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Sample records for hot ridge flank

  1. Novel microbial assemblages inhabiting crustal fluids within mid-ocean ridge flank subsurface basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Bowers, Robert M; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Rappé, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Although little is known regarding microbial life within our planet's rock-hosted deep subseafloor biosphere, boreholes drilled through deep ocean sediment and into the underlying basaltic crust provide invaluable windows of access that have been used previously to document the presence of microorganisms within fluids percolating through the deep ocean crust. In this study, the analysis of 1.7 million small subunit ribosomal RNA genes amplified and sequenced from marine sediment, bottom seawater and basalt-hosted deep subseafloor fluids that span multiple years and locations on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank was used to quantitatively delineate a subseafloor microbiome comprised of distinct bacteria and archaea. Hot, anoxic crustal fluids tapped by newly installed seafloor sampling observatories at boreholes U1362A and U1362B contained abundant bacterial lineages of phylogenetically unique Nitrospirae, Aminicenantes, Calescamantes and Chloroflexi. Although less abundant, the domain Archaea was dominated by unique, uncultivated lineages of marine benthic group E, the Terrestrial Hot Spring Crenarchaeotic Group, the Bathyarchaeota and relatives of cultivated, sulfate-reducing Archaeoglobi. Consistent with recent geochemical measurements and bioenergetic predictions, the potential importance of methane cycling and sulfate reduction were imprinted within the basalt-hosted deep subseafloor crustal fluid microbial community. This unique window of access to the deep ocean subsurface basement reveals a microbial landscape that exhibits previously undetected spatial heterogeneity.

  2. Evidence for microbial carbon and sulfur cycling in deeply buried ridge flank basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Mark A; Rouxel, Olivier; Alt, Jeffrey C; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Ono, Shuhei; Coggon, Rosalind M; Shanks, Wayne C; Lapham, Laura; Elvert, Marcus; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Inagaki, Fumio; Teske, Andreas

    2013-03-15

    Sediment-covered basalt on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges constitutes most of Earth's oceanic crust, but the composition and metabolic function of its microbial ecosystem are largely unknown. By drilling into 3.5-million-year-old subseafloor basalt, we demonstrated the presence of methane- and sulfur-cycling microbes on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Depth horizons with functional genes indicative of methane-cycling and sulfate-reducing microorganisms are enriched in solid-phase sulfur and total organic carbon, host δ(13)C- and δ(34)S-isotopic values with a biological imprint, and show clear signs of microbial activity when incubated in the laboratory. Downcore changes in carbon and sulfur cycling show discrete geochemical intervals with chemoautotrophic δ(13)C signatures locally attenuated by heterotrophic metabolism.

  3. Biogeochemical Fluxes Across the Juan de Fuca Ridge-Flank: Minor and Trace Element Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, S. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Jannasch, H. W.

    2006-12-01

    Crustal ridge-flank hydrothermal convection of seawater profoundly affects; global geochemical fluxes and cycles, plate tectonics through crustal cooling, and the deep biosphere. Comprehensive assessment of chemical fluxes from this type of hydrothermal circulation has been obscured by sampling artifacts during sample retrieval and extraction from drilling and the lack of uncontaminated in situ samples. With the development of sealed borehole observatories (CORKs) it is now possible to obtainable uncontaminated crustal formation fluids. The Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge presented an ideal region for addressing the effects of ridge flank hydrothermal circulation on global processes because of direct access to basement fluids through six CORKs and the known composition of nearby spring fluids. We present data from fluids collected via osmotically-pumped continuous fluid samplers (OsmoSamplers) from within sealed boreholes. Methods using high-resolution ICP-MS were developed to allow analysis of trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Y, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, and U) and the entire suite of rare-earth elements in 5ml of sample. Fluids from OsmoSamplers deployed at 3 drill sites (1024, 1026, and 1027) were analyzed along with borehole fluids collected at two additional sites (1025 and 1026). Pore fluids from multiple drilling legs were also compared for sampling artifacts associated with differing sediment core collection techniques. The results of this study determined which trace elements can be accurately determined from ocean drilling and pore water extraction from sediments and borehole sampling by comparison with the time-integrated samples obtained from within the sealed boreholes. Once the accurate composition of basement fluids was determined, it was possible to examine regional trends of the hydrothermal aquifer system both along and across strike of the ridge axis. These data of crustal fluids can then be compared to pore fluids collected during

  4. Palagonitization of Basalt Glass in the Flanks of Mid-Ocean Ridges: Implications for the Bioenergetics of Oceanic Intracrustal Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türke, Andreas; Nakamura, Kentaro; Bach, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    When basalt is exposed to oxygenated aqueous solutions, rims of palagonite form along fractures at the expense of glass. We employed electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fresh glass and adjacent palagonite crusts to determine the geochemical changes involved in palagonite formation. Samples were retrieved from drill cores taken in the North Pond Area, located on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°45'N and 46°05'W. We also analyzed whole rock powders to determine the overall crust-seawater exchange in a young ridge flank. Radioactive elements are enriched in palagonite relative to fresh glass, reaching concentrations where radiolytic production of molecular hydrogen (H2) may be a significant energy source. Based on these results, we hypothesize that microbial ecosystems in ridge flank habitats undergo a transition in the principal energy carrier, fueling carbon fixation from Fe oxidation in very young crust to H2 consumption in older crust. Unless the H2 is swept away by rapid fluid flow (i.e., in young flanks), it may easily accumulate to levels high enough to support chemolithoautotrophic life. In older flanks, crustal sealing and sediment accumulation have slowed down seawater circulation, and the significance of radiolytically produced H2 for catalytic energy supply is expected to increase greatly. Similar habitats on other planetary surfaces are theoretically possible, as accumulation of radiolytically produced hydrogen merely requires the presence of H2O molecules and a porous medium, from which the hydrogen is not lost.

  5. Temperature and redox effect on mineral colonization in Juan de Fuca Ridge flank subsurface crustal fluids

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    Jean-Paul eBaquiran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine microbe-mineral interactions in subsurface oceanic crust, we evaluated microbial colonization on crustal minerals that were incubated in borehole fluids for one year at the seafloor wellhead of a crustal borehole observatory (IODP Hole U1301A, Juan de Fuca Ridge flank as compared to an experiment that was not exposed to subsurface crustal fluids (at nearby IODP Hole U1301B. In comparison to previous studies at these same sites, this approach allowed assessment of the effects of temperature, fluid chemistry, and/or mineralogy on colonization patterns of different mineral substrates, and an opportunity to verify the approach of deploying colonization experiments at an observatory wellhead at the seafloor instead of within the borehole. The Hole U1301B deployment did not have biofilm growth, based on microscopy and DNA extraction, thereby confirming the integrity of the colonization design against bottom seawater intrusion. In contrast, the Hole U1301A deployment supported biofilms dominated by Epsilonproteobacteria (43.5% of 370 16S rRNA gene clone sequences and Gammaproteobacteria (29.3%. Sequence analysis revealed overlap in microbial communities between different minerals incubated at the Hole U1301A wellhead, indicating that mineralogy did not separate biofilm structure within the one-year colonization experiment. Differences in the Hole U1301A wellhead biofilm community composition relative to previous studies from within the borehole using similar mineral substrates suggest that temperature and the diffusion of dissolved oxygen through plastic components influenced the mineral colonization experiments positioned at the wellhead. This highlights the capacity of low abundance crustal fluid taxa to rapidly establish communities on diverse mineral substrates under changing environmental conditions such as from temperature and oxygen.

  6. Nitrogen Stimulates the Growth of Subsurface Basalt-associated Microorganisms at the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxu; Fang, Jing; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust constitutes the largest aquifer system on Earth, and microbial activity in this environment has been inferred from various geochemical analyses. However, empirical documentation of microbial activity from subsurface basalts is still lacking, particularly in the cool (basaltic basement on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that was sampled during Expedition 336 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Enrichment experiments with different carbon (bicarbonate, acetate, methane) and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) sources revealed significant cell growth (one magnitude higher cell abundance), higher intracellular DNA content, and increased Fe(3+)/ΣFe ratios only when nitrogen substrates were added. Furthermore, a Marinobacter strain with neutrophilic iron-oxidizing capabilities was isolated from the basalt. This work reveals that basalt-associated microorganisms at North Pond had the potential for activity and that microbial growth could be stimulated by in vitro nitrogen addition. Furthermore, iron oxidation is supported as an important process for microbial communities in subsurface basalts from young and cool ridge flank basement.

  7. Venting formation fluids from deep-sea boreholes in a ridge flank setting: ODP Sites 1025 and 1026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Jannasch, Hans W.; Kastner, Miriam; Plant, Josh N.; Decarlo, Eric H.; Lebon, Geoff

    2004-08-01

    During ODP Leg 168, two of ten boreholes, ODP Holes 1025C and 1026B, were cased through the sediment section, penetrated basaltic crust that is overpressured, and sealed. In 1999 and 2000 the seals were removed, allowing crustal formation fluids to vent and be sampled. The composition of these fluids is compared to those of basal deep-sea pore waters, which have been the basis for estimating geochemical fluxes from low-temperature ridge flank hydrothermal systems. Estimates for the composition of the major ions in formation fluids based on basal pore waters are within 5% of the values measured in borehole fluids. Similar comparisons for minor and trace elements are not as good; some are reactive in the sediment section, resulting in large uncertainties in the pore water extrapolation, while others are influenced by a variety of contaminants, including steel, grease, drilling muds, and basal sediment. Evidence for contamination includes high dissolved and particulate concentrations of several metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb) and measurable changes in concentration during the past four years in response to reaction with basal sediment. This new confidence in estimating the primary composition of formation fluids, coupled with advances in thermodynamic and kinetic models, reveals the possibility of anhydrite precipitation in ridge flank hydrothermal systems at temperatures of ˜70°C. Such new insights allow us to address the timing and conditions under which seawater-crustal reactions occur, leading to more accurate models of crustal evolution.

  8. Nitrogen stimulates the growth of subsurface basalt-associated microorganisms at the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxu eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic crust constitutes the largest aquifer system on Earth, and microbial activity in this environment has been inferred from various geochemical analyses. However, empirical documentation of microbial activity from subsurface basalts is still lacking, particularly in the cool (<25 °C regions of the crust, where are assumed to harbor active iron-oxidizing microbial communities. To test this hypothesis, we report the enrichment and isolation of crust-associated microorganisms from North Pond, a site of relatively young and cold basaltic basement on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that was sampled during Expedition 336 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Enrichment experiments with different carbon (bicarbonate, acetate, methane and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium sources revealed significant cell growth (one magnitude higher cell abundance, higher intracellular DNA content, and increased Fe3+/ΣFe ratios only when nitrogen substrates were added. Furthermore, a Marinobacter strain with neutrophilic iron-oxidizing capabilities was isolated from the basalt. This work reveals that basalt-associated microorganisms at North Pond had the potential for activity and that microbial growth could be stimulated by in vitro nitrogen addition. Furthermore, iron oxidation is supported as an important process for microbial communities in subsurface basalts from young and cool ridge flank basement.

  9. Catastrophic flank collapses and slumping in Pico Island during the last 130 kyr (Pico-Faial ridge, Azores Triple Junction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A. C. G.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marques, F. O.; Sibrant, A. L. R.; Santos de Campos, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Pico Island constitutes the easternmost sub-aerial domain of a steep WNW-ESE volcanic ridge, which has developed within the Nubia-Eurasia diffuse plate boundary (Azores Triple Junction). The island comprises three volcanic systems, from older to younger: the Topo Volcano, the Fissural System, and the Pico Stratovolcano. From a high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (10 m), and new bathymetric, stratigraphic, structural, and high-precision K-Ar data, we reconstruct the main successive stages of growth and partial destruction of the island over the last 200 kyr. We especially concentrate on the central sector of the island, which has recorded gradual movements through slumping and catastrophic flank collapses since ca. 130 kyr. The remmants of the Topo Volcano are partly exposed on Pico's SE flank, and are here dated between 186 ± 5 and 115 ± 4 ka. Topo was significantly destroyed by N- and S-directed large-scale flank collapses between ca. 125 and 70 ka. On Pico's N flank, collapse seems to have removed all the unstable material, but in the S the collapse structure is composite, including a major flank collapse and a remnant slump complex that is still active. A first episode of deformation occurred between ca. 125 and 115 ka along the master fault of the slump. Between ca. 115 and 69 ka, most of the unstable material was removed by a major flank collapse, leaving behind a still considerable volume of unstable material that comprises the active slump. This first collapse was catastrophic and generated a large debris deposit recognized on the high-resolution bathymetry, with a minimum run-out of ca. 17 km. The scar was partially filled by volcanic products erupted from volcanic cones developed within the slump depression, and possibly also from the early WNW-ESE Fissural System. Subsequent deformation in the slump area affected in part the filling units, leading to the individualization of secondary curved faults. Younger volcanic products have gradually

  10. Estimates of Europa's ice shell thickness and strain rate from flanking cracks and bulge along Ridge R

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhongwen; CHEN Chuxin

    2006-01-01

    Europa,the second Galilean satellite outward from Jupiter,has an outer layer of water of about 100 km thick and an outmost ice shell.The thickness of the ice shell is very important in understanding Europa's habitability and thermal history,but estimates from different studies are very inconsistent,ranging from 0.2 to 30 km.Here we obtain an estimate of the ice shell thickness from locations of flanking crack and forebulge along Ridge R.Considering the water's heating process to nearby ice shell in the crack,a flexure model is applied and it suggests the thickness of an ice shell to be 500-1500 m without a convective layer.Compared with previous studies using the same method but ignoring the water's heating process,the rationality and accuracy have been improved dramatically in our results.We also get some constraints on the strain rate ε and the characteristic temperature Tc,which defines the base of the elastic layer.

  11. Hydrothermal scavenging on the Juan de Fuca Ridge: {sup 230}Th{sub xs}, {sup 10}Be, and REEs in ridge-flank sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, C.R.; Colley, S.; Higgs, N.C.; Ludford, E.M. [Southampton Oceanography Centre, Southampton (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    We have investigated the geochemistry of a hydrothermally enriched sediment core recovered from the western flank of the N.Cleft Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, {approximately}8km west of the {open_quotes}MegaPlume{close_quotes} area previously identified near 45{degrees}N. The core contains varying biogenic, lithogenic, and hydrothermal components, as reflected in CaCO{sub 3}, Al, and Fe contents, respectively. Horizons of pronounced hydrothermal input, in core-top sediments and at depth, exhibit increased concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb and shifts in Pb isotopic compositions toward nonradiogenic (MORB/hydrothermal) values. REE concentrations co-vary with hydrothermal Fe down-core, and shale-normalised REE distribution patterns exhibit both negative Ce-anomalies and positive Eu-anomalies, indicative of input from plume-particle fall-out. Unsupported {sup 230}Th{sub xs} activities down-core are consistent with continuous slow sediment accumulation rates of 0.54 cm/ky for 200 ky since the deposition of the deeper Fe-rich horizon. {sup 10}Be{sub (0)}, and {sup 9}Be isotope concentrations also co-vary with hydrothermal Fe down-core and exhibit {sup 10}Be{sub (0)} ratios which approach that of Pacific Ocean deep water, indicative of a seawater-scavenging source. 49 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Influence of Igneous Basement on Deep Sediment Microbial Diversity on the Eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge Flank

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    Jessica M. Labonté

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities living in deeply buried sediment may be adapted to long-term energy limitation as they are removed from new detrital energy inputs for thousands to millions of years. However, sediment layers near the underlying oceanic crust may receive inputs from below that influence microbial community structure and/or activity. As part of the Census of Deep Life, we used 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing on DNA extracted from a spectrum of deep sediment-basement interface samples from the subsurface of the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank (collected on IODP Expedition 327 to examine this possible basement influence on deep sediment communities. This area experiences rapid sedimentation, with an underlying basaltic crust that hosts a dynamic flux of hydrothermal fluids that diffuse into the sediment. Chloroflexi sequences dominated tag libraries in all sediment samples, with variation in the abundance of other bacterial groups (e.g., Actinobacteria, Aerophobetes, Atribacteria, Planctomycetes, and Nitrospirae. These variations occur in relation to the type of sediment (clays versus carbonate-rich and the depth of sample origin, and show no clear connection to the distance from the discharge outcrop or to basement fluid microbial communities. Actinobacteria-related sequences dominated the basalt libraries, but these should be viewed cautiously due to possibilities for imprinting from contamination. Our results indicate that proximity to basement or areas of seawater recharge is not a primary driver of microbial community composition in basal sediment, even though fluids diffusing from basement into sediment may stimulate microbial activity.

  13. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  14. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a linear trace of the Kerguelen hot spot in the Indian Ocean, was emplaced on a rapidly drifting Indian plate. Magma production rates along the ridge track are computed using gravity-derived excess crustal thickness data...

  15. Hot subduction: Magmatism along the Hunter Ridge, SW Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, A.J.; Verbeeten, A.; Danyushevsky, L.V.; Sigurdsson, I.A. [SRC for Ore Deposit Research, Hobart, TAS (Australia); Maillet, P. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Department of Geology; Maillet, P. [ORSTOM Centre de Brest, France, (France); Monzier, M. [ORSTOM Centre, Ecuador, (Ecuador)

    1997-12-31

    The Hunter `fracture zone` is generally regarded as a transform plate boundary linking the oppositely dipping Tongan and Vanuatu subduction systems. Dredging along the Hunter Ridge and sampling of its northernmost extent, exposed as the island of Kadavu in Fiji, has yielded a diversity of magmatic suites, including arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites, high-Mg lavas with some affinities to boninites and some affinities to adakites, and true adakitic lavas associated with remarkable low-Fe, high-Na basalts with 8-16 ppm Nb (herein high-Nb basalts). Lavas which show clear evidence of slab melt involvement in their petrogenesis occur at either end of the Hunter Ridge, whereas the arc tholeiites and high-Ca boninites appear to be restricted to the south central part of the ridge. Mineralogical and whole rock geochemical data for each of these suites are summarized, and a tectono-magmatic model for their genesis and distribution is suggested. Trace element features and radiogenic isotope data for the Hunter Ridge lavas indicate compositions analogue to Pacific MORB-like mantle. Extended abstract. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Rapid Amplification of Flanking Sequences of a Known DNA Region by Partial Restriction Digestion and Hot Start PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Qun-feng; LIU Qiang; YANG Yin-gui; CHEN Jin-feng

    2008-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for cloning the flanking genomic sequences of a known DNA region is reported in this study. This method combined partial restriction endonuclease digestion, adaptor ligation, and a single round polymerase chain reaction. Total genomic DNA was partially digested with the frequent-cutting restriction enzyme Mse Ⅰ. The partially digested products were ligated to an unphosphorylated adaptor. A hot start PCR amplification with Taq polymerase and dNTP was performed with a DNA-specific primer and the adaptor primer complementary to the adaptor and the Mse Ⅰ recognition site. The amplified products were fractionated, cloned and sequenced. By this method, we cloned the downstream region of a gynoecious marker TG/CAC234 from cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

  17. IODP Expedition 336: initiation of long-term coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological experimentation within the seafloor at North Pond, western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K.; Bach, W.; Klaus, A.

    2014-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 addressed questions concerning subseafloor microbial life and its relation to seawater circulation and basalt-seawater reactions in the basaltic ocean crust. Sediment and basement samples were recovered at three drill sites located in the North Pond area, an 8 × 15 km large sediment pond on the 8 Ma western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge around 22°45' N and 46°05' W in roughly 4450 m water depth. The average core recovery rate in basement was approx. 31%. The subseafloor depth of the basement holes ranges from 90 to 332 m; sediment thickness is between 36 and 90 m. Two of the holes (U1382A, and U1383C) were equipped with advanced Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories, employing - for the first time - fiberglass casing. Another CORK string was deployed in Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 395A, but the wellhead broke off upon final installment. Nonetheless, the North Pond observatory is fully operational and post-cruise observatory research is already underway. Combined geochemical and microbiological studies of the drill core samples and experimental CORK materials will help understand (1) the extent and activity of microbial life in basalt and its relation to basalt alteration by circulating seawater, and (2) the mechanism of microbial inoculation of an isolated sediment pond.

  18. IODP Expedition 327 and Atlantis Expedition AT 18-07: Observatories and Experiments on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 327 and Atlantis Expedition AT18-07 Shipboard Parties

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 327 (summer 2010 was designed to resolve the nature of fluid-rock interactions in young, upper volcanic crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Expedition 327 drilled, cased and cored two new basement holes, conducted hydrogeologic experiments, and installed subseafloorborehole observatories (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits, CORKs. These CORKs were intended to allow borehole conditions to recover to a more natural state after the dissipation of disturbances caused by drilling, casing, and other operations; provide a long-term monitoring and sampling presence for determining fluid pressure, temperature, composition,and microbiology; and facilitate the completion of active experiments to resolve crustal hydrogeologic conditions and processes. Expedition 327 was followed (summer2011 by R/V Atlantis Expedition AT18-07, with the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV Jason, to service these CORKs, collect subseafloor pressure data, recover and deploy autonomous fluid and microbial samplers, collect large volumes of borehole fluids, and initiate a cross-hole hydrogeologic experiment using an electromagnetic flowmeter. In addition, Atlantis Expedition AT18-07 refurbished an old CORK that could not be replaced during IODP Expedition 327, completing a critical part of the three-dimensional observation network that is currently being used to monitor a large-scale, directional formation response to long-term fluid flow from the crust.

  19. IODP Expedition 321T: Cementing Operations at Holes U1301A and U1301B, Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Fisher

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available IODP Expedition 301 (Fisher et al., 2005a was part of a series of expeditions and experiments to quantify hydrogeologic, lithologic, biogeochemical, and microbiological properties, processes, and linkages on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, North Pacific (Fig. 1. Operations during Expedition 301 included replacement of one existing subseafloor borehole observatory (“CORK”, Hole 1026B, drilling two basement holes and installing two new long-term observatories (Holes U1301A and U1301B, coring the upper ~300 m of basement and shallow sediments above basement, and collection of in situ hydrogeologic and geophysical data from basement. Subsequent expeditions using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV and submersible have serviced borehole observatories, collected pressure and temperature data and fluid and microbiological samples, and replaced components as needed to maintain these systems for futureuse. Another drilling expedition is planned for 2010 (see backcover for schedule to emplace three more borehole observatories and initiate cross-hole tests, and additional ROV and submersible ex-peditions will conduct long-term experiments and recover subseafloor data and samples.

  20. Phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms in subseafloor crustal fluids from Holes 1025C and 1026B along the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P; Glazer, Brian T; Rappé, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    To expand investigations into the phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms inhabiting the subseafloor biosphere, basalt-hosted crustal fluids were sampled from Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) affixed to Holes 1025C and 1026B along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) flank using a clean fluid pumping system. These boreholes penetrate the crustal aquifer of young ocean crust (1.24 and 3.51 million years old, respectively), but differ with respect to borehole depth and temperature at the sediment-basement interface (147 m and 39°C vs. 295 m and 64°C, respectively). Cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes revealed that fluids retrieved from Hole 1025C were dominated by relatives of the genus Desulfobulbus of the Deltaproteobacteria (56% of clones) and Candidatus Desulforudis of the Firmicutes (17%). Fluids sampled from Hole 1026B also contained plausible deep subseafloor inhabitants amongst the most abundant clone lineages; however, both geochemical analysis and microbial community structure reveal the borehole to be compromised by bottom seawater intrusion. Regardless, this study provides independent support for previous observations seeking to identify phylogenetic groups of microorganisms common to the deep ocean crustal biosphere, and extends previous observations by identifying additional lineages that may be prevalent in this unique environment.

  1. Flank pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  2. Initiation of long-term coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological experimentation within the seafloor at North Pond, western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K.J.; Backert, N.; Bach, W.; Becker, K.; Klaus, A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Anderson, L.; Haddad, A.G.; Harigane, Y.; Campion, P.L.; Hirayama, H.; Mills, H.J.; Hulme, S.M.; Nakamura, K.; Jorgensen, S.L.; Orcutt, B.; Insua, T.L.; Park, Y.-S.; Rennie, V.; Salas, E.C.; Rouxel, O.; Wang, F.; Russel, J.A.; Wheat, C.G.; Sakata, K.; Brown, M.; Magnusson, J.L.; Ettlinger, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 successfully initiated subseafloor observatory science at a young mid-ocean-ridge flank setting. All of the drilled sites are located in the North Pond region of the Atlantic Ocean (22??45'N, 46??05'W) in 4414-4483 m water depth. This area is known from previous ocean drilling and site survey investigations as a site of particularly vigorous circulation of seawater in permeable 8 Ma basaltic basement underlying a <300 m thick sedimentary pile. Understanding how this seawater circulation affects microbial and geochemical processes in the uppermost basement was the primary science objective of Expedition 336. Basement was cored and wireline-logged in Holes U1382A and U1383C. Upper oceanic crust in Hole U1382A, which is only 50 m west of Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 395A, recovered 32 m of core between 110 and 210 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Core recovery in basement was 32%, yielding a number of volcanic flow units with distinct geochemical and petrographic characteristics. A unit of sedimentary breccia containing clasts of basalt, gabbroic rocks, and mantle peridotite was found intercalated between two volcanic flow units and was interpreted as a rock slide deposit. From Hole U1383C we recovered 50.3 m of core between 69.5 and 331.5 mbsf (19%). The basalts are aphyric to highly plagioclase-olivine-phyric tholeiites that fall on a liquid line of descent controlled by olivine fractionation. They are fresh to moderately altered, with clay minerals (saponite, nontronite, and celadonite), Fe oxyhydroxide, carbonate, and zeolite as secondary phases replacing glass and olivine to variable extents. In addition to traditional downhole logs, we also used a new logging tool for detecting in situ microbial life in ocean floor boreholes-the Deep Exploration Biosphere Investigative tool (DEBI-t). Sediment thickness was ???90 m at Sites U1382 and U1384 and varied between 38 and 53 m at Site U1383. The sediments are

  3. Is the Juan Fernandez Ridge (nazca Plate) a Deep-Mantle Hot SPOT Trail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, L. E.; Selles, D.; Díaz, A.; Piña-Gauthier, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. Geochronological data is still scarce to prove this is the case, and other hypothesis should be taken into account. There are a few constrains, like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages in Robinson Crusoe yield ca. 1-3 Ma, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. New geological mapping also shows a sharp unconformity between the older, strongly altered sequences and more recent, post-erosional volcanic piles, where only the vent facies have disappeared. A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. Fondecyt grant 110966 is acknowledged for financial support.

  4. Microbial biodiversity of thermophilic communities in hot mineral soils of Tramway Ridge, Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Rochelle M; Wood, Susanna A; Grzymski, Joseph J; McDonald, Ian R; Cary, S Craig

    2009-03-01

    Tramway Ridge, located near the summit of Mount Erebus in Antarctica, is probably the most remote geothermal soil habitat on Earth. Steam fumaroles maintain moist, hot soil environments creating extreme local physicochemical differentials. In this study a culture-independent approach combining automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and a 16S rRNA gene library was used to characterize soil microbial (Bacterial and Archaeal) diversity along intense physicochemical gradients. Statistical analysis of ARISA data showed a clear delineation between bacterial community structure at sites close to fumaroles and all other sites. Temperature and pH were identified as the primary drivers of this demarcation. A clone library constructed from a high-temperature site led to the identification of 18 novel bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). All 16S rRNA gene sequences were deep branching and distantly (85-93%) related to other environmental clones. Five of the signatures branched with an unknown group between candidate division OP10 and Chloroflexi. Within this clade, sequence similarity was low, suggesting it contains several yet-to-be described bacterial groups. Five archaeal OTUs were obtained and exhibited high levels of sequence similarity (95-97%) with Crenarchaeota sourced from deep-subsurface environments on two distant continents. The novel bacterial assemblage coupled with the unique archaeal affinities reinvigorates the hypotheses that Tramway Ridge organisms are relics of archaic microbial lineages specifically adapted to survive in this harsh environment and that this site may provide a portal to the deep-subsurface biosphere.

  5. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a linear trace of the Kerguelen hot spot in the Indian Ocean, was emplaced on a rapidly drifting Indian plate. Magma production rates along the ridge track are computed using gravity-derived excess crustal thickness data. The production rates change between 2 and 15 m3/s over timescales of 3-16 Myr. Major variations in magma production rates are primarily associated with significant changes in the Indian plate velocity with low-production phases linked to high plate velocity periods. The lowest magma production rate (2 m3/s) at 62 Ma is associated with the rapid northward drift of Indian plate under the influence of the Reunion mantle plume. The contemporaneous slowing of the African plate coincides with increase in magma production rate along the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The present study suggests that variations in the Indian plate motion and frequent ridge jumps have a major role in controlling the magma production, particularly on long-period cycles (~16 Myr). Short-period variations (~5 Myr) in magma productions may be associated with intrinsic changes in the plume, possibly due to the presence of solitary waves in the plume conduit.

  6. Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): petrology and thermochronology of a rejuvenated hot spot trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J.; Lara, L. E.

    2012-04-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. However, geochronological data is still scarce and there are a few constrains to support this hypothesis like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), some published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages and specially the ongoing Ar-Ar dating effort in Robinson Crusoe define a ca. 1-4 Ma time span, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. In addition, new geological mapping shows a sharp unconformity between the older (ca. 4 Ma), strongly altered sequences and the more recent (ca. 1 Ma), post-erosional volcanic piles, where the proximal facies are still preserved. Petrological evidence also supports this evolution pattern. In fact, the partially altered older sequence is tholeiitic (Ba/Yb=12.70; La/Yb=8.12; Ba/Y=6.51; Ba/Zr=0.89). The shield stage (ca. 1-3 Ma) is transicional from tholeiitic to alkaline (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09) and the younger (ca. 1 Ma) is mostly alkaline (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project

  7. The axial topographic high at intermediate and fast spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbotte, Suzanne M.; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-12-01

    An axial topographic high is commonly observed at both fast spreading ridges and some segments of intermediate spreading ridges. At fast rates the axial high is primarily created by the buoyancy of hot rock and magma beneath the rise. As newly formed crust is transported off axis, little vestige of an axial high is observed on the ridge flanks. In contrast, at intermediate rates, a significant component of the positive topography may be a volcanic construction, preserved on the ridge flanks as abyssal hills, which are slit axial volcanoes. We suggest this difference in the nature of the axial high reflects a lithosphere strong enough to support construction of a volcanic crestal ridge at intermediate spreading rates, but only rarely at fast rates. Relict overlap ridges, found within the discordant zones left by overlapping spreading centers, is one class of ridge-flank topography which appears to have a significant volcanic constructional component even at fast spreading ridges. Unlike topography away from these discontinuities, the relief and shape of overlapping spreading centers is preserved as relict ridge tips are rafted onto the ridge flanks. Reduced magma supply at these discontinuities may give rise to an axial lithosphere strong enough to support volcanic construction of overlap ridges. Low axial lithospheric strength may also account for the lack of normal faults within the innermost 1-2 km of fast, and some intermediate, spreading ridges. With a thin/weak brittle layer at the ridge crest, tensile failure will predominate and few normal faults will form. Depths to the axial magma chamber reflector observed in multi-channel seismic data limit the thickness of the brittel layer on axis to less than 1-2 km for much of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). This depth is comparable to depths over which tensile failure within the oceanic crust will predominate, estimated from the Griffith criteria for fracture initiation (approx. 0.5-1.5 km). As the brittle layer

  8. Spectroscopic FITS to the Alma Science Verification Band 6 Survey of the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Satyakumar; McMillan, James P.; Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Remijan, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Individual spectral lines in astrophysical data are ordinarily assigned by comparison with line frequency and intensities predicted by catalogs. Here we seek to fit the spectra of specific sources within Orion KL that are first selected by ALMA's angular resolution and then by Doppler velocity class. For each molecule in this study, astrophysical reference lines are selected. Subsequent analyses of individual velocity components provide the astrophysical column density and temperature for these velocity regimes. These column densities and temperatures are then combined with results from the complete experimental spectra obtained from our laboratory spectra to model the molecule's contribution to the entire astrophysical spectrum [1]. Effects due to optical thickness and spectral overlap are included in the analyses. Examples for ethyl cyanide in the hot core and methanol in the compact ridge will be presented. [1] J. P. McMillan, S. M. Fortman, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, "The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experi- mental Spectrum of Methanol (CH3OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz," Astrophys. J., vol. 795, pp. 56(1-9), 2014.

  9. Time-series geochemical and tracer injection recovery data from the deep (basaltic) crustal fluids from IODP Holes 1301A/1362B on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, J. P.; Hsieh, C.; Guss, J.; Fisher, A. T.; Lin, H.; Clark, J. F.; Wheat, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program borehole CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories provide invaluable opportunities to study the deep biosphere. In order to draw large volumes of fluids from crustal aquifers to seafloor, we developed an autonomous sensor and fluid sampling system, GeoMICROBE (Cowen et al., 2012). GeoMICROBE's Major components include a positive displacement primary pump, a primary valve manifold system, sensors (e.g., fluid flow rate, temperature, dissolved O2, electrochemistry-voltammrtry analyzer), 24-48 port in situ filtration and fluid collection system, computerized controller, six 24V-40A batteries and wet-mateable (ODI) communications with submersibles. This sampling system has been successfully deployed at IODP Hole 1301A in 2010 on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge. The GeoMICROBE was successfully recovered in the summer of 2011. However, due to the narrow inner diameter of the fluid delivery line (1/4''), the batteries were exhausted and only half of the preprogrammed sampling procedures were accomplished. After quick turn-around the GeoMICROBE was redeployed at nearby CORK 1362B for Summer, 2012 recovery. CORKs 1301A and 1362B are only ~800 m apart and both penetrate to ~40-50m into the basement. Unlike CORK 1301A, the fluid deliver line installed on CORK 1362B has 1/2'' inner diameter. The much lower resistance allows us to pump the fluids up with reduced power consumption. A conservative power consumption model was made to ensure that enough battery power would be available to complete the twelve monthly samplings. Monthly, following extensive flushing ~3 L of fluid was passed through a 0.2 μm polycarbonate filter. The filter holder was pre-charged with 6% glutaraldehyde. Also, monthly whole fluid samples were collected and stored in an acid-washed 500mL Tedlar bag. The whole fluid will be used for analysis of colloidal (Microspheres) and dissolved tracers injected into the upper crust in August 2010 as well as

  10. Spatiotemporal distribution of the seismicity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores from hydroacoustic data: Insights into seismogenic processes in a ridge-hot spot context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, J.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Martin, C.; LourençO, N.; Luis, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Haxel, J.; Fowler, M. J.; Fox, C. G.; Lau, A. T.-K.; Bazin, S.

    2012-02-01

    The seismicity of the North Atlantic was monitored from May 2002 to September 2003 by the `SIRENA array' of autonomous hydrophones. The hydroacoustic signals provide a unique data set documenting numerous low-magnitude earthquakes along the section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) located in a ridge-hot spot interaction context. During the experiment, 1696 events were detected along the MAR axis between 40°N and 51°N, with a magnitude of completeness level ofmb≈ 2.4. Inside the array, location errors are in the order of 2 km, and errors in the origin time are less than 1 s. From this catalog, 15 clusters were detected. The distribution of source level (SL) versus time within each cluster is used to discriminate clusters occurring in a tectonic context from those attributed to non-tectonic (i.e. volcanic or hydrothermal) processes. The location of tectonic and non-tectonic sequences correlates well with regions with positive and negative Mantle Bouguer Anomalies (MBAs), indicating the presence of thinner/colder and thicker/warmer crust respectively. At the scale of the entire array, both the complete and declustered catalogs derived from the hydroacoustic signals show an increase of the seismicity rate from the Azores up to 43°30'N suggesting a diminishing influence of the Azores hot spot on the ridge-axis temperature, and well correlated with a similar increase in the along-axis MBAs. The comparison of the MAR seismicity with the Residual MBA (RMBA) at different scales leads us to think that the low-magnitude seismicity rates are directly related to along-axis variations in lithosphere rheology and temperatures.

  11. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain hot spot removal early action characterization field data summary report, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the field and laboratory efforts as a result of the Bear Creek Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Project Early Action. The purpose of this project was to collect data necessary to assess contaminant levels in the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain and evaluate the risk posed by the sites. This report provides information on the background of the site, characterization of site and field activities, results of field and laboratory data collected, extent and distribution of contamination, and an assessment of the future risk posed by the site.

  12. Temporal variations of the segmentation of slow to intermediate spreading mid-ocean ridges 1. Synoptic observations based on satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briais, Anne; Rabinowicz, Michel

    2002-05-01

    The high-resolution geoid and gravity maps derived from ERS-1 and Geosat satellite geodetic missions reveal a set of small-scale lineations on the flanks of slow to intermediate spreading mid-ocean ridges. Assuming that these lineations reflect the variations in crustal structure induced by mid-ocean ridge axial discontinuities, we use them to investigate how the discontinuities, and the segments they bound, appear, migrate, and disappear. We provide a synoptic description of the main characteristics of the crustal structure variations, as well as their evolution in time, over the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific-Antarctic Ridges. The second-order segment length does not appear to vary with the spreading rate for the slow to intermediate spreading ridges investigated here. The amplitude of the gravity signal associated with off-axis discontinuity traces increases with the obliquity of the ridge to spreading and decreases with spreading rate and with the proximity of a ridge section to a hot spot. The patterns of the gravity lineations appear to be very homogeneous over 500- to 1000-km-large corridors bounded by large fracture zones. Far from hot spots, corridors are characterized either by segments bounded by discontinuities migrating back and forth along the axis, implying a lifetime of 10-30 Myr for the segments, or by segments and discontinuities very stable in space and time, surviving for 40-50 Myr. Closer to hot spots, the segmentation is affected in two ways. First, segments tend to migrate along axis away from hot spots, or toward cold spots. Second, asymmetric spreading tends to keep sections of ridges closer to hot spots than normal spreading would. These observations support the hypothesis that ridge segmentation and its evolution are controlled by mantle dynamics. Our analysis provides observational constraints for further models of crustal production along ridges, which are presented in the companion paper by Rabinowicz and Briais [2002].

  13. Repeat ridge jumps associated with plume-ridge interaction, melt transport, and ridge migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Ito, Garrett; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Repeated shifts, or jumps, of mid-ocean ridge segments toward nearby hot spots can produce large, long-term changes to the geometry and location of the tectonic plate boundaries. Ridge jumps associated with hot spot-ridge interaction are likely caused by several processes including shear on the base of the plate due to expanding plume material as well as reheating of lithosphere as magma passes through it to feed off-axis volcanism. To study how these processes influence ridge jumps, we use numerical models to simulate 2-D (in cross section) viscous flow of the mantle, viscoplastic deformation of the lithosphere, and melt migration upward from the asthenospheric melting zone, laterally along the base of the lithosphere, and vertically through the lithosphere. The locations and rates that magma penetrates and heats the lithosphere are controlled by the time-varying accumulation of melt beneath the plate and the depth-averaged lithospheric porosity. We examine the effect of four key parameters: magmatic heating rate of the lithosphere, plate spreading rate, age of the seafloor overlying the plume, and the plume-ridge migration rate. Results indicate that the minimum value of the magmatic heating rate needed to initiate a ridge jump increases with plate age and spreading rate. The time required to complete a ridge jump decreases with larger values of magmatic heating rate, younger plate age, and faster spreading rate. For cases with migrating ridges, models predict a range of behaviors including repeating ridge jumps, much like those exhibited on Earth. Repeating ridge jumps occur at moderate magmatic heating rates and are the result of changes in the hot spot magma flux in response to magma migration along the base of an evolving lithosphere. The tendency of slow spreading to promote ridge jumps could help explain the observed clustering of hot spots near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Model results also suggest that magmatic heating may significantly thin the lithosphere

  14. Spatial variations in isostatic compensation mechanisms of the Ninetyeast Ridge and their tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2013-10-01

    Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), one of the longest linear volcanic features on the Earth, offers an excellent opportunity of understanding the isostatic response to the interactions of mantle plume with the migrating mid-ocean ridge. Bathymetry, geoid, and gravity (shipborne and satellite) data along 72 closely spaced transects and 17 overlapping grids on the NER are analyzed and modeled to determine the effective elastic thickness (Te) beneath the entire ridge. The results of 2-D and 3-D flexural modeling of the NER show large spatial variations in Te values ranging from 4 to 35 km, suggesting that the ridge was compensated along its length by different isostatic mechanisms. The southern (south of 22°S latitude) and northern (north of 2°N latitude) parts of the NER have Te values of >10 and >23 km, respectively, revealing that the southern part was emplaced on a lithosphere of intermediate strength possibly on flank of the Indian plate, whereas the northern part was emplaced in an intraplate setting. In contrast, in the central part of the NER (between latitudes 22°S and 2°N), highly variable Te values (4-22 km) are estimated. The scattered Te values in the central NER suggest that this part may have evolved due to the occurrence of frequent ridge jumps caused by the interaction of Kerguelen hot spot with rapid northward migration of the Wharton spreading ridge. Residual Mantle Bouguer Anomaly (RMBA) map of the NER and adjacent basins reveals that the entire length of the NER is associated with a significant negative anomaly up to 200 mGal, indicating the presence of thickened crust or less dense mantle beneath the ridge. 3-D crustal thickness map of the NER, generated by inversion of the RMBA data, shows a thick crust ranging from 15 to 19 km. The present study clearly shows that NER possesses a highly segmented isostatic pattern with the occurrence of subcrustal underplating or subsurface loading.

  15. Soil salinity data from Grand Liard Bayou and flanking marshes, New Orleans, LA, 2015-12-01 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0151634)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project restored both structural and habitat functions of Grand Liard Bayou and flanking marshes. The project created and nourished marsh and restored a ridge on...

  16. Soil salinity data from Bayou Dupont and flanking marshes, New Orleans, LA, 2015-09-16 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0151633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project restored both structural and habitat functions of Bayou Dupont and flanking marshes. The project created and nourished marsh and restored a ridge on the...

  17. The morphotectonics and its evolutionary dynamics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (49° to 51°E)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yuyang; LI Jiabiao; LI Shoujun; RUAN Aiguo; NI Jianyu; YU Zhiteng; ZHU Lei

    2013-01-01

    The morphotectonic features and their evolution of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are dis-cussed on the base of the high-resolution full-coverage bathymetric data on the ridge between 49°-51°E. A comparative analysis of the topographic features of the axial and flank area indicates that the axial topogra-phy is alternated by the ridge and trough with en echelon pattern and evolved under a spatial-temporal mi-gration especially in 49°-50.17°E. It is probably due to the undulation at the top of the mantle asthenosphere, which is propagating with the mantle flow. From 50.17° to 50.7°E, is a topographical high terrain with a crust much thicker than the global average of the oceanic crust thickness. Its origin should be independent of the spreading mechanism of ultra-slow spreading ridges. The large numbers of volcanoes in this area indicate robust magmatic activity and may be related to the Crozet hot spot according to RMBA (residual mantle Bouguer anomaly). The different geomorphological feature between the north and south flanks of the ridge indicates an asymmetric spreading, and leading to the development of the OCC (oceanic core complex). The tectonic activity of the south frank is stronger than the north and is favorable to develop the OCC. The first found active hydrothermal vent in the SWIR at 37°47′S, 49°39′E is thought to be associated with the detach-ment fault related to the OCC.

  18. Polygonal Ridge Networks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Laura; Dickson, James; Grosfils, Eric; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    Polygonal ridge networks, also known as boxwork or reticulate ridges, are found in numerous locations and geological contexts across Mars. While networks formed from mineralized fractures hint at hot, possibly life-sustaining circulating ground waters, networks formed by impact-driven clasting diking, magmatic dikes, gas escape, or lava flows do not have the same astrobiological implications. Distinguishing the morphologies and geological context of the ridge networks sheds light on their potential as astrobiological and mineral resource sites of interest. The most widespread type of ridge morphology is characteristic of the Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis region and consists of thin, criss-crossing ridges with a variety of heights, widths, and intersection angles. They are found in ancient Noachian terrains at a variety of altitudes and geographic locations and may be a mixture of clastic dikes, brecciated dikes, and mineral veins. They occur in the same general areas as valley networks and ancient lake basins, but they are not more numerous where these features are concentrated, and can appear in places where they morphologies are absent. Similarly, some of the ridge networks are associated with hydrated mineral detections, but some occur in locations without detections. Smaller, light-toned ridges of variable widths have been found in Gale Crater and other rover sites and are interpreted to be smaller version of the Nili-like ridges, in this case formed by the mineralization of fractures. This type of ridge is likely to be found in many other places on Mars as more high-resolution data becomes available. Hellas Basin is host to a third type of ridge morphology consisting of large, thick, light-toned ridges forming regular polygons at several superimposed scales. While still enigmatic, these are most likely to be the result of sediment-filled fractures. The Eastern Medusae Fossae Formation contains large swaths of a fourth, previously undocumented, ridge network type

  19. Tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge derived from spreading records in adjacent oceanic basins and age constraints of the ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Abraham, H.; Sager, W.W.; Pringle, M.S.; Frey, F.; Rao, D.G.; Levchenko, O.V.

    and magnetic anomaly ages implies that the hot spot first emplaced NER volcanoes on the Indian plate at a distance from the Wharton Ridge, but as the northward drifting spreading ridge approached the hot spot, the two interacted, keeping later NER volcanism...

  20. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    The term 'hot spot' emerged in the 1960s from speculations that Hawaii might have its origins in an unusually hot source region in the mantle. It subsequently became widely used to refer to volcanic regions considered to be anomalous in the then-new plate tectonic paradigm. It carried with it the implication that volcanism (a) is emplaced by a single, spatially restricted, mongenetic melt-delivery system, assumed to be a mantle plume, and (b) that the source is unusually hot. This model has tended to be assumed a priori to be correct. Nevertheless, there are many geological ways of testing it, and a great deal of work has recently been done to do so. Two fundamental problems challenge this work. First is the difficulty of deciding a 'normal' mantle temperature against which to compare estimates. This is usually taken to be the source temperature of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However, Earth's surface conduction layer is ˜200 km thick, and such a norm is not appropriate if the lavas under investigation formed deeper than the 40-50 km source depth of MORB. Second, methods for estimating temperature suffer from ambiguity of interpretation with composition and partial melt, controversy regarding how they should be applied, lack of repeatability between studies using the same data, and insufficient precision to detect the 200-300 °C temperature variations postulated. Available methods include multiple seismological and petrological approaches, modelling bathymetry and topography, and measuring heat flow. Investigations have been carried out in many areas postulated to represent either (hot) plume heads or (hotter) tails. These include sections of the mid-ocean spreading ridge postulated to include ridge-centred plumes, the North Atlantic Igneous Province, Iceland, Hawaii, oceanic plateaus, and high-standing continental areas such as the Hoggar swell. Most volcanic regions that may reasonably be considered anomalous in the simple plate-tectonic paradigm have been

  1. Deformation of forearcs caused by subduction of aseismic ridges: The role of ridge orientation and convergence direction investigated with 3D finite-element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable deformation of the forearc region. To investigate the role of ridge orientation relative to the margin and convergence direction on the style of forearc deformation, we developed a series of 3D finite-elemente models, in which a rigid oceanic plate carrying the model ridge subducts beneath a deformable forearc wedge. Experiments were carried out for angles of 30°, 60° and 90° between the ridge axis and the trench and for different convergence directions. In the experiments, in which the ridge axis is parallel to the convergence direction, the ridge is stationary; in all other experiments, the ridge migrates along the margin and thus affects different regions of the forearc. Our results show that the ridge indents and uplifts the forearc in all models. For obliquely subducting ridges the displacement and strain fields become highly asymmetric regardless if the ridge is stationary or migrates along the forearc. Only if the ridge is stationary and oriented perpendicular to the margin, the deformation is symmetric relative to the ridge axis. Stationary ridges show uplift only above the ridge tip, whereas a migrating ridge causes a wave of uplift above the leading flank of the ridge followed by subsidence above the trailing flank. Horizontal strain components show domains of both extension and shortening, with extension occurring above the ridge tip and shortening above the ridge flanks. To compare our results with natural case studies, we computed additional models reflecting the setting of the stationary Cocos Ridge subducting beneath southern Costa Rica and of the Nazca Ridge, which migrates along the Peruvian margin. The results of these adjusted models are in good agreement with field observations. For the model of the Cocos Ridge the highest degree of shortening occurs normal to the margin, which coincides with the location of a thrust belt in the forearc of Costa Rica with its maximum shortening inboard

  2. New ridge parameters for ridge regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Dorugade

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hoerl and Kennard (1970a introduced the ridge regression estimator as an alternative to the ordinary least squares (OLS estimator in the presence of multicollinearity. In ridge regression, ridge parameter plays an important role in parameter estimation. In this article, a new method for estimating ridge parameters in both situations of ordinary ridge regression (ORR and generalized ridge regression (GRR is proposed. The simulation study evaluates the performance of the proposed estimator based on the mean squared error (MSE criterion and indicates that under certain conditions the proposed estimators perform well compared to OLS and other well-known estimators reviewed in this article.

  3. ATTENUATION AND FLANKING TRANSMISSION IN LIGHTWEIGHT STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Lhomond, Alice; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the attenuation and flanking transmissions of impact noise in lightweight building structures is studied using a modal approach. The structural field is mainly analysed, putting the main attention to the parts being important in the modelling. The amount of attenuation produced...... by the periodically reinforcing beams used in lightweight building structures is analysed. The consequence of these factors in modelling flanking transmission is also discussed....

  4. Glass and mineral chemistry of northern central Indian ridge basalts: Compositional diversity and petrogenetic significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Basavalingu, B.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    (MORBs) from the outer ridge flank (VT area) and a near-ridge seamount (VM area) reveal that they are moderately phyric plagioclase basalts composed of plagioclase (phenocryst [An sub(60-90)] and groundmass [An sub(35-79)]), olivine (Fo sub(81...

  5. Wrinkle ridges in the floor material of Kasei Valles, Mars: Nature and origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Craddock, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges on Mars occur almost exclusively in smooth plains material referred to as ridged plains. One of the largest contiguous units of ridged plains occurs on Lunae Planum on the eastern flank of the Tharsis rise. The eastern, western, and northern margins of the ridged plains of Lunae Planum suffered extensive erosion in early Amazonian channel-forming events. The most dramatic example of erosion in early Amazonian plains is in Kasei Valles. The nature an origin of the wrinkle ridges in the floor material of Kasei Valles are discussed.

  6. Colored neon flanks and line gap enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, C; Spillmann, L; Kunz, K

    1984-01-01

    When a colored line connects two black (or differently colored) lines across a gap, colored neon flanks are seen on either side of it. These flanks extend over gap sizes of 50 min arc foveally and are not explained by Bezold-type assimilation. They may be elicited by black lines as short as 6 min arc adjoining the colored line at each end. To maximize these flanks, the black and colored lines must appear linearly continuous. Nonaligned junctions weaken the effect and an angular tilt of more than 40 dog destroys it. In this and other respects, (local) neon flanks are similar to van Tuijl's (global) neon color spreading (1975). Both phenomena have analogs in brightness perception. We propose that neon spreading is a lateral extension of neon flanks across the empty space between them, and discuss similarities of these effects with other brightness illusions (Schumann, Prandtl, Ehrenstein). For this group of illusions the term "line gap enhancement" is introduced to imply perceptual enhancement of changes in brightness and/or color along lines. Correspondences between the psychophysical properties and structural prerequisites for line gap enhancement on one hand and neuronal response properties of end-zone inhibited (hypercomplex) cortical cells on the other are discussed.

  7. Propagating buoyant mantle upwelling on the Reykjanes Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Fernando; Hey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge have been attributed to mantle plume flow radiating outward from the Iceland hotspot. This model requires very rapid mantle upwelling and a "rheological boundary" at the solidus to deflect plume material laterally and prevent extreme melting above the plume stem. Here we propose an alternative explanation in which shallow buoyant mantle upwelling instabilities propagate along axis to form the crustal features of the ridge and flanks. As only the locus of buoyant upwelling propagates this mechanism removes the need for rapid mantle plume flow. Based on new geophysical mapping we show that a persistent sub-axial low viscosity channel supporting buoyant mantle upwelling can explain the current oblique geometry of the ridge as a reestablishment of its original configuration following an abrupt change in opening direction. This mechanism further explains the replacement of ridge-orthogonal crustal segmentation with V-shaped crustal ridges and troughs. Our findings indicate that crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge and flanks are formed by shallow buoyant mantle instabilities, fundamentally like at other slow spreading ridges, and need not reflect deep mantle plume flow.

  8. Microsatellites grant more stable flanking genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joukhadar Reem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are DNA sequences that include tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases. SSRs are ubiquitous in all genomes and highly mutable. Presentation of the hypothesis Results from previous studies suggest that flanking regions of SSR are exhibit high stability in a wide range of organisms. We hypothesized that the SSRs ability to discard weak DNA polymerases could be responsible for this unusual stability. . When the weak polymerases are being decayed over SSRs, the flanking sequences would have higher opportunity to be replicated by more stable DNA polymerases. We present evidence of the molecular basis of our hypothesis. Testing the hypothesis The hypothesis could be tested by examining the activity of DNA polymerase during and after a number of PCRs. The PCR reactions should be run with the same SSR locus possessing differences in the SSR length. The hypothesis could also be tested by comparing the mutational rate of a transferred gene between two transformations. The first one has a naked T-DNA (transferred DNA, while the second one has the same T-DNA flanked with two SSRs. Implications of the hypothesis In any transformation experiment, flanking the T-DNA fragment with SSR sequences would result in more stably transferred genes. This process would decrease the unpredictable risks that may occur because of the mutational pressure on this foreign segment.

  9. The Hubble Deep Field South Flanking Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, R A; Brown, T M; Casertano, S; Conselice, C J; De Mello, D F; Dickinson, M E; Ferguson, H C; Fruchter, A S; Gardner, J P; Gilmore, D; González-Lopezlira, R A; Heyer, I; Hook, R N; Kaiser, M E; Mack, J; Makidon, R B; Martin, C L; Mutchler, M Y; Smith, T E; Stiavelli, M; Teplitz, H I; Wiggs, M S; Williams, R E; Zurek, D R; Lucas, Ray A.; Baum, Stefi A.; Brown, Thomas M.; Casertano, Stefano; Conselice, Chris; Mello, Duilia de; Dickinson, Mark E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gilmore, Diane; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Heyer, Inge; Hook, Richard N.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Mack, Jennifer; Makidon, Russell; Martin, Crystal L.; Mutchler, Max; Stiavelli, Massimo; Teplitz, Harry I.; Wiggs, Michael S.; Williams, Robert E.; Zurek, David R.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Hubble Deep Field South program, a set of shorter 2-orbit observations were obtained of the area adjacent to the deep fields. The WFPC2 flanking fields cover a contiguous solid angle of 48 square arcminutes. Parallel observations with the STIS and NICMOS instruments produce a patchwork of additional fields with optical and near-infrared (1.6 micron) response. Deeper parallel exposures with WFPC2 and NICMOS were obtained when STIS observed the NICMOS deep field. These deeper fields are offset from the rest, and an extended low surface brightness object is visible in the deeper WFPC2 flanking field. In this data paper, which serves as an archival record of the project, we discuss the observations and data reduction, and present SExtractor source catalogs and number counts derived from the data. Number counts are broadly consistent with previous surveys from both ground and space. Among other things, these flanking field observations are useful for defining slit masks for spectroscopic follow-up o...

  10. Understanding Etna flank instability through numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia; Merri, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    As many active volcanoes, Mount Etna shows clear evidence of flank instability, and different mechanisms were suggested to explain this flank dynamics, based on the recorded deformation pattern and character. Shallow and deep deformations, mainly associated with both eruptive and seismic events, are concentrated along recognised fracture and fault systems, mobilising the eastern and south-eastern flank of the volcano. Several interacting causes were postulated to control the phenomenon, including gravity force, magma ascent along the feeding system, and a very complex local and/or regional tectonic activity. Nevertheless, the complexity of such dynamics is still an open subject of research and being the volcano flanks heavily urbanised, the comprehension of the gravitative dynamics is a major issue for public safety and civil protection. The present research explores the effects of the main geological features (in particular the role of the subetnean clays, interposed between the Apennine-Maghrebian flysch and the volcanic products) and the role of weakness zones, identified by fracture and fault systems, on the slope instability process. The effects of magma intrusions are also investigated. The problem is addressed by integrating field data, laboratory tests and numerical modelling. A bi- and tri-dimensional stress-strain analysis was performed by a finite difference numerical code (FLAC and FLAC3D), mainly aimed at evaluating the relationship among geological features, volcano-tectonic structures and magmatic activity in controlling the deformation processes. The analyses are well supported by dedicated structural-mechanical field surveys, which allowed to estimate the rock mass strength and deformability parameters. To take into account the uncertainties which inevitably occur in a so complicated model, many efforts were done in performing a sensitivity analysis along a WNW-ESE section crossing the volcano summit and the Valle del Bove depression. This was

  11. Hot Money, Hot Potato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    International hot money flowing into Chinese capital markets has caught the attention of Chinese watchdogs The Chinese are not the only ones feasting on the thriving property and stock markets. Apparently, these markets are the targets of international h

  12. Manganese oxidation by bacterial isolates from the Indian Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Krishnan, K.P.; Khedekar, V.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Ridge waters during the cruise SK194 onboard ORV Sagar Kanya (July, 2003). A total of 25 samples along the ridge axis and flanks were collected in 100 ml sterile polypropylene bottles and analyzed immediately onboard. An inoculum of 100 ll was used... twice with sterile saline and resuspended by vortexing. The inoculum size was calculated by direct cell counts in a cell counting chamber. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC; 0.025%) was added to every tube prior to incubation. For heterotrophic or amen...

  13. Composition measurements in the dusk flank magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-03-01

    The dusk flank magnetosphere exhibits significant structure. Several regions have been identified, including the plasma sheet, mantle, and low latitude boundary layer. Transitions from one region to the next, for example from the mantle to the plasma sheet, can be abrupt or indistinct. In addition, the density within the flank mantle can range over several orders of magnitude. Although there is significant structure in this region of the magnetosphere, individual regions often can be distinguished by their energy spectra and ion composition. ISEE Fast Plasma Experiment and Plasma Composition Experiment data are used to examine the composition of the mantle and to study a set of transitions from the mantle to the plasma sheet where plasmas with mantle-like and plasma sheet-like energies mix. This study indicates that the variability of the mantle density is largely due to variability in the solar wind component (H+ and He2+); the ionospheric plasma (O+) density is roughly constant. Similarly, the plasma with mantle-like energy found in the mixed region is largely of solar wind origin.

  14. Telling the Story of Ridge Flank Research to all Ages and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. K.; Brennon, R.; Hamner, K.; Kane, J.; Ringlein, J.; Strong, L. R.; Orcutt, B. N.; Fisher, A. T.; Edwards, K. J.; Cowen, J. P.; Hulme, S.; Wheat, C. G.; Scientific Team of Expedition AT18-07

    2011-12-01

    A team of six education and communication specialists took part in Expedition AT18-07 onboard the R/V Atlantis during Summer 2011 as part of Hydrogeologic, Geochemical, and Microbiological Experiments in Young Ocean Crust of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Using Subseafloor Observatories. Fully integrating into the science party of this expedition, educators brought their diverse backgrounds (middle school science, high school physics and biology, informal science institutions, and science media/communication) to bear as they participated in shipboard operations, laboratory analyses and scientific problem-solving. Their primary role, however, was to translate the excitement and significance of these investigations for a variety of non-science audiences on shore - including museum visitors, scout groups, summer camps, summer schools and college students - and provide rich opportunities for interaction surrounding transformative science in real time. Using a satellite-based internet link, educators took advantage of web-based tools, Skype and social networking sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to bring the real process of science live from the seafloor to classrooms from Washington, D.C. to Taiwan. Activities and products included: 13 live ship-to-shore video broadcasts, development of classroom activities, partnerships among scientists and educators, web-based microbiology investigations, production of videos, development of museum exhibits and programs, and a video game based on the ROV Jason. In addition, several scientists initiated independent education projects, to which the education and communication team contributed their skills, including the Adopt a Microbe from the Seafloor web site, which provided regular art and science activities about microbiology and invites active participation from shore-based groups. Results of post-expedition work with students and the public will be shared, as will pre- and post-expedition evaluation reports on the impact of this experience directly on the team members. Special thanks to the Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations and Deep Earth Academy for sponsoring this work.

  15. Ridge and Furrow Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per Grau

    2016-01-01

    Ridge and furrow is a specific way of ploughing which makes fields of systematic ridges and furrows like a rubbing washboard. They are part of an overall openfield system, but the focus in this paper is on the functionality of the fields. There are many indications that agro-technological reasons...

  16. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  17. Effect of flanking sounds on the auditory continuity illusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maori Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The auditory continuity illusion or the perceptual restoration of a target sound briefly interrupted by an extraneous sound has been shown to depend on masking. However, little is known about factors other than masking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined whether a sequence of flanking transient sounds affects the apparent continuity of a target tone alternated with a bandpass noise at regular intervals. The flanking sounds significantly increased the limit of perceiving apparent continuity in terms of the maximum target level at a fixed noise level, irrespective of the frequency separation between the target and flanking sounds: the flanking sounds enhanced the continuity illusion. This effect was dependent on the temporal relationship between the flanking sounds and noise bursts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The spectrotemporal characteristics of the enhancement effect suggest that a mechanism to compensate for exogenous attentional distraction may contribute to the continuity illusion.

  18. Ridge jump process in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back to the centre of the hotspot in response to the absolute westward drift of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Mantellic pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact conditions of the last ridge jump in Northern Iceland remain controversial. The diachronous evolution of these two parts of Iceland may be related to the asymmetric plume-ridge interaction when comparing Northern and Southern I...

  19. Hot microswimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroy, Klaus; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Cichos, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Hot microswimmers are self-propelled Brownian particles that exploit local heating for their directed self-thermophoretic motion. We provide a pedagogical overview of the key physical mechanisms underlying this promising new technology. It covers the hydrodynamics of swimming, thermophoresis and -osmosis, hot Brownian motion, force-free steering, and dedicated experimental and simulation tools to analyze hot Brownian swimmers.

  20. Evidence for a Mega-Tsunami Generated by Giant Flank Collapse of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, R. S.; Madeira, J.; Helffrich, G. R.; Schaefer, J. M.; Winckler, G.; Quartau, R.; Adena, K.

    2013-12-01

    Mega-tsunamis generated by ocean island flank collapses are expected to be some of the most hazardous forces of nature, yet evidence for their near-source effects and inferred high run-ups so far is scarce or hotly debated. A newly discovered deposit on the northern coast of Santiago Island (Cape Verde), however, documents the magnitude and run-up height associated with this kind of event. Additionally to chaotic conglomerates distributed from sea-level up to 100 m elevation standing on slopes as steep as 20°, the deposit comprises a number of scattered megaclasts of submarine lava flows, limestone and tuff. The megaclasts are presently located over a higher substructural slope built on younger subaerial lava flows and at elevations ranging 160-220 m a.s.l. All megaclasts correspond to lithologies that crop out exclusively in nearby cliff faces. The origin of this deposit is consequently attributed to an exceptional wave that plucked blocks from the cliff face, transported them inland and deposited them over the higher slopes of the volcanic edifice. The distribution of the megaclasts, together with the local geomorphology, is in agreement with a tsunami that approached the island edifice from the west and was refracted along its northern flank, flooding a series of northwest-oriented valleys. This suggests that the well-known flank collapse of Fogo volcano, located 55 km west of Santiago, is the most likely source, a hypothesis being tested with surface exposure dating. The inferred run-up exceeded 200 m and is consistent with numerical simulations by Paris et al. 2011, implying that the present Fogo island morphology probably developed by at least one giant flank collapse with devastating near-source effects.

  1. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  2. Fingermark ridge drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  3. Integrated study to define the hazard of the unstable flanks of Mt. Etna: the Italian DPC-INGV FLANK Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Valerio; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes are often characterized by unstable flanks. The eastern and south-eastern flanks of Mt. Etna (Italy) have shown repeated evidence of instability in the recent past. The extent and frequency of these processes varies widely, from nearly continuous creep-like movements of specific portions of the flank to the rarer slip of the entire eastern sector, involving also the off-shore portion. Estimated slip rates may vary enormously, from mm/yr to m/week. The most dramatic instability events are associated with major eruptions and shallow seismic activity, as during 2002-2003, posing a serious hazard to the inhabited flanks of the volcano. The Italian Department of Civil Defense (DPC), with the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV), as well as with the involvement of Italian Universities and other Research Institutes, has launched a 2-years project (may 2008-may 2010) devoted to minimize the hazard deriving from the instability of the Etna flanks. This multidisciplinary project embraces geological, geophysical, volcanological, modeling and hazard studies, both on the on-shore and the off-shore portions of the E and SE flanks of the volcano. Indeed, the main aims are to define: (a) the 3D geometry of the collapsing sector(s); (b) the relationships between flank movement and volcanic and seismic activity; (c) the hazard related to the flank instability. The collected data populate a GIS database implemented according the WoVo rules. This project represents the first attempt, at least in Europe, to use an integrated approach to minimize the hazard deriving from flank instability in a volcano. Here we briefly summarize the state of the art of the project at an advanced stage, highlighting the path of the different Tasks, as well as the main results.

  4. Isolation of sequences flanking Ac insertion sites by Ac casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dafang; Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Localizing Ac insertions is a fundamental task in studying Ac-induced mutation and chromosomal rearrangements involving Ac elements. Researchers may sometimes be faced with the situation in which the sequence flanking one side of an Ac/Ds element is known, but the other flank is unknown. Or, a researcher may have a small sequence surrounding the Ac/Ds insertion site and needs to obtain additional flanking genomic sequences. One way to rapidly clone unknown Ac/Ds flanking sequences is via a PCR-based method termed Ac casting. This approach utilizes the somatic transposition activity of Ac during plant development, and provides an efficient means for short-range genome walking. Here we describe the principle of Ac casting, and show how it can be applied to isolate Ac macrotransposon insertion sites.

  5. Internal structure of the western flank of the Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands, from land magnetotelluric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, X.; Jones, A. G.

    2010-07-01

    Large-scale mass wasting is a natural part of the evolution of volcanic islands, where deformation and indications of flank instability, such as large-scale faulting and seismic and aseismic slip are common. The Cumbre Vieja volcano on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) provides an ideal setting to address fundamental questions about the structure, evolution and stability of island volcanoes. The island of La Palma is still in a shield-building stage, and it has been postulated that the western side of the island lies over a pre-existing zone of weakness that can nucleate ruptures. We undertook an audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) survey over the proposed unstable western flank to try to image structures that may be associated with the zone of weakness. The magnetotelluric method (MT) is a geophysical technique used to map the presence of fluids or image important structural contrasts. The goals of this study were (1) to delineate the unstable flank, (2) to map the structures underneath and (3) to determine the presence and geometry of fluids. The results show a 1 km thick top resistive layer overlaying an area of reduced resistivity (enhanced conductivity), interpreted as a layer consisting of an alteration zone and also fluids. Our results confirm previous studies that suggested the existence of a western flank lying over collapse debris material and hyaloclastites, and also they allow us to map part of the subaerial southern extent of the Cumbre Nueva units that lie beneath the more recent Cumbre Vieja rocks. In addition, dimensionality analysis maps the rotation of the dike emplacement off ridge, along the western flank in an en echelon fashion.

  6. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  7. Geophysical and geochemical evidence for deep temperature variations beneath mid-ocean ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Colleen A; Langmuir, Charles H; Gale, Allison

    2014-04-01

    The temperature and composition of Earth's mantle control fundamental planetary properties, including the vigor of mantle convection and the depths of the ocean basins. Seismic wave velocities, ocean ridge depths, and the composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts can all be used to determine variations in mantle temperature and composition, yet are typically considered in isolation. We show that correlations among these three data sets are consistent with 250°C variation extending to depths >400 kilometers and are inconsistent with variations in mantle composition at constant temperature. Anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism. Chemical heterogeneity may contribute to scatter about the global trend. The coherent temperature signal provides a thermal calibration scale for interpreting seismic velocities located distant from ridges.

  8. Structural, geochronological, magnetic and magmatic constraints of a ridge collision/ridge subduction-related ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anma, Ryo

    2013-04-01

    almost instantaneously. The ophiolite is surrounded by synchronous (5.7 Ma to 5.2 Ma) granitic intrusions with various compositions. Our data indicates that the granitic melts started forming near the conjunction of the subducting ridge and transform fault. Generation of granitic melts continued as the spreading center of the same segment subducted, due to partial melting of the oceanic crust and subducted sediments at amphibolite-facies conditions. The obduction of the Taitao ophiolite also accompanied volcanism in the Chile Margin that migrates from west (5.2 Ma) to east (4.6 Ma) at a rate of 5 cm/y as a fracture zone subducted. A ridge collision/ridge subduction-related ophiolite has a short-life. The most intrinsic recognition criteria for such ophiolite must be hot emplacement of plutonic rocks, that represent magmatism at the axial magma chamber in the spreading ridge environment, into cold forearc region, which results in rapid cooling of the deep plutonic section (U-Pb ages coincide with cooling ages within an error range), and pervasive high temperature ductile deformation (after magmatic flow) throughout gabbro. Folding continued until the rocks were cooled to Curie T of magnetite (~580C) in the case of the Taitao ophiolite. A ridge collision/ridge subduction-related ophiolite may accompany block rotation of volcanic sequence, because of high viscosity contrast between hot plutonic section and overriding volcanic section that has already cooled and solidified. It may also accompany acidic intrusions with various compositions and basaltic volcanisms due to subduction of fracture zones.

  9. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  10. High resolution bathymetric and sonar images of a ridge southeast of Terceira Island (Azores plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, N.; Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J.; Silva, I.; Goslin, J.; Ligi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Terceira rift is a oblique ultra-slow spreading system where a transtensive regime results from differential movement between Eurasian and African plates. So far no classical ridge segmentation pattern has here been observed. The predominant morphological features are fault controlled rhombic shaped basins and volcanism related morphologies like circular seamounts and volcanic ridges. We present SIMRAD EM300 (bathymetry + backscatter) images acquired over one of these ridges located SE of Terceira Island, during the SIRENA cruise (PI J. Goslin), which complements previous TOBI mosaics performed over the same area during the AZZORRE99 cruise (PI M. Ligi). The ridge presents a NW-SE orientation, it is seismically active (a seismic crisis was documented in 1997) and corresponds to the southern branch of a V shape bathymetric feature enclosing the Terceira Island and which tip is located west of the Island near the 1998 Serreta ridge eruption site. NE of the ridge, the core of the V, corresponds to the North Hirondelle basin. All this area corresponds mainly to Brunhes magnetic epoch. The new bathymetry maps reveal a partition between tectonic processes, centred in the ridge, and volcanism present at the bottom of the North Hirondelle basin. The ridge high backscatter surface is cut by a set of sub-parallel anastomosed normal faults striking between N130º and N150º. Some faults present horse-tail terminations. Fault splays sometimes link to neighbour faults defining extensional duplexes and fault wedge basins and highs of rhombic shape. The faulting geometry suggests that a left-lateral strike slip component should be present. The top of the ridge consists on an arched demi-.horst, and it is probably a volcanic structure remnant (caldera system?), existing prior to onset of the tectonic stage in the ridge. Both ridge flanks display gullies and mass wasting fans at the base of the slope. The ridge vicinities are almost exclusively composed of a grayish homogeneous

  11. Geology along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mark W.; Southworth, C. Scott; Tollo, Richard P.; Merschat, Arthur J.; Wagner, Sara; Lazor, Ava; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Back Formations. These rocks are bound by numerous faults, including the Rock Castle Creek fault that separates Ashe Formation rocks from Alligator Back Formation rocks in the core of the Ararat River synclinorium. The lack of unequivocal paleontologic or geochronologic ages for any of these rock sequences, combined with fundamental and conflicting differences in tectonogenetic models, compound the problem of regional correlation with Blue Ridge cover rocks to the north.The geologic transition from the central to southern Appalachians is also marked by a profound change in landscape and surficial deposits. In central Virginia, the Blue Ridge consists of narrow ridges that are held up by resistant but contrasting basement and cover lithologies. These ridges have shed eroded material from their crests to the base of the mountain fronts in the form of talus slopes, debris flows, and alluvial-colluvial fans for perhaps 10 m.y. South of Roanoke, however, ridges transition into a broad hilly plateau, flanked on the east by the Blue Ridge escarpment and the eastern Continental Divide. Here, deposits of rounded pebbles, cobbles, and boulders preserve remnants of ancestral west-flowing drainage systems.Both bedrock and surficial geologic processes provide an array of economic deposits along the length of the Blue Ridge Parkway corridor in Virginia, including base and precious metals and industrial minerals. However, common stone was the most important commodity for creating the Blue Ridge Parkway, which yielded building stone for overlooks and tunnels, or crushed stone for road base and pavement.

  12. Comparison of flank margin cave development on San Salvador island, Bahamas, and Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylroie, J.; Carew, J.L.; Frank, E.F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Boardman, M.

    1995-01-01

    San Salvador Island, Bahamas is a 161 Km2 tectonically stable late Quaternary carbonate island located 600 km east-southeast of Miami FL. San Salvador contains numerous flank margin caves (phreatic karst features) that developed primarily in late Pleistocene eolianites. These caves developed during a short time in versy small fresh-water lenses. Cave elevations and Uranium-series ages from stalagmites indicate that all currently subaerial flank margin caves developed during the last interglacial seal-level highstand that was 6 m above current mean seal level 125,000 years ago (oxygen isotope substage 5e), which lasted no more than 14,000 years. The caves were formed by dissolution in the mixing zone at the margin of a freshwater lens that was elevated by the substage 5e highstand, and which resided within the small emergent portions of eolianite ridges. The flank margin caves have chambers with volumes greater than 1000 m3 on San Salvador; on other Bahamian islands, chambers as large as 14,000 m3 are known.

  13. MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AT THE BOREHOLE OBSERVATORY ON THE COSTA RICA RIFT FLANK (OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM HOLE 896A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eNigro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbiology of subsurface, hydrothermally-influenced basaltic crust flanking mid-ocean ridges has remained understudied, due to the difficulty in accessing the subsurface environment. The instrumented boreholes resulting from scientific ocean drilling offer access to samples of the formation fluids circulating through oceanic crust. We analyzed the phylogenetic diversity of bacterial communities of fluid and microbial mat samples collected in situ from the observatory at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 896A, drilled into ~6.5-million-year-old basaltic crust on the flank of the Costa Rica Rift in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from borehole fluid and from a microbial mat coating the outer surface of the fluid port revealed both unique and shared phylotypes. The dominant bacterial clones from both samples were related to the autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing genus Thiomicrospira. Both samples yielded diverse gamma- and alphaproteobacterial phylotypes, as well as members of the Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Analysis of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO genes (cbbL and cbbM from the sampling port mat and from the borehole fluid demonstrated autotrophic carbon assimilation potential for in-situ microbial communities; most cbbL genes were related to those of the sulfur-oxidizing genera Thioalkalivibrio and Thiomicrospira, and cbbM genes were affiliated with uncultured phyloytypes from hydrothermal vent plumes and marine sediments. Several 16S rRNA gene phylotypes from the 896A observatory grouped with phylotypes recovered from seawater-exposed basalts and sulfide deposits at inactive hydrothermal vents, but there is little overlap with hydrothermally-influenced basaltic boreholes 1026B and U1301A on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, suggesting that site-specific characteristics of Hole 896A (i.e. seawater mixing into borehole fluids affect the microbial community

  14. Geometrical constraints on the evolution of ridged sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundrud, Trisha L.; Melling, Humfrey; Ingram, R. Grant

    2004-06-01

    A numerical model of the evolving draft distribution of seasonal pack ice is driven by freezing and ice field compression in one dimension. Spatial transects of sea ice draft acquired during winter in the Beaufort Sea are used to evaluate the model. Histograms obtained by ice-profiling sonar on subsea moorings reveal changes in the draft distribution, while observations of ice velocity by Doppler sonar allow calculation of the strain to which the draft distribution is responding. Numerical diffusion in thermal ice growth is controlled using a remapping algorithm. Mechanical redistribution algorithms in common use generate much more deep ridged ice than is observed. Geometric constraints on ridge-keel development that reflect the finite extent of level floes available for ridge building and the true average shape of keels produce more realistic results. In the seasonal pack ice of the Beaufort Sea, 75% of all floes are too small to provide a volume of ice sufficient to construct a keel of draft equal to that commonly assumed in ice dynamics modeling. On average, the distribution of draft within keels has a negative exponential form, implying a cusped keel shape with more area on the thinner flanks than at the crest; models commonly assume a uniform redistribution of ice into a keel of triangular shape. Clearly, the spatial organization of ice within seasonal pack or, equivalently, the existence of ridges and floes should be an acknowledged factor in redistribution theory for pack ice thickness.

  15. Flank solar wind interaction. Annual report, June 1991-July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, S.L.; Greenstadt, E.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of the first 12 months of our program to study the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind on the far flanks of the bow shock. This study employs data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft during its traversals of the Earth's magnetotail and correlative data from spacecraft monitoring the solar wind upstream. Our main effort to date has involved assembling data sets and developing new plotting programs. Two talks were given at the Spring Meeting of the American Geophysical Union describing our initial results from analyzing data from the far flank foreshock and magnetosheath. The following sections summarize our results.

  16. Transducer model produces facilitation from opposite-sign flanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, J. A.; Watson, A. B.; Morgan, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Small spots, lines and Gabor patterns can be easier to detect when they are superimposed upon similar spots, lines and Gabor patterns. Traditionally, such facilitation has been understood to be a consequence of nonlinear contrast transduction. Facilitation has also been reported to arise from non-overlapping patterns with opposite sign. We point out that this result does not preclude the traditional explanation for superimposed targets. Moreover, we find that facilitation from opposite-sign flanks is weaker than facilitation from same-sign flanks. Simulations with a transducer model produce opposite-sign facilitation.

  17. Geology of Smooth Ridge: MARS-IODP Cabled Observatory Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordahl, K. A.; Paull, C. K.; Ussler, W.; Aiello, I. W.; Mitts, P.; Greene, H. G.; Gibbs, S.

    2004-12-01

    We document the geologic environment of Smooth Ridge, off shore Central California, where the deep-water node associated with the MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research Site) scientific research cable is to be deployed. The MARS cable will provide internet connections and electric power at a node in 890 m of water in support of scientific observatory development and experiments. IODP boreholes are proposed which will be connected to the MARS cable. The deeply incised channels of Monterey and Soquel Canyons flank Smooth Ridge to the SW and NE and the San Gregorio faults marks its NW and upslope boundary. However, the top of Smooth Ridge, as its name implies, only has subdued bathymetric features. These include a subtle downslope channel and one distinct slump scar. A patch of acoustically reflective seafloor on the west side of the ridge, over 5 km from the MARS site, is associated with the only known large-scale biological community on the crest of Smooth Ridge. A reflection seismic survey conducted in 2003 with a high-resolution electrical sparker source reveals the stratigraphy of the Smooth Ridge in unprecedented detail. In conjunction with previously collected widely-spaced multichannnel seismic data, observations and samples obtained using remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) dives, and piston cores, this new survey reveals the erosional and depositional history of Smooth Ridge. The continuity of seismic reflections indicates nearly undisturbed deposition occurred until at least the mid-Miocene. Since that time, and especially since the upper Pliocene, the record is marked by unconformities and infill due to shifting channels, large slumps and landslides, and sediment waves. Several crossing seismic lines provide a quasi-three-dimensional view of a distinct slump scar's structure, and reveal a history of multiple headwall failures. Other subsurface structures, including a much larger, and older, slump feature, have no bathymetric expression at all. 14C dated piston

  18. Cocos Ridge Collision as a Driver for Plate Boundary Deformation in the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M.; Geirsson, H.; Kobayashi, D.

    2011-12-01

    The subduction and collision of bathymetric highs can result in geodynamic changes along convergent plate boundaries, including intense upper plate deformation, increases in mechanical coupling and seismicity, migration and or cessation of volcanism and formation of forearc terranes. But how extensive can the deformation associated with these features be and what are the implications for the long-term formation and evolution of plate boundary zones? Plate boundary evolution and upper plate deformation in southern Central America associated with Cocos Ridge collision is well studied and indicates, 1) migration of the volcanic arc toward the backarc northwest of and cessation of volcanism directly inboard the ridge, 2) uplift of the Cordillera de Talamanca inboard the ridge, 3) shortening across the forearc Fila Costena fold and thrust belt, and 4) outer forearc uplift above and flanking the ridge. Recent geodynamical modeling of Cocos Ridge collision, combined with the results of kinematic block models for the Central American margin, suggests the ridge drives northwest-directed forearc motion from central Costa Rica northwest to the Cocos - Caribbean (Central American forearc block) - North America triple junction, greatly increasing the spatial scale of deformation. Upperplate deformation of the Central American margin to the southeast of the Cocos Ridge in Panama was not investigated in these models. We investigate the dynamics of Cocos Ridge collision along the entire Central American margin and the implications on plate boundary evolution with a new geodynamic model of ridge collision. Our model results are compared to a new GPS derived horizontal velocity field for Central America and preliminary results indicate that the Cocos Ridge drives the Panamanian isthmus into northern South America (i.e., the North Andes block).

  19. A deep scar in the flank of Tenerife (Canary Islands): Geophysical contribution to tsunami hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Nicolas P.; Schnegg, Pierre-André; Falco, Pierik; Costa, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    Among the high-intensity on-Earth tsunami generating events, seismicity, submarine landslides, and volcano lateral collapses are the most important [Ward, S.H., 2001. Landslide tsunami. J. Geophy. Res. 106, 11201-11215; Holcomb, R.T., Searle, R.C., 1991. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes. Mar. Geotech. 10, 19-32; Tinti, S., Bortolucci, E., Romagnoli, C., 2000. Computer simulations of tsunamis due to the sector collapse ar Stromboli, Italy. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 96, 103-128; Ward, S.N., Day, S., 2003. Ritter Island Volcano — lateral collapse and the tsunami of 1888. Geophys. J. Int. 154, 891-902; MacGuire, W.J., 2003. Volcano instability and lateral collapse. Revista 1, 33-45]. Offshore bathymetry studies highlighted huge accumulations of large mass-waste flows (up to thousands cubic kilometres) inherited from past lateral collapses or submarine landslides [ Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Deplus, C., Villemant, B., 2003. Large-scale flank collapse events during the activity of Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Lesser Antilles. J. Geophys. Res. 108, ECV13; Moore, J.G. et al., 1989. Prodigious submarine Landslides on the Hawaiian ridge. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 17465-17484] which spread over more than 100 km off the northern Tenerife (Canary Islands) coastline [Watts, A.B., Masson, D.G., 1995. A giant landslide on the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 24487-24498]. Although mechanics and dynamics triggering such catastrophic events follow from combined complex processes and interactions [Hürlimann, M., Garcia-Piera, J.-O., Ledesma, A., 2000. Causes and mobility of large volcanic landslides: application to Tenerife, Canary Islands. J. Volcano. Geotherm. Res. 103, 121-134; Masson, D.G. et al., 2002. Slope failures on the flanks of the western Canary Islands. Earth-Sci. Rev. 57, 1-35; Reid, M.E., Sisson, T.W., Brien, D.L., 2001. Volcano collapse promoted by hydrothermal alteration and edifice shape, Mount Rainier, Washington. Geology 29, 779

  20. Hematite Bearing Ridge as Evidence for Anoxic Water Discharge in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Morris, R. V.; Murchie, S. L.; Seelos, F. P.; Seelos, K. D.; McGovern, A.; Viviano, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM hyperspectral imaging data covering the northern flank of Mount Sharp and acquired with pixels spatially oversampled have been processed to retrieve high signal to noise single scattering albedo spectra from 0.45 to 2.6 μm with enhanced spatial resolution. Using these data and coordinated HiRISE images, a ~200 m wide and 6.5 km long ridge to the north of a large channel system emanating from Mount Sharp was identified and mapped. The ridge is composed of finely layered strata dipping to the north and exhibits a strong spectral signature of crystalline hematite. To the west, the ridge transitions to an escarpment overlain by younger strata; to the east, debris flows from Mount Sharp cover and obscure the ridge. The ridge is stratigraphically directly above the clay bearing strata. We interpret the ridge to be formed by erosion associated with outflow from the channel that preferentially stripped away flanking strata not as well cemented by hematite. We hypothesize that the hematite accumulated where anoxic groundwater discharged and came into contact with an oxidizing Martian atmosphere. Anoxic water may have originated as precipitation that percolated through the mound, leaching Fe2+ from the overlying sulfate layers until encountering the clay aquiclude. Alternatively, anoxic Fe2+-rich waters at Gale could have originated by groundwater discharge near the base of the mound. In this scenario, dissolved Fe2+ could be leached from an underlying basaltic aquifer or possibly the clay layer. Given that iron oxidation reactions on Earth may be mediated by chemolithotrophic microorganisms, the ridge provides a compelling site for a detailed measurement campaign by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover.

  1. Geology of the western, eastern and northern flanks of the Olympus Mons volcano as seen in HRSC and MOC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Werner, S. C.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.; Dumke, A.; Ivanov, B. A.; Gwinner, K.

    This study is based on the analysis of images taken by MEX High Resolution Stereo Camera and in combination with MGS MOC images. 3-D imagery in the form of HRSC-based anaglyphs and DTMs were very helpful for the study. Our observation and analysis confirm the well-known interpretation of Olympus Mons as a giant shield volcano, but also show that this construct locally has probably partly been made of airborne dust (and/or ash) and ice layered deposits (Neukum et al, 2004; Basilevsky et al., 2005; this study). The deposits form mesas locally standing above the lava fields in the volcano western and eastern flanks as well as ridges locally observed at the top parts of the scarps rimming the Olympus construct on its western and northern flanks. The ridge tops stand a few hundred meters above the adjacent lava flows coming from the volcano top. Ice presence in these deposits was inferred from the presence of "collapse" features locally extending downslope as channel-like forms. The neutron-spectrometry measurements (Feldman et al., 2004) show a noticeable decrease in the neutron flux suggesting presence of up to 15-18 vol. % of equivalent water (ice) in the upper 1 m surface layer in the western part of the construct. The ice-rich deposits could have been emplaced during the epochs of high orbital inclination of Mars (Mishna et al., 2004) and could be partly preserved in the modern epoch due to protecting dust covers (Skorov et al., 2001). At the foot of the western slope of the volcano are seen flow-like features interpreted as remnants of rock glaciers (Lucchitta, 1981; Milkovich and Head, 2006). The dating by crater statistics shows that different areas of the Olympus Mons construct and lava fields at its foot have a spread of ages from >3.5 b.y. to 2 m.y. and glacier-like flows show a 0.5 b.y. to 4 m.y. age range. The eastern flank of the volcano shows a complex of morphologies caused by fluvial (channels), tectonic (wrinkle ridges) and volcanic (lava flows and

  2. Hot Tickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  3. An unusual manifestation of acute appendicitis with left flank pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Talanow, MD, PhD

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The author presents a case with an unusual presentation of early appendicitis. The patient presented initially with left sided flank pain. Workup for nephrolithiasis, including non-contrast CT of the abdomen and pelvis was negative for renal stones or hydronephrosis. After discharge, the patient presented one week later in the ED with right lower quadrant pain. Contrast enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed perforated appendicitis.

  4. Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

  5. Structure and isostatic compensation of the Comorin Ridge, north central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.; Bansal, A. R.

    2008-11-01

    Bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data (about 9200 lkm) of the Comorin Ridge, north central Indian Ocean were investigated using the transfer function and forward model techniques to understand the mode of isostatic compensation and origin of the ridge. The ridge extends for about 500 km in NNW-SSE direction and associates with low-amplitude gravity anomalies ranging from 25 to 30 mGal compared to the ridge relief, suggesting that the anomalies are compensated at deeper depths. From Admittance analysis an Airy model or local compensation with an elastic plate thickness (Te) of about 3 km and crust thickness (t) of 15-20 km are suggested for the southern part of the Comorin Ridge (south of 5°N), whereas for the northern part a flexural plate model with an elastic thickness of about 15 km is obtained. Admittance analysis together with the results from gravity forward modelling reveal that the south part was emplaced on relatively weak oceanic crust with both surface and subsurface loading, while the north part was emplaced on the continental crust. Based on present studies and published plate kinematic models we interpret that the Comorin Ridge was evolved at about 90 Ma during the rift stage of Madagascar from the southwest of India. We have also demarcated the continent-ocean boundary (COB) west of Sri Lanka and southern tip of India, which runs across the strike of the ridge, placing the northern part of the ridge on continent and southern part on oceanic crust. On the southern part of the ridge eastern flank is steep-faulted up to 0.6 km and is controlled by the 79°E FZ and then by COB.

  6. Long-term seismicity of the Reykjanes Ridge (North Atlantic) recorded by a regional hydrophone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Jean; Lourenço, Nuno; Dziak, Robert P.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Haxel, Joe; Luis, Joaquim

    2005-08-01

    The seismicity of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge was recorded by two hydrophone networks moored in the sound fixing and ranging (SOFAR) channel, on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, north and south of the Azores. During its period of operation (05/2002-09/2003), the northern `SIRENA' network, deployed between latitudes 40° 20'N and 50° 30'N, recorded acoustic signals generated by 809 earthquakes on the hotspot-influenced Reykjanes Ridge. This activity was distributed between five spatio-temporal event clusters, each initiated by a moderate-to-large magnitude (4.0-5.6 M) earthquake. The rate of earthquake occurrence within the initial portion of the largest sequence (which began on 2002 October 6) is described adequately by a modified Omori law aftershock model. Although this is consistent with triggering by tectonic processes, none of the Reykjanes Ridge sequences are dominated by a single large-magnitude earthquake, and they appear to be of relatively short duration (0.35-4.5 d) when compared to previously described mid-ocean ridge aftershock sequences. The occurrence of several near-equal magnitude events distributed throughout each sequence is inconsistent with the simple relaxation of mainshock-induced stresses and may reflect the involvement of magmatic or fluid processes along this deep (>2000 m) section of the Reykjanes Ridge.

  7. Application of artificial neural networks to segmentation and classification of topographic profiles of ridge-flank seafloor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Lourenco, E.; Kodagali, V.N.; Baracho, J.

    In this paper, we have utilized Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) for seafloor topographic data segmentation and roughness classification using the multibeam- Hydrosweep system (installed onboard ocean research vessel Sagar Kanya) data. Bathymetric...

  8. [Importance of the flank line in the radiologic semiotics of abdominal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutoli, A; Gaeta, M; Mantineo, G; Bosurgi, G

    1986-04-01

    The authors have analysed the flank stripe in 70 normal subjects and in patients with abdominal disease. The flank stripe has a wide variability and is very useful to detect and locate abdominal pathologic conditions.

  9. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be

  10. Mid-ocean ridges, InRidge and the future

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Drolia, R.K.; Ray, Dwijesh

    , Canada, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Portugal, Russia, Spain, UK and US pooled in their expertise. Some of the national ridge research programmes of various coun - tries ar e: Bridge (Britain, this programme is now...) to oversee the development and implementation of its various programmes. This committee consists of a cross - section of the global ridge researchers. A central office (presently in Japan) is invol - ved to plan activities, hold special conferences...

  11. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_flank [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_flank mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic flank SRX804059... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_flank.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_flank [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_flank mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic flank SRX804058,...SRX804059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_flank.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank mm9 All antigens Embryo Embryonic flank SRX804058,...SRX804059 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank mm9 Input control Embryo Embryonic flank SRX804059... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_flank.bed ...

  15. Hot electron stabilization of a helically symmetric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Furth and Boozer (private communication; Proceedings of the Advanced Bumpy Torus Concepts Workshop, CONF-830758, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 1983, p. 161) have suggested the use of relativistic electrons to achieve the second stability regime in a helical axis stellarator (Heliac). The hot electrons would only be required until the background plasma reached the second stability regime; the heating power maintaining the hot electron layer would then be turned off. The basic correctness of Furth and Boozer's suggestion is confirmed numerically by a localized stability analysis of helically symmetric plasma equilibria, with anisotropic pressure profiles. Stability is evaluated using the localized interchange criterion in which the hot electrons, because of their large drift speeds, are treated as rigid. A hot electron pressure profile is exhibited; it provides a stable path to the second stability regime for the background plasma.

  16. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Johnson, A.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  17. Hot Money,Hot Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    After emerging from the economic doldrums, developing economies are now confronted with a new danger-a flood of international hot money. But how has the speculative capital circumvented regulatory controls and what are the consequences concerning the stability of the developing world? Zhao Zhongwei, a senior researcher with the Institute of World Politics and Economics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, discussed these issues in an article recently published in the China Securities Journal. Edited excerpts follow

  18. Ridge-spotting: A new test for Pacific absolute plate motion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Paul; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Relative plate motions provide high-resolution descriptions of motions of plates relative to other plates. Yet geodynamically, motions of plates relative to the mantle are required since such motions can be attributed to forces (e.g., slab pull and ridge push) acting upon the plates. Various reference frames have been proposed, such as the hot spot reference frame, to link plate motions to a mantle framework. Unfortunately, both accuracy and precision of absolute plate motion models lag behind those of relative plate motion models. Consequently, it is paramount to use relative plate motions in improving our understanding of absolute plate motions. A new technique called "ridge-spotting" combines absolute and relative plate motions and examines the viability of proposed absolute plate motion models. We test the method on six published Pacific absolute plate motions models, including fixed and moving hot spot models as well as a geodynamically derived model. Ridge-spotting reconstructs the Pacific-Farallon and Pacific-Antarctica ridge systems over the last 80 Myr. All six absolute plate motion models predict large amounts of northward migration and monotonic clockwise rotation for the Pacific-Farallon ridge. A geodynamic implication of our ridge migration predictions is that the suggestion that the Pacific-Farallon ridge may have been pinned by a large mantle upwelling is not supported. Unexpected or erratic ridge behaviors may be tied to limitations in the models themselves or (for Indo-Atlantic models) discrepancies in the plate circuits used to project models into the Pacific realm. Ridge-spotting is promising and will be extended to include more plates and other ocean basins.

  19. Two decades of Indian research on Ninetyeast Ridge reveal how seafloor spreading and mantle plume activities have shaped the eastern Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.

    It is widely accepted that the Ninetyeast Ridge ridge is a product of volcanic trace of the Kerguelen mantle plume (hot spot) on the northward-drifting Indian plate between ~85 and 42 Ma. Studies carried out from the early 1990s to 2013 have brought...

  20. Ridge asymmetry and deep aqueous alteration at the trench observed from Rayleigh wave tomography of the Juan de Fuca plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Samuel; Ruan, Youyi; Forsyth, Donald W.

    2016-10-01

    Using Rayleigh wave tomography of noise-removed ocean bottom seismometer data from the Cascadia Initiative, we illuminate the structure of the upper mantle beneath the Juan de Fuca plate. Beneath the Juan de Fuca ridge, there is strong asymmetry, with a pronounced low-velocity zone in the 25-65 km depth range. Extending to the west from the spreading axis, this anomaly has velocities low enough to indicate the presence of melt. The asymmetry in velocity structure and the much greater abundance of seamounts on the west flank of the ridge suggest that dynamic, buoyant upwelling is important, perhaps triggered by thermal or compositional anomalies beneath Axial Seamount. In contrast, there is no evidence for asymmetry in the axial zone or lower than expected velocities beneath the Gorda ridge. On the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge, the shear velocity in the 25-65 depth range is higher than expected; the lithosphere appears to be colder and thicker than predicted by standard plate cooling models, perhaps caused by the downwelling counterpart of the upwelling on the west side of the ridge. Close to the trench, there is a sharp decrease in shear velocity. We interpret this as aqueous alteration caused by hydrothermal circulation through deep normal faults associated with bending of the plate. Beneath the Astoria and Nitinat fans, where abyssal plain sediment is thickest, the velocity decrease is much smaller, which is consistent with a thick sediment cap that prevents hydrothermal alteration of the plate.

  1. Preliminary assessment of the state of CO2 soil degassing on the flanks of Gede volcano (West Java, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunrat, S. L.; Schwandner, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    Gede Volcano (West Java) is part of an andesitic stratovolcano complex consisting of Pangrango in the north-west and Gede in the south-east. The last recorded eruptive activity was a phreatic subvolcanian ash eruption in 1957. Current activity is characterized by episodic swarms at 2-4 km depth, and low-temperature (~160°C) crater degassing in two distinct summit crater fumarolic areas. Hot springs occur in the saddle between the Gede and Pangrango edifice, as well as on the NE flank base. The most recent eruptive events produced pyroclastic material, their flow deposits concentrate toward the NE. A collaborative effort between the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency and the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) is since 2010 aimed at upgrading the geophysical and geochemical monitoring network at Gede Volcano. To support the monitoring instrumentation upgrades under way, surveys of soil CO2 degassing have been performed on the flanks of Gede, in circular and radial traverses.The goal was to establish a spatial distribution of flank CO2 fluxes, and to allow smart siting for continuous gas monitoring stations. Crater fluxes were not surveyed, as its low-temperature hydrothermal system is likely prone to large hydraulic changes in this tropical environment, resulting in variable permeability effects that might mask signals from deeper reservoir or conduit degassing. The high precipitation intensity in the mountains of tropical Java pose challenges to this method, since soil gas permeability is largely controlled by soil moisture content. Simultaneous soil moisture measurements were undertaken. The soil CO2 surveys were carried out using a LI-8100A campaign flux chamber instrument (LICOR Biosciences, Lincoln, Nebraska). This instrument has a very precise and highly stable sensor and an atmospheric pressure equilibrator, making it highly sensitive to low fluxes. It is the far superior choice for higher precision low

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Midventral and Flank Laparotomy Approaches in Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Abubakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare two laparotomy approaches (flank and midventral. Ten (n=10 apparently healthy goats of different breeds and sex, average age of 12±2.1 months, and average weight of 13.4±2 kg were used for the investigation. The goats were randomly divided into flank and midventral groups, each group comprising five goats (n=5. Standard aseptic laparotomy was performed under lumbosacral epidural anaesthesia with mild sedation. Postsurgical wound score showed significant difference (P<0.05 in erythema at 18–24 hours and 10–14 days after surgery between the two approaches; significant difference of dehiscence between the two groups was also recorded at 10–14 days after surgery. Total white blood cells (WBC and lymphocytes counts were significantly different (P<0.05 at the first and second week after surgery. There was significant difference of platelets critical value and platelets dimension width at the first and second week after surgery. Significant difference of packed cells volume between the two approaches was also recorded one week after surgery. It was concluded that midventral laparotomy approach can be conveniently and safely performed under aseptic precautions without fear of intra- and postoperative clinical problems.

  3. A modal-spectral model for flanking transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblet-Puig, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    A model for the prediction of direct and indirect (flanking) sound transmissions is presented. It can be applied to geometries with extrusion symmetry. The structures are modelled with spectral finite elements. The acoustic domains are described by means of a modal expansion of the pressure field and must be cuboid-shaped. These reasonable simplifications in the geometry allow the use of more efficient numerical methods. Consequently the coupled vibroacoustic problem in structures such as junctions is efficiently solved. The vibration reduction index of T-junctions with acoustic excitation and with point force excitation is compared. The differences due to the excitation type obey quite general trends that could be taken into account by prediction formulas. However, they are smaller than other uncertainties not considered in practice. The model is also used to check if the sound transmissions of a fully vibroacoustic problem involving several flanking paths can be reproduced by superposition of independent paths. There exist some differences caused by the interaction between paths, which are more important at low frequencies.

  4. Reverse time migration of prism waves for salt flank delineation

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-09-22

    In this paper, we present a new reverse time migration method for imaging salt flanks with prism wave reflections. It consists of four steps: (1) migrating the seismic data with conventional RTM to give the RTM image; (2) using the RTM image as a reflectivity model to simulate source-side reflections with the Born approximation; (3) zero-lag correlation of the source-side reflection wavefields and receiver-side wavefields to produce the prism wave migration image; and (4) repeating steps 2 and 3 for the receiver-side reflections. An advantage of this method is that there is no need to pick the horizontal reflectors prior to migration of the prism waves. It also separately images the vertical structures at a different step to reduce crosstalk interference. The disadvantage of prism wave migration algorithm is that its computational cost is twice that of conventional RTM. The empirical results with a salt model suggest that prism wave migration can be an effective method for salt flank delineation in the absence of diving waves.

  5. Plasma Transport at the Magnetospheric Flank Boundary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Antonius

    2012-04-23

    Progress is highlighted in these areas: 1. Model of magnetic reconnection induced by three-dimensional Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes at the magnetospheric flank boundary; 2. Quantitative evaluation of mass transport from the magnetosheath onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 3. Comparison of mass transfer by cusp reconnection and Flank Kelvin Helmholtz modes; 4. Entropy constraint and plasma transport in the magnetotail - a new mechanism for current sheet thinning; 5. Test particle model for mass transport onto closed geomagnetic field for northward IMF; 6. Influence of density asymmetry and magnetic shear on (a) the linear and nonlinear growth of 3D Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) modes, and (b) three-dimensional KH mediated mass transport; 7. Examination of entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail; 8. Entropy change and plasma transport by KH mediated reconnection - mixing and heating of plasma; 9. Entropy and plasma transport in the magnetotail - tail reconnection; and, 10. Wave coupling at the magnetospheric boundary and generation of kinetic Alfven waves.

  6. Leakage of active crater lake brine through the north flank at Rincon de la Vieja volcano, northwest Costa Rica, and implications for crater collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempter, K.A.; Rowe, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Active Crater at Rincon de la Vieja volcano, Costa Rica, reaches an elevation of 1750 m and contains a warm, hyper-acidic crater lake that probably formed soon after the eruption of the Rio Blanco tephra deposit approximately 3500 years before present. The Active Crater is buttressed by volcanic ridges and older craters on all sides except the north, which dips steeply toward the Caribbean coastal plains. Acidic, above-ambient-temperature streams are found along the Active Crater's north flank at elevations between 800 and 1000 m. A geochemical survey of thermal and non-thermal waters at Rincon de la Vieja was done in 1989 to determine whether hyper-acidic fluids are leaking from the Active Crater through the north flank, affecting the composition of north-flank streams. Results of the water-chemistry survey reveal that three distinct thermal waters are found on the flanks of Rincon de la Vieja volcano: acid chloride-sulfate (ACS), acid sulfate (AS), and neutral chloride (NC) waters. The most extreme ACS water was collected from the crater lake that fills the Active Crater. Chemical analyses of the lake water reveal a hyper-acidic (pH ~ 0) chloride-sulfate brine with elevated concentrations of calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, manganese, copper, zinc, fluorine, and boron. The composition of the brine reflects the combined effects of magmatic degassing from a shallow magma body beneath the Active Crater, dissolution of andesitic volcanic rock, and evaporative concentration of dissolved constituents at above-ambient temperatures. Similar cation and anion enrichments are found in the above-ambient-temperature streams draining the north flank of the Active Crater. The pH of north-flank thermal waters range from 3.6 to 4.1 and chloride:sulfate ratios (1.2-1.4) that are a factor of two greater than that of the lake brine (0.60). The waters have an ACS composition that is quite different from the AS and NC thermal waters that occur along the southern flank of Rincon

  7. Leakage of Active Crater lake brine through the north flank at Rincón de la Vieja volcano, northwest Costa Rica, and implications for crater collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempter, K. A.; Rowe, G. L.

    2000-04-01

    The Active Crater at Rincón de la Vieja volcano, Costa Rica, reaches an elevation of 1750 m and contains a warm, hyper-acidic crater lake that probably formed soon after the eruption of the Rio Blanco tephra deposit approximately 3500 years before present. The Active Crater is buttressed by volcanic ridges and older craters on all sides except the north, which dips steeply toward the Caribbean coastal plains. Acidic, above-ambient-temperature streams are found along the Active Crater's north flank at elevations between 800 and 1000 m. A geochemical survey of thermal and non-thermal waters at Rincón de la Vieja was done in 1989 to determine whether hyper-acidic fluids are leaking from the Active Crater through the north flank, affecting the composition of north-flank streams. Results of the water-chemistry survey reveal that three distinct thermal waters are found on the flanks of Rincón de la Vieja volcano: acid chloride-sulfate (ACS), acid sulfate (AS), and neutral chloride (NC) waters. The most extreme ACS water was collected from the crater lake that fills the Active Crater. Chemical analyses of the lake water reveal a hyper-acidic (pH∼0) chloride-sulfate brine with elevated concentrations of calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, manganese, copper, zinc, fluorine, and boron. The composition of the brine reflects the combined effects of magmatic degassing from a shallow magma body beneath the Active Crater, dissolution of andesitic volcanic rock, and evaporative concentration of dissolved constituents at above-ambient temperatures. Similar cation and anion enrichments are found in the above-ambient-temperature streams draining the north flank of the Active Crater. The pH of north-flank thermal waters range from 3.6 to 4.1 and chloride:sulfate ratios (1.2-1.4) that are a factor of two greater than that of the lake brine (0.60). The waters have an ACS composition that is quite different from the AS and NC thermal waters that occur along the southern flank of

  8. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  9. Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

  10. Glass and Mineral Chemistry of Northern Central Indian Ridge Basalts: Compositional Diversity and Petrogenetic Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dwijesh RAY; Ranadip BANERJEE; Sridhar D IYER; Basavaraju BASAVALINGU; Subir MUKHOPADHYAY

    2009-01-01

    The glass and mineral chemistry of basalts examined from the northern central Indian ridge (NCIR) provides an insight into magma genesis around the vicinity of two transform faults: Vityaz (VT) and Vema (VM). The studied mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) from the outer ridge flank (VT area) and a near-ridge seamount (VM area) reveal that they are moderately phyric plagioclase basalts composed of plagioclase (phenocryst [An_(60-90)] and groundmass [An_(35-79)]), olivine (FO_(81-88)), diopside (Wo_(45-51), En_(25-37), Fs_(14-24)), and titanomagnetite (FeO_t~63.75 wt% and TiO_2 ~22.69 wt%). The whole-rock composition of these basalts has similar Mg# [mole Mg/mole(Mg+Fe~(2+)] (VT basalt: ~0.56-0.58; VM basalt: ~0.57), but differ in their total alkali content (VT basalt: ~2.65; VM basalt: ~3.24). The bulk composition of the magma was gradually depleted in MgO and enriched in FeO_t, TiO_2, P_2O_5, and Na_2O with progressive fractionation, the basalts were gradually enriched in Y and Zr and depleted in Ni and Cr. In addition, the ΣREE of magma also increased with fractionation, without any change in the (La/ Yb)_N value. Glass from the VM seamount shows more fractionated characters (Mg#: 0.56-0.57) compared to the outer ridge flank lava of the VT area (Mg#: 0.63-0.65). This study concludes that present basalts experienced low-pressure crystallization at a relatively shallow depth. The geochemical changes in the NCIR magmas resulted from fractional crystallization at a shallow depth. As a consequence, spinel was the first mineral to crystallize at a pressure 10 kbar, followed by Fe-rich olivine at <10 kbar pressure.

  11. Microsatellite flanking region similarities among different loci within insect species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meglécz, E; Anderson, S J; Bourguet, D; Butcher, R; Caldas, A; Cassel-Lundhagen, A; d'Acier, A C; Dawson, D A; Faure, N; Fauvelot, C; Franck, P; Harper, G; Keyghobadi, N; Kluetsch, C; Muthulakshmi, M; Nagaraju, J; Patt, A; Péténian, F; Silvain, J-F; Wilcock, H R

    2007-04-01

    Although microsatellites are ubiquitous in eukaryota, the number of available markers varies strongly among taxa. This meta-analysis was conducted on 32 insect species. Sequences were obtained from two assembled whole genomes, whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences from 10 species and screening partial genomic libraries for microsatellites from 23 species. We have demonstrated: (1) strong differences in the abundance of microsatellites among species; (2) that microsatellites within species are often grouped into families based on similarities in their flanking sequences; (3) that the proportion of microsatellites grouped into families varies strongly among taxa; and (4) that microsatellite families were significantly more often associated with transposable elements - or their remnants - than unique microsatellite sequences.

  12. Evidence of Multiple Flank Collapse at Volcan Baru, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J. A.; Rose, W. I.

    2009-12-01

    Michigan Tech's Peace Corps Master's International program (PCMI) in Geological Hazards has enabled several long-term investigations of active volcanoes in Latin America. To contribute to volcanic hazard assessments in Panama and achieve the goals defined by the PCMI program, we developed this debris avalanche project to address outstanding questions regarding Volcan Baru's most devastating event - massive slope failure of the western flank. Relying on basic mapping tools as well as the 2007 USGS Open-File Report focusing on hazard assessments of Panama's youngest and potentially active volcano, identification of the debris avalanche deposits (DAD) required detailed field investigations to determine the limits of the units. Extending across an area larger than 600 km2, field strategies were developed based on outcrop exposures within drainages and road-cuts. Aerial photos and DEMs of Baru's nested craters were interpreted by earlier scientists as the remains of two collapsed flanks. The results from in-depth field traverses provide several important discoveries: paleosols and sharp contacts within the stratigraphy indicate multiple DAD, deeply weathered hummocks red-flag the deposits more than 50-km away from Baru's crater, and high-quality radiocarbon samples (up to 45-cm long fragments of entrained wood) lie in the distal reaches of the debris flow area. During the 2008-2009 field seasons, we received assistance from the University of Panama, Civil Protection, and Panama's National Institute of Geography. Support from local experts and feedback from professional scientists of the Smithsonian Institution and Costa Rica's Institute of Electricity were invaluable. The 2-year investment in volcanic hazard studies has brought together resources from several countries as well as fresh data that will benefit the residents and emergency management officials of Panama. Jigsaw fractured clasts lie within Volcan Baru's debris avalanche deposits more than 28 km south of the

  13. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  14. Seismicity And Accretion Processes Along The Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of the Azores using data from the MARCHE Autonomous Hydrophone Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Julie; Cevatoglu, Melis; Cannat, Mathilde; Escartin, Javier; Maia, Marcia; Tisseau, Chantal; Dziak, Robert; Goslin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    The seismicity of the South Atlantic Ocean has been recorded by the MARCHE network of 4 autonomous underwater hydrophones (AUH) moored within the SOFAR channel on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The instruments were deployed south of the Azores Plateau between 32° and 39°N from July 2005 to August 2008. The low attenuation properties of the SOFAR channel for earthquake T-wave propagation result in a detection threshold reduction from a magnitude completeness level (Mc) of ~4.3 for MAR events recorded by the land-based seismic networks to Mc=2.1 using this hydrophone array. A spatio-temporal analysis has been performed among the 5600 events recorded inside the MARCHE array. Most events are distributed along the ridge between lat. 39°N on the Azores Platform and the Rainbow (36°N) segment. In the hydrophone catalogue, acoustic magnitude (Source Level, SL) is used as a measure of earthquake size. The source level above which the data set is complete is SLc=205 dB. We look for seismic swarms using the cluster software of the SEISAN package. The criterion used are a minimum SL of 210 to detect a possible mainshock, and a radius of 30 km and a time window of 40 days after this mainshock (Cevatoglu, 2010, Goslin et al., 2012). 7 swarms with more than 15 events are identified using this approach between 32°et 39°N of latitude. The maximum number of earthquake in a swarm is 57 events. This result differs from the study of Simao et al. (2010) as we processed a further year of data and selected sequences with fewer events. Looking at the distribution of the SL as a function of time after the mainshock, we discuss the possible mechanism of these earthquakes : tectonic events with a "mainshock-aftershock" distribution fitting a modified Omori law or volcanic events showing more constant SL values. We also present the geophysical setting of these 7 swarms, using gravity, bathymetry, and available local geological data. This study illustrates the potential of

  15. Effects of tool flank wear on orthogonal cutting process of aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Ping; KE Ying-lin

    2006-01-01

    The tool flank begins to wear out as soon as cutting process proceeds. Cutting parameters such as cutting forces and cutting temperature will vary with increasing degree of flank wear. In order to reveal the relationship between them, the theoretical situations of cutting process were analyzed considering the tool flank wear effect. The variation rules of cutting force, residual stress and temperature distributions along with the tool flank wear were analyzed comparing with the sharp tool tip. Through FEM simulation method, affections of the tool flank wear value VB on cutting forces, residual stress and temperature distributions were analyzed. A special result in this simulation is that the thrust force is more sensitive to tool flank wear, which can be used as a recognition method of tool condition monitoring. The FEM simulation analysis result agrees well with the experimental measuring data in public literatures and some experiments made also by the authors.

  16. Oak Ridge callibration recall program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pritchard, E.W. [Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

  17. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  18. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 with the mission of standing up a supercomputer 100 times...

  19. A mechanism for the origin and development of the large-scale dunefield on the right flank of the lower reach of Laoha River, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Han; GuiFang Zhang; Li You; Liang Zhou; Lin Yang; XueYong Zhao; YuLin Li; TongHui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    By viewing satellite imagery, a striking large-scale dunefield can be clearly perceived, with a size of nearly 63 km long and 11 km wide, and trending NE–SW, on the right flank of the lower Laoha River, Northeast China. By means of remote sensing imagery analysis and field observation as well as a comparison with a small-scale dunefield on the right flank of the lower Xiangshui River, analogous to the case of the lower Laoha River, this paper presents a new mechanism for its origin and development. The results show that:(1) the large-scale dunefield bears a tile-style framework overwhelmingly composed of transverse barchanoid ridges perpendicular to the predominant winds, and inlaid diverse blowouts. (2) The small-scale dunefield, referred to as a primary structural unit of the large one, is typical of an incipient dunefield, following the same rules of evolution as the larger. (3) A succession of barchanoid ridge chains can steadily migrate downwind in much the same manner as surface wave propagation in air or water stimulated by an incised valley, and ultimately tend to bear roughly the same wavelength and amplitude under stable climate and hydrologic regimes. (4) The first ridge chain acquires its sand source substantially from the downwind escarpments exposing the loose Quaternary sandy sediments to the air, while the ensuing ridges derive their sands dominantly from in situ deflation of the underlain Quaternary loose sandy sediments in blowouts, partly from the upwind ridges through northern elongated horns. Theoretically, the sands from riparian escarpments can be transported by wind to the downwind distal end of a dunefield after sufficient long du-ration. (5) The lower Laohahe region experienced probably three significant climatic changes in the past, corresponding to the three active dune belts, suggesting that once a large-scale dunefield occurs, it is nearly impossible to be completely stabilized, at least in its central portions. At present, seasonal

  20. Flank transparency: transparent filters seen in dynamic two-color displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, D; Rodriguez, A M; Hoffman, D D

    2001-01-01

    Flank transparency is the perception of a colored transparent filter evoked by apparent-motion displays containing as few as two colors. Displays of flank transparency contain a random array of line segments placed on a uniform background. Small flanks are added to the line segments if the segments fall in the interior of a moving virtual shape, such as a virtual disk. This leads to the perception of a colored transparent disk with well-defined boundaries moving over the array of lines. Current qualitative and quantitative models of luminance and color conditions for perceptual transparency do not account for flank transparency as they require displays containing at least three different colors.

  1. Pyroclastic eruptions from Axial caldera, Juan de Fuca Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helo, Christoph; Stix, John [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Clague, Dave A [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Unconsolidated volcaniclastic glass deposits on the flanks of Axial Seamount, a caldera system situated on the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the NE Pacific Ocean, demonstrate the occurrence of explosive events, in addition to effusive activity. The variety of produced glass fragments ranges from various angular forms to thin deep-sea limu o Pele, with dominantly moderately fractionated to occasionally primitive MOR basalt composition. A model involving the collapse of a magmatic foam layer may account for the observed spectrum of glass fragments.

  2. Patterns of nucleotides that flank substitutions in human orthologous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence context is an important aspect of base mutagenesis, and three-base periodicity is an intrinsic property of coding sequences. However, how three-base periodicity is influenced in the vicinity of substitutions is still unclear. The effect of context on mutagenesis should be revealed in the usage of nucleotides that flank substitutions. Relative entropy (also known as Kullback-Leibler divergence is useful for finding unusual patterns in biological sequences. Results Using relative entropy, we visualized the periodic patterns in the context of substitutions in human orthologous genes. Neighbouring patterns differed both among substitution categories and within a category that occurred at three codon positions. Transition tended to occur in periodic sequences relative to transversion. Periodic signals were stronger in a set of flanking sequences of substitutions that occurred at the third-codon positions than in those that occurred at the first- or second-codon positions. To determine how the three-base periodicity was affected near the substitution sites, we fitted a sine model to the values of the relative entropy. A sine of period equal to 3 is a good approximation for the three-base periodicity at sites not in close vicinity to some substitutions. These periods were interrupted near the substitution site and then reappeared away from substitutions. A comparative analysis between the native and codon-shuffled datasets suggested that the codon usage frequency was not the sole origin of the three-base periodicity, implying that the native order of codons also played an important role in this periodicity. Synonymous codon shuffling revealed that synonymous codon usage bias was one of the factors responsible for the observed three-base periodicity. Conclusions Our results offer an efficient way to illustrate unusual periodic patterns in the context of substitutions and provide further insight into the origin of three

  3. Eskers in Ireland, analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Xavier; Bourke, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Sinuous ridges on the surface of Mars are often inferred as putative esker ridges. Eskers cover several hundred kilometers of the Irish landscape and are one of the dominant landforms in the Irish Midlands. Well exposed stratigraphic sections and the body of existing knowledge due to extensive research carried out on these landforms make the Irish eskers an excellent analog for sinuous ridges on Mars. The Irish Eskers are sinuous ridges 0.1 - 80 km long, 20 - 500 m wide and 4 - 50 m high laid down by glacial meltwater in tunnels and crevasses in stationary or retreating ice sheets. They are commonly composed of sands and gravels with rounded boulders and cobbles. The gravels are usually bedded and the beds often slump towards the flank of the esker, indicating collapse as the confining ice walls melt. Four types of eskers have been identified in Ireland: (i) Continuous subglacial tunnel fill represents deposition within tunnels underneath or within an ice body originally used as water escape conduits; (ii) Continuous fluvial ice-channel fill deposit in channels cut into the ice on top of the glacier or down to the substrate subsequently infilled by sediments; (iii) Long beads - subglacial tunnel fill are segmented ridges, with a length-width ratio of 5:1 to 10:1, representing sequential deposition near or at the ice margin as the ice sheet retreats; (iv) Short beads are glaciolacustrine deposits interpreted as sequential deposition of ice-contact subaqueous outwash fans. Irish eskers have significant morphological similarities with those identified on Mars providing an opportunity for an insightful morphological and morphometric analysis to determine potential formative environments on Mars. Putative Martian eskers are 2-300 km long, 50-3000 m wide and 10-150 m high. The Irish eskers are similar in scale and present dimensions within these ranges. Eskers in Ireland are composed of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders. Mars esker-like ridges observed in high

  4. InRidge program: Preliminary results from the first cruise

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.

    The first cruise under India's own Ridge research initiative, InRidge collected new data on bathymetry, free-air gravity and magnetic anomalies across the ridge axis between the Vema and Zhivago transform faults in the Central Indian Ridge...

  5. Flank pseudohernia following posterior rib fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butensky, Adam M; Gruss, Leah P; Gleit, Zachary L

    2016-10-01

    A pseudohernia is an abdominal wall bulge that may be mistaken for a hernia but that lacks the disruption of the abdominal wall that characterizes a hernia. Thus, the natural history and treatment of this condition differ from those of a hernia. This is the first report of a pseudohernia due to cough-associated rib fracture. A case of pseudohernia due to fractures of the 10(th) and 11(th) ribs in a 68-year-old white woman is presented. The patient suffered from a major coughing episode 1 year prior to her presentation, after which she noted a progressively enlarging bulge in her left flank. Computed tomography demonstrated a bulge in the abdominal wall containing bowel and spleen but with all muscle and fascial layers intact; in addition, lateral 10(th) rib and posterior 11(th) rib fractures were noted. As there was no defect in muscle or fascia, we diagnosed a pseudohernia, likely due to a denervation injury from the fractured ribs. Symptomatic treatment was recommended, including wearing a corset and referral to a pain management clinic. Symptomatic treatment is thought to be the mainstay of therapy for pseudohernias, as surgical intervention is unlikely to be of benefit.

  6. Transposed genes in Arabidopsis are often associated with flanking repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Woodhouse

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the eukaryotic genome is known to be mobile, largely due to the movement of transposons and other parasitic elements. Recent work in plants and Drosophila suggests that mobility is also a feature of many nontransposon genes and gene families. Indeed, analysis of the Arabidopsis genome suggested that as many as half of all genes had moved to unlinked positions since Arabidopsis diverged from papaya roughly 72 million years ago, and that these mobile genes tend to fall into distinct gene families. However, the mechanism by which single gene transposition occurred was not deduced. By comparing two closely related species, Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, we sought to determine the nature of gene transposition in Arabidopsis. We found that certain categories of genes are much more likely to have transposed than others, and that many of these transposed genes are flanked by direct repeat sequence that was homologous to sequence within the orthologous target site in A. lyrata and which was predominantly genic in identity. We suggest that intrachromosomal recombination between tandemly duplicated sequences, and subsequent insertion of the circular product, is the predominant mechanism of gene transposition.

  7. The study of double flank micro gear roll testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen-Chih; An, Nai-Chun; Yang, Shu-Han; Yan, Sheng-Zhan; Chen, Shih-Lu

    2011-12-01

    The recent fast development of multifunctional portable electronic devices results in the obvious requirement of micro mechanical components. Due to the popular application of the micro actuators and the micro gearboxes, micro gears become the frequently used micro mechanical component in a small device such as small intelligent robots or dental surgical devices. Metal Industries Research & Development Centre (MIRDC) has successfully developed a small speed reducer that comprises several micro planetary gear trains. The module of this micro planetary gear train is 0.12mm. Since all gears are small, no commercial instrument is available for inspection. How to evaluate the manufacturing quality of micro gears becomes an important issue. This study focuses on the double flank gear rolling test and a specialized apparatus is built referring to the testing requirements in the international standards. The center distance variation during the rolling test is recorded and two indices, the total radial composite deviation and the maximum tooth-to-tooth radial composite deviation, are calculated to evaluate the accuracy grade of the micro gears. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the micro gear made by the cold forging process conforms to grade 7 defined in the ISO 1328-2 while grade 2 is achieved if the JGMA 116-02 is specified.

  8. Asymmetric nucleosomes flank promoters in the budding yeast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Zentner, Gabriel E; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Nucleosomes in active chromatin are dynamic, but whether they have distinct structural conformations is unknown. To identify nucleosomes with alternative structures genome-wide, we used H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping, which revealed that 5% of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleosome positions have asymmetric histone-DNA interactions. These asymmetric interactions are enriched at nucleosome positions that flank promoters. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) sequence-based profiles of asymmetric nucleosome positions revealed a corresponding asymmetry in MNase protection near the dyad axis, suggesting that the loss of DNA contacts around H4S47 is accompanied by protection of the DNA from MNase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation mapping of selected nucleosome remodelers indicated that asymmetric nucleosomes are bound by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex, which is required for maintaining nucleosomes at asymmetric positions. These results imply that the asymmetric nucleosome-RSC complex is a metastable intermediate representing partial unwrapping and protection of nucleosomal DNA on one side of the dyad axis during chromatin remodeling.

  9. Improving prosthetic prognosis by connective tissue ridge augmentation of alveolar ridge

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The contour of edentulous ridge should be carefully evaluated before a fixed partial denture is undertaken. The ideal ridge height and width allows placement of a natural looking pontic which facilitates maintenance of plaque-free environment. The localized alveolar ridge defect refers to the volumetric deficit of the limited extent of bone and soft tissue within the alveolar process. Such type of ridge defects can be corrected by surgical ridge augmentation that can be accomplished by the ad...

  10. Mid-oceanic ridge system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    cinders, followed by a rebuilding phase with hot magma. The entire Pacific Ocean boundary is surrounded by long stretches of volcanoes and is known collectively as The Ring of Fire. Continental / Continental Where two continental plates collide...

  11. Sex Determination from Fingerprint Ridge Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sudesh Gungadin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with an aim to establish a relationship between sex and fingerprint ridge density. The fingerprints were taken from 500 subjects (250 males and 250 females in the age group of 18-60 years. After taking fingerprints, the ridges were counted in the upper portion of the radial border of each print for all ten fingers and mean value was calculated. The results have shown that a finger print ridge of 14 ridges/25 mm2 is more likely of female origin. It has been successful to support the hypothesis that women tend to have a statistically significant greater ridge density than men.

  12. Crustal structure of the Walvis Ridge at the junction with the Namibian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Tanja; Jokat, Wilfried; Behrmann, Jan H.; Ryberg, Trond; Weber, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Continental breakup is commonly preceded or accompanied by massive volcanism and deposition of flood basalts. The large volumes of magma are thought to originate from hot upwelling mantle plumes arriving at the lithosphere. The following plume conduit often leaves a trail in form of volcanic islands or aseismic ridges on the newly created oceanic crust. Due to this correlation in space and time between plume-derived structures and continental breakup, plumes are considered to have a triggering effect or even cause continental breakups. The South Atlantic is a classical example for this model including the Parana (South America) and Etendeka (Africa) flood basalts as well as the aseismic ridges Rio Grande Rise and Walvis Ridge on both conjugate margins. The Walvis Ridge connects the Etendeka flood basalts with the active volcanic islands of Tristan da Cunha, the current hotspot position. To investigate the modification of the continent ocean transition (COT) by the arriving plume head, a large geophysical on- and offshore experiment was conducted in 2011 at the intersection of Walvis Ridge with the African continent. We present two P-wave velocity models of the deep crustal structure derived from seismic refraction data. One profile crosses the ridge ~500km away from the coastline, while the other one extends along the ridge and continues onshore. 27 ocean bottom stations (OBS, spacing 13 km) were deployed for the perpendicular profile, 28 OBS, 50 land stations and 8 dynamite shots were used for the longitudinal profile. Crustal velocities beneath Walvis Ridge range between 5.5 km/s and 7.0 km/s, which are typical velocities for oceanic crust. The thickness, however, is approximately three times than normal, 17 km in the western part and increasing to 22 km towards the continent. The COT is characterized by 30 km thick crust with a high velocity lower crustal body (HVLCB) with seismic velocities up to 7.5 km/s. The western boundary of the HVLCB is at a similar

  13. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  14. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Controls on ferromanganese crust composition and reconnaissance resource potential, Ninetyeast Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James; Conrad, Tracey A.; Mizell, Kira; Banakar, Virupaxa K.; Frey, Frederick A.; Sager, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A reconnaissance survey of Fe-Mn crusts from the 5000 km long (~31°S to 10°N) Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the Indian Ocean shows their widespread occurrence along the ridge as well as with water depth on the ridge flanks. The crusts are hydrogenetic based in growth rates and discrimination plots. Twenty samples from 12 crusts from 9 locations along the ridge were analyzed for chemical and mineralogical compositions, growth rates, and statistical relationships (Q-mode factor analysis, correlation coefficients) were calculated. The crusts collected are relatively thin (maximum 40 mm), and those analyzed varied from 4 mm to 32 mm. However, crusts as thick as 80 mm can be expected to occur based on the age of rocks that comprise the NER and the growth rates calculated here. Growth rates of the crusts increase to the north along the NER and with water depth. The increase to the north resulted from an increased supply of Mn from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to depths below the OMZ combined with an increased supply of Fe at depth from the dissolution of biogenic carbonate and from deep-sourced hydrothermal Fe. These increased supplies of Fe increased growth rates of the deeper-water crusts along the entire NER. Because of the huge terrigenous (rivers, eolian, pyroclastic) and hydrothermal (three spreading centers) inputs to the Indian Ocean, and the history of primary productivity, Fe-Mn crust compositions vary from those analyzed from open-ocean locations in the Pacific.

  16. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinoluk, Tolga [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Armesto, Néstor, E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Beuf, Guillaume [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Lublinsky, Michael [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-12-17

    We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  18. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Beuf, Guillaume; Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  19. Bose enhancement and the ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altinoluk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We point out that Bose enhancement in a hadronic wave function generically leads to correlations between produced particles. We show explicitly, by calculating the projectile density matrix in the Color Glass Condensate approach to high-energy hadronic collisions, that the Bose enhancement of gluons in the projectile leads to azimuthal collimation of long range rapidity correlations of the produced particles, the so-called ridge correlations.

  20. A coral-rubble ridge as evidence for hurricane overwash, Anegada (British Virgin Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiske, M.; Halley, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    A coral-rubble ridge fringes part of the north shore of Anegada, a low-lying island in the northern Caribbean. Both historical reports and the geological record underline its vulnerability to tsunami and hurricanes. In this study we document the sedimentary characteristics of a coral-rubble ridge, which extends discontinuously along 1.5-1.8 km of chiefly north-facing shores at Soldier Wash. The ridge is less distinctive and appears only in patches along the west-facing shoreline at Windless Bight, where the wave regime is calmer. It is located ca. 8 m from the fair-weather shore, has a maximum width of 15 m and a maximum thickness of 0.8 m. The lower seaward-facing slope of the ridge is relatively flat, probably due to successive reworking, whereas the upper seaward slope is steep and partly displays avalanching faces. The landward flank is gently sloping and terminates abruptly. The ridge is mainly composed of well-rounded, encrusted and bored coral rubble (average diameter of 16 cm) that has been reworked in the shallow marine environment prior to transport. Only a few pieces of angular beach rock and karstified Pleistocene limestone are incorporated. The components build a clast-supported framework. No sand is present in the interstices. Imbrication of flat clasts indicates a deposition during landward bed load transport. The ridge morphology, composition and related hydrodynamic conditions during its emplacement are typical for coral-rubble ridges deposited by hurricane-induced storm surges. In comparison, nearby evidence for tsunami inundation is very different because the tsunami-transported coral boulders on Anegada are much bigger (2 m) than the biggest components in the ridge, they are deposited much farther inland (up to 1.5 km), and the corals seem to have been freshly broken out of the reef by the tsunami. The age of the ridge is difficult to estimate. The dark grey surface of the ridge is caused by bioweathering by endolithic organisms that takes tens

  1. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  2. Removing the remaining ridges in fingerprint segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU En; ZHANG Jian-ming; YIN Jian-ping; ZHANG Guo-min; HU Chun-feng

    2006-01-01

    Fingerprint segmentation is an important step in fingerprint recognition and is usually aimed to identify non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions and exclude them as background so as to reduce the time expenditure of image processing and avoid detecting false features. In high and in low quality ridge regions, often are some remaining ridges which are the afterimages of the previously scanned finger and are expected to be excluded from the foreground. However, existing segmentation methods generally do not take the case into consideration, and often, the remaining ridge regions are falsely classified as foreground by segmentation algorithm with spurious features produced erroneously including unrecoverable regions as foreground. This paper proposes two steps for fingerprint segmentation aimed at removing the remaining ridge region from the foreground. The non-ridge regions and unrecoverable low quality ridge regions are removed as background in the first step, and then the foreground produced by the first step is further analyzed for possible remove of the remaining ridge region. The proposed method proved effective in avoiding detecting false ridges and in improving minutiae detection.

  3. Dynamics of sand ridges in coastal seas: the effect of storms, tides and grain sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgreen, M.

    2003-10-01

    observed phase shift between bed topography and mean grain size for shoreface-connected ridges (finest sand on seaward flanks) is due to the selective transport via suspended load of grains with different sizes. Parameter values are based on the sand ridges along the Atlantic coast of North America. A net stabilising effect on the initial growth and an enhanced migration is predicted. A physical explanation for the model results is given. During fair weather or tidally dominated conditions, when bed load transport of sediment is dominant, the results indicate an increase in initial growth and migration rates of tidal sand ridges for a bimodal sediment mixture. A symmetrical tidal current results in a grain size distribution, with the coarsest sand found at the crest of the ridges. Results are compared with the tidal ridges on the Belgian coastal shelf. The investigation of the long-term evolution of shoreface-connected ridges focuses on storm-dominated micro-tidal shelves. It is shown that, starting from an initial state without bedforms, a pattern of ridges with a finite height develops. The evolution of the spatial patterns in the mean grain size and bottom topography are shown and discussed in terms of physical mechanisms.

  4. Seafloor tilt induced by ocean tidal loading inferred from broadband seismometer data from the Cascadia subduction zone and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl E.; Heesemann, Martin; Lambert, Anthony; He, Jianheng

    2017-04-01

    Mass-balancing voltages from four buried broadband seismometers connected to the NEPTUNE Canada seafloor cable are being recorded at 24-bit resolution. Sites are located on the Vancouver Island continental shelf, the nearby Cascadia accretionary prism, the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and the western flank close to the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis. Tidal variations are present throughout the records. Variations in vertical acceleration at three of the sites match predicted gravitational attraction variations very well; those at the fourth site show a small residual that is probably caused by sensitivity to tilt resulting from sensor inclination. Horizontal accelerations, which at tidal periods are sensitive primarily to tilt, are anomalously large relative to standard-earth model results. After removal of predicted tidal body and ocean attraction and loading terms, the residuals are seen to follow ocean pressure variations. Responses range from 0.4 μrad dbar-1 (0.04 μrad kPa-1) at 10° true (down under positive load) at the continental shelf site, to 0.6 μrad dbar-1 at 243° at the Cascadia prism, 0.4 μrad dbar-1 at 90° at the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, and 0.2 μrad dbar-1 at 116° true on the western ridge flank. Except at the continental shelf site, tilts are roughly perpendicular to structural strike. The tilt observations can be explained by loading-induced deformation in the presence of local lithologic gradients or by the influence of faults or structurally controlled anisotropic elastic properties. The observations highlight the utility of using mass position data from force-feedback broad-band seismometers for geodynamic studies.

  5. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample.

  6. InSAR Measurements of Flank Stability at Cumbre Vieja Volcano, La Palma (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Rachel; Thomas, Adam; Li, Zhenhong; McGuire, Bill; Ziebart, Marek; Day, Simon

    2010-03-01

    It has been suggested that instability of the western flank of Cumbre Vieja volcano, on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands), could have the potential to result in a lateral collapse of the flank, which in turn could generate an Atlantic tsunami. InSAR measurements provide an excellent way to corroborate data from GPS and structural surveys to provide independent corroboration. This work will use maps of atmospheric phase delay to improve the accuracy of persistent scatterer interferometry results over the island, and integrate these measurements with new GPS data, to give a complete assessment of flank stability and allow better assessment of the risks posed by the volcano.

  7. A 55-Year Old Man with Acute Painful Flank Mass, a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Alavi-Moghaddam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernias (LH accounts for less than 1.5% of total hernia incidence. It can occur in two separate triangular areas of the flank. About 300 cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 55-year old man with acute painful left side flank mass and final diagnosis of LH. The mass was appeared about three hours before admission and his pain was slight at first but became more severe gradually. He had stable vital sign and the only positive finding on his physical examination was the sphere shape, firm, mobile, and mild tender mass at his left flank.

  8. Geochemistry and morphology of metalliferous sediments and oxyhydroxides from the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrischeva, Elitsa; Scott, Steven D.

    2007-07-01

    We present first data on the geochemistry, mineralogy and morphology of near-vent sediments (35 and 200 m from active vent) and ridge flank sediments (approximately 3 km from the vent field) as well as oxyhydroxide deposits from the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The purpose of the study was to understand better the origin and characteristic features of metalliferous sediments associated with base and precious metal massive sulfides in volcanic terrains. Hydrothermal components in sediments are Fe-Si ± S-rich and Mn-Fe-Si-rich phases, sulfides and barite, which were exclusively derived from plume fallout. Sulfides are only a minor constituent of near-vent sediments (2-4 wt%) and were not detected in ridge flank sediments. The study suggests that the distribution of hydrothermal phases and associated elements in near-vent and ridge flank sediments is affected mainly by processes of agglomeration, dissolution, absorption and settling that take place within a plume and to a lesser extent post-depositional processes. Rapid deposition of sulfides in the vicinity of the vents is reflected in a sharp drop of the Cu concentrations in sediments with increasing distance from the vents. Besides sulfides, important carriers of Pb, Cu, Zn and Co in near-vent sediments are Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides that occur together with silica as aggregates of gel-like material and flaky particles and as coatings on filaments. Away from the vents, trace metals are mostly in Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides and authigenic Fe-rich montmorillonite. Oxyhydroxides at the Main Endeavour field are interpreted to have originated from oxidation of mound sulfides accompanied by precipitation of primary Fe-oxyhydroxide + silica from low-temperature fluids. At the Mothra field, seafloor deposits and chimney crusts composed of Fe-oxyhydroxide ± Mn + silica are considered to be direct precipitates from hydrothermal fluids that have been less diluted with seawater. Oxyhydroxide deposits exhibit unique microtextures

  9. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean – A process oriented modelling approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M Sreejith; M Radhakrishna; K S Krishna; T J Majumdar

    2011-08-01

    The 85°E Ridge extends from the Mahanadi Basin, off northeastern margin of India to the Afanasy Nikitin Seamount in the Central Indian Basin. The ridge is associated with two contrasting gravity anomalies: negative anomaly over the north part (up to 5°N latitude), where the ridge structure is buried under thick Bengal Fan sediments and positive anomaly over the south part, where the structure is intermittently exposed above the seafloor. Ship-borne gravity and seismic reflection data are modelled using process oriented method and this suggest that the 85°E Ridge was emplaced on approximately 10–15 km thick elastic plate (Te) and in an off-ridge tectonic setting. We simulated gravity anomalies for different crust-sediment structural configurations of the ridge that were existing at three geological ages, such as Late Cretaceous, Early Miocene and Present. The study shows that the gravity anomaly of the ridge in the north has changed through time from its inception to present. During the Late Cretaceous the ridge was associated with a significant positive anomaly with a compensation generated by a broad flexure of the Moho boundary. By Early Miocene the ridge was approximately covered by the postcollision sediments and led to alteration of the initial gravity anomaly to a small positive anomaly. At present, the ridge is buried by approximately 3 km thick Bengal Fan sediments on its crestal region and about 8 km thick pre- and post-collision sediments on the flanks. This geological setting had changed physical properties of the sediments and led to alter the minor positive gravity anomaly of Early Miocene to the distinct negative gravity anomaly.

  10. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean - A process oriented modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Radhakrishna, M.; Krishna, K. S.; Majumdar, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    The 85°E Ridge extends from the Mahanadi Basin, off northeastern margin of India to the Afanasy Nikitin Seamount in the Central Indian Basin. The ridge is associated with two contrasting gravity anomalies: negative anomaly over the north part (up to 5°N latitude), where the ridge structure is buried under thick Bengal Fan sediments and positive anomaly over the south part, where the structure is intermittently exposed above the seafloor. Ship-borne gravity and seismic reflection data are modelled using process oriented method and this suggest that the 85°E Ridge was emplaced on approximately 10-15 km thick elastic plate ( Te) and in an off-ridge tectonic setting. We simulated gravity anomalies for different crust-sediment structural configurations of the ridge that were existing at three geological ages, such as Late Cretaceous, Early Miocene and Present. The study shows that the gravity anomaly of the ridge in the north has changed through time from its inception to present. During the Late Cretaceous the ridge was associated with a significant positive anomaly with a compensation generated by a broad flexure of the Moho boundary. By Early Miocene the ridge was approximately covered by the post-collision sediments and led to alteration of the initial gravity anomaly to a small positive anomaly. At present, the ridge is buried by approximately 3 km thick Bengal Fan sediments on its crestal region and about 8 km thick pre- and post-collision sediments on the flanks. This geological setting had changed physical properties of the sediments and led to alter the minor positive gravity anomaly of Early Miocene to the distinct negative gravity anomaly.

  11. Metallogenesis along the Indian Ocean Ridge System

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray, Dwijesh

    active hydrothermal black smoker deposit along this ridge system (Figure 1). The obser - vations summarized here comprise the res ults obtained from the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR), Carlsberg... and appears to be in a tectonic stage of rift development. A hydrothermal plume with maximum concentration of 202 nl/l methane (CH 4 ) and a tempera ture anomaly of + 0.05?C was delineated at 24?03 minuteS (hydro - ther mal plume site). Manganese...

  12. Dredged Rock Samples from the Alpha Ridge, Arctic Ocean: Implications for the Tectonic History and Origin of the Amerasian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, K.; Mayer, L.; Miller, E. L.; Coakley, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Amerasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean conceals one of the few unresolved plate tectonic puzzles on Earth, with important implications for the geologic history of the vast adjoining shelfal regions. Until we are able to scientifically drill the most controversial parts of the Amerasian Basin seafloor, many questions about its age and origin will remain unanswered. To address the plate tectonic origin of the Amerasian Basin, we dredged steep escarpments along the Alpha Ridge, a bathymetric ridge that extends across the Amerasian Basin. The Alpha Ridge is dissected by structures that have been characterized by seismic reflection and which appear to be normal fault-bound linear ridges and basins. The Alpha Ridge has been described as a hot spot track, an oceanic plateau, and a possible spreading center. Dredged samples taken in 1985 from the central Alpha Ridge were determined to be highly altered fragmental basalt and yielded a Late Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar whole rock age which agreed with the conventional models for a purely volcanic/oceanic origin of the Alpha Ridge (Forsythe and others, 1986; Lawver et al., 2002). Dredged rock samples were taken by the icebreaker USCGC Healy (HLY0805, Mayer and Armstrong, 2008) and included samples from a steep slope of a subsidiary ridge in the south central Alpha/Mendeleev Ridge complex. The fresh broken surfaces of large blocks of rock and the lithologic similarity of the rocks recovered suggest an outcrop was sampled. The recovered rocks included interbedded red sandstones and ochre mudstones with well-defined bedding and sedimentary structures. Preliminary shipboard analysis suggests they may be tuffaceous and/or derived from volcanic sources, and may possibly be continental in origin. Further analysis and descriptions will be carried out in the coming months to determine their age and depositional environment. The results of this analysis and their possible implications for the origin of the Alpha Ridge and tectonic history of

  13. The Northern Central Indian Ridge: Geology and tectonics of fracture zones-dominated spreading ridge segments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Drolia, R.K.; Iyer, S.D.; Chakraborty, B.; Kodagali, V.N.; Ray, Dwijesh; Misra, S.; Andrade, R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Rajasekhar, R.P.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    - OCEANIC RIDGES CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 85, NO. 3, 10 AUGUST 2003 The Northern Central Indian Ridge: Geology and tectonics of fracture zones - dominated spreading ridge segments R. K. Drolia*, Sridhar D. Iyer ? , B. Chakraborty, V. N. Kodagali, D... anomalies are plotted perpendicular to cruise tracks. SPECIAL SECTION: MID - OCEANIC RIDGES CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 85, NO. 3, 10 AUGUST 2003 291 20 ? 18 Ma old and runs along the equator from the CIR in the west to the Wharton Basin in the east...

  14. Hot-dome anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brian E.

    1998-05-01

    Hot-dome anemometry obtains three components of flow velocity using an array of sensors, specifically five hot films in the present contribution, which are mounted around the hemispherical tip of a cylindrical support. Calibration for speed and angle resembles that of hot wires and split films except that the procedures accommodate heat transfer dominated by forced convection from the surface of a sphere rather than single or multiple cylinders. Measurements are obtained with hot domes, conventional hot wires, and impact probes in the wake of a wing to quantify measurement uncertainties.

  15. Intense mixing of lower thermocline water on the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Laurent, Louis C; Thurnherr, Andreas M

    2007-08-01

    Buoyancy exchange between the deep and the upper ocean, which is essential for maintaining global ocean circulation, mainly occurs through turbulent mixing. This mixing is thought to result primarily from instability of the oceanic internal wave field, but internal waves tend to radiate energy away from the regions in which they are generated rather than dissipate it locally as turbulence and the resulting distribution of turbulent mixing remains unknown. Another, more direct, mixing mechanism involves the generation of turbulence as strong flows pass through narrow passages in topography, but the amount of turbulence generated at such locations remains poorly quantified owing to a lack of direct measurements. Here we present observations from the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean that suggest that passages in rift valleys and ridge-flank canyons provide the most energetic sites for oceanic turbulence. Our measurements show that diffusivities as large as 0.03 m2 s(-1) characterize the mixing downstream of a sill in a well-stratified boundary layer, with mixing levels remaining of the order of 10(-4) m2 s(-1) at the base of the main thermocline. These mixing rates are significantly higher than the diffusivities of the order of 10(-5) m2 s(-1) that characterize much of the global thermocline and the abyssal ocean. Our estimates suggest that overflows associated with narrow passages on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean produce as much buoyancy flux as has previously been estimated for the entire Romanche fracture zone, a large strait in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that connects the North and South Atlantic basins. This flux is equivalent to the interior mixing that occurs in the entire North Atlantic basin at the depth of the passages, suggesting that turbulence generated in narrow passages on mid-ocean ridges may be important for buoyancy flux at the global scale.

  16. Reconstructing Hydrothermal Activity on the Juan de Fuca Ridge over the Last 25ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmel, N.; Costa, K.; McManus, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity on mid-ocean ridges plays a unique role in biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Hydrothermal vents are a significant source of dissolved Fe, a critical micronutrient in the ocean that supports primary productivity and can modulate the carbon cycle. Little is known about hydrothermal activity in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but new evidence suggests lower sea levels may generate enhanced hydrothermal activity. If hydrothermal activity was higher during the LGM, an Fe fertilized biological pump could have contributed to lower atmospheric CO2 levels. In this study we investigate sediment cores from the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) to reconstruct hydrothermal activity over the past 25 ka. Five multicores were examined from a spatial array, covering a depth transect along the ridge flank and crest, with a temporal resolution of between 500 and 1000 years. Fe and Cu concentrations were measured by flux fusion, corrected for lithogenic inputs, and normalized to 230Th to calculate hydrothermal fluxes. Hydrothermal flux of Fe and Cu was observed at all times from all sites, suggesting persistent hydrothermal activity on the JdFR. Furthermore, Fe flux into the sediment increases with proximity to the ridge, consistent with a hydrothermal source. The sediment record indicates a stable flux of Fe during the Holocene, compared to flux variations that change by up to 100% between 15 and 20ka. Averaged over 5-7kyr time slices, Cu flux is greater in all 5 records during the LGM than during the Holocene, but in contrast, Fe flux overall appears slightly lower during the LGM than the Holocene. These are the first records from the JdFR to cover the last deglaciation at millennial timescales, and they suggest a more complicated hydrothermal response to glacial sea level changes than observed at other mid-ocean ridges.

  17. Geophysical and geological surveys along the northeastern flank of Mount error, Northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Rajendraprasad, B.; Hansen, R.D.

    Bathymetry, multichannel continuous seismic reflection, magnetic and gravity surveys and sampling were carried out over Mount Error in the northwestern Indian Ocean and along the northeastern flank of the seamount, to study the nature of its...

  18. Hot demonstration of proposed commercial nuclide removal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This task covers the development and operation of an experimental test unit located in a Building 4501 hot cell within Building 4501 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This equipment is designed to test radionuclides removal technologies under continuous operatoin on actual ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant, Savannah River high-level waste supernatant, and Hanford supernatant. The latter two may be simulated by adding the appropriate chemicals and/or nuclides to the MVST supernatant.

  19. Structural development of the Jan Mayen microcontinent (JMMC): An update of its role during the rift transition from the Ægir Ridge to the Kolbeinsey Ridge, and effects on the formation of the Greenland-Iceland-Faroe ridge complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blischke, Anett; Gaina, Carmen; Hopper, John R.; Peron-Pinvidic, Gwenn; Brandsdóttir, Bryndis; Guarnieri, Pierpaolo; Erlendsson, Ögmundur

    2016-04-01

    This study presents results of an ongoing PhD research project and proposes a revision of the Jan Mayen microcontinent's Cenozoic evolution with a special emphasis on the structural relationship to the Greenland-Iceland Faroe ridge complex. Recently acquired and publicly available geophysical and borehole data collected offshore Iceland since the early 1970s, facilitate a thorough review of Tertiary rift systems and their association with the Jan Mayen microcontinent, updating recent kinematic modelling that details the timing of the North Atlantic opening along the Jan Mayen transfer systems, and the Iceland-Faroe-Greenland transfer system bordering the Greenland-Iceland Faroe ridge complex, which covers a large area of thick crust that stretches across the North Atlantic Ocean between the central East Greenland and the North-West European margins. The established regional reflection seismic dataset interpretations and plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the microcontinent may represent the southern extension of the East Greenland Jameson Land basin, suggesting a similar structural trend as the Faroe-Shetland basin. The Cenozoic structural evolution of the Jan Mayen microcontinent and surrounding oceanic crust includes six main phases that correlate to several major unconformities and related structures. Important events include the pre-break-up unconformity, the break-up to drift phase, a drifting phase and establishment of the Ægir Ridge seafloor spreading during the early Eocene, oblique seafloor spreading direction east of JMMC during mid-Eocene caused the formation of transform systems and uplift along the southern flank Jan Mayen microcontinent forming the Iceland Plateau Rift (Brandsdóttir et al. 2015), accompanied by igneous activity along the northeastern margin of the Blosseville Kyst (Larsen et al. 2014), ridge relocation via a southeast to northwest en-echelon ridge system transition from the southern extent of the microcontinent during the

  20. Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Don D.

    This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

  1. Pulley Ridge Swath Bathymetry Grid - filtered

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in...

  2. Pulley Ridge Swath Bathymetry Grid - filtered

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  3. Pulley Ridge Swath Bathymetry Grid - filtered

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Pulley Ridge is a series of drowned barrier islands that extends almost 200 km in 60-100 m water depths. This drowned ridge is located on the Florida Platform in the...

  4. Petrology of tectonically segmented Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Distribution and mineralogy of various rock types along the 4200-km-long slow-spreading Central Indian Ridge, between Owen fracture zone in the north and Indian Ocean triple junction in the south, is studied in the light of ridge segmentation...

  5. The Glasma and the Hard Ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Moschelli, George

    2009-01-01

    Correlation measurements indicate that excess two particle correlations extend over causally disconnected rapidity ranges. Although, this enhancement is broad in relative rapidity $\\eta=\\eta_1 - \\eta_2$, it is focused in a narrow region in relative azimuthal angle $\\phi=\\phi_1 - \\phi_2$. The resulting structure looks like a ridge centered at $\\eta = \\phi=0$. Similar ridge structures are observed in correlations of particles associated with a jet trigger (the hard ridge) and in correlations without a trigger (the soft ridge). The long range rapidity behavior requires that the correlation originates in the earliest stage of the collision, and probes properties of the production mechanism. Glasma initial conditions as predicted by the theory of Color Glass Condensate and provide a and early stage correlation that naturally extends far in rapidity. We have previously shown that the soft ridge is a consequence of particles forming from an initial Glasma phase that experience a later stage transverse flow. We exten...

  6. The influence of isotropic and anisotropic crustal permeability on hydrothermal flow at fast spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Rüpke, Lars; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Morgan, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We use 3-D numerical models of hydrothermal fluid flow to assess the magnitude and spatial distribution of hydrothermal mass and energy fluxes within the upper and lower oceanic crust. A better understanding of the hydrothermal flow pattern (e.g. predominantly on-axis above the axial melt lens vs. predominantly off-axis and ridge-perpendicular over the entire crustal thickness) is essential for quantifying the volume of oceanic crust exposed to high-temperature fluid flow and the associated leaching and redistribution of economically interesting metals. The initial setup of all 3-D models is based on our previous 2-D studies (Theissen-Krah et al., 2011), in which we have coupled numerical models for crustal accretion and hydrothermal fluid flow. One result of these 2-D calculations is a crustal permeability field that leads to a thermal structure in the crust that matches seismic tomography data at the East Pacific Rise. Our reference 3-D model for hydrothermal flow at fast-spreading ridges predicts the existence of a hybrid hydrothermal system (Hasenclever et al., 2014) with two interacting flow components that are controlled by different physical mechanisms. Shallow on-axis flow structures develop owing to the thermodynamic properties of water, whereas deeper off-axis flow is strongly shaped by crustal permeability, particularly the brittle-ductile transition. About ˜60% of the discharging fluid mass is replenished on-axis by warm (up to 300oC) recharge flow surrounding the hot thermal plumes. The remaining ˜40%, however, occurs as colder and broader recharge up to several kilometres away from the ridge axis that feeds hot (500-700oC) deep off-axis flow in the lower crust towards the ridge. Both flow components merge above the melt lens to feed ridge-centred vent sites. In a suite of 3-D model calculations we vary the isotropic crustal permeability to quantify its influence on on-axis vs. off-axis hydrothermal fluxes as well as on along-axis hydrothermal

  7. Dissecting the influence of the collinear and flanking bars in White's effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Barbara; Padmanabhan, Ganesh; McCourt, Mark E

    2016-10-01

    In White's effect equiluminant test patches placed on the black and white bars of a square-wave grating appear different in brightness. The illusion has generated intense interest because the direction of the brightness effect does not correlate with the amount of black or white border in contact with the test patch, or in its general vicinity. Therefore, unlike brightness induction effects such as simultaneous contrast, White's effect is not consistent with explanations based on contrast or assimilation that depend solely on the relative amounts of black and white surrounding the test patches. We independently manipulated the luminance of the collinear and flanking bars to investigate their influence on test patch matching luminance (brightness). The inducing grating was a 0.5c/d square-wave and test patches measured 1.0° in width and either 0.5° or 3.0° in height. Test patches measuring 0.5° in height had more extensive contact with the collinear bars and test patches measuring 3.0° in height had more extensive contact with the flanking bars. The luminance of the collinear (or flanking) bars assumed twenty values from 3.2 to 124.8cd/m(2), while the luminance of the flanking (or collinear) bars remained white (124.8cd/m(2)) or black (3.2cd/m(2)). Under these conditions the influence of the collinear and flanking bars was found to be purely in the direction of contrast. The effect was dominated by contrast from the collinear bars (which results in White's effect), however, the influence of the flanking bars was also in the contrast direction. The data elucidate the luminance relationships between the collinear and flanking bars which produce the behavior associated with White's effect as well as that associated with "the inverted White effect" which is akin to simultaneous contrast.

  8. SRTM Anaglyph: Wheeler Ridge, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data

  9. Improving prosthetic prognosis by connective tissue ridge augmentation of alveolar ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Niraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The contour of edentulous ridge should be carefully evaluated before a fixed partial denture is undertaken. The ideal ridge height and width allows placement of a natural looking pontic which facilitates maintenance of plaque-free environment. The localized alveolar ridge defect refers to the volumetric deficit of the limited extent of bone and soft tissue within the alveolar process. Such type of ridge defects can be corrected by surgical ridge augmentation that can be accomplished by the addition of either soft or hard tissues. This article describes a procedure of surgical connective tissue augmentation of a localized deficient alveolar ridge in the maxilla, followed by fixed partial denture, enhancing the esthetics, function and health.

  10. Improving prosthetic prognosis by connective tissue ridge augmentation of alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Niraj; Singh, Balendra P; Rao, Jitendra; Rastogi, Pavitra

    2010-01-01

    The contour of edentulous ridge should be carefully evaluated before a fixed partial denture is undertaken. The ideal ridge height and width allows placement of a natural looking pontic which facilitates maintenance of plaque-free environment. The localized alveolar ridge defect refers to the volumetric deficit of the limited extent of bone and soft tissue within the alveolar process. Such type of ridge defects can be corrected by surgical ridge augmentation that can be accomplished by the addition of either soft or hard tissues. This article describes a procedure of surgical connective tissue augmentation of a localized deficient alveolar ridge in the maxilla, followed by fixed partial denture, enhancing the esthetics, function and health.

  11. Evaluation of Flanking Noise Transmission within Periodically Distributed Lightweight Beam Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Wooden frame structures are highly preferred as lightweight building systems nowadays. Lightweight building structures have gained more interest due to lower cost of production. However, there is a growing concern regarding noise and vibration issues within lightweight structures. Sound may pass...... from one room to another as indirect or flanking noise via joints or as direct transmission between adjacent rooms. The present analysis concerns flanking transmission within two-dimensional infinite periodic beam structures. The beam is comprised of two different materials placed in a periodic manner....... Two different theoretical methods are taken into consideration to evaluate flanking noise transmission within the beam structure: The finite-element method (FEM) and a Floquet theory approach. Research is carried out regarding the effects of periodicity in a wide range of frequencies from 0 to 300 Hz...

  12. Flank wear analysing of high speed end milling for hardened steel D2 using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazza Faizi Al-Hazza, Muataz; Ibrahim, Nur Asmawiyah bt; Adesta, Erry T. Y.; Khan, Ahsan Ali; Abdullah Sidek, Atiah Bt.

    2017-03-01

    One of the main challenges for any manufacturer is how to decrease the machining cost without affecting the final quality of the product. One of the new advanced machining processes in industry is the high speed hard end milling process that merges three advanced machining processes: high speed milling, hard milling and dry milling. However, one of the most important challenges in this process is to control the flank wear rate. Therefore a analyzing the flank wear rate during machining should be investigated in order to determine the best cutting levels that will not affect the final quality of the product. In this research Taguchi method has been used to investigate the effect of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut and determine the best level s to minimize the flank wear rate up to total length of 0.3mm based on the ISO standard to maintain the finishing requirements.

  13. KINERJA JACKKNIFE RIDGE REGRESSION DALAM MENGATASI MULTIKOLINEARITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANY DEVITA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordinary least square is a parameter estimations for minimizing residual sum of squares. If the multicollinearity was found in the data, unbias estimator with minimum variance could not be reached. Multicollinearity is a linear correlation between independent variabels in model. Jackknife Ridge Regression(JRR as an extension of Generalized Ridge Regression (GRR for solving multicollinearity.  Generalized Ridge Regression is used to overcome the bias of estimators caused of presents multicollinearity by adding different bias parameter for each independent variabel in least square equation after transforming the data into an orthoghonal form. Beside that, JRR can  reduce the bias of the ridge estimator. The result showed that JRR model out performs GRR model.

  14. Oak Ridge TNS Program: system description manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.; Becraft, W.R.; Brown, T.G.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Sardella, C.; Shannon, T.E.; Steiner, D.; Wells, W.M.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1979-05-01

    This document provides a systems description of the Reference Design for The Next Step (TNS) evolved at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1978. The description is presented on the basis of 24 individual device and facility systems. Additional information on these systems, the Reference Design, and the FY 1978 Oak Ridge TNS activities can be found in the associated technical memoranda, ORNL/TM-6720 and ORNL/TM-6722--ORNL/TM-6733.

  15. Realization of Ridge Regression in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, S.; Kovacheva, S.; Prodanova, K.

    2008-10-01

    The least square estimator (LSE) of the coefficients in the classical linear regression models is unbiased. In the case of multicollinearity of the vectors of design matrix, LSE has very big variance, i.e., the estimator is unstable. A more stable estimator (but biased) can be constructed using ridge-estimator (RE). In this paper the basic methods of obtaining of Ridge-estimators and numerical procedures of its realization in MATLAB are considered. An application to Pharmacokinetics problem is considered.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Magma Effects on Hydrothermal Venting at Ultra-Slow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong; Niu, Xiongwei; Ruan, Aiguo; Li, Jiabiao; Meng, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Finite element method is used to numerically simulate oceanic crust thermal dynamics in order to understand the hydrothermal venting mechanism at ultra-slow spreading ridge, whether is the ancient magma chamber still living and supplying hot magma for vents or have surrounding hotspots been affecting on the ridge continually with melting and hot magma. Two models are simulated, one is a horizontal layered oceanic crust model and the other is a model derived from wide angle seismic experiment of OBS at the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (50°E, Zhao et al., 2013; Li et al., 2015; Niu et al., 2015). For the former two cases are simulated: without magma from upper mantel or with continuous magma supply, and for the latter supposing magma supply occurs only once in short period. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Without melt magma supply at the oceanic crust bottom, a magma chamber can live only thousands ten thousand years. According to the simulated results in this case, the magma chamber revealed by seismic data at the mid-east shallow section of the Southwest Indian Ridge could only last 0.8Ma, the present hydrothermal venting is impossible to be the caused by the magma activity occurred during 8-11Ma (Sauter et al., 2009). (2) The magma chamber can live long time with continuous hot magma supply beneath the oceanic crust due to the melting effects of surrounding ridge hotspots, and would result hydrothermal venting with some tectonic structures condition such as detachment faults. We suggest that the present hydrothermal activities at the mid-east shallow section of the Southwest Indian Ridge are the results of melting effects or magma supply from surrounding hotspots. This research was granted by the National Basic Research program of China (grant 2012CB417301) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41176046, 91228205). References Zhao, M., Qiu, X., Li, J., et al., 2013. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon

  17. Mitigation of Flanking Noise in Double-Plate Panel Structures by Periodic Stiffening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Andersen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The present analysis focuses on flanking noise transmission within a two-wall structure of finite size. The walls are lightweight panel structures, each consisting of two plates with internal ribs. A finite-element model is utilized, assuming that the studs are fully fixed to the plates. Further...... is important. Hence, analyses are carried out for different positions of the load. It has been found that the ribs have a significant impact, not only on the flanking noise but also on the direct radiation of sound from the wall on which the external force has been placed. Furthermore, the response changes...

  18. Simulation of flanking transmission in super-light structures for airborne and impact sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Super-light structures are an invention based on combining lightweight concrete with normal concrete for better structural performance and lighter structures. The overall principle is based on load carrying arches of a normal concrete stabilised and protected from fire by a light-aggregate concrete....... In the flanking transmission analysis the influence of a large array of different flanking walls, structural connection details, room size and floor constructions, all typical or desirable for common multi-storey residential constructions, have been investigated. The results form a basis for guidelines on how...

  19. 胁痛病因证治源流%Flank Pains Etiology and Pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭振

    2011-01-01

    Reviewing Flank pains common etiology and pathogenesis, dialectical analysis and pathogenic factor. Think of the dialectical type of Flank pains including: the exogenous attacks, depressed,blood stasis block, phlegm retention block, yin deficiency of liver and kidney, be distressed about diet,Pathogenic viruses.%回顾分析古代医家常用胁痛病因病机,辨证分析及治则治法.认为胁痛的辨证分型有:外邪侵袭,情志不遂,瘀血阻滞,痰饮留着,肝肾阴虚,饮食所伤,外感疠气.

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  1. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of the Southeast Indian Ridge, 129°E to 140°E, and Off-axis Volcanism: Preliminary Results of the STORM Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briais, Anne; Barrère, Fabienne; Boulart, Cédric; Ceuleneer, Georges; Ferreira, Nicolas; Hanan, Barry; Hémond, Christophe; Macleod, Sarah; Maia, Marcia; Maillard, Agnès; Merkuryev, Sergey; Park, Sung-Hyun; Révillon, Sidonie; Ruellan, Etienne; Schohn, Alexandre; Watson, Sally; Yang, Yun-Seok

    2016-04-01

    We present observations of the South-East Indian Ridge (SEIR) collected during the STORM cruise (South Tasmania Ocean Ridge and Mantle) on the N/O L'Atalante early 2015. The SEIR between Australia and Antarctica displays large variations of axial morphology despite an almost constant intermediate spreading rate. The Australia-Antarctic Discordance (AAD) between 120°E and 128°E is a section of the mid-ocean ridge where the magma budget is abnormally low, and which marks the boundary between Indian and Pacific mantle domains with distinct geochemical isotopic compositions. The STORM project focuses on the area east of the discordance from 128 to 140°E, where gravity highs observed on satellite-derived maps of the flanks of the SEIR reveal numerous volcanic seamounts. A major objective of the STORM cruise was to test the hypothesis of a mantle flow from the Pacific to the Indian domains. We collected multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data between 136 and 138°E to map off-axis volcanic ridges up to 10 Ma-old crust. We mapped the SEIR axis between 129 and 140°E, and the northern part of the George V transform fault. We collected rock samples on seamounts and in the transform fault, basaltic glass samples along the ridge axis, and near-bottom samples and in-situ measurements in the water column. Our observations reveal that the off-axis seamounts form near the SEIR axis, are not associated to off-axis deformation of the ocean floor, and are often located near the traces of ridge axis discontinuities. We also observe a general shallowing of the ridge axis from the AAD to the George V TF and the presence of robust axial segments near the transform fault. Our new data allow us to describe the complex evolution of the transform fault system. They also permit to locate new hydrothermal systems along the ridge axis.

  3. Incorporating Ridges with Minutiae for Improved Fingerprint verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms.M.Indra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Next to DNA, fingerprint is the unique feature which identifies the individual. Distortions and skin deformations makes the fingerprint unreliable and it is difficult to match using minutiae alone. But when ridge features are incorporated with minutiae features (minutiae type, orientation and position more topological information can be obtained. And also ridges are invariant to transformations such as rotation and translation[1]. Ridge based coordinate system is used to extract the ridge features such as ridge length, ridge count, ridge type and curvature direction in the skeletonized image. Breadth First Search is used to traverse the graph formed using the minutiae as the node and the ridge vector formed using the ridge features as the edge. The proposed ridge feature gives additional information for fingerprint matching with little increment in template size and can be used along with the existing minutiae features to increase the accuracy and robustness of fingerprint recognition systems.

  4. Tectonic evolution of the Resolution Ridge System, New Zealand: insights gained through UNCLOS surveying for natural prolongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R.; Barker, D.

    2005-12-01

    younger oceanic rift initiated along the Campbell Plateau margin and propagated northward into continental NZ. Seafloor spreading in this orientation was maintained between about 47 and 30 Ma (anomalies 21-11) to form the Southeast Tasman Oceanic Crust (STOC). Integration of swath bathymetry, seismic reflection, potential field, and dredge data confirms the origin of the ridge system as an uplifted rift flank formed in oceanic crust in the southwest, and establishes the probable extent of fragments of continental crust in the northeast. The initial rift exploited existing faults and TS crustal structure, and the inherited nature of these faults along the ridge system may provide a rationale for its rapid formation. A deep basement trough lies between the uplifted rift flank footwall and the younger STOC oceanic basement. This trough follows the trend of the RRS, paralleling the basement ridges of the southwest RRS and truncating the southern extent of the en echelon ridges of the northeast RRS. This implies rapid faulting across pre-existing northeast-southwest structural grain and an apparent delay in onset of magmatic systems associated with newly established sea floor spreading. There is no evidence of significant structural reactivation post-dating formation of the RRS. More precise identification of TS transform structures along the ridge system provides pinning points that may help better constrain plate reconstructions and the processes of rift propagation during STOC sea floor spreading.

  5. Hydrosweep Measurements During the Expedition ARK XX-2 to Lena Trough and Western Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, S.; Kohls, T.; Roeber, S.; Snow, J.

    2004-12-01

    two-dimensional slope histograms were produced. They show clearly the predominant slope direction and are helpful in distinction between sediment basins, volcanos and ridge flanks.

  6. Hot Molecular Gas in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Herrnstein, R M G; Herrnstein, Robeson McGary; Ho, Paul T.P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the new 23 GHz receivers at the Very Large Array (VLA), we have detected NH3(6,6) emission (nu=25.056025 GHz) from hot (>150 K) molecular clouds in the central 10 pc of the Galaxy. This is the first successful detection of NH3(6,6) with the VLA. The brightest emission comes from a region interior to the ``circumnuclear disk'' (CND), less than 1.5 pc in projected distance from Sgr A*. This region does not show molecular emission from lower energy transitions such as NH3(1,1) and (2,2), HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0). Line ratios of NH3(6,6) and (3,3) emission as well as NH3(6,6) line widths have peak values within 1.5 pc of Sgr A*, indicating that the gas is physically close to the nucleus. NH3(6,6) is also detected towards many features outside the CND observed in NH3(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3). These features tend to lie along ridges of gas associated with Sgr A East or the massive ``molecular ridge'' that connects the ``20 km/s'' and ``50 km/s'' giant molecular clouds (GMCs).

  7. Finite Element Approach for Analyses of Flanking Noise Transmission within Lightweight Panel Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Andersen, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the analysis of noise transmission in a lightweight panel structure. The analysis is based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA) employing solid elements for the structure. The analysis focuses on flanking noise transmission in panel structures of finite size. A parametric study...

  8. A New Mathematical Model for Flank Wear Prediction Using Functional Data Analysis Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Jozić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach improving the reliability of flank wear prediction during the end milling process. In the present work, prediction of flank wear has been achieved by using cutting parameters and force signals as the sensitive carriers of information about the machining process. A series of experiments were conducted to establish the relationship between flank wear and cutting force components as well as the cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed per tooth, and radial depth of cut. In order to be able to predict flank wear a new linear regression mathematical model has been developed by utilizing functional data analysis methodology. Regression coefficients of the model are in the form of time dependent functions that have been determined through the use of functional data analysis methodology. The mathematical model has been developed by means of applied cutting parameters and measured cutting forces components during the end milling of workpiece made of 42CrMo4 steel. The efficiency and flexibility of the developed model have been verified by comparing it with the separate experimental data set.

  9. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...

  10. Supported PCR : an efficient procedure to amplify sequences flanking a known DNA segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudenko, George N.; Rommens, Caius M.T.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    We describe a novel modification of the polymerase chain reaction for efficient in vitro amplification of genomic DNA sequences flanking short stretches of known sequence. The technique utilizes a target enrichment step, based on the selective isolation of biotinylated fragments from the bulk of gen

  11. Rapid changes of microsatellite flanking sequence in the allopolyploidization of new synthesized hexaploid wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lianquan; LIU Dengcai; YAN Zehong; LAN Xiujin; ZHENG Youliang; ZHOU Yonghong

    2004-01-01

    It was suggested that the rapid changes of DNA sequence and gene expression occurred at the early stages of allopolyploid formation. In this study, we revealed the microsatellite (SSR) differences between newly formed allopolyploids and their donor parents by using 21 primer sets specific for D genome of wheat. It was indicated that rapid changes had occurred in the "shock" process of the allopolyploid formation between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii. The changes of SSR flanking sequence resulted in appearance of novel bands or disappearance of parental bands. The disappearance of the parental bands showed much higher frequencies in comparison with that of appearance of novel bands. Disappearance of the parental bands was not random. The frequency of disappearance in tetraploid wheat was much higher than in Ae. tauschii, i. e. the disappearance frequency in AABB genome was much higher than in D genome. Changes of SSR flanking sequence occurred at the early stage of F1 hybrid or just after chromosome doubling. From the above results, it can be inferred that SSR flanking sequence region was very active and was amenable to change in the process of polyploidization. This suggested that SSR flanking sequence probably had special biological function at the early stage of ployploidization. The rapid and directional changes at the early stage of polyploidization might contribute to the rapid evolution of the newly formed allopolyploid and allow the divergent genomes to act in harmony.

  12. Genomic flank-sequencing of plasposon insertion sites for rapid identification of functional genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveau, J.H.J.; Gerards, S.; Fritsche, K.; Zondag, G.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Plasposons are modified mini-Tn5 transposons for random mutagenesis of Gram-negative bacteria. Their unique design allows for the rescue cloning and sequencing of DNA that flanks insertion sites in plasposon mutants. However, this process can be laborious and time-consuming, as it involves genomic D

  13. Analysis of Roughness and Flank Wear in Turning Gray Cast Iron Using Cryogenically Treated Cutting Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R. Ramji

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine the flank wear and surface roughness in turning gray cast iron using cryogenically treated carbide inserts. Turning experiments were conducted with cutting velocities: 53, 85, 99, 149 m/sec, feeds: 0.12, 0.16, 0.2, 0.24 mm/rev and a constant depth of cut: 1.5 mm. The specimens were turned using cryogenically treated and non-treated carbide inserts. The cryogenic treatment cycle consisted of cooling the test samples from room temperature to cryogenic temperature of -178.9 C in 3 h, soaking at cryogenic tem perature around 24 h and warming to room temperature in about 5 h. The surface roughness (Ra, R z, Rq and Rt :m of the turned specimens was measured using talysurf and flank wear of the tool was measured using toolm akers microscope. The experimental layout was designed based on the Taguchi’s Orthogonal Array technique and ANOVA was performed to identify the effect of the parameters on the response variables. Cryogenically treated inserts proved superior to the non-treated in all the test conditions in terms of lesser flank wear of the inserts and reduced surface roughness of the specimens. The after turned inserts w ere examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the flank wear mechanism.

  14. Sudden aseismic fault slip on the south flank of Kilauea volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, Peter; Segall, Paul; Johnson, Kaj; Lisowski, Michael; Miklius, Asta

    2002-02-28

    One of the greatest hazards associated with oceanic volcanoes is not volcanic in nature, but lies with the potential for catastrophic flank failure. Such flank failure can result in devastating tsunamis and threaten not only the immediate vicinity, but coastal cities along the entire rim of an ocean basin. Kilauea volcano on the island of Hawaii, USA, is a potential source of such flank failures and has therefore been monitored by a network of continuously recording geodetic instruments, including global positioning system (GPS) receivers, tilt meters and strain meters. Here we report that, in early November 2000, this network recorded transient southeastward displacements, which we interpret as an episode of aseismic fault slip. The duration of the event was about 36 hours, it had an equivalent moment magnitude of 5.7 and a maximum slip velocity of about 6[?]cm per day. Inversion of the GPS data reveals a shallow-dipping thrust fault at a depth of 4.5[?]km that we interpret as the down-dip extension of the Hilina Pali--Holei Pali normal fault system. This demonstrates that continuously recording geodetic networks can detect accelerating slip, potentially leading to warnings of volcanic flank collapse.

  15. Forests of the tropical eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas, M.L.; Gosling, W.D.; Pennington, R.T.; Poole, I.; Sherlock, S.C.; Mothes, P.

    2014-01-01

    Inter-bedded volcanic and organic sediments from Erazo (Ecuador) indicate the presence of four different forest assemblages on the eastern Andean flank during the middle Pleistocene. Radiometric dates (40Ar-39Ar) obtained from the volcanic ash indicate that deposition occurred between 620,000 and 19

  16. Tsunami deposits at high altitudes on the flanks of volcanic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    It is actually difficult to infer the mechanisms and dynamics of giant mass failures of oceanic shield volcanoes and to evaluate related tsunami hazards. Marine conglomerates and gravels found at unusually high elevations in Hawaii, Cape Verde, Mauritius and Canary Islands are often interpreted as being the result of tsunami waves generated by such massive flank failures. In the first part of this contribution, we document tsunami deposits (marine gravels with pumices) attached to the northwestern slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands, at altitudes up to 132 m asl. Stratigraphy of the deposits and composition of the pumices allows identifying sources of the successive tsunamis and proposing a new scenario for the Icod flank failure and El Abrigo caldera-forming eruption ca. 170 ka. Then we propose a litterature review of tsunami deposits at high altitudes on the flanks of volcanic islands, and especially oceanic shield volcanoes. These deposits are discussed in terms of texture, structure, composition and particularly the juvenile volcanic material, and implications for better understanding the mechanisms controlling massive flank failures.

  17. Interphase FISH detection of BCL2 rearrangement in follicular lymphoma using breakpoint-flanking probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaandrager, J W; Schuuring, E; Raap, T; Philippo, K; Kleiverda, K; Kluin, P

    2000-01-01

    Rearrangement of the BCL2 gene is an important parameter for the differential diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Although a relatively large proportion of breakpoints is clustered, many are missed by standard PCR. A FISH assay is therefore desired. Up to now, a lack of probes flanking the BCL2 gene

  18. Causal link between Quaternary paleoclimatic changes and flank collapses on volcanic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, A.; Quidelleur, X.; Samper, A.

    2007-05-01

    Giant landslides and resulting tsunamis represent the main geologic hazards linked to volcanic island evolution. From bathymetric data and on-land geological studies, flank failures have been identified around numerous volcanic islands, in most geodynamic contexts. However, the enabling and triggering conditions are still poorly understood and several internal and external causes may act simultaneously to reach a critical threshold. We here present a compilation of well-dated flank destabilization events within the last 1 Myr from Tahiti, Hawaii, Canary Islands, Guadeloupe and Martinique (Lesser Antilles), and examine their relationships with global paleoclimatic changes evidenced by a global stack of benthic ?18O records. We show that a causal relationship between flank collapse of volcanic islands and global climatic changes has existed at least since 900 kyr. Moreover, high precision ages reported here favor the hypothesis that major flank collapse events occurred during the onset of glacial to interglacial transitions when a sudden influx of melt water from polar ice caps causes rapid sea level rise. We propose that following a sub aerial erosion interval during low sea level stands, rapid sea level rise induces enhanced coastal erosion and sudden changes of pore pressure conditions within basal layers, which favor edifice failure.

  19. Absces i højre flanke--senkomplikation til laparoskopisk kolecystektomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillingsø, Jens; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the treatment of choice in cases of symptomatic gallstones. A 74-year-old female presented with a spontaneously perforated abscess in her right flank and passage through it of gallstones. Four years previously during LC the gallbladder perforated and 10...

  20. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  1. Magma Mixing: Why Picrites are Not So Hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    porosity in regions where crustal-level magma chambers and flanking rift zones do not have a chance to form. Low-magma supply is favored. In the ocean basins, such upper mantle mainlining occurs only at certain fracture zones, deep propagating rifts at microplates, or ultra-slow spreading ridges, but no liquids (glasses) with >10% MgO occur at any of these places. On continents, rift structures through cratons might allow this, but so far no picrite, ferropicrite, or meimichite that has been adequately described from these places lacks evidence for end-member mixing. Low-temperature iron-rich magmas can accumulate in the deep lower crust and later rise to form substantial intrusions (e.g. Skaergaard) or erupt as flood basalts (Columbia River). Some komatiites might represent high-temperature liquids, but many are so altered that original liquid compositions cannot be deduced (e.g., Gorgona). The hottest intraplate volcano is Kilauea, Hawaii, where rare picrite glass with 15% MgO has an estimated eruptive temperature (1) of ~1350C and a potential temperature at 1 GPa of ~1420C. Lavas at all other linear island chains, Iceland and even west Greenland where picrites are abundant, are cooler than this. (1) Beattie, P., 1993. CMP 115: 103-111.

  2. Preliminary results from the first InRidge cruise to the central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Iyer, S.D.; Rao, M.M.M.; Banerjee, R.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Ghose, I.; Ganesan, P.; Rao, A.K.; Suribabu, A.; Ganesh, C.; Naik, G.P.

    stream_size 1 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt stream_source_info Inter_Ridge_News_7_40.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  3. Geology of the Cooper Ridge NE Quadrangle, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehler, Henry W.

    1979-01-01

    The Cooper Ridge NE 7?-minute quadrangle is 18 miles southeast of Rock Springs, Wyo., on the east flank of the Rock Springs uplift. Upper Cretaceous rocks composing the Rock Springs Formation, Ericson Sandstone, Almond Formation, Lewis Shale, Fox Hills Sandstone, and Lance Formation, Paleocene rocks composing the Fort Union Formation, and Eocene rocks composing the Wasatch Formation are exposed and dip 5?-8? southeast. Outcrops are unfaulted and generally homoclinal, but a minor cross-trending fold, the Jackknife Spring anticline, plunges southeastward and interrupts the northeast strike of beds. Older rocks in the subsurface are faulted and folded, especially near the Brady oil and gas field. Coal beds are present in the Almond, Lance, and Fort Union Formations. Coal resources are estimated to be more than 762 million short tons in 16 beds more than 2.5 feet thick, under less than 3,000 ft of overburden. Nearly 166 million tons are under less than 200 ft of overburden and are recoverable by strip mining. Unknown quantities of oil and gas are present in the Cretaceous Rock Springs, Blair, and Dakota Formations, Jurassic sandstone (Entrada Sandstone of drillers), Jurassic(?) and Triassic(?) Nugget Sandstone, Permian Park City Formation, and Pennsylvanian and Permian Weber Sandstone at the Brady field, part of which is in the southeast corner of the quadrangle, and in the Dakota Sandstone at the Prenalta Corp. Bluewater 33-32 well near the northern edge of the quadrangle. Other minerals include uranium in the Almond Formation and titanium in the Rock Springs Formation.

  4. Hot plasma dielectric tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    The hot plasma dielectric tensor is discussed in its various approximations. Collisionless cyclotron resonant damping and ion/electron Bernstein waves are discussed to exemplify the significance of a kinetic description of plasma waves.

  5. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39'E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Li, Jiabiao; Sauter, Daniel; Ruan, Aiguo; Chen, John; Cannat, Mathilde; Singh, Satish; Zhang, Jiazheng; Wu, Zhenli; Niu, Xiongwei

    2013-10-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is an ultraslow spreading end-member of mid-ocean ridge system. We use air gun shooting data recorded by ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and multibeam bathymetry to obtain a detailed three-dimensional (3-D) P wave tomographic model centered at 49°39'E near the active hydrothermal "Dragon Flag" vent. Results are presented in the form of a 3-D seismic traveltime inversion over the center and both ends of a ridge segment. We show that the crustal thickness, defined as the depth to the 7 km/s isovelocity contour, decreases systematically from the center (˜7.0-8.0 km) toward the segment ends (˜3.0-4.0 km). This variation is dominantly controlled by thickness changes in the lower crustal layer. We interpret this variation as due to focusing of the magmatic activity at the segment center. The across-axis velocity model documents a strong asymmetrical structure involving oceanic detachment faulting. A locally corrugated oceanic core complex (Dragon Flag OCC) on the southern ridge flank is characterized by high shallow crustal velocities and a strong vertical velocity gradient. We infer that this OCC may be predominantly made of gabbros. We suggest that detachment faulting is a prominent process of slow spreading oceanic crust accretion even in magmatically robust ridge sections. Hydrothermal activity at the Dragon Flag vents is located next to the detachment fault termination. We infer that the detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection.

  6. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  7. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  8. Zinc, copper, and lead in mid-ocean ridge basalts and the source rock control on Zn/Pb in ocean-ridge hydrothermal deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    The contents of Zn, Cu, and Pb in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and the MORB source-rock control on Zn/Pb in ocean-ridge hydrothermal deposits are examined. The values of Zn, Cu, and Pb for submarine mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are, respectively (in ppm): average MORB-75, 75, and 0.7; West Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR)-87, 64, and 0.5; southern JFR-120 and 0.5; and 21??N, East Pacific Rise (EPR)-73, 78, and 0.5. Values of Zn/Pb range from about 100-240 and Cu/ Pb from 100-156. In this study, Zn is found to correlate positively with TiO2 + FeO (mean square of weighted deviates, MSWD, of 1.6 for JFR basalt), and inversely with Mg number (MSWD of 3.5). Therefore, contrary to statements in the literature that Zn should be compatible in MORB, Zn is a mildly incompatible element and must be enriched in the glass phase relative to olivine as Zn does not fit into the other major phenocryst phase, plagioclase. In the source of MORB, Zn likely is most enriched in oxides: spinel, magnetite, and titanomagnetite. Copper generally does not correlate well with other elements in most MORB data examined. When differentiation is dominated by olivine, Cu has a tendency to behave incompatibly (e.g., at Mg numbers > 70), but, overall, Cu shows some tendency towards being a compatible element, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, a behavior presumably due to separation of sulfides in which Cu (but not Zn) is markedly enriched. Copper thus may be in dispersed sulfides in the source of MORB. Ocean ridges provide important data on source-rock controls for sulfide deposits because, in sediment-starved ridges, much is known about the possible source rocks and mineralization is presently occurring. In contrast to Zn/Pb ~5 in continental hot Cl-rich brines, Zn/Pb in the hottest sediment-starved ridge black smoker hydrothermal fluids at 21 ??N, EPR is about 110, similar to local MORB (145), but Cu/Pb is closer to 30, possibly due to subsurface deposition of Cu. At the JFR, the best

  9. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  10. Emerged quaternary marine terraces in southern Peru: Sea level changes and continental margin tectonics over the subducting Nazca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the arid climate, mollusk shells in the marine cover strata are exceptionally well preserved and provide datable samples for a terrace and sea level chronology. Amino acid racemization was the most extensively used dating method, with three other numerical dating methods, electron spin resonance (ESR), Uranium-series, and radiocarbon ages used to calibrate the amino acid ages. D-alloisoleucine/L-isoleucine (A/I) ratios of >200 mollusks shells belong to six statistically and geomorphically defined aminozones. Aminozone IIa correlates with the last Interglacial (deep-sea oxygen isotope Stage 5e) based on 12 ESR ages and the similarity of the IIa ratios to those determined from calibrated last Interglacial sites on the Pacific Coast, U.S. Calibrated amino acid ages for the other aminozones are; I = >45,000 yr B.P. and {le} 87,000; IIb = 211,000 yr B.P.; III = 297,000 yr B.P.; IV = 496,000 yr B.P.; and V {ge} 945,000 yr B.P. The calibrated ages agree with ESR, Uranium series, and radioactive ages. The pattern of terrace deformation can be approximated by a simple geometric model in which the subconducting Nazca Ridge migrates obliquely southeastward as a rigid trapezoid beneath the forearc. The model correctly predicts a pattern of marine terrace deformation with the highest elevations located above the southern flank of the Nazca Ridge and subsidence above the northern flank. The topography, pattern of marine terrace deformation, and Quaternary rates of uplift of the Paracas Block are determined by oblique subduction of the aseismic Nazca Ridge.

  11. Dynamic implications of ridges on a debris avalanche deposit at Tutupaca volcano (southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Patricio; Roche, Olivier; Samaniego, Pablo; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Bernard, Karine; Mariño, Jersy

    2016-02-01

    Catastrophic volcanic landslides can involve different parts of a volcano that can be incorporated into any resulting debris avalanche. The different material properties may influence the mechanical behaviour and, hence, the emplacement mechanisms of the different avalanche units. We present data from a coupled hydrothermal- and magmatic-related volcanic landslide at Tutupaca volcano (Peru). Around ad 1802, the hydrothermal system under Tutupaca's growing dacite dome failed, creating a debris avalanche that triggered a large explosive eruption. A typical debris avalanche hummocky unit is found, formed out of rock from the dome foot and the underlying hydrothermally altered lavas. It is covered by a more widespread and remarkable deposit that contains remnants of the hot dome core and the inner hydrothermal material. This deposit has ridges 20-500-m long, 10-30-m wide and 1-5-m high, regularly spaced and that fan slightly outward. Cross sections exposed within the ridges reveal coarser cores and finer troughs, suggesting grain size segregation during emplacement. Ridge morphology and granulometry are consistent with fingering known to occur in granular flows. The ridges are also associated with large blocks that have evidence of differential movement compared with the rest of the flowing mass. The presence of both ridged and hummocky deposits in the same event shows that, as different lithologies combine and collapse sequentially, materials with different mechanical properties can coexist in one landslide, leading to contrasting emplacement dynamics. The different structures thus highlight the complexity of such hazardous volcanic events and show the difficulty we face with modelling them.

  12. Bathymetry of Reykjanes Ridge: A methodological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Banul, Karolina, 1987-

    2014-01-01

    The sea floor is one of the Earths parts that still are mostly unexplored. Recent multibeam technology has now opened up new opportunities to increase our knowledge in this hitherto hidden part of the world. In this study part of the Reykjanes Ridge was analysed in order to create a high resolution and comprehensive topographic map of this northern part of the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge. The general aims of the study were to i) develop seamless method from Caris, a raw analytical program for mu...

  13. Ridge and Transverse Correlation at Separated Rapidities

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    A simple phenomenological relationship between the ridge distribution in $\\Delta\\eta$ and the single-particle distribution in $\\eta$ can be established from the PHOBOS data on both distributions. The implication points to the possibility that there is no long-range longitudinal correlation. An interpretation of the relationship is then developed, based on the recognition that longitudinal uncertainty of the initial configuration allows for non-Hubble-like expansion at early time. It is shown that the main features of the ridge structure can be explained in a model where transverse correlation stimulated by semihard partons is the principal mechanism.

  14. Tissue Engineering for Vertical Ridge Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neel; Kim, Beomjune; Zaid, Waleed; Spagnoli, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    This article provides an overview of basic tissue engineering principles as they are applied to vertical ridge defects and reconstructive techniques for these types of deficiencies. Presented are multiple clinical cases ranging from office-based dentoalveolar procedures to the more complex reconstruction of postresection mandibular defects. Several different types of regenerative tissue constructs are presented; either used alone or in combination with traditional reconstructive techniques and procedures, such as maxillary sinus augmentation, Le Fort I osteotomy, and microvascular free tissue transfer. The goal is to also familiarize the reconstructive surgeon to potential future strategies in vertical alveolar ridge augmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  16. Geology and Thermal History of Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Keith E.

    1978-01-01

    Mammoth Hot Springs, located about 8 km inside the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park, consists of nearly 100 hot springs scattered over a score of steplike travertine terraces. The travertine deposits range in age from late Pleistocene to the present. Sporadic records of hot-spring activity suggest that most of the current major springs have been intermittently active since at least 1871. Water moving along the Norris-Mammoth fault zone is heated by partly molten magma and enriched in calcium and bicarbonate. Upon reaching Mammoth this thermal water (temperature about 73?C) moves up through the old terrace deposits along preexisting vertical linear planes of weakness. As the water reaches the surface, pressure is released, carbon dioxide escapes as a gas, and bicarbonate in the water is partitioned into more carbon dioxide and carbonate; the carbonate then combines with calcium to precipitate calcium carbonate, forming travertine. The travertine usually precipitates rapidly from solution and is lightweight and porous; however, dense travertine, such as is found in core from the 113-m research drill hole Y-10 located on one of the upper terraces, forms beneath the surface by deposition in the pore spaces of older deposits. The terraces abound with unusual hot-spring deposits such as terracettes, cones, and fissure ridges. Semicircular ledges (ranging in width from about 0.3 m to as much as 2.5 m), called terracettes, formed by deposition of travertine around slowly rising pools. Complex steplike arrangements of terracettes have developed along runoff channels of some hot springs. A few hot springs have deposited cone-shaped mounds, most of which reach heights of 1-2 m before becoming dormant. However, one long-inactive cone named Liberty Cap attained a height of about 14 m. Fissure ridges are linear mounds of travertine deposited from numerous hot-spring vents along a medial fracture zone. The ridges range in height from about 1 to 6 m and in length from a

  17. Ridge regression estimator: combining unbiased and ordinary ridge regression methods of estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Damodar Gore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Statistical literature has several methods for coping with multicollinearity. This paper introduces a new shrinkage estimator, called modified unbiased ridge (MUR. This estimator is obtained from unbiased ridge regression (URR in the same way that ordinary ridge regression (ORR is obtained from ordinary least squares (OLS. Properties of MUR are derived. Results on its matrix mean squared error (MMSE are obtained. MUR is compared with ORR and URR in terms of MMSE. These results are illustrated with an example based on data generated by Hoerl and Kennard (1975.

  18. Large fault fabric of the Ninetyeast Ridge implies near-spreading ridge formation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sager, W.W.; Paul, C.F; Krishna, K.S.; Pringle, M.S.; Eisin, A.E.; Frey, F; Rao, D; Levchenko, O.V.

    Large Fault Fabric of the Ninetyeast Ridge Implies Near-Spreading Ridge Formation 1 W. W. Sager 1 *, C. F. Paul 1 , K. S. Krishna 2 , M. Pringle 3 , A. E. Eisin 1,4 , F. A. Frey 3 , D. Gopala 2 Rao 5 , O. Levchenko 6 3 1 Department of Oceanography....proc.sr.121.122.1991. 254 Sandwell, D. T., and W. H. F. Smith (2009), Global marine gravity from retracked Geosat and 255 ERS-1 Altimetry: Ridge segmentation versus spreading rate, J. Geophys. Res., 114, 1-16, 256 doi:10.10029/2008JB006008, 2009. 257...

  19. IR Hot Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  20. Hot Air Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stouffs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Invented in 1816, the hot-air engines have known significant commercial success in the nineteenth century, before falling into disuse. Nowadays they enjoy a renewed interest for some specific applications. The "hot-air engines" family is made up of two groups: Stirling engines and Ericsson engines. The operating principle of Stirling and Ericsson engines, their troubled history, their advantages and their niche applications are briefly presented, especially in the field of micro-combined heat and power, solar energy conversion and biomass energy conversion. The design of an open cycle Ericsson engine for solar application is proposed. A first prototype of the hot part of the engine has been built and tested. Experimental results are presented.

  1. The human SOX18 gene: Expression analysis and characterization of its 5’ flanking region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Isidora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish an adequate in vitro model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human SOX18 gene. The paper presents an analysis of expression of this gene in cultured cell lines and characterization of its 5' flanking region. Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated SOX18 expression in HeLa cells, indicating that this cell line provides a suitable model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the given gene. We also cloned, sequenced and for the first time characterized the human SOX18 5’ flanking region. It is shown that the region 892 bp in size immediately upstream from the start codone harbors regulatory elements sufficient for transcription and represents an SOX18 promoter region.

  2. Stability analysis of Western flank of Cumbre Vieja volcano (La Palma) using numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Pablo J.; Fernandez-Merodo, Jose A.; Fernandez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    La Palma volcanic island is one of the youngest of the Canary archipelago, being a composite volcano formed by three overlapping volcanic centers. There are clear onshore and offshore evidences of past giant landslides that have occurred during its evolution. Currently, the active Cumbre Vieja volcano is in an early development state (Carracedo et al., 2001). The study of flank instability processes aim to assess, among other hazards, catastrophic collapse and potential tsunami generation. Early studies of the potential instability of Cumbre Vieja volcano western flank have focused on the use of sparse geodetic networks (Moss et al. 1999), surface geological mapping techniques (Day et al. 1999) and offshore bathymetry (Urgeles et al. 1999). Recently, a dense GNSS network and satellite radar interferometry results indicate ground motion consistent with deep-seated creeping processes (Prieto et al. 2009, Gonzalez et al. 2010). In this work, we present a geomechanical advanced numerical model that captures the ongoing deformation processes at Cumbre Vieja. We choose the Finite Elements Method (FEM) which is based in continuum mechanics and is the most used for geotechnical applications. FEM has the ability of using arbitrary geometry, heterogeneities, irregular boundaries and different constitutive models representative of the geotechnical units involved. Our main contribution is the introduction of an inverse approach to constrain the geomechanical parameters using satellite radar interferometry displacements. This is the first application of such approach on a large volcano flank study. We suggest that the use of surface displacements and inverse methods to rigorously constrain the geomechanical model parameter space is a powerful tool to understand volcano flank instability. A particular important result of the studied case is the estimation of displaced rock volume, which is a parameter of critical importance for simulations of Cumbre Vieja tsunamigenic hazard

  3. Unraveling the unusual morphology of the Cretaceous Dirck Hartog extinct mid-ocean ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S. J.; Whittaker, J. M.; Halpin, J.; Williams, S.; Milan, L. A.; Daczko, N. R.; Wyman, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore southwest Australia formed during Mesozoic East Gondwana breakup and Kerguelen plume activity. This study combines petrographic and geochemical data from the first samples ever to be dredged from the flanks of the Dirck Hartog Ridge (DHR), a prominent linear bathymetric feature in the central PAP, with new bathymetric profiles across the PAP to better constrain the formation of the early Indian Ocean floor. The DHR exhibits high relief and distinctive asymmetry that is unusual compared to most active or extinct spreading centres and likely results from compression and deformation of the recently extinct DHR during changes in relative motion of the Indian plate (110 - 100 Ma). Exhumation of gabbros in the southern DHR and an increase in seafloor roughness towards the centre of the PAP, likely result from a half spreading rate decrease from 35 mm/yr (based on magnetic reversals) to 24 mm/yr at ~114 Ma. The results support a slowdown of spreading prior to full cessation at ~102 Ma. The composition of basaltic samples varies along the DHR: from sub-alkaline dolerites with incompatible element concentrations most similar to depleted-to-normal mid-ocean ridge basalts in the south, to alkali basalts similar to ocean island basalts in the north. Therefore, magma sources and degrees of partial melting varied in space and time, a result supporting the interpretation that the DHR is an extinct spreading ridge rather than a pseudofault. The enriched alkali basalt signatures may be attributed to melting of a heterogeneous mantle or to the influence of the Kerguelen plume over distances greater than 1000 km. The results demonstrate the significance of regional tectonic plate motions on the formation and deformation of young ocean crust, and provide insight into the unique DHR morphology.

  4. Submarine hot springs and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stanley L.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    1988-01-01

    The popular hypothesis that life originally arose in hydrothermal vents at oceanic ridge crests is examined. It is shown that the high temperatures in the vents would not allow synthesis of organic compounds, but would decompose them, unless the exposure time at vent temperature was short. Even if the essential organic molecules were available in the hot hydrothermal waters, the subsequent steps of polymerization and the conversion of these polymers into the first organisms would not occur as the vent waters were quenched to the colder temperatures of the primitive oceans.

  5. A 75-Year Old Man Complaining of Flank Pain and Obstructive Urinary Symptoms: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Kowsari

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBenign renal cystic adenoma with out malignant features is a very rare entity. A 75 year old male with obstructive Lower tract symptoms and vague flank pain was admitted and planned for nephrectomy of non functional kidney -due to long term nephrolithiasis- intra operative finding was a cystic hydronephrotic kidney filled by thick mucous secretions which turned out to be a cyst adenoma of kidney with no malignant features.

  6. Evidence of sheared sills related to flank destabilization in a basaltic volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthod, C.; Famin, V.; Bascou, J.; Michon, L.; Ildefonse, B.; Monié, P.

    2016-04-01

    Piton des Neiges basaltic volcano (La Réunion) has been deeply dissected by erosion, exposing large volumes of debris avalanche deposits. To shed light on the factors that led to volcano flank destabilizations, we studied the structure, the crystallographic and magnetic fabrics of the substratum of a debris avalanche unit. This substratum is a complex of > 50 seaward-dipping sills that has been exposed by the avalanche. Structural observations show that the sill plane in contact with the avalanche is one of the latest intrusions in the sill complex. In this uppermost sill, the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is correlated to the crystallographic preferred orientation of magmatic silicate minerals, allowing us to use AMS as a proxy to infer the magmatic flow. The AMS fabric across the intrusion is strongly asymmetric, which reveals that the contact sill was emplaced with a normal shear displacement of its hanging wall. The shear displacement and the magma flow in the intrusion are both directed toward the NNE, i.e. toward the sea, which is also the direction of the slope and of the debris avalanche runout. Because all the sills in the intrusion complex have a similar dip and dip direction, it is likely that several of them also underwent a cointrusive slip toward the NNE. We conclude that this cointrusive normal slip, repeated over many intrusions of the sill complex, increased the flank instability of the volcano. This incremental instability may have ended up into the observed debris avalanche deposit. At Piton de la Fournaise, the active volcano of La Réunion, sill intrusion and cointrusive flank displacement have been inferred from geophysical studies for the April 2007 eruption. By providing direct evidence of sheared sills, our study substantiates the idea that repeated sill intrusions may eventually trigger flank destabilizations in basaltic volcanoes.

  7. Supported PCR: an efficient procedure to amplify sequences flanking a known DNA segment

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, George N.; Rommens, Caius M.T.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    We describe a novel modification of the polymerase chain reaction for efficient in vitro amplification of genomic DNA sequences flanking short stretches of known sequence. The technique utilizes a target enrichment step, based on the selective isolation of biotinylated fragments from the bulk of genomic DNA on streptavidin-containing support. Subsequently, following ligation with a second universal linker primer, the selected fragments can be amplified to amounts suitable for further molecula...

  8. BPTs: thiophene-flanked benzodipyrrolidone conjugated polymers for ambipolar organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumer, Joseph W; Levick, Matthew; Dai, Sheng-Yao; Rossbauer, Stephan; Huang, Zhenggang; Biniek, Laure; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Durrant, James R; Procter, David J; McCulloch, Iain

    2013-05-18

    A series of novel thiophene-flanked benzodipyrrolidone (BPT)-based alternating copolymers are synthesised, their optical and electrical properties evaluated. The BPT unit promotes a conjugated, planar polymer backbone, with a low bandgap, primarily due to low lying LUMO energy levels. Copolymerisation with thiophene exhibits well balanced ambipolar organic field-effect transistor performance, with electron and hole mobilities 0.1 and 0.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively.

  9. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

  10. Mid-oceanic ridges - Guest editorial

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Ins titutes of Techno logy and national laboratories. A few Inter national re - searchers, notably from the USA, Portugal, France and J a pan too have shown interest in the I n Ridge and are keen to collaborate with India. It is foreseen that In...

  11. Petrography of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Petrographic characteristics of basalts collected from a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge (lat. 3 degrees 35'N to 3 degrees 41'N; long. 64 degrees 05'E to 64 degrees 09'E) show typical pillow lava zonations with variable concentrations of plagioclase...

  12. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  13. Ridges and hotspots: perspectives from global tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Shen; Tanimoto, Toshiro

    1991-01-01

    Resolution in global tomography has improved to a level of about 1000 km due to a rapid increase of digital data during the last decade. We have started to see various important tectonic features in some detail. We will attempt to summarize our current observations for ridges and hotspots.

  14. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ribbon Ridge. 9.182 Section 9.182 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., to the road's intersection with North Valley Road, near the Erwin Young School, section 39, T3S, R3W...

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. [ed.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  16. Structure and origin of the 85 degrees E ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Chaubey, A.K.; Ramprasad, T.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Krishna, K.S.; Desa, M.; Murty, G.P.S.; Subrahmanyam, C.

    processes for the ridge emplacement have been suggested. Ridge emplacement may be (1) due to shearing of the lithosphere caused by stretching and compressional forces associated at the time of major plate reorganization immediately after the evolution...

  17. Wrinkle Ridges in Aeolis Dorsa, Mars: Preliminary Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, R. M.; Burr, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    Previous work has interpreted wrinkle ridges as compressional landforms caused by movement along blind thrust faults. Our preliminary mapping in the Aeolis Dorsa, Mars has identified widely distributed wrinkle ridges, suggesting episodic contraction.

  18. Prediction of eigenmodes cutoff frequencies of sectoral coaxial ridged waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model of sectoral coaxial ridged waveguides has been developed using coupled-integralequations technique. Maximal ratios of cutoff frequencies of two lowest modes of sectoral coaxial ridged waveguides have been obtained.

  19. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the efficiency of surface plasmon polariton excitation by a focused laser beam using gold ridges. The dependence of the efficiency on geometrical parameters of ridges and wavelength dependence are examined. The experimental measurements accomplished...

  20. What controls the distribution and tectono-magmatic features of oceanic hot spot volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Valerio; Vezzoli, Luigina

    2016-04-01

    Hot spot oceanic volcanoes worldwide show significant deviations from the classic Hawaiian reference model; these mainly concern the distribution of edifices and overall tectono-magmatic features, as the development of the volcanic rift zones and extent of flank instability. Here we try to explain these deviations investigating and comparing the best-known hot spot oceanic volcanoes. At a general scale, these volcanoes show an age-distance progression ranging from focused to scattered. This is here explained as due to several independent factors, as the thermal or mechanical weakening of the plate (due to the lithosphere thickness or regional structures, respectively), or the plume structure. At a more detailed scale, hot spot volcanoes show recurrent features, including mafic shield edifices with summit caldera and volcanic rift zones, often at the head of an unstable flank. However, despite this recurrence, a widespread tectono-magmatic variability is often found. Here we show how this variability depends upon the magma supply and age of the oceanic crust (influencing the thickness of the overlying pelagic sediments). Well-developed rift zones and larger collapses are found on hot spot volcanoes with higher supply rate and older crust, as Hawaii and Canary Islands. Poorly-developed rift zones and limited collapses occur on hot spot volcanoes with lower supply rate and younger crust, as Easter Island and Ascension. Transitional features are observed at hot spots with intermediate productivity (Cape Verde, Reunion, Society Islands and, to a minor extent, the Azores), whereas the scarcity or absence of pelagic sediments may explain the lack of collapses and developed rift zones in the productive Galapagos hot spot.

  1. Ultrasonic Hot Embossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Karl Schomburg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic hot embossing is a new process for fast and low-cost production of micro systems from polymer. Investment costs are on the order of 20.000 € and cycle times are a few seconds. Microstructures are fabricated on polymer foils and can be combined to three-dimensional systems by ultrasonic welding.

  2. What's Hot? What's Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczynski, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    When Goldilocks finds three bowls of porridge at different temperatures in the three bears' house, she accurately assesses the situation and comes up with one of the most recognizable lines in children's literature," This porridge is too hot; this porridge is too cold; aahh, this porridge is just right!" Goldilocks' famous line is a perfect…

  3. Hot house bad house

    OpenAIRE

    Azzopardi, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    Shaun Azzopardi met up with a team of researchers led by Eur. Ing. Charles Yousif to take the concrete block to the next level. It is more exciting than it sounds. Photography by Dr Edward Duca. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/hot-house-bad-house/

  4. Fending Off Hot Money

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Amid uncertainties about the amount of hot money,the government strives to curb the harmful capital The benchmark Shanghai Composite Index was plagued by dips, climbs and dives as the stock market slumped from 3,186 to 2,838 points

  5. Seismic hazard evaluation for Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservations, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Toro, G.F. [Risk Engineering, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Hunt, R.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering

    1992-09-30

    This study presents the results of an investigation of seismic hazard at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservations (K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Oak Ridge is located in eastern Tennessee, in an area of moderate to high historical seismicity. Results from two separate seismic hazard analyses are presented. The EPRI/SOG analysis uses the input data and methodology developed by the Electric Power Research Institute, under the sponsorship of several electric utilities, for the evaluation of seismic hazard in the central and eastern United States. The LLNL analysis uses the input data and methodology developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Both the EPRI/SOG and LLNL studies characterize earth-science uncertainty on the causes and characteristics of earthquakes in the central and eastern United States. This is accomplished by considering multiple hypotheses on the locations and parameters of seismic source zones and by considering multiple attenuation functions for the prediction of ground shaking given earthquake size and location. These hypotheses were generated by multiple expert teams and experts. Furthermore, each team and expert was asked to generate multiple hypotheses in order to characterize his own internal uncertainty. The seismic-hazard calculations are performed for all hypotheses. Combining the results from each hypothesis with the weight associated to that hypothesis, one obtains an overall representation of the seismic hazard at the Oak Ridge site and its uncertainty.

  6. An interdisciplinary management of severely resorbed maxillary anterior ridge complicated by traumatic bite using a ridge splitting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Narender Dev; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Chaudhari, Prabhat Kumar; Rathi, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the teeth and alveolar ridge of the maxillary anterior region due to trauma can cause severe alveolar ridge deficiency. Ridge augmentation is a valuable periodontal plastic surgical method for the correction of ridge defects for esthetic purpose. Although ridge augmentation can help to restore the ridge volume, the grafting procedures can significantly increase the patient morbidity, treatment time, and the cost. Among the ridge augmentation techniques, the ridge split procedure demonstrates many benefits such as no need for donor site, the rare risk of damage to underlying anatomical structures, less pain, and swelling. This case report presents a vertical split technique for increasing the bone volume. There was a remarkable healing and significant increase in bone volume. We have followed the case for 6 months. PMID:25810602

  7. Experimental study of the interplay between magmatic rift intrusion and flank instability with application to the 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    KAUST Repository

    Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Mount Etna volcano is subject to transient magmatic intrusions and flank movement. The east flank of the edifice, in particular, is moving eastward and is dissected by the Timpe Fault System. The relationship of this eastward motion with intrusions and tectonic fault motion, however, remains poorly constrained. Here we explore this relationship by using analogue experiments that are designed to simulate magmatic rift intrusion, flank movement, and fault activity before, during, and after a magmatic intrusion episode. Using particle image velocimetry allows for a precise temporal and spatial analysis of the development and activity of fault systems. The results show that the occurrence of rift intrusion episodes has a direct effect on fault activity. In such a situation, fault activity may occur or may be hindered, depending on the interplay of fault displacement and flank acceleration in response to dike intrusion. Our results demonstrate that a complex interplay may exist between an active tectonic fault system and magmatically induced flank instability. Episodes of magmatic intrusion change the intensity pattern of horizontal flank displacements and may hinder or activate associated faults. We further compare our results with the GPS data of the Mount Etna 2001 eruption and intrusion. We find that syneruptive displacement rates at the Timpe Fault System have differed from the preeruptive or posteruptive periods, which shows a good agreement of both the experimental and the GPS data. Therefore, understanding the flank instability and flank stability at Mount Etna requires consideration of both tectonic and magmatic forcing. Key Points Analyzing Mount Etna east flank dynamics during the 2001 eruption Good correlation between analogue models and GPS data Understanding the different behavior of faulting before/during/after an eruption © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  8. 3D gravity modelling reveals off-axis crustal thickness variations along the western Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.; Jokat, Wilfried

    2016-11-01

    Near-orthogonal ultra-slow (13.3 mm yr- 1 to 6.5 mm yr- 1) sea floor spreading in the absence of large transform faults make the Arctic Gakkel Ridge ideally suited for the study of magmatic processes. To enable this, we generated a three-dimensional gravity model of crustal thickness over the ridge and parts of the adjacent Nansen and Amundsen basins west of 65° E. The model shows that oceanic crust accreted prior to chrons C5/C6 is generally very thin (1-3 km). Magnetic anomalies over this thin crust are highly variable both parallel and perpendicular to the ridge axis. This is the result of amagmatic or weakly volcanic spreading that started with the opening of the basins 56 Ma ago. The separation of Greenland from Svalbard at chron C5/C6 led to the inflow of North Atlantic mantle into the western Eurasia Basin leading to a change in the mantle convection system and the establishment of a magmatic dichotomy along the Gakkel Ridge. Robust magmatism was established in the Western Volcanic Zone (6° 30‧ W-3° 30‧ E), leading to creation of a 6.6 km thick igneous crust, characterized by a strong positive axial magnetic anomaly, numerous volcanic cones, and widespread thick mid-ocean ridge basalts. The transition to the neighbouring Sparsely Magmatic (3° 30‧ E-29° E) and Eastern Volcanic (29° E-85° E) zones is sharp. Peridotites cover the central valley and the inner rift flanks, the central magnetic anomaly vanishes and crustal thickness decreases to 1-4 km. Transverse basement ridges, extending for as much as 100 km into the adjacent basins, intersect the central valley. Although partly of tectonic origin, the transverse ridges are also an expression of long-living magmatic centres, as revealed by increased magnetic anomaly intensities and local thickening of the crust to values as great as 5.9 km.

  9. Initiation of Ridges and Transform Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyst, M.; Thompson, G. A.; Parsons, T.

    2004-12-01

    No clear consensus has emerged to explain initiation of the strikingly regular pattern of ocean ridges and transform faults. The question is important on the continents also, because a less regular pattern of step-overs on faults such as the San Andreas influences the sources of earthquakes. We explore the question by finite element modeling and a study of observational data on ridges and transforms. We focus on the simplest case, where ridges and transforms seem to self-organize at new plate boundaries as soon as new oceanic (magmatic) crust forms. The South Atlantic supplies a clear example. Continental South America and Africa separated along an irregular break, whose general shape is still preserved in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In detail, however, the sea floor magnetic anomalies and satellite gravity show that traces of the ridges and transforms extend to the base of the continental slope, i.e. they formed quickly in the new oceanic crust. The Gulf of California provides another clear example and is notable because of its northward transition into the continental San Andreas fault system. In continental crust, dike segments connected by transform faults provide the clearest analogues of oceanic ridges and transforms. Remarkably, the ridge-transform pattern has been simulated by pulling the crust on molten wax [Oldenburg and Brune, JGR, 80, 1975] and also observed in the crust of a molten lava lake [Duffield, JGR, 77, 1972]. In neither of these models, however, do the spatial and temporal scales permit investigation of the dikes whose repeated emplacement and inflation builds layer 3 of the ocean crust. It is well established that, under a buoyant head of magma, dikes tend to fracture and intrude the crust in planes perpendicular to the least horizontal stress, and they relieve the stress difference as they inflate [e.g. Parsons and Thompson, Science, 253, 1991]. Dikes are commonly used as stress-direction indicators analogous to artificial hydraulic fractures

  10. Comprehensive work plan for Building 3001 storage canal at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This Comprehensive Work Plan describes the method of accomplishment to replace the shielding protection of the water in the canal with a controlled low strength material (CLSM) 4. The canal was used during the operation of the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor in the 1940s and 1950s to transport spent fuel slugs and irradiated test materials from the reactor, under water to the hot cell in Building 3019 for further processing, packaging, and handling. After the reactor was shut down, the canal was used until 1990 to store some irradiated materials until they could be transferred to a Solid Waste Storage Area. This task has the following objectives and components: (1) minimize potential future risk to human health and the environment; (2) reduce surveillance and maintenance cost of the canal; (3) perform site preparation activities; (4) replace the water in the canal with a solid CLSM; (5) pump the water to the Process Waste Treatment System (PWTS) for further processing at the same rate that the CLSM is pumped under the water; (6) remove the water using a process that will protect the workers and the public in the visitors area from contamination while the CLSM is being pumped underneath the water; (7) painting a protective coating material over the CLSM after the CLSM has cured.

  11. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  12. What Is Hot Yoga (Bikram)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Consumer health What is hot yoga? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Hot yoga is a vigorous form of yoga performed in a studio ... you check with your doctor before trying hot yoga if you have any health concerns. If you have heart disease, problems with ...

  13. Effect of Micro Ridges on Orientation of Cultured Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on orientation of cultured cells has been studied in vitro. Several patterns of micro ridges have been fabricated on a transparent polydimethylsiloxane disk with the photo lithography technique. The ridges consist of several lines of rectangular column: the width of 0.003 mm, the interval of 0.007 mm. Variation has been made on the height of the ridge between 0.0003 mm and 0.0035 mm. C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line originated with cross-striated muscle of C3H mouse was cultured on the disk with the micro ridges for one week and was observed with an inverted phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that cells adhere on the top of the ridge and align to the longitudinal direction of the micro ridges with the height between 0.0015 mm and 0.0025 mm.

  14. Active convection beneath ridges: a new spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    The role of buoyancy-driven, "active" upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges has been long debated [1,2,3], with the naysayers holding sway in recent years. Recent work on tomographic imaging of the sub-ridge mantle has revealed patterns in velocity variation that seem inconsistent with what we expect of passive upwelling and melting [4]. The irregular distribution, asymmetry, and off-axis locations of slow regions in tomographic results are suggestive of time-dependent convective flow. Using 2D numerical simulations of internally consistent mantle and magmatic flow plus melting/freezing [5,6], I investigate the parametric subspace in which active convection is expected to occur. For low mantle viscosities, interesting symmetry-breaking behavior is predicted. References: [1] Rabinowicz, et al., EPSL, 1984; [2] Buck & Su, GRL, 1989; [3] Scott & Stevenson, JGR, 1989; [4] Toomey et al., Nature, 2007; [5] McKenzie, J.Pet., 1984; [6] Katz, J.Pet., 2008;

  15. Tubular initial conditions and ridge formation

    CERN Document Server

    Borysova, M S; Karpenko, Iu A; Shapoval, V M; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2013-01-01

    The 2D azimuth & rapidity structure of the two-particle correlations in relativistic A+A collisions is altered significantly by the presence of sharp inhomogeneities in superdense matter formed in such processes. The causality constraints enforce one to associate the long-range longitudinal correlations observed in a narrow angular interval, the so-called (soft) ridge, with peculiarities of the initial conditions of collision process. This study's objective is to analyze whether multiform initial tubular structures, undergoing the subsequent hydrodynamic evolution and gradual decoupling, can form the soft ridges. Motivated by the flux-tube scenarios, the initial energy density distribution contains the different numbers of high density tube-like boost-invariant inclusions that form a bumpy structure in the transverse plane. The influence of various structures of such initial conditions in the most central A+A events on the collective evolution of matter, resulting spectra, angular particle correlations an...

  16. Model selection in kernel ridge regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Kernel ridge regression is a technique to perform ridge regression with a potentially infinite number of nonlinear transformations of the independent variables as regressors. This method is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts....... The influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy is investigated. Several popular kernels are reviewed, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. The latter two kernels are interpreted in terms of their smoothing properties......, and the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels are related to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based on these interpretations, guidelines are provided for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study...

  17. Marketing for Oak Ridge technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosser, G.A.

    1989-06-15

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., which manages major research and production facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the Department of Energy, has implemented a systematic approach to marketing for technology transfer. Unique mechanisms have been created to address the need for market research and analysis, strategy formulation, and the execution of plans designed to engender the broadest commercial use of government-funded technologies. Establishment of formal ties with the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Business has resulted in an expanded role for marketing in support of the Oak Ridge program. The creation of graduate research positions has enabled MBA students to contribute to, and learn from, a program which is at the forefront of an important national initiative.

  18. Unfaulting the Sardarapat Ridge, Southwest Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, P.; Connor, C.; Connor, L. J.; Savov, I. P.; Karakhanyan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Armenia is located near the core of contractional deformation associated with the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian tectonic plates. Several studies of this region, including portions of adjacent Georgia, Iran, and Turkey, have indicated that 1-2 mm/yr of intra-plate, north-south shortening is primarily accommodated by a network of E-W trending thrust faults, and NW-trending (dextral) and NE-trending (sinistral) strike-slip faults. One proposed fault in this network, the Sardarapat Fault (SF), was investigated as part of a regional seismic hazard assessment ahead of the installation of a replacement reactor at the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP). The SF is primarily defined by the Sardarapat Ridge (SR), which is a WNW-trending, 40-70 m high topographic feature located just north of the Arax River and the Turkey-Armenia border. The stratigraphy comprising this ridge includes alluvium overlying several meters of lacustrine deposits above a crystal-rich basaltic lava flow that yields an Ar-Ar age of 0.9 +/- 0.02 Ma. The alluvial sediments on the ridge contain early Bronze age (3832-3470 BP) artifacts at an elevation 25 m above those of the surrounding alluvial plane. This has lead to the suggestion that the SR is bound to the south (the steepest side) by the SF, which is uplifting the ridge at a rate of 0.7 mm/yr. However, despite the prominence and trend of the ridge there are no unequivocal observations, such as scarps or exposures of fault rocks, to support the existence of the SF. The goal of the investigation of the SR area was to test various models for the formation of the ridge including faulting and combined volcanic and erosional processes. We therefore collected gravimetric, magnetic, magneto-tellurics (MT), and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data across an area of ~400 km2, and used correlations of stratigraphic data from coreholes drilled proximal to the study area to define the geometry of the contact between the basement and basin fill to

  19. Modeling "secular" flank motion at Kilauea Volcano (Hawai'i) during 2000-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Amelung, F.; Baker, S.; Govers, R. M.; Poland, M. P.; Lavallee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Kilauea's south flank is moving seaward due to flank instabilities. The rate is influenced by magmatic events (dike intrusions) and tectonic events (earthquakes and slow-slip events at the decollement), but the general flank motion signal remains significant at any time, with rates of 6-10 cm/yr during the past decade. The surface displacements were explained by fault slip along the decollement beneath Kilauea combined with deep-rift opening in elastic halfspace dislocation models. While these models explain the kinematics well, the dynamics of the rift opening are not resolved, and the question on contribution from magmatic driving forces versus an entirely gravitationally-driven system remains. InSAR time-series analysis (Small Baseline Algorithm; SBAS) showed linear surface subsidence at Kilauea summit (maximum rate 5.5 cm/yr south of the caldera) during 2000-2003, a time-period during which the influence of distinct deformation events is small in comparison to previous and later time-periods. Here, we investigate if summit subsidence can be explained as a consequence of secular flank motion at Kilauea by ductile creep of a deep magma mush, using a numerical model with time-dependent material deformation properties to constrain velocities rather than displacements. We developed a 2D finite element model that investigates the deformation response of Kilauea to gravitational driving forces only. The model geometry includes a decollement fault beneath the volcano that can have locked and creeping fault segments. We introduce time-dependent material behavior using a viscoelastic model media. The host rock remains stable over geodetic timescales given its high viscosity value, while the deep-seated magma mush beneath Kilauea caldera is assigned a lower viscosity and spreads at significant rates. The deformation signal of the magma mush is transmitted to the surface, causing local subsidence at Kilauea summit, showing that summit subsidence can be explained by flank

  20. Warm Jupiters are less lonely than hot Jupiters: close neighbours

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chelsea X; Triaud, Amaury H M J

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions, between systems that contain hot Jupiters (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (periods between 10 and 200 days). Hot Jupiters as a whole, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to $2 R_{\\rm Earth}$). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to $1 R_{\\rm Earth}$. In stark contrast, half of the warm Jupiters are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and warm Jupiters are mutually exclusive, in particular in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of warm Jupiters also yields clue to their formation. The warm Jupiters that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those ...

  1. Hot Subluminous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  2. The hot Hagedorn Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the half-centenary of Hagedorn temperature and the statistical bootstrap model (SBM) we present a short account of how these insights coincided with the establishment of the hot big-bang model (BBM) and helped resolve some of the early philosophical difficulties. We then turn attention to the present day context and show the dominance of strong interaction quark and gluon degrees of freedom in the early stage, helping to characterize the properties of the hot Universe. We focus attention on the current experimental insights about cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuation, and develop a much improved understanding of the neutrino freeze-out, in this way paving the path to the opening of a direct connection of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) physics in the early Universe with the QCD-lattice, and the study of the properties of QGP formed in the laboratory.

  3. The hot chocolate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Frank S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-05-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  4. Hot chocolate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  5. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalla López-López

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats.

  6. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla , PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD...would like express my gratitude to Dr. Michael Havrilla , my research advisor. Your ability to illustrate the entire picture of the subject was...electromagnetics U U U UU 83 Dr. Michael J. Havrilla (ENG) (937) 255-3636 x4582 michael.havrilla@afit.edu

  7. Fingerprint image mosaicking by recursive ridge mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoungtaek; Choi, Heeseung; Lee, Sangyoun; Kim, Jaihie

    2007-10-01

    To obtain a large fingerprint image from several small partial images, mosaicking of fingerprint images has been recently researched. However, existing approaches cannot provide accurate transformations for mosaics when it comes to aligning images because of the plastic distortion that may occur due to the nonuniform contact between a finger and a sensor or the deficiency of the correspondences in the images. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for mosaicking fingerprint images, which iteratively matches ridges to overcome the deficiency of the correspondences and compensates for the amount of plastic distortion between two partial images by using a thin-plate spline model. The proposed method also effectively eliminates erroneous correspondences and decides how well the transformation is estimated by calculating the registration error with a normalized distance map. The proposed method consists of three phases: feature extraction, transform estimation, and mosaicking. Transform is initially estimated with matched minutia and the ridges attached to them. Unpaired ridges in the overlapping area between two images are iteratively matched by minimizing the registration error, which consists of the ridge matching error and the inverse consistency error. During the estimation, erroneous correspondences are eliminated by considering the geometric relationship between the correspondences and checking if the registration error is minimized or not. In our experiments, the proposed method was compared with three existing methods in terms of registration accuracy, image quality, minutia extraction rate, processing time, reject to fuse rate, and verification performance. The average registration error of the proposed method was less than three pixels, and the maximum error was not more than seven pixels. In a verification test, the equal error rate was reduced from 10% to 2.7% when five images were combined by our proposed method. The proposed method was superior to other

  8. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  9. Peppery Hot Bean Curd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Peppery Hot Bean Curd is a famous dish that originated in Chengdu,Sichuan Province.Dating back to the year under the reign of Emperor Tongzhi during the Qing Dynasty(1862-1875),a woman chef named Chen created this dish.In Chinese it is called Mapo Bean Curd. Ingredients:Three pieces of bean curd,100 grams lean pork,25 grams green soy beans or garlic

  10. Sequence and single-base polymorphisms of the bovine alpha-lactalbumin 5'-flanking region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, G T; Bremel, R D

    1993-04-30

    The alpha-lactalbumin (alpha LA)-encoding gene is a potential quantitative trait locus in dairy animals. In cattle, the production of alpha LA is tightly coupled to the onset of lactation and it serves as a regulatory subunit of the enzyme responsible for lactose synthesis. Lactose is the major osmole controlling water movement in the mammary gland. To better understand the control of bovine alpha LA expression, the 5'-flanking region of a Holstein alpha LA gene was cloned and sequenced. The sequenced clone contains 1952 bp of 5'-flanking region and 66-bp of the protein-coding region. Three single-bp polymorphisms were identified within this region. These polymorphisms occur at positions +15, +21 and +54 relative to the mRNA transcription start point (tsp). The +15 and +21 variations occur in the region encoding the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA-coding sequence. The +54 polymorphism is a silent mutation in the SP-coding region of the gene. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR, Cetus)-based screening method has been employed to analyze the genotype of cattle at the +15 position. A total of 501 randomly selected cattle from seven breeds were screened for this allele. Of these animals, only the Holstein breed of cattle was found to contain the +15 variation and it occurs at a gene frequency of 32%. Sequence comparisons were conducted between the 5'-flanking regions of the bovine-milk-protein encoding genes, alpha LA, beta-casein and alpha S1-casein, which are coordinately expressed. Regions of similarity extending to 350 bp in length were observed between these sequences.

  11. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Jeddi, Zeinab; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream at the southern margin of Mýrdalsjökull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. We have not found any comparable examples in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have to be considered as potential seismic sources. Discerning between these two causes is critical for monitoring glacier-clad volcanoes and has been controversial at Katla. For this new seismic cluster on the south flank, we regard volcano-related processes as more likely than glacial ones for the following reasons: 1) the seismic activity started during an unrest episode involving sudden melting of the glacier and a jökulhlaup; 2) the glacier stream is small and stagnant; 3) the seismicity remains regular and stable for years; 4) there is no apparent correlation with short-term weather changes, such as rainstorms. We suggest that a small, shallow hydrothermal system was activated on Katla's south flank in 2011, either by a minor magmatic injection or by changes of permeability in a local crack system.

  12. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  13. Large-scale flank collapse events during the activity of Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Friant, Anne; Boudon, Georges; Deplus, Christine; Villemant, Benoã®T.

    2003-01-01

    A horseshoe-shaped structure already identified on the southwestern flank of Montagne Pelée (Martinique, Lesser Antilles arc) was previously interpreted as resulting of a flank collapse event, but no debris avalanche deposits were observed at the time. New offshore high-resolution bathymetry and geophysical data (Aguadomar cruise; December 1998 to January 1999; R/V L'Atalante) lead us to identify three debris avalanche deposits on the submarine western flank of Montagne Pelée extending down to the Grenada Basin. They display morphological fronts and hummocky morphology on bathymetric data, speckled pattern on backscatter data and hyperbolic facies on 3.5 kHz and seismic profiles. New on-land geological studies lead us to identify two other horseshoe-shaped structures on the same flank of the volcano. The three submarine deposits have been traced back to the structures identified on land, which confirms the occurrence of repeated flank collapse events during the evolution of Montagne Pelée. The ages of the last two events are estimated at ˜9 ka and ˜25 ka on the basis of 14C and 238U/230Th dates. Every flank collapse produced debris avalanches which flowed down to the Caribbean Sea. We propose that the repeated instabilities are due to the large asymmetry of the island with western aerial and submarine slopes steeper than the eastern slopes. The asymmetry results from progressive loading by accumulation of volcanic products on the western slopes of the volcano and development of long-term gravitational instabilities. Meteoric and hydrothermal fluid circulation on the floor of the second flank collapse structure also creates a weakened hydrothermalized area, which favors the recurrence of flank collapses.

  14. Role of large flank-collapse events on magma evolution of volcanoes. Insights from the Lesser Antilles Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, Georges; Villemant, Benoît; Friant, Anne Le; Paterne, Martine; Cortijo, Elsa

    2013-08-01

    Flank-collapse events are now recognized as common processes of destruction of volcanoes. They may occur several times on a volcanic edifice pulling out varying volumes of material from km3 to thousands of km3. In the Lesser Antilles Arc, a large number of flank-collapse events were identified. Here, we show that some of the largest events are correlated to significant variations in erupted magma compositions and eruptive styles. On Montagne Pelée (Martinique), magma production rate has been sustained during several thousand years following a 32 ka old flank-collapse event. Basic and dense magmas were emitted through open-vent eruptions that generated abundant scoria flows while significantly more acidic magmas were produced before the flank collapse. The rapid building of a new cone increased the load on magma bodies at depth and the density threshold. Magma production rate decreased and composition of the erupted products changed to more acidic compared to the preceding period of activity. These low density magma generated plinian and dome-forming eruptions up to the Present. In contrast at Soufrière Volcanic Centre of St. Lucia and at Pitons du Carbet in Martinique, the flank-collapses have an opposite effect: in both cases, the acidic magmas erupted immediately after the flank-collapses. These magmas are highly porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) and much more viscous than the magmas erupted before the flank-collapses. They have been generally emplaced as voluminous and uptight lava domes (called “the Pitons”). Such magmas could not ascent without a significant decrease of the threshold effect produced by the volcanic edifice loading before the flank-collapse.

  15. Polyglutamine Amyloid Core Boundaries and Flanking Domain Dynamics in Huntingtin Fragment Fibrils Determined by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hoop, Cody L.; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Hou, Zhipeng; Poirier, Michelle A.; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.

    2014-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the huntingtin (htt) protein leads to misfolding and aggregation. There is much interest in the molecular features that distinguish monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillar species that populate the aggregation pathway and likely differ in cytotoxicity. The mechanism and rate of aggregation are greatly affected by the domains flanking the polyQ segment within exon 1 of htt. A “protective” C-terminal proline-rich flanking doma...

  16. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-05-01

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (ɛHf = +15.7-+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread ɛHf values (from-2.3 to-4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins.

  17. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-05-17

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (εHf = +15.7-+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread εHf values (from-2.3 to-4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins.

  18. Hot subluminous stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heber, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich vs. He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters omega Cen and NGC~2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope phase of evolution.They provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet purely understood phase of stellar evolution. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW~Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the pulsator V391 ...

  19. Solar Hot Water Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  20. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  1. Evaluation of Various Joints between Studs and Plates on Flanking Noise Transmission within Lightweight Periodic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Noise propagation in lightweight building structures is an issue that needs attention in the current building trend. In this paper, a finite-element model is utilized for the analysis of flanking noise transmission in a lightweight panel structure consisting of two plates with internal ribs using...... various joints between the studs and the plates. Four different coupling configurations are considered: 1) all structural contact points are completely tied; 2) only nodes on the centre lines of the structure are tied; 3) a narrow strip of 5 mm, 10 mm or 20 mm tied elements connect the frame to the plates...

  2. Geochemistry of summit fumarole vapors and flanking thermal/mineral waters at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, C.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Popocatepetl Volcano is potentially devastating to populations living in the greater Mexico City area. Systematic monitoring of fumarole gases and flanking thermal/mineral springs began in early 1994 after increased fumarolic and seismic activity were noticed in 1991. These investigations had two major objectives: (1) to determine if changes in magmatic conditions beneath Popocatepetl might be reflected by chemical changes in fumarolic discharges and (2) to determine if thermal/mineral spring waters in the vicinity of Popocatepetl are geochemically related to or influences by the magmatic system. This report summarizes results from these two discrete studies.

  3. Autism associated gene, engrailed2, and flanking gene levels are altered in post-mortem cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeon Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous genetic studies demonstrated association between the transcription factor engrailed2 (EN2 and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Subsequent molecular analysis determined that the EN2 ASD-associated haplotype (rs1861972-rs1861973 A-C functions as a transcriptional activator to increase gene expression. EN2 is flanked by 5 genes, serotonin receptor5a (HTR5A, insulin induced gene1 (INSIG1, canopy1 homolog (CNPY1, RNA binding motif protein33 (RBM33, and sonic hedgehog (SHH. These flanking genes are co-expressed with EN2 during development and coordinate similar developmental processes. To investigate if mRNA levels for these genes are altered in individuals with autism, post-mortem analysis was performed. METHODS: qRT-PCR quantified mRNA levels for EN2 and the 5 flanking genes in 78 post-mortem cerebellar samples. mRNA levels were correlated with both affection status and rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Molecular analysis investigated whether EN2 regulates flanking gene expression. RESULTS: EN2 levels are increased in affected A-C/G-T individuals (p = .0077. Affected individuals also display a significant increase in SHH and a decrease in INSIG1 levels. Rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype is correlated with significant increases for SHH (A-C/G-T and CNPY1 (G-T/G-T levels. Human cell line over-expression and knock-down as well as mouse knock-out analysis are consistent with EN2 and SHH being co-regulated, which provides a possible mechanism for increased SHH post-mortem levels. CONCLUSIONS: EN2 levels are increased in affected individuals with an A-C/G-T genotype, supporting EN2 as an ASD susceptibility gene. SHH, CNPY1, and INSIG1 levels are also significantly altered depending upon affection status or rs1861972-rs1861973 genotype. Increased EN2 levels likely contribute to elevated SHH expression observed in the post-mortem samples.

  4. Postmortem Evaluation of Left Flank Laparoscopic Access in an Adult Female Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pizzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are still few reports of laparoscopy in megavertebrates. The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis is the tallest land mammal, and the largest ruminant species. An 18-year-old multiparous female hybrid giraffe, weighing 650 kg, was euthanized for chronic health problems, and left flank laparoscopy was performed less than 30 minutes after death. Safe primary access was achieved under visualisation using an optical bladed trocar (Visiport Plus, Tyco healthcare UK Ltd without prior abdominal insufflation. A left paralumbar fossa approach allowed access to the spleen, rumen, left kidney, and intestines, but did not allow access to the reproductive tract which in nongravid females is intrapelvic in nature.

  5. Genetic analysis on 3'-terminal flanking region of uncoupling protein 3 in different pig breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 3′-terminal flanking region of porcine uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was cloned, the sequence data revealed 15 nucleotide substitutions among Landrace and three Chinese native pig breeds named Neijiang, Minpig and Erhualian. The continuous 9 polymorphic sites were checked by PCR-RFLP, the results indicatedthat Erhualian had extraordinary gene frequency, presented most significant difference by χ2 test compared with Landrace, Largewhite, Neijiang and Minpig respectively, significant level compared with Meishan; and Meishan also had significant difference compared with Landrace and Minpig respectively. These results canbe concluded that Taihu pigs have special genetic characteristics among pig breeds.

  6. Stability analysis of Hawaiian Island flanks using insight gained from strength testing of the HSDP core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nick; Watters, Robert J.; Schiffman, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Hawaiian Island flank failures are recognized as the largest landslide events on Earth, reaching volumes of several thousand cubic kilometers and lengths of over 200 km and occurring on an average of once every 100 000 years. The 3.1 km deep Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) enabled an investigation of the rock mass strength variations on the island of Hawaii [Schiffman, P., Watters, R.J., Thompson, N., Walton, A.W., 2006. Hyaloclastites and the slope stability of Hawaiian volcanoes: insights from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project's 3-km drill core. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 151 (1-3): 217-228]. This study builds on that of Schiffman et al. [Schiffman, P., Watters, R.J., Thompson, N., Walton, A.W., 2006. Hyaloclastites and the slope stability of Hawaiian volcanoes: Insights from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project's 3-km drill core. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 151 (1-3): 217-228] by considering more in-depth rock mass classification and strength testing methods of the HSDP core. Geotechnical core logging techniques combined with laboratory strength testing methods show that rock strength differences exist within the edifice. Comparing the rock strength parameters obtained from the various volcano lithologies identified weak zones, suggesting the possible location of future slip surfaces for large flank failures. Relatively weak rock layers were recognized within poorly consolidated hyaloclastite zones, with increases in strength based on degree of alteration. Subaerial and submarine basalt flows are found to be significantly stronger. With the aid of digital elevation models, cross-sections have been developed of key flank areas on the island of Hawaii. Limit equilibrium slope stability analyses are performed on each cross-section using various failure criteria for the rock mass strength calculations. Based on the stability analyses the majority of the slopes analyzed are considered stable. In cases

  7. Augmenting CRISPR applications in Drosophila with tRNA-flanked sgRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Fillip; Bullock, Simon L

    2016-10-01

    We present tRNA-based vectors for producing multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) from a single RNA polymerase II or III transcript in Drosophila. The system, which is based on liberation of sgRNAs by processing flanking tRNAs, permits highly efficient multiplexing of Cas9-based mutagenesis. We also demonstrate that the tRNA-sgRNA system markedly increases the efficacy of conditional gene disruption by Cas9 and can promote editing by the recently discovered RNA-guided endonuclease Cpf1.

  8. A romifidine and morphine combination for epidural analgesia of the flank in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Fierheller, Erin E.; Caulkett, Nigel A.; Bailey, Jeremy V.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to determine the onset, duration, and degree of analgesia achieved with a combination of romifidine (50 μg/kg body weight [BW]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg BW) administered epidurally. Ten adult Holstein Friesen cows were assigned to either a treatment group receiving the romifidine and morphine combination or a control group receiving 0.9% saline in a randomized, blinded, crossover design. Cows were assessed for degree of flank analgesia and systemic ...

  9. North Kona slump: Submarine flank failure during the early(?) tholeiitic shield stage of Hualalai Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Coombs, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    The North Kona slump is an elliptical region, about 20 by 60 km (1000-km2 area), of multiple, geometrically intricate benches and scarps, mostly at water depths of 2000–4500 m, on the west flank of Hualalai Volcano. Two dives up steep scarps in the slump area were made in September 2001, using the ROV Kaiko of the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), as part of a collaborative Japan–USA project to improve understanding of the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes. Both dives, at water depths of 2700–4000 m, encountered pillow lavas draping the scarp-and-bench slopes. Intact to only slightly broken pillow lobes and cylinders that are downward elongate dominate on the steepest mid-sections of scarps, while more equant and spherical pillow shapes are common near the tops and bases of scarps and locally protrude through cover of muddy sediment on bench flats. Notably absent are subaerially erupted Hualalai lava flows, interbedded hyaloclastite pillow breccia, and/or coastal sandy sediment that might have accumulated downslope from an active coastline. The general structure of the North Kona flank is interpreted as an intricate assemblage of downdropped lenticular blocks, bounded by steeply dipping normal faults. The undisturbed pillow-lava drape indicates that slumping occurred during shield-stage tholeiitic volcanism. All analyzed samples of the pillow-lava drape are tholeiite, similar to published analyses from the submarine northwest rift zone of Hualālai. Relatively low sulfur (330–600 ppm) and water (0.18–0.47 wt.%) contents of glass rinds suggest that the eruptive sources were in shallow water, perhaps 500–1000-m depth. In contrast, saturation pressures calculated from carbon dioxide concentrations (100–190 ppm) indicate deeper equilibration, at or near sample sites at water depths of − 3900 to − 2800 m. Either vents close to the sample sites erupted mixtures of undegassed and degassed magmas, or volatiles were resorbed from

  10. “Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Thrombosis – A Rare Cause of Acute Flank Pain”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raghavendran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many patients present with severe abdominal pain. Renal Artery Thrombosis (RAT is rare, serious and misdiagnosed. RAT has been well described in association with various disorders, but isolated spontaneously occurring RAT is rare and only 2 cases have been described as of date. We present a case of flank pain presenting to emergency for evaluation and discuss the clinical aspects and management. We would like to stress on the important role of serum LDH levels and CT scan in RAT. Early diagnosis may result in salvage of organ by minimally invasive techniques. Late diagnosis will almost always result in nephrectomy.

  11. From mantle to crust: Tomographic image of a mid-ocean ridge volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Koulakov, Ivan; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes are an integral part of mid-ocean ridges. At ultraslow spreading ridges, volcanic centres receive more melt than is produced locally and hence are centres of very efficient magmatism. The cause of melt focussing and the structure of the underlying magma plumbing systems at these volcanic centres are still enigmatic. We present microearthquake data and local earthquake tomography results, based on a one-year deployment of ocean bottom seismometers from 2012 to 2013 on a volcanic centre at the ultraslow Southwest Indian Ridge. In the period 1996-2001, several tectono-magmatic earthquake swarms including unusually strong teleseismically recorded events indicated recent magmatic activity at the experiment site. The distribution of recorded microearthquakes reveals a prominent gap in seismicity of approx. 20 km diameter immediately beneath the volcano indicating elevated temperatures. Tomography results show distinct velocity anomalies in the area of the seismicity gap. An eminent circular low Vs anomaly was found at 4-6 km depth beneath the volcano, imaging a potential crustal magma chamber. Another anomaly of high Vp/Vs-ratios is located at the eastern rim of the seismicity gap, capped by a cluster of microearthquakes and underlain by another low Vs anomaly in the upper mantle. We propose anomalies of reduced seismic velocity to result from recent magmatic activity that is further manifested in elevated temperatures beneath the volcano. Clustering microearthquake foci might be associated with steep temperature gradients and thermal fracturing, where hot upwelling material is confronted with a cold, rigid crust. Our results provide the first direct observation of a melt lens beneath the ultraslow type of mid-ocean ridge and give unprecedented insights to potential magma pathways from the upper mantle to the crust.

  12. Geomorphic and exhumational response of the Central American Volcanic Arc to Cocos Ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Kristin D.; Kirby, Eric; Fisher, Donald M.; van Soest, Matthijs

    2012-04-01

    The timing of collision of the Cocos Ridge at the Middle America Trench remains one of the outstanding questions in the tectonic evolution of the Central American convergent margin. New analyses of the tectonic geomorphology of the Cordillera de Talamanca, the extinct volcanic arc inboard of the Cocos Ridge, coupled with low temperature thermochronometry data, provide insight into the cooling and erosional history of the arc from late Miocene to present. We identify a low-relief surface at high elevation along the northeastern flanks of the range, which represents a relict erosional landscape cut across shallow plutonic rocks of the arc edifice. Longitudinal profiles of rivers on this surface are isolated from steep downstream sections by prominent knickzones that are interpreted to reflect a migrating wave of transient incision generated during differential rock uplift of the range. Reconstruction of pre-incision profiles suggests that rock uplift during the growth of the Cordillera de Talamanca is no greater than ˜2 km. This inference is corroborated by results from our apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track analyses along an elevation transect on Mt. Chirripó, the highest mountain in the Cordillera de Talamanca. Low-temperature cooling ages overlap significantly with published high-temperature40Ar/39Ar ages; the combined results imply that rapid cooling in the late Miocene was related to secular cooling of a shallow pluton, rather than exhumation. Our results imply that rapid incision along downstream channel segments, differential rock uplift, and growth of the Talamanca as a bivergent orogenic wedge associated with the onset of Cocos Ridge subduction are relatively young characteristics of the range. A review of previously published radiometric ages and revised plate reconstructions for the late Miocene further suggest that the cessation of arc volcanism in both the Cordillera de Talamanca and the Cordillera Central of western Panama was coeval with the

  13. The Alarcón Rise: detail mapping and preliminary results on the geometry, distribution and kinematics of faults and fissures on a ridge-transform system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelz, R. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Santa Rosa-del Rio, M.; Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Guardado-France, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcón Rise, the northernmost segment of the East Pacific Rise before it enters the Gulf of California, is the oldest and perhaps most active spreading ridge-transform system along the oblique-divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary in the southern Gulf of California. Magnetic anomalies along the main ridge axis, which stretches for nearly 50 km long in a NE-SW (034o) direction, suggest that spreading with new oceanic crust was fully established ca. 2.5 Ma, and that its modern configuration as the main plate boundary initiated ca. 2 Ma (Umhoefer, P.J. et al., 2007 Basin Research). High resolution (1m lateral/0.2m vertical) bathymetry data and direct observations of the entire ridge segment, collected and performed by MBARI's autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and ROV dives, respectively, during the 2012 Expedition to the Gulf of California, have revealed the presence of an intense array of fault-scarps and fissures displacing numerous neovolcanic landforms such as huge lava domes and smaller cones, pillow mounds and large sheet flows along the entire ridge. The relative age of the surface ruptures is wide-ranging. At some places the fractures appear to be relatively recent, as evident by the apparent young age of the fractured flows, based on having few sessile organisms and/or relatively thin sediment cover. In contrast, fractures and fault-scarps elsewhere are observed to have been partially or totally overrun by lava flows, suggesting their preexistence and relatively older age. The ridge parallel faults and fissures change orientation dramatically as they approach and wrap around the bordering Pescadero and Tamayo fracture zones, which limit the northern and southern flanks of the rise, respectively, giving the ridge a sigmoidal geometry with a Z-shaped symmetry. Moreover, the presence of an en echelon volcanic fissure system near the southern end of the ridge, measuring several kilometers long and oriented somewhat obliquely (~15o clockwise) to

  14. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  15. Alveolar ridge rehabilitation to increase full denture retention and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mefina Kuntjoro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge generally complicates prostetic restoration expecially full denture. Low residual alveolar ridge and basal seat can cause unstable denture, permanent ulcer, pain, neuralgia, and mastication difficulty. Pre-proshetic surgery is needed to improve denture retention and stability. Augmentation is a major surgery to increase vertical height of the atrophic mandible while vestibuloplasty is aimed to increase the denture bearing area. Purpose: The augmentation and vestibuloplasty was aimed to provide stability and retentive denture atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge. Case: A 65 years old woman patient complained about uncomfortable denture. Clinical evaluate showed flat ridge in the anterior mandible, flabby tissue and candidiasis, while residual ridge height was classified into class IV. Case management: Augmentation using autograph was conducted as the mandible vertical height is less than 15 mm. Autograph was used to achieve better bone quantity and quality. Separated alveolar ridge was conducted from left to right canine region and was elevated 0.5 mm from the previous position to get new ridge in the anterior region. The separated alveolar ridge was fixated by using T-plate and ligature wire. Three months after augmentation fixation appliances was removed vestibuloplasty was performed to increase denture bearing area that can make a stable and retentive denture. Conclusion: Augmentation and vestibuloplasty can improve flat ridge to become prominent.Latar belakang: Ridge mandibula yang atrofi pada umumnya mempersulit pembuatan restorasi prostetik terutama gigi tiruan lengkap (GTL. Residual alveolar ridge dan basal seat yang rendah menyebabkan gigi tiruan menjadi tidak stabil, menimbulkan ulser permanen, nyeri, neuralgia, dan kesulitan mengunyah. Tujuan: Augmentasi dan vestibuloplasti pada ridge mandibula yang atrofi dilakukan untuk menciptakan gigi tiruan yang stabil dan retentive. Kasus: Pasien wanita

  16. Character of shell beds flanking Herod Point shoal, southeastern Long Island Sound, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Williams, S.J.; Babb, Ivar G.

    2011-01-01

    High biogenic productivity, strong tidal currents, shoal topography, and short transport distances combine to favor shell-bed formation along the lower flanks of a cape-associated shoal off Herod Point on Long Island, New York. This shell bed has a densely packed, clast-supported fabric composed largely of undegraded surf clam (Spisula solidissima) valves. It is widest along the central part of the western flank of the shoal where topographic gradients are steep and a stronger flood tide results in residual flow. The bed is narrower and thinner toward the landward margins where currents are too weak to transport larger valves and topographic gradients are gentle, limiting bed-load transport mechanisms by which the shells are concentrated. Reconnaissance mapping off Roanoke Point suggests that shell beds are also present at the other cape-associated shoals off northeastern Long Island, where relatively similar geomorphic and oceanographic conditions exist. These shell beds are important to the Long Island Sound ecosystem because they provide complex benthic habitats of rough and hard substrates at the boundary between the muddy basin floor and mobile sand of the shoals. ?? 2011, the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  17. Overview of the geology of the east flank of the Front Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grose, T.L.T. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the geology encountered as part of a geology field trip. This stop identifies the monocline that forms the east flank of the Front Range and the west flank of the Denver Basin. The stratigraphic section viewed in cross section to the south is composed of: (1) migmatitic quartzo-feldspathic gneiss of Early Proterozoic age; (2) red sandstone and conglomerate of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Fountain Formation, 1,700 Feet thick; (3) Lyons Sandstone of Permian age, 200 feet thick; (4) shale, siltstone, and limestone of the Lykins Formation of Permian and Triassic age, 200 Feet thick; (5) gypsum, shale, and limestone of the Ralston Creek Formation of Jurassic age, 90 feet thick; (6) sandstone, shale, and limestone of the Morrison Formation of Jurassic age, 300 feet thick, locally containing dinosaur bones; (7) Lower Cretaceous Dakota Group, including the Lytle Formation of sandstone and conglomerate, 80 feet thick, and the South Platte Formation of sandstone and shale, 220 feet thick.

  18. Microarray analyses and comparisons of upper or lower flanks of rice shoot base preceding gravitropic bending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Hu

    Full Text Available Gravitropism is a complex process involving a series of physiological pathways. Despite ongoing research, gravitropism sensing and response mechanisms are not well understood. To identify the key transcripts and corresponding pathways in gravitropism, a whole-genome microarray approach was used to analyze transcript abundance in the shoot base of rice (Oryza sativa sp. japonica at 0.5 h and 6 h after gravistimulation by horizontal reorientation. Between upper and lower flanks of the shoot base, 167 transcripts at 0.5 h and 1202 transcripts at 6 h were discovered to be significantly different in abundance by 2-fold. Among these transcripts, 48 were found to be changed both at 0.5 h and 6 h, while 119 transcripts were only changed at 0.5 h and 1154 transcripts were changed at 6 h in association with gravitropism. MapMan and PageMan analyses were used to identify transcripts significantly changed in abundance. The asymmetric regulation of transcripts related to phytohormones, signaling, RNA transcription, metabolism and cell wall-related categories between upper and lower flanks were demonstrated. Potential roles of the identified transcripts in gravitropism are discussed. Our results suggest that the induction of asymmetrical transcription, likely as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation, precedes gravitropic bending in the rice shoot base.

  19. Characterization of Bovine 5′-flanking Region during Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jeong Jang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs have been used as a powerful tool for research including gene manipulated animal models and the study of developmental gene regulation. Among the critical regulatory factors that maintain the pluripotency and self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs, NANOG plays a very important role. Nevertheless, because pluripotency maintaining factors and specific markers for livestock ESCs have not yet been probed, few studies of the NANOG gene from domestic animals including bovine have been reported. Therefore, we chose mouse ESCs in order to understand and compare NANOG expression between bovine, human, and mouse during ESCs differentiation. We cloned a 600 bp (−420/+181 bovine NANOG 5′-flanking region, and tagged it with humanized recombinant green fluorescent protein (hrGFP as a tracing reporter. Very high GFP expression for bovine NANOG promoter was observed in the mouse ESC line. GFP expression was monitored upon ESC differentiation and was gradually reduced along with differentiation toward neurons and adipocyte cells. Activity of bovine NANOG (−420/+181 promoter was compared with already known mouse and human NANOG promoters in mouse ESC and they were likely to show a similar pattern of regulation. In conclusion, bovine NANOG 5-flanking region functions in mouse ES cells and has characteristics similar to those of mouse and human. These results suggest that bovine gene function studied in mouse ES cells should be evaluated and extrapolated for application to characterization of bovine ES cells.

  20. Performance of genotype imputation for rare variants identified in exons and flanking regions of genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Genotype imputation has the potential to assess human genetic variation at a lower cost than assaying the variants using laboratory techniques. The performance of imputation for rare variants has not been comprehensively studied. We utilized 8865 human samples with high depth resequencing data for the exons and flanking regions of 202 genes and Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS data to characterize the performance of genotype imputation for rare variants. We evaluated reference sets ranging from 100 to 3713 subjects for imputing into samples typed for the Affymetrix (500K and 6.0 and Illumina 550K GWAS panels. The proportion of variants that could be well imputed (true r(2>0.7 with a reference panel of 3713 individuals was: 31% (Illumina 550K or 25% (Affymetrix 500K with MAF (Minor Allele Frequency less than or equal 0.001, 48% or 35% with 0.0010.05. The performance for common SNPs (MAF>0.05 within exons and flanking regions is comparable to imputation of more uniformly distributed SNPs. The performance for rare SNPs (0.01

  1. Stratigraphy and Characterization of Volcanic Deposits on the Northwestern Flanks of Mt. Makiling, Laguna, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybanez, R. L.; Bonus, A. A. B.; Judan, J. M.; Racoma, B. A.; Morante, K. A. M.; Balangue, M. I. R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Mt. Makiling is an inactive stratovolcano located in the province of Laguna. Semi-detailed geologic field mapping on the northwestern low-level flanks and apron of the volcano was conducted. Exposures reveal a volcanic terrain hosting a wide variety of volcanic rocks: lava flows, pyroclastic surges, pyroclastic flows, and tuff deposits. Stratigraphic logging of the volcanic deposits showed differences in occurrence of the deposit types as well as their characteristics. The pyroclastic flow deposits are found at the base of the column overlain by pyroclastic surges which were more common in the area. Capping the pyroclastic surges is a thin layer of tuffaceous units. Isolated deposits of lava flows of andesitic composition were mapped in the western flank of Mt. Makiling. These varying volcanic deposits are derived from different eruptive activities of Mt. Makiling, with at least three separate eruptive episodes indicated by the exposed deposits. Two separate explosive eruptions are marked by two different pyroclastic deposits, while an effusive episode, marked by andesitic lava flows, can also be identified. The pyroclastic surge deposit is uncharacteristically thick, around a hundred meters or more exposed, providing further questions as to the magnitude of past eruptions or the mechanism of pyroclastic material deposition around the volcano. Mt. Makiling, thus, has historically undergone different eruption types, but still releases generally the same material composition across varying deposits: intermediate or andesitic composition. This is consistent with the trend of Philippine volcanoes, and with the Macolod corridor which hosts this volcanic system.

  2. Sequence Analysis of SSR-Flanking Regions Identifies Genome Affinities between Pasture Grass Fungal Endophyte Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline van Zijll de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species of the Neotyphodium and Epichloë genera are endophytes of pasture grasses showing complex differences of life-cycle and genetic architecture. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed from endophyte-derived expressed sequence tag (EST collections. Although SSR array size polymorphisms are appropriate for phenetic analysis to distinguish between taxa, the capacity to resolve phylogenetic relationships is limited by both homoplasy and heteroploidy effects. In contrast, nonrepetitive sequence regions that flank SSRs have been effectively implemented in this study to demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of grass fungal endophytes. Consistent patterns of relationships between specific taxa were apparent across multiple target loci, confirming previous studies of genome evolution based on variation of individual genes. Evidence was obtained for the definition of endophyte taxa not only through genomic affinities but also by relative gene content. Results were compatible with the current view that some asexual Neotyphodium species arose following interspecific hybridisation between sexual Epichloë ancestors. Phylogenetic analysis of SSR-flanking regions, in combination with the results of previous studies with other EST-derived SSR markers, further permitted characterisation of Neotyphodium isolates that could not be assigned to known taxa on the basis of morphological characteristics.

  3. Determining injuries from posterior and flank stab wounds using computed tomography tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vishal; Reid, Chris M; Fortlage, Dale; Lee, Jeanne; Kobayashi, Leslie; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-04-01

    Unlike anterior stab wounds (SW), in which local exploration may direct management, posterior SW can be challenging to evaluate. Traditional triple contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging is cumbersome and technician-dependent. The present study examines the role of CT tractography as a strategy to manage select patients with back and flank SW. Hemodynamically stable patients with back and flank SW were studied. After resuscitation, Betadine- or Visipaque®-soaked sterile sponges were inserted into each SW for the estimated depth of the wound. Patients underwent abdominal helical CT scanning, including intravenous contrast, as the sole abdominal imaging study. Images were reviewed by an attending radiologist and trauma surgeon. The tractogram was evaluated to determine SW trajectory and injury to intra- or retroperitoneal organs, vascular structures, the diaphragm, and the urinary tract. Complete patient demographics including operative management and injuries were collected. Forty-one patients underwent CT tractography. In 11 patients, tractography detected violation of the intra- or retroperitoneal cavity leading to operative exploration. Injuries detected included: the spleen (two), colon (one), colonic mesentery (one), kidney (kidney), diaphragm (kidney), pneumothorax (seven), hemothorax (two), iliac artery (one), and traumatic abdominal wall hernia (two). In all patients, none had negative CT findings that failed observation. In this series, CT tractography is a safe and effective imaging strategy to evaluate posterior torso SW. It is unknown whether CT tractography is superior to traditional imaging modalities. Other uses for CT tractography may include determining trajectory from missile wounds and tangential penetrating injuries.

  4. Renal infarction versus pyelonephritis in a woman presenting with fever and flank pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Priola, Adriano M; Vigotti, Federica N; Guzzo, Gabriella; Veltri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Patients with fever, flank pain, and dysuria frequently are encountered in the emergency department. Acute pyelonephritis is the most likely diagnosis; however, its clinical and radiologic presentation consistently overlap with that of acute renal infarction. Ultrasound is unable to distinguish early infarction from nonabscessed acute pyelonephritis. Hence, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are needed. We report the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with fever, flank pain, and dysuria, along with respiratory distress and tachycardia. Elevated values for inflammatory indexes suggested a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, and subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed hypodense wedge-shaped areas in both kidneys. However, the presence of a thin rim of capsular enhancement (cortical rim sign), the absence of perirenal inflammatory changes, and the location of the lesions apart from defined calyces suggested the alternative diagnosis of renal infarction. The underlying cause was not identified until an episode of acute dyspnea revealed paroxysmal arrhythmia. Our case demonstrates that a thorough knowledge of the imaging findings of renal infarction and acute pyelonephritis is essential to correctly making the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multidisciplinary geophysical study of the NE sector of the unstable flank of Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Cocina, Ornella; Siniscalchi, Agata; Barberi, Graziella; Guglielmino, Francesco; Romano, Gerardo; Sicali, Simona; Tripaldi, Simona

    2015-04-01

    On volcanic areas, usually characterized by complex structural environments, a lot of independent geophysical studies are usually performed. The non-uniqueness of the geophysical inverse models, the different level of resolution and sensitivity of the results spurred us to integrate independent geophysical datasets and results collected on Mt. Etna volcano, in order to obtain more accurate and reliable model interpretation. Mt. Etna volcano is located along the eastern coast of Sicily and it is characterized by a complex structural setting. In this region, the general N-S compressive regime related to the Africa - Europe collision interacts with the WNW-ESE extensional regime associated to the Malta Escarpment dynamics, observable along the eastern coast of Sicily. At Mt Etna, a great number of studies concerns the existence of instability phenomena; a general eastward motion of the eastern flank of the volcano has been measured with always increasing detail and its relationship with the eruptive and magmatic activity is being investigated. The unstable flank appears bounded to the north by the E-W-trending Provenzana - Pernicana Fault System and to the SW by the NS Ragalna Fault system. Eastwards, this area is divided by several NW-SE trending faults. Recent studies consider this area as divided into several blocks characterized by different shape and kinematics. Ground deformation studies (GPS and InSAR) define the NE portion of the unstable flank as the most mobile one. In the frame of the MEDiterranean Supersites Volcanoes (MED-SUV) project, ground deformation data (GPS and INSAR), 3D seismicity, seismic tomography and two resistivity model profiles, have been analyzed together, in order to put some constraints on the deep structure of the NE sector of the unstable flank. Seismic data come from the permanent network run by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) - Sezione di Catania, Osservatorio Etneo. Ground deformation data comes from In

  6. Crustal magnetization and accretion at the Southwest Indian Ridge near the Atlantis II fracture zone, 0-25 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford, A.; Tivey, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Dick, H.; Schouten, Hans; Kinoshita, H.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze geophysical data that extend from 0 to 25-Myr-old seafloor on both flanks of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Lineated marine magnetic anomalies are consistent and identifiable within the study area, even over seafloor lacking a basaltic upper crust. The full spreading rate of 14 km/Myr has remained nearly constant since at least 20 Ma, but crustal accretion has been highly asymmetric, with half rates of 8.5 and 5.5 km/Myr on the Antarctic and African flanks, respectively. This asymmetry may be unique to a ???400 km wide corridor between large-offset fracture zones of the SWIR. In contrast to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, crustal magnetization amplitudes correlate directly with seafloor topography along the present-day rift valleys. This pattern appears to be primarily a function of along-axis variations in crustal thickness, rather than magnetic mineralogy. Off-axis, magnetization amplitudes at paleo-segment ends are more positive than at paleo-segment midpoints, suggesting the presence of an induced component of magnetization within the lower crust or serpentinized upper mantle. Alteration of the magnetic source layer at paleo-segment midpoints reduces magnetization amplitudes by 70-80% within 20 Myr of accretion. Magnetic and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B data suggest that the lower crust cooled quickly enough to lock in a primary thermoremanent magnetization that is in phase with that of the overlying upper crust. Thus magnetic polarity boundaries within the intrusive lower crust may be steeper than envisioned in prior models of ocean crustal magnetization. As the crust ages, the lower crust becomes increasingly important in preserving marine magnetic stripes.

  7. Hot bitumen grouting rediscovered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudts, A. [ECO Grouting Specialists, Grand Valley, ON (Canada)

    2001-10-01

    The article extols the value of hot bitumen grouting, in conjunction with cement-based grout, as a fast, safe, environmentally-friendly and cost-effective sealant. A major advantage of bitumen grout is that blown bitumen will never wash out. The article discusses the properties and some applications of bitumen grout. A diagram shows an application of bitumen and cement-based grout at a large dam. Examples of preventing water flow in dams, in a coal mine and in a potash mine are also given.

  8. Seamount morphology in the Bowie and Cobb hot spot trails, Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, Jason D.; Keller, Randall A.; Duncan, Robert A.; Dziak, Robert P.

    2007-09-01

    Full-coverage multibeam bathymetric mapping of twelve seamounts in the Gulf of Alaska reveals that they are characterized by flat-topped summits (rarely with summit craters) and by terraced, or step-bench, flanks. These summit plateaus contain relict volcanic features (e.g., flow levees, late-stage cones, and collapse craters) and as such must have been constructed by volcanic processes such as lava ponding above a central vent, rather than by erosion above sea level. The terraced flanks are composed of a sequence of stacked lava deltas and cones, probably tube-fed from a central lava pond, a morphology which is suggestive of long-lived, stable central lava sources and low to moderate eruption rates, indicative of significant time spent above a hot spot outlet. Most of these seamounts have summit plateaus surrounded, and cut into, by amphitheater headwall scarps, and flanks that are scarred by debris chutes, but lack visible debris accumulations at their base. We interpret the lack of blocky debris fields as evidence that the slope failures are mainly small-scale debris flows, rather than large-scale flank collapses. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that large flank-collapse blocks from early in the histories of these seamounts are now hidden beneath the thick glacio-fluvial fan deposits that cover the Gulf of Alaska seafloor. These slope failure features become smoother and longer and increase in size and abundance with increasing age of a seamount, suggesting that slope failure processes continue long after volcanic activity ceases.

  9. The origin and geological significance of lunar ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lunar ridges are a kind of familiar linear structures developed on the lunar surface. The distribution pattern, formation mechanism and research significance of lunar ridges are discussed in this paper. Single lunar ridges are usually distributed in the form of broken lineation, and, as whole, lunar ridges are trapezoidal or annular in shape around the maria. As to the formation mechanism, only volcanism or tectonism was emphasized in the past, but the two processes are seldom taken into combined consideration. On the basis of detailed analyses, the authors thought that tectonism is a prerequisite for the formation of lunar ridges, while volcanism is the key factor controlling their particular shapes. Finally, the authors pointed out that it is very significant in the study of lunar ridges to link the course of lunar structure evolution with the stress state in the lunar crust.

  10. Magnetic Anomalies over the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, W C; Heirtzler, J R

    1966-12-01

    Four magnetic profiles across the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge reveal magnetic anomalies that show trends parallel with the ridge axis and symmetry about the ridge axis. The distribution of bodies that could cause these anomalies supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the generation of patterns of magnetic anomalies associated with the midocean ridge system. The geometry of the bodies accords with the known reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 3.4 million years, indicating a spreading rate of the ocean floor of 4.5 centimeters per year. If one assume that the spreading rate within 500 kilometers of the ridge axis has been constant, reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 10.0 million years can be determined. This new, detailed history of field reversals accords with observed anomalies over Reykjanes Ridge in the North Atlantic if a spreading rate of 1 centimeter per year is assumed there.

  11. Field Use of NMIS at Oak Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, L.G.; Conger, M.; Hughes, S.S.; Mattingly, J.K.; McEvers, J.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Perez, R.B.; Turner, C.R.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.

    1999-08-26

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS), developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), has been successfully used at Y-12 for nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A). It is particularly useful in the high gamma-ray background of storage arrays and for shielded HEU. With three systems in use at Y-12, NMIS has enhanced the NMC&A capability for verification and for confirmation of materials in storage and for HEU receipts by providing capability not available or practical by other NDA methods for safeguards. It has recently cost-effectively quantified the HEU mass and enrichment of hundreds of HEU metal items to within a total spread of {+-} 5% (3 sigma) with and mean deviations for all HEU verified of + 0.2% for mass and {minus}0.2% for enrichment. Three cart portable systems are easily moved around with minimal impact on facility operations since no permanent dedicated floor space is required. The positive impact of NMIS at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is improved and more cost effective NMC&A as well as the resolution of NMC&A findings. Its operation at the Y-12 Plant is essential for compliance with the NMC&A requirements of the US Department of Energy. NMIS portability has allowed one system to be moved temporarily to the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant for characterization of a large deposit of hydrated uranyl fluoride. The impact of this NMIS application was enhanced and verified nuclear criticality safety that led to the safe removal of a large deposit originally estimated by gamma-ray spectrometry and neutron counting to contain 1300 kg of 3.3 wt% {sup 235}U material. NMIS has also been operational at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pantex.

  12. Microsurgical treatment of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-qi HE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the microsurgical technique of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma resectional therapy.Methods The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed of 29 patients(13 males and 16 females;aged 18-68 years with average of 42 years;duration of disease was 5 months to 8 years,averaged 28 months with medial sphenoidal ridge meningioma and admitted from Jan.2005 to Jan.2010.The anatomical relationship of the tumor to surrounding structures was assessed intraoperatively,the tumor was then completely resected through cutting off the tumor supplying vessels,shrinking the tumor volume and separating the tumors from adjacent vessels and nerves.All the patients were followed up for 4 months to 4 years.Results Of the 29 cases,20 got total tumor removal,7 got subtotal and 2 got partial tumor removal.Of the 20 patients with obviously preoperative visual impairment,12 were obviously relieved,6 showed no improvement and 2 got symptoms aggravation.Hemiplegia occurred in 2 cases and oculomoter nerve palsy in 6 cases.There was no death after surgery.A 6 months to 4 years follow-up showed that no recurrence was found in 27 patients with tumor resection level of Simpson I and II,2 patients with tumor resection level of Simpson III received postoperative radiotherapy or gamma knife surgery,and 1 recurred and received reoperation.Conclusions Fine intraoperative assessment of the anatomical relationship of the tumor to surrounding structures,separating and excising tumor according to the assessed result is the key of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma resection,and the tumor resection is favorable to visual rehabilitation and tumor control.

  13. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL; Thach, Kevin G [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  14. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, David A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  15. Ecological Resilience and Resistance in the Hyper Diverse Forests on the Eastern Andean Flank (Mera, Ecuador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, H. F.; Gosling, W. D.; Montoya, E.; Sherlock, S.; Mothes, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Today the Neotropics contain some of the world's most biodiverse and threatened ecosystems. Sediments obtained from two radiocarbon infinite (>48,000 years) stratigraphic sections on the eastern Andean flank, provide new insight into the relationship between biodiversity and disturbance during the Pleistocene (~200,000 years). Pollen analysis of modern and fossil material indicates that hyper diverse forest vegetation has been a feature of the Andean flank landscape for 100,000 years (pollen richness: modern = 44, fossil = 48). Correlation of past vegetation with disturbance events (volcanic and fluvial) indicates the response of hyper-diverse forest to past landscape scale change. Pollen records from near Mera (01°27 S, 78°06 W; 1117 m asl) indicate two major changes in the pollen assemblage, with forest communities dominated by: i) Hedyosmum-Alnus-Ilex, and ii) Combretaceae-Melastomataceae-Myrtaceae. These two pollen assemblages most closely resemble modern vegetation cloud forest (2500-3400m asl) and lower montane rain forest (700-2499 m asl) respectively. Sedimentary evidence suggests that at least 21 volcanic events and three changes in the local fluvial regime perturbed the regional landscape during the period of deposition. However, there is no evidence for volcanic or fluvial disturbance events causing a persistent change in vegetation community. Volcanic events (tephra deposits) are associated with increased fire (charcoal particles), and changes in vegetation (pollen grains); however, within ~50cm of sediment accumulation above each tephra, pollen assemblages revert to pre-deposition compositions. Increased fluvial influence (gravel deposits) is associated with elevated input of pollen from taxa today found at higher elevations (Podocarpus-Celtis). The input of high elevation taxa concomitant with fluvial deposits is most likely indicative of an increase in long-distance transport of pollen along water courses originating in the Andes. Our data indicate

  16. Coeval giant landslides in the Canary Islands: Implications for global, regional and local triggers of giant flank collapses on oceanic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulesteix, Thomas; Hildenbrand, Anthony; Soler, Vicente; Quidelleur, Xavier; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2013-05-01

    Giant landslides are an important part of the evolution of most intra-plate volcanic islands. They often proceed in catastrophic events, likely to generate voluminous debris avalanches and eventually trigger destructive tsunamis. Although knowledge of the timing of their recurrence is a key factor regarding the hazard assessment in coastal environments, only a few of them have been well dated. In this contribution, we focus on the La Orotava event on Tenerife, which we date with the unspiked K-Ar technique, between 534 and 523 ka. Such narrow temporal interval is compatible, within uncertainties, with the age of the Cumbre Nueva collapse on the neighboring island of La Palma. We thus examine here the possible common triggering mechanisms at the global, regional and local scales. Both events occurred shortly after the climax of the oxygen isotopic stage 14, during the rapid transition towards the interglacial stage 13, reinforcing the hypothesis of a control from global paleoclimatic changes on the destabilization of oceanic islands. Intense volcanic pulses at the regional scale also lead to the synchronous overgrowth of several volcanic islands in the archipelago, but coeval destabilization on Tenerife and La Palma appears significantly controlled by the intrinsic morphology of the edifices, with contrasted instability thresholds for shield volcanoes and volcanic ridges respectively. Finally, we propose that the two events may be genetically linked. Dynamic transfer of voluminous debris avalanches during a giant landslide episode can induce isostatic readjustments, generate significant ground acceleration and finally produce a large tsunami, three processes which can concur to trigger large scale flank collapse on a neighboring mature unstable volcanic island.

  17. Comprehensive integrated planning: A process for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Oak Ridge Comprehensive Integrated Plan is intended to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management and Oak Ridge Operations Order 430. DOE contractors are charged with developing and producing the Comprehensive Integrated Plan, which serves as a summary document, providing information from other planning efforts regarding vision statements, missions, contextual conditions, resources and facilities, decision processes, and stakeholder involvement. The Comprehensive Integrated Plan is a planning reference that identifies primary issues regarding major changes in land and facility use and serves all programs and functions on-site as well as the Oak Ridge Operations Office and DOE Headquarters. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a valuable national resource and is managed on the basis of the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development and how mission, economic, ecological, social, and cultural factors are used to guide land- and facility-use decisions. The long-term goals of the comprehensive integrated planning process, in priority order, are to support DOE critical missions and to stimulate the economy while maintaining a quality environment.

  18. Tectonic origin of Crowley's Ridge, northeastern Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanArsdale, R.B. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geology Dept.); Williams, R.A.; Shedlock, K.M.; King, K.W.; Odum, J.K. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Schweig, E.S. III; Kanter, L.R. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Crowley's Ridge is a 320 km long topographic ridge that extends from Thebes, Illinois to Helena, Arkansas. The ridge has been interpreted as an erosional remnant formed during Quaternary incision of the ancestral Mississippi and Ohio rivers; however, the Reelfoot Rift COCORP line identified a down-to-the-west fault bounding the western margin of Crowley's Ridge south of Jonesboro, Arkansas. Subsequent Mini-Sosie seismic reflection profiles confirmed the COCORP data and identified additional faults beneath other margins of the ridge. In each case the faults lie beneath the base of the ridge scarp. The Mini-Sosie data did not resolve the uppermost 150 m and so it was not possible to determine if the faults displace the near-surface Claiborne Group (middle Eocene). A shotgun source seismic reflection survey was subsequently conducted to image the uppermost 250 m across the faulted margins. The shotgun survey across the western margin of the ridge south of Jonesboro reveals displaced reflectors as shallow as 30 m depth. Claiborne Group strata are displaced approximately 6 m and it appears that some of the topographic relief of Crowley's Ridge at this location is due to post middle Eocene fault displacement. Based on the reflection data, the authors suggest that Crowley's Ridge is tectonic in origin.

  19. One Piece Orbitozygomatic Approach Based on the Sphenoid Ridge Keyhole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    The one-piece orbitozygomatic (OZ) approach is traditionally based on the McCarty keyhole. Here, we present the use of the sphenoid ridge keyhole and its possible advantages as a keyhole for the one-piece OZ approach. Using transillumination technique the osteology of the sphenoid ridge was exami......The one-piece orbitozygomatic (OZ) approach is traditionally based on the McCarty keyhole. Here, we present the use of the sphenoid ridge keyhole and its possible advantages as a keyhole for the one-piece OZ approach. Using transillumination technique the osteology of the sphenoid ridge...

  20. New beach ridge type: severely limited fetch, very shallow water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, W.F.; Demirpolat, S.

    1988-09-01

    The southern end of Laguna Madre (Texas) north of the Rio Grande mouth is marked by very shallow water, wide tidal flats, lunettes, islands made of beach ridges, and lesser features. The number and variety of islands in the lagoon is remarkable. The lunettes (clay dunes) are made primarily of quartz sand and coarse silt. They are common 5-10 m high, irregular in shape, and steep sided. They were deposited from wind transport and did not migrate. Those that are islands in the lagoon predate present position of sea level. Islands made of beach ridges were built from the lagoon side. Photoanalysis, field work, and granulometry all show that this sand was not moved into these ridges by Gulf of Mexico waves. Trenches in 12 beach ridges showed horizontal bedding but neither low-angle nor steep cross-bedding (quite unlike swash-built beach ridges). The ridges were built by wind-tide lag effects, not from the swash. Therefore, these beach ridges are a new type, in addition to swash-built, eolian, and storm-surge ridges. Growth of the ridges appears to be completed.

  1. Flank gland-secreted putative chemosignals pertaining to photoperiod, endocrine states, and sociosexual behavior in golden hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Juan LIU, Da-Wei WANG, Lixing SUN, Jin-Hua ZHANG, Jian-Xu ZHANG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies have shown that flank glands are involved in chemical communication in golden hamsters Mesocricetus auratus but little chemical analysis has been conducted on volatiles arising from these glands. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected compounds from the flank glands of males, only eight of which were also produced in females. Based on these chemical data we performed a number of further experiments. By manipulating light we found that males exposed to short-photoperiods developed smaller flank glands than those exposed to long-photoperiods. Six flank gland volatiles reduced in relative abundance, which possibly coded for reproductive status of males of this seasonally breeding hamster species. Through dyadic encounters, we were able to induce the formation of dominant-subordinate relationships and show that two glandular compounds became high in relative abundance and may function as dominance pheromones. Castration eliminated all male-specific compounds resulting from flank glands, but bilateral ovariectomies only affected one compound in females. Once these ovariectomized females were treated with testosterone, their glandular compounds resembled those of males, suggesting these compounds are under the main control of androgen. Two female putative pheromones, tetradecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid, were used in binary choice tests and were both found to attract males over females. Applying a solution of these pheromone compounds to adult males also suppressed their agonistic behavior [Current Zoology 56 (6: 800–812, 2010].

  2. Closed-Loop Feedback Flank Errors Correction of Topographic Modification of Helical Gears Based on Form Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiliang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase quality, reduce heavy-duty gear noise, and avoid edge contact in manufacturing helical gears, a closed-loop feedback correction method in topographic modification tooth flank is proposed based on the gear form grinding. Equations of grinding wheel profile and grinding wheel additional radial motion are derived according to tooth segmented profile modification and longitudinal modification. Combined with gear form grinding kinematics principles, the equations of motion for each axis of five-axis computer numerical control forming grinding machine are established. Such topographical modification is achieved in gear form grinding with on-machine measurement. Based on a sensitivity analysis of polynomial coefficients of axis motion and the topographic flank errors by on-machine measuring, the corrections are determined through an optimization process that targets minimization of the tooth flank errors. A numerical example of gear grinding, including on-machine measurement and closed-loop feedback correction completing process, is presented. The validity of this flank correction method is demonstrated for tooth flank errors that are reduced. The approach is useful to precision manufacturing of spiral bevel and hypoid gears, too.

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma in left flank due to saree: Largest reported case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Mandhane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Saree is a female costume unique for Indian ladies. This includes a superficial cloth and a skirt underneath which is fastened securely to the waist by a cord. Persistent and long term wearing of this costume has resulted in waist dermatoses. Waist dermatoses theoretically may present with malignant transformation. Here we present a case of 60 year old female who presented with left flank ulcer following chronic irritation from saree, biopsy was taken and it showed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. We decided to do wide excision with tension free suturing. Post operatively the patient followed up for 12 week and has shown to be disease free. This turns out to be the third case being reported and the largest ever to be reported in the literature. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1803-1806

  4. Flank pain after minor trauma as the initial manifestation of malignant pheochromocytoma; a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niroomand Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma is a tumor which originates from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla or the sympathetic ganglia. This tumor secrets a high amount of catecholamine and metabolites, causing hypertension crisis with headache, tachycardia, sweating and flushing (classic triad of pheochromocytoma. However, in some cases the disease may cause atypical symptoms or may be asymptomatic. The presented patient is a 34-year-old man who referred to our clinic with left flank pain. He had a history of falling from height. In the primary physical examination, a large mass in the abdominal left upper quadrant was palpated. After diagnostic evaluation malignant pheochromocytoma was detected. The patient was discharged on the fourth day after surgery. Malignant pheochromocytoma can presented with atypical symptoms or can be asymptomatic.

  5. Global optimization of tool path for five-axis flank milling with a cylindrical cutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, optimum positioning of cylindrical cutter for five-axis flank milling of non-developable ruled surface is addressed from the perspective of surface approximation. Based on the developed interchangeability principle, global optimization of the five-axis tool path is modeled as approximation of the tool envelope surface to the data points on the design surface following the minimum zone criterion recommended by ANSI and ISO standards for tolerance evaluation. By using the signed point-to-surface distance function, tool path plannings for semi-finish and finish millings are formulated as two constrained optimization problems in a unified framework. Based on the second order Taylor approximation of the distance function, a sequential approximation algorithm along with a hierarchical algorithmic structure is developed for the optimization. Numerical examples are presented to confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  6. Global optimization of tool path for five-axis flank milling with a cylindrical cutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Han; ZHU LiMin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,optimum positioning of cylindrical cutter for five-axis flank milling of non-developable ruled surface is addressed from the perspective of surface approximation.Based on the developed interchangeability principle,global optimization of the five-axis tool path is modeled as approximation of the tool envelope surface to the data points on the design surface following the minimum zone criterion recommended by ANSI and ISO standards for tolerance evaluation.By using the signed point-to-surface distance function,tool path plannings for semi-finish and finish millings are formulated as two constrained optimization problems in a unified framework.Based on the second order Taylor approximation of the distance function,a sequential approximation algorithm along with a hierarchical algorithmic structure is developed for the optimization.Numerical examples are presented to confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  7. Mitigation of Flanking Noise Transmission in Periodic Structures of Lightweight Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domadiya, Parthkumar Gandalal

    Lightweight structures becoming increasingly popular within the building industry and hence they requires immediate attention to address their vibro-acoustic behaviour. Flanking noise transmission is one of the main concerns while using lightweight panels in buildings, since sound can travel...... characteristics in periodic structures, the structure must be simplified; hence, one dimensional structures such as bars and beams are considered for further investigation. A periodic bar model comprised of systemically placed Plexiglas and steel elements is generated using two methods: an FE method and a Floquet...... transmission in periodic structures of lightweight elements by employing various numerical, analytical and experimental methods. At first, three dimensional finite-element (FE) models of a Z-shaped lightweight panel structure based on various frame designs, inclusion of air and structural coupling between...

  8. A Twenty-Four-Year-Old Woman with Left Flank Lipoma-Like Hibernoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. Shackelford

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of a left flank mass that was painful on palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 10.0 × 6.0 × 2.5 cm mass consistent with lipoma. A fatty lobulated mass was excised and subjected to H&E staining and immunohistochemical analyses. The specimen consisted of mature univacuolated adipocytic cells, with intermixed multivacuolated eosinophilic granular cells. No atypia or hyperchromasia was identified. Most of the cells were S100 positive and Ki-67 immunonegative. A diagnosis of a lipoma-like hibernoma was rendered. Hibernomas are rare benign lipomatous tumors that show differentiation toward brown fat. The lipoma-like hibernoma subtype is rare and can be misdiagnosed as atypical lipoma or well-differentiated liposarcoma. Here we describe an example of this rare tumor.

  9. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  10. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  11. US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management Public Involvement Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This document was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements for writing community relations plans. It includes information on how the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office prepares and executes Environmental Management Community relations activities. It is divided into three sections: the public involvement plan, public involvement in Oak Ridge, and public involvement in 1995. Four appendices are also included: environmental management in Oak Ridge; community and regional overview; key laws, agreements, and policy; and principal contacts.

  12. Behavior of Cell on Vibrating Micro Ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of micro ridges on cells cultured at a vibrating scaffold has been studied in vitro. Several parallel lines of micro ridges have been made on a disk of transparent polydimethylsiloxane for a scaffold. To apply the vibration on the cultured cells, a piezoelectric element was attached on the outside surface of the bottom of the scaffold. The piezoelectric element was vibrated by the sinusoidal alternating voltage (Vp-p < 16 V at 1.0 MHz generated by a function generator. Four kinds of cells were used in the test: L929 (fibroblast connective tissue of C3H mouse, Hepa1-6 (mouse hepatoma, C2C12 (mouse myoblast, 3T3-L1 (mouse fat precursor cells. The cells were seeded on the micro pattern at the density of 2000 cells/cm2 in the medium containing 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin/ streptomycin. After the adhesion of cells in several hours, the cells are exposed to the ultrasonic vibration for several hours. The cells were observed with a phase contrast microscope. The experimental results show that the cells adhere, deform and migrate on the scaffold with micro patterns regardless of the ultrasonic vibration. The effects of the vibration and the micro pattern depend on the kind of cells.

  13. Fs-Laser structuring of ridge waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, D.; Gottmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    Thin films made by PLD from Er:ZBLAN and Nd:Gd3Ga5O12 are micro machined to form optical wave guiding structures using Ti:sapphire and Yb:glass fiber laser radiation. For the manufacturing of the ridge waveguides grooves are structured by ablation using femtosecond laser radiation. The fluence, the scanning velocity, the repetition rate, and the orientation of the polarization with respect to the scanning direction are varied. The resulting structures are characterized using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Damping and absorption coefficients of the waveguides are determined by observing the light scattered from the waveguides due to droplets in the thin films and the surface roughness of the structured edges. To discriminate between damping due to droplets and the structured edges, damping measurements in the non-structured films and the structured waveguides are performed. Ridge waveguides with non-resonant damping losses smaller than 3 dB/cm are achieved. Due to the high repetition rate of the Yb:glass fiber laser, the manufacturing time for one waveguide has been decreased by a factor of more than 100 compared to earlier results achieved with the Ti:sapphire laser.

  14. Simultaneous Double Star and Cluster FTEs observations on the dawnside flank of the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We present Cluster and Double Star-1 (TC-1 observations from a close magnetic conjunction on 8 May 2004. The five spacecraft were on the dawnside flank of the magnetosphere, with TC-1 located near the equatorial plane and Cluster at higher geographic latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. TC-1, at its apogee, skimmed the magnetopause for almost 8h (between 08:00-16:00 UT. Flux Transfer Events (FTEs, moving southward/tailward from the reconnection site, were observed by TC-1 throughout almost all of the period. Cluster, travelling on a mainly dawn-dusk trajectory, crossed the magnetopause at around 10:30 UT in the same Magnetic Local Time (MLT sector as TC-1 and remained close to the magnetopause boundary layer in the Southern Hemisphere. The four Cluster spacecraft observed FTEs for a period of 6.5h between 07:30 and 14:00 UT.

    The very clear signatures and the finite transverse sizes of the FTEs observed by TC-1 and Cluster imply that, during this event, sporadic reconnection occurred. From the properties of these FTEs, the reconnection site was located northward of both TC-1 and Cluster on the dawn flank of the magnetosphere. Reconnection occurred between draped magnetosheath and closed magnetospheric field lines. Despite variable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions and IMF-Bz turnings, the IMF clock angle remained greater than 70° and the location site appeared to remain relatively stable in position during the whole period. This result is in agreement with previous studies which reported that the dayside reconnection remained active for an IMF clock angle greater than 70°. The simultaneous observation of FTEs at both Cluster and TC-1, separated by 2h in MLT, implies that the reconnection site on the magnetopause must have been extended over several hours in MLT.

  15. The Interaction of Polyglutamine Peptides with Lipid Membranes Is Regulated by Flanking Sequences Associated with Huntingtin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Kauffman, Karlina J.; Umbaugh, C. Samuel; Frey, Shelli L.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  16. Expression of the human glucokinase gene: important roles of the 5' flanking and intron 1 sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucokinase plays important tissue-specific roles in human physiology, where it acts as a sensor of blood glucose levels in the pancreas, and a few other cells of the gut and brain, and as the rate-limiting step in glucose metabolism in the liver. Liver-specific expression is driven by one of the two tissue-specific promoters, and has an absolute requirement for insulin. The sequences that mediate regulation by insulin are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the liver-specific expression of the human glucokinase gene we compared the structures of this gene from diverse mammals. Much of the sequence located between the 5' pancreatic beta-cell-specific and downstream liver-specific promoters of the glucokinase genes is composed of repetitive DNA elements that were inserted in parallel on different mammalian lineages. The transcriptional activity of the liver-specific promoter 5' flanking sequences were tested with and without downstream intronic sequences in two human liver cells lines, HepG2 and L-02. While glucokinase liver-specific 5' flanking sequences support expression in liver cell lines, a sequence located about 2000 bases 3' to the liver-specific mRNA start site represses gene expression. Enhanced reporter gene expression was observed in both cell lines when cells were treated with fetal calf serum, but only in the L-02 cells was expression enhanced by insulin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the normal liver L-02 cell line may be a better model to understand the regulation of the liver-specific expression of the human glucokinase gene. Our results also suggest that sequences downstream of the liver-specific mRNA start site have important roles in the regulation of liver-specific glucokinase gene expression.

  17. Whale phylogeny and rapid radiation events revealed using novel retroposed elements and their flanking sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kaiya

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A diversity of hypotheses have been proposed based on both morphological and molecular data to reveal phylogenetic relationships within the order Cetacea (dolphins, porpoises, and whales, and great progress has been made in the past two decades. However, there is still some controversy concerning relationships among certain cetacean taxa such as river dolphins and delphinoid species, which needs to be further addressed with more markers in an effort to address unresolved portions of the phylogeny. Results An analysis of additional SINE insertions and SINE-flanking sequences supported the monophyly of the order Cetacea as well as Odontocete, Delphinoidea (Delphinidae + Phocoenidae + Mondontidae, and Delphinidae. A sister relationship between Delphinidae and Phocoenidae + Mondontidae was supported, and members of classical river dolphins and the genera Tursiops and Stenella were found to be paraphyletic. Estimates of divergence times revealed rapid divergences of basal Odontocete lineages in the Oligocene and Early Miocene, and a recent rapid diversification of Delphinidae in the Middle-Late Miocene and Pliocene within a narrow time frame. Conclusions Several novel SINEs were found to differentiate Delphinidae from the other two families (Monodontidae and Phocoenidae, whereas the sister grouping of the latter two families with exclusion of Delphinidae was further revealed using the SINE-flanking sequences. Interestingly, some anomalous PCR amplification patterns of SINE insertions were detected, which can be explained as the result of potential ancestral SINE polymorphisms and incomplete lineage sorting. Although a few loci were potentially anomalous, this study demonstrated that the SINE-based approach is a powerful tool in phylogenetic studies. Identifying additional SINE elements that resolve the relationships in the superfamily Delphinoidea and family Delphinidae will be important steps forward in completely resolving

  18. Flanking region sequence information to refine microRNA target predictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Russiachand Heikham; Ravi Shankar

    2010-03-01

    The non-coding elements of a genome, with many of them considered as junk earlier, have now started gaining long due respectability, with microRNAs as the best current example. MicroRNAs bind preferentially to the 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of the target genes and negatively regulate their expression most of the time. Several microRNA:target prediction softwares have been developed based upon various assumptions and the majority of them consider the free energy of binding of a target to its microRNA and seed conservation. However, the average concordance between the predictions made by these softwares is limited and compounded by a large number of false-positive results. In this study, we describe a methodology developed by us to refine microRNA:target prediction by target prediction softwares through observations made from a comprehensive study. We incorporated the information obtained from dinucleotide content variation patterns recorded for flanking regions around the target sites using support vector machines (SVMs) trained over two different major sources of experimental data, besides other sources. We assessed the performance of our methodology with rigorous tests over four different dataset models and also compared it with a recently published refinement tool, MirTif. Our methodology attained a higher average accuracy of 0.88, average sensitivity and specificity of 0.81 and 0.94, respectively, and areas under the curves (AUCs) for all the four models scored above 0.9, suggesting better performance by our methodology and a possible role of flanking regions in microRNA targeting control. We used our methodology over genes of three different pathways – toll-like receptor (TLR), apoptosis and insulin – to finally predict the most probable targets. We also investigated their possible regulatory associations, and identified a hsa-miR-23a regulatory module.

  19. [Sequence characterization of the 5'-Flanking region of the GHR gene in Tibetan sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Jie; Wei, Ya-Ping; Zhong, Jin-Cheng; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lu, Hong; Tong, Zi-Bao

    2007-08-01

    The 5'-Flanking sequence (including the P1 promotor and exon 1A) of the GHR gene in Oura-type Tibetan sheep (O. aries) was cloned by T-A method and sequenced (GenBank accession No. EF116490). Characterization and comparison of this sequence with mouflons (O. musimon), goat (C. hircus), cattle (B. taurus) and European bison (B. bonasus) orthologues were also conducted. Results showed that: 1) The 5'-flanking region contained many potential transcriptional factor binding sites such as those for C/EBPb, C/EBP, SP1, Cap, USF, HFH-2, HNF-3b, and Oct-1, which might have an important effect on transcription activation and regulation as well as tissue-specific expression. The rate of repetitive sequences was 2.55% and no SINEs, LINEs, LTR anti-transcription elements or DNA transposon elements were found, although one (TG)11 microsatellite was found. 2) In the P1 promotor region, sequence homology between the Tibetan sheep and mouflon, goat, cattle and European bison was 99.7%, 94.2%, 85.9% and 86.5%, respectively, while that for exon 1A was 99.0%, 97.0%, 92.7% and 94.6%, respectively. 3) The molecular phylogenetic tree among these species, constructed by the neighborhood joining method based on the sequences of no-coding region of the GHR genes, placed the two Bovinae species on one branch and the three Caprinae species on the other. Tibetan sheep and mouflons were joined first, followed by the goat, and then the Bovinae species, including the cattle and European bison. This result of phylogenetic clustering was not only identical to the taxonomy, but also to the phylogenetic clustering using the mitochondrial DNA of these species.

  20. Evidence for the concerted evolution between short linear protein motifs and their flanking regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Chica

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Linear motifs are short modules of protein sequences that play a crucial role in mediating and regulating many protein-protein interactions. The function of linear motifs strongly depends on the context, e.g. functional instances mainly occur inside flexible regions that are accessible for interaction. Sometimes linear motifs appear as isolated islands of conservation in multiple sequence alignments. However, they also occur in larger blocks of sequence conservation, suggesting an active role for the neighbouring amino acids. RESULTS: The evolution of regions flanking 116 functional linear motif instances was studied. The conservation of the amino acid sequence and order/disorder tendency of those regions was related to presence/absence of the instance. For the majority of the analysed instances, the pairs of sequences conserving the linear motif were also observed to maintain a similar local structural tendency and/or to have higher local sequence conservation when compared to pairs of sequences where one is missing the linear motif. Furthermore, those instances have a higher chance to co-evolve with the neighbouring residues in comparison to the distant ones. Those findings are supported by examples where the regulation of the linear motif-mediated interaction has been shown to depend on the modifications (e.g. phosphorylation at neighbouring positions or is thought to benefit from the binding versatility of disordered regions. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that flanking regions are relevant for linear motif-mediated interactions, both at the structural and sequence level. More interestingly, they indicate that the prediction of linear motif instances can be enriched with contextual information by performing a sequence analysis similar to the one presented here. This can facilitate the understanding of the role of these predicted instances in determining the protein function inside the broader context of the cellular network

  1. Temperature Estimates for the Slow Slip Region on the Decollement Underlying the South Flank of Kilauea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Eleven slow slip events on the decollement beneath the south flank of Kilauea volcano have been documented geodetically since 1998 (Brooks et al., 2006; Montgomery-Brown et al., 2009; 2013). Tectonic tremor has not been observed associated with these events, in contrast to most slow slip events in subduction zones (Montgomery-Brown et al., 2013). The slow slip events occur on the decollement at ~8 km depth, and updip of the 'normal' earthquakes on the fault. Constraining temperatures on Kilauea's decollement allows comparisons between its slow slip events and those in subduction zones. Kilauea's slow slip events (~8 km depth) are significantly shallower than most subduction zone slow slip events. I estimate temperatures in a 2-D cross-section through the south flank of Kilauea by combining methods used in subduction zone thermal models (Wang et al., 1995) with elements of intrusion cooling models of volcanoes (e.g., Civetta et al., 2004). Temperatures in the cross-section are controlled by: 1) heat sources from friction on the decollement, radioactive decay, and volcanic activity, and 2) heat transport by conduction, advection of the volcanic pile to the southeast over the underlying oceanic lithosphere, and advective heat transport associated with groundwater flow. I examine the thermal effects of a range of effective friction coefficients on the fault from 0-0.2. I determine the potential effects of groundwater flow in the upper ~1-2 km of the onshore and near-offshore volcanic pile (e.g., Kauahikaua, 1993; Buttner and Huenges, 2003) on decollement temperatures. Finally, I examine how heat input from Kilauea volcano may result in higher decollement temperatures than at the same depth on plate boundary faults in subduction zones.

  2. HSDP II Drill Core: Preliminary Rock Strength Results and Implications to Flank Stability, Mauna Kea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, N.; Watters, R. J.; Schiffman, P.

    2004-12-01

    Selected portions of the 3-km HSDP II core were tested to provide unconfined rock strength data from hyaloclastite alteration zones and pillow lavas. Though the drilling project was not originally intended for strength purpose, it is believed the core can provide unique rock strength insights into the flank stability of the Hawaiian Islands. The testing showed that very weak rock exists in the hyaloclastite abundant zones in the lower 2-km of the core with strength dependent on the degree of consolidation and type of alteration. Walton and Schiffman identified three zones of alteration, an upper incipient alteration zone (1080-1335m), a smectitic zone (1405-1573m) and a lower palagonitic zone from about 1573 m to the base of the core. These three zones were sampled and tested together with pillow lava horizons for comparison. Traditional cylindrical core was not available as a consequence of the entire core having been split lengthwise for archival purposes. Hence, point load strength testing was utilized which provides the unconfined compressive strength on irregular shaped samples. The lowest unconfined strengths were recorded from incipient alteration zones with a mean value of 9.5 MPa. Smectitic alteration zones yielded mean values of 16.4 MPa, with the highest measured alteration strengths from the palagonite zones with a mean value of 32.1 MPa. As anticipated, the highest strengths were from essentially unaltered lavas with a mean value of 173 MPa. Strength variations of between one to two orders of magnitude were identified in comparing the submarine hyaloclastite with the intercalated submarine lavas. The weakest zones within the hyaloclastites may provide horizons for assisting flank collapse by serving as potential thrust zones and landslide surfaces.

  3. Whale phylogeny and rapid radiation events revealed using novel retroposed elements and their flanking sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2011-10-27

    A diversity of hypotheses have been proposed based on both morphological and molecular data to reveal phylogenetic relationships within the order Cetacea (dolphins, porpoises, and whales), and great progress has been made in the past two decades. However, there is still some controversy concerning relationships among certain cetacean taxa such as river dolphins and delphinoid species, which needs to be further addressed with more markers in an effort to address unresolved portions of the phylogeny. An analysis of additional SINE insertions and SINE-flanking sequences supported the monophyly of the order Cetacea as well as Odontocete, Delphinoidea (Delphinidae + Phocoenidae + Mondontidae), and Delphinidae. A sister relationship between Delphinidae and Phocoenidae + Mondontidae was supported, and members of classical river dolphins and the genera Tursiops and Stenella were found to be paraphyletic. Estimates of divergence times revealed rapid divergences of basal Odontocete lineages in the Oligocene and Early Miocene, and a recent rapid diversification of Delphinidae in the Middle-Late Miocene and Pliocene within a narrow time frame. Several novel SINEs were found to differentiate Delphinidae from the other two families (Monodontidae and Phocoenidae), whereas the sister grouping of the latter two families with exclusion of Delphinidae was further revealed using the SINE-flanking sequences. Interestingly, some anomalous PCR amplification patterns of SINE insertions were detected, which can be explained as the result of potential ancestral SINE polymorphisms and incomplete lineage sorting. Although a few loci were potentially anomalous, this study demonstrated that the SINE-based approach is a powerful tool in phylogenetic studies. Identifying additional SINE elements that resolve the relationships in the superfamily Delphinoidea and family Delphinidae will be important steps forward in completely resolving cetacean phylogenetic relationships in the future.

  4. Late Pleistocene flank collapse of Zempoala volcano (Central Mexico) and the role of fault reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, José Luis; Macías, Rodolfo; García Palomo, Armando; Capra, Lucia; Macías, José Luis; Layer, Paul; Rueda, Hernando

    2008-11-01

    Zempoala is an extinct Pleistocene (˜ 0.7-0.8 Ma) stratovolcano that together with La Corona volcano (˜ 0.9 Ma) forms the southern end of the Sierra de las Cruces volcanic range, Central Mexico. The volcano consists of andesitic and dacitic lava flows and domes, as well as pyroclastic and epiclastic sequences, and has had a complex history with several flank collapses. One of these collapses occurred during the late Pleistocene on the S-SE flank of the volcano and produced the Zempoala debris avalanche deposit. This collapse could have been triggered by the reactivation of two normal fault systems (E-W and NE-SW), although magmatic activity cannot be absolutely excluded. The debris avalanche traveled 60 km to the south, covers an area of 600 km 2 and has a total volume of 6 km 3, with a calculated Heim coefficient (H/L) of 0.03. Based on the textural characteristics of the deposit we recognized three zones: proximal, axial, and lateral distal zone. The proximal zone consists of debris avalanche blocks that develop a hummocky topography; the axial zone corresponds with the main debris avalanche deposit made of large clasts set in a sandy matrix, which transformed to a debris flow in the lateral distal portion. The deposit is heterolithologic in composition, with dacitic and andesitic fragments from the old edifice that decrease in volume as bulking of exotic clasts from the substratum increase. Several cities (Cuernavaca, Jojutla de Juárez, Alpuyeca) with associated industrial, agricultural, and tourism activities have been built on the deposit, which pose in evidence the possible impact in case of a new event with such characteristics, since the area is still tectonically active.

  5. Both 5' and 3' flanks regulate Zebrafish brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Gerhard

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise control of developmental and cell-specific expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene is essential for normal neuronal development and the diverse functions of BDNF in the adult organism. We previously showed that the zebrafish BDNF gene has multiple promoters. The complexity of the promoter structure and the mechanisms that mediate developmental and cell-specific expression are still incompletely understood. Results Comparison of pufferfish and zebrafish BDNF gene sequences as well as 5' RACE revealed three additional 5' exons and associated promoters. RT-PCR with exon-specific primers showed differential developmental and organ-specific expression. Two exons were detected in the embryo before transcription starts. Of the adult organs examined, the heart expressed a single 5' exon whereas the brain, liver and eyes expressed four of the seven 5' exons. Three of the seven 5' exons were not detectable by RT-PCR. Injection of promoter/GFP constructs into embryos revealed distinct expression patterns. The 3' flank profoundly affected expression in a position-dependent manner and a highly conserved sequence (HCS1 present in 5' exon 1c in a dehancer-like manner. Conclusions The zebrafish BDNF gene is as complex in its promoter structure and patterns of differential promoter expression as is its murine counterpart. The expression of two of the promoters appears to be regulated in a temporally and/or spatially highly circumscribed fashion. The 3' flank has a position-dependent effect on expression, either by affecting transcription termination or post-transcriptional steps. HCS1, a highly conserved sequence in 5' exon 1c, restricts expression to primary sensory neurons. The tools are now available for detailed genetic and molecular analyses of zebrafish BDNF gene expression.

  6. Airborne sound insulation evaluation and flanking path prediction of coupled room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassia, R. D.; Asmoro, W. A.; Arifianto, D.

    2016-11-01

    One of the parameters to review the acoustic comfort is based on the value of the insulation partition in the classroom. The insulation value can be expressed by the sound transmission loss which converted into a single value as weighted sound reduction index (Rw, DnTw) and also have an additional sound correction factor in low frequency (C, Ctr) .In this study, the measurements were performed in two positions at each point using BSWA microphone and dodecahedron speaker as the sound source. The results of field measurements indicate the acoustic insulation values (DnT w + C) is 19.6 dB. It is noted that the partition wall not according to the standard which the DnTw + C> 51 dB. Hence the partition wall need to be redesign to improve acoustic insulation in the classroom. The design used gypsum board, plasterboard, cement board, and PVC as the replacement material. Based on the results, all the material is simulated in accordance with established standards. Best insulation is cement board with the insulation value is 69dB, the thickness of 12.5 mm on each side and the absorber material is 50 mm. Many factors lead to increase the value of acoustic insulation, such as the thickness of the panel, the addition of absorber material, density, and Poisson's ratio of a material. The prediction of flanking path can be estimated from noise reduction values at each measurement point in the class room. Based on data obtained, there is no significant change in noise reduction from each point so that the pathway of flanking is not affect the sound transmission in the classroom.

  7. Simultaneous Optimization of Tooth Flank Form of Involute Helical Gears in Terms of Both Vibration and Load Carrying Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh; Suzuki, Yoshitomo

    The alignment condition of automotive gears changes considerably during operation due to the deformation of shafts, bearings, and gear box by transmission of load. Under such conditions, the gears are required to satisfy not only reliability in strength and durability under maximum loading conditions, but also low vibrational characteristics under light loading conditions during the cruising of a car. In this report, the characteristics of the optimum tooth flank form of gears in terms of both vibration and load carrying capacity are clarified. The local optimum tooth flank form appears in each excitation valley, where the vibrational excitation is low and the actual contact ratio takes a specific value. The influence of the choice of different local optimum solutions on the vibrational performance of the optimized gears is investigated. The practical design algorithm for the optimum tooth flank form of a gear set in terms of both vibration and load carrying capacity is then proposed and its result is evaluated by field experience.

  8. Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  9. Carslberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Slow-spreading Apparent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, P. A.; Murton, B. J.; Bostrom, K.; Widenfalk, L.; Melson, W. G.; O'Hearn, T.; Cronan, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    We compare morphology, tectonics, petrology, and hydrothermal activity of a known section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between the Kane and Atlantis fracture zones (full multi-beam coverage 21N to 31N) to the lesser known Carlsberg Ridge (CR; limited multi-beam coverage plus satellite altimetry). The CR extends from the Owen Fracture Zone (10N) to the Vityaz Fracture Zone (5S) and spreads at half-rates (~1.2-1.8 cm/yr) similar to the MAR: 1) Morphology: Both ridges exhibit distinct segmentation (primarily sinistral) and axial valleys with high floor to crest relief (range 1122-1771 m). Average lengths of segments (CR: 70 km; MAR: 50 km) and crest-to crest width of the axial valley are greater on the CR (40 km) than MAR (23 km). Axial volcanic ridges form the neovolcanic zone on both ridges, typically 2.6 km wide and 213 m high on the CR. Average water depth near segment centers is greater on the MAR (3933 m) than the CR (3564 m). V-shaped patterns oblique to the spreading axis are present on both ridges. 2) Tectonics: Segments on each ridge are predominantly separated by short-offset (Bulls-eye Mantle Bouguer Lows (-30 to -50 mgal) are present at centers of spreading segments on both ridges. Metamorphic core complexes of lower crust and upper mantle are present on the MAR section (at fracture zones) and at least at one locality at 58.33E on the CR. 3) Petrology: MORB composition from our 20 stations along the CR fall into the MORB family, with no evidence of hotspot inputs (no excess K or Nb), or extreme fractionation, similar to the MAR section. REE and trace element patterns between 57E and 61E on the CR indicate increasing melt depletion to the northwest, while glasses exhibit a striking systematic increase in MgO (decrease in fractionation) to the northwest and attain among the most primitive composition of any ocean ridge adjacent to the Owen fracture zone (9.93wt percent). Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Indian Ocean MORB are distinct from those of

  10. Flanking region variation of ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit STR and SNP loci in Yavapai Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; King, Jonathan L; Novroski, Nicole M M; Churchill, Jennifer D; Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; McCulloh, Kelly L; Weise, Jessica A; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Budowle, Bruce

    2017-02-27

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers advantages over current capillary electrophoresis-based analysis of short tandem repeat (STR) loci for human identification testing. In particular STR repeat motif sequence information can be obtained, thereby increasing the discrimination power of some loci. While sequence variation within the repeat region is observed relatively frequently in some of the commonly used STRs, there is an additional degree of variation found in the flanking regions adjacent to the repeat motif. Repeat motif and flanking region sequence variation have been described for major population groups, however, not for more isolated populations. Flanking region sequence variation in STR and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in the Yavapai population was analyzed using the ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit and STRait Razor v2s. Seven and 14 autosomal STRs and identity-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (iiSNPs), respectively, had some degree of flanking region variation. Three and four of these identity-informative loci, respectively, showed ≥5% increase in expected heterozygosity. The combined length- and sequence-based random match probabilities (RMPs) for 27 autosomal STRs were 6.11×10(-26) and 2.79×10(-29), respectively. When combined with 94 iiSNPs (a subset of which became microhaplotypes) the combined RMP was 5.49×10(-63). Analysis of length-based and sequence-based autosomal STRs in STRUCTURE indicated that the Yavapai are most similar to the Hispanic population. While producing minimal increase in X- and Y-STR discrimination potential, access to flanking region data enabled identification of one novel X-STR and three Y-STR alleles relative to previous reports. Five ancestry-informative SNPs (aiSNPs) and two phenotype-informative SNPs (piSNPs) exhibited notable flanking region variation.

  11. On the Hot Money Trail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The huge influx of international hot money is threatening inflation and affecting the country’s monetary policy In the last three months, the country’s financial supervisory departments have conducted frequent but atypical investi-gations of hot money.

  12. How hot is the sun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘超

    2001-01-01

    Do you know how hot thesun is? There are no solidsor liquids on the sun. Why not? The temperature onoutside the sun is more than 10, 000℃, and that at the centre is about 20, 000, 000℃.The sun is so hot that all thesolids and all the liquids havebeen turned into gases.

  13. Seismicity And Accretion Process Along The North Mid-Atlantic Ridge From The SIRENA Autonomous Hydrophone Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, J.; Goslin, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Maia, M. A.; Tisseau, C.; Royer, J.

    2009-12-01

    The seismicity of the North Atlantic Ocean was recorded by the SIRENA array of 6 autonomous underwater hydrophones (AUH) moored within the SOFAR channel on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The instruments were deployed north of the Azores Plateau between 40° and 50°N from June 2002 to September 2003. The low attenuation properties of the SOFAR channel for earthquake T-wave propagation result in a detection threshold reduction to a magnitude completeness level (Mc) of ~2.8, to be compared to a Mc~4.7 for MAR events recorded by land-based seismic networks. A spatio-temporal analysis was performed over the 1696 events localized inside the SIRENA array. For hydrophone-derived catalogs, the acoustic magnitude, or Source Level (SL), is used as a measure of earthquake size. The ''source level completeness'', above which the data set is complete, is SLc=208 dB. The SIRENA catalog was searched for swarms using the cluster software of the SEISAN distribution. A minimum SL of 210 dB was chosen to detect a possible mainshock, and all subsequent events within 40 days following the possible mainshock, located within a radius of 15 km from the mainshock were considered as events of the swarm. 15 km correspond to the maximum fault length in a slow-ridge context. 11 swarms with more than 15 events were detected along the MAR between 40°et 50°N during the SIRENA deployment. The maximum number of earthquakes in a swarm is 40 events. The SL vs. time distribution within each swarm allowed a first discrimination between the swarms occurring in a tectonic context and those which can be attributed to volcanic processes, the latter showing a more constant SL vs. time distribution. Moreover, the swarms occurring in a tectonic context show a "mainshock-afterschock" distribution of the cumulative number of events vs. time, fitting a Modified Omori Law. The location of tectonic and volcanic swarms correlates well with regions where a positive and negative Mantle Bouguer

  14. Melt extraction and mantle source at a Southwest Indian Ridge Dragon Bone amagmatic segment on the Marion Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changgui; Dick, Henry J. B.; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2016-03-01

    This paper works on the trace and major element compositions of spatially associated basalts and peridotites from the Dragon Bone amagmatic ridge segment at the eastern flank of the Marion Platform on the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The rare earth element compositions of basalts do not match the pre-alteration Dragon Bone peridotite compositions, but can be modeled by about 5 to 10% non-modal batch equilibrium melting from a DMM source. The Dragon Bone peridotites are clinopyroxene-poor harzburgite with average spinel Cr# ~ 27.7. The spinel Cr# indicates a moderate degree of melting. However, CaO and Al2O3 of the peridotites are lower than other abyssal peridotites at the same Mg# and extent of melting. This requires a pyroxene-poor initial mantle source composition compared to either hypothetical primitive upper mantle or depleted MORB mantle sources. We suggest a hydrous melting of the initial Dragon Bone mantle source, as wet melting depletes pyroxene faster than dry. According to the rare earth element patterns, the Dragon Bone peridotites are divided into two groups. Heavy REE in Group 1 are extremely fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 7% fractional melting in the garnet stability field and another ~ 12.5 to 13.5% in the spinel stability field from depleted and primitive upper mantle sources, respectively. Heavy REE in Group 2 are slightly fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 15 to 20% fractional melting in the spinel stability field from a depleted mantle source. Both groups show similar melting degree to other abyssal peridotites. If all the melt extraction occurred at the middle oceanic ridge where the peridotites were dredged, a normal ~ 6 km thick oceanic crust is expected at the Dragon Bone segment. However, the Dragon Bone peridotites are exposed in an amagmatic ridge segment where only scattered pillow basalts lie on a partially serpentinized mantle pavement. Thus their depletion requires an

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

  16. 60 Years of Great Science (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review (vol. 36, issue 1) highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  17. Pesticide Leaching from Agricultural Fields with Ridges and Furrows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2010-01-01

    In the evaluation of the risk of pesticide leaching to groundwater, the soil surface is usually assumed to be level, although important crops like potato are grown on ridges. A fraction of the water from rainfall and sprinkler irrigation may flow along the soil surface from the ridges to the furrows

  18. Warm Jupiters Are Less Lonely than Hot Jupiters: Close Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chelsea; Wu, Yanqin; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting the Kepler transit data, we uncover a dramatic distinction in the prevalence of sub-Jovian companions between systems that contain hot Jupiters (HJs) (periods inward of 10 days) and those that host warm Jupiters (WJs) (periods between 10 and 200 days). HJs, with the singular exception of WASP-47b, do not have any detectable inner or outer planetary companions (with periods inward of 50 days and sizes down to 2 R Earth). Restricting ourselves to inner companions, our limits reach down to 1 R Earth. In stark contrast, half of the WJs are closely flanked by small companions. Statistically, the companion fractions for hot and WJs are mutually exclusive, particularly in regard to inner companions. The high companion fraction of WJs also yields clues to their formation. The WJs that have close-by siblings should have low orbital eccentricities and low mutual inclinations. The orbital configurations of these systems are reminiscent of those of the low-mass close-in planetary systems abundantly discovered by the Kepler mission. This, and other arguments, lead us to propose that these WJs are formed in situ. There are indications that there may be a second population of WJs with different characteristics. In this picture, WASP-47b could be regarded as the extending tail of the in situ WJs into the HJ region and does not represent the generic formation route for HJs.

  19. Plateaus and sinuous ridges as the fingerprints of lava flow inflation in the Eastern Tharsis Plains of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Orr, Tim; de Wet, Andrew P.; Zimbelman, James R.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; Garry, W. Brent; Crumpler, Larry S.; Williams, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The Tharsis Montes rift aprons are composed of outpourings of lava from chaotic terrains to the northeast and southwest flank of each volcano. Sinuous and branching channel networks that are present on the rift aprons suggest the possibility of fluvial processes in their development, or erosion by rapidly emplaced lavas, but the style of lava flow emplacement throughout rift apron development is not clearly understood. To better characterize the style of lava emplacement and role of fluvial processes in rift apron development, we conducted morphological mapping of the Pavonis Mons southwest rift apron and the eastern Tharsis plains using images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Context Camera (CTX), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) along with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Precision Experiment Data Records (PEDRs) and gridded data. Our approach was to: (1) search for depositional fans at the slope break between the rift apron and adjacent low slope plains; (2) determine if there is evidence that previously formed deposits might have been buried by plains units; (3) characterize the Tharsis plains morphologies east of Pavonis Mons; and (4) assess their relationship to the rift apron units. We have not identified topographically significant depositional fans, nor did we observe evidence to suggest that plains units have buried older rift apron units. Flow features associated with the rift apron are observed to continue across the slope break onto the plains. In this area, the plains are composed of a variety of small fissures and low shield vents around which broad channel-fed and tube-fed flows have been identified. We also find broad, flat-topped plateaus and sinuous ridges mixed among the channels, tubes and vents. Flat-topped plateaus and sinuous ridges are morphologies that are analogous to those observed on the coastal plain of Hawai‘i, where lava

  20. A Study of a Heavy Rainfall Event in the Central Part of Korea in a Situation of a Synoptic Scale Ridge over the Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-hyun; Lee, Yunkyu

    2016-04-01

    Observational and numerical studies have been carried out to explain the heavy rainfall event over Seoul metropolitan area and Gyeonggi province on June 29 2011. The characteristic features for this heavy rainfall event is convergence produced by the association of low-level mesoscale trough above the Yellow sea in a situation of a synoptic scale ridge over the Korean peninsula. Maximum of 234mm rainfall was recorded in one day, and most of the rainfall occurred in 12 hours. The major cause of this event is the formation of convergence zone. Abrupt wind direction change created by south-westerly low-level jet at the windward side and northerly or south-easterly wind caused by synoptic scale ridge at the lee side of the rainfall region produce horizontal wind shear in the middle of the mesoscale pressure trough. Also, wind speed difference at the exit of the low-level jet is another cause of the convergence. The low-level jet forms around the East China Sea. Land-sea heat capacity difference causes the increase of meridional temperature gradient around the coast line of the East China Sea during the daytime and induces the meridional pressure gradient increase. Therefore, low-level jet strengthens at the area where the meridional pressure gradient is strong. This low-level jet moves along the western flank of Western Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH) and impacts on Korean Peninsula. Formation of the synoptic scale ridge seems to be associated with WPSH and the strong low pressure system at the northeast of Korean Peninsula. The strong cyclone suppresses the northern flank of the WPSH, and relatively high pressure forms at the windward and lee side of the pressure low. Orographic effect plays an important role in intensifying pressure ridge over the Korean Peninsula. Numerical studies have been carried out to understand the effect of the condensation latent heat, land-sea heat capacity difference, and the orography by using WRF model. Topography sensitivity simulation

  1. The fate of volatiles in mid-ocean ridge magmatism

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Tobias; Hirschmann, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    Deep-Earth volatile cycles couple the mantle with near-surface reservoirs. Volatiles are emitted by volcanism and, in particular, from mid-ocean ridges, which are the most prolific source of basaltic volcanism. Estimates of volatile extraction from the asthenosphere beneath ridges typically rely on measurements of undegassed lavas combined with simple petrogenetic models of the mean degree of melting. Estimated volatile fluxes have large uncertainties; this is partly due to a poor understanding of how volatiles are transported by magma in the asthenosphere. Here, we assess the fate of mantle volatiles through numerical simulations of melting and melt transport at mid-ocean ridges. Our simulations are based on two-phase, magma/mantle dynamics theory coupled to an idealised thermodynamic model of mantle melting in the presence of water and carbon dioxide. We combine simulation results with catalogued observations of all ridge segments to estimate a range of likely volatile output from the global mid-ocean ridge...

  2. 76 FR 78908 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ..., Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office, P.O. Box 2001, EM-90, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. Phone (865) 241... and Reuse. The speaker will be Brian Henry, DOE Oak Ridge. Public Participation: The EM SSAB,...

  3. Really Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  4. Model Selection in Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    Kernel ridge regression is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts. This paper investigates the influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy. We review several popular kernels......, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. We interpret the latter two kernels in terms of their smoothing properties, and we relate the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based...... on these interpretations, we provide guidelines for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study confirms the practical usefulness of these rules of thumb. Finally, the flexible and smooth functional forms provided by the Gaussian and Sinc kernels makes them widely...

  5. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1989. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1989 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1. 16 figs., 194 tabs.

  7. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.R. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1990. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1990 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1.

  8. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed-Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.; Moore, M.; Thompson, M.

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a 'base scope' retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a 'DER scope' which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  9. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed-Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.; Moore, M.; Thompson, M.

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a 'base scope' retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a 'DER scope' which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  10. Repetitious-Hot-Pressing Technique in Hot-Pressing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shixue SONG; Xing AI; Wei GAO; Jun ZHAO

    2003-01-01

    A new pressing method was proposed for hot-pressing process. Experimental results indicated that the porosity in Al2O3/TiC/Ni/Mo (hereafter called Al2O3/TiC composite) composite compacts decreases by 6% after adopting this new technique,compared to traditional hot-pressing technique under the same sintering temperature. The flexural strength and Vickerhardness increase from 883 MPa to 980 MPa and from 16 GPa to 21.1 GPa, respectively. A theoretical model was given toanalyze the densification mechanism of the composite in the process of repetitious-hot-pressing.

  11. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  12. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  13. Oak Ridge Health Studies phase 1 report, Volume 1: Oak Ridge Phase 1 overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, M.I.; Van Cleave, M.L.; Turri, P.; Daniel, J.

    1993-09-01

    In July 1991, the State of Tennessee initiated the Health Studies Agreement with the United States Department of Energy to carry out independent studies of possible adverse health effects in people living in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The health studies focus on those effects that could have resulted or could result from exposures to chemicals and radioactivity released at the Reservation since 1942. The major focus of the first phase was to complete a Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. This study was designed to find out if enough data exist about chemical and radionuclide releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation to conduct a second phase. The second phase will lead to estimates of the actual amounts or the ``doses`` of various contaminants received by people as a result of off-site releases. Once the doses of various contaminants have been estimated, scientists and physicians will be better able to evaluate whether adverse health effects could have resulted from the releases.

  14. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, James [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Moore, Mike [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Thompson, Margo [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit (DER) at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  15. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  16. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, James [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Moore, Mike [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States); Thompson, Margo [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit (DER) at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  17. Tiger team assessment of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1990-02-01

    This document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environmental, Safety, and Health (including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance), and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable federal (including DOE), state, and local regulations and requirements. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  19. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  20. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  1. Charmonium in Hot Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xingbo

    2012-01-01

    We investigate charmonium production in the hot medium created by heavy-ion collisions by setting up a framework in which in-medium charmonium properties are constrained by thermal lattice QCD (lQCD) and subsequently implemented into kinetic approaches. A Boltzmann transport equation is employed to describe the time evolution of the charmonium phase space distribution with the loss and gain term accounting for charmonium dissociation and regeneration (from charm quarks), respectively. The momentum dependence of the charmonium dissociation rate is worked out. The dominant process for in-medium charmonium regeneration is found to be a 3-to-2 process. Its corresponding regeneration rates from different input charm-quark momentum spectra are evaluated. Experimental data on $J/\\psi$ production at CERN-SPS and BNL-RHIC are compared with our numerical results in terms of both rapidity-dependent inclusive yields and transverse momentum ($p_t$) spectra. Within current uncertainties from (interpreting) lQCD data and fr...

  2. CLONING OF FOREIGN GENE'S FLANKING SEQUENCES IN TRANSGENIC RICE BY INVERSE PCR%反向PCR克隆转基因水稻的外源基因旁侧序列

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩志勇; 王新其; 沈革志

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of inverse PCR, we have founded a IPCR technique to clone foreign gene's flanking sequence in transgenic rice, which is suitable to treat mass materials. We used mini-preparation protocol to extract total DNA of transgenic rice, and DNA was digested by more than 10 times restriction endonuclease overnight in 50μL. The digested fragments were purified and self-ligated in a reaction volume of 20 μL. In order to enhance the specificity of PCR amplifying flanking sequences, the nested-PCR was used, and hot-start PCR and touchdown PCR were combined with it. Thirty five of foreign gene's flanking sequences have been cloned in transgenic rice, the cloned fragments, sizes are 300~750 bp, and the specificity of PCR product has been proved by Southern blot. The result showed that this IPCR technique is quick, convenient and stable for flanking sequence cloning.%以反向PCR(IPCR)为基础建立了适合于处理大量材料的克隆转基因水稻中外源基因旁侧序列的技术体系。该方法中用小量法提取转基因水稻总DNA;总DNA用10倍过量的限制性内切酶在50 μL反应体积中进行过夜酶切;酶切片段在20 μL体积中进行自连接,之后进行套式PCR(nested-PCR)扩增旁侧序列。在套式PCR中结合了热启动PCR和降落PCR技术以增强PCR反应的特异性。用这种方法,本实验室在一周内克隆了35个转基因水稻株系中外源基因的旁侧序列,长度在300~750 bp之间,PCR产物的特异性用Southern杂交进行了证明。实验结果表明这个方法具有快速、稳定和高效的优点。

  3. The occurrence of Mt Barca flank eruption in the evolution of the NW periphery of Etna volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, S.; Del Carlo, P.; Lo Castro, M. D.; de Beni, E.; Wijbrans, J.

    2009-01-01

    Geological surveys, tephrostratigraphic study, and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations have allowed us to chronologically constrain the geological evolution of the lower NW flank of Etna volcano and to reconstruct the eruptive style of the Mt Barca flank eruption. This peripheral sector of the Mt Etna edifice, corresponding to the upper Simeto valley, was invaded by the Ellittico volcano lava flows between 41 and 29 ka ago when the Mt Barca eruption occurred. The vent of this flank eruption is located at about 15 km away from the summit craters, close to the town of Bronte. The Mt Barca eruption was characterized by a vigorous explosive activity that produced pyroclastic deposits dispersed eastward and minor effusive activity with the emission of a 1.1-km-long lava flow. Explosive activity was characterized by a phreatomagmatic phase followed by a magmatic one. The geological setting of this peripheral sector of the volcano favors the interaction between the rising magma and the shallow groundwater hosted in the volcanic pile resting on the impermeable sedimentary basement. This process produced phreatomagmatic activity in the first phase of the eruption, forming a pyroclastic fall deposit made of high-density, poorly vesicular scoria lapilli and lithic clasts. Conversely, during the second phase, a typical strombolian fall deposit formed. In terms of hazard assessment, the possible occurrence of this type of highly explosive flank eruption, at lower elevation in the densely inhabited areas, increases the volcanic risk in the Etnean region and widens the already known hazard scenario.

  4. Efficient gusA Transient Expression in Porphyra yezoensis Protoplasts Mediated by Endogenous Beta-tubulin Flanking Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Qianhong; YU Wengong; DAI Jixun; LIU Hongquan; XU Rifu; GUAN Huashi; PAN Kehou

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous tubulin promoter has been widely used for expressing foreign genes in green algae, but the efficiency and feasibility of endogenous tubulin promoter in the economically important Porphyra yezoensis (Rhodophyta) are tmknown. In this study, the flanking sequences of beta-tubulin gene from P. yezoensis were amplified and two transient expression vectors were constructed to determine their transcription promoting feasibility for foreign gene gusA. The testing vector pATubGUS was constructed by inserting 5'- and 3'-flanking regions (Tub5'and Tub3') up- and down-stream of β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (gusA), respectively,into pA, a derivative of pCAT(R)3-enhancer vector. The control construct, pAGUSTub3, contains only gusA and Tub3 '. These constructs were electroporated into P. yezoensis protoplasts and the GUS activities were quantitatively analyzed by spectrometry. The results demonstrated that gusA gene was efficiently expressed in P. yezoensis protoplasts under the regulation of 5'-flanking sequence of the beta-tubulin gene. More interestingly, the pATubGUS produced stronger GUS activity in P. yezoensis protoplasts when compared to the result from pBI221, in which the gusA gene was directed by a constitutive CaMV 35 S promoter. The data suggest that the integration of P. yezoensis protoplast and its endogenous beta-tubulin flanking sequences is a potential novel system for foreign gene expression.

  5. Contrasting neogene denudation histories of different structural regions in the transantarctic mountains rift flank constrained by cosmogenic isotope measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wateren, F.M. van der; Dunai, T.J.; Balen, R.T. van; Klas, W.; Verbers, A.L.L.M.; Passchier, S.; Herpers, U.

    1999-01-01

    Separate regions within the Transantarctic Mountains, the uplifted flank of the West Antarctic rift system, appear to have distinct Neogene histories of glaciation and valley downcutting. Incision of deep glacial outlet valleys occurred at different times throughout central and northern Victoria Lan

  6. Polymorphisms of Flanking Region of the ASB15 Gene and Their Associations with Performance Traits in Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y C; Han, R L; Li, Z J; Geng, J; Tian, Y D; Jiang, R R; Wu, J P; Kang, X T

    2017-01-02

    Research on the identity of genes and their relationship with traits of economic importance in chickens could assist in the selection of poultry. In this study, an F2 resource population of Gushi chickens crossed with Anka broilers was used to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the flanking region of the ASB15 gene by DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). One SNP of -1271 C>T in 5' flanking region of the chicken ASB15 gene and two SNPs of the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A in 3' flanking region were identified. Furthermore, the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A in 3' flanking region were in complete linkage. Association analysis results showed that -1271 C>T was not associated with performance traits, while the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A were significantly associated with BW2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, SL12, CD8, CW4, 8, 12, BSL4, 8, 12, and SEW, EW, WW, BMW, LW, CW, SFT. Our results suggest that the ASB15 gene profoundly affects chicken performance traits.

  7. Rare case of a strangulated intercostal flank hernia following open nephrectomy: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Jones, Frank; Turner, Jacquelyn; Cason, Frederick; Clark, Clarence

    2015-01-01

    Flank incisions may be associated with incisional flank hernias, which may progress to incarceration and strangulation. Compromised integrity of the abdominal and intercostal musculature due to previous surgery may be associated with herniation of abdominal contents into the intercostal space. There have been six previously reported cases of herniation into the intercostal space after a flank incision for a surgical procedure. This case highlights the clinical picture associated with an emergent strangulated hernia and highlights the critical steps in its management. We present a case of a 79-year-old adult man with multiple comorbidities presenting with a strangulated flank hernia secondary to an intercostal incision for a right-sided open nephrectomy. The strangulated hernia required emergent intervention including right-sided hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and mucous fistula. Abdominal incisional hernias are rare and therefore easily overlooked, but may result in significant morbidity or even death in the patient.. The diagnosis can be made with a thorough clinical examination and ultrasound or computed topographical investigation. Once a hernia has become incarcerated, emergent surgical management is necessary to avoid strangulation and small bowel obstruction. Urgent diagnosis and treatment of this extremely rare hernia is paramount especially in the setting of strangulation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Building the Ridge on Iapetus: Impacts Can Be Constructive!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickle, A. M.; Roberts, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Iapetus has a continuous ridge along the equator that extends for more than 110° in longitude. Parts of the ridge rise as much as 20 km above the surrounding terrains. Earlier Voyager observations revealed mountains on the anti-Saturn side of Iapetus with as much as 25-km in relief, extending from 180°W-220°W which may be a continuation of this ridge. Most models for the formation of this enigmatic ridge are endogenic, generally requiring the formation of a fast-spinning Iapetus with an oblate shape due to the rotation speed. Though abundant, many of these models require specific scenarios and have constraining parameters in order to generate a ridge comparable to what is seen today. An exogenic formation mechanism has also been proposed, that the ridge represents the remains of an early ring system around Iapetus that collapsed onto the surface. Thus far, none of the models have conclusively identified the origin of the ridge. We assume an exogenic origin for the ridge, derived from a collapsing disk of debris around Iapetus, without invoking any specific model for the generation of the debris disk, to determine whether it is possible to generate a ridge of the size and shape as observed. Here, the impact of the collapsing debris is simulated using the CTH hydrocode. Pi-scaling calculations suggest that extremely oblique impact angles (1-10°) are needed to add to ridge topography. These extreme impact angles severely reduce the cratering efficiency compared to a vertical impact, adding material rather than eroding it during crater formation. Furthermore, material is likely to be excavated at low angles, enhancing downrange accumulation. Multiple impacts from debris pieces will heighten this effect. Because infalling debris is predicted to impact at extremely low angles, both of these effects might have contributed to ridge formation on Iapetus. The extreme grazing angles of the impacts modeled here decouple much of the projectile energy, and impact heating of

  9. Hot scalar electrodynamics as a toy model for hot QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Krämmer, U; Schulz, H; Kraemmer, Ulrike; Rebhan, Anton K; Schulz, Hermann

    1995-01-01

    Hot scalar electrodynamics is adopted as a toy model for a hot gluon plasma to display some aspects of the compulsory resummation of hard thermal loops when next-to-leading order quantities at soft momentum scales are to be calculated. [Talk given by A.K.R. at a one-day meeting dedicated to the memory of Tanguy ALTHERR, held on November 4, 1994 at CERN, Geneva. To appear in a Gedenkschrift published by World Scientific.

  10. Chandra X-Ray Observations of Young Clusters. III. NGC 2264 and the Orion Flanking Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Rebull, L M; Micela, G; Ramírez, S V; Sciortino, S; Stauffer, J R; Strom, S E; Wolff, S C

    2006-01-01

    Chandra observations of solar-like pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the Orion Flanking Fields (age ~1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (~3 Myr) are compared with the results of the COUP survey of similar objects in the ONC (~0.5 Myr). The correlations between log Lx and mass found for PMS stars on convective tracks in these clusters are consistent with the relationships found for the ONC, indicating little change in the median values of either log Lx or log Lx/Lbol during the first ~3-5 Myr of evolution down convective tracks. The fraction of stars with extreme values of Lx, more than 10 times higher than the average for a given Lbol or with log Lx/Lbol greater than the canonical saturation value of -2.9, is however larger by a factor of two in the younger ONC when compared with the Orion FF and NGC 2264. PMS stars in NGC 2264 on radiative tracks have Lx/Lbol values that are systematically lower by a factor of ~10 times than those found for stars of similar mass on convective tracks. The dramatic decrease in flux from conve...

  11. The chicken vitellogenin II gene is flanked by a GATA factor-dependent estrogen response unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D L; Burch, J B

    1996-08-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II (VTGII) gene is flanked by an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) at -350 and a perfect ERE at -620. In the present study we show that this imperfect ERE lies within an estrogen response unit (ERU) that requires a GATA factor and the estrogen receptor to function as an estrogen-dependent enhancer. We infer that GATA-6 contributes to the estrogen-dependent and liver-specific regulation of the endogenous VTGII gene since this is the predominant GATA factor expressed in adult liver. Our analysis of the VTGII ERU revealed four salient points. First, this ERU is comprised of an ERE and a bank of functionally redundant GATA-binding sites. Second, the GATA-6 transactivation domain is necessary (and sufficient, when tethered near the ERE) to render this ERU functional. Third, ERU enhancer activity is dependent on GATA 6, regardless of whether the resident ERE is imperfect or perfect. Fourth, in contrast to a report that the estrogen receptor antagonizes the activity of another GATA factor (GATA-1), we show that these two factors can function in a synergistic manner within the context of the VTGII ERU.

  12. Increasing long-wavelength relief across the southeastern flank of the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R. A.; Fay, N. P.; Hreinsdóttir, S.; Chase, C.; Zandt, G.

    2009-09-01

    A high degree of correlation between present-day relative rock uplift measured using continuous GPS geodesy and spatially averaged surface elevations suggests that long-wavelength topographic relief is presently increasing along the southeastern flank of the Sierra Nevada range and within an adjacent portion of the northern Basin and Range province. Current estimates for erosion rate are an order of magnitude smaller than the relative rates determined by geodesy. Thus, although the uplift serves to enhance long-wavelength relief, it cannot be explained entirely as an isostatic response to erosion. If uplift rates have been constant through time, the duration over which the uplift could have been active (Sierra are evolving with time. According to either hypothesis, vertical surface motions may have slowly accelerated since ~mid-Pliocene time. Several possible mechanisms for progressive reduction of EET may be attributable to thermo-mechanical disequilibrium that began with the removal of an ultramafic root from the Sierran batholith during late Miocene or early Pliocene time. Specific mechanisms for ongoing enhancement of loads are less obvious. Based on these results, we suggest that dense networks of long-running continuous GPS stations around the world currently represent an underutilized resource for studies of orogenesis and upper mantle processes.

  13. Flanking magnitudes: dissociation between numerosity and numerical value in a selective attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naparstek, Sharon; Safadi, Ziad; Lichtenstein-Vidne, Limor; Henik, Avishai

    2015-07-01

    The current research examined whether peripherally presented numerical information can affect the speed of number processing. In 2 experiments, participants were presented with a target matrix flanked by a distractor matrix and were asked to perform a comparative judgment (i.e., decide whether the target was larger or smaller than the reference 5). In Experiment 1, the target was symbolic (i.e., a single digit), and in Experiment 2, it was nonsymbolic (i.e., a random presentation of dots). In both experiments, flanker matrices had 2 dimensions-numerosity and numerical value-that were manipulated orthogonally to create stimulus congruent and stimulus incongruent conditions. Incongruent trials differed in the laterality between target and flanker (i.e., their location in relation to the reference 5). When responding to symbolic targets (Experiment 1), only the flanker's numerical value affected reaction times (RTs), whereas when responding to nonsymbolic targets (Experiment 2), only the flanker's numerosity affected RTs. In addition, the pattern of flanker interference differed between targets: For symbolic targets, laterality did not affect responses, whereas for nonsymbolic targets, laterality did affect responses. These results imply both symbolic and nonsymbolic magnitudes can be automatically activated; however, this activation is contingent upon their relevance to the task at hand. Implications of these results on the efficiency of the visual processing system and on numerical cognition are further discussed.

  14. The flank eruption history of Etna (1610-2006 as a constraint on lava flow hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Branca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Data of the flank eruptions of Etna from over the last 400 years were extracted from the new geological map for the lava flow extensions and vent positions, and from the catalogs of historical eruptions for the eruption durations and lava volumes. The partially or widely hidden lava fields on the new geological map were retrieved from older geological maps. The distributions of the eruption durations and lava volumes were analyzed, with the definition of six eruptive classes for use in numerical simulations. The threshold values for the eruption durations and lava volumes were set at 45 days and at 35 × 106 m3 and 100 × 106 m3, respectively. A global analysis was performed on the whole volcano to evaluate the recurrence of the classes, and to estimate for each class the ranges, means and standard deviations of the durations, volumes and elevations of the main vent. The same analysis was repeated by subdividing the volcano into three sectors, which were defined on the basis of the distribution of the eruptive fissures over the last 15 ka. The classes have different recurrences across these various sectors, and different distributions of volumes, durations and elevations of the main vent. Finally, a lava flow resurfacing map that counts the number of lava flows on each given area of the volcano over the last 400 years was compiled and then normalized.

  15. Influence of PAS domain flanking regions on oligomerisation and redox signalling by NifL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Little

    Full Text Available Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS domains constitute a typically dimeric, conserved α/β tertiary fold of approximately 110 amino acids that perform signalling roles in diverse proteins from all kingdoms of life. The amino terminal PAS1 domain of NifL from Azotobacter vinelandii accommodates a redox-active FAD group; elevation of cytosolic oxygen concentrations result in FAD oxidation and a concomitant conformational re-arrangement that is relayed via a short downstream linker to a second PAS domain, PAS2. At PAS2, the signal is amplified and passed on to effector domains generating the 'on' (inhibitory state of the protein. Although the crystal structure of oxidised PAS1 reveals regions that contribute to the dimerisation interface, 21 amino acids at the extreme N-terminus of NifL, are unresolved. Furthermore, the structure and function of the linker between the two PAS domains has not been determined. In this study we have investigated the importance to signalling of residues extending beyond the core PAS fold. Our results implicate the N-terminus of PAS1 and the helical linker connecting the two PAS domains in redox signal transduction and demonstrate a role for these flanking regions in controlling the oligomerisation state of PAS1 in solution.

  16. A romifidine and morphine combination for epidural analgesia of the flank in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierheller, Erin E; Caulkett, Nigel A; Bailey, Jeremy V

    2004-11-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to determine the onset, duration, and degree of analgesia achieved with a combination of romifidine (50 microg/kg body weight [BW]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg BW) administered epidurally. Ten adult Holstein Friesen cows were assigned to either a treatment group receiving the romifidine and morphine combination or a control group receiving 0.9% saline in a randomized, blinded, crossover design. Cows were assessed for degree of flank analgesia and systemic sedation at various time intervals over a period of 24 hours. The romifidine and morphine combination, compared with saline, provided significant analgesia for at least 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and up to 12 hours (P = 0.004) after epidural administration. Treated cows were sedate between 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and 6 hours (P = 0.002) after epidural administration. These results provide evidence for a potential cost-effective intra- and postoperative method of analgesia; however, the sedation seen in this study could be detrimental to patients expected return to the farm shortly after surgery. Further research into withdrawal times, systemic effects, and potential adverse effects are needed before an opiod and alpha2-adrenergic agonist combination can be used safely in a clinical setting.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Earth's Dayside and Flank Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Hasegawa, H.; Lavraud, B.; Phan, T.; Escoubet, C. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Borg, A. L.; Volwerk, M.; Berchem, J.; Constantinescu, O. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; Masson, A.; Laakso, H.; Soucek, J.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Frey, H. U.; Panov, E. V.; Shen, C.; Shi, J. K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Pu, Z. Y.; Wang, J.; Wild, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) can drive waves at the magnetopause. These waves can grow to form rolled-up vortices and facilitate transfer of plasma into the magnetosphere. To investigate the persistence and frequency of such waves at the magnetopause we have carried out a survey of all Double Star 1 magnetopause crossings, using a combination of ion and magnetic field measurements. Using criteria originally used in a Geotail study made by Hasegawa et al. (2006) (forthwith referred to as H2006), 17 candidate events were identified from the entire TC-1 mission (covering 623 orbits where the magnetopause was sampled), a majority of which were on the dayside of the terminator. The relationship between density and shear velocity was then investigated, to identify the predicted signature of a rolled up vortex from H2006 and all 17 events exhibited some level of rolled up behavior. The location of the events had a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry, with 12 (71 %) on the post noon, dusk flank suggesting preferential growth in this region.

  18. The Radical Flank Effect and Cross-occupational Collaboration for Technology Development during a Power Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Emily; Kellogg, Katherine C

    2016-12-01

    This 12-month ethnographic study of an early entrant into the U.S. car-sharing industry demonstrates that when an organization shifts its focus from developing radical new technology to incrementally improving this technology, the shift may spark an internal power struggle between the dominant engineering group and a challenger occupational group such as the marketing group. Analyzing 42 projects in two time periods that required collaboration between engineering and marketing during such a shift, we show how cross-occupational collaboration under these conditions can be facilitated by a radical flank threat, through which the bargaining power of moderates is strengthened by the presence of a more-radical group. In the face of a strong threat by radical members of a challenger occupational group, moderate members of the dominant engineering group may change their perceptions of their power to resist challengers' demands and begin to distinguish between the goals of radical versus more-moderate challengers. To maintain as much power as possible and prevent the more-dramatic change in engineering occupational goals demanded by radical challengers, moderate engineers may build a coalition with moderate challengers and collaborate for incremental technology development.

  19. Age of Yingfeng rapakivi granite pluton on the north flank of Qaidam and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Qinghui; LU Xinxiang; WANG Fei; SUN Yangui; WEI Xiangdong; XlNG Zuoyun

    2004-01-01

    The Yingfeng rapakivi granite on the north flank of Qaidam is a newly discovered Proterozoic rapakivi pluton in China, which was found after the discovery of Shachang rapakivi in Miyun County, Beijing and Kuandian rapakivi in Jilin Province. Yingfeng rapakivi pluton is exposed on the north side of the suture belt between Qinling-Kunlun orogenic belt and North China plate. U-Pb zircon isotopic dating and Ar-Ar isotopic dating of both hornblende and K-feldspar from the Yingfeng rapakivi granite have been conducted. The results show that the age of (1776±33)Ma at the upper intercept in Concorde diagram represents the age of formation of the pluton,whereas the age of (526 ± 281) Ma at the lower intercept and Ar-Ar mineral dating of hornblende and K-feldspar correspond to the age of a later event affecting the pluton, suggesting that Yingfeng pluton has ever been affected by strong regional Caledonian-Hercynian tectonic movement after its formation. The discovery of middle Proterozoic Yingfeng rapakivi granite provides a petrologic evidence for the timing of cratonization of both the continental crust basement in western China and the basement of the North China plate and for a rifting event taking place in the mid-Proterozoic, suggesting that an amalgamation of ancient China continents had ever happened during the "L(u) liang Movement" between the early Proterozoic and the mid-Proterozoic.

  20. A rhodanine flanked nonfullerene acceptor for solution-processed organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Holliday, Sarah

    2015-01-21

    A novel small molecule, FBR, bearing 3-ethylrhodanine flanking groups was synthesized as a nonfullerene electron acceptor for solution-processed bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics (OPV). A straightforward synthesis route was employed, offering the potential for large scale preparation of this material. Inverted OPV devices employing poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the donor polymer and FBR as the acceptor gave power conversion efficiencies (PCE) up to 4.1%. Transient and steady state optical spectroscopies indicated efficient, ultrafast charge generation and efficient photocurrent generation from both donor and acceptor. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate polaron generation efficiency as well as recombination dynamics. It was determined that the P3HT:FBR blend is highly intermixed, leading to increased charge generation relative to comparative devices with P3HT:PC60BM, but also faster recombination due to a nonideal morphology in which, in contrast to P3HT:PC60BM devices, the acceptor does not aggregate enough to create appropriate percolation pathways that prevent fast nongeminate recombination. Despite this nonoptimal morphology the P3HT:FBR devices exhibit better performance than P3HT:PC60BM devices, used as control, demonstrating that this acceptor shows great promise for further optimization.

  1. Geologic map of the northeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano, Island of Hawai'i, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2017-05-01

    SummaryMauna Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, has erupted 33 times since written descriptions became available in 1832. Some eruptions were preceded by only brief seismic unrest, while others followed several months to a year of increased seismicity.The majority of the eruptions of Mauna Loa began in the summit area (>12,000-ft elevation; Lockwood and Lipman, 1987); yet the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) was the source of eight flank eruptions since 1843 (table 1). This zone extends from the 13,680-ft-high summit towards Hilo (population ~60,000), the second largest city in the State of Hawaii. Although most of the source vents are farther than 30 km away, the 1880 flow from one of the vents extends into Hilo, nearly reaching Hilo Bay. The city is built entirely on flows erupted from the NERZ, most older than that erupted in 1843.Once underway, Mauna Loa's eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities in their path. For example, lava flows erupted from the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) in 1950 advanced at an average rate of 9.3 km per hour, and all three lobes reached the ocean within approximately 24 hours (Finch and Macdonald, 1953). The flows near the eruptive vents must have traveled even faster.In terms of eruption frequency, pre-eruption warning, and rapid flow emplacement, Mauna Loa poses an enormous volcanic-hazard threat to the Island of Hawai‘i. By documenting past activity and by alerting the public and local government officials of our findings, we can anticipate the volcanic hazards and substantially mitigate the risks associated with an eruption of this massive edifice.From the geologic record, we can deduce several generalized facts about the geologic history of the NERZ. The middle to the uppermost section of the rift zone were more active in the past 4,000 years than the lower part, perhaps due to buttressing of the lower east rift zone by Mauna Kea and Kīlauea volcanoes. The historical flows

  2. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Guðmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream on the southern margin of M\\'yrdalsj\\"okull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. No comparable examples have been found in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have ...

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  4. The role of viscous magma mush spreading in volcanic flank motion at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Amelung, F.; Baker, S.; Govers, R.; Poland, M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to explain seaward motion of the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. The consistency of flank motion during both waxing and waning magmatic activity at Kīlauea suggests that a continuously acting force, like gravity body force, plays a substantial role. Using finite element models, we test whether gravity is the principal driver of long-term motion of Kīlauea's flank. We compare our model results to geodetic data from Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar during a time period with few magmatic and tectonic events (2000-2003), when deformation of Kīlauea was dominated by summit subsidence and seaward motion of the south flank. We find that gravity-only models can reproduce the horizontal surface velocities if we incorporate a regional décollement fault and a deep, low-viscosity magma mush zone. To obtain quasi steady state horizontal surface velocities that explain the long-term seaward motion of the flank, we find that an additional weak zone is needed, which is an extensional rift zone above the magma mush. The spreading rate in our model is mainly controlled by the magma mush viscosity, while its density plays a less significant role. We find that a viscosity of 2.5 × 1017–2.5 × 1019 Pa s for the magma mush provides an acceptable fit to the observed horizontal surface deformation. Using high magma mush viscosities, such as 2.5 × 1019 Pa s, the deformation rates remain more steady state over longer time scales. These models explain a significant amount of the observed subsidence at Kīlauea's summit. Some of the remaining subsidence is probably a result of magma withdrawal from subsurface reservoirs

  5. Study of surface roughness and flank wear in hard turning of AISI 4140 steel with coated ceramic inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sudhansu Ranjan; Kuma, Amaresh [National Institute of Technology, Jamshedpur (India); Dhupal, Debabrata [Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla (India)

    2015-10-15

    This experimental investigation deals with dry hard turning of AISI 4140 steel using PVD-TiN coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}+TiCN mixed ceramic inserts. The combined effect of cutting parameters (cutting speed, feed and depth of cut) on performance characteristics such as surface roughness and flank wear is explored by Full factorial design (FFD) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results show that feed is the principal cutting parameter influencing surface roughness, followed by cutting speed. However, flank wear is affected by the cutting speed and interaction of feed-depth of cut, although depth of cut has not been found statistically significant, but flank wear is an increasing function of depth of cut. Observations are made on the machined surface, and worn tool by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to establish the process. Abrasion was the major wear mechanism found during hard turning within the studied range. The effect of tool wear on surface roughness was also studied. The experimental data were analyzed to predict the optimal range of surface roughness and flank wear. Based on Response surface methodology (RSM), mathematical models were developed for surface roughness (Ra) and flank wear (VB) with 95% confidence level. Finally, under optimum cutting conditions (obtained by response optimization technique), tool life was evaluated to perform cost analysis for justifying the economic viability of coated ceramic inserts in hard turning. The estimated machining cost per part for TiN coated ceramic was found to be lower (Rs. 12.31) because of higher tool life (51 min), which results in the reduction of downtime and increase in savings.

  6. The role of viscous magma mush spreading in volcanic flank motion at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Amelung, F.; Baker, S.; Govers, R.; Poland, M.

    2013-05-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to explain seaward motion of the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The consistency of flank motion during both waxing and waning magmatic activity at Kīlauea suggests that a continuously acting force, like gravity body force, plays a substantial role. Using finite element models, we test whether gravity is the principal driver of long-term motion of Kīlauea's flank. We compare our model results to geodetic data from Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar during a time period with few magmatic and tectonic events (2000-2003), when deformation of Kīlauea was dominated by summit subsidence and seaward motion of the south flank. We find that gravity-only models can reproduce the horizontal surface velocities if we incorporate a regional décollement fault and a deep, low-viscosity magma mush zone. To obtain quasi steady state horizontal surface velocities that explain the long-term seaward motion of the flank, we find that an additional weak zone is needed, which is an extensional rift zone above the magma mush. The spreading rate in our model is mainly controlled by the magma mush viscosity, while its density plays a less significant role. We find that a viscosity of 2.5 × 1017-2.5 × 1019 Pa s for the magma mush provides an acceptable fit to the observed horizontal surface deformation. Using high magma mush viscosities, such as 2.5 × 1019 Pa s, the deformation rates remain more steady state over longer time scales. These models explain a significant amount of the observed subsidence at Kīlauea's summit. Some of the remaining subsidence is probably a result of magma withdrawal from subsurface reservoirs.

  7. The role of viscous magma mush spreading in volcanic flank motion at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Christina; Amelung, Falk; Baker, Scott; Govers, Rob; Poland, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to explain seaward motion of the south flank of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i. The consistency of flank motion during both waxing and waning magmatic activity at Kīlauea suggests that a continuously acting force, like gravity body force, plays a substantial role. Using finite element models, we test whether gravity is the principal driver of long-term motion of Kīlauea's flank. We compare our model results to geodetic data from Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar during a time period with few magmatic and tectonic events (2000-2003), when deformation of Kīlauea was dominated by summit subsidence and seaward motion of the south flank. We find that gravity-only models can reproduce the horizontal surface velocities if we incorporate a regional décollement fault and a deep, low-viscosity magma mush zone. To obtain quasi steady state horizontal surface velocities that explain the long-term seaward motion of the flank, we find that an additional weak zone is needed, which is an extensional rift zone above the magma mush. The spreading rate in our model is mainly controlled by the magma mush viscosity, while its density plays a less significant role.We find that a viscosity of 2.5 x 10^17 - 2.5 x 10^19 Pa s for the magma mush provides an acceptable fit to the observed horizontal surface deformation. Using high magma mush viscosities, such as 2.5 x 10^19 Pa s, the deformation rates remain more steady state over longer time scales. These models explain a significant amount of the observed subsidence at Kīlauea's summit. Some of the remaining subsidence is probably a result of magma withdrawal from subsurface reservoirs.

  8. Location and extent of recently active lava flows on the eastern flank of Idunn Mons on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, Piero; Mueller, Nils; Helbert, Joern; D'Amore, Mario

    2016-10-01

    The eastern flank of Idunn Mons, Imdr Regio's single large volcano, was identified in VIRTIS data as one of the regions with relatively high values of thermal emissivity at 1 μm wavelength. Our study intends to identify location and extent of the sources of such anomalies, thus the lava flows responsible for the relatively high emissivity observed by VIRTIS over the eastern flank of Idunn Mons. We perform a simulation iterating the geologic mapping made over Magellan radar images of the same area with modeling of the blurring caused by the scattering of the 1 μm radiation in the atmosphere. At every iteration, we map the lava flow units in the surroundings of Idunn Mons and we assign each unit an assumed value of emissivity. We observed a good match between the mapped flows and the clusters resulting from the consistency of the mapped lava flows through the ISO clustering analysis. We tested eight different configurations, calculating the total RMS error compared to VIRTIS observations. The best-fit configuration is that where we assigned high values of emissivity to the flank lava flows. Results also show a correlation between the ISO clustering analysis and the best-fit configuration. We reconstructed the post-eruption stratigraphy of the eastern flank of Idunn Mons, displaying the three flank lava flows units likely responsible for the relatively high 1 μm emissivity anomalies observed by VIRTIS. The average microwave emissivity provides a further evidence of the basaltic composition of the mapped lava flows.

  9. Modeling of Principal Flank Wear: An Empirical Approach Combining the Effect of Tool, Environment and Workpiece Hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mia, Mozammel; Al Bashir, Mahmood; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Hard turning is increasingly employed in machining, lately, to replace time-consuming conventional turning followed by grinding process. An excessive amount of tool wear in hard turning is one of the main hurdles to be overcome. Many researchers have developed tool wear model, but most of them developed it for a particular work-tool-environment combination. No aggregate model is developed that can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. An empirical model of principal flank wear (VB) has been developed for the different hardness of workpiece (HRC40, HRC48 and HRC56) while turning by coated carbide insert with different configurations (SNMM and SNMG) under both dry and high pressure coolant conditions. Unlike other developed model, this model includes the use of dummy variables along with the base empirical equation to entail the effect of any changes in the input conditions on the response. The base empirical equation for principal flank wear is formulated adopting the Exponential Associate Function using the experimental results. The coefficient of dummy variable reflects the shifting of the response from one set of machining condition to another set of machining condition which is determined by simple linear regression. The independent cutting parameters (speed, rate, depth of cut) are kept constant while formulating and analyzing this model. The developed model is validated with different sets of machining responses in turning hardened medium carbon steel by coated carbide inserts. For any particular set, the model can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. Since the predicted results exhibit good resemblance with experimental data and the average percentage error is <10 %, this model can be used to predict the principal flank wear for stated conditions.

  10. Aerodynamic roughness length related to non-aggregated tillage ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion in agricultural soils is dependent, in part, on the aerodynamic roughness length (z0 produced by tillage ridges. Although previous studies have related z0 to ridge characteristics (ridge height (RH and spacing (RS, these relationships have not been tested for tillage ridges observed in the North African agricultural fields. In these regions, due to climate and soil conditions, small plowing tools are largely used. Most of these tools produce non-aggregated and closely-spaced small ridges. Thus, experiments were conducted in a 7-m long wind tunnel to measure z0 for 11 ridge types covering the range of geometric characteristics frequently observed in south Tunisia. Experimental results suggest that RH2/RS is the first order parameter controlling z0. A strong relationship between z0 and RH2/RS is proposed for a wide range of ridge characteristics.

  11. Use of ridge points in partial fingerprint matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gang; Srihari, Sargur N.; Srinivasan, Harish; Phatak, Prasad

    2007-04-01

    Matching of partial fingerprints has important applications in both biometrics and forensics. It is well-known that the accuracy of minutiae-based matching algorithms dramatically decrease as the number of available minutiae decreases. When singular structures such as core and delta are unavailable, general ridges can be utilized. Some existing highly accurate minutiae matchers do use local ridge similarity for fingerprint alignment. However, ridges cover relatively larger regions, and therefore ridge similarity models are sensitive to non-linear deformation. An algorithm is proposed here to utilize ridges more effectively- by utilizing representative ridge points. These points are represented similar to minutiae and used together with minutiae in existing minutiae matchers with simple modification. Algorithm effectiveness is demonstrated using both full and partial fingerprints. The performance is compared against two minutiae-only matchers (Bozorth and k-minutiae). Effectiveness with full fingerprint matching is demonstrated using the four databases of FVC2002- where the error rate decreases by 0.2-0.7% using the best matching algorithm. The effectiveness is more significant in the case of partial fingerprint matching- which is demonstrated with sixty partial fingerprint databases generated from FVC2002 (with five levels of numbers of minutiae available). When only 15 minutiae are available the error rate decreases 5-7.5%. Thus the method, which involves selecting representative ridge points, minutiae matcher modification, and a group of minutiae matchers, demonstrates improved performance on full and especially partial fingerprint matching.

  12. Hydrodynamic role of longitudinal ridges in a leatherback turtle swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver among marine turtles, has five longitudinal ridges on its carapace. These ridges are the most remarkable morphological features distinguished from other marine turtles. To investigate the hydrodynamic role of these ridges in the leatherback turtle swimming, we model a carapace with and without ridges by using three dimensional surface data of a stuffed leatherback turtle in the National Science Museum, Korea. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel in the ranges of the real leatherback turtle's Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack (α). The longitudinal ridges function differently according to the flow condition (i.e. Re and α). At low Re and negative α that represent the swimming condition of hatchlings and juveniles, the ridges significantly decrease the drag by generating streamwise vortices and delaying the main separation. On the other hand, at high Re and positive α that represent the swimming condition of adults, the ridges suppress the laminar separation bubble near the front part by generating streamwise vortices and enhance the lift and lift-to-drag ratio. Supported by the NRF program (2011-0028032).

  13. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  14. Small Friends of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis Ernesto; Johnson, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters are Jupiter-sized gas giant exoplanets that closely orbit their host star in periods of about 10 days or less. Early models hypothesized that these exoplanets formed away from the star, then over time drifted to their characteristically closer locations. However, new theories predict that Hot Jupiters form at their close proximity during the process of core accretion (Batygin et al. 2015). In fact, a super-Earth and a Neptune-sized exoplanet have already been detected in the Hot Jupiter-hosting star WASP-47 (Becker et al. 2015). We will present our analysis of radial velocity time series plots to determine whether low-mass, short-period planets have been previously overlooked in systems of stars which host Hot Jupiters.The SAO REU program is funded in part by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851.

  15. Hot dry rock geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiken, G.; Murphy, H.; Nunz, G.; Potter, R.

    1981-08-01

    Man-made geothermal systems are discussed which make it possible to extract heat from hot rocks in areas where natural fluids are insufficient for the development of hydrothermal energy. The location and magnitude of high- and low-temperature geothermal resources in the USA for such hot dry rock (HDR) systems are examined. An HDR concept is described in which water is injected into one of two nearly parallel wells connected at depth by man-made fractures; the injected water circulates through the fracture system, where it is heated by conduction from the hot rock, and hot fluid, which can be used for heating or for electric power generation, rises through the second well. Some heat-extraction experiments using the described concept are reviewed which are being conducted in a complex volcanic field in New Mexico. The economics of HDR energy is evaluated.

  16. Do scientists trace hot topics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tian; Li, Menghui; Wu, Chensheng; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries, among research works regarding different number of authors, different number of affiliations and different number of references. These observations could be valuable for policy makers when deciding research funding and also for individual researchers when searching for scientific projects.

  17. Coulomb explosion of "hot spot"

    CERN Document Server

    Oreshkin, V I; Chaikovsky, S A; Artyomov, A P

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed and estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  18. SRTM Stereo Pair: Wheeler Ridge, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994

  19. Extended Cold Testing of a Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2002-12-23

    The effectiveness of a mixer is dependent on the size of the tank to be mixed, the characteristics of the waste, and the operating conditions. Waste tanks throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex require mixing and mobilization systems capable of (1) breaking up and suspending materials that are difficult to mix and pump, without introducing additional liquids into the tank; (2) complementing and augmenting the performance of other remotely operated and/or robotic waste retrieval systems; and (3) operating in tanks with various quantities of waste. The Oak Ridge Russian pulsating mixer pump (PMP) system was designed with the flexibility to permit deployment in a variety of cylindrical tanks. The PMP was installed at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the performance of the system over an extended range of operating conditions, including supply pressures up to 175 psig. Previously conducted cold tests proved the applicability of the PMP for deployment in ORNL gunite tank TH-4. The previous testing and hot demonstrations had been limited to operating at air supply pressures of <100 psig. The extended cold testing of the Russian PMP system showed that the system was capable of mobilizing waste simulants in tanks in excess of 20-ft diam. The waste simulant used in these tests was medium-grain quartz sand. The system was successfully installed, checked out, and operated for 406 pulse discharge cycles. Only minor problems (i.e., a sticking air distributor valve and a few system lockups) were noted. Some improvements to the design of the air distributor valve may be needed to improve reliability. The air supply requirements of the PMP during the discharge cycle necessitated the operation of the system in single pulse discharge cycles to allow time for the air supply reservoir to recharge to the required pressure. During the test program, the system was operated with sand depths of 2, 4, and 4.5 in.; at

  20. Multiple linear regression with correlations among the predictor variables. Theory and computer algorithm ridge (FORTRAN 77)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gaans, P. F. M.; Vriend, S. P.

    Application of ridge regression in geoscience usually is a more appropriate technique than ordinary least-squares regression, especially in the situation of highly intercorrelated predictor variables. A FORTRAN 77 program RIDGE for ridged multiple linear regression is presented. The theory of linear regression and ridge regression is treated, to allow for a careful interpretation of the results and to understand the structure of the program. The program gives various parameters to evaluate the extent of multicollinearity within a given regression problem, such as the correlation matrix, multiple correlations among the predictors, variance inflation factors, eigenvalues, condition number, and the determinant of the predictors correlation matrix. The best method for the optimum choice of the ridge parameter with ridge regression has not been established yet. Estimates of the ridge bias, ridged variance inflation factors, estimates, and norms for the ridge parameter therefore are given as output by RIDGE and should complement inspection of the ridge traces. Application within the earth sciences is discussed.

  1. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Hummer, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A review on the quantitative spectroscopy (QS) of hot stars is presented, with particular attention given to the study of photospheres, optically thin winds, unified model atmospheres, and stars with optically thick winds. It is concluded that the results presented here demonstrate the reliability of Qs as a unique source of accurate values of the global parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and elemental abundances) of hot stars.

  2. Technical evaluation of the in situ vitrification melt expulsion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on April 21, 1996, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    On April 21, 1996, at 6:12 p.m., approximately 20 tons of molten glass were expelled from a 216-ton body of molten (approximately 1600{degrees}C) radioactively contaminated soil (containing 2.4 Ci of {sup 137}Cs) at a field site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The melt expulsion was caused by pressurized steam venting rapidly through, rather than by the desired path around, the molten body. During the previous 17 days, an old seepage pit was undergoing in situ vitrification (ISV) to convert it from porous, leachable soil into a monolithic, impermeable vitreous waste form. Approximately 2 MW of electrical power was being delivered to the molten body, which was contained in the ground and covered with a stainless steel hood maintained under negative pressure to collect, filter, scrub, and monitor off-gas. Off-gas into the hood was rapidly heated by the melt expulsion from a typical operating temperature of 250{degrees}C to over 1000{degrees}C with an associated surge of pressure sufficient to lift the 15,000-lb hood approximately 12 in. off the ground. A small pool of molten glass was able to flow up to 3 ft outside the hood while it was raised off the ground. The escaping hot off-gas and molten glass ignited several small fires in combustible components near or attached to the external hood frame (e.g, wire insulation, plastic hose, fiberglass trays). Fire department personnel responded to the emergency notification within minutes but were not needed because the small fires self-extinguished within an hour. Four project personnel were performing tasks at the site at the time of the melt expulsion; none were injured or contaminated during the melt expulsion incident. Air samples taken from the hood perimeter near the small fires failed to detect any airborne contamination.

  3. Solar cell with doped groove regions separated by ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molesa, Steven Edward; Pass, Thomas; Kraft, Steve

    2017-01-31

    Solar cells with doped groove regions separated by ridges and methods of fabricating solar cells are described. In an example, a solar cell includes a substrate having a surface with a plurality of grooves and ridges. A first doped region of a first conductivity type is disposed in a first of the grooves. A second doped region of a second conductivity type, opposite the first conductivity type, is disposed in a second of the grooves. The first and second grooves are separated by one of the ridges.

  4. Optical dating of dune ridges on Rømø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

    . Samples for OSL dating were taken ~0.5 m below the crests of four different dune ridges; at least five samples were recovered from each ridge to test the internal consistency of the ages. Additional samples were recovered from the low lying areas in the swales and from the scattered dune formations......, and all ages were broadly consistent with those expected from historical information. The oldest aeolian surface on Rømø appears to be 370±30 years. This is built on what we interpret as a marine sandbank, whose surface is ~700 years old. The sand ridges seaward of the hummocky dune field have well...

  5. Fingerprint Ridge Frequency Estimation in the Fourier Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIU, V.-V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ridge frequency is an important parameter in fingerprint image processing and feature extraction. However, ridge frequency estimation is a difficult task in noisy fingerprint images. A simple and accurate method for the computation of fingerprint ridge frequency using the Fourier spectrum is proposed. The results of the experiments conducted on a collection of fingerprints as well as a quantitative method for performance evaluation based on a Gabor filter-bank are presented. The proposed method is robust with respect to noise and reliable frequency images are obtained.

  6. Distribution of contact loads over the flank-land of the cutter with a rounded cutting edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V.; Gerasimov, A.; Kim, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, contact conditions between a tool and a workpiece material for wear-simulating turning by a cutter with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge are analysed. The results of the experimental study of specific contact load distribution over the artificial flank wear-land of the cutter in free orthogonal turning of the disk from titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr), ductile (63Cu) and brittle (57Cu1Al3Mn) brasses are described. Investigations were carried out by the method of ‘split cutter’ and by the method of the artificial flank-land of variable width. The experiments with a variable feed rate and a cutting speed show that in titanium alloy machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge the highest normal contact load (σh max = 3400…2200 MPa) is observed immediately at the cutting edge, and the curve has a horizontal region with the length of 0.2… 0.6 mm. At a distance from the cutting edge, the value of specific normal contact load is dramatically reduced to 1100…500 MPa. The character of normal contact load for a rounded cutting edge is different -it is uniform, and its value is approximately 2 times smaller compared to machining with a sharp-cornered cutting edge. In author’s opinion it is connected with generation of a seizure zone in a chip formation region and explains the capacity of highly worn-out cutting tools for titanium alloys machining. The paper analyses the distribution of tangential contact loads over the flank land, which pattern differs considerably for machining with a sharp-cornered edge and with a rounded cutting edge. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (specific contact load as a stress σ or τ) hf - the width of the flank wear land (chamfer) of the cutting tool, flank wear land can be natural or artificial like the one in this paper [mm]; xh - distance from the cutting edge on the surface of the flank-land [mm

  7. Hydrothermal activity in Tertiary Icelandic crust: Implication for cooling processes along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałgan, D.; Devey, C. W.; Yeo, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Known hydrothermal activity along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is mostly high-temperature venting, controlled by volcano-tectonic processes confined to ridge axes and neotectonic zones ~15km wide on each side of the axis (e.g. TAG or Snake Pit). However, extensive exploration and discoveries of new hydrothermal fields in off-axis regions (e.g. Lost City, MAR) show that hydrothermalism may, in some areas, be dominated by off-axis venting. Little is known about nature of such systems, including whether low-temperature "diffuse" venting dominates rather than high-temperature black-smokers. This is particularly interesting since such systems may transport up to 90% of the hydrothermal heat to the oceans. In this study we use Icelandic hot springs as onshore analogues for off-shore hydrothermal activity along the MAR to better understand volcano-tectonic controls on their occurrence, along with processes supporting fluid circulation. Iceland is a unique laboratory to study how new oceanic crust cools and suggests that old crust may not be as inactive as previously thought. Our results show that Tertiary (>3.3 Myr) crust of Iceland (Westfjords) has widespread low-temperature hydrothermal activity. Lack of tectonism (indicated by lack of seismicity), along with field research suggest that faults in Westfjords are no longer active and that once sealed, can no longer support hydrothermal circulation, i.e. none of the hot springs in the area occur along faults. Instead, dyke margins provide open and permeable fluid migration pathways. Furthermore, we suggest that the Reykjanes Ridge (south of Iceland) may be similar to Westfjords with hydrothermalism dominated by off-axis venting. Using bathymetric data we infer dyke positions and suggest potential sites for future exploration located away from neotectonic zone. We also emphasise the importance of biological observations in seeking for low-temperature hydrothermal activity, since chemical or optical methods are not sufficient.

  8. A Hadronic Scenario for the Galactic Ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Marinelli, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Several observations from Fermi-LAT, up to few hundred GeV, and from H.E.S.S., up to $\\sim$ 10 TeV, reported an intense $\\gamma$-ray emission from the inner part of the Galactic plane. After the subtraction of point-like contributions, the remaining $\\gamma$-ray spectrum can provide important hints about the cosmic-ray (CR) population in that region. In particular, the diffuse spectrum measured by both Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. in the Galactic Ridge is significantly harder with respect to the rest of the Galaxy. These results were recently interpreted in terms of a comprehensive CR transport model which, adopting a spatial dependent diffusion coefficient and convective velocity, reproduces Fermi-LAT results on the whole sky as well as local CR spectra. We showed as that model predicts a significantly harder neutrino diffuse emission compared to conventional scenarios: The predicted signal is able to account for a significant fraction of the astrophysical flux measured by IceCube. In this contribution, we use the...

  9. Cosmic Web Reconstruction through Density Ridges: Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E; Genovese, Christopher R; Schneider, Donald P; Wasserman, Larry

    2015-01-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift; Ozertem & Erdogmus 2011; Chen et al. 2015). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three dataset covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For ...

  10. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A.R. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to the public about the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the public and the environment. It describes the environmental surveillance and monitoring activities conducted at and around the DOE facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Preparation and publication of this report is in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1. The order specifies a publication deadline of June of the following year for each calendar year of data. The primary objective of this report is to summarize all information collected for the previous calendar year regarding effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and estimates of radiation and chemical dose to the surrounding population. When multiple years of information are available for a program, trends are also evaluated. The first seven sections of Volume 1 of this report address this objective. The last three sections of Volume 1 provide information on solid waste management, special environmental studies, and quality assurance programs.

  11. A porous flow model of flank eruptions on Mt. Etna: second-order perturbation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cenni

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A porous flow model for magma migration from a deep source within a volcanic edifice is developed. The model is based on the assumption that an isotropic and homogeneous system of fractures allows magma migration from one localized feeding dyke up to the surface of the volcano. The maximum level that magma can reach within the volcano (i.e., the «free surface» of magma, where fluid pressure equals the atmospheric pressure is reproduced through a second-order perturbation approach to the non-linear equations governing the migration of incompressible fluids through a porous medium. The perturbation parameter is found to depend on the ratio of the volumic discharge rate at the source (m3/s divided by the product of the hydraulic conductivity of the medium (m1/s times the square of the source depth. The second-order corrections for the free surface of Mt. Etna are found to be small but not negligible; from the comparison between first-order and second-order free surfaces it appears that the former is higher near the summit, slightly lower at intermediate altitudes and slightly higher far away from the axis of the volcano. Flank eruptions in the southern sector are found to be located in regions where the topography is actually lower than the theoretical free surface of magma. In this sector, modulations in the eruption site density correlate well with even minor differences between free surface and topography. In the northern and western sectors similar good fits are found, while the NE rift and the eastern sector seem to require mechanisms or structures respectively favouring and inhibiting magma migration.

  12. Removal of ureteral calculi in two geldings via a standing flank approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Jeremy; Freeman, David E; MacKay, Robert J; Matyjaszek, Sarah; Lewis, Jordan; Sanchez, L Chris; Meyer, Stephanie

    2012-11-01

    Two geldings, aged 11 and 17 years, were examined for treatment of ureteroliths located approximately 10 cm proximal to the bladder. Ureteral obstruction was an incidental finding in 1 horse that was referred because of urinary tract obstruction and a cystic calculus. This horse did not have clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure, although severe hydronephrosis was evident on transabdominal ultrasonography. The second patient had a serum creatinine concentration of 6.3 mg/dL (reference range, 0.8 to 2.2 mg/dL) and mild hydronephrosis of the affected left kidney. In both patients, the obstructed ureter was exteriorized through a flank incision as a standing procedure, and the calculus was crushed and removed with a uterine biopsy forceps introduced through a ureterotomy approximately 25 cm proximal to the calculus. The cystic calculus was removed through a perineal urethrostomy by lithotripsy, piecemeal extraction, and lavage. The horse without azotemia developed pyelonephritis in the affected kidney and was euthanatized because of complications of a nephrectomy 13 months later. In the horse with azotemia, the serum creatinine concentration decreased after surgery, and the horse returned to its intended use. However, it was euthanatized approximately 2 years after surgery because of progressive renal failure, and a large nephrolith was found in the previously unobstructed right kidney. The technique used for ureterolith removal was successful in both horses in this report, did not require sophisticated equipment, and could be effective in the early stages of ureteral obstruction as a means of restoring urine flow and renal function. The outcome in the horse with advanced unilateral renal disease without azotemia would suggest that nephrectomy should be considered as a treatment in such patients.

  13. Evaluation of the flanking nucleotide sequences of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy substitution mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Mealey, Katrina L

    2008-07-03

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a familial myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500. More than 400 causative mutations have been identified in 13 sarcomeric and myofilament related genes, 350 of these are substitution mutations within eight sarcomeric genes. Within a population, examples of recurring identical disease causing mutations that appear to have arisen independently have been noted as well as those that appear to have been inherited from a common ancestor. The large number of novel HCM mutations could suggest a mechanism of increased mutability within the sarcomeric genes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the most commonly reported HCM genes, beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7), myosin binding protein C, troponin I, troponin T, cardiac regulatory myosin light chain, cardiac essential myosin light chain, alpha tropomyosin and cardiac alpha-actin for sequence patterns surrounding the substitution mutations that may suggest a mechanism of increased mutability. The mutations as well as the 10 flanking nucleotides were evaluated for frequency of di-, tri- and tetranucleotides containing the mutation as well as for the presence of certain tri- and tetranculeotide motifs. The most common substitutions were guanine (G) to adenine (A) and cytosine (C) to thymidine (T). The CG dinucleotide had a significantly higher relative mutability than any other dinucleotide (pmutation was calculated; none were at a statistically higher frequency than the others. The large number of G to A and C to T mutations as well as the relative mutability of CG may suggest that deamination of methylated CpG is an important mechanism for mutation development in at least some of these cardiac genes.

  14. Project plan for the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The Background Soil characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents.

  15. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The

  16. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1999-11-14

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

  17. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  18. Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America: Mantle refertilization by arc-hot spot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Feigenson, Mark D.; Szymanski, David; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Although most Central American magmas have a typical arc geochemical signature, magmas in southern Central America (central Costa Rica and Panama) have isotopic and trace element compositions with an ocean island basalt (OIB) affinity, similar to the Galapagos-OIB lavas (e.g., Ba/La 10, 206Pb/204Pb > 18.8). Our new data for Costa Rica suggest that this signature, unusual for a convergent margin, has a relatively recent origin (Late Miocene ˜6 Ma). We also show that there was a transition from typical arc magmas (analogous to the modern Nicaraguan volcanic front) to OIB-like magmas similar to the Galapagos hot spot. The geographic distribution of the Galapagos signature in recent lavas from southern Central America is present landward from the subduction of the Galapagos hot spot tracks (the Seamount Province and the Cocos/Coiba Ridge) at the Middle American Trench. The higher Pb isotopic ratios, relatively lower Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, and enriched incompatible-element signature of central Costa Rican magmas can be explained by arc-hot spot interaction. The isotopic ratios of central Costa Rican lavas require the subducting Seamount Province (Northern Galapagos Domain) component, whereas the isotopic ratios of the adakites and alkaline basalts from southern Costa Rica and Panama are in the geochemical range of the subducting Cocos/Coiba Ridge (Central Galapagos Domain). Geological and geochemical evidence collectively indicate that the relatively recent Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America represents a geochemical signal from subducting Galapagos hot spot tracks, which started to collide with the margin ˜8 Ma ago. The Galapagos hot spot contribution decreases systematically along the volcanic front from central Costa Rica to NW Nicaragua.

  19. Tool flank wear model and parametric optimization in end milling of metal matrix composite using carbide tool: Response surface methodology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokiadass

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly automated CNC end milling machines in manufacturing industry requires reliable model for prediction of tool flank wear. This model later can be used to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax according to the process parameters. In this investigation an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tool flank wear (VBmax of carbide tools while machining LM25 Al/SiCp incorporating the process parameters such as spindle speed (N, feed rate (f, depth of cut (d and various % wt. of silicon carbide (S. Response surface methodology (RSM was applied to optimizing the end milling process parameters to attain the minimum tool flank wear. Predicted values obtained from the developed model and experimental results are compared, and error <5 percent is observed. In addition, it is concluded that the flank wear increases with the increase of SiCp percentage weight in the MMC.

  20. Trying to understand the ridge effect in hydrodynamic model

    CERN Document Server

    Hama, Yogiro; Grassi, Frederique; Qian, Wei-Liang

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper, the hydrodynamic code NeXSPheRIO was used in conjunction with STAR analysis methods to study two-particle correlations as function of Delta_eta and Delta_phi. Both the ridge-like near-side and the double-hump away-side structures were obtained. However, the mechanism of ridge production was not clear. In order to understand it, we study a simple model with only one high-energy density peripheral tube in a smooth cylindrical back-ground, with longitudinal boost invariance. The results are rather surprising, but the model does produce the triple-ridge structure with one high ridge plus two lower ones placed symmetrically with respect to the former one. The shape of this structure is rather stable in a wide range of parameters.

  1. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  2. Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Lake Wales Ridge NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  3. The Trail Inventory of Glacial Ridge NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  4. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AdvR, Inc. proposes the development of an efficient process for fabricating ridge waveguides in magnesium-doped lithium niobate (MgO:LN). The effort will include,...

  5. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA Phase I STTR effort, the feasibility of fabricating isolated ridge waveguides in 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (5% MgO:LN) will be established....

  6. Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2006 fiscal year. The report begins with an...

  7. Geoid anomalies over Gorringe Ridge, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, A.

    1984-04-01

    The geoid anomalies over Gorringe Ridge, a very prominent high in the topography north of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary, have been deduced from Seasat alimetric data, and an interpretation of these anomalies together with the gravity anomalies is attempted. The geoid anomalies generated by the topographic high alone with the serpentinite density nearly fit the observed geoid anomalies, so that the structure must be either out of isostatic equilibrium or compensated at great depth. It is shown that a model in isostatic equilibrium with a small negative density contrast extending to 60 km depth or more explains both the gravity and geoid anomalies and is compatible with the deep seismicity north of Gorringe Ridge. Previous nonisostatic models, one involving an uplift of the upper mantle beneath the ridge, one describing a nascent subduction zone, and another involving flexure of the elastic part of the lithosphere due to the ridge loading, are discussed.

  8. Alveolar ridge changes in patients congenitally missing mandibular second premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, M S; Kokich, V G

    1994-02-01

    This study investigated changes in ridge width over time in patients who were congenitally missing mandibular second premolars. Data were obtained from stone casts and radiographs of 35 edentulous sites on 22 patients representing three time periods: (1) before extraction of the primary mandibular second molar, (2) completion of orthodontic treatment, and (3) long-term evaluation. The findings indicate that ridge width decreases 25% within 3 years after primary molar extraction. The rate of decrease diminishes to 4% over the next 3 years. The change in ridge width had a weak association with the age of the patient at the time of the extraction but a small predictive value. No correlation was found between changes in ridge width and height and the time since the extraction or the age of the patient at the time of extraction.

  9. [Mandibular ridge augmentation with hydroxylapatite and its extension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Mercier, P

    1996-01-01

    The results of 5 years follow-up of 84 cases of mandibular residual ridge augmented with hydroxlapatite (HA), followed by ridge extension, are reported. The first surgical procedures, subperiosteal HA insertion, and the second stage of total lowering of the floow of the mouth, vestibuloplasty and skin graft are detailedly described. The ridge is augmented by the first surgery, disturbance of the fraenums of the lip, buccal and tongue and muscles are eliminated by the second surgery, to increase denture retention and stability, improve wear resisting of tissue covered over the artifical ridge and eliminate pain and uncomfort when wearing denture. The results of five years follow-up show that two stages reconstruction are better than HA insertion only. HA is a kind of ideal material of bone replacement, which is not resorbed in most cases.

  10. A comparative study of some robust ridge and liu estimators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science World Journal ... To handle these two problems jointly, the study combines the Ridge and Liu Estimators ... Application to the proposed estimators to three (3) real life data set with multicollinearity and outliers problems reveals that the ...

  11. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  12. February 2007 Multibeam Mapping of Pulley Ridge, southwest Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This disk or set of disks contain high-resolution multibeam and backscatter maps of the Pulley Ridge Area, near the Tortugas, in the Gulf of Mexico. It includes the...

  13. Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Fiscal Year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2005 fiscal year. The report begins with an...

  14. A Novel Approach to Characterize Compositional Variability through Time at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The temporal, spatial, and compositional variability of eruptive products illuminates the scales of magmatic sources and processes. Prior methods to evaluate this variability rely on extensive sampling of lava flows. We describe a novel approach to assess the variability of submarine volcanics using material recovered in pushcores at a mid-ocean ridge. Pushcores collected from the west flank of Endeavour in 2011 with ROV Doc Ricketts were extruded in 1- or 2-cm intervals and volcaniclastic glass shards and foraminifera were extracted for electron microprobe and radiocarbon analyses, respectively. 14C ages and glass compositions from two cores provide chemical stratigraphies we compare to compositions of proximal lavas to assess local variability and volcaniclast dispersal. A 20-cm core from the north slope of Summit Seamount ~100m above the axial valley floor has a basal age of 4.5ka and 10-12 cm is ~1.5ka. Shards in the bottom 6cm are chemically distinct from the lava flow that it overlies. These basal shards are bimodal in MgO and the more differentiated mode is similar to flows on the valley floor on the opposite side of the faulted remnants of Summit Seamount. Most shards in the top 14 cm are similar to the underlying lava flow and have uniform MgO of 7.3 ×0.1. This composition is dominant in shards from 6-12 cm, which may represent a single eruption. Nearby flows encompassing three additional distinct lava types are also present as rare random shards; one additional lava type ~1km distant is absent. A 24-cm core from NW of Main Endeavour Field overlies a compositionally distinct low pillow mound on the west flank; no shards with this composition are found. The core is dated at 10.5ka (basal), ~4.8ka (15-17 cm), and ~2.0ka (9-11 cm). From 10.5 to 4.8 ka, most shards are compositionally similar to, but slightly more evolved than, extensive sheet lavas that flowed around the pillow mounds. A subordinate amount of shards that are compositionally similar, but more

  15. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  16. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmer, Phillip; Battle, Philip; Suckow, William; Switzer, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This work proposes to establish the feasibility of fabricating isolated ridge waveguides in 5% MgO:LN. Ridge waveguides in MgO:LN will significantly improve power handling and conversion efficiency, increase photonic component integration, and be well suited to spacebased applications. The key innovation in this effort is to combine recently available large, high-photorefractive-damage-threshold, z-cut 5% MgO:LN with novel ridge fabrication techniques to achieve high-optical power, low-cost, high-volume manufacturing of frequency conversion structures. The proposed ridge waveguide structure should maintain the characteristics of the periodically poled bulk substrate, allowing for the efficient frequency conversion typical of waveguides and the high optical damage threshold and long lifetimes typical of the 5% doped bulk substrate. The low cost and large area of 5% MgO:LN wafers, and the improved performance of the proposed ridge waveguide structure, will enhance existing measurement capabilities as well as reduce the resources required to achieve high-performance specifications. The purpose of the ridge waveguides in MgO:LN is to provide platform technology that will improve optical power handling and conversion efficiency compared to existing waveguide technology. The proposed ridge waveguide is produced using standard microfabrication techniques. The approach is enabled by recent advances in inductively coupled plasma etchers and chemical mechanical planarization techniques. In conjunction with wafer bonding, this fabrication methodology can be used to create arbitrarily shaped waveguides allowing complex optical circuits to be engineered in nonlinear optical materials such as magnesium doped lithium niobate. Researchers here have identified NLO (nonlinear optical) ridge waveguide structures as having suitable value to be the leading frequency conversion structures. Its value is based on having the low-cost fabrication necessary to satisfy the challenging pricing

  17. Along ridge variation of the seafloor cooling and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Ju; Chiao, Ling-Yun

    2013-04-01

    Bathymetry is linearly proportional to the square root of the seafloor age according to decades of observations. It is well explained by the essentially one-dimensional thermal contraction such as that demonstrated in the classical half-space cooling model and the subsequent 2-D modifications such as the plate model, GDH1 model, PSM model etc. However, much less efforts have been undertaken on study of variation of seafloor cooling along the ridge axis. We carefully examine corridors in the spreading direction that avoid seamounts and other some secondary structures, in addition to the sediment correction. We find that subsidence rates vary along major mid-ocean ridges. It would require a range of 400 to -600°C difference if the subsidence rate variations are attributed entirely to sub-ridge mantle temperature anomalies. Pronounced anomalies include the noticeable lows at the equator in the mid-Atlantic ridge and the northern section of East Pacific Rise that might be attributed to the close by continental lithosphere. The eastern section in mid-Indian ridge is also significantly cooler within regions of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), which has been attributed to an ancient slab stalled beneath the present-day Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR). Further researches that take into account of trends of geoid data is underway to make consistent interpretations.

  18. Nonlinear Forecasting With Many Predictors Using Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Heij, Christiaan

    This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation of the predi......This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation...... of the predictive regression model is based on a shrinkage estimator to avoid overfitting. We extend the kernel ridge regression methodology to enable its use for economic time-series forecasting, by including lags of the dependent variable or other individual variables as predictors, as typically desired...... in macroeconomic and financial applications. Monte Carlo simulations as well as an empirical application to various key measures of real economic activity confirm that kernel ridge regression can produce more accurate forecasts than traditional linear and nonlinear methods for dealing with many predictors based...

  19. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Alessandro; Foresta, Enrico; Falchi, Marco; De Angelis, Paolo; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Pelo, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation.

  20. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Moro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation.

  1. Controls on ferromanganese crust composition and reconnaissance resource potential, Ninetyeast Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Conrad, Tracey; Mizell, Kira; Banakar, Virupaxa K.; Frey, Frederick A.; Sager, William W.

    2016-04-01

    A reconnaissance survey of Fe-Mn crusts from the 5000 km long (~31°S to 10°N) Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the Indian Ocean shows their widespread occurrence along the ridge as well as with water depth on the ridge flanks. The crusts are hydrogenetic based in growth rates and discrimination plots. Twenty samples from 12 crusts from 9 locations along the ridge were analyzed for chemical and mineralogical compositions, growth rates, and statistical relationships (Q-mode factor analysis, correlation coefficients) were calculated. The crusts collected are relatively thin (maximum 40 mm), and those analyzed varied from 4 mm to 32 mm. However, crusts as thick as 80 mm can be expected to occur based on the age of rocks that comprise the NER and the growth rates calculated here. Growth rates of the crusts increase to the north along the NER and with water depth. The increase to the north resulted from an increased supply of Mn from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to depths below the OMZ combined with an increased supply of Fe at depth from the dissolution of biogenic carbonate and from deep-sourced hydrothermal Fe. These increased supplies of Fe increased growth rates of the deeper-water crusts along the entire NER. Because of the huge terrigenous (rivers, eolian, pyroclastic) and hydrothermal (three spreading centers) inputs to the Indian Ocean, and the history of primary productivity, Fe-Mn crust compositions vary from those analyzed from open-ocean locations in the Pacific. The sources of detrital material in the crusts change along the NER and reflect, from north to south, the decreasing influence of the Ganga River system and volcanic arcs located to the east, with increasing influence of sediment derived from Australia to the south. In addition, weathering of NER basalt likely contributed to the aluminosilicate fraction of the crusts. The southernmost sample has a relatively large detrital component compared to other southern NER crust samples, which was probably

  2. Hot Alps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, F.; Minelli, L.; Pignatelli, A.; Gilardi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although it is frequently assumed that crust of Alpine orogens is hot due to the occurrence of thick and young (hence radiogenic) crust, evidence on the thermal ranking of orogens is contradictory. Heat flow measurements from shallow wells (depth ≤ 1 km) in the Alps yield a relatively cold thermal regime of 50-80 mW/m2, but data are likely biased by meteoric cold-water circulation. Here we report on the spectral analysis of the aeromagnetic residuals of northern Italy to derive the Curie point depth (CPD), assumed to represent the 600°C isotherm depth. Airborne magnetics were acquired on whole Italy during the 1970s by the national oil company AGIP (now Eni). Data were gathered by several surveys carried out at 1000-13,300 feet (300-4000 m) altitude, with flight line spacing of 2-10 km. Surveys of the Alps and Po Plain (northern Italy) were obtained both with a line spacing of 5 km (and 5 km tie lines), at an altitude of 4000-5000 and 13,300 feet, respectively. To evaluate CPDs we used the centroid method (routinely adopted in recent CPD studies on East Asia and central-southern Europe) on 72 square windows of 100-110 km edge, with a 50% degree of superposition. CPDs vary between 16 and 38 km (22 km on average) in the Po Plain, located south of the Alps and representing the Adriatic-African foreland area. Conversely, the Alps yield very shallow CPDs, ranging between 6 and 15 km (10 km on average). CPDs fall systematically above local Moho depths, implying that magnetic source bottoms documented in this study do not represent a lithological boundary over non-magnetic peridotitic mantle, but can be safely associated with CPDs and the 600°C isotherm. CPDs from the Po Plain are in rough agreement with reported heat flow values of 25-60 mW/m2, and imply and average thermal conductivity (k) of the Po Plain crust of 1.5 W/m°K, at the lower bound of k values measured and inferred for the crust. Conversely, the average 10 km CPD documented in the Alps translates into

  3. On the relationship between tropospheric conditions and widespread hot days in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakereh, Hossein; Shadman, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated how the tropospheric conditions relate to the occurrence of widespread hot days (WHD) in Iran using the data of maximum daily temperature and other tropospheric variables. To better understand the tropospheric conditions during WHD, different patterns of tropospheric circulation were examined systematically. Four tropospheric types were identified based on sea level pressure (SLP). SLP, 500 hPa height, anomaly patterns, and warm advection maps were constructed for typical days of each group. The tropospheric conditions associated with hot days occurred simultaneously with a low-pressure system at sea level, a ridge at middle troposphere over Iran, and a pronounced trough over the Mediterranean Sea at 500 hPa. These conditions caused air mass from subtropical regions toward Iran. That is, northward, northeastward, and even eastward winds injected heat with warm origins toward the country. Hot days compounded by drought conditions have affected many parts of the country in different ways such as decrease in the agricultural products in numerous areas and significant discharge reduction in many rivers. The society is also very likely to face considerable challenges to cope with hot days. The findings of the study can be utilized in climate modeling and climate prediction of hot days in the country. Accordingly, water and electricity consumption can be planned with further precision and water consumption can be managed in crises.

  4. STEREO and Wind observations of a fast ICME flank triggering a prolonged geomagnetic storm on 5-7 April 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Farrugia, Charles J; Liu, Ying; Veronig, Astrid M; Leitner, M; Galvin, Antoinette B; Biernat, Helfried K

    2010-01-01

    On 5 April 2010 an interplanetary (IP) shock was detected by the Wind spacecraft ahead of Earth, followed by a fast (average speed 650 km/s) IP coronal mass ejection (ICME). During the subsequent moderate geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = -72 nT, maximum Kp=8-), communication with the Galaxy 15 satellite was lost. We link images from STEREO/SECCHI to the near-Earth in situ observations and show that the ICME did not decelerate much between Sun and Earth. The ICME flank was responsible for a long storm growth phase. This type of glancing collision was for the first time directly observed with the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers. The magnetic cloud (MC) inside the ICME cannot be modeled with approaches assuming an invariant direction. These observations confirm the hypotheses that parts of ICMEs classified as (1) long-duration MCs or (2) magnetic-cloud-like (MCL) structures can be a consequence of a spacecraft trajectory through the ICME flank.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND TOOL FLANK WEAR IN TURNING OF AISI 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH CVD COATED TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. KALADHAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel is a popularly used grade in the various fields of manufacturing because of its high ductility, high durability and excellent corrosion resistance. High work hardening, low heat conductivity and high built up edge (BUE formation made this as difficult-to- machine material. Poor surface quality and rapid tool wear are the common problems encountered while machining it. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the influence of machining parameters on the performance measures, surface roughness and flank wear in turning of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with a two layer Chemical vapour deposition(CVD coated tool. In order to achieve this, Taguchi approach has been employed. The results revealed that the cutting speed most significantly, influences both surface roughness and flank wear. In addition to this the optimal setting of process parameters and optimal ranges of performance measures are predicted.

  6. Can comodulation masking release occur when frequency changes could promote perceptual segregation of the on-frequency and flanking bands?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L; Epp, Bastian; Stasiak, Arkadiusz

    2013-01-01

    bands relative to the inhibitory areas (as seen in physiological recordings using stationary flanking bands). Preliminary physiological results in the cochlear nucleus of the Guinea pig show that a correlate of CMR can also be found at this level of the auditory pathway with sweeping flanking bands.......A common characteristic of natural sounds is that the level fluctuations in different frequency regions are coherent. The ability of the auditory system to use this comodulation is shown when a sinusoidal signal is masked by a masker centred at the signal frequency (on-frequency masker, OFM...... and comodulation could serve as cues to indicate which of the stimulus components originate from one source. If the common fate of frequency components is the stronger binding cue, the sweeping FBs and the OFM with a fixed centre frequency should no longer form one auditory object and the CMR should be abolished...

  7. A new colorful species of Pristimantis (Anura: Craugastoridae) from the eastern flank of the Cordillera Central in Colombia .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Prieto, Diego A; Rivera-Correa, Mauricio; Daza, Juan M

    2014-12-22

    We describe a new species of Pristimantis from the humid forests on the eastern flank of the northern Cordillera Central in Colombia (6º 23' 19.3554" N, 75º 1' 24.0594" W; ca. 1150 m.a.s.l.). Pristimantis jaguensis sp. nov. is characterized by an extraordinary variation in color and is readily distinguished from congeneric species by lacking nuptial pads, discoidal fold and conical calcar tubercles; flanks and belly white to cream without blotches as well as iris yellow ocher to copper with thick brown reticulation and cream sclera. Molecular phylogenetic analyses recovered the new species in a clade with species mostly distributed in Ecuador. Our finding suggests that new taxa can still be discovered in the Middle Magdalena River valley of Colombia despite the extensive sampling this region has received during the last decades. 

  8. [Brood parasitism and egg mimicry on Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Cettia fortipes) by Lesser Cuckoo (Cuculus poliocephalus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Can-Chao; Cai, Yan; Liang, Wei

    2010-10-01

    Nest fate of Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler (Cettia fortipes) was conducted in breeding seasons from 1999 to 2009 in Kuankuoshui Natural Reserve, Guizhou province. Predation rate, parasitism rate, hatching success, nesting success and reproductive success were surveyed and egg color was quantified using spectrophotometer. Principal component analysis, reflectance spectrum and Robinson Project were used to analyze the egg color of bush warbler and egg mimicry of Lesser Cuckoo (Cuculus poliocephalus) in parasitized nests. Our results indicated that the Brownish-flanked Bush Warbler suffered from high predation rate and relatively high parasitism rate of 49.26% and 9.18%, respectively. Reflectance analysis showed that the hue and chroma of Lesser Cuckoo eggs were highly mimetic but the egg brightness and ultraviolet reflectance were different from the bush warbler.

  9. Proteins binding to the 5‘—flanking regualtory elements of the human β—globin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZHIGANG; YADICHEN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The binding of nuclear proteins prepared from mouse erythroid tissue in different developmental stages to the 5'-flanking regulatory elements of human β-globin gene,two negative control regions(NCR1,-610to-490 bp;NCR2,-338,to-233bp),was identified.Two stage specific protein factors corresponding to embryonic and fetal stages were found to be capable of binding to NCR2.These data provided evidence that the cis acting elements of the 5'-flanking region might be involved in the developmental control of β-globin gene and NCR2 might be responsible in art for the silence of β-glolbin gene in the embryonic and fetal stages.

  10. Higher primates, but not New World monkeys, have a duplicate set of enhancers flanking their apoC-I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppione, Donald L

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the apoC-I gene and its pseudogene on human chromosome 19 are flanked by a duplicate set of enhancers. Multienhancers, ME.1 and ME.2, are located upstream from the genes and the hepatic control region enhancers, HCR.1 and HCR.2, are located downstream. The duplication of the enhancers has been thought to have occurred when the apoC-I gene was duplicated during primate evolution. Currently, the only primate data are for the human enhancers. Examining the genome of other primates (great and lesser apes, Old and New World monkeys), it was possible to locate the duplicate set of enhancers in apes and Old World monkeys. However, only a single set was found in New World monkeys. These observations provide additional evidence that the apoC-I gene and the flanking enhancers underwent duplication after the divergence of Old and New World monkeys.

  11. Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

  12. Stress history and geotechnical properties of sediment from the Cape Fear Diapir, Blake Ridge Diapir, and Blake Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Geotechnical properties of sediment from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 are presented as: (1) normalized shipboard strength ratios from the Cape Fear Diapir, the Blake Ridge Diapir, and the Blake Ridge; and (2) Atterberg limit, vane shear strength, pocket-penetrometer strength, and constant-rate-of-strain consolidation results from Hole 995A, located on the Blake Ridge. This study was conducted to understand the stress history in a region characterized by high sedimentation rates and the presence of gas hydrates. Collectively, the results indicate that sediment from the Blake Ridge exhibits significant underconsolidated behavior, except near the seafloor. At least 10 m of additional overburden was removed by erosion or mass wasting at Hole 993A on the Cape Fear Diapir, compared to nearby sites.

  13. Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge(s) revisited: Indications of a C22-change in plate motion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Arne; Funck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Fracture Zone and separation of the 200-km-long, fracture-zone-parallel continental East Greenland Ridge from the Eurasia plate is thought to be related to a major change in relative plate motions between Greenland and Eurasia during the earliest Oligocene (Chron 13 time). This study presents...... a reinterpretation of the Greenland Fracture Zone -East Greenland Ridge based on new and existing geophysical data. Evidence is shown for two overstepping ridge segments (Segments A and B) of which Segment A corresponds to the already known East Greenland Ridge while Segment B was not detected previously....... Interpretation of sonobuoy data and revised modeling of existing OBS data across Segment B indicate a continental composition of the segment. This interpretation is supported by magnetic anomaly data. The Segments A and B are bounded by portions of the Greenland Fracture Zone with a distinct similar to 10...

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B. [and others

    1994-12-01

    A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

  15. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2016-10-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three data set covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For each bin, we ignore the redshift, treating the galaxy observations as a 2-D data and detect filaments using SCMS. The filament catalogue consists of 130 individual 2-D filament maps, and each map comprises points on the detected filaments that describe the filamentary structures at a particular redshift. We also apply our filament catalogue to investigate galaxy luminosity and its relation with distance to filament. Using a volume-limited sample, we find strong evidence (6.1σ-12.3σ) that galaxies close to filaments are generally brighter than those at significant distance from filaments.

  16. Measurement of surface roughness and flank wear on hard martensitic stainless steel by CBN and PCBN cutting tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thamizhmanii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The experiments with different operating parameters using CBN and PCBN tools on hard AISI 440 C material were investigated in this paper.Design/methodology/approach: In this research AISI 440 C stainless was used under hard condition. The cutting tools are having three cutting edges and each edge repeated for 5 times. The test conducted by each cutting edge was termed as trail 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5. The length of cutting was 150 mm and each trail. The surface roughness and flank wear, crater wear and BUE were measured by SEM.Findings: The surface roughness was low by CBN at high turning cutting speed and the flank wear was high. The surface roughness was high by PCBN tool than CBN tool and flank wear recorded was low for PCBN tool than CBN tool. The chips produced were saw tooth in all operating parameters. The CBN tool was unable to withstand heat at cutting zone and hence more flank wear occurred. The PCBN tool sustained the temperature and less tool wear occurred. More crater wear formed on PCBN tools where as CBN tool produced less crater wear. The formation of crater wear on the rake face was due to rough surface of the saw tooth chips.Practical implications: The investigation results will provide useful information to applying CBN and PCBN cutting tools in hard turning stainless steels.Originality/value: Hard turning is a latest technology and possible to turn all hard materials. The hard turning produce net shaped products and reduces machining time, low cost per products, etc. The difficult to cut materials like stainless steels was turned by super hard cutting tools like CBN and PCBN to achieve good surface roughness, dimensional control and reduced tool wear.

  17. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  18. Volumetric Changes in Edentulous Alveolar Ridge Sites Utilizing Guided Bone Regeneration and a Custom Titanium Ridge Augmentation Matrix (CTRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Milling CBCT Cone Beam Computed Tomography CT Computed Tomography CTRAM Custom Titanium Ridge Augmentation Matrix DMLS Direct Metal Laser Sintering ...could be used by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) to create custom titanium mesh to reconstruct a deficient maxillary alveolar anterior ridge. A pre...Sinus Augmentations. Int J Periodont Rest Dent 2005; 25:231-237. Ciocca L, Fantini M, De Crescenzio F, Corinaldesi G, Scotti R. Direct Metal

  19. Qualitative and quantitative event-specific PCR detection methods for oxy-235 canola based on the 3' integration flanking sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Litao; Guo, Jinchao; Zhang, Haibo; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Dabing

    2008-03-26

    As more genetically modified plant events are approved for commercialization worldwide, the event-specific PCR method has become the key method for genetically modified organism (GMO) identification and quantification. This study reveals the 3' flanking sequence of the exogenous integration of Oxy-235 canola employing thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR). On the basis of the revealed 3' flanking sequence, PCR primers and TaqMan probe were designed and qualitative and quantitative PCR assays were established for Oxy-235 canola. The specificity and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of these two PCR assays were validated to as low as 0.1% for the relative LOD of qualitative PCR assay; the absolute LOD and LOQ were low to 10 and 20 copies of canola genomic DNA in quantitative PCR assay, respectively. Furthermore, ideal quantified results were obtained in the practical canola sample detection. All of the results indicate that the developed qualitative and quantitative PCR methods based on the revealed 3' integration flanking sequence are suitable for GM canola Oxy-235 identification and quantification.

  20. Organization of ATPA coding and 3' flanking sequences associated with cytoplasmic male sterility in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, C D; Ortega, V M

    1992-08-01

    A region of the mitochondrial genome associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in Phaseolus vulgaris was flanked by two different repeated sequences designated x and y. The DNA sequence of the CMS-unique region and a portion of each flanking repeat was determined. Repeat x contained a complete coding copy of the F1 ATPase subunit A (atpA) gene, as well as an open reading frame (orf) predicting a protein of 209 amino acids. The TGA termination codon of the atpA gene and the ATG initiation codon of orf209 were overlapping. These reading frames were oriented with their 3' ends proximal to the CMS-unique region. The CMS-unique region of 3736 nucleotides contained numerous orfs. The longest of these predicted proteins being of 239, 98 and 97 amino acids. The 3' coding and 3' flanking regions of orf98 were derived from an internal region of the higher plant chloroplast tRNA alanine intron. The region of repeat y immediately adjacent to the CMS-unique region contained the 111 carboxy-terminal coding residues of the apocytochrome b (cob) gene. This segment was oriented with its 5' end proximal to the CMS-unique region, but cob gene sequences were not fused to an initiation codon within the unique region.

  1. Scanning mutagenesis of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib eAhsan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform scanning mutagenesis of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from phylogenetic analysis of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution.

  2. Compartmentalization of the Coso East Flank Geothermal Field Imaged by 3-D Full-tensor MT Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nathaniel J.; Kaven, Joern Ole; Davatzes, Nicholas; Newman, Gregory A.

    2016-11-01

    Previous magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the high-temperature Coso geothermal system in California identified a subvertical feature of low resistivity (2 - 5 Ohm-m) and appreciable lateral extent (>1 km) in the producing zone of the East Flank field. However, these models could not reproduce gross 3-D effects in the recorded data. We perform 3-D full-tensor inversion and retrieve a resistivity model that out-performs previous 2-D and 3-D off-diagonal models in terms of its fit to the complete 3-D MT dataset as well as the degree of modeling bias. Inclusion of secondary Zxx and Zyy data components leads to a robust east-dip (60o) to the previously identified conductive East Flank reservoir feature, which correlates strongly with recently mapped surface faults, downhole well temperatures, 3-D seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity. We perform synthetic forward modeling to test the best fit dip of this conductor using the response at a nearby MT station. We interpret the dipping conductor as a fractured and fluidized compartment, which is structurally-controlled by an unmapped blind East Flank fault zone.

  3. Compartmentalization of the Coso East Flank geothermal field imaged by 3-D full-tensor MT inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nathaniel J.; Kaven, Joern Ole; Davatzes, Nicholas; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-02-01

    Previous magnetotelluric (MT) studies of the high-temperature Coso geothermal system in California identified a subvertical feature of low resistivity (2-5 Ohm m) and appreciable lateral extent (>1 km) in the producing zone of the East Flank field. However, these models could not reproduce gross 3-D effects in the recorded data. We perform 3-D full-tensor inversion and retrieve a resistivity model that out-performs previous 2-D and 3-D off-diagonal models in terms of its fit to the complete 3-D MT data set as well as the degree of modelling bias. Inclusion of secondary Zxx and Zyy data components leads to a robust east-dip (60†) to the previously identified conductive East Flank reservoir feature, which correlates strongly with recently mapped surface faults, downhole well temperatures, 3-D seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity. We perform synthetic forward modelling to test the best-fit dip of this conductor using the response at a nearby MT station. We interpret the dipping conductor as a fractured and fluidized compartment, which is structurally controlled by an unmapped blind East Flank fault zone.

  4. Flanking sequence determination and event-specific detection of genetically modified wheat B73-6-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyi Xu; Jijuan Cao; Dongmei Cao; Tongtong Zhao; Xin Huang; Piqiao Zhang; Fengxia Luan

    2013-01-01

    In order to establish a specific identification method for genetically modified (GM) wheat,exogenous insert DNA and flanking sequence between exogenous fragment and recombinant chromosome of GM wheat B73-6-1 were successfully acquired by means of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR strategies.Newly acquired exogenous fragment covered the full-length sequence of transformed genes such as transformed plasmid and corresponding functional genes including marker uidA,herbicide-resistant bar,ubiquitin promoter,and high-molecular-weight gluten subunit.The flanking sequence between insert DNA revealed high similarity with Triticum turgidum A gene (GenBank:AY494981.1).A specific PCR detection method for GM wheat B73-6-1 was established on the basis of primers designed according to the flanking sequence.This specific PCR method was validated by GM wheat,GM corn,GM soybean,GM rice,and non-GM wheat.The specifically amplified target band was observed only in GM wheat B73-6-1.This method is of high specificity,high reproducibility,rapid identification,and excellent accuracy for the identification of GM wheat B73-6-1.

  5. Cloning of Genomic DNA Flanking Transposon in the Nonpathogenic Mutant of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines M715

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA AKHDIYA RUSMANA

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to clone flanking DNA derived from Tn-5 mutagenesis of wild type strain Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines as first step to clone and to identify the gene involved in pathogenicity mechanism. We have localized the flanking DNA fragment from a nonpathogenic mutant of Xag M715. Southern hybridization analysis using 2.8 kb EcoRI from pYR103 as a probe showed that the fragment is located within 2.0 kb PstI fragment. A 0.7 kb flanking DNA was amplified using inverse PCR technique, and inserted into pGEM-T Easy vector generating a 3.7 kb recombinant plasmid (pAA01. Southern hybridization analysis of the wild type (YR32 with pAA01 as a probe indicated a hybridization signal located at approximately 3.0 kb PstI fragment. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the DNA fragment has a 64% identity to a vir gene of Bacillus anthracis.

  6. Long-range genomic enrichment, sequencing, and assembly to determine unknown sequences flanking a known microRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaorong Ma

    Full Text Available Conserved plant microRNAs (miRNAs modulate important biological processes but little is known about conserved cis-regulatory elements (CREs surrounding MIRNA genes. We developed a solution-based targeted genomic enrichment methodology to capture, enrich, and sequence flanking genomic regions surrounding conserved MIRNA genes with a locked-nucleic acid (LNA-modified, biotinylated probe complementary to the mature miRNA sequence. Genomic DNA bound by the probe is captured by streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, amplified, sequenced and assembled de novo to obtain genomic DNA sequences flanking MIRNA locus of interest. We demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of this enrichment methodology in Arabidopsis thaliana to enrich targeted regions spanning 10-20 kb surrounding known MIR166 and MIR165 loci. Assembly of the sequencing reads successfully recovered all targeted loci. While further optimization for larger, more complex genomes is needed, this method may enable determination of flanking genomic DNA sequence surrounding a known core (like a conserved mature miRNA from multiple species that currently don't have a full genome assembly available.

  7. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  8. Aesthetic enhancement with periodontal plastic procedure in a class 3 alveolar ridge defect

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Localised alveolar ridge defect refers to volumetric deficit of the limited extent of bone and soft tissue within the alveolar process. Such type of ridge defects can be corrected by surgical ridge augmentation that can be accomplished by the addition of either soft or hard tissues. The contour of a partially edentulous ridge should be thoroughly evaluated before a fixed partial denture is undertaken. The ideal ridge width and height allows placement of a natural appearing pontic which provid...

  9. Software Simulation of Hot Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.; Hansen, P.N.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    1999-01-01

    the solidification rate and the strain rate of the hot tear prone areas. But, until recently it was only possible to simulate the solidification rate, so that the criteria could not be used effectively.Today, with new software developments, it is possible to also simulate the strain rate in the hot tear prone areas....... With this additional information, the criteria can, for the first time, be used to their full potential.The purpose of this paper is to first give an introduction to a stress/strain simulation procedure that can be used in any foundry. Then, some results how to predict the hot cracking tendency in a casting are shown......, and the use of simulation to reduce this tendency is illustrated....

  10. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  11. The Global Distribution of Wrinkle Ridges on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotti, Frank; Suppe, John

    1999-05-01

    New digital mapping of over 65,000 wrinkle ridges of the plains of Venus shows a strong correlation between the location and orientation of these long, low-amplitude compressive anticlines and major features of the geoid and long-wavelength topography. Regions with wrinkle ridges occupy 43% of the plains and are strongly skewed toward low elevations and negative geoid anomalies. About 93% of the wrinkle ridge plains lie below mean planetary radius and 72% have negative geoid anomalies. In contrast, the extensional rift zones of Venus are strongly skewed toward high elevations and positive geoid anomalies. Thus compressive deformation dominates the topographic and geoid lows, whereas extensional rifting is generally restricted to the highs. These observations are consistent with geoid-based stress models that predict compression in geoid lows and extension in geoid highs. The orientations of wrinkle ridges are generally consistent over regions extending for 1000-10,000 km. Many regions have multiple sets of wrinkle ridges of different orientations reflecting multiple episodes and directions of compression; however, about 80% of the regions display a single dominant wrinkle ridge orientation, with secondary orientations subordinate. The dominant wrinkle ridge orientations in many regions follow the contours of long-wavelength topography and geoid or lie along the axes of troughs in the geoid. Thus the maximum horizontal compression recorded by the folds is commonly parallel to the present-day gradient in geoid and topography, although some regions are strong exceptions, perhaps reflecting changes in topography and geoid with time. The dominant wrinkle ridge trends ring several major geoid and topographic swells, especially Western Aphrodite Terra and Lada Terra, with ring diameters of 75-120° (8000-13,000 km). In addition there are smaller rings of wrinkle ridges around the swells in Themis, Eistla, and Bell regiones, especially Gula Mons, with ring diameters of 25

  12. Morphodynamics and slope stability at Mergui Ridge, off western Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J.; Gross, F.; Krastel, S.; Jintasaeranee, P.; Bunsomboonsakul, S.; Winkelmann, D.; Weinrebe, W.

    2012-04-01

    2D seismic data from the top and the western slope of the Mergui Ridge (200 km off the Thai west coast) have been acquired during MASS cruise III in January 2011 in water depths between 300 and 2200 m. The Mergui Ridge is a part of the outer shelf slope off the Thai-Malay Peninsula and forms the eastern boundary of the East Andaman Basin. Structural features in the working area include faulted older slope sediments at the transition from Mergui Ridge to East Andaman Basin that are onlapping on the (acoustic) basement of Mergui Ridge. At their top these sediments are bordered by a pronounced erosive unconformity. Younger sedimentary units on top include three E-W elongated carbonate platforms. Moreover, drift sediments are deposited on top of the ridge, comprising features such as large scale sediment waves and moats around the platforms indicating transport and reworking of the sediments. These sediments are thinning towards the edge of the ridge where a zone of non-sedimentation prevails. In the East Andaman Basin younger sediments comprise disturbed and partially faulted units that are overlain by plastered drifts with increasing thickness towards south, where pronounced sediment waves within the drifts may indicate slope normal sediment transport by bottom currents. At the basin ridge transition, within the drift sediments on top of Mergui Ridge, and at the edge of the ridge several smaller scale mass transport deposits were identified. These MTDs indicate a general instability of the slope. Instability and general morphology of the slope may result from long-term tectonic processes such as extension due to backarc basin formation in the Andaman Sea basin. Moreover, phases of uplift, erosion and subsidence may have contributed to faulting and deformation of older units in our working area. Ongoing tectonics might still cause deformation and instability. In addition, bottom currents may presently play an important role concerning morphodynamic development by

  13. The last glacial termination on the eastern flank of the central Patagonian Andes (47 ° S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, William I.; Villa-Martínez, Rodrigo; Vilanova, Isabel; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Moreno, Patricio I.

    2017-07-01

    dispersal of hygrophilous trees and herbs from the eastern flank of the central Patagonian Andes, contributing to the afforestation of the western Andean slopes and pacific coasts of central Patagonia during T1.

  14. Investigation of Anomalous Terrains on the West Flank of Olympus Mons using CRISM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelos, K. D.; Bridges, N. T.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The west flank of the Olympus Mons volcano hosts an anomalous linear chain of semicircular terrains. We report here analyses of these features using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and other instruments. The terrains appear bright in both daytime and nighttime data from the Thermal Emission Imaging Experiment (THEMIS) and have moderate thermal inertia, contrasting with the regional dust mantle. They have no observable topographic relief, and morphologically appear inconsistent with volcanic or sedimentary deposits. Several forms of aeolian activity are evident, including yardangs, dunes, and scour-like features. However, the yardangs and scours appear to predate the terrains, and superposed dunes, while ubiquitous, do not fully account for the spectral and morphologic properties. Targeted hyperspectral visible and near infrared data from CRISM (20-40 m/pixel, ~0.4 to 4 μm) of the terrains show distinct circumferential color zonation and internal banding. Differences in spectral slope and depth of the 3 μm water absorption are apparent within these color units. Relatively low albedo materials that comprise small dune fields are superposed on variably higher albedo areas. Both of these materials exhibit negative infrared spectral slopes, but it is most pronounced in the areas with highest albedo. Around the perimeter of the terrains are two albedo zones that appear transitional with the surrounding high albedo dust cover, progressively darkening inward. Along with the overall decrease in albedo, however, is an apparent increase in the depth of the 3 μm hydration band. Spectral features indicative of specific hydrated minerals (e.g, sulfates, phyllosilicates) have not been observed, but an enhanced 3 μm absorption could indicate that these anomalous terrains were influenced by ephemeral water at some point in the near past. Recent aqueous activity on the largest volcano on Mars may represent a unique opportunity for

  15. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  16. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, David. A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Caress, David W.; Gill, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A.; Delaney, John R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-08-01

    bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ˜4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ˜4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ˜4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ˜2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620-1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ˜1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ˜2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  17. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Caress, David W; Gillespie, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A; Delaney, John R; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ~4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ~4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ~4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ~2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620–1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ~1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ~2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  18. Swift, UVOT and Hot Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Michael H; Hagen, Lea M Z; Hoversten, Erik A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our ongoing investigation into the properties of hot stars and young stellar populations using the Swift/UVOT telescope. We present UVOT photometry of open and globular clusters and show that UVOT is capable of characterizing a variety of rare hot stars, including Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch and Extreme Horizontal Branch Stars. We also present very early reults of our survey of stellar populations in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We find that the SMC has experienced recent bouts of star formation but constraining the exact star formation history will depend on finding an effective model of the reddening within the SMC.

  19. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs.

  20. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.