500cm. (author)

  7. EVALUATION OF FOUR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT PACKAGES FOR CONTROLLING MAIN PESTS OF COTTON IN RAINFED FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurindah Nurindah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cotton production nationally is low due to various constraints, including pests. Two main pests commonly found in cotton plantation in rain fed fields are cotton leafhopper (Amrasca biguttula and cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera. The study aimed to evaluate four packages of integrated pest management (IPM techniques to control cotton leafhopper and cotton bollworm in rain fed fields. The experiment was conducted in farmers’ fields at Asembagus, East Java, between January and July 2012. Four packages of IPM evaluated were cotton varieties, i.e. Kanesia 10 or Kanesia 13, and seed treatment with synthetic insecticide (imidacloprid before sowing or spraying molasses (10 ml L-1 water as food for natural enemies. The cotton plants were intercropped with groundnut and sprayed with neem seed extract (NSE at the action threshold level for pest control. These packages were compared among themselves and also with the methods usually used by farmers, i.e. planting cotton variety Kanesia 8 intercropped with groundnut and pest control using synthetic chemical insecticides. Twenty five plants were sampled randomly per plot and measured for their growth, leafhopper and  bollworm populations, as well as cotton seed yield per plot. Observations were made weekly, starting at 30 days after planting (DAP until 120 DAP. The results showed that the use of Kanesia 10 or Kanesia 13 intercropped with groundnut and spraying molasses to conserve natural enemies was the best  pest management practice and superior to farmers’ practices. Conserving natural enemies is not only profitable (saving production cost of IDR1,150,000 to IDR1,500,000 ha-1 season-1, but also safe for the environment (no need to spray chemical insecticides.

  8. Evaluation of specific absorption rate as a dosimetric quantity for electromagnetic fields bioeffects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris J Panagopoulos

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. METHODS: We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. RESULTS: WE FIND THAT: a The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. CONCLUSIONS: SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar

  9. A Field Evaluation of a Prototype Global Identifier for UF6 Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), members of the U.S. national laboratories, UF6 industry stakeholders, and international inspectorates have been working on developing a global identifier (ID) for UF6 cylinders. This industry-driven project has identified efficiency gains for facility operations, state and/or regional regulation, and inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The global ID features standardized alphanumeric characters, a large font, a barcode (for automated reading), and it is affixed to the cylinder. Four years of active engagement with all of the stakeholders has resulted in on the development of user requirements, implementation guidelines, and a preferred design for the ID. Although this project was conceived and has been largely managed from the DOE/NNSA side to address international non-proliferation concerns, it remains an industry-driven initiative. When designing the field evaluation, the NNSA team worked closely with a World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI) Working Group on UF6 Cylinder Identification to determine features that would provide the most benefit. The WNTI Working Group consists predominately of industry members associated with cylinder fabrication, UF6 conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, and cylinder transport. Despite its industry-laden focus, the DOE/NNSA team realized that a vote of confidence from the IAEA could serve as a catalyst for the overall project, and its eventual implementation. In April of 2016, a field evaluation was conducted to demonstrate how the key features of the identifier would work in an operational setting. A selected team travelled to Vienna to evaluate the benefits of a global identifier in performing a PIV in a cylinder storage area containing ~50-100 cylinders. The mock tag-checking exercise was conducted three separate times, with varying scenarios with three different teams. The first group performed the exercise according

  10. Arabidopsis meiotic crossover hotspots overlap with H2A.Z nucleosomes at gene promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kelly, Krystyna A.; Venn, Oliver; Higgins, James D.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Franklin, F. Chris H.; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    PRDM9 directs human meiotic crossover hotspots to intergenic sequence motifs, whereas budding yeast hotspots overlap low nucleosome density regions in gene promoters. To investigate hotspots in plants, which lack PRDM9, we used coalescent analysis of Arabidopsis genetic variation. Crossovers increase towards gene promoters and terminators, and hotspots are associated with active chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z, histone H3K4me3, low nucleosome density and low DNA methylation. Hotspot-enriched A-rich and CTT-repeat DNA motifs occur upstream and downstream of transcriptional start respectively. Crossovers are asymmetric around promoters and highest over CTT-motifs and H2A.Z-nucleosomes. Pollen-typing, segregation and cytogenetic analysis show decreased crossovers in the arp6 H2A.Z deposition mutant, at multiple scales. During meiosis H2A.Z and DMC1/RAD51 recombinases form overlapping chromosomal foci. As arp6 reduces DMC1/RAD51 foci, H2A.Z may promote formation or processing of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. We propose that gene chromatin ancestrally designates hotspots within eukaryotes and PRDM9 is a derived state within vertebrates. PMID:24056716

  11. Persistent 'hotspots' of lymphatic filariasis microfilaraemia despite 14 years of mass drug administration in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Yikpotey, Paul; Marfo, Benjamin K; Odoom, Samuel; Mensah, Ernest O; Asiedu, Odame; Alomatu, Bright; Hervie, Edward T; Yeboah, Abednego; Ade, Serge; Hinderaker, Sven G; Reid, Anthony; Takarinda, Kudakwashe C; Koudou, Benjamin; Koroma, Joseph B

    2016-12-01

    Among the 216 districts in Ghana, 98 were declared endemic for lymphatic filariasis in 1999 after mapping. Pursuing the goal of elimination, WHO recommends annual treatment using mass drugs administration (MDA) for at least 5 years. MDA was started in the country in 2001 and reached national coverage in 2006. By 2014, 69 districts had 'stopped-MDA' (after passing the transmission assessment survey) while 29 others remained with persistent microfilaraemia (mf) prevalence (≥1%) despite more than 11 years of MDA and were classified as 'hotspots'. An ecological study was carried out to compare baseline mf prevalence and anti-microfilaria interventions between hotspot and stopped-MDA districts. Baseline mf prevalence was significantly higher in hotspots than stopped-MDA districts (p<0.001). After three years of MDA, there was a significant decrease in mf prevalence in hotspot districts, but it was still higher than in stopped-MDA districts. The number of MDA rounds was slightly higher in hotspot districts (p<0.001), but there were no differences in coverage of MDA or long-lasting-insecticide-treated nets. The main difference in hotspots and stopped-MDA districts was a high baseline mf prevalence. This finding indicates that the recommended 5-6 rounds annual treatment may not achieve interruption of transmission.

  12. Identification of hot-spot residues in protein-protein interactions by computational docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Recio Juan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of protein-protein interactions is becoming increasingly important for biotechnological and therapeutic reasons. We can define two major areas therein: the structural prediction of protein-protein binding mode, and the identification of the relevant residues for the interaction (so called 'hot-spots'. These hot-spot residues have high interest since they are considered one of the possible ways of disrupting a protein-protein interaction. Unfortunately, large-scale experimental measurement of residue contribution to the binding energy, based on alanine-scanning experiments, is costly and thus data is fairly limited. Recent computational approaches for hot-spot prediction have been reported, but they usually require the structure of the complex. Results We have applied here normalized interface propensity (NIP values derived from rigid-body docking with electrostatics and desolvation scoring for the prediction of interaction hot-spots. This parameter identifies hot-spot residues on interacting proteins with predictive rates that are comparable to other existing methods (up to 80% positive predictive value, and the advantage of not requiring any prior structural knowledge of the complex. Conclusion The NIP values derived from rigid-body docking can reliably identify a number of hot-spot residues whose contribution to the interaction arises from electrostatics and desolvation effects. Our method can propose residues to guide experiments in complexes of biological or therapeutic interest, even in cases with no available 3D structure of the complex.

  13. Technical Evaluation of Sprinkler Irrigation Systems which were Implemented in Tea Fields of the Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kourosh majdsalimi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Designing and management of sprinkler irrigation systems depend on the situation and location of its implementation and often rely on professional and long-term tests (9. Having a good irrigation system depends on knowledge of the relationship between soil, water, plants, irrigation scheduling, the required amount of irrigation water to the water-holding capacity of soil, climate and plant growth (6.The less use of sprinkler irrigation systems and less performed research projects in the Guilan province, lack of correct design parameters due to shortage of the required parameters for local and regional planning, has led to reliance on charts and tables. Therefore, planning water resources cannot be performed well and with accurate details. According to many researchers (8, the technical evaluation should be a regular and short-term process to review the problems and possible performance of irrigation systems. Merriam and Keller (10 defined the assessment of an irrigation system analysis, based on field measurements in real terms during the normal work of the system. Therefore, to develop these systems over the next few years, it is essential to evaluate the use of irrigation systems and review the performance of existing problems and utilizing the results to improve it. The aim of this study was to assess the current status of implemented irrigation systems in the tea plantations of Guilan and evaluate their performance. Materials and Methods: In this study, six classic sprinkler irrigation systems in tea fields of Guilan province were evaluated during two years. Sprinkler irrigation systems of semi-portable, solid-set and solid-set (hand-move sprinkler were selected randomly. To evaluate this irrigation systems, Christiansen’s uniformity coefficient (CU, distribution uniformity (DU, potential application efficiency of low-quarter (PELQ and application efficiency of low-quarter (AELQ in the form of trial blocks were estimated by

  14. Sixteen Years of Bt Maize in the EU Hotspot: Why Has Resistance Not Evolved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Castañera

    Full Text Available The majority of Bt maize production in the European Union (EU is concentrated in northeast Spain, which is Europe's only hotspot where resistance might evolve, and the main target pest, Sesamia nonagrioides, has been exposed to Cry1Ab maize continuously since 1998. The cropping system in northeast Spain has some similar characteristics to those that probably led to rapid resistance failures in two other target noctuid maize pests. These include repeated cultivation of Bt maize in the same fields, low use of refuges, recurring exposure of larvae to non-high dose concentrations of Cry1Ab toxin during the first years of cultivation, low migratory potential, and production concentrated in an irrigated region with few alternative hosts. Available data reveal no evidence of resistance in S. nonagrioides after 16 years of use. We explore the possible reasons for this resistance management success using evolutionary models to consider factors expected to accelerate resistance, and those expected to delay resistance. Low initial adoption rates and the EU policy decision to replace Event 176 with MON 810 Bt maize were key to delaying resistance evolution. Model results suggest that if refuge compliance continues at the present 90%, Bt maize might be used sustainably in northeast Spain for at least 20 more years before resistance might occur. However, obtaining good estimates of the present R allele frequency and level of local assortative mating are crucial to reduce uncertainty about the future success of resistance management.

  15. The compatibility of agricultural intensification in a global hotspot of smallholder agrobiodiversity (Bolivia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, Karl S

    2013-02-19

    Integrating the conservation of biodiversity by smallholder farmers with agricultural intensification is increasingly recognized as a leading priority of sustainability and food security amid global environmental and socioeconomic change. An international research project investigated the smallholder agrobiodiversity of maize (corn) in a global hotspot (Bolivia) undergoing significant intensification. Peach-based intensification was pronounced (300-400%) and prolonged (2000-2010) in study areas. Intensification and maize agrobiodiversity were found to co-occur within smallholder landscapes. Interactions of these field systems did not trigger land-change tipping points leading to landrace extirpation. By 2010 maize landraces in the study areas still demonstrated high levels of taxonomic and ecological biodiversity and contributed significantly to this crop's agrobiodiversity at national (31%) and hemispheric (3%) scales. Social and ecological resilience and in situ conservation of the maize agrobiodiversity by Bolivian smallholders was enabled through robust linkages to off-farm migration; resource access and asset capabilities among both traditional and nontraditional growers; landrace agroecology and food uses; and innovative knowledge and skills. The smallholders' resilience resulting from these linkages was integral to the conditional success of the in situ conservation of maize agrobiodiversity. Environment-development interactions both enabled smallholders' agrobiodiversity resilience and influenced the limits and vulnerability of agrobiodiversity. Scientific policy recommendations regarding land-use planning and sustainability analysis are targeted to specific Río+20 priorities for agrobiodiversity.

  16. Conservation of Terrestrial Vertebrates in a Global Hotspot of Karst Area in Southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenhua; Tang, Songhua; Jiang, Zhigang; Chen, Jing; Fang, Hongxia; Li, Chunwang

    2016-05-26

    The karst area of southwest China (KASC) is the largest piece of karst landscape on the earth and a global biodiversity hot-spot with high concentrations of endemic species. Although a number of nature reserves (NRs) have been established across the region, the representativeness of biodiversity of the NR system is still unknown. Based on comprehensive literature and field surveys, and intensive consultations with zoologists and wildlife managers, we compiled distributions of 1,204 terrestrial vertebrate species and 271 NRs in KASC. We found Jinxiu, Mengla, Hekou, and Jinghong have the richest amphibian species; Jinxiu has the highest species richness of reptiles; Jinghong, Menghai, and Mengla have the largest numbers of avian species; whereas, Mengla, Longzhou, and Ningming have the greatest mammalian diversity in the region. Gap analysis among NR system, species richness pattern, and five biogeographic indicators found insufficient representation of the NR system on territorial vertebrate diversity. The conservation effectiveness in Guizhou Province was much lower than that in Guangxi and Yunnan Provinces. Under-representation and over-representation simultaneously occurred in many of the ecoregions, elevation classes, vegetation types, landcover categories, and human disturbance intensity gradients. For conservation of terrestrial vertebrates in KASC, several suggestions were presented in this study.

  17. Sixteen Years of Bt Maize in the EU Hotspot: Why Has Resistance Not Evolved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañera, Pedro; Farinós, Gema P.; Ortego, Félix; Andow, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of Bt maize production in the European Union (EU) is concentrated in northeast Spain, which is Europe’s only hotspot where resistance might evolve, and the main target pest, Sesamia nonagrioides, has been exposed to Cry1Ab maize continuously since 1998. The cropping system in northeast Spain has some similar characteristics to those that probably led to rapid resistance failures in two other target noctuid maize pests. These include repeated cultivation of Bt maize in the same fields, low use of refuges, recurring exposure of larvae to non-high dose concentrations of Cry1Ab toxin during the first years of cultivation, low migratory potential, and production concentrated in an irrigated region with few alternative hosts. Available data reveal no evidence of resistance in S. nonagrioides after 16 years of use. We explore the possible reasons for this resistance management success using evolutionary models to consider factors expected to accelerate resistance, and those expected to delay resistance. Low initial adoption rates and the EU policy decision to replace Event 176 with MON 810 Bt maize were key to delaying resistance evolution. Model results suggest that if refuge compliance continues at the present 90%, Bt maize might be used sustainably in northeast Spain for at least 20 more years before resistance might occur. However, obtaining good estimates of the present R allele frequency and level of local assortative mating are crucial to reduce uncertainty about the future success of resistance management. PMID:27144535

  18. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 2: precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2017-02-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as `field' or `global' significance. The block length for the local resampling tests is precisely determined to adequately account for the time series structure. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Daily precipitation climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. While the downscaled precipitation distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones in most regions in summer, the biases of some distribution characteristics are significant over large areas in winter. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate stationary fine-scale climate features in the daily precipitation field over regions of complex topography in both seasons and appropriate transient fine-scale features almost everywhere in summer. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the clear additional value of dynamical downscaling over global climate simulations. The evaluation methodology has a broad spectrum of applicability as it is

  19. Evaluation of TENORMs field measurement with actual activity concentration in contaminated soil matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Fort, Roger; Alboiu, Mirtyll; Hettiaratchi, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    The occurrence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORMs) concentrated through anthropogenic processes in contaminated soils at oil and gas facilities represent one of the most challenging issues facing the Canadian and US oil and gas industry today. Natural occurring radioactivity materials (NORMs) field survey techniques are widely used as a rapid and cost-effective method for ascertaining NORMs risks associated with contaminated soils and waste matrices as well other components comprising the environment. Because of potentially significant liability issues with Norms if not properly managed, the development of quantitative relationships between TENORMs field measurement techniques and laboratory analysis present a practical approach in facilitating the interim safe decision process since laboratory results can take days. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between direct measurements of field radioactivity and various laboratory batch techniques using data collection technologies for NORM and actual laboratory radioactivity concentrations. The significance of selected soil characteristics that may improve or confound these relationships in the formulation of empirical models was also achieved as an objective. The soil samples used in this study were collected from 4 different locations in western Canada and represented a wide range in terms of their selected chemical and physical properties. Multiple regression analyses for both field and batch data showed a high level of correlation between radionuclides Ra-226 and Ra-228 as a function of data collection technologies and relevant soil parameters. All R2 values for the empirical models were greater than 0.80 and significant at P<0.05. The creation of these empirical models could be valuable in improving predictability of radium contamination in soils and therefore, reduce analytical costs as well as environmental liabilities.

  20. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  1. Field Evaluation of a High Throughput Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification Test for the Detection of Asymptomatic Plasmodium Infections in Zanzibar

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Morris, Ulrika; Ding, Xavier C; Jovel, Irina; Mwinyi I Msellem; Bergman, Daniel; Islam, Atiqul; Ali, Abdullah S; Polley, Spencer; Gonzalez, Iveth J.; Mårtensson, Andreas; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background New field applicable diagnostic tools are needed for highly sensitive detection of residual malaria infections in pre-elimination settings. Field performance of a high throughput DNA extraction system for loop mediated isothermal amplification (HTP-LAMP) was therefore evaluated for detecting malaria parasites among asymptomatic individuals in Zanzibar. Methods HTP-LAMP performance was evaluated against real-time PCR on 3008 paired blood samples collected on filter papers in a commu...

  2. Field Evaluation of a High Throughput Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification Test for the Detection of Asymptomatic Plasmodium Infections in Zanzibar

    OpenAIRE

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Morris, Ulrika; Ding, Xavier C; Jovel, Irina; Msellem, Mwinyi I; Bergman, Daniel; Islam, Atiqul; Ali, Abdullah S.; Polley, Spencer; Gonzalez, Iveth J.; Mårtensson, Andreas; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background New field applicable diagnostic tools are needed for highly sensitive detection of residual malaria infections in pre-elimination settings. Field performance of a high throughput DNA extraction system for loop mediated isothermal amplification (HTP-LAMP) was therefore evaluated for detecting malaria parasites among asymptomatic individuals in Zanzibar. Methods HTP-LAMP performance was evaluated against real-time PCR on 3008 paired blood samples collected on filter papers in a commu...

  3. Evaluation of a Dual-Purpose Chemical Applicator for Paddy Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Abubakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the major problems of rice production is the shortage of labor resulting from migration from rural to urban areas, making it very difficult to meet peak demands for paddy production. In most developing countries of Southeast Asia, agricultural mechanization of paddy field operation is mostly carried out using conventional machines. For example in rice production powerintensive operations such as water pumping, land preparations, transplanting seedlings, harvestings and threshing are being mechanized but other operations like fertilizer and chemical (pesticides applications are not yet fully mechanized, rather they are performed manually with motorized backpack knapsack sprayers which have many disadvantages. The main objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a new concept dual-purpose chemical applicator for paddy fields farmers in order to complement the labor shortage during the peak period. Approach: A dual-purpose chemical applicator for flooded paddy field was evaluated using the S341.4 Standard in respect to the distribution patterns/droplet sizes and uniformity of spreading/spraying for the chemical application to boost agricultural mechanization in rice production and also to overcome the safety concern of hazardous spray drift during chemical application by the paddy farmers. The dual purpose applicator was mounted on a high clearance prime mover. The machine performances for both granular and liquid chemical application were reported. Results: Results for urea granular chemical indicate that at low (40 kg ha−1 and high (120 kg ha−1 rates and 550 rpm disc speed distribution pattern skewed to the left whereas the distribution pattern shape at medium (80 kg ha−1 rates was good flattop. At high rate (120 kg ha−1 and 1000 rpm disc speed, mean distribution pattern became poor (M-shape and also at low and medium application rates the distribution pattern shapes lopsided

  4. Meta-Analytic Evaluation of a Virtual Field Trip to Connect Middle School Students with University Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Liu, Jia; Parker, Loran Carleton; Burgess, Wilella

    2015-01-01

    Although virtual field trips are becoming popular, there are few empirical studies of their impacts on student outcomes. This study reports on a meta-analytic evaluation of the impact of a virtual field trip on student perceptions of scientists. Specifically, the study examined the summary effect of zipTrips broadcasts on evaluation…

  5. Meta-Analytic Evaluation of a Virtual Field Trip to Connect Middle School Students with University Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Liu, Jia; Parker, Loran Carleton; Burgess, Wilella

    2015-01-01

    Although virtual field trips are becoming popular, there are few empirical studies of their impacts on student outcomes. This study reports on a meta-analytic evaluation of the impact of a virtual field trip on student perceptions of scientists. Specifically, the study examined the summary effect of zipTrips broadcasts on evaluation…

  6. Conserving Biogeography: Habitat Loss and Vicariant Patterns in Endemic Squamates of the Cerrado Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Pietro L H; Machado, Ricardo B; Nogueira, Cristiano de C

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the threat levels and impacts of habitat loss over the Cerrado Squamate fauna. The region is under severe habitat loss due to mechanized agriculture, accelerated by changes in the Brazilian National Forest Code. The Squamate fauna of the Cerrado is rich in endemics and is intrinsically associated with its surrounding microhabitats, which make up a mosaic of phitophysiognomies throughout the region. Herein we evaluate current conservation status of Squamate biogeographic patterns in the Brazilian Cerrado, the single savanna among global biodiversity hotspots. To do so, we first updated point locality data on 49 endemic Squamates pertaining to seven non-random clusters of species ranges in the Cerrado. Each cluster was assumed to be representative of different biogeographic regions, holding its own set of species, herein mapped according to their extent of occurrence (EOO). We then contrasted these data in four different scenarios, according to the presence or absence of habitat loss and the presence or absence of the current protected area (PA) cover. We searched for non-random patterns of habitat loss and PA coverage among these biogeographic regions throughout the Cerrado. Finally, with the species EOO as biodiversity layers, we used Zonation to discuss contemporary PA distribution, as well as to highlight current priority areas for conservation within the Cerrado. We ran Zonation under all four conservation scenarios mentioned above. We observed that habitat loss and PA coverage significantly differed between biogeographic regions. The southernmost biogeographic region is the least protected and the most impacted, with priority areas highly scattered in small, disjunct fragments. The northernmost biogeographic region (Tocantins-Serra Geral) is the most protected and least impacted, showing extensive priority areas in all Zonation scenarios. Therefore, current and past deforestation trends are severely threatening biogeographic patterns in

  7. Development, validation and field evaluation of a quantitative real-time PCR able to differentiate between field Mycoplasma synoviae and the MS-H-live vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, R; Feberwee, A; Landman, W J M

    2017-08-01

    A quantitative PCR (qPCR) able to differentiate between field Mycoplasma synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain was developed, validated and evaluated. It was developed using nucleotide differences in the obg gene. Analytical specificity and sensitivity assessed using DNA from 194 M. synoviae field samples, three different batches of MS-H vaccine and from 43 samples representing four other avian Mycoplasma species proved to be 100%. The detection limit for field M. synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain was 10(2-3) and 10(2) colony-forming units PCR equivalents/g trachea mucus, respectively. The qPCR was able to detect both, field M. synoviae and MS-H vaccine strain in ratios of 1:100 determined both using spiked and field samples. One hundred and twenty samples from M. synoviae-infected non-vaccinated birds, 110 samples from M. synoviae-vaccinated birds from a bird experiment and 224 samples from M. synoviae negative (serology and PCR) birds were used to determine the relative sensitivity and specificity using a previously described M. synoviae PCR as reference. The relative sensitivity and specificity for field M. synoviae were 95.0% and 99.6%, respectively, and 94.6% and 100% for the MS-H-live vaccine, respectively. Field validation and confirmation by multi locus sequence typing revealed that the qPCR correctly distinguished between MS-H and field M. synoviae. Evaluation of the differentiating M. synoviae qPCR in three commercial flocks suggested transmission of MS-H-live vaccine from vaccinated to non-vaccinated flocks at the same farm. Furthermore, it showed evidence for the colonization with field M. synoviae in MS-H-vaccinated flocks.

  8. Fish ladders: safe fish passage or hotspot for predation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Antonio Agostinho

    Full Text Available Fish ladders are a strategy for conserving biodiversity, as they can provide connectivity between fragmented habitats and reduce predation on shoals that accumulate immediately below dams. Although the impact of predation downstream of reservoirs has been investigated, especially in juvenile salmonids during their downstream movements, nothing is known about predation on Neotropical fish in the attraction and containment areas commonly found in translocation facilities. This study analysed predation in a fish passage system at the Lajeado Dam on the Tocantins River in Brazil. The abundance, distribution, and the permanence (time spent of large predatory fish along the ladder, the injuries imposed by piranhas during passage and the presence of other vertebrate predators were investigated. From December 2002 to October 2003, sampling was conducted in four regions (downstream, along the ladder, in the forebay, and upstream of the reservoir using gillnets, cast nets and counts or visual observations. The captured fish were tagged with thread and beads, and any mutilations were registered. Fish, birds and dolphins were the main predator groups observed, with a predominance of the first two groups. The entrance to the ladder, in the downstream region, was the area with the highest number of large predators and was the only region with relevant non-fish vertebrates. The main predatory fish species were Rhaphiodon vulpinus, Hydrolycus armatus, and Serrasalmus rhombeus. Tagged individuals were detected predating along the ladder for up to 90 days. Mutilations caused by Serrasalmus attacks were noted in 36% of species and 4% of individuals at the top of the ladder. Our results suggested that the high density of fish in the restricted ladder environment, which is associated with injuries suffered along the ladder course and the presence of multiple predator groups with different predation strategies, transformed the fish corridor into a hotspot for

  9. Multisectoral Climate Impact Hotspots in a Warming World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Franziska; Mueller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Clark, Douglas B.; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; deJesusColonGonzalez, Felipe; Floerke, Martina; Folberth, Christian; Franssen, Wietse; Frieler, Katja; Friend, Andrew D.; Gosling, Simon N.; Hemming, Deborah; Khabarov, Nikolay; Kim, Hyungjun; Lomas, Mark R.; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Mengel, Matthias; Morse, Andrew; Neumann, Kathleen; Nishina, Kazuya; Ostberg, Sebastian; Pavlick, Ryan; Ruane, Alex C.

    2014-01-01

    The impacts of global climate change on different aspects of humanity's diverse life-support systems are complex and often difficult to predict. To facilitate policy decisions on mitigation and adaptation strategies, it is necessary to understand, quantify, and synthesize these climate-change impacts, taking into account their uncertainties. Crucial to these decisions is an understanding of how impacts in different sectors overlap, as overlapping impacts increase exposure, lead to interactions of impacts, and are likely to raise adaptation pressure. As a first step we develop herein a framework to study coinciding impacts and identify regional exposure hotspots. This framework can then be used as a starting point for regional case studies on vulnerability and multifaceted adaptation strategies. We consider impacts related to water, agriculture, ecosystems, and malaria at different levels of global warming. Multisectoral overlap starts to be seen robustly at a mean global warming of 3 degC above the 1980-2010 mean, with 11% of the world population subject to severe impacts in at least two of the four impact sectors at 4 degC. Despite these general conclusions, we find that uncertainty arising from the impact models is considerable, and larger than that from the climate models. In a low probability-high impact worst-case assessment, almost the whole inhabited world is at risk for multisectoral pressures. Hence, there is a pressing need for an increased research effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of impacts, as well as for the development of policy measures under existing uncertainty.

  10. Multisectoral climate impact hotspots in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Franziska; Müller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Clark, Douglas B.; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Colón González, Felipe de Jesus; Flörke, Martina; Folberth, Christian; Franssen, Wietse; Frieler, Katja; Friend, Andrew D.; Gosling, Simon N.; Hemming, Deborah; Khabarov, Nikolay; Kim, Hyungjun; Lomas, Mark R.; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Mengel, Matthias; Morse, Andrew; Neumann, Kathleen; Nishina, Kazuya; Ostberg, Sebastian; Pavlick, Ryan; Ruane, Alex C.; Schewe, Jacob; Schmid, Erwin; Stacke, Tobias; Tang, Qiuhong; Tessler, Zachary D.; Tompkins, Adrian M.; Warszawski, Lila; Wisser, Dominik; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The impacts of global climate change on different aspects of humanity’s diverse life-support systems are complex and often difficult to predict. To facilitate policy decisions on mitigation and adaptation strategies, it is necessary to understand, quantify, and synthesize these climate-change impacts, taking into account their uncertainties. Crucial to these decisions is an understanding of how impacts in different sectors overlap, as overlapping impacts increase exposure, lead to interactions of impacts, and are likely to raise adaptation pressure. As a first step we develop herein a framework to study coinciding impacts and identify regional exposure hotspots. This framework can then be used as a starting point for regional case studies on vulnerability and multifaceted adaptation strategies. We consider impacts related to water, agriculture, ecosystems, and malaria at different levels of global warming. Multisectoral overlap starts to be seen robustly at a mean global warming of 3 °C above the 1980–2010 mean, with 11% of the world population subject to severe impacts in at least two of the four impact sectors at 4 °C. Despite these general conclusions, we find that uncertainty arising from the impact models is considerable, and larger than that from the climate models. In a low probability-high impact worst-case assessment, almost the whole inhabited world is at risk for multisectoral pressures. Hence, there is a pressing need for an increased research effort to develop a more comprehensive understanding of impacts, as well as for the development of policy measures under existing uncertainty. PMID:24344270

  11. Automated Selection of Hotspots (ASH): enhanced automated segmentation and adaptive step finding for Ki67 hotspot detection in adrenal cortical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lu (Hao); T.G. Papathomas (Thomas); D. van Zessen (David); D. Palli (Domenico); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); A.P. Stubbs (Andrew P.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In prognosis and therapeutics of adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), the selection of the most active areas in proliferative rate (hotspots) within a slide and objective quantification of immunohistochemical Ki67 Labelling Index (LI) are of critical importance. In addition to i

  12. The application of strain field intensity method in the steel bridge fatigue life evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Yanjun; Cao, Kaisheng

    2012-04-01

    Asce's survey shows that 80%--90% bridge damage were associated with fatigue and fracture problems. With the operation of vehicle weight and traffic volume increases constantly, the fatigue of welded steel bridge is becoming more and more serious in recent years. A large number of studies show that most prone to fatigue damage of steel bridge is part of the welding position. Thus, it's important to find a more precise method to assess the fatigue life of steel bridge. Three kinds of fatigue analysis method is commonly used in engineering practice, such as nominal stress method, the local stress strain method and field intensity method. The first two methods frequently used for fatigue life assessment of steel bridge, but field intensity method uses less ,and it widely used in fatigue life assessment of aerospace and mechanical. Nominal stress method and the local stress strain method in engineering has been widely applied, but not considering stress gradient and multiaxial stress effects, the accuracy of calculation stability is relatively poor, so it's difficult to fully explain the fatigue damage mechanism. Therefore, it used strain field intensity method to evaluate the fatigue life of steel bridge. The fatigue life research of the steel bridge based on the strain field method and the fatigue life of the I-section plate girder was analyzed. Using Ansys on the elastoplastic finite element analysis determined the dangerous part of the structure and got the stress-strain history of the dangerous point. At the same time, in order to divide the unit more elaborate introduced the sub-structure technology. Finally, it applies K.N. Smith damage equation to calculate the fatigue life of the dangerous point. In order to better simulating the actual welding defects, it dug a small hole in the welding parts. It dug different holds from different view in the welding parts and plused the same load to calculate its fatigue life. Comparing the results found that the welding

  13. Field evaluation of rapid HIV serologic tests for screening and confirming HIV-1 infection in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, H C; Granade, T C; Nunez, C A; Meza, R; Terrell, S; Amador, L; George, J R

    1997-03-01

    To determine the ability of simple, rapid tests to identify HIV-1 antibody-positive specimens in field settings using the World Health Organization's (WHO) alternative testing strategies. Three-phase evaluation of simple, rapid assays using banked specimens and prospectively collected serum specimens at regional hospitals and rural clinics. Seven test (Retrocell, Genie, HIVCHEK, SUDS HIV-1, Testpack, Serodia HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 RTD) were evaluated and results compared with standard enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot results (phase 1). Further evaluation consisted of prospective testing of routine specimens at regional (phase 2; n = 900) and rural, peripheral laboratories (phase 3; n = 1266) throughout Honduras with selected assays. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each assay and combination of assays for each phase to evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO alternative testing strategies. All tests in all phases were > 99% sensitive after correcting for technical errors, with two exceptions (SUDS, phase 1; HIVCHEK, phase 3). In phase 3, where the testing algorithm was diagnostic, several combinations of assays were 100% sensitive and specific using WHO strategy II or III. For the Honduras Ministry of Health, the combination of Retrocell and Genie was found to be equally sensitive, more specific (no indeterminate results), and less expensive than EIA/Western blot. Combinations of rapid, simple HIV antibody assays provide sensitivity and specificity performance comparable to EIA/Western blot. Application of these combinations in the WHO alternative testing strategies provides an inexpensive and effective method of determining HIV status. Assay combinations using these strategies can be easily performed in small, rural laboratories and have been implemented in routine HIV screening in Honduras.

  14. Bottom-up communication. Identifying opportunities and limitations through an exploratory field-based evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.; Irvine, K.N. [Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development, De Montfort University, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Communication to promote behaviours like energy saving can use significant resources. What is less clear is the comparative value of different approaches available to communicators. While it is generally agreed that 'bottom-up' approaches, where individuals are actively involved rather than passive, are preferable to 'top-down' authority-led projects, there is a dearth of evidence that verifies why this should be. Additionally, while the literature has examined the mechanics of the different approaches, there has been less attention paid to the associated psychological implications. This paper reports on an exploratory comparative study that examined the effects of six distinct communication activities. The activities used different communication approaches, some participative and others more top-down informational. Two theories, from behavioural studies and communication, were used to identify key variables for consideration in this field-based evaluation. The evaluation aimed to assess not just which activity might be most successful, as this has limited generalisability, but to also gain insight into what psychological impacts might contribute to success. Analysis found support for the general hypothesis that bottom-up approaches have more impact on behaviour change than top-down. The study also identified that, in this instance, the difference in reported behaviour across the activities related partly to the extent to which intentions to change behaviour were implemented. One possible explanation for the difference in reported behaviour change across the activities is that a bottom-up approach may offer a supportive environment where participants can discuss progress with like-minded individuals. A further possible explanation is that despite controlling for intention at an individual level, the pre-existence of strong intentions may have an effect on group success. These suggestive findings point toward the critical need for additional and larger-scale studies

  15. Hotspots and Coldspots: Household and village-level variation in orphanhood prevalence in rural Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Gerland

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We explore the spatial distribution of orphans in two areas of Malawi. We first review pertinent themes in qualitative data collected in our research sites. Then, using spatial analysis, we show how positive and negative clusters of orphans-which we term orphanhood "hotspots" and "coldspots"-can be found at the village and sub-village levels. In the third and longest section of the paper, and using multilevel analyses with both simple and complex variance structures, we evaluate the relationship between the presence of orphans and a range of individual, household and village-level characteristics, including households' spatial relationship to each other and to other local sites of significance. This series of analyses shows that the most important covariates of orphan presence are the density of settlement, household size, and religious characteristics, with the latter measured simultaneously at both household and village-level. Other characteristics like education, reported mortality levels and HIV infection, are wholly unrelated to orphan prevalence at all analytic levels. Wealth and various spatial characteristics are only marginally associated with orphan prevalence. We conclude by reviewing some difficulties in explaining causal mechanisms underlying these observed relationships, and discussing conceptual, theoretical and programmatic implications.

  16. Forests and drugs: coca-driven deforestation in tropical biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Liliana M; Bejarano, Adriana C; Hall, Mark A; Correa, H Leonardo; Corthals, Angelique; Espejo, Oscar J

    2011-02-15

    Identifying drivers of deforestation in tropical biodiversity hotspots is critical to assess threats to particular ecosystems and species and proactively plan for conservation. We analyzed land cover change between 2002 and 2007 in the northern Andes, Chocó, and Amazon forests of Colombia, the largest producer of coca leaf for the global cocaine market, to quantify the impact of this illicit crop on forest dynamics, evaluate the effectiveness of protected areas in this context, and determine the effects of eradication on deforestation. Landscape-level analyses of forest conversion revealed that proximity to new coca plots and a greater proportion of an area planted with coca increased the probability of forest loss in southern Colombia, even after accounting for other covariates and spatial autocorrelation. We also showed that protected areas successfully reduced forest conversion in coca-growing regions. Neither eradication nor coca cultivation predicted deforestation rates across municipalities. Instead, the presence of new coca cultivation was an indicator of municipalities, where increasing population led to higher deforestation rates. We hypothesize that poor rural development underlies the relationship between population density and deforestation in coca-growing areas. Conservation in Colombia's vast forest frontier, which overlaps with its coca frontier, requires a mix of protected areas and strategic rural development to succeed.

  17. Disentangling Phylogenetic Relationships in a Hotspot of Diversity: The Butterworts (Pinguicula L., Lentibulariaceae) Endemic to Italy

    Science.gov (United