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Sample records for hot atom reaction

  1. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  2. Labelling of macromoleculear carbohydrates by means of 'Hot Atom' reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of polysaccharides have been performed using atoms with such high kinetic energy that they can break normally very stable bindings thus permitting labelling by substitution reactions. Such atoms can be produced in nuclear transformations. We have chosen to study the labelling efficiency of 'hot atoms' ( 77 Br, 123 I and 125 I) produced in radioactive decay (β + -decay and E.C.) of noble gas nuclides ( 77 Kr, 123 Xe and 125 Xe) which easily could be brought in close contact with the molecule to be labelled. Substances to be labelled have been starch particles and high molecular weight glycogen. (author)

  3. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H 2 /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C 2 H 2 /minus/> C 2 HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs

  4. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  5. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms? This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs

  6. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  7. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H 2 R reactions where RH is CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , or C 3 H 8 , (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  9. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry. [Production by sputtering; reaction with butenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O(/sup 3/P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated. (DLC)

  10. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1976--January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1977-01-01

    Multivalent hot atoms formed by the nuclear recoil method were studied: 31 Si, 32 P, and 11 C. For the recoil 31 Si reactions, we have completed the study on the reactivities of conjugated dienes towards monomeric 31 SiF 2 . The relative reactivities of 1,3-butadiene, trans-pentadiene, cis-pentadiene and 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene towards 31 SiF 2 have been measured as: 1.0:0.89:0.91:1.06 for singlet 31 SiF 2 ; and as 1.0:0.80:0.52:0.89 for the triplet. The large steric effect detected here between cis- and trans-pentadienes for their reactivities towards triplet 31 SiF 2 -donor indicates that a direct 1,4-addition process is possible for such 31 SiF 2 donating complexes. 2-methyl-1,1-diflorosilacyclopent-3-ene and its 3-methyl isomer were successfully synthesized by the co-pyrolysis technique. Experiments to evaluate the relative addition efficiencies of 31 SiH 2 towards various conjugated dienes; and to study to H- and F-abstraction mechanism by 31 Si atoms were begun. For recoil 32 P reactions, some progress has been made towards evaluating the mechanism of abstraction reactions by recoil 32 P atoms in PF 3 -PCl 3 system, and the moderator effect for recoil 32 P reactions with PF 3 -CH 4 mixtures. The possible formation of 32 PH, and the formation of 32 P atoms via the 32 S(n,p) 32 P process have also been explored. For recoil 11 C reactions, major progress has been obtained in the moderator studies of its reactions with 1,3-butadiene. With the successive addition of Ne as a moderator, the yield of acetylene- 11 C decreased, the yield of cyclopentene- 11 C increased while those of both 1,2,4-pentatriene- 11 C and cyclopentadiene- 11 C went through a minimum. Some progress for the identification of the last unknown 11 C-labeled product from this system has also been made

  11. Ninth international symposium on hot atom chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the Symposium are compiled. The topics considered were chemical dynamics of high energy reactions, hot atom chemistry in organic compounds of tritium, nitrogen, oxygen, and halogens, theory and chemical dynamics of hot atom reactions as determined by beam studies, solid state reactions of recoil atoms and implanted ions, hot atom chemistry in energy-related research, hot atom chemistry in inorganic compounds of oxygen and tritium, hot positronium chemistry, applied hot atom chemistry in labelling, chemical effects of radioactive decay, decay-induced reactions and excitation labelling, physical methods in hot atom chemistry, and hot atom reactions in radiation and stratospheric chemistry

  12. Moderation and absorption effects on hot replacement reactions of 38Cl atoms in mixtures of ortho-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berei, K.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.; Szatmary, Z.; Vass, Sz.

    1989-10-01

    Conditions are given for the equivalence of the Estrup-Wolfgang description of the hot atom reaction kinetics with the first-order Hurwitz approximation in the neutron slowing down theory. Conclusions are drawn for the applicability of this approach for describing hot atom replacement processes in reactive mixtures. Analytical and numerical calculations were carried out to explain an unusual concentration dependence of 38 Cl-for-Cl substitution, found experimentally in liquid binary mixtures of ortho-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene. (author) 39 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Hot atom chemistry of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemistry of energetic carbon atoms is discussed. The experimental approach to studies that have been carried out is described and the mechanistic framework of hot carbon atom reactions is considered in some detail. Finally, the direction that future work might take is examined, including the relationship of experimental to theoretical work. (author)

  14. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  15. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil 31 Si and recoil 11 C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil 31 Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of 31 Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to γ-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100 0 C. Another recoil 31 Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the 31 Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of [ 31 Si]-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH 3 and PF 3 together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil 31 Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of 31 SiF 2 reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of 31 SiF 2 and 31 SiH 2 with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2- 14 C-propanone and 1,3- 14 C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO 4 was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the 11 C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil 11 C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the 11 C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T 2 on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated

  16. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil /sup 31/Si and recoil /sup 11/C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil /sup 31/Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of /sup 31/Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to ..gamma..-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100/sup 0/C. Another recoil /sup 31/Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the /sup 31/Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of (/sup 31/Si)-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH/sub 3/ and PF/sub 3/ together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil /sup 31/Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ and /sup 31/SiH/sub 2/ with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2-/sup 14/C-propanone and 1,3-/sup 14/C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO/sub 4/ was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil /sup 11/C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T/sub 2/ on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated.

  17. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  18. Handbook of hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.; Matsuura, Tatsuo; Yoshihara, Kenji

    1992-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry is an increasingly important field, which has contributed significantly to our understanding of many fundamental processes and reactions. Its techniques have become firmly entrenched in numerous disciplines, such as applied physics, biomedical research, and all fields of chemistry. Written by leading experts, this comprehensive handbook encompasses a broad range of topics. Each chapter comprises a collection of stimulating essays, given an in-depth account of the state-of-the-art of the field, and stressing opportunities for future work. An extensive introduction to the whole area, this book provides unique insight into a vast subject, and a clear delineation of its goals, techniques, and recent findings. It also contains detailed discussions of applications in fields as diverse as nuclear medicine, geochemistry, reactor technology, and the chemistry of comets and interstellar grains. (orig.)

  19. Quasiclassical Studies of Eley-Rideal and Hot Atom Reactions on Surface: H(D)→D(H)+Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurdu, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Randomly distributed hydrogen adsorbates on the surface of Cu(1 1 1) are used to form 0.50, 0.25 and 0.15 monolayers of coverages to simulate D(H)→H(D) + Cu(111) system at 30 K and 94 K surface temperatures. The interaction of this system is mimicked by a LEPS function which is parameterized by using the energy points which were calculated by a density-functional theory method and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy for various configurations of one a,nd two hydrogen atoms on the Cu(111) surface. Our results on H 2 , D 2 , and HD formations via Eley-Redial and hot-atom mechanisms will be presented at these temperatures. Probabilities for the rotational, vibrational, total and translational energy distributions of the products are calculated. In addition traping onto the surface, inelastic reflection of the incident projectile and penetration of the adsorbate or projectile atom into the slab is analyzed. Hot-atom pathways for product formations are shown to make significant contributions

  20. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta 2 O 5 and V 2 O 5 . Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O( 3 P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated

  1. Hot atom chemistry of sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovski, D. S.; Koleva, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt to cover all papers dealing with the hot atom chemistry of sulpphur is made. Publications which: a) only touch the problem, b) contain some data, indirectly connected with sulphur hot atom chemistry, c) deal with 35 S-production from a chloride matrix, are included as well. The author's name and literature source are given in the original language, transcribed, when it is necessary, in latine. A number of primery and secondary documents have been used including Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atomindex, the bibliographies of A. Siuda and J.-P. Adloff for 1973 - 77, etc. (authors)

  2. Molecular beam studies and hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continetti, R.E.; Lee, Y.T.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the crossed molecular beam technique to the study of hot atom chemistry has provided significant insights into the dynamics of hot atom reaction. To illustrate this, two recent studies are discussed. Those are the study on the influence of translational energy in 0.6 to 1.5 eV range on endoergic reaction, and the experimental study on the detailed dynamics of elementary reaction at translational energy of 0.53 and 1.01 eV. The first example illustrates the contribution that molecular beam experiment can make in the understanding of the dynamics of endoergic substitution reaction. The second example illustrates the role that such studies can play in evaluating exact three-dimensional quantum scattering calculation and ab initio potential energy surfaces for chemical reaction. In the case of endoergic reaction of halogen substitution, it was observed that the reactive collision involved short lived collision complexes. It is suggested that energetic effect alone cannot account for the difference in cross sections, and dynamic effect most play a large role. In atom-diatom reaction, the differential cross section measurement of D+H 2 →DH+H reaction was carried out, and the results are discussed. (K.I.)

  3. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  4. Hot atom chemistry: Three decades of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The seminal experiments of Szilard and Chalmers indicated that the energy released in a nuclear transformation could be used to initiate chemical reaction. But basic studies of small molecules in the gas phase, from which reaction mechanisms could be elucidated, were not made until the late 50's. Since then theory and experiments have gone hand in hand in the study of the hot atom reactions of many recoil species. This review will present a broad overview of progress that has been made in understanding how the energy received by the atom (translation, ionization, electronic) in a nuclear transformation is used to drive chemical reactions. The limitations implied by concomitant radiation damage and ignorance of the exact state of the reacting species, upon fundamental studies and practical applications, will also be discussed

  5. From hot atom chemistry to epithermal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    2004-01-01

    The rise and fall of hot atom chemistry (HAC) over the years from 1934 to 2004 is reviewed. Several applications are discussed, in particular to astrophysics and the interaction of energetic ions and atoms in space. Epithermal chemistry (ETC) is proposed to substitute the old name, since it better fits the energy range as well as the non-thermal and non-equilibrium character of the reactions. ETC also avoids the strong connexion of HAC to nuclear chemistry and stands for the opening of the field to physical chemistry and astrophysics. (orig.)

  6. On the existence of hot positronium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, E.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of hot Ps reactions is nowadays questioned; the controversy arises from the two models (the Ore gap and the spur theories) advanced in order to explain the mechanism of the positronium formation and of its inhibition in liquids by dissolution of certain compounds. The hypothesis of the hot Ps reactions was initially advanced as an additional statement for explaining the inhibition phenomenon within the framework of the Ore gap theory, but it is not considered necessary for the spur theory. The present paper is chiefly intended as a presentation of this particular aspect of Ps chemistry to hot atom chemists unspecialized in the field. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basic physics and experimental methods used in positronium chemistry. Contents: positrons and positronium formation; inhibition and enhancement of Ps formation in solutions; positronium reactions in gases. (Auth.)

  7. Hot atom chemistry of monovalent atoms in organic condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecklin, G.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of hot atom studies in condensed organic phases are considered, and recent advances in condensed phase organic hot atom chemistry of recoil tritium and halogen atoms are discussed. Details are presented of the present status and understanding of liquid phase hot atom chemistry and also that of organic solids. The consequences of the Auger effect in condensed organic systems are also considered. (author)

  8. Liquid phase hot atom chemistry: At crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Omaha, NE

    1981-01-01

    The state of current research in liquid phase hot atom chemistry is discussed. Four classes of experimental approaches are high-lighted. These include 1) primary physical data for (n,γ)-activated 128 I, (I.T.)-activated 130 I and effects on chemical reactivity; 2) the density-variation technique involving iodine reactions with saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; 3) stereochemistry experiments on chlorocarbon molecules with single and multiple chiral centers; and 4) experiments employing dilute aqueous solutions of halogenerated biomolecules in the ice state, exposed to neutron irradiation. (orig.) [de

  9. Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Amino Acids; Reactions entre Atomes Chauds de Tritium et Acides Amines; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov tritiya s aminokislotami; Reacciones de Atomos de Tritio Calientes con Aminoacidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonov, E. F.; Nesmejanov, An. N. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Universitet, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    In the existing literature there is a lack of systematic data on the interaction of tritium recoil atoms with amino acids, yet such data, in conjunction with results already obtained for organic acids and amines, could help in determining the mechanism of hot reactions in relation to the structure of compounds (chain length, functional substitutes). A study was made of the yields from the reaction of hot tritium atoms: (1) with amino acids having lengthened chains, and (2) with amino acids having a carbon chain of constant length, but with various functional substitutes. For this purpose mixtures of lithium carbonate and the acids under study were irradiated for 15 min with a slow neutron flux of 0.87 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. Analysis was carried out on a gas chromatography unit with interchangeable columns (molecular sieves, and liquid petrolatum on kieselguhr) and with paper chromatography. Although the data obtained for the radiation survival capacity of amino acids as a function of carbon chain length were at variance with a basic tenet of radiation chemistry according to which the conservation of molecules increases in proportion to the length of their chains, the data can be explained in terms of an intramolecular transfer of energy along the carbon chain from the collision site of the hot atom to the hydroxyl group, and subsequent ''de-excitation''; on the other hand, although the energy, of tritium recoil atoms is greater than that of the chemical bond, the latter nevertheless exerts an influence on the radiation conservation of molecules with a carbon chain of constant length but with various substitutes. (author) [French] Les etudes publiees jusqu'a present ne contiennent guere de renseignements systematiques sur les interactions entre atomes de tritium de recul et acides amines. Pourtant, ces donnees, completees par celles dont on dispose sur les acides organiques et les amines, pourraient aider a definir le mecanisme des reactions chaudes en fonction

  10. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  11. Remarks on theoretical hot-atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, Mitio

    1993-01-01

    The publication of the 'Handbook of Hot Atom Chemistry', following the earlier volume 'Recent Trend and Application', was a major milestone in physical chemistry. Theoretical treatments of hot atom chemistry must address two classes of problems. The first class concerns the individual collisions of hot atoms with other atoms or molecules. The second class concerns the description of the consequences of the many collisions of hot atoms and their chemical environment. Most of the remarks pertain to the problems of the first class. The central issue is the adiabaticity of nuclear motions versus electronic motions. To be precise, any atomic core motion should be mentioned rather than pure nuclear motion, because tightly bound core electrons are largely irrelevant to the chemistry. When nuclear motions are sufficiently slow, or for other reasons that can be regarded as adiabatic, the collision problem is basically straightforward, therefore, interatomic and intermolecular forces can be assumed, and their consequences for nuclear motions are calculable in principle. In the case of non-adiabaticity being important, much more difficult problems arise, and it is briefly discussed, and the work by Phelps is cited. (K.I.)

  12. 12th international hot atom chemistry symposium, Balatonfuered, Hungary, 23-28 September 1984. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This proceedings contains the abstracts of 91 papers presented at the symposium. The majority of papers discusses various hot atom reactions and decay processes. A list of previous 11 international hot atom chemistry symposia from 1959 to 1982 is also given. One paper published in full length presents an overview of them (A.P. Wolf p. 89-89/b). (R.P.)

  13. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  14. Gas to liquid to solid transition in halogen hot atom chemistry. 6. Product formation routes and chemical selectivity of high energy iodine reactions with butyne isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmestani, S.K.; Firouzbakht, M.L.; Rack, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of recoil produced iodine-128 with isomers of butyne were studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase conditions, with rare gas additives and in the presence and absence of radical scavengers (I 2 and O 2 ). It was found that recoil iodine-128 reactions were initiated by thermal electronically excited I + species for both 1-butyne and 2-butyne systems. While the diverse and complex nature of the reactions cannot be explained by simple chemical parameters, comparisons among the alkyne systems demonstrate preferential attack of iodine at the triple bond resulting, mainly, in electronically excited intermediates. A comparison of the various product formation routes results in the characterization of general traits common to the alkynes. 6 figures, 4 tables

  15. A guide to Internet atomic databases for hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Internet atomic databases are nowadays considered to be the primary tool for dissemination of atomic data. We present here a review of numerical and bibliographic databases of importance for diagnostics of hot plasmas. Special attention is given to new and emerging trends, such as online calculation of various atomic parameters. The recently updated NIST databases are presented in detail

  16. A guide to Internet atomic databases for hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralchenko, Yuri [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States)]. E-mail: yuri.ralchenko@nist.gov

    2006-05-15

    Internet atomic databases are nowadays considered to be the primary tool for dissemination of atomic data. We present here a review of numerical and bibliographic databases of importance for diagnostics of hot plasmas. Special attention is given to new and emerging trends, such as online calculation of various atomic parameters. The recently updated NIST databases are presented in detail.

  17. Gas to liquid to solid transition in halogen hot atom chemistry. II. Systematics of bromine reactions activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition with halomethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.E.; Grauer, W.M.; Helton, R.W.; Rack, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    Bromine reactions activated by 79 Br(n,γ) 80 Br, 81 Br(n,γ)/sup 82m/Br + 82 Br, and /sup 82m/Br(I.T.) 82 Br nuclear transformations were studied in halomethanes as functions of mole fraction of Br 2 , phase, density, and intermolecular distance. Gas phase systematics coupled with the density and mole fraction of Br 2 studies demonstrate the existence of systematic trends in the condensed phases as evidenced by the Richardson--Wolfgang effect. A definitive difference due to activation that is independent of system and suggests the importance of caging at higher densities is shown by the variation of total and individual organic product yields with density. The study of total organic product yield vs. intermolecular distance provides both a means of separating cage and molecular reactions and suggests the importance of molecular properties in the caging event. (U.S.)

  18. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  19. Quantitative Studies of the Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures; Etudes Quantitatives des Reactions des Atomes Chauds de Tritium avec les Hydrocarbures et les Melanges d'Hydrocarbures; Kolichestvennoe issledovanie reaktsij goryachikh atomov tritiya s gidrouglerodami i smesyami gidrouglerodov; Estudio Cuantitativo de las Reacciones de Atomos de Tritio Calientes con Hidrocarburos y Mezclas de Hidrocarburos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urch, D. S.; Welch, M. J. [Department Of Chemistry, Queen Mary College. University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    The kinetic theory of hot-atom reactions is expanded to cover the general system of two reactive species and an inert moderator. From results with a single reactant and moderator, two reactants without moderator, and two reactants with moderator, values of, or ratios of, the reactivity integral I and the average logarithmic energy loss per collision a can be calculated. New results are presented from the reaction of hot tritium produced by the He{sup 3}(n, p)H{sup 3} reaction with the following systems (all contain oxygen scavenger): ethane with helium moderator butane with helium moderator neopentane with helium moderator ethane and butane with and without helium moderator ethane and neopentane with and without helium moderator Values of a and I for the three reactants are calculated from the three types of system and the agreement between the results is discussed in the terms of the accuracy of the model. The results obtained from the different systems agree to within the limits of the experimental error, and this shows that the kinetic theory model can be applied to hot-atom systems with some certainty and that the assumptions made when considering mixtures are reasonable ones. The ratios of the reactivity of the hydrocarbons in mixtures with regard to substitution reactions are not the same as the ratios of the number of hydrogen atoms in the hydrocarbons. The values obtained for these ratios are explained in terms of the values of I and S (the collision cross-section) for the hydrocarbons. (author) [French] Les auteurs etendent la theorie cinetique des reactions des atomes chauds au systeme general forme par deux especes reactives et un ralentisseur inerte. A partir des resultats obtenus au moyen d'un seul corps en reaction et d'un ralentisseur, de deux corps en reaction sans ralentisseur et de deux corps en reaction avec ralentisseur, il est possible de calculer les valeurs ou les rapports de l'integrale de reactivite I, et de la perte d'energie logarithmique

  20. Accelerators and nuclear reactors as tools in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, L.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of accelerators and of nuclear reactors - the latter to a lesser extent - are discussed in view of their present and future use in hot atom chemistry research and its applications. (author)

  1. Hot atom chemistry of mixed crystals. 35 years of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1993-01-01

    When this contribution was prepared, the author decided to present the more personal aspects of his work and the concepts that directed him. Since the time when the author interested in solid state hot atom chemistry more than 30 years ago, still now the generally accepted theory has not been existed. The irradiation test by using the BEPO pile in Harwell is reported. The use of glass fiber paper instead of cellulose paper was investigated. The real problem of the different models of primary retention should be solved. The idea of mixed crystal systems was the result of an experimental accident. The attempt of preparing mixed crystals, the papers that the author has written, the procedures of the experiment such as electrophoresis, the results of the electrophoretic separation are discussed. The next step was obviously the investigation of the ligand recoil. The production of the transient ligand vacancy complexes and their final fate resulted in mixed hexachlorobromometallate species is shown for the system K 2 O s Cl 6 -K 2 O s Br 6 (n,γ) 38 Cl. The reaction of the 38 Cl, the information about recoil atom reactions which increased with the complexity of target substances, and the resulted informations are reported. (K.I.)71 refs

  2. Halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1975--February 14, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1976-02-01

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, are being studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and other organic systems. Experimental and theoretical data are presented in the following areas: systematics of iodine hot atom reactions in halomethanes, reactions and systematics of iodine reactions with pentene and butene isomers, radiative neutron capture activated reactions of iodine with acetylene, gas to liquid to solid transition in hot atom chemistry, kinetic theory applications of hot atom reactions and the mathematical development of caging reactions, solvent dependence of the stereochemistry of the 38 Cl for Cl substitution following 37 Cl(n,γ) 38 Cl in liquid meso and dl-(CHFCl) 2 . A technique was also developed for the radioassay of Al in urine specimens

  3. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  4. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  5. Effects of Temperature and Pressure on Hot-Atom Reactions in Bromoethane; Effets de la Temperature et de la Pression sur les Reactions des Atomes Chauds dans le Bromoethane; Vliyanie temperatury i davleniya na reaktsii goryachikh atomov v bromehtane; Efectos de la Temperatura y de la Presion en las Reacciones de Atomos Calientes en el Bromoetano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, A. J.; Mia, M. D.; Miller, G. E.; Shaw, P. F.D. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    A study has been made of the yields of compounds containing Br{sup 80m} produced by irradiation of bromethane- bromine mixtures with 14 MeV neutrons at 18 Degree-Sign C, -80 Degree-Sign C and -115 Degree-Sign C, and at atmospheric pressure, and also at 18 Degree-Sign C at pressures up to 10{sup 4} atm. In addition to compounds previously reported in this system, small quantities of bromoethene, 1:2 dibromoethene, mono-and dibromopropanes, and mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-bromo- butanes have been found. There is also indirect evidence for the production of bromobutenes. The diffusion-dependent reactions are complex, and can be explained by assuming that pyrolysis of the liquid occurs in the vicinity of the hot atom to give bromoethyl radicals and ethylene. Addition of radicals to the latter then accounts for the formation of bromides containing more than two carbon atoms and for their diffusion-dependent yields. Reduction in temperature or increase in pressure generally causes an increase in yield attributable to a decreased rate of diffusion. The effect is most marked upon the yield of 1:2 dibromoethane, which is largely produced by the diffusive reaction of bromoethyl radicals and which increases fourfold by the application of 10{sup 4} atm because of the suppression of the dissociation CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}Br Rightwards-Arrow-Over-Leftwards-Arrow CH{sub 2} = CH{sub 2} + Br under the influence of the ''hot-spike''. By contrast, dissociation of the radical (CH{sub 3} - CHBr) into bromoethene and a hydrogen atom is energetically forbidden, and the yield of 1: 1 dibromoethane is roughly independent of pressure. The variation with temperature and pressure of the yield of bromoethane at large bromine concentrations is close to that predicted previously. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie les rendements en composes contenant {sup 80m}Br produits par exposition de melanges de bromoethane-brome a des neutrons de 14 MeV aux temperatures de 18 Degree-Sign , -80 Degree

  6. Studies in hot atom and radiation chemistry. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, W.S.

    1980-09-01

    /sub nThe results on the reactive scattering of B + ( 3 P/sub u/) by D 2 has been published and a corresponding study on the ground state ( 1 S/sub g/) of B + has been submitted for publication. The ionic aspect of the Br-ethane hot atom system is being investigated using beam techniques. It is found that there is no direct reaction of Br + with ethane which can explain the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br reported by hot atom chemists for the Br-ethane hot atom system. Likewise, no satisfactory explanation exists for the dependence of the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br on moderator mole fraction. Studies of the collisions of Br + with Kr (which is used as a moderator in hot atom systems) shows that ions such as BrKr + are formed. Electron irradiation of CH 3 Br-Kr mixtures shows that CH 3 BrKr + is formed in good yield. Electron irradiation of Br 2 -Kr mixtures shows that ions such as Br(Kr)/sub n/ + are formed. Such ions can be produced in the Kr moderated Br-ethane hot atom system and can explain the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br and its dependence on Kr pressure

  7. Radiation-chemical aspects of solid state hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.; Collins, K.E.; Collins, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    The study of nuclear hot atom chemical (NHAC) processes occurring in solids is seriously limited by the lack of adequate methods for directly studying the chemical species containing hot atoms. In the present review the effects of ionizing radiation on parent and non-parent yields from solid state targets is surveyed and qualitative interpretations are given. After a few general remarks of the relationship of radiation chemistry to solid state NHAC, a detailed description of the radiation effects is given (radiation annealing, neutron activation, changes in separable yield). (Auth.)

  8. Nickel Chloride Promoted Glaser Coupling Reaction in Hot Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Hua LI; Lei WANG; Min WANG; Jin Can YAN

    2004-01-01

    A Glaser coupling reaction of terminal alkynes in the presence of nickel chloride without any organics and bases in hot water has been developed, which produces the corresponding homo-coupling products in good yields.

  9. The Reactions of Hot Fluorine-18 with Gaseous Carbon Tetrafluoride; Reactions des Atomes {sup 18}F Chauds avec le Tetrafluorure de Carbone en Phase Gazeuse; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov ftora-18 s gazovoj fazoj tetraftormetana; Reacciones de Atomos Calientes de Fluor-18 con Tetrafluoruro de Carbono Gaseoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colebourne, N.; Todd, J. F.J.; Wolfgang, R. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1965-04-15

    Studies on the reactions of hot Fie atoms with carbon tetrafluoride are reported. Gaseous samples were exposed to the 40-60 MeV (maximum) bremsstrahlung beam of the Yale University Electron Accelerator. The F{sup 19} ({gamma}, n) F{sup 18} process produces F{sup 18} with a kinetic energy of the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} eV. These species lose energy by collision and are expected to reach the ''chemical'' energy range (< 100 eV) as ground state atoms. Ethylene was found to be a good scavenger for thermal F{sup 18} atoms. Analysis of products was made using standard radio-gas chromatography techniques. The system was found to be quite sensitive to extraneous radiation damage effects and appropriate precautions were taken. Hot displacement reactions, similar to those observed for hot hydrogen, but much less efficient, were found: F{sup 18} + CF{sup 4} --> CF{sub 3}F{sup 18} + F, F{sup 18} +CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 2}F{sup 18} + (F + F), It was impossible to study the abstraction reaction F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 3} + FF{sup 18} directly. However, indirect evidence suggests that it also has a low efficiency. Detailed studies of the effect of moderator on the F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} system have been made. The data obtained were analysed by means of the kinetic theory of hot reactions. The system was found to be in accord with this formalism, providing quantitative confirmation of the present interpretation of the results. The carbon tetrafluoride and methane systems provide a basis for some tentative conclusions on the mechanisms of hot fluorine atom reactions. At present it appears that with certain important, but natural, modifications the model first developed for hot hydrogen atoms is applicable [French] Le memoire est consacre a des etudes sur les reactions des atomes {sup 18}F chauds avec le tetrafluorure de carbone. Des echantillons gazeux ont ete exposes a un faisceau de rayonnements de freinage de 40 a 60 MeV (maximum) emis par l'accelerateur d

  10. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.

    1969-01-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [sr

  11. Atomic properties in hot plasmas from levels to superconfigurations

    CERN Document Server

    Bauche, Jacques; Peyrusse, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to the calculation of hot-plasma properties which generally requires a huge number of atomic data. It is the first book that combines information on the details of the basic atomic physics and its application to atomic spectroscopy with the use of the relevant statistical approaches. Information like energy levels, radiative rates, collisional and radiative cross-sections, etc., must be included in equilibrium or non-equilibrium models in order to describe both the atomic-population kinetics and the radiative properties. From the very large number of levels and transitions involved in complex ions, some statistical (global) properties emerge. The book presents a coherent set of concepts and compact formulas suitable for tractable and accurate calculations. The topics addressed are: radiative emission and absorption, and a dozen of other collisional and radiative processes; transition arrays between level ensembles (configurations, superconfigurations); effective temperatures of configurat...

  12. 18F in hot atom chemistry and equilibrium chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, J.W.; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Knickelbein, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Superexcited molecules are unusual species that at present can only be investigated using nuclear recoil methods. The thermochemical technique for measuring the excitation energy distributions of superexcited molecules is reviewed and applied to recent studies of CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F formed from high energy atomic exchange reactions in CF 4 and C 2 F 6 . The nascent CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F range in energy from 1.7 to about 45 eV. The average energies of these products range from 15 to 20 eV. The internal excitation that accompanies these reactions is initially localized near the 18 F bonding site, and the C 2 F 5 18 F decomposition mechanism is non-statistical. Moderated nuclear recoil experiments yield mechanisms and rates for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms. Under our standard experimental conditions from 3.4 x 10 4 to 3.4 x 10 8 labeled product molecules are available for radioassay. This procedure is free from systematic error and the measurements yield exceptional precision and sensitivity because (1) high energy reactions with the thermally active reagents are suppressed. (2) the host environment is rigorously controlled, and (3) the molecular products from many single atom reactions are directly counted. The limitations of this technique are described and results are presented for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms with CH 4 and C 2 H 4 . (J.P.N.)

  13. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  14. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  15. Impurity 'hot' atoms 67Ga in a role a physical-chemical studies at an estimation of radiation damage in Zn cyclotron targets after bombardment with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the migration of impurity 'hot atoms' 67 Ga produced from various types of nuclear reaction on zinc targets is reported. The type of charged particles as well as their energy, beam current, total fluency was varied

  16. The hot-atom chemistry of crystalline chromates. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    Chromates in general and potassium chromate in particular, have been attractive as compounds for hot-atom chemical study because of the favourable nuclear properties of chromium, the great thermal and radiation stability of the compounds, the apparent structural simplicity of the crystals and the presumed known and simple chemistry of the expected recoil products. A wealth of information has been accumulated over the past 25 years, from which the anticipation of a straightforward chemistry has given way to an expanding realization that these systems are actually quite complex. More solid-state hot-atom chemical studies have dealt with potassium chromate than with any other compound. Thus, a major fraction of this review is given to this compound. The emphasis is on recent literature and on the pesent views of phenomena which affect the chemical fate of recoil chromium atoms in chromates. Many other data are tabulated so that the interested reader can speculate independently on the results of a wide variety of experiments. (Auth.)

  17. A collisional-radiative average atom model for hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    A collisional-radiative 'average atom' (AA) model is presented for the calculation of opacities of hot plasmas not in the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The electron impact and radiative rate constants are calculated using the dipole oscillator strengths of the average atom. A key element of the model is the photon escape probability which at present is calculated for a semi infinite slab. The Fermi statistics renders the rate equation for the AA level occupancies nonlinear, which requires iterations until the steady state. AA level occupancies are found. Detailed electronic configurations are built into the model after the self-consistent non-LTE AA state is found. The model shows a continuous transition from the non-LTE to the LTE state depending on the optical thickness of the plasma. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  18. Hot spring therapy of atomic bomb exposed patients, (9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, O [Balneogic Sanatorium for the Atomic Bomb Injured Beppu, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, H

    1978-03-01

    The following description shows the statistics and the results of medical examinatin concerning the patients utilized Beppu Atomic Bomb Center from April, 1977, to March, 1978. Number of persons utilized the center was 3904, and 20285 man-days in total. Number of case treated there was 268. Number of diseases amounted to 442 of 66 sorts, excluding temporary of acute diseases such as acute entergastritis and cold diseases, etc. According to the report by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, atomic bomb-exposed persons show twice as much rate of incidence as normal persons, and owing to aging, many of them have more than two kinds of diseases. Among the diseases, 60 cases were hypertension, 32 heart disease, 30 knee-arthritis, 26 diabetes, 25 hepatitis, 23 spondylosis deformans, etc. Among 268 cases treated by hot spring therapy, 6 were totally cured, and 252 showed alleviation, while 10 showed no change.

  19. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    During the past three years we have been working on four problems in the general area of gas phase kinetics and energy transfer of small molecules. These are: (1) measurements of the fine structure populations of ground state oxygen atoms produced in photodissociation reactions; (2) quenching of the Rydberg B ( 1 Σ + ) state of CO; (3) vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules; and (4) kinetics of hydrogen molecules. The first two topics, which involve transitions between different electronic states of the parent molecule, are a departure from our previous research interests. In the accompanying renewal proposal we discuss plans to pursue these new topics vigorously during the coming year. The third topic is a continuation of our long interest in the energy dependence of the rates laws governing vibrational-to-translational energy transfer of molecules having large initial amounts of vibrational excitation. The final topic is a continuation of our studies of the reaction of O( 3 P) + H 2 . In this work we measured the rate constant for the reaction O( 3 P) with deuterium and also analyzed spectroscopically different sources of vibrationally excited hydrogen for possible future work. We discuss each of these four studies in the following sections

  20. Reaction of hydrogen atoms produced by radiolysis and photolysis in solid phase at 4 and 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of H atoms in the solid phase has been reviewed with special attention to comparison of H atoms produced by radiolysis with those produced by photolysis. The paper consists of three parts. I -Production of H atoms: (1) the experimental results which indicate H-atom formation in the radiolysis of solid alkane are summarized; (2) ESR saturation behavior of trapped H atoms depends upon the method of H-atom-production, i.e. photolysis or radiolysis, and upon the initial energy of H atoms in the photolysis. II - Diffusion of H atoms: (1) activation energies for thermally-activated diffusion of H atoms are shown; (2) quantum diffusion of H atoms in solid H 2 is explained in terms of repetition of tunneling reaction H 2 + H → H + H 2 . III -Reaction of H atoms: (1) reactions and trapping processes of hot H atoms have been shown in solid methane and argon by use of hot H atoms with specified initial energy; (2) when H atoms are produced by the radiolysis of solvent alkane or by the photolysis of HI in the alkane mixtures at 77 K, the H atoms react very selectively with solute alkane at low concentration. The selective reaction of the H atom has been found in eight matrices; (3) activation energy for a hydrogen-atom-abstraction reaction by thermal H atoms at low temperatures is less than than several kJ mol -1 because of quantum tunneling. The absolute rate constants for H 2 (D 2 , HD) + H(D) tunneling reactions have been determined experimentally in solid hydrogen at 4.2K; (4) theoretical studies for tunneling reactions H 2 (D 2 ,HD) + H(D) at ultralow temperatures were reviewed. The calculated rate constants were compared with the rate constants obtained experimentally. (author)

  1. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi

    2007-04-01

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp 3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  2. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  3. Chromium 51 em K2CrO4: reactions of dopant atoms in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valim, J.B.; Nascimento, R.L.G. do; Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the chemistry of 'dopant' 51 Cr(III) atoms in crystalline Cr(VI) compounds began as a sub-field of Hot Atom Chemistry. We shall review the attempts to use 'dopant' chromium-51 atoms as surrogate chromium recoil atoms with the special property of having a low-energy, recoil-dam-age-free history. These dopant atoms have shown behaviors very similar to those of high energy recoil 51 Gr atoms, thus offering little hope of learning about special damage site structures and reactions by behavioral differences. Recent work has shown that at least some of the 'dopant' 51 Cr(III) is present as a second, non-chromate solid phase in 'doped crystal' experiments. Monodisperse 51 Cr(OH) 3 particles mixed with pure K 2 CrO 4 are very reactive. (Author) [pt

  4. sup(60)Co hot atom chemistry of tris(acetylacetonato) cobalt(III) adsorbed on silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioji, H.; Sakai, Y.; Tominaga, T.

    1985-01-01

    The sup(60)Co hot atom reactions were studied in tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt(III) adsorbed on silica gel surface. sup(57)Fe Moessbauer spectra of tris(acetylacetonato)iron(III) in the corresponding system were also measured in order to examine the state of dispersion of complex molecules on silica gel. The retention formation processes were discussed in terms of the dependence of sup(60)Co retention on the adsorbed amount (concentration) of cobalt(III) complexes. (author)

  5. Reactions of Hot Hydrogen Atoms with Ethylene. The Role of Excited Ethyl Radicals as Intermediate Products; Reactions des Atomes Chauds d'Hydrogene avec l'Ethylene. Le Role des Radicaux Ethyle Excites Comme Produits Intermediaires; Reaktsiya goryachikh atomov vodoroda s ehtilenom. Rol' vozbuzhdennykh ehtil'nykh radikalov kak promezhutochnykh produktov; Reacciones de Atomos Calientes de Hidrogeno con Etileno Papel de los Radicales Etilicos Excitados como Productos Intermedios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzantiev, B. G.; Shvedchikov, A. P. [Institut Himicheskoj Fiziki AN SSSR, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    It is well known that the nuclear reactions Li{sup 6}(n, {alpha})T and He{sup 3}(n, p) T result in the formation of hot atoms of radioactive hydrogen. The characteristics of the chemical consequences of nuclear transformations are largely determined by the high chemical activity of such atoms. However, hydrogen atoms can play an essential role not only in nuclear chemistry but also in other branches of high-energy chemistry, such as radiolysis and photolysis. In the present research we attempted to make a comparative study of the behaviour of hot hydrogen atoms obtained in various ways: by the Li{sup 6} (n, {alpha})T reaction (recoil energy = 2.7 MeV); by radiolysis (E{approx} a few eV); by photolysis (E{approx} 1 - 1,5 eV; hot hydrogen is obtained from HI by photolysis at {lambda} = 2537A). In order to obtain tritium atoms, we used crystals and films of Li{sub 2}Co{sub 3}, Li{sup 6}F, Li{sup 6}OH, Li{sup 6}BO{sub 2} * 8H{sub 2} as targets. Gaseous ethylene (P = 5-10 atm) and its mixtures with ammonia, helium and inhibitors, were subjected to radiation. Radiation was carried out on an IRT-1000 reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 12} a/cm{sup 2} * s. Tritium-labelled compounds and products of radiation chemistry reactions were identified by gas chromatography involving the use of two monitoring units connected in series (a katharometer and a G-M flow counter). It is shown that the spectrum of labelled and unlabelled products in irradiated ethylene is very distinct. The main labelled products are C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 4}H{sub 10} and hydrocarbons > C{sub 4}; the H{sub 2} yield is small. The main unlabelled products are HT, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}T and C{sub 4}H{sub 9}T; the yield of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}T and especially of C{sub 2}HT is insignificant. The labelled-compound yields are dependent on the introduction of additives (ammonia, helium, iodine) into the ethylene, on the type of lithium-containing compound and on the structure of

  6. Reactions the private life of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Through an innovative, closely integrated design of images and text, and his characteristically clear, precise, and economical exposition, Peter Atkins explains the processes involved in chemical reactions. He begins by introducing a 'tool kit' of basic reactions, such as precipitation, corrosion, and catalysis, and concludes by showing how these building blocks are brought together in more complex processes such as photosynthesis.

  7. Significance of fundamental processes of radiation chemistry in hot atom chemical processes: electron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the current understanding of the course of electron thermalization. An outline is given of the physical picture without going into mathematical details. The analogy of electron thermalization with hot atom processes is taken as guiding principle in this paper. Content: secondary electrons (generation, track structure, yields); thermalization (mechanism, time, spatial distribution); behaviour of hot electrons. (Auth.)

  8. Single-Atom Catalysts of Precious Metals for Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2018-01-10

    Single-atom catalysts (SACs), in which metal atoms are dispersed on the support without forming nanoparticles, have been used for various heterogeneous reactions and most recently for electrochemical reactions. In this Minireview, recent examples of single-atom electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are introduced. Many density functional theory (DFT) simulations have predicted that SACs may be effective for CO 2 reduction to methane or methanol production while suppressing H 2 evolution, and those cases are introduced here as well. Single atoms, mainly Pt single atoms, have been deposited on TiN or TiC nanoparticles, defective graphene nanosheets, N-doped covalent triazine frameworks, graphitic carbon nitride, S-doped zeolite-templated carbon, and Sb-doped SnO 2 surfaces. Scanning transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement, and in situ infrared spectroscopy have been used to detect the single-atom structure and confirm the absence of nanoparticles. SACs have shown high mass activity, minimizing the use of precious metal, and unique selectivity distinct from nanoparticle catalysts owing to the absence of ensemble sites. Additional features that SACs should possess for effective electrochemical applications were also suggested. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  10. Reactions of hot nitrogen in water-ice at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.; Schurwanz, K.

    1985-04-01

    The reactions of hot nitrogen atoms were studied in H 2 O-ice at 77 K. The nitrogen atoms were generated via the nuclear process 16 O(p,α) 13 N with 20 MeV protons from a cyclotron and by implantation of 250 keV 14 N + ions. The formation of chemical compounds of 13 N was studied over a wide dose range of the energy deposited by the protons from Dsup(*)=10 -2 to 26 eV per target molecule. The 13 N-labeled products and their yields as depending on the dose were determined via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radio-gaschromatography (GC). The reactions of implanted 14 N + ions were studied in H 2 O-ice at 6 K. The analysis of the products was achieved by optical low-temperature spectroscopy in the near UV, visible and infrared spectral regions. Primary (original hot) products of 13 N were: 13 NH 4 + with a radiochemical yield of 51%, 13 NO 2 - (37%), and 13 NO 3 - (9%) as detected after irradiation with the lowest proton dose applied of Dsup(*)=10 -2 eV. With increasing dose the 13 NH 4 + -yield rose to a broad maximum at 95%. Correspondingly the yields of nitrite and nitrate decreased. Applications of the studies are the preparation of 13 N-labeled precursor compounds for the fast synthesis of 13 N-radiopharmaceuticals and the laboratory simulations of chemical processes in the interplanetary and interstellar ice bodies. The ion implantation studies gave first information on the hot formation of nitrogen-oxygen compounds. NH-compounds could not be found in the spectra. This reflects the 13 N-product distribution at high doses in the nuclear recoil experiments. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Signatures of a quantum diffusion limited hydrogen atom tunneling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanoff, Morgan E; Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2017-12-20

    We are studying the details of hydrogen atom (H atom) quantum diffusion in highly enriched parahydrogen (pH 2 ) quantum solids doped with chemical species in an effort to better understand H atom transport and reactivity under these conditions. In this work we present kinetic studies of the 193 nm photo-induced chemistry of methanol (CH 3 OH) isolated in solid pH 2 . Short-term irradiation of CH 3 OH at 1.8 K readily produces CH 2 O and CO which we detect using FTIR spectroscopy. The in situ photochemistry also produces CH 3 O and H atoms which we can infer from the post-photolysis reaction kinetics that display significant CH 2 OH growth. The CH 2 OH growth kinetics indicate at least three separate tunneling reactions contribute; (i) reactions of photoproduced CH 3 O with the pH 2 host, (ii) H atom reactions with the CH 2 O photofragment, and (iii) long-range migration of H atoms and reaction with CH 3 OH. We assign the rapid CH 2 OH growth to the following CH 3 O + H 2 → CH 3 OH + H → CH 2 OH + H 2 two-step sequential tunneling mechanism by conducting analogous kinetic measurements using deuterated methanol (CD 3 OD). By performing photolysis experiments at 1.8 and 4.3 K, we show the post-photolysis reaction kinetics change qualitatively over this small temperature range. We use this qualitative change in the reaction kinetics with temperature to identify reactions that are quantum diffusion limited. While these results are specific to the conditions that exist in pH 2 quantum solids, they have direct implications on the analogous low temperature H atom tunneling reactions that occur on metal surfaces and on interstellar grains.

  12. Chemical reactions of recoil atoms and thermal atoms of tritium with haloid benzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1978-01-01

    Radiochemical yields have been determined for the products of substitution of hydrogen atoms and halides in Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes with tritium atoms obtained during thermal dissociation of T 2 and with recoil atoms T arising in nuclear reaction 6 Li(n, P)T. It is shown that in the series of Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes yields of the products of substitution of halides atoms with tritium grow, whereas those of hydrogen atom substitution change only little. The correlation nature of the yields of substitution products of halide atoms with tritium remains constant in a wide range of the initial kinetic energies of T atoms for the recoil atoms with E 0 =2.7 MeV and for the completely thermolized atoms during thermal dissociation of T 2

  13. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  14. Primary processes and ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Boo, B.H.; Stewart, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry has permitted the elucidation of the chemistry of free atoms, and these include the polyvalent atoms of refractory group 14 elements, that is, carbon, silicon and germanium. Since no more than two bonds are formed normally in a single reactive collision of free atoms, the study on the chemistry of atoms like C, Si and Ge that require the formation of more than two bonds to saturate their chemical valence necessarily involves the study of reactive intermediates. By the studies on the chemistry of recoiling 31 Si atoms, the mechanistic conclusions reached are reported. The most important unanswered questions concerning the reaction of recoiling 31 Si atoms in the systems are shown, and progress has been made toward the answering. By using tetramethyl silane as a trapping agent for silicon ions, it has been established that the reaction of 31 Si ions contributes significantly to the formation of products in recoil systems. The studies by various researchers on this theme are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Measurement of proton capture reactions in the hot cycles: an evaluation of experimental methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leleux, P [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1998-06-01

    In the hot cycles, most of the proton capture reactions involve radioactive nuclei in the entrance and exit channels. This paper evaluates the specific methods that were designed to measure such reactions. (orig.)

  16. Reaction of O+, CO+, and CH+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, W.; Villinger, H.; Howorka, F.; Lindinger, W.; Tosis, P.; Bassi, D.; Ferguson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rate coefficients for reactions of the ions O + , CO + , and CH + with atomic hydrogen have been measured for the first time at 300 K. This provides basic data for the ion chemistry of planetary atmospheres, cometary atmospheres, and interstellar molecular clouds. The O + +H measurement supports quantal calculations of this reaction. The CO + +H reaction provides an example of partial spin nonconservation in a charge-transfer reaction occurring in a deep potential well. Reactions of the same ions with H 2 that have been measured elsewhere are also reported

  17. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ -p atoms in each target. The rates λ ppμ and λ pd can be extracted

  18. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  19. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  20. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  1. Experimental studies of laser-generated translationally hot atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    An important determinant of the outcome of a chemical interaction is the relative translational energy of the partners. This thesis focuses on the generation of translationally energetic atoms and molecules and the role of translational energy in chemical interactions. One set of studies examines the competitive pathways of reactions and energy transfer in hyperthermal collisions of fast H or D atoms with HF. The vibrational excitation of HF or DF is measured using a time- and wavelength-resolved infrared emission technique. The results suggest that different collision geometries can lead to markedly different mechanisms for vibrational excitation. Another set of experiments is performed with a goal to generate a repetitively pulsed source of molecules or atoms with translational energies in the 0.1-10 eV range. A pulsed UV laser is used to excite a molecular film, vaporizing a number of molecules near the surface of the film. The composition and velocity of these molecules are measured by their time-of-flight to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Kinetic energies in the range of 0.1-10 eV are observed; the energies are continuously variable and the molecules can be repetitively and reproducibly generated. To establish the dynamics of the vaporization, the internal distributions of fast 0.1-0.7 eV NO molecules are measured using a laser multiphoton detection technique. These studies indicate that the translationally hot molecules are ejected rotationally cold, i.e. typically with only 3% of the energy in rotational excitation. The large disequilibrium between translation and rotation suggests that the vaporization occurs by a transient, nonequilibrium heating mechanism coupled with an adiabatic expansion. The result is additionally promising in light of the desire to produce fast beams of molecules with characterizable and narrow internal energy distributions

  2. Hot reactions of 13N in solid methane at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiergolla, J.; Nebeling, B.; Roessler, K.

    1987-09-01

    The chemical reactions of recoil- 13 N were studied in solid methane at 77 K. 13 N was generated via the the nuclear reaction 12 C(d,n) 13 N. The radiation dose deliverd by the 8.5 MeV deuterons amounted to D * = 0.6 eV per target molecule. The products formed by high energy chemical processes (hot chemistry) were analyzed by radio-gaschromatography. 13 NH 3 with 52% and CH 3 13 NH 2 with 25% radiochemical yield were found to be the main products. HC 13 N was not formed, but CH 3 13 CN amounts to 4%. For the more complex products carbon chain prolongation is prefered over multiple methylation such as show the yields of 8% for C 2 H 5 13 NH 2 and 3% (CH 3 ) 2 13 NH. (CH 3 ) 3 N was not detected. The formation of 13 NH 3 is due to hydrogen abstraction, that of CH 3 13 NH 2 due to insertion of NH radical into the C-H bond of CH 4 . Another, however, less probable pathway could be the insertion of 13 N into methane. The methylamine radical may react with another methane molecule via hydrogen transfer to methylamine or attack to CH 4 to dimethylamine. The 13 N-products were formed with high radiochemical purity and can potentially be applied for the synthesis of 13 N-radiopharmaceuticals. The reactions studied bear also informations on chemical processes in space (e.g. solar wind interactions with comets or interplanetary dust). 13 N-high energy chemical products are, however, of a less exobiological significance then those formed by hot carbon atoms, e.g. in the 'mirror' system 11 C/NH 3 (s). (orig.) [de

  3. Alkyl hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of the CN radical with ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of the abstraction of alkyl hydrogen atoms from the β and α positions of ethanol by the CN radical in solution using the Empirical Valence Bond (EVB) method. We have built separate 2 × 2 EVB models for the Hβ and Hα reactions, where the atom transfer is parameterized using ab initio calculations. The intra- and intermolecular potentials of the reactant and product molecules were modelled with the General AMBER Force Field, with some modifications. We have carried out the dynamics in water and chloroform, which are solvents of contrasting polarity. We have computed the potential of mean force for both abstractions in each of the solvents. They are found to have a small and early barrier along the reaction coordinate with a large energy release. Analyzing the solvent structure around the reaction system, we have found two solvents to have little effect on either reaction. Simulating the dynamics from the transition state, we also study the fate of the energies in the HCN vibrational modes. The HCN molecule is born vibrationally hot in the CH stretch in both reactions and additionally in the HCN bends for the Hα abstraction reaction. In the early stage of the dynamics, we find that the CN stretch mode gains energy at the expense of the energy in CH stretch mode.

  4. Electromagnetically induced photonic bandgap in hot Cs atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D. W.; Zhang, L.; Su, X. M.; Zhuo, Z. C.; Kim, J. B

    2010-01-01

    Three-level Λ-type thermal Cs atoms are used to demonstrate the phenomenon of a photonic bandgap induced by quantum coherence with a standing wave (SW). We observed the transmitted signals of probe field driven by several kinds of SW, which are formed by a strong forward-traveling field and a backward-traveling field when a mirror reflects the forward-traveling beam. Considering Doppler inhomogeneous broadenings with a SW drive, we employ Fourier transformation to solve density-matrix equations for simulation results. The simulation results are found to be consistent with the experimental results.

  5. Theoretical studies of the reactions of HCN with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, R.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been made of the energetics of the important pathways involved in the reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen cyanide. For each reaction ab initio GVB-CI calculations were carried out to determine the structures and vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products; then POL-CI calculations were carried out to more accurately estimate the electronic contribution to the energetics of the reactions. The hydrogen abstraction reaction is calculated to be endoergic by 24 kcal/mol [expt. ΔH (0 K) = 16--19 kcal/mol] with a barrier of 31 kcal/mol in the forward direction and 6 kcal/mol in the reverse direction. For the hydrogen addition reactions, addition to the carbon atom is calculated to be exoergic by 19 kcal/mol with a barrier of 11 kcal/mol, while addition to the nitrogen center is essentially thermoneutral with a barrier of 17 kcal/mol. Calculations were also carried out on the isomerization reactions of the addition products. The cis→trans isomerization of HCNH has a barrier of only 10 kcal/mol with the trans isomer being more stable by 5 kcal/mol. The (1,2)-hydrogen migration reaction, converting H 2 CN to trans-HCNH, is endoergic by only 14 kcal/mol, but the calculated barrier for the transfer is 52 kcal/mol. The energy of the migration pathway thus lies above that of the dissociation--recombination pathway

  6. Research involving hot atoms of nucleogenic origin and its practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Over the years, a large body of information has amassed which has helped to clarify the authors understanding of the complex chemistry occurring within chemical systems immediately following a nuclear reaction. With the increased knowledge of how reactive nuclides generated by such processes react chemically, it became increasingly apparent that the translational or recoil energy imparted to such species was not always the driving force behind some of the unusual chemistry seen in these systems. In many instances, the state of electronic excitation was found to strongly affect their chemistry. In others, the concomitant radiation chemistry often altered initial chemical states. Even so, with just a general understanding of how these effects work in unison, it has been possible in many instances to predict radiolabel distributions and yields in molecules. This ability has had an enormous impact in other fields utilizing radiotracers in research. This presentation will highlight specific examples in basic hot atom research which have focused on these problems, and describe general applications to other disciplines using radiotracers

  7. A comparison of two atomic models for the radiative properties of dense hot low Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.; Sauvan, P.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Florido, R.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, two different atomic models (ANALOP based on parametric potentials and IDEFIX based on the dicenter model) are used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot dense, low Z plasmas, and the results are compared to each other. In addition, the ANALOP code has been used to compute free-bound cross sections for hydrogen-like ions

  8. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  9. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  10. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Period covered: September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental approach to attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined and the progress made in the last year is reviewed in sections entitled: primary steps in the reaction of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms and the identification of reactive intermediates; thermally induced silylene and germylene reactions; the role of ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms and other ion-molecule reactions studies; and silicon free radical chemistry

  11. Molecular Ions in Ion Upflows and their Effects on Hot Atomic Oxygen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, V.; Yau, A. W.; Shizgal, B.

    2017-12-01

    We present new direct ion composition observations of molecular ions in auroral ion upflows from the CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP). These observed molecular ions are N2+, NO+, and possibly O2+, and are found to occur at all e-POP altitudes starting at about 400 km, during auroral substorms and the different phases of magnetic storms, sometimes with upflow velocities exceeding a few hundred meters per second and abundances of 5-10%. The dissociative recombination of both O2+ and NO+ was previously proposed as an important source of hot oxygen atoms in the topside thermosphere [Hickey et al., 1995]. We investigate the possible effect of the observed molecular ions on the production of hot oxygen atoms in the storm and substorm-time auroral thermosphere. We present numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation for the steady-state oxygen energy distribution function, taking into account both the production of the hot atoms and their subsequent collisional relaxation. Our result suggests the formation of a hot oxygen population with a characteristic temperature on the order of 0.3 eV and constituting 1-5% of the oxygen density near the exobase. We discuss the implication of this result in the context of magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling.

  12. Barium atoms and N20 molecular agregates reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visticot, J.P.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Alcaraz, C.; Cuvellier, J.; Berlande, J.

    1988-06-01

    The collisions between a barium atom and N20 molecular agregates are studied, for a better understanding of the solvation part in a chemical reaction. The experiments are carried out in a crossed molecular beam device. The light coming from the collision zone is scattered, and analysed by means of a photon detector. A time-of-flight technique is applied in the investigation of the beam's polymer concentration. The results show a nearly negligible chemiluminescent effect in the reaction between barium and N20 polymer. A solvated BaO formation mechanism is proposed to justify the experimental results [fr

  13. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  14. The hydrogen atom-deuterium molecule reaction: Experimental determination of product quantum state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinnen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The H + H 2 atom exchange reaction (and its isotopic analogs) is the simplest neutral bimolecular chemical reaction because of the small number of electrons in the system and the lightness of the nuclei. The H 3 potential energy surface (PES) is the most accurately known reactive surface (LSTH surface); there have been both quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantal calculations performed on it. This is one of the few systems for which theory is ahead of experiment, and many theoretical predictions await experimental comparison. The H + D 2 → HD + D reaction is studied using thermal D 2 (∼298 K) and translationally hot hydrogen atoms. Photolysis of HI at 266 nm generates H atoms with center-of-mass collision energies of 1.3 and 0.55 eV, both of which are above the classical reaction barrier of 0.42 eV. The rovibrational population distribution of the molecular product is measured by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). A major effort has been directed toward calibrating the (2+1) REMPI detection procedure, to determine quantitatively the relationship between ion signals and relative quantum state populations for HD. An effusive, high-temperature nozzle has been constructed to populate thermally the high rovibrational levels observed in the reaction. The results are compared to theoretical calculations of the E,F 1 Σ g + - X 1 Σ g + two-photon transition moments. For the H + D 2 reaction, the populations of all energetically accessible HD product levels are measured. Specifically, the following levels are observed: HD(v = 0, J = 0-15), HD(v = 1, J = 0-12), and HD(v = 2, J = 0-8). Of the available energy, 73% is partitioned into product translation, 18% into HD rotation, and 9% into HD vibration

  15. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  16. The decay of hot nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A=45 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.

    1993-01-01

    The decay of hot nuclei formed in the reactions 139 La + 27 Al, 51 V, nat Cu, and 139 La were studied by the coincident detection of up to four complex fragments (Z > 3) emitted in these reactions. Fragments were characterized as to their atomic number, energy and in- and out-of-plane angles. The probability of the decay by an event of a given complex fragment multiplicity as a function of excitation energy per nucleon of the source is nearly independent of the system studied. Additionally, there is no large increase in the proportion of multiple fragment events as the excitation energy of the source increases past 5 MeV/nucleon. This is at odds with many prompt multifragmentation models of nuclear decay. The reactions 139 La + 27 Al, 51 V, nat Cu were also studied by combining a dynamical model calculation that simulates the early stages of nuclear reactions with a statistical model calculation for the latter stages of the reactions. For the reaction 139 La + 27 Al, these calculations reproduced many of the experimental features, but other features were not reproduced. For the reaction 139 La + 51 V, the calculation failed to reproduce somewhat more of the experimental features. The calculation failed to reproduce any of the experimental features of the reaction 139 La + nat Cu, with the exception of the source velocity distributions

  17. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Energetic halogen atoms or ions, activated by various nuclear transformations are studied in gas, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes, and liquid and solid aqueous solutions of biomolecular and organic solutes in order to understand better the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental program and its goals remain the same, consisting of four interrelated areas: (1) The stereochemistry of energetic 18 F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 38 Cl substitution reactions with chiral molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. (2) The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving energetic chlorine, bromine, and iodine reactions in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and aqueous solutions of biomolecules and alkyl halides is being investigated in more detail. Current attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. Specifically, energetic halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions or organic and biomolecular solutes are studied. (3) Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular and organic solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are being studied in an attempt to learn more about the activation events in the condensed phase. (4) The applications of hot chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Current attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as site indicators in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are currently being developed. 14 references

  18. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1979-01-01

    The experimental approach to attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined and the progress made in the last year is reviewed in sections entitled: (a) Primary steps in the reaction of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms and the identification of reactive intermediates; (b) Thermally induced silylene and germylene reactions; (c) Silicon free radical chemistry; (d) The role of ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms

  19. Nuclear prehistory influence on transfer velocity of 54Mn impurity 'hot' atoms in irradiated metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of nuclear prehistory on transfer velocity of 54 Mn impurity 'hot'-atoms - got by different nuclear channels: 56 Fe(d, α), 54 Fe(n,p) in irradiated metallic iron - is studied. Irradiation of targets were carried out in U-120 accelerator (energy range 7.3/5.3 MeV, deuteron beam current makes up 5 μA). Mean density of thermal neutron (WWR-M reactor) makes up 8.6·10 13 neutron·cm -2 ·s -1 . It is shown, that transfer velocity of 54 Mn 'hot' atoms is defining by rate of radiation damage of targets in the irradiation process at that a key importance has a bombarding particles type applied for radioactive label getting

  20. Two-color ghost interference with photon pairs generated in hot atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sheng Ding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental observation of a two-photon ghost interference experiment. A distinguishing feature of our experiment is that the photons are generated via a non-degenerated spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a hot atomic ensemble; therefore the photon has narrow bandwidth. Besides, there is a large difference in frequency between two photons in a pair. Our works may be important to achieve more secure, large transmission capacity long-distance quantum communication.

  1. Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor in hot quartz cells with cold windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilshanskaya, E. V.; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Murashkin, D. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor was performed in hot quartz cells with cold windows. The Doppler-free absorption resonances with spectral width near 50 MHz were observed. For these experiments and future applications long-lived quartz cells with buffer gas were designed and made. A cooling laser for calcium magneto-optical trap will be frequency locked to the saturation resonances in the long-lived cells.

  2. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Tamon [Genbaku Hibakusha Beppu Onsen Ryoyo Kenkyusho, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, Hideo

    1983-03-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2

  3. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Tamon; Tsuji, Hideo.

    1983-01-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2 - 3 times daily, and many patients had microwave and low frequency wave treatment. Soaking in a bath (containing 1.4 mg of cupric sulfate and 11.4 mg of zinc sulfate per liter) was practiced by diabetic patients. The therapeutic effects were difficult to judge because the period of stay of the most patients was about 10 days, but in most of them, subjective symptoms were relieved when they left the sanatorium. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. Activation barriers for series of exothermic homologous reactions. VI. Reactions of lanthanide and transition metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Alan S.; Fontijn, Arthur

    2001-09-01

    Semiempirical configuration interaction (SECI) theory to predict activation barriers, E, as given by k(T)=ATn exp(-E(RT), has been applied to homologous series of lanthanide (LN) and transition metal (TM) atom oxidation reactions. This was achieved by considering as homologous series reactions of elements differing only by the number of electrons in one subshell. Comparison between SECI and experimental results leads to an average deviation for the LN+N2O reactions of 0.66 kJ mol-1, and up to 5.5 kJ mol-1 for other series. Thirty-one activation barriers are reported.

  5. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, /sup 80/Br, /sup 82m/Br + /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 82/Br, /sup 128/I, /sup 130/I, and /sup 130m/I + /sup 130/I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation to determine the role of hot atom kinetic energy, halogen atom, enantioner structure, steric effects and phase on the extent of substitution by retention of configuration or by Walden inversion. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace element determinations in biological systems was continued.

  6. Effect of hot isostatic pressing on reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. K.; Moore, T. J.; Millard, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens of nearly theoretical density have been obtained through the isostatic hot pressing of reaction-bonded silicon nitride under 138 MPa of pressure for two hours at 1850, 1950, and 2050 C. An amorphous phase that is introduced by the hot isostatic pressing partly accounts for the fact that while room temperature flexural strength more than doubles, the 1200 C flexural strength increases significantly only after pressing at 2050 C.

  7. Atomic process calculations in hot dense plasmas using average atom models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragones, J.M.; Gamez, L.; Honrubia, J.J.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Minguez, E.; Ocana, J.L.; Perlado, J.M.; Serrano, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the past years, an important effort has been devoted in the authors Institute to develop the NORCLA code, which in the first version was characterized by the following features: one-dimensional lagrangian mesh; equilibrium between radiation, ion and electron species; local alpha energy deposition; neutron transport by the discrete ordinates method and analytical equation of state, opacities and conductivities. In the successive versions of NORCLA, EOS and electron conductivities were modified by the pressure ionization and degeneracy corrections; a module was also developed for computing the energy deposition of the incident ion beams coupled to the energy equation, and a code to calculate the alpha particle transport and energy deposition. Recently, a 3T version of the NORCLA code, with tabular EOS, opacities and conductivities, laser ray tracing and suprathermal electrons transport has been produced. In this article, the atomic physic models developed to determine more accurate the atomic data, such as EOS and opacities are explained, giving a brief description and a comparison of them. As a result of this development, a DENIM Atomic Data Library is being generated, taking some data and procedures from the SESAME Library. This library is presented, including a comparison of the opacity data for aluminium and iron at different densities and temperatures. Conclusions about this work are presented, and the ongoing developments summarized

  8. (e,2e) reactions on atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    At high enough incident energy and for high enough momentum transfer an incident electron interacts with a single electron of a target atom or molecule, cleanly removing it and leaving the residual ion in one of its spectrum of quantum states. Under these conditions the dynamics of the reaction simply involves a two-electron collision, the target electron having a momentum given by the structure of the target and ion, and equal and opposite to the recoil momentum of the ion. Since two-electron collisions are well understood (Mott scattering) the reaction is the basis of the understanding of the energy and momentum structure of the target and ion known as electron momentum spectroscopy

  9. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia; Hemija vruceg atoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [Serbo-Croat] Daje se pregled rada na hemiji vruceg atoma od osnivanja Instituta do danas, pri cemu se narocito istice uloga koju je u tome imao prof. P. Savic. Dok su u prvom periodu istrazivanja u ovoj oblasti doprinosila resavanju raznih problema proizvodnje radioaktivnih izotopa, ona su danas tesno povezana sa radom u radiohemiji, fizickoj hemiji tecnih i cvrstih sistema, kinetici brzih reakcija, doprinoseci sa svoje strane razvoju tih oblasti (author)

  10. Accelerated procedure to solve kinetic equation for neutral atoms in a hot plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2017-12-01

    The recombination of plasma charged components, electrons and ions of hydrogen isotopes, on the wall of a fusion reactor is a source of neutral molecules and atoms, recycling back into the plasma volume. Here neutral species participate, in particular, in charge-exchange (c-x) collisions with the plasma ions and, as a result, atoms of high energies with chaotically directed velocities are generated. Some fraction of these hot atoms hit the wall. Statistical Monte Carlo methods normally used to model c-x atoms are too time consuming for reasonably small level of accident errors and extensive parameter studies are problematic. By applying pass method to evaluate integrals from functions, including the ion velocity distribution, an iteration approach to solve one-dimensional kinetic equation [1], being alternative to Monte Carlo procedure, has been tremendously accelerated, at least by a factor of 30-50 [2]. Here this approach is developed further to solve the 2-D kinetic equation, applied to model the transport of c-x atoms in the vicinity of an opening in the wall, e.g., the entrance of the duct guiding to a diagnostic installation. This is necessary to determine firmly the energy spectrum of c-x atoms penetrating into the duct and to assess the erosion of the installation there. The results of kinetic modeling are compared with those obtained with the diffusion description for c-x atoms, being strictly relevant under plasma conditions of low temperature and high density, where the mean free path length between c-x collisions is much smaller than that till the atom ionization by electrons. It is demonstrated that the previous calculations [3], done with the diffusion approximation for c-x atoms, overestimate the erosion rate of Mo mirrors in a reactor by a factor of 3 compared to the result of the present kinetic study.

  11. Direct nuclear reactions and the structure of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterfeld, F.

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis deals with two different aspects of direct nuclear reactions, namely on the one hand with the microscopic calculation of the imaginary optical potential for the elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering as well as on the other hand with the microscopic analysis of giant magnetic resonances in atomic nuclei which are excited by (p,n) charge-exchange reactions. In the first part of the thesis the imaginary part of the optical potential for the elastic proton- and neutron-nucleus scattering is microscopically calculated in the framework of the so called nuclear-structure approximation to the optical potential. The calculations are performed in the Feshbach formalism in second-order perturbation theory corresponding to an effective projectile-target-nucleon interaction. In the second part of this thesis in the framework of microscopic nuclear models a complete analysis of different A(p,n)B charge-exchange reactions at high incident energies 160 MeV 90 Zr(p,n) reaction three collective spin-isospin resonances could be uniquely identified. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Origin of Power Laws for Reactions at Metal Surfaces Mediated by Hot Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of experiments have established that certain chemical reactions at metal surfaces can be driven by multiple hot-electron-mediated excitations of adsorbates. A high transient density of hot electrons is obtained by means of femtosecond laser pulses and a characteristic feature of such...... density functional theory and the delta self-consistent field method. With a simplifying assumption, the power law becomes exact and we obtain a simple physical interpretation of the exponent n, which represents the number of adsorbate vibrational states participating in the reaction....

  13. DBAC: A simple prediction method for protein binding hot spots based on burial levels and deeply buried atomic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A protein binding hot spot is a cluster of residues in the interface that are energetically important for the binding of the protein with its interaction partner. Identifying protein binding hot spots can give useful information to protein engineering and drug design, and can also deepen our understanding of protein-protein interaction. These residues are usually buried inside the interface with very low solvent accessible surface area (SASA). Thus SASA is widely used as an outstanding feature in hot spot prediction by many computational methods. However, SASA is not capable of distinguishing slightly buried residues, of which most are non hot spots, and deeply buried ones that are usually inside a hot spot. Results We propose a new descriptor called “burial level” for characterizing residues, atoms and atomic contacts. Specifically, burial level captures the depth the residues are buried. We identify different kinds of deeply buried atomic contacts (DBAC) at different burial levels that are directly broken in alanine substitution. We use their numbers as input for SVM to classify between hot spot or non hot spot residues. We achieve F measure of 0.6237 under the leave-one-out cross-validation on a data set containing 258 mutations. This performance is better than other computational methods. Conclusions Our results show that hot spot residues tend to be deeply buried in the interface, not just having a low SASA value. This indicates that a high burial level is not only a necessary but also a more sufficient condition than a low SASA for a residue to be a hot spot residue. We find that those deeply buried atoms become increasingly more important when their burial levels rise up. This work also confirms the contribution of deeply buried interfacial atomic contacts to the energy of protein binding hot spot. PMID:21689480

  14. Interlayer electron-hole pair multiplication by hot carriers in atomic layer semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Fatemeh; Grossnickle, Max; Su, Shanshan; Lake, Roger; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel

    Two-dimensional heterostructures composed of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides provide the opportunity to design novel devices for the study of electron-hole pair multiplication. We report on highly efficient multiplication of interlayer electron-hole pairs at the interface of a tungsten diselenide / molybdenum diselenide heterostructure. Electronic transport measurements of the interlayer current-voltage characteristics indicate that layer-indirect electron-hole pairs are generated by hot electron impact excitation. Our findings, which demonstrate an efficient energy relaxation pathway that competes with electron thermalization losses, make 2D semiconductor heterostructures viable for a new class of hot-carrier energy harvesting devices that exploit layer-indirect electron-hole excitations. SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  15. KfK Institute for Hot Atom Chemistry. Results report on research and development activities 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Institute for Hot Atom Chemistry is concerned with R and D tasks in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The aim is to optimize reprocessing technology with a view to safety and economic efficiency. Work is carried out within the framework of the projects reprocessing and waste management, and fast breeder in contact with WAK. The Institute increasingly carries out work within the framework of the project pollution abatement in the environment; the emphasis lies on dioxin chemistry. After the Wackersdorf task, subjects of waste management, in particular special wastes, have been added. (orig.) [de

  16. Two-pulse atomic coherent control spectroscopy of Eley-Rideal reactions: An application of an atom laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Solvejg; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A spectroscopic application of the atom laser is suggested. The spectroscopy termed 2PACC (two-pulse atomic coherent control) employs the coherent properties of matter waves from a two-pulse atom laser. These waves are employed to control a gas-surface chemical recombination reaction. The method is demonstrated for an Eley-Rideal reaction of a hydrogen or alkali atom-laser pulse where the surface target is an adsorbed hydrogen atom. The reaction yields either a hydrogen or alkali hydride molecule. The desorbed gas-phase molecular yield and its internal state is shown to be controlled by the time and phase delay between two atom-laser pulses. The calculation is based on solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in a diabatic framework. The probability of desorption which is the predicted 2PACC signal has been calculated as a function of the pulse parameters

  17. Physics of quantum fluids new trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Modugno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  18. The decay of hot nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.; Mignerey, A.C.; Madani, H.; Marchetti, A.A.; Colonna, M.; DiToro, M.

    1992-01-01

    The decay of hot nuclei formed in lanthanum-induced reactions utilizing inverse kinematics has been studied from E/A = 35 to 55 MeV. At each bombarding energy studied, the probability for the multiple emission of complex fragments has been found to be independent of target. Global features (total charge, source velocity) of the reaction La + Al at E/A = 45 MeV have been reproduced by coupling a dynamical model to study the collision stage of the reaction to a statistical model of nuclear decay

  19. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Guangjie; Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH 2 radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH 2 radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH 3 with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH 2 radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH 2 radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH 2 radical flux and the reactivity of the NH 2 radicals

  20. Plasmonic photocatalytic reactions enhanced by hot electrons in a one-dimensional quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The plasmonic endothermic oxidation of ammonium ions in a spinning disk reactor resulted in light energy transformation through quantum hot charge carriers (QHC, or quantum hot electrons, during a chemical reaction. It is demonstrated with a simple model that light of various intensities enhance the chemical oxidization of ammonium ions in water. It was further observed that light illumination, which induces the formation of plasmons on a platinum (Pt thin film, provided higher processing efficiency compared with the reaction on a bare glass disk. These induced plasmons generate quantum hot electrons with increasing momentum and energy in the one-dimensional quantum well of a Pt thin film. The energy carried by the quantum hot electrons provided the energy needed to catalyze the chemical reaction. The results indicate that one-dimensional confinement in spherical coordinates (i.e., nanoparticles is not necessary to provide an extra excited state for QHC generation; an 8 nm Pt thin film for one-dimensional confinement in Cartesian coordinates can also provide the extra excited state for the generation of QHC.

  1. Properties of Hot and Fast Rotating Atomic Nuclei Studied by Means of Giant Dipole Resonance in Exclusive Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maj, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work entitled ''Properties of hot and fast rotating atomic nuclei studied by means of Giant Dipole Resonance in exclusive experiments'', is the habilitation thesis of dr. Adam Maj. It consists of the review (in Polish) of performed research and of attached reprints from 16 original publications (in English) which A. Maj is the main or one of the main authors. All the studies were performed in collaboration with the groups from Milano and Copenhagen, using the HECTOR array equipment (described in chapter V). The Giant Dipole Resonance couples to the quadrupole degrees of freedom of the nucleus, and therefore constitutes a unique probe to test the shapes of atomic nuclei. In addition, the γ decay of the GDR from highly excited nuclei is a very fast process, it can compete with other modes of nuclear decay, and therefore can provide the information on the initial stages of excited nuclei. The presented investigations were concentrated on the following aspects: the shapes and thermal shape fluctuations, the origin of the behaviour of the GDR width, the properties of some exotic nuclei (Jacobi shapes, superdeformation, superheavy nuclei) and on ''entrance channel'' effects. The GDR γ decay was measured for nuclei with very different masses: from light nuclei with A≅45, through A≅110, 145,170,190, up to superheavy nuclei with A≅270. The shapes of hot nuclei are not fixed but fluctuate. The extent of these fluctuations and their influence on the measured quantities (GDR strength function, angular distribution and effective shape) is discussed in chapter VI.1. The observed width of the GDR is found to arise from the interplay of two effects: the thermal shape fluctuations, which are controlled by the nuclear temperature, and the deformation effects, controlled by the angular momentum. The ''collisional damping'' effect, which should influence the intrinsic GDR width, was found to be negligible (chapter VI.2). The GDR γ decay from hot superheavy nucleus 272 Hs

  2. Physics of quantum fluids. New trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramati, Alberto [Paris Univ. (France). Laboratoire Kastler Brossel; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Modugno, Michele (eds.) [IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Historia de la Ciencia

    2013-10-01

    Provides an overview of the field of quantum fluids. Presents analogies and differences between polariton and atomic quantum fluids. With contributions from the major actors in the field. Explains a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics. The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  3. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Prajakta Rajaram; Heufer, K Alexander; Fernandes, Ravi Xavier

    2018-04-25

    Isopentanol is a potential next-generation biofuel for future applications to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine concepts. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of isopentanol, especially to its auto-ignition behavior which is linked both to efficiency and pollutant formation in real combustion systems, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. H-Abstraction reaction rates from fuel molecules are key initiation steps for chain branching required for auto-ignition. In this study, rate constants are determined for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical by implementing the CBS-QB3 composite method. For the treatment of the internal rotors, a Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation is applied. On comparing the computed reaction energies, the highest exothermicity (ΔE = -46 kJ mol-1) is depicted for Hα abstraction by the H atom whereas the lowest endothermicity (ΔE = 29 kJ mol-1) is shown for the abstraction of Hα by the HO2˙ radical. The formation of hydrogen bonding is found to affect the kinetics of the H atom abstraction reactions by the HO2˙ radical. Further above 750 K, the calculated high pressure limit rate constants indicate that the total contribution from delta carbon sites (Cδ) is predominant for hydrogen atom abstraction by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

  4. Comparative evaluation of atom mapping algorithms for balanced metabolic reactions: application to Recon 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciat Gonzalez, German A; El Assal, Lemmer R P; Noronha, Alberto; Thiele, Ines; Haraldsdóttir, Hulda S; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2017-06-14

    The mechanism of each chemical reaction in a metabolic network can be represented as a set of atom mappings, each of which relates an atom in a substrate metabolite to an atom of the same element in a product metabolite. Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions typically represent biochemistry at the level of reaction stoichiometry. However, a more detailed representation at the underlying level of atom mappings opens the possibility for a broader range of biological, biomedical and biotechnological applications than with stoichiometry alone. Complete manual acquisition of atom mapping data for a genome-scale metabolic network is a laborious process. However, many algorithms exist to predict atom mappings. How do their predictions compare to each other and to manually curated atom mappings? For more than four thousand metabolic reactions in the latest human metabolic reconstruction, Recon 3D, we compared the atom mappings predicted by six atom mapping algorithms. We also compared these predictions to those obtained by manual curation of atom mappings for over five hundred reactions distributed among all top level Enzyme Commission number classes. Five of the evaluated algorithms had similarly high prediction accuracy of over 91% when compared to manually curated atom mapped reactions. On average, the accuracy of the prediction was highest for reactions catalysed by oxidoreductases and lowest for reactions catalysed by ligases. In addition to prediction accuracy, the algorithms were evaluated on their accessibility, their advanced features, such as the ability to identify equivalent atoms, and their ability to map hydrogen atoms. In addition to prediction accuracy, we found that software accessibility and advanced features were fundamental to the selection of an atom mapping algorithm in practice.

  5. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Progress report, February 1, 1982-July 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental approach toward attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined, and the progress made in the 1982 to 1984 period is reviewed in sections entitled: (1) Recoil atom experiments, (2) Studies of thermally and photochemically generated silicon and germanium radicals, and (3) Ion-molecule reaction studies

  6. Reaction mechanism of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons by the crossed molecular beams method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Baseman, R.J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  7. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  8. Reactions of sulfur atoms. XV. Absolute rate parameters for the S(3P210) + alkyne reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Roodselaar, A.; Safarik, I.; Strausz, O.P.; Gunning, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Using flash photolysis with vacuum uv kinetic absorption spectroscopy, absolute rate constants and Arrhenius parameters have been measured for the addition of ground state S( 3 P 2 , 1 , 0 ) atoms to alkynes. The decay of sulfur atoms in COS, alkyne, and CO 2 -diluent mixtures is first order in sulfur atom concentration and the first-order decay rate constants are proportional to the alkyne concentration. The following rate constants were determined at room temperature: k(C 2 H 2 ) = k(C 2 D 2 ) + (2.3 +- 0.4) x 10 8 ; k(CHCCH 3 ) = (4.8 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CHCC 2 H 5 ) = (3.3 +- 0.2) x 10 9 ; k(CH 3 CCCH 3 ) = 1.6 +- 0.2) x 10 10 ; k(CH 3 CCC 2 C 5 ) = 1.8 +- 0.3) x 10 10 ; and k(CF 3 CCCF 3 ) = (2.1 +- 0.4) x 10 8 L mol -1 s -1 . The Arrhenius parameters determined are k(C 2 H 2 ) = (3.4 +- 1.9) x 10 10 exp[(-3000 +- 400)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 and k(CHCCH 3 ) = (2.0 +- 1.2) x 10 10 exp[(-900 +- 200)/RT] L mol -1 s -1 where error limits represent standard deviations. The rate parameters are compared to those obtained for the addition of other electrophilic reagents to alkynes and the results discussed in terms of structural and kinetic factors. Theoretical treatment of the secondary H/D isotope effect in the acetylene reaction satisfactorily reproduces the experimental value. 5 tables, 4 figures, 59 references

  9. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1980-02-01

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, 80 Br, /sup 82m/Br + 82 Br, 82 Br, 82 Br, 128 I, 130 I, and /sup 130m/I + 130 I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace elements and trace molecule determinations in biological systems was continued

  10. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  11. Ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of ions with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of H 2 + , HeH + , and CO 2 + ions with hydrogen atoms, and the reactions of D 2 + , CO 2 + , CO + , N 2 + and HCN + with deuterium atoms, were studied using ion cyclotron resonance techniques. These reactions proceed predominantly via a charge transfer mechanism. The rate constants measured are: 6.4, 9.1, 1.1, 5.0, 0.84, 0.90, 1.2, and 0.37 x 10 -10 cm 3 /sec, respectively. Hydrocarbon ions of the types CH/sub n/ + and C 2 H/sub n/ + , where n=2--4, do not react with H or D atoms

  12. Relative mobility of 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskii, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The method of competitive reactions was used to determine the relative mobilities of the 1-H atoms of carbohydrates in reactions of heterogeneous isotope exchange, using various reference standards, catalysts, and buffer systems. On the basis of the results obtained, the investigated carbohydrates are ranged in a series of decreasing mobility of the hydrogen atoms exchanged in heterogeneous isotope exchange reactions. It was demonstrated that the mobility of the 1-H atoms is related to the concentration of the acyclic forms of the carbohydrates

  13. Dipole-dipole interactions in a hot atomic vapor and in an ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautenkov, V. A.; Saakyan, S. A.; Bronin, S. Ya; Klyarfeld, A. B.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    In our paper ideal and non-ideal gas media of neutral atoms are analyzed. The first we discuss a dipole broadening of atomic transitions in excited dilute and dense metal vapors. Then the theoretical studies of the dipole-dipole interactions in dense ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms are considered. Possible future experiments on a base of our experimental arrangement are suggested.

  14. Prediction of reacting atoms for the major biotransformation reactions of organic xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudik, Anastasia V; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of drug metabolite structures is essential at the early stage of drug discovery to understand the potential liabilities and risks connected with biotransformation. The determination of the site of a molecule at which a particular metabolic reaction occurs could be used as a starting point for metabolite identification. The prediction of the site of metabolism does not always correspond to the particular atom that is modified by the enzyme but rather is often associated with a group of atoms. To overcome this problem, we propose to operate with the term "reacting atom", corresponding to a single atom in the substrate that is modified during the biotransformation reaction. The prediction of the reacting atom(s) in a molecule for the major classes of biotransformation reactions is necessary to generate drug metabolites. Substrates of the major human cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases from the Biovia Metabolite database were divided into nine groups according to their reaction classes, which are aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation, N- and O-glucuronidation, N-, S- and C-oxidation, and N- and O-dealkylation. Each training set consists of positive and negative examples of structures with one labelled atom. In the positive examples, the labelled atom is the reacting atom of a particular reaction that changed adjacency. Negative examples represent non-reacting atoms of a particular reaction. We used Labelled Multilevel Neighbourhoods of Atoms descriptors for the designation of reacting atoms. A Bayesian-like algorithm was applied to estimate the structure-activity relationships. The average invariant accuracy of prediction obtained in leave-one-out and 20-fold cross-validation procedures for five human isoforms of cytochrome P450 and all isoforms of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase varies from 0.86 to 0.99 (0.96 on average). We report that reacting atoms may be predicted with reasonable accuracy for the major classes of metabolic reactions

  15. Self-consistent average-atom scheme for electronic structure of hot and dense plasmas of mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianmin

    2002-01-01

    An average-atom model is proposed to treat the electronic structures of hot and dense plasmas of mixture. It is assumed that the electron density consists of two parts. The first one is a uniform distribution with a constant value, which is equal to the electron density at the boundaries between the atoms. The second one is the total electron density minus the first constant distribution. The volume of each kind of atom is proportional to the sum of the charges of the second electron part and of the nucleus within each atomic sphere. By this way, one can make sure that electrical neutrality is satisfied within each atomic sphere. Because the integration of the electron charge within each atom needs the size of that atom in advance, the calculation is carried out in a usual self-consistent way. The occupation numbers of electron on the orbitals of each kind of atom are determined by the Fermi-Dirac distribution with the same chemical potential for all kinds of atoms. The wave functions and the orbital energies are calculated with the Dirac-Slater equations. As examples, the electronic structures of the mixture of Au and Cd, water (H 2 O), and CO 2 at a few temperatures and densities are presented

  16. Self-consistent average-atom scheme for electronic structure of hot and dense plasmas of mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianmin

    2002-10-01

    An average-atom model is proposed to treat the electronic structures of hot and dense plasmas of mixture. It is assumed that the electron density consists of two parts. The first one is a uniform distribution with a constant value, which is equal to the electron density at the boundaries between the atoms. The second one is the total electron density minus the first constant distribution. The volume of each kind of atom is proportional to the sum of the charges of the second electron part and of the nucleus within each atomic sphere. By this way, one can make sure that electrical neutrality is satisfied within each atomic sphere. Because the integration of the electron charge within each atom needs the size of that atom in advance, the calculation is carried out in a usual self-consistent way. The occupation numbers of electron on the orbitals of each kind of atom are determined by the Fermi-Dirac distribution with the same chemical potential for all kinds of atoms. The wave functions and the orbital energies are calculated with the Dirac-Slater equations. As examples, the electronic structures of the mixture of Au and Cd, water (H2O), and CO2 at a few temperatures and densities are presented.

  17. Quasi-static electron density fluctuations of atoms in hot compressed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.

    1982-01-01

    The standard theoretical methods for the calculation of properties of hot compressed matter lead to a description based on the Average Atom model. In this model the degenerate orbitals are populated with the Fermi-Dirac (FD) density, partitioned according to the binomial distribution. Since the one particle picture is inadequate to evaluate reliable optical properties, a method involving correlated population fluctuations, but limited to unrelaxed orbitals and lacking time dependence, has been examined. The probability distribution of fluctuations in a particular level is evaluated through a decoupling procedure. The method is carried out self consistently. For each level this leads to the definition of an effective 1st order ionization energy as a statistical sum of all possible transition energies. As a result the effective number of electrons exchanged with the outside weights the chemical potential. This defines an effective chemical potential μsup(k) for each level. In many cases of interest the statistics leads to FD type average occupation numbers. This allows a treatment of the continuum in a Thomas-Fermi like model using the effective ionization energy and μsup(k). We obtain a simultaneous description of charge rearrangements and net fluctuations in the Wigner-Seitz cell. The discussion is supported by numerical results for iron. (author)

  18. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium ( 51 Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  19. Fluorine atom subsurface diffusion and reaction in photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Frank; Fraser, D.; Coburn, J.W.; Graves, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic studies of fluorine and deuterium atoms interacting with an OiR 897 10i i-line photoresist (PR) are reported. All experiments were conducted at room temperature. Films of this PR were coated on quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates and exposed to alternating fluxes of these atoms in a high vacuum apparatus. Mass changes of the PR were observed in situ and in real time during the atom beam exposures using the QCM. A molecular-beam sampled differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) was used to measure the species desorbing from the PR surface during the F and D atom exposures. During the D atom exposures, hydrogen abstraction and etching of the PR was observed, but no DF formation was detected. However, during the F atom exposures, the major species observed to desorb from the surface was DF, formed from fluorine abstraction of deuterium from the photoresist. No evidence of film etching or fluorine self-abstraction was observed. The film mass increased during F atom exposure, evidently due to the replacement of D by F in the film. The rate of DF formation and mass uptake were both characterized by the same kinetics: An initially rapid step declining exponentially with time (e -t/τ ), followed by a much slower step following inverse square root of time (t -1/2 ) kinetics. The initially rapid step was interpreted as surface abstraction of D by F to form DF, which desorbs, with subsequent F impacting the surface inserted into surface C dangling bonds. The slower step was interpreted as F atoms diffusing into the fluorinated photoresist, forming DF at the boundary of the fluorinated carbon layer. The t -1/2 kinetics of this step are interpreted to indicate that F diffusion through the fluorinated carbon layer is much slower than the rate of F abstraction of D to form DF, or the rate of F insertion into the carbon dangling bonds left behind after DF formation. A diffusion-limited growth model was formulated, and the model parameters are

  20. Quadrupole type mass spectrometric study of the abstraction reaction between hydrogen atoms and ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat

    2008-02-01

    The reactions of photochemically generated deuterium atoms of selected initial translational energy with ethane have been investigated. At each initial energy the relative probability of the atoms undergoing reaction or energy loss on collision with ethane was investigated, and the phenomenological threshold energy was measured as 30+/-5kJmol(-1) for the abstraction from the secondary C-H bonds. The ratio of relative yields per bond, secondary:primary was approximately 3 at the higher energies studied. The correlation of threshold energies with bond dissociation energies, heats of reaction and activation energies is discussed for abstraction reactions with several hydrocarbons.

  1. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reactions of bromine atoms and dimethyl sulfoxide bromine atom complexes with alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Katagiri, Miho; Sawamura, Sadashi

    2007-05-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-Br complexes were generated by pulse radiolysis of DMSO/bromomethane mixtures and the formation mechanism and spectral characteristics of the formed complexes were investigated in detail. The rate constant for the reaction of bromine atoms with DMSO and the extinction coefficient of the complex were obtained to be 4.6×10 9 M -1 s -1 and 6300 M -1 cm -1 at the absorption maximum of 430 nm. Rate constants for the reaction of bromine atoms with a series of alcohols were determined in CBrCl 3 solutions applying a competitive kinetic method using the DMSO-Br complex as the reference system. The obtained rate constants were ˜10 8 M -1 s -1, one or two orders larger than those reported for highly polar solvents. Rate constants of DMSO-Br complexes with alcohols were determined to be ˜ 10 7 M -1 s -1. A comparison of the reactivities of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes with those of chlorine atoms and chlorine atom complexes which are ascribed to hydrogen abstracting reactants strongly indicates that hydrogen abstraction from alcohols is not the rate determining step in the case of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes.

  2. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod; Lo, John M H; Roscoe, John M.; Alquaity, Awad; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential

  3. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  4. The relative reactivities of ethane, ethane-d6, n-butane and neopentane towards 'hot' tritium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.; Welch, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    The reactions of recoil tritium with ethane-butane, and ethane-neopentane mixtures have been studied in the presence and absence of helium moderator. It is shown that the larger molecules are labelled by recoil atoms of a higher mean energy than those which label ethane. It is also shown that hydrogen atoms at CH 2 sites are replaced by higher energy tritium atoms than those at CH 3 sites. An analogy is drawn with the abstraction reaction and a simple unified model for high-energy recoil tritium reactions at a C-H site is proposed. The more complex the other groups attached to the carbon the greater the mean energy of the recoil atoms reacting with the C-H bond. Experiments with ethane-d 6 established that the primary isotope effect for abstraction is comparable to that for displacement with a value of 1.25 approximately 1.30. (orig.) [de

  5. Universal Four-Boson System: Dimer-Atom-Atom Efimov Effect and Recombination Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the four-boson system with resonant interactions are described. Momentum-space scattering equations for the four-particle transition operators are used. The properties of unstable tetramers with approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are determined. In addition, the three- and four-cluster recombination processes in the four-boson system are studied. (author)

  6. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1978--February 14, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1979-02-01

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, were studied in gaseous, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes and other organic systems in order to better understand the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental and theoretical program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) the reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure and liquid systems; (2) the gas to condensed state transition in halogen high chemistry, involving bromine activated by the (n,γ) and (I.T.) processes in ethane was investigated in more detail; (3) systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of 80 Br/sup m/, 80 Br, 82 Br/sup m/ + 82 Br, 82 Br, 128 I, 130 I, and 130 I/sup m/ + 130 I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators; (4) kinetic theory applications of high energy reactions and mathematical development of caging mechanisms were developed; (5) the sterochemistry of 38 Cl substitution reactions involving diastereomeric 1,2-dichloro-1,2-difluorethane in liquid mixtures was completed, suggesting that the stereochemical course of the substitution process is controlled by the properties of the solvent molecules; and (6) the applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems was continued, especially involving aluminum and vanadium trace determinations

  7. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.

    1990-05-01

    This program, which has been supported for twenty-four years by the Us Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, has produced significant advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of chemical activation by nuclear processes; the stereochemistry of radioactivity for solution of specific problems. This program was contributed to the training of approximately seventy scientists at various levels. This final report includes a review of the areas of research and chronological tabulation of the publications

  8. Growth and Destruction of PAH Molecules in Reactions with Carbon Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    A very high abundance of atomic carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and the high reactivity of these species toward different hydrocarbon molecules including benzene, raise questions regarding the stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in space. To test the efficiency of destruction of PAH molecules via reactions with atomic carbon, we performed a set of laboratory and computational studies of the reactions of naphthalene, anthracene, and coronene molecules with carbon atoms in the ground state. The reactions were investigated in liquid helium droplets at T = 0.37 K and by quantum chemical computations. Our studies suggest that all small and all large catacondensed PAHs react barrierlessly with atomic carbon, and therefore should be efficiently destroyed by such reactions in a broad temperature range. At the same time, large compact pericondensed PAHs should be more inert toward such a reaction. In addition, taking into account their higher photostability, much higher abundances of pericondensed PAHs should be expected in various astrophysical environments. The barrierless reactions between carbon atoms and small PAHs also suggest that, in the ISM, these reactions could lead to the bottom-up formation of PAH molecules.

  9. Optical emissions from oxygen atom reactions with adsorbates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, David B.; Fraser, Mark E.; Gauthier-Beals, Mitzi; Holtzclaw, Karl W.; Malonson, Mark; Gelb, Alan H.

    1992-12-01

    Although most optical materials are inert to the ambient low earth orbit environment, high velocity oxygen atoms will react with adsorbates to produce optical emissions from the ultraviolet into the infrared. The adsorbates arise from chemical releases or outgassing from the spacecraft itself. We have been investigating kinetic and spectral aspects of these phenomenon by direct observation of the 0.2 to 13 micrometers chemiluminescence from the interaction of a fast atomic oxygen beam with a continuously dosed surface. The dosing gases include fuels, combustion products and outgassed species such as unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), NO, H2O and CO. The surface studied include gold and magnesium fluoride. In order to relate the results to actual spacecraft conditions these phenomena have been explored as a function of O atom velocity, dosant flux and substrate temperature. UDMH dosed surfaces exhibit spectra typical (wavelength and intensity) of carbonaceous surfaces. The primary emitters are CO, CO2, and OH. H2O dosed surfaces are dominated by OH and /or H2O emission while CO dosed surfaces are dominated by CO and CO2 emissions. The nitric oxide dosed surface produces a glow from 0.4 to 5.4 micrometers due to NO2* continuum emission. The emission was observed to increase by a factor of two upon cooling the surface from 20 degree(s)C to -35 degree(s)C.

  10. Atomic nuclei and nuclear reactions. Theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.G.; Tartakovsky, V.K.; Kenjebaev, K.K.; Shunkeyev, K.Sh.; Ismatov, E.I.; Mukhammedov, S.; Comsan, M.N.H.; Djuraev, Sh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The short description of the book preparation by the collective authors from Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Egypt is given. The present book is the expanded course of lectures on the theory of nuclei, nuclear reactions and their applications delivered by the authors for a number of years in the Ukrainian National University, Aktubinsk State University of the Kazakhstan Republic, Tashkent National University, Samarkand and Termez State Universities of Uzbekistan Republic, Egyptian National Universities (Al-Az'har, Menoufeya, Suez-Canal and Tanta) and the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan. The lectures present foundations of the modern concepts of the structure of nuclei, on the nature of nuclear processes and nuclear transformations. Main attention in the book was paid to the presentation of the basics and some modern achievements in the field of the theory of nuclei and nuclear reactions. A number of problems was investigated in original works and were not presented in the physics textbooks. The book presents the non-relativistic theory of nuclear reactions, questions of relativistic nuclear physics were not considered here. Non-relativistic theory of nuclear reactions is based on the notions of collision matrix or S-matrix. In absence of consequent microscopic theory, the scattering matrix can be found phenomenological based on definite assumptions on the character of nuclear interactions. Modern applications of nuclear reactions for the development of nuclear methods of analysis are presented. The delayed and nuclear techniques with nuclear reactor, accelerators and radioisotopic sources are considered. The book is designed as a textbook for bachelor and postgraduate students of physical faculties of universities and engineering-physical institutions, lecturers and researchers, working in the field of nuclear physics. The book gives an up-to-date list of references on nuclear reaction theory and

  11. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  12. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Analytical criterion for shock ignition of fusion reaction in hot spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Breil, J.; Lafon, M.; Vallet, A.; Bel, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Shock ignition of DT capsules involves two major steps. First, the fuel is assembled by means of a low velocity conventional implosion. At stagnation, the central core has a temperature lower than the one needed for ignition. Then a second, strong spherical converging shock, launched from a high intensity laser spike, arrives to the core. This shock crosses the core, rebounds at the target center and increases the central pressure to the ignition conditions. In this work we consider this latter phase by using the Guderley self-similar solution for converging flows. Our model accounts for the fusion reaction energy deposition, thermal and radiation losses thus describing the basic physics of hot spot ignition. The ignition criterion derived from the analytical model is successfully compared with full scale hydrodynamic simulations. (authors)

  14. Isotope effects in the reactions of atomic ions with H2, D2, and HD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentrout, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    Reactions of various atomic ions with H 2 , D 2 , and HD have been studied as a function of kinetic energy by using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. For exothermic reactions, the dependence on translational and rotational energy and the effect of angular momentum conservation are illustrated. For endothermic reactions, the observed behavior falls into several distinct groups (statistical, direct and impulsive) that can be used to characterize the potential energy surfaces for the reactions. The characteristic behavior of each of these groups is illustrated and then used to understand more complex reaction systems

  15. Molecular Beam Chemistry: Reactions of Oxygen Atoms with Halogen Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-15

    nonlinear one has s = 3, r = 1, and n = 3/2. In the "loose" complex the bending modes go over to free rotation of the product diatomit molecule; thus s...contains no adjustable parameters. All observable properties *l of the reaction may be predicted including product velocity and angular dis- tributions...example, P. R. Bevington, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1969). 65. Equation (3) is strictly

  16. Reaction of the H atom in gamma-irradiated ferrous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, R.W.

    1977-10-01

    The effect of sulphuric acid, ferrous and ferric ion, and oxygen concentrations on G(Fe 3+ ) values from cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated soltuions has been studied. Kinetic expressions were derived for reaction models involving reactions of various forms of the H atom and additional reactions postulated to be of importance at high solute concentration. Three models were assumed invoking the additional reactions: (1) an independent yield of an excited water species; (2) increasing contributions from interspur reactions of well established species at increasing solute concentration; (3) inhibition of charge pair recombination by acid and scavenger species. The calculated G(Fe 3+ ) values from the various models were compared by the least squares method with experimental G(Fe 3+ ) values from over 600 irradiations. Model 3 provided the best fit to the data for the least number of adjustable parameters. No evidence for more than one form of H atom was found with this model. (J.R.)

  17. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  18. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  19. Influence of laser induced hot electrons on the threshold for shock ignition of fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaïtis, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Le Bel, E.; Duchateau, G.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, UMR 5107,351 Cours de la Libération, 33400 Talence (France)

    2016-07-15

    The effects of Hot Electrons (HEs) generated by the nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) on the dynamics of Shock Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion targets are investigated. The coupling between the laser beam, plasma dynamics and hot electron generation and propagation is described with a radiative hydrodynamics code using an inline model based on Paraxial Complex Geometrical Optics [Colaïtis et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 041101 (2015)]. Two targets are considered: the pure-DT HiPER target and a CH-DT design with baseline spike powers of the order of 200–300 TW. In both cases, accounting for the LPI-generated HEs leads to non-igniting targets when using the baseline spike powers. While HEs are found to increase the ignitor shock pressure, they also preheat the bulk of the imploding shell, notably causing its expansion and contamination of the hotspot with the dense shell material before the time of shock convergence. The associated increase in hotspot mass (i) increases the ignitor shock pressure required to ignite the fusion reactions and (ii) significantly increases the power losses through Bremsstrahlung X-ray radiation, thus rapidly cooling the hotspot. These effects are less prominent for the CH-DT target where the plastic ablator shields the lower energy LPI-HE spectrum. Simulations using higher laser spike powers of 500 TW suggest that the CH-DT capsule marginally ignites, with an ignition window width significantly smaller than without LPI-HEs, and with three quarters of the baseline target yield. The latter effect arises from the relation between the shock launching time and the shell areal density, which becomes relevant in presence of a LPI-HE preheating.

  20. Is H Atom Abstraction Important in the Reaction of Cl with 1-Alkenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walavalkar, M P; Vijayakumar, S; Sharma, A; Rajakumar, B; Dhanya, S

    2016-06-23

    The relative yields of products of the reaction of Cl atoms with 1-alkenes (C4-C9) were determined to see whether H atom abstraction is an important channel and if it is to identify the preferred position of abstraction. The presence of all the possible positional isomers of long chain alkenones and alkenols among the products, along with chloroketones and chloroalcohols, confirms the occurrence of H atom abstraction. A consistent pattern of distribution of abstraction products is observed with oxidation at C4 (next to allyl) being the lowest and that at CH2 groups away from the double bond being the highest. This contradicts with the higher stability of allyl (C3) radical. For a better understanding of the relative reactivity, ab initio calculations at MP2/6-311+G (d,p) level of theory are carried out in the case of 1-heptene. The total rate coefficient, calculated using conventional transition state theory, was found to be in good agreement with the experimental value at room temperature. The preferred position of Cl atom addition is predicted to be the terminal carbon atom, which matches with the experimental observation, whereas the rate coefficients calculated for individual channels of H atom abstraction do not explain the observed pattern of products. The distribution of abstraction products except at C4 is found to be better explained by reported structure activity relationship, developed from experimental rate coefficient data. This implies the reactions to be kinetically dictated and emphasizes the importance of secondary reactions.

  1. When hydroquinone meets methoxy radical: Hydrogen abstraction reaction from the viewpoint of interacting quantum atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Milena; Nakarada, Đura; Etinski, Mihajlo

    2018-05-25

    Interacting Quantum Atoms methodology is used for a detailed analysis of hydrogen abstraction reaction from hydroquinone by methoxy radical. Two pathways are analyzed, which differ in the orientation of the reactants at the corresponding transition states. Although the discrepancy between the two barriers amounts to only 2 kJ/mol, which implies that the two pathways are of comparable probability, the extent of intra-atomic and inter-atomic energy changes differs considerably. We thus demonstrated that Interacting Quantum Atoms procedure can be applied to unravel distinct energy transfer routes in seemingly similar mechanisms. Identification of energy components with the greatest contribution to the variation of the overall energy (intra-atomic and inter-atomic terms that involve hydroquinone's oxygen and the carbon atom covalently bound to it, the transferring hydrogen and methoxy radical's oxygen), is performed using the Relative energy gradient method. Additionally, the Interacting Quantum Fragments approach shed light on the nature of dominant interactions among selected fragments: both Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are of comparable importance when considering interactions of the transferring hydrogen atom with all other atoms, whereas the exchange-correlation term dominates interaction between methoxy radical's methyl group and hydroquinone's aromatic ring. This study represents one of the first applications of Interacting Quantum Fragments approach on first order saddle points. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The reaction of nitromethane with hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the gas phase. A mechanistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Thomsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction between H and CH3NO2, has been studied in a discharge flow system using electron paramagnetic resonance and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry for the detection of reactants and products. Deuterium atoms have, in addition to CD3NO2, been used to support...... the proposed reaction mechanism. The reaction was studied with the atomic reactant in slight excess at 298 K and a total pressure of 2 Torr. Two concurrent reaction channels: (1a) H+CH3NO2-->HONO+.CH3 and (1b) H+CH3NO2-->CH3NO+.OH were observed. The branching ratio, k1a/(k1a+k1b), is 0.7+/-0.2....

  3. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with hydrogen peroxide as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundström, T.; Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependence for the reaction of H atoms with H2O2 at pH 1 has been determined using pulse radiolysis technique. The reaction was studied in the temperature range 10-120 degreesC. The rate constant at 25 degreesC was found to be 5.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and the activa......The temperature dependence for the reaction of H atoms with H2O2 at pH 1 has been determined using pulse radiolysis technique. The reaction was studied in the temperature range 10-120 degreesC. The rate constant at 25 degreesC was found to be 5.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(7) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1...

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas phase reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Ponomarev, DA; Nielsen, OJ

    2001-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with iodobenzene (C6H5I) in 20-700 Torr of N-2, air, or O-2 diluent at 296 K. The reaction proceeds with a rate constant k(Cl + QH(5)I) = (3.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) to give...

  5. Capturing Chemistry in Action with Electrons: Realization of Atomically Resolved Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, Anatoly A; Weber, Peter M; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2017-08-23

    One of the grand challenges in chemistry has been to directly observe atomic motions during chemical processes. The depiction of the nuclear configurations in space-time to understand barrier crossing events has served as a unifying intellectual theme connecting the different disciplines of chemistry. This challenge has been cast as an imaging problem in which the technical issues reduce to achieving not only sufficient simultaneous space-time resolution but also brightness for sufficient image contrast to capture the atomic motions. This objective has been met with electrons as the imaging source. The review chronicles the first use of electron structural probes to study reactive intermediates, to the development of high bunch charge electron pulses with sufficient combined spatial-temporal resolution and intensity to literally light up atomic motions, as well as the means to characterize the electron pulses in terms of temporal brightness and image reconstruction. The use of femtosecond Rydberg spectroscopy as a novel means to use internal electron scattering within the molecular reference frame to obtain similar information on reaction dynamics is also discussed. The focus is on atomically resolved chemical reaction dynamics with pertinent references to work in other areas and forms of spectroscopy that provide additional information. Effectively, we can now directly observe the far-from-equilibrium atomic motions involved in barrier crossing and categorize chemistry in terms of a power spectrum of a few dominant reaction modes. It is this reduction in dimensionality that makes chemical reaction mechanisms transferrable to seemingly arbitrarily complex (large N) systems, up to molecules as large as biological macromolecules (N > 1000 atoms). We now have a new way to reformulate reaction mechanisms using an experimentally determined dynamic mode basis that in combination with recent theoretical advances has the potential to lead to a new conceptual basis for

  6. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy 18 F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 76 Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,γ) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied

  7. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy /sup 18/F, /sup 34m/Cl, and /sup 76/Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,..gamma..) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied.

  8. Chemical reactions involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions; Cr203 + 2 Na2S04(1) + 3/2 02 yields 2 Na2Cr04(1) + 2 S03(g)n TiO2 + Na2S04(1) yields Na20(T102)n + 503(g)n T102 + Na2Cro4(1) yields Na2(T102)n + Cr03(g).

  9. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  10. Enantioselective H-atom transfer reaction: a strategy to synthesize formaldehyde aldol products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Patil, Kalyani

    2005-04-14

    [reaction: see text] Enantioselective radical alkylation of Baylis-Hillman adducts furnished aldol products in good yield and selectivity. The results illustrate that the selectivity in the hydrogen atom transfer is dependent on the size of the ester substituent, with smaller substituents providing better enantioselectivity.

  11. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Toth, L.M.; Yustein, J.T.; Andrews, L.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O 2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO 2 and UO 3 . In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO 2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16 O 2 / 18 O 2 experiments which failed to produce 16 OU 18 O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O 2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO 2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO 2+ 2 )(O 2- 2 ) and (UO + 2 )(O - 2 ), and a weak complex, UO 3 --O 2 , were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O 2 reactions. Similar U atom and N 2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N 2 . Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN 2 --N 2 and UN 2 --2N 2 complexes

  12. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Rodney D.; Toth, L. Mac; Yustein, Jason T.; Andrews, Lester

    1993-10-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO2 and UO3. In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16O2/18O2 experiments which failed to produce 16OU18O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO2+2)(O2-2) and (UO+2)(O-2), and a weak complex, UO3-O2, were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O2 reactions. Similar U atom and N2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N2. Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN2-N2 and UN2-2N2 complexes.

  13. Photoinduced ethane formation from reaction of ethene with matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2005-10-27

    The reactions of matrix-isolated Ti, V, or Nb atoms with ethene (C(2)H(4)) have been studied by FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Under conditions where the ethene dimer forms, metal atoms react with the ethene dimer to yield matrix-isolated ethane (C(2)H(6)) and methane. Under lower ethene concentration conditions ( approximately 1:70 ethene/Ar), hydridic intermediates of the types HMC(2)H(3) and H(2)MC(2)H(2) are also observed, and the relative yield of hydrocarbons is diminished. Reactions of these metals with perdeuterioethene, and equimolar mixtures of C(2)H(4) and C(2)D(4), yield products that are consistent with the production of ethane via a metal atom reaction involving at least two C(2)H(4) molecules. The absence of any other observed products suggests the mechanism also involves production of small, highly symmetric species such as molecular hydrogen and metal carbides. Evidence is presented suggesting that ethane production from the ethene dimer is a general photochemical process for the reaction of excited-state transition-metal atoms with ethene at high concentrations of ethene.

  14. Learning about Regiochemistry from a Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears-Dundes, Christopher; Huon, Yoeup; Hotz, Richard P.; Pinhas, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment has been developed in which the hydrogen-atom abstraction and the coupling of propionitrile, using Fenton's reagent, are investigated. Students learn about the regiochemistry of radical formation, the stereochemistry of product formation, and the interpretation of GC-MS data, in a safe reaction that can be easily completed in one…

  15. Surface reactions during atomic layer deposition of Pt derived from gas phase infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, W.M.M.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Dielissen, S.A.F.; Mackus, A.J.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to obtain absolute number information on the reaction products during atomic layer deposition of Pt from (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethylplatinum [(MeCp)PtMe3] and O2. From the detection of CO2 and H2O it was established that the precursor ligands are oxidatively

  16. Highly Durable Platinum Single-Atom Alloy Catalyst for Electrochemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Roh, Chi-Woo; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan

    2018-01-01

    Single atomic Pt catalyst can offer efficient utilization of the expensive platinum and provide unique selectivity because it lacks ensemble sites. However, designing such a catalyst with high Pt loading and good durability is very challenging. Here, single atomic Pt catalyst supported on antimony...... functional theory calculations show that replacing Sb sites with Pt atoms in the bulk phase or at the surface of SbSn or ATO is energetically favorable. The Pt1/ATO shows superior activity and durability for formic acid oxidation reaction, compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The single atomic Pt...... structure is retained even after a harsh durability test, which is performed by repeating cyclic voltammetry in the range of 0.05–1.4 V for 1800 cycles. A full cell is fabricated for direct formic acid fuel cell using the Pt1/ATO as an anode catalyst, and an order of magnitude higher cell power is obtained...

  17. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of μ - p atoms. The ppμ-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced

  18. Studies of the reactions of hydrogen atoms by time-resolved E. S. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, R W; Verma, N C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    Time-resolved e.s.r. spectroscopy has been used to follow directly the reactions of H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of acid solutions. Detailed analysis of the time profile of the e.s.r. signal was carried out by means of modified Bloch equations. The increased signal found when a scavenger for OH such as t-butyl alcohol is present is shown to be mainly the result of slower H atom decay by radical-radical reaction. The reaction H + OH does not appear to produce any signal polarization. The decay curves observed in the presence of solute are readily accounted for by the treatment, and good plots of pseudo first-order rate constant against solute concentration are obtained. The absolute rate constants for reaction with H atoms are for methanol 2.5 x10/sup 6/, for ethanol 2.1 X 10/sup 7/, for isopropanol 6.8 x 10/sup 7/, and for succinic acid 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/s/sup -1/. These values are in good agreement with the earlier chemical measurements.

  19. Reaction (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probe of electron correlation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions contain information about the two vacancy-energy spectrum and electron-pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. The simplest mechanisms are discussed, demonstrating some features which await experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and the relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from the nonrelativistic case. The origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms, and possible means of their detection, are discussed. In addition, the role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feshbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are considered, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules, and clusters. The modification of these reactions due to photon emission is discussed. The future of the domain is outlined

  20. Reactions (γ,2e) and (e,3e) as probes of electronic correlations in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1993-01-01

    Cross sections of the (γ,2e) and (e,3e) reactions carry information on two vacancy energy spectrum and on electron pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. Simplest mechanisms of them are discussed, demonstrating some features which are waiting for experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and even to relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from what it is for the nonrelativistic case. Origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms and possible means of their detection are discussed. Role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feschbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are mentioned, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules and clusters. Modification of the type of these reactions due to rather probable emission of the photon is discussed. Future of the domain is outlined. (orig.)

  1. Selective hydrogen atom abstraction by hydrogen atoms in photolysis and radiolysis of alkane mixtures at 770 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Kinugawa, K.; Eguchi, M.; Guedes, S.M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms, has been found in Isobutane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane(TMB), cyclopropane matrices besides neopentane matrix. The selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction in neopentane-isobutane mixture is affected by the difference of kinetic energies of H atoms. The reaction occurs more favorably with decreasing the kinetic energy of H atoms. Competitive reaction between c-C 6 H 12 and Hi for H atoms has been studied in the radiolysis and photolysis of neo-C 5 H 12 HI mixture at 77 K. The rate constants of these reactions in neopentane matrix are quite different from these of thermal H atom reaction, but similar to those of hot H atom reaction. Importance of the selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms is pointed out in the radical formation in the radiolysis of pure TMB at 77 K [pt

  2. Neutral atom analyzers for diagnosing hot plasmas: A review of research at the ioffe physicotechnical institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.

    2009-01-01

    Research on neutral particle diagnostics of thermonuclear plasmas that has been carried out in recent years at the Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (St. Petersburg, Russia) is reviewed. Work on the creation and improvement of neutral atom analyzers was done in two directions: for potential applications (in particular, on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which is now under construction at Cadarache in France) and for investigation of the ion plasma component in various devices (in particular, in the largest tokamaks, such as JET, TFTR, and JT-60). Neutral atom analyzers are the main tool for studying the behavior of hydrogen ions and isotopes in magnetic confinement systems. They make it possible to determine energy spectra, to perform the isotope analysis of atom fluxes from the plasma, to measure the absolute intensity of the fluxes, and to record how these parameters vary with time. A comparative description of the analyzers developed in recent years at the Ioffe Institute is given. These are ACORD-12/24 analyzers for recording 0.2-100-keV hydrogen and deuterium atoms with a tunable range of simultaneously measured energies, CNPA compact analyzers for a fixed energy gain in the ranges 80-1000 eV and 0.8-100 keV, an ISEP analyzer for simultaneously recording the atoms of all the three hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) in the energy range 5-700 keV, and GEMMA analyzers for recording atom fluxes of hydrogen and helium isotopes in the range 0.1-4 MeV. The scintillating detectors of the ISEP and GEMMA analyzers have a lowered sensitivity to neutrons and thus can operate without additional shielding in neutron fields of up to 10 9 n/(cm 2 s). These two types of analyzers, intended to operate under deuterium-tritium plasma conditions, are prototypes of atom analyzers created at the Ioffe Institute for use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. With these analyzers, a number of new results have been

  3. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA's hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R ampersand D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required

  4. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  5. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  6. Quantum chemical study of the elementary reactions in zirconium oxide atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, Yuniarto; Musgrave, Charles B.

    2002-01-01

    Elementary reactions in atomic layer deposition of zirconia using zirconium tetrachloride and water are investigated using the density functional theory. The atomistic mechanisms of the two deposition half cycles on the Zr-OH and Zr-Cl surface sites are investigated. Both half reactions proceed through the formation of stable intermediates, resulting in high barriers for HCl formation. We find that the intermediate stability is lowered as the surface temperature is raised. However, increasing temperature also increases the dissociation free-energy barrier, which in turn results in increased desorption of adsorbed precursors

  7. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  8. Chain reaction. History of the atomic bomb; Kettenreaktion. Die Geschichte der Atombombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mania, Hubert

    2010-07-01

    Henri becquerel tracked down in 1896 a strange radiation, which was called radioactivity by Marie Curie. In the following centuries German scientists Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Werner Heisenberg presented fundamental contributions to understand processes in the atomic nucleus. At Goettingen, center of the international nuclear physics community, the American student J. Robert Oppenheimer admit to this physical research. In the beginning of 1939 the message of Otto Hahns' nuclear fission electrified researchers. The first step, unleashing atomic energy, was done. A half year later the Second World War begun. And suddenly being friend with and busily communicating physicians were devided into hostile power blocs as bearers of official secrets. The author tells in this exciting book the story of the first atomic bomb as a chain reaction of ideas, discoveries and visions, of friendships, jealousy and intrigues of scientists, adventurers and genius. (orig./GL)

  9. Experimental and Simulation Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressing of Gas Atomized Stainless Steel 316L Powder Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Dongguo; Park, Seong Jin; Ha, Sangyul; Shin, Youngho; Park, Dong Yong; Chung, Sung Taek; Bollina, Ravi; See, Seongkyu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the densification behavior of stainless steel 316L (STS 316L) powders during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and to characterize the mechanical properties of HIPed specimens. The HIP experiments were conducted with gas atomized STS 316L powders with spherical particle shapes under controlled pressure and temperature conditions. The mechanical properties of HIPed samples were determined based on a series of tensile tests, and the results were compared to a reference STS 316L sample prepared by the conventional process, i.e., extrusion and annealing process. Corresponding microstructures before and after tensile tests were observed using scanning electron microscopy and their relationships to the mechanical properties were addressed. Furthermore, a finite element simulation based on the power-law creep model was carried out to predict the density distribution and overall shape change of the STS316L powder compact during HIP process, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  10. Experimental and Simulation Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressing of Gas Atomized Stainless Steel 316L Powder Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dongguo; Park, Seong Jin [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sangyul [Samsung Electro-Mechanics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Youngho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Yong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung Taek [CetaTech Inc., Sacheon (Korea, Republic of); Bollina, Ravi [Bahadurpally Jeedimetla, Hyderabad (India); See, Seongkyu [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the densification behavior of stainless steel 316L (STS 316L) powders during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and to characterize the mechanical properties of HIPed specimens. The HIP experiments were conducted with gas atomized STS 316L powders with spherical particle shapes under controlled pressure and temperature conditions. The mechanical properties of HIPed samples were determined based on a series of tensile tests, and the results were compared to a reference STS 316L sample prepared by the conventional process, i.e., extrusion and annealing process. Corresponding microstructures before and after tensile tests were observed using scanning electron microscopy and their relationships to the mechanical properties were addressed. Furthermore, a finite element simulation based on the power-law creep model was carried out to predict the density distribution and overall shape change of the STS316L powder compact during HIP process, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  11. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, B.; Baluktsian, T.; Schlagmueller, M.; Koelle, A.; Kuebler, H.; Loew, R.; Pfau, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ∼4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with fluorobenzene at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Hurley, MD

    2002-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with fluorobenzene, C6H5F, in 700 Torr of N-2 or air diluent at 296 K. Reaction of Cl atoms with C6H5F proceeds via two pathways: H-atom abstraction to give HCl and the C6H4F...... with Cl atoms via a mechanism which, at least in part, leads neither to production of C6H5Cl nor to reformation of C6H5F. As the steady-state Cl atom concentration is increased, the fraction of the C6H5F-Cl adduct undergoing reaction with Cl atoms increases causing an increase in the effective rate...

  14. Rate Constants and H-Atom Product Yields for the Reactions of O(1D) Atoms with Ethane and Acetylene from 50 to 296 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Reyes, Dianailys; Hickson, Kevin M

    2018-05-01

    The gas phase reactions of atomic oxygen in its first excited state with ethane and acetylene have been investigated in a continuous supersonic flow reactor over the temperature range 50 K to 296 K. O(1D) atoms were produced by pulsed laser photolysis of ozone at 266 nm. Two different types of experiments, kinetics measurements and H-atom product yield determinations, were performed by detecting O(1D) atoms and H(2S) atoms respectively by vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence. The measured rate constants are in agreement with previous work at room temperature and little or no temperature dependence was observed as the temperature is decreased to 50 K. H-atoms yields were found to be independent of temperature for the reaction of O(1D) with ethane. These product yields are discussed in the context of earlier dynamics measurements at higher temperature. Due to the influence of secondary reactions, no H-atom yields could be obtained for the reaction of O(1D) with acetylene.

  15. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  16. Oxygen atom transfer reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. A bonding evolution theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Sensato, Fabricio R; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2014-08-07

    In this research, a comprehensive theoretical investigation has been conducted on oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions from Mimoun complexes to sulfides and sulfoxides. The joint use of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of chemical events along a reaction pathway. The progress of the reaction has been monitored by structural stability domains from ELF topology while the changes between them are controlled by turning points derived from CT which reveal that the reaction mechanism can be separated in several steps: first, a rupture of the peroxo O1-O2 bond, then a rearrangement of lone pairs of the sulfur atom occurs and subsequently the formation of S-O1 bond. The OAT process involving the oxidation of sulfides and sulfoxides is found to be an asynchronous process where O1-O2 bond breaking and S-O1 bond formation processes do not occur simultaneously. Nucleophilic/electrophilic characters of both dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide, respectively, are sufficiently described by our results, which hold the key to unprecedented insight into the mapping of electrons that compose the bonds while the bonds change.

  17. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  18. Quantifying atom addition reactions on amorphous solid water: a review of recent laboratory advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2018-06-01

    Complex organic molecules found in space are mostly formed on and in the ice mantle covering interstellar dust grains. In clouds where ionizing irradiation is insignificant, chemical reactions on the ice mantle are dominated by thermal processes. Modeling of grain surface chemistry requires detailed information from the laboratory, including sticking coefficients, binding energies, diffusion energy barriers, mechanism of reaction, and chemical desorption rates. In this talk, recent laboratory advances in obtaining these information would be reviewed. Specifically, this talk will focus on the efforts in our group in: 1) Determining the mechanism of atomic hydrogen addition reactions on amorphous solid water (ASW); 2) Measuring the chemical desorption coefficient of H+O3-->O2+OH using the time-resolved scattering technique; and 3) Measuring the diffusion energy barrier of volatile molecules on ASW. Further laboratory studies will be suggested.This research was supported by NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Research Grant #1615897.

  19. The solvation reaction field for a hydrogen atom in a dielectric continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A reaction field exists even for a nonpolar solute embedded in a spherical cavity within a surrounding homogeneous dielectric continuum. This arises from the tail of the electronic wave function that penetrates beyond the cavity boundary into the dielectric region. This effect, which is neglected or treated only in cursory fashion in most reaction field implementations, is examined in detail for the simple case of a ground state hydrogen atom, where very accurate solutions of the relevant equations can be obtained. Properties considered include the penetration of the electron outside the cavity, the electronic density at the nucleus, the electron binding energy, the electrostatic free energy of solvation, the polarizability, and the vertical 1s→2p excitation energy. Also, the effect of the common approximation of neglecting the volume polarization and treating only the surface polarization contribution to the reaction field is critically evaluated. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atom by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ito, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Incident angle dependence of reactions between graphene and hydrogen atoms are obtained qualitatively by classical molecular dynamics simulation under the NVE condition with modified Brenner reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential. Chemical reaction depends on two parameters, i.e., polar angle θ and azimuthal angle φ of the incident hydrogen. From the simulation results, it is found that the reaction rates strongly depend on polar angle θ. Reflection rate becomes larger with increasing θ, and the θ dependence of adsorption rate is also found. The θ dependence is caused by three dimensional structure of the small potential barrier which covers adsorption sites. φ dependence of penetration rate is also found for large θ. (author)

  1. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1 . This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm −1 . Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  2. Observations of crystallization and melting in poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends by hot-stage atomic-force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, R.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1998-01-01

    The binary blend of poly(ethylene oxide)/atactic poly(methyl methacrylate) is examined using hot-stage atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. It was found possible to follow in real time the melting process, which reveals itself to

  3. Use of a CO2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO 2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility

  4. Synthesis and decay process of superheavy nuclei with Z=119-122 via hot-fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghahramany, N.; Ansari, A. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, College of Science, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In this research article attempts have been made to calculate the superheavy-nuclei synthesis characteristics including, the potential energy parameters, fusion probability, fusion and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections as well as, decay properties of compound nucleus and the residue nuclei formation probability for elements with Z=119-122 by using the hot-fusion reactions. It is concluded that, although a selection of double magic projectiles such as {sup 48}Ca with high binding energy, simplifies the calculations significantly due to spherical symmetric shape of the projectile, resulting in high evaporation residue cross section, unfortunately, nuclei with Z > 98 do not exist in quantities sufficient for constructing targets for the hot-fusion reactions. Therefore, practically our selection is fusion reactions with titanium projectile because the mass production of target nuclei for experimental purposes is more feasible. Based upon our findings, it is necessary, for new superheavy-nuclei production with Z > 119, to use neutron-rich projectiles and target nuclei. Finally, the maximal evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of superheavy elements with Z=119-122 have been calculated and compared with the previously founded ones in the literature. (orig.)

  5. Effect of deformations on the compactness of odd-Z superheavy nuclei formed in cold and hot fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2018-03-01

    Using the extended fragmentation theory, the compactness of hot and cold fusion reactions is analyzed for odd-Z nuclei ranging Z = 105- 117. The calculations for the present work are carried out at T = 0MeV and ℓ = 0 ħ, as the temperature and angular momentum effects remain silent while addressing the orientation degree of freedom (i.e. compact angle configuration). In the hot fusion, 48Ca (spherical) + actinide (prolate) reaction, the non-equatorial compact (nec) shape is obtained for Z = 113 nucleus. On the other hand, Z > 113 nuclei favor equatorial compact (ec) configuration. The distribution of barrier height (VB) illustrate that the ec-shape is obtained when the magnitude of quadrupole deformation of the nucleus is higher than the hexadecupole deformation. In other words, negligible or small -ve β4-deformations support ec configurations. On the other hand, large (+ve) magnitude of the β4-deformation suggests that the configuration appears for compact angle θc < 90 °, leading to nec structure. Similar deformation effects are observed for Bi-induced reactions, in which not belly-to-belly compact (nbbc) configurations are seen at θc = 42 °. In addition to the effect of β2 and β4-deformations, the exclusive role of octupole deformations (β3) is also analyzed. The β3-deformations do not follow the reflection symmetry as that of β2 and β4, leading to the possible occurrence of compact configuration within 0° to 180° angular range.

  6. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate - reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canosa-Mas, C.E.; Duffy, J.M.; Thompson, K.C.; Wayne, R.P. [Physical and Theoretical Chemical Lab., Oxford (United Kingdom); King, M.D. [King' s College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-05-01

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8()+-(0.3)x10{sup -12} and )approx4x10{sup -21} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered. (Author)

  7. The atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate—reactions with atomic chlorine and with ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Duffy, Justin M.; King, Martin D.; Thompson, Katherine C.; Wayne, Richard P.

    Methyl salicylate is one of a number of semiochemicals, signal molecules, emitted by herbivore-infested plants. These signal molecules attract predators of the herbivore, and the chemicals thus act indirectly as part of the defence mechanism of the plant. Previous studies have shown that ozone damage to plants can also elicit the emission of signal molecules. The fate of these signal molecules in the atmosphere is not known. Preliminary studies have been undertaken to examine the atmospheric chemistry of methyl salicylate for the first time. Rate coefficients for the reaction of methyl salicylate with atomic chlorine and with ozone have been determined; the values are (2.8±0.3)×10 -12 and ˜4×10 -21 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1. These results suggest that neither reaction with atomic chlorine nor reaction with ozone will provide important loss routes for methyl salicylate in the atmosphere. The possible importance of photolysis of methyl salicylate in the atmosphere is considered.

  8. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on a heterogeneous solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    A method of the Monte Carlo simulation of the isotopic exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on an arbitrarily heterogeneous solid surface is described by employing hydrogen as an example. (author)

  9. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Baryshnikov, F.F.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom are used to calculate the charge exchange cross-sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, allowance being made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross-section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross-section. The cross-sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values Z. It is shown that the cross-section may be approximated to within approximately 9 /v).10 -15 cm 2 for Z>=18 (v in cm/s). A detailed comparison with the calculations of various authors is performed. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found. A calculation is made of variation in the spectral line intensities of the ion O +7 with injection of a neutral hydrogen beam in conditions similar to the experimental conditions on the ORMAK facility. (author)

  10. Atom Probe Tomography of Phase and Grain Boundaries in Experimentally-Deformed and Hot-Pressed Wehrlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukjati, J.; Parman, S. W.; Cooper, R. F.; Zhao, N.

    2017-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) was used to characterize the chemistry of three grain boundaries: an olivine-olivine (ol-ol) and olivine-clinopyroxene (ol-cpx) boundary in fine-grained experimentally-deformed wehrlite and an ol-cpx boundary in a fine-grained, hot-pressed wehrlite. Grain boundaries were extracted and formed into APT tips using a focused ion beam (FIB). The tips were analyzed in a reflectron-equipped LEAP4000HR (Harvard University) at 1% or 0.5% detection rate, 5pJ laser energy and 100kHz pulse rate. Total ion counts are between 40 and 100 million per tip. Examination of grain and phase boundaries in wehrlite are of interest since slow-diffusing and olivine-incompatible cations present in cpx (e.g. Ca and Al) may control diffusion-accommodated grain boundary sliding and affect mantle rheology (Sundberg & Cooper, 2008). At steady state, ol-cpx aggregates are weaker than either ol or cpx end member, the results of which are not currently well-explained. We investigate grain boundary widths to understand the transport of olivine-incompatible elements. Widths of grain/phase boundary chemical segregation are between 3nm and 6nm for deformed ol-ol and ol-cpx samples; minimally-deformed (hot-pressed) samples having slightly wider chemical segregation widths. Chemical segregation widths were determined from profiles of Na, Al, P, Cl, K, Ca, or Ni, although not all listed elements can be used for all samples (e.g. Na, K segregation profiles can only be observed for ol-ol sample). These estimates are consistent with prior estimates of grain boundary segregation by atom probe tomography on ol-ol and opx-opx samples (Bachhav et al., 2015) and are less than ol-ol interface widths analyzed by STEM/EDX (Hiraga, Anderson, & Kohlstedt, 2007). STEM/EDX will be performed on deformed wehrlite to investigate chemical profile as a function of applied stress orientation and at length scales between those observable by APT and EPMA. Determination of phase boundary chemistry and

  11. Photo- and radiation-chemical stability of molecules. Reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.G.; Ovchinnikov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the review of works published up to 1978 one of the main problems of radiation chemistry is discussed, namely the relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation. Theoretical aspects of this problem are considered for reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off. It is shown that the radical yield in low-temperature radiation-chemical experiments is connected with the position of lower triplet states of molecules, ionization potentials, polarity of medium and the energy of C-H bonds in cation radicals

  12. Ruthenium-catalyzed reactions--a treasure trove of atom-economic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Barry M; Frederiksen, Mathias U; Rudd, Michael T

    2005-10-21

    The demand for new chemicals spanning the fields of health care to materials science combined with the pressure to produce these substances in an environmentally benign fashion pose great challenges to the synthetic chemical community. The maximization of synthetic efficiency by the conversion of simple building blocks into complex targets remains a fundamental goal. In this context, ruthenium complexes catalyze a number of non-metathesis conversions and allow the rapid assembly of complex molecules with high selectivity and atom economy. These complexes often exhibit unusual reactivity. Careful consideration of the mechanistic underpinnings of the transformations can lead to the design of new reactions and the discovery of new reactivity.

  13. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2015-02-12

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential energy surface of the title reaction were obtained at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. These molecular geometries were reoptimized using three different meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) functionals. Single-point energies of the stationary points were obtained by employing the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD) and fourth-order Møller-Plesset (MP4 SDQ) levels of theory. The computed CCSD and MP4(SDQ) energies for optimized structures at various DFT functionals were found to be consistent within 2 kJ mol-1. For a more accurate energetic description, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory were performed for the minimum structures and transition states optimized at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Similar to other ether + Br reactions, it was found that the tetrahydropyran + Br reaction proceeds in an overall endothermic addition-elimination mechanism via a number of intermediates. However, the reactivity of various ethers with atomic bromine was found to vary substantially. In contrast with the 1,4-dioxane + Br reaction, the chair form of the addition complex (c-C5H10O-Br) for THP + Br does not need to undergo ring inversion to form a boat conformer (b-C4H8O2-Br) before the intramolecular H-shift can occur to eventually release HBr. Instead, a direct, yet more favorable route was mapped out on the potential energy surface of the THP + Br reaction. The rate coefficients for all relevant steps involved in the reaction mechanism were computed using the energetics of coupled cluster calculations. On the basis of the results of the CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory, the calculated overall rate coefficients can be expressed as kov.,calc.(T) = 4.60 × 10

  14. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  15. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  16. In Situ Apparatus to Study Gas-Metal Reactions and Wettability at High Temperatures for Hot-Dip Galvanizing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltsov, A.; Cornu, M.-J.; Scheid, J.

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of gas-metal reactions and related surface wettability at high temperatures is often limited due to the lack of in situ surface characterization. Ex situ transfers at low temperature between annealing furnace, wettability device, and analytical tools induce noticeable changes of surface composition distinct from the reality of the phenomena.Therefore, a high temperature wettability device was designed in order to allow in situ sample surface characterization by x-rays photoelectron spectroscopy after gas/metal and liquid metal/solid metal surface reactions. Such airless characterization rules out any contamination and oxidation of surfaces and reveals their real composition after heat treatment and chemical reaction. The device consists of two connected reactors, respectively, dedicated to annealing treatments and wettability measurements. Heat treatments are performed in an infrared lamp furnace in a well-controlled atmosphere conditions designed to reproduce gas-metal reactions occurring during the industrial recrystallization annealing of steels. Wetting experiments are carried out in dispensed drop configuration with the precise control of the deposited droplets kinetic energies. The spreading of drops is followed by a high-speed CCD video camera at 500-2000 frames/s in order to reach information at very low contact time. First trials have started to simulate phenomena occurring during recrystallization annealing and hot-dip galvanizing on polished pure Fe and FeAl8 wt.% samples. The results demonstrate real surface chemistry of steel samples after annealing when they are put in contact with liquid zinc alloy bath during hot-dip galvanizing. The wetting results are compared to literature data and coupled with the characterization of interfacial layers by FEG-Auger. It is fair to conclude that the results show the real interest of such in situ experimental setup for interfacial chemistry studies.

  17. He-ion and self-atom induced damage and surface-morphology changes of a hot W target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Dadras, J; Krstic, P S; Meyer, H M III; Parish, C M

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80–12 000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundred impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences, energies and temperatures for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased. (paper)

  18. The Effects of Heat Stress on Selective Attention and Reaction Time among Workers of a Hot Industry: Application of Computerized Version of Stroop Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2015-04-01

    .Conclusion: According to the findings in present study, heat stress causes an increase in reaction time and a decrease in selective attention. Thus, heat can be assumed as a stressor in hot work environments and the heat should be taken into account while design of job and tasks which needed selective attention or reaction time.

  19. Search for an explanation for neutralization rates of atomic ion-ion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas M.; Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured well over a hundred rate coefficients k for cation-anion mutual neutralization reactions at thermal energies. For molecular ions, the k at 300 K tend not to vary more than a factor of two or three, presumably because a great many neutral states cross the incoming Coulombic potential energy curve. Atomic-atomic systems, for which there are few favorable curve crossings between the neutral and Coulombic curves, show variation of at least a factor of 60 in the measured k values at 300 K. For reactions involving the noble-gas cations, we assume that the final state is the lowest excited state of the neutral, plus the ground state of the neutralized anion, because otherwise the crossing distance R is so small that the curve-crossing probability is nil. We plotted measured k values (in cm3/s) vs the distance R (in bohr) at which the neutral and Coulombic curves cross, the found that the data are fairly well fit by a power law for k, 10-4R - 2 . 8 . The question is, is there a physical explanation for the observed dependence on R? We will discuss the data and the expectations of Landau-Zener theory. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR-2303EP).

  20. Correlations and polarization in electronic and atomic collisions and (e,2e) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubner, P.J.O.; Weigold, E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the invited papers presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Correlations and Polarization in Electronic and Atomic collisions and (e,2e) Reactions held at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia from 18-21 July, 1991. This symposium was a satellite meeting to the XVII International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) held in Brisbane, Australia. It follows a tradition of satellite meetings on (e,2e) collisions and on correlation and polarization in electronic and atomic collisions held in association with previous ICPEACs. The subject matter of this symposium covered that of the previous meeting at Hoboken, USA (1989) on correlation and polarization phenomena as well as that of the previous meeting at the University of Maryland (1989) on (e,2e) collisions. In addition it extended the scope to include some discussion of (e,3e), (γ,eγ) and (γ,2γ) coincidence measurements. The discussion of the current rapid advances in coincidence experiments, correlations and polarization measurements and related theoretical developments brought together 100 scientist from many countries with broad interdisciplinary backgrounds. The symposium stressed the common threads weaving through all these areas of research. (Author)

  1. Surface modification of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by reaction with atomic nitrogen at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Luning; Pejakovic, Dusan A.; Geng Baisong; Marschall, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Dry etching of {0 0 0 1} basal planes of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using active nitridation by nitrogen atoms was investigated at low pressures and high temperatures. The etching process produces channels at grain boundaries and pits whose shapes depend on the reaction temperature. For temperatures below 600 deg. C, the majority of pits are nearly circular, with a small fraction of hexagonal pits with rounded edges. For temperatures above 600 deg. C, the pits are almost exclusively hexagonal with straight edges. The Raman spectra of samples etched at 1000 deg. C show the D mode near 1360 cm -1 , which is absent in pristine HOPG. For deep hexagonal pits that penetrate many graphene layers, neither the surface number density of pits nor the width of pit size distribution changes substantially with the nitridation time, suggesting that these pits are initiated at a fixed number of extended defects intersecting {0 0 0 1} planes. Shallow pits that penetrate 1-2 graphene layers have a wide size distribution, which suggests that these pits are initiated on pristine graphene surfaces from lattice vacancies continually formed by N atoms. A similar wide size distribution of shallow hexagonal pits is observed in an n-layer graphene sample after N-atom etching.

  2. Reactions of Ground State Nitrogen Atoms N(4S) with Astrochemically-Relevant Molecules on Interstellar Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Nourry, Sendres

    2015-06-01

    In the last few years, ambitious programs were launched to probe the interstellar medium always more accurately. One of the major challenges of these missions remains the detection of prebiotic compounds and the understanding of reaction pathways leading to their formation. These complex heterogeneous reactions mainly occur on icy dust grains, and their studies require the coupling of laboratory experiments mimicking the extreme conditions of extreme cold and dilute media. For that purpose, we have developed an original experimental approach that combine the study of heterogeneous reactions (by exposing neutral molecules adsorbed on ice to non-energetic radicals H, OH, N...) and a neon matrix isolation study at very low temperatures, which is of paramount importance to isolate and characterize highly reactive reaction intermediates. Such experimental approach has already provided answers to many questions raised about some astrochemically-relevant reactions occurring in the ground state on the surface of dust grain ices in dense molecular clouds. The aim of this new present work is to show the implication of ground state atomic nitrogen on hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from some astrochemically-relevant species, at very low temperatures (3K-20K), without providing any external energy. Under cryogenic temperatures and with high barrier heights, such reactions involving N(4S) nitrogen atoms should not occur spontaneously and require an initiating energy. However, the detection of some radicals species as byproducts, in our solid samples left in the dark for hours at 10K, proves that hydrogen abstraction reactions involving ground state N(4S) nitrogen atoms may occur in solid phase at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show the efficiency of radical species formation stemming from non-energetic N-atoms and astrochemically-relevant molecules. We will then discuss how such reactions, involving nitrogen atoms in their ground states, might be the first key step

  3. Reactions of tritium atoms with amino acids, deuterated amino acids and mixtures of amino acids. Additivity property and isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badun, G.A.; Filatov, Eh.S.

    1988-01-01

    Interaction of tritium atoms with glycine (1) and leucine (2) amino acids, deuterated amino acids, their mixtures and glycylleucine (3) peptide in the 77-300 K temperature range is studied in isothermal and gradient regimes. Tagged amino acids were separated from targets after conducting the reaction. At T 150 K are associated with intermolecular transmission of free valence in the mixture of amino acids. Regularities of the reaction found for the mixture of amino acids are conserved for (3) as well, i.e. the peptide bond does not essentially affect the reaction of isotopic exchange conditioned by atomic tritium

  4. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  5. Chemistry of nuclear recoil 18F atoms. VIII. Mechanisms and yields of caging reactions in liquid phase 1,1-difluoroethane and 1,1,1-trifluoroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.G.; Root, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    New procedures are reported for the specification of caging yields in nuclear recoil chemistry experiments. All five hot 18 F substitution channels in CH 3 CF 3 and CH 3 CHF 2 exhibit caging at large density. The respective total caged yields at 195 degreeK are 4.0% +- 0.6% and 5.6% +- 0.6%, and the total yields of stabilized substitution products are 8.9% +- 0.4% and 8.6% +- 0.6%. The simplest plausible caging mechanism involves primary Franck--Rabinowitsch radical recombination of 18 F atoms with aliphatic radicals. Density-variation results cannot be used for the qualitative detection of caging reactions unless excitation-stabilization complications have been shown to be unimportant

  6. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  7. Kinetics of the reactions of bromine atoms with a series of aliphatic aldehydes at 298 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, I.; Imrik, K.; Dobe, S.; Berces, T. [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Budapest (Hungary). Koezponti Kemiai Kutato Intezete

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) with selected aldehydes, i.e. ethanal (1), propanal (2), 2-methyl-propanal (3), 2.2-dimethyl-propanal (4) and trichloroacetaldehyde (5) were studied at 298{+-}2 K. Rate constants for overall reactions were measured using the fast flow technique with resonance fluorescence detection of Br. Complementary determinations were carried out by the laser flash photolysis method. The following rate constants were obtained in the kinetic measurements ({+-}2{sigma}): k{sub 1}=(2.1{+-}0.2) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 2}=(4.3{+-}0.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 3}=(6.3{+-}1.4) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 4}=(8.5{+-}0.8) x 10{sup 12}, k{sub 5}{<=}1 x 10{sup 9}, all in cm{sup 3}mol{sup -1}s{sup -1} units. The probable mechanism for the reactions of bromine atoms with aliphatic aldehydes has been discussed. (orig.)

  8. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyacetone CH3C(O)CH2OH with Cl atoms is investigated using the relative rate technique. Experiments are carried out in a 65 L multipass photoreactor in the temperature range of 281-350 K. A mid-infrared spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser in external cavity emitting at 9.5 μm is used to analyze the reactants. The determined rate coefficient for the investigated reaction is (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10-11exp(381.5 ± 57.3/T). The results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and compared with those obtained previously. The impact of Cl atoms on the atmospheric life time of hydroxyacetone is also discussed. Developing analytical techniques to quantify this compound in the atmosphere. Several methods of measurement have been used including the technique of proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) [2] and derivatization with a chemical agent such as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) [3,4] followed by GC/MS or HPLC analyses. The HA amount in the troposphere was found to be in the order of a few hundred parts per trillion by volume [4], Performing laboratory experiments in order to study the HA reactivity with atmospheric oxidants. The first study on the kinetic of the reaction between OH radicals and HA was made by Dagault et al. [5] whose work was performed at room temperature by flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. The determined rate constant implies a lifetime of a few days for HA relative to oxidation by OH radicals. Orlando et al. performed mechanistic and kinetics studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals and Cl atoms at room temperature using a relative method [6]. Products detection was performed using FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, these authors studied the photolysis of HA to determine its quantum yield and UV absorption spectrum. These studies showed that HA is principally removed from the atmosphere by reaction with OH radicals. Kinetic studies of the reaction of OH radicals with HA as a

  9. Effect of addition of water-soluble salts on the hydrogen generation of aluminum in reaction with hot water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum powder was ball milled for different durations of time with different weight percentages of water-soluble salts (NaCl and KCl). The hydrogen generation of each mixture in reaction with hot water was measured. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the morphology, surfaces and cross sections of the produced particles. The results show that the presence of salts in the microstructure of the aluminum considerably increases the hydrogen generation rate. At shorter milling times, the salt covers the aluminum particles and becomes embedded in layers within the aluminum matrix. At higher milling durations, salt and aluminum phases form composite particles. A higher percentage of the second phase significantly decreases the milling time needed for activation of the aluminum particles. Based on the EDS results from cross sections of the milled particles, a mechanism for improvement of the hydrogen generation rate in the presence of salts is suggested. - Highlights: • Milling and water soluble salts have a synergic effect on hydrogen generation. • Salt and aluminum form composite particles by milling. • Salt is dissolved in water leaving aluminum with much fresh surfaces for the reaction. • The chemical effect of salt on the reaction is negligible compared to its structural effect.

  10. A study of the decay modes of hot systems formed in the Ar + Au and Ar + Th reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, B.; Cramer, B.; Ingold, G.; Jahnke, U.; Schwinn, E.; Doubre, H.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.; Jiang, D.X.; Morjean, M.; Piasecki, E.; Pouthas, J.; Sokolov, A.; Gatty, B.; Jacquet, D.

    1990-01-01

    Decay channels of hot systems formed in Ar + Au and Ar + Th reactions have been investigated by measuring the associated neutron multiplicity with a 4π liquid scintillator detector. The presented results show that, in contrast with the conclusion of the folding angle method, fission remains very probable as a deexcitation channel for hot systems even at 44 MeV/u, but its cross section decreases when the bombarding energy increases from 32 MeV/u to 44 MeV/u. On the opposite, the heavy residue production increases in this incident energy domain. The average IMF multiplicity per central collision is shown to be large, minimum values of 1.0 and 1.2 have been found for E inc = 44 and 77 MeV/u respectively. The possible link between the previously observed saturation in the thermal energy deposited in the system and the increasing probability for this system to avoid fissioning for increasing bombarding energies is discussed. A possible explanation could be found in an important non equilibrium emission of light particles or IMFs

  11. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Liyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Li, Qianqian; Dong, Cezhou; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hongtao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Klie, Robert F.; Yassar, Reza Shahbazian

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Factorized distorted wave approximation for the (e,2e) reaction on atoms : noncoplanar symmetric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, A.J.; McCarthy, I.E.; Noble, C.J.; Weigold, E.

    1977-02-01

    Angular and energy correlations for electrons produced in the ionization of neon and xenon by electrons with energies between 400eV and 2.5 keV have been measured using symmetric noncoplanar kinematics. The reaction yields information about the atomic orbitals and their correlations when analysed with the distorted-wave off-shell impulse approximation. In the past either plane waves or various eikonal approximations have been used for the distorted waves, and in the cases where the eikonal parameters are approximately related to the elastic scattering the spectroscopic sum rule has been approximately verified. In the present work calculations have also been carried out using partial-wave-expanded optical model wave functions which describe the elastic scattering in detail. (Author)

  13. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati; Jiang, Qiu; Kurra, Narendra; Buttner, Ulrich; Wang, Xianbin; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  14. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Crossed molecular beam study of H and D atom reactions with NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberland, H.; Lucadou, W. von; Rohwer, P.

    1976-01-01

    Angular distributions and time of flight spectra of OH and OD from the reactions H + NO 2 and D + NO 2 have been measured at a relative kinetic energy of 440 meV (approximately 10 kcal/mol). Both angular distributions peak in the forward (atom beam) direction, the fall off to larger angles being more rapid for OD than for OH. Within statistical error the centre of mass velocity spectra do not show an isotope effect. Only 24 +- 5% of the total energy available is channeled into product translation independent of the isotope. This value is in very good agreement with our earlier results and with data from Polanyi and Sloans chemiluminescence experiments. (orig.) [de

  16. Selective Production of Renewable para-Xylene by Tungsten Carbide Catalyzed Atom-Economic Cascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tao; Li, Changzhi; Li, Lin; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Zhang, Bo; Cong, Yu; Wang, Aiqin

    2018-02-12

    Tungsten carbide was employed as the catalyst in an atom-economic and renewable synthesis of para-xylene with excellent selectivity and yield from 4-methyl-3-cyclohexene-1-carbonylaldehyde (4-MCHCA). This intermediate is the product of the Diels-Alder reaction between the two readily available bio-based building blocks acrolein and isoprene. Our results suggest that 4-MCHCA undergoes a novel dehydroaromatization-hydrodeoxygenation cascade process by intramolecular hydrogen transfer that does not involve an external hydrogen source, and that the hydrodeoxygenation occurs through the direct dissociation of the C=O bond on the W 2 C surface. Notably, this process is readily applicable to the synthesis of various (multi)methylated arenes from bio-based building blocks, thus potentially providing a petroleum-independent solution to valuable aromatic compounds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  18. Proceedings of the 2nd joint seminar on atomic collisions and heavy ion induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kichinosuke; Ozawa, Kunio; Kamitsubo, H.; Nomura, T.; Awaya, Y.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-11-01

    The meeting of the 2nd joint seminar on atomic collisions and heavy ion induced nuclear reactions was held at the University of Tokyo, May 13 and 14, 1982. The aim of this seminar has been not only to recognize the common problems lying between above two research fields, but also to obtain an overview of the theoretical and experimental approaches to clear the current problems. In the seminar, more than 50 participants gathered and presented 16 papers. These are two general reviews and fourteen comprehensive surveys on topical subjects which have been developed very intensively in recent years. The editors would like to thank all participants for their assistance and cooperation in making possible a publication of these proceedings. (author)

  19. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 64}Ni + {sup 144,154}Sm reaction -- Energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The fission hindrance of hot nuclei was deduced recently from an enhanced emission of GDR {gamma} rays, neutrons and charged particles prior to scission of heavy nuclei. In the most recent experiments addressing this topic, namely new measurements of the pre-scission {gamma} rays and evaporation residues from the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reaction, a rather sharp transition from negligible to full one-body dissipation occurs over the excitation energy region E{sub exc} = 60-100 MeV. However, the cross section does not appear to level out or start to decline again at the upper end of the energy range as expected in this interpretation. It is therefore clearly desirable to extend the excitation energy range to look for such an effect in order to either corroborate or refute this interpretation.

  20. MoS2 monolayer catalyst doped with isolated Co atoms for the hydrodeoxygenation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoliang; Robertson, Alex W.; Li, Molly Meng-Jung; Kuo, Winson C. H.; Darby, Matthew T.; Muhieddine, Mohamad H.; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Stamatakis, Michail; Warner, Jamie H.; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2017-08-01

    The conversion of oxygen-rich biomass into hydrocarbon fuels requires efficient hydrodeoxygenation catalysts during the upgrading process. However, traditionally prepared CoMoS2 catalysts, although efficient for hydrodesulfurization, are not appropriate due to their poor activity, sulfur loss and rapid deactivation at elevated temperature. Here, we report the synthesis of MoS2 monolayer sheets decorated with isolated Co atoms that bond covalently to sulfur vacancies on the basal planes that, when compared with conventionally prepared samples, exhibit superior activity, selectivity and stability for the hydrodeoxygenation of 4-methylphenol to toluene. This higher activity allows the reaction temperature to be reduced from the typically used 300 °C to 180 °C and thus allows the catalysis to proceed without sulfur loss and deactivation. Experimental analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal a large number of sites at the interface between the Co and Mo atoms on the MoS2 basal surface and we ascribe the higher activity to the presence of sulfur vacancies that are created local to the observed Co-S-Mo interfacial sites.

  1. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  2. Investigations of reactions between pure refractory metals and light gases with the field ion microscope and atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krautz, E.; Haiml, G.

    1989-01-01

    The initial stages of selected reactions of the refractory metals tungsten, niobium and tantalum with hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and methane have been studied with the field ion microscope in atomic resolution whereby the composition of single net planes converages and surface zones could absolutely be analyzed with the atom probe by using field desorption under defined conditions at low temperatures. 14 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  3. Products and mechanism of the reaction of Cl atoms with unsaturated alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana; Rodríguez, Diana; Soto, Amparo; Bravo, Iván; Diaz-de-Mera, Yolanda; Notario, Alberto; Aranda, Alfonso

    2012-04-01

    The products of the chlorine atom initiated oxidation of different unsaturated alcohols were determined at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature, in a 400 L teflon reaction chamber using GC-FID and GC-MS for the analysis. The major products detected (with molar yields in brackets) are: chloroacetaldehyde (50 ± 8%) and acrolein (27 ± 2%) from allyl alcohol; acetaldehyde (77 ± 11%), chloroacetaldehyde (75 ± 18%), and methyl vinyl ketone (17 ± 2%) from 3-buten-2-ol; acetone (55 ± 4%) and chloroacetaldehyde (59 ± 8%) from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol; chloroacetone (18 ± 1%) and methacrolein (8 ± 1%) from 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol; acetaldehyde (20 ± 1%), crotonaldehyde (6 ± 3%), 3-choloro-4-hydroxy-2-butanone (2 ± 2%) and 2-chloro-propanal (4 ± 5%) from crotyl alcohol; and acetone (24 ± 3%) from 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol. The experimental data suggests that addition of Cl to the double bond of the unsaturated alcohol is the dominant reaction pathway compared to the H-abstraction channel.

  4. Theoretical Investigation of the Interfacial Reactions during Hot-Dip Galvanizing of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, G. K.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mehrotra, S. P.

    2009-03-01

    In the modern galvanizing line, as soon as the steel strip enters the aluminum-containing zinc bath, two reactions occur at the strip and the liquid-zinc alloy interface: (1) iron rapidly dissolves from the strip surface, raising the iron concentration in the liquid phase at the strip-liquid interface; and (2) aluminum forms a stable aluminum-iron intermetallic compound layer at the strip-coating interface due to its greater affinity toward iron. The main objective of this study is to develop a simple and realistic mathematical model for better understanding of the kinetics of galvanizing reactions at the strip and the liquid-zinc alloy interface. In the present study, a model is proposed to simulate the effect of various process parameters on iron dissolution in the bath, as well as, aluminum-rich inhibition layer formation at the substrate-coating interface. The transient-temperature profile of the immersed strip is predicted based on conductive and convective heat-transfer mechanisms. The inhibition-layer thickness at the substrate-coating interface is predicted by assuming the cooling path of the immersed strip consists of a series of isothermal holds of infinitesimal time-step. The influence of galvanizing reaction is assessed by considering nucleation and growth mechanisms at each hold time, which is used to estimate the total effect of the immersion time on the formation mechanism of the inhibition layer. The iron- dissolution model is developed based on well established principles of diffusion taking into consideration the area fraction covered by the intermetallic on the strip surface during formation of the inhibition layer. The model can be effectively used to monitor the dross formation in the bath by optimizing the process parameters. Theoretical predictions are compared with the findings of other researchers. Simulated results are in good agreement with the theoretical and experimental observation carried out by other investigators.

  5. Reaction of atomic bromine with acetylene and loss rate of atmospheric acetylene due to reaction with OH, Cl, O, and Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.; Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The first-order, diffusion, and bimolecular rate constants for the reaction Br + C2H2 yields C2H3Br are evaluated. The rate constants are measured at 210, 248, 298, and 393 K and at pressures between 15-100 torr Ar using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of atomic bromine via Br resonance radiation. It is observed that the reaction is not affected by pressure or temperature and the bimolecular constant = (4.0 + or - 0.8) x 10 to the -15th cu cm/sec with an error of two standard deviations. The C2H2 + Br reaction rates are compared with reactions of C2H2 with Cl, OH, NH2, and H. The loss rates for atmospheric C2H2 for reactions with OH, Cl, O, and Br are calculated as a function of altitude.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Gas-Phase Reaction of Selected Carbonyls with Cl Atoms between 250 and 340 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, A. S.; Algrim, L.; Abdelhamid, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonyls are important products from the gas phase degradation of most volatile organic compounds. Their atmospheric reactions therefore have a significant impact on atmospheric composition, particularly in aged air masses. While the reactions of short-chain linear carbonyls are well understood, the chemistry of larger (> C6) and branched carbonyl is more uncertain. To provide insight into these reactions, the reactions of three carbonyls (methyl isopropyl ketone, MIK; di-isopropyl ketone, DIK; and diethyl ketone, DEK) with chlorine atoms were investigated between 250 and 340 K and 1 atm in the presence and absence of NOx and an HO2 source (methanol). Experiments were performed in a photochemical reactor using a combination of long-path Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The kinetics were studied using the relative rate technique with butanone and isopropanol as the reference compounds. The Arrhenius expression for the three rate coefficients was determined to be k(DEK+Cl) = 3.87 x 10-11e(2 × 7 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , k(MIPK+Cl) = 7.20 x 10-11e(0.2× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , and k(DIPK+Cl) = 3.33 x 10-10e(-3× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 . Measured reaction products accounted for 38-72 % of the reacted carbon and were consistent with strong deactivation of the carbon atom adjacent to the carbonyl group with respect to H-atom abstraction by Cl atoms. The product distributions also provide insight into radical recycling from the organic peroxy + HO2 reaction, and the relative rates of isomerization, fragmentation and reaction with O2 for carbonyl-containing alkoxy radicals. Implications of these results will be discussed.

  7. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Nam Yu

    2015-10-01

    Results and conclusion: Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  8. Nafion®-catalyzed microwave-assisted Ritter reaction: An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    An atom-economic solvent-free synthesis of amides by the Ritter reaction of alcohols and nitriles under microwave irradiation is reported. This green protocol is catalyzed by solid supported Nafion®NR50 with improved efficiency and reduced waste production.

  9. Presolvated Electron Reaction with Methylacetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-atom Abstraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Alex; Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methylacetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-CO-OCH3) at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-CO-OCH3) in the temperature range (77 to ca. 170 K) have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylen protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K), CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-CO-OCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) support the radical assignments. PMID:25255751

  10. Diode laser probe of CO2 vibrational excitation produced by collisions with hot deuterium atoms from the 193 nm excimer laser photolysis D2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.A.; Cai, J.Y.; Flynn, G.W.; Weston, R.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of D 2 S in D 2 S/CO 2 mixtures produces fast deuterium atoms (E/sub TR/approx.2.2 eV) which vibrationally excite CO 2 molecules via inelastic translation--vibration/rotation (T--V/R) energy exchange processes. A high resolution (10 -3 cm -1 ) cw diode laser probe was used to monitor the excitation of ν 3 (antisymmetric stretch) and ν 2 (bend) vibrations in CO 2 . The present results are compared with previous experiments involving hot hydrogen atom excitation of CO 2 in H 2 S/CO 2 mixtures as well as with theoretical calculations of the excitation probability. The probability for excitation of a ν 3 quantum in CO 2 is about 1%--2% per gas kinetic D/CO 2 collision. Bending (ν 2 ) quanta are produced about eight times more efficiently than antisymmetric stretching (ν 3 ) quanta. The thermalization rate for cooling hot D atoms below the threshold for production of a ν 3 vibrational quantum corresponds to less than 2 D*/D 2 S collisions or 15 D*/CO 2 collisions

  11. An integrated high temperature environmental cell for atom probe tomography studies of gas-surface reactions: Instrumentation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.R.; Bagot, P.A.J.; Rajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated environmental cell has been designed and developed for the latest generation of Atom Probe Tomography LEAP™ instruments, allowing controlled exposure of samples to gases at high temperatures. Following treatment, samples can be transferred through the LEAP vacuum system for subsequent APT analysis, which provides detailed information on changes to chemical microstructures following the reactions with near-atomic resolution. A full description of the cell is presented, along with some sample results on the oxidation of aluminum and two platinum-group alloys, demonstrating the capability of combining exposure/characterization functionality in a single instrument. - Highlights: • Designed and built atom probe environmental cell for in situ reactions. • Investigated Al oxidation, and demonstrated improvement with new cell. • in situ APT analysis of Pt-alloys showed surface segregation of Rh and Ir

  12. Atom-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H5→C3H4+OH: Nascent rovibrational state distributions of product OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Hohjai; Kwon, Han-Cheol; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Young-Sang; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2002-08-01

    The reaction dynamics of ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3P)] with allyl radicals (C3H5) has been investigated by applying a combination of crossed beams and laser induced fluorescence techniques. The reactants O(3P) and C3H5 were produced by the photodissociation of NO2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of precursor allyl iodide, respectively. A new exothermic channel of O(3P)+C3H5→C3H4+OH was observed and the nascent internal state distributions of the product OH (X 2Π:υ″=0,1) showed substantial bimodal internal excitations of the low- and high-N″ components without Λ-doublet and spin-orbit propensities in the ground and first excited vibrational states. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations, it is predicted that on the lowest doublet potential energy surface the major reaction channel of O(3P) with C3H5 is the formation of acrolein (CH2CHCHO)+H, which is consistent with the previous bulk kinetic experiments performed by Gutman et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 94, 3652 (1990)]. The counterpart C3H4 of the probed OH product in the title reaction is calculated to be allene after taking into account the factors of reaction enthalpy, barrier height and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. On the basis of population analyses and comparison with prior calculations, the statistical picture is not suitable to describe the reactive atom-radical scattering processes, and the dynamics of the title reaction is believed to proceed through two competing dynamical pathways. The major low N″-components with significant vibrational excitation may be described by the direct abstraction process, while the minor but extraordinarily hot rotational distribution of high N″-components implies that some fraction of reactants is sampled to proceed through the indirect short-lived addition-complex forming process.

  13. Unveiling the high-activity origin of single-atom iron catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Cheng, Daojian; Xu, Haoxiang; Zeng, Xiaofei; Wan, Xin; Shui, Jianglan; Xiang, Zhonghua; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-06-26

    It is still a grand challenge to develop a highly efficient nonprecious-metal electrocatalyst to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we propose a surfactant-assisted method to synthesize single-atom iron catalysts (SA-Fe/NG). The half-wave potential of SA-Fe/NG is only 30 mV less than 20% Pt/C in acidic medium, while it is 30 mV superior to 20% Pt/C in alkaline medium. Moreover, SA-Fe/NG shows extremely high stability with only 12 mV and 15 mV negative shifts after 5,000 cycles in acidic and alkaline media, respectively. Impressively, the SA-Fe/NG-based acidic proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) exhibits a high power density of 823 mW cm -2 Combining experimental results and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we further reveal that the origin of high-ORR activity of SA-Fe/NG is from the Fe-pyrrolic-N species, because such molecular incorporation is the key, leading to the active site increase in an order of magnitude which successfully clarifies the bottleneck puzzle of why a small amount of iron in the SA-Fe catalysts can exhibit extremely superior ORR activity.

  14. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Shchepunov, V. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Gulbekyan, G. G.; Khabarov, M. V.; Bekhterev, V. V.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Efremov, A. A.; Pashenko, S. V.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Yeremin, A. V.; Yavor, M. I.; Kalimov, A. G.

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A≈20 to A≈500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90° electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  15. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Oganessian, Yu T; Dmitriev, S N; Itkis, M G; Gulbekyan, G G; Khabarov, M V; Bekhterev, V V; Bogomolov, S L; Efremov, A A; Pashenko, S V; Stepantsov, S V; Yeremin, A V; Yavor, M I; Kalimov, A G

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 sup - sup 3. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A approx 20 to A approx 500, its mass acceptance is as large as +-2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considere...

  16. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10 -3 . The set up can work in the wide mass range from A∼20 to A∼500, its mass acceptance is as large as ±2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given

  17. The project of the mass separator of atomic nuclei produced in heavy ion induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Shchepunov, V.A. E-mail: shchepun@sunhe.jinr.rushchepun@cv.jinr.ru; Dmitriev, S.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Gulbekyan, G.G.; Khabarov, M.V.; Bekhterev, V.V.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Pashenko, S.V.; Stepantsov, S.V.; Yeremin, A.V.; Yavor, M.I.; Kalimov, A.G

    2003-05-01

    A new separator and mass analyzer, named MASHA (mass analyzer of super heavy atoms), has been designed at the Flerov Laboratory JINR Dubna to separate and measure masses of nuclei and molecules with precision better than 10{sup -3}. The set up can work in the wide mass range from A{approx}20 to A{approx}500, its mass acceptance is as large as {+-}2.8%. In particular, it allows unambiguous mass identification of super heavy nuclei with a resolution better than 1 amu at the level of 300 amu. Synthesized in nuclear reactions nuclides are emitted from an ECR ion source at energy E=40 kV and charge state Q=+1. Then they pass the following steps of separation and analysis: the first section of rough separation, the second section of separation and mass analysis and the final section of separation with a 90 deg. electrostatic deflector. In the focal plane of the device, a focal plane detector determines positions (masses) of studied nuclei. Ion optics of the analyzer, optimized up to the second order, is considered. Description of its elements and subsystems is given.

  18. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Atmospheric reactions of methylcyclohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals: determination of rate coefficients and degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Bernabé; Ceacero-Vega, Antonio A; Jiménez, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    As the result of biogenic and anthropogenic activities, large quantities of chemical compounds are emitted into the troposphere. Alkanes, in general, and cycloalkanes are an important chemical class of hydrocarbons found in diesel, jet and gasoline, vehicle exhaust emissions, and ambient air in urban areas. In general, the primary atmospheric fate of organic compounds in the gas phase is the reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH). The oxidation by Cl atoms has gained importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments, and in the Arctic troposphere. The aim of this paper is to study of the atmospheric reactivity of methylcylohexanes with Cl atoms and OH radicals under atmospheric conditions (in air at room temperature and pressure). Relative kinetic techniques have been used to determine the rate coefficients for the reaction of Cl atoms and OH radicals with methylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and 1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane at 298 ± 2 K and 720 ± 5 Torr of air by Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in two atmospheric simulation chambers. The products formed in the reaction under atmospheric conditions were investigated using a 200-L Teflon bag and employing the technique of solid-phase microextraction coupled to a GC-MS. The rate coefficients obtained for the reaction of Cl atoms with the studied compounds are the following ones (in units of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (3.11 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.16), (2.89 ± 0.26), and (2.61 ± 0.42), respectively. For the reactions with OH radicals the determined rate coefficients are (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)): (1.18 ± 0.12), (1.49 ± 0.16), (1.41 ± 0.15), and (1.77 ± 0.23), respectively. The reported error is twice the standard deviation. A detailed

  20. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-02-28

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory.

  1. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  2. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  3. Breakout from the hot CNO cycle: the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}) and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradfield-Smith, W; Laird, A M; Davinson, T; Pietro, A di; Ostrowski, A N; Shotter, A C; Woods, P J [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cherubini, S; Galster, W; Graulich, J S; Leleux, P; Michel, L; Ninane, A; Vervier, J [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Aliotta, M; Cali, D; Cappussello, F; Cunsolo, A; Spitaleri, C [INFN, Catania (Italy); Gorres, J; Wiescher, M [Notre Dame Univ. (United States); Rahighi, J [Van de Graaf Lab., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hinnefeld, J [Indiana Univ., South Bend (United States)

    1998-06-01

    One of the most important reactions which determines the rate of breakout from the hot CNO cycle is the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne. The reaction {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na may also provide an alternative breakout route. Experiments are being undertaken at Louvain-La-Neuve using the radioactive {sup 18}Ne beam to study these reactions by measurement of {alpha}({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 21}Na and d({sup 18}Ne,p){sup 19}Ne{sup *} {yields} {sup 15}O + {alpha} (orig.)

  4. Ceramic containers for spent nuclear fuel. II. Reactions between TiO2 and the steel canning during hot isostatic processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, B.; Forberg, S.

    1984-01-01

    Rutile was selected for some practical studies of processing and properties of ceramic containers. Hot isostatic pressing at 1280 0 C has resulted in reaction zones between the TiO 2 powder and the steel canning. The phases ilmenite, pseudobrookite, rutile, and iron have been identified by x-ray diffraction and by microprobe analysis. The microstructures have been interpreted by classical metallographic methods, and some microstructures obtained by hot pressing and rapid cooling have also been examined for purposes of comparison. Some implications of the microstructures have been discussed in terms of microcracking and slow crack growth. 13 refs., 7 figs

  5. Experimental Investigation of the ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na Reaction Rate and Implications for Breakout from the Hot CNO Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarge, J; Kuvin, S A; Baby, L T; Baker, J; Wiedenhöver, I; Höflich, P; Volya, A; Blackmon, J C; Deibel, C M; Gardiner, H E; Lai, J; Linhardt, L E; Macon, K T; Need, E; Rasco, B C; Quails, N; Colbert, K; Gay, D L; Keeley, N

    2016-10-28

    The ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na reaction is the second step of a reaction chain which breaks out from the hot CNO cycle, following the ^{15}O(α,γ)^{19}Ne reaction at the onset of x-ray burst events. We investigate the spectrum of the lowest proton-unbound states in ^{20}Na in an effort to resolve contradictions in spin-parity assignments and extract reliable information about the thermal reaction rate. The proton-transfer reaction ^{19}Ne(d,n)^{20}Na is measured with a beam of the radioactive isotope ^{19}Ne at an energy around the Coulomb barrier and in inverse kinematics. We observe three proton resonances with the ^{19}Ne ground state, at 0.44, 0.66, and 0.82 MeV c.m. energies, which are assigned 3^{+}, 1^{+}, and (0^{+}), respectively. In addition, we identify two resonances with the first excited state in ^{19}Ne, one at 0.20 MeV and one, tentatively, at 0.54 MeV. These observations allow us for the first time to experimentally quantify the astrophysical reaction rate on an excited nuclear state. Our experiment shows an efficient path for thermal proton capture in ^{19}Ne(p,γ)^{20}Na, which proceeds through ground state and excited-state capture in almost equal parts and eliminates the possibility for this reaction to create a bottleneck in the breakout from the hot CNO cycle.

  6. O-, N-Atoms-Coordinated Mn Cofactors within a Graphene Framework as Bioinspired Oxygen Reduction Reaction Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Mao, Kaitian; Gao, Shiqi; Huang, Hao; Xia, Guoliang; Lin, Zhiyu; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Changlai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Qianwang

    2018-05-28

    Manganese (Mn) is generally regarded as not being sufficiently active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared to other transition metals such as Fe and Co. However, in biology, manganese-containing enzymes can catalyze oxygen-evolving reactions efficiently with a relative low onset potential. Here, atomically dispersed O and N atoms coordinated Mn active sites are incorporated within graphene frameworks to emulate both the structure and function of Mn cofactors in heme-copper oxidases superfamily. Unlike previous single-metal catalysts with general M-N-C structures, here, it is proved that a coordinated O atom can also play a significant role in tuning the intrinsic catalytic activities of transition metals. The biomimetic electrocatalyst exhibits superior performance for the ORR and zinc-air batteries under alkaline conditions, which is even better than that of commercial Pt/C. The excellent performance can be ascribed to the abundant atomically dispersed Mn cofactors in the graphene frameworks, confirmed by various characterization methods. Theoretical calculations reveal that the intrinsic catalytic activity of metal Mn can be significantly improved via changing local geometry of nearest coordinated O and N atoms. Especially, graphene frameworks containing the Mn-N 3 O 1 cofactor demonstrate the fastest ORR kinetics due to the tuning of the d electronic states to a reasonable state. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Photo induced multiple fragmentation of atoms and molecules: Dynamics of Coulombic many-particle systems studied with the COLTRIMS reaction microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czasch, A.; Schmidt, L.Ph.H.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Jagutzki, O.; Schoessler, S.; Schoeffler, M.S.; Doerner, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    2005-01-01

    Many-particle dynamics in atomic and molecular physics has been investigated by using the COLTRIMS reaction microscope. The COLTRIMS technique visualizes photon and ion induced many-particle fragmentation processes in the eV and milli-eV regime. It reveals the complete momentum pattern in atomic and molecular many-particle reactions comparable to the bubble chamber in nuclear physics

  8. Reaction layer growth and reaction heat of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels using centrifugally atomized powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Han, Young Soo; Park, Jong Man; Park, Soon Dal; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2003-01-01

    The growth behavior of reaction layers and heat generation during the reaction between U-Mo powders and the Al matrix in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels were investigated. Annealing of 10 vol.% U-10Mo/Al dispersion fuels at temperatures from 500 to 550 deg. C was carried out for 10 min to 36 h to measure the growth rate and the activation energy for the growth of reaction layers. The concentration profiles of reaction layers between the U-10Mo vs. Al diffusion couples were measured and the integrated interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for the U and Al in the reaction layers. Heat generation of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels with 10-50 vol.% of U-Mo fuel during the thermal cycle from room temperature to 700 deg. C was measured employing the differential scanning calorimetry. Exothermic heat from the reaction between U-Mo and the Al matrix is the largest when the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel is about 30 vol.%. The unreacted fraction in the U-Mo powders increases as the volume fraction of U-Mo fuel increases from 30 to 50 vol.%

  9. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with Diethyl Ethylphosphonate and Triethyl Phosphate

    KAUST Repository

    Laversin, H.

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, the relative-rate technique has been used to obtain rate coefficients for the reaction of two organophosphorus compounds: Triethyl phosphate (TEP) and Diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) with OH radicals and Cl atoms at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298 – 352 K. The following expressions (in cm3molecule-1s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP and TEP: kOH+DEEP= (7.84±0.65)x10-14exp((1866±824)/T), kOH+TEP = (6.54±0.42)x10-14exp((1897±626)/T), kCl+DEEP = (5.27± 0.80)x10−11exp(765±140/T) and kCl+TEP = (5.23± 0.80)x10−11exp(736± 110/T). These results show that the reaction of the studied compounds with Cl atoms proceeds more rapidly than that with OH radicals. The related tropospheric lifetimes suggest that once emitted into the atmosphere, TEP and DEEP can be removed within a few hours in areas close to their emission sources. TEP and DEEP are principally removed by OH radicals. However, in coastal areas where the Cl atoms’ concentration is higher, TEP and DEEP removal by reaction with Cl atoms could be a competitive process.

  10. Application of discrete solvent reaction field model with self-consistent atomic charges and atomic polarizabilities to calculate the χ(1) and χ(2) of organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2018-01-01

    We use the discrete solvent reaction field model to evaluate the linear and second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of 3-methyl-4-nitropyridine-1-oxyde crystal. In this approach, crystal environment is created by supercell architecture. A self-consistent procedure is used to obtain charges and polarizabilities for environmental atoms. Impact of atomic polarizabilities on the properties of interest is highlighted. This approach is shown to give the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities within error bar of experiment as well as the linear optical susceptibilities in the same order as experiment. Similar quality of calculations are also applied to both 4-N,N-dimethylamino-3-acetamidonitrobenzene and 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline crystals.

  11. Hot atom chemistry in oxyanion targets: Part 3. Some theoretical aspects of reincorporation of parent form in permanganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Singh, J.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to advance qualitative and quantitative interpretations for the observed data on retention of recoil 56 Mn in potassium and ammonium permanganates in the light of following physical models; (a) extreme back-diffusion model, (b) billiard-ball collision model and (c) hot zone model. (author). 6 tables, 22 refs

  12. Study of porogen removal by atomic hydrogen generated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition for the fabrication of advanced low-k thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godavarthi, S., E-mail: srinivas@cinvestav.mx [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Universidad, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wang, C.; Verdonck, P. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matsumoto, Y.; Koudriavtsev, I. [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Tielens, H.; Baklanov, M.R. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-01-30

    In order to obtain low-k dielectric films, a subtractive technique, which removes sacrificial porogens from a hydrogenated silicon oxycarbide (SiOC:H) film, has been used successfully by different groups in the past. In this paper, we report on the porogen removal from porogenated SiOC:H films, using a hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) equipment. Molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atomic hydrogen by the hot wires and these atoms may successfully remove the hydrocarbon groups from the porogenated SiOC:H films. The temperature of the HWCVD filaments proved to be a determining factor. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), ellipsometric porosimetry and capacitance-voltage analyses, it was possible to determine that for temperatures higher than 1700 °C, efficient porogen removal occurred. For temperatures higher than 1800 °C, the presence of OH groups was detected. The dielectric constant was the lowest, 2.28, for the samples processed at a filament temperature of 1800 °C, although porosity measurements showed higher porosity for the films deposited at the higher temperatures. XRR and SIMS analyses indicated densification and Tungsten (W) incorporation at the top few nanometers of the films.

  13. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  14. HBr Formation from the Reaction between Gas-phase Bromine Atom and Vibrationally Excited Chemisorbed Hydrogen Atoms on a Si(001)-(2 x 1) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, J.; Yoon, S. H.; Park, K. G.; Kim, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the probability of HBr formation and energy disposal of the reaction exothermicity in HBr produced from the reaction of gas-phase bromine with highly covered chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on a Si (001)-(2 x 1) surface. The reaction probability is about 0.20 at gas temperature 1500 K and surface temperature 300 K. Raising the initial vibrational state of the adsorbate(H)-surface(Si) bond from the ground to v = 1, 2 and 3 states causes the vibrational, translational and rotational energies of the product HBr to increase equally. However, the vibrational and translational motions of product HBr share most of the reaction energy. Vibrational population of the HBr molecules produced from the ground state adsorbate-surface bond (vHSi = 0) follows the Boltzmann distribution, but it deviates seriously from the Boltzmann distribution when the initial vibrational energy of the adsorbate-surface bond increases. When the vibration of the adsorbate-surface bond is in the ground state, the amount of energy dissipated into the surface is negative, while it becomes positive as vHSi increases. The energy distributions among the various modes weakly depends on surface temperature in the range of 0-600 K, regardless of the initial vibrational state of H(ad)-Si(s) bond

  15. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  16. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  17. Atomic Layer Control of Thin Film Growth Using Binary Reaction Sequence Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Our research is focusing on the atomic layer control of thin film growth. Our goal is to deposit films with precise control of thickness and conformality on both flat and high aspect ratio structures...

  18. Single Cobalt Atoms with Precise N-Coordination as Superior Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peiqun; Yao, Tao; Wu, Yuen; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Yue; Liu, Wei; Ju, Huanxin; Zhu, Junfa; Hong, Xun; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Zhou, Gang; Wei, Shiqiang; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-26

    A new strategy for achieving stable Co single atoms (SAs) on nitrogen-doped porous carbon with high metal loading over 4 wt % is reported. The strategy is based on a pyrolysis process of predesigned bimetallic Zn/Co metal-organic frameworks, during which Co can be reduced by carbonization of the organic linker and Zn is selectively evaporated away at high temperatures above 800 °C. The spherical aberration correction electron microscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements both confirm the atomic dispersion of Co atoms stabilized by as-generated N-doped porous carbon. Surprisingly, the obtained Co-Nx single sites exhibit superior ORR performance with a half-wave potential (0.881 V) that is more positive than commercial Pt/C (0.811 V) and most reported non-precious metal catalysts. Durability tests revealed that the Co single atoms exhibit outstanding chemical stability during electrocatalysis and thermal stability that resists sintering at 900 °C. Our findings open up a new routine for general and practical synthesis of a variety of materials bearing single atoms, which could facilitate new discoveries at the atomic scale in condensed materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Production and transport chemistry of atomic fluorine in remote plasma source and cylindrical reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangoli, S P; Johnson, A D; Fridman, A A; Pearce, R V; Gutsol, A F; Dolgopolsky, A

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, NF 3 -based plasmas are being used in semiconductor manufacturing to clean chemical vapour deposition (CVD) chambers. With advantages such as faster clean times, substantially lower emissions of gases having high global warming potentials, and reduced chamber damage, NF 3 plasmas are now favoured over fluorocarbon-based processes. Typically, a remote plasma source (RPS) is used to dissociate the NF 3 gas and produce atomic fluorine that etches the CVD residues from the chamber surfaces. However, it is important to efficiently transport F atoms from the plasma source into the process chamber. The current work is aimed at understanding and improving the key processes involved in the production and transport of atomic fluorine atoms. A zero-dimensional model of NF 3 dissociation and F production chemistry in the RPS is developed based on various known and derived plasma parameters. Additionally, a model describing the transport of atomic fluorine is proposed that includes both physical (diffusion, adsorption and desorption) and chemical processes (surface and three-body volume recombination). The kinetic model provides an understanding of the impact of chamber geometry, gas flow rates, pressure and temperature on fluorine recombination. The plasma-kinetic model is validated by comparing model predictions (percentage F atom density) with experimental results (etch rates)

  20. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the molecular beam kinetics of the deuterium atom--hydrogen halide exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, L.M.; Suzukawa, H.H. Jr.; Thompson, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Unadjusted quasiclassical trajectory computations have been carried out to simulate the molecular beam scattering of thermal D atom beams at 2800 degreeK crossed with beams of HCl and HI at 250 degreeK. Total reaction cross sections, energy partitioning distributions, and differential scattering cross sections have been computed for the exchange reactions D+HCl → DCl+H and D+HI → DI+H while total reaction cross sections are reported for the corresponding abstractions, i.e., D+HCl → HD+Cl and D+HI → HD+I. For the exchange reactions, the computed reaction cross sections are within the range estimated from the crossed beam experiments. The calculated average energy partitioned into relative translational motion of products is in near quantitative agreement with the beam results, and the predicted differential scattering cross sections appear to be in qualitative accord with the beam experiments. The over-all agreement between theory and experiment indicates that previously computed values for the thermal rate coefficients for the exchange reactions are of the right order and that a systematic error exists in the interpretation of photolysis data in the hydrogen--hydrogen halide systems

  1. Exchange and polarization effects in the elementary excitation spectrum of a hydrogen atom immersed in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharma-wardana, M.W.C.; Grimaldi, F.; Lecourt, A.; Pellissier, J.

    1980-01-01

    The one-particle hydrogenic Green's function has been calculated for a partially ionized plasma consisting of hydrogen atoms, electrons, and protons at high temperatures. The theoretical method extends a previous publication and involves an evaluation of the mass operator in the Dyson equation to include proper self-energy parts to ''all orders'' in the screened interaction. This mass operator characterizes the effective micropotential felt by the atom in the plasma and determines all of the one-particle properties and some two-particle properties associated with the atomic subsystem. The first-order mass operator is nonzero only for exchange scattering, which leads to a frequency-independent exchange shift. This temperature- and density-dependent theory of the exchange shift replaces the usual semiphenomenological schemes based on the Slater-Kohn-Sham type of theory. The exchange-shifted Green's functions are used in evaluating the higher-order contributions. Computer calculations and the resolution of the poles of the Green's function lead to level shifts, widths, and spectral functions. These are calculated within both the second-order and the all-order theory. The second-order theory, which may be valid at sufficiently high densities and in turbulent plasmas, overemphasises the atom-plasmon coupling and shows new structures. The inclusion of contributions beyond second order removes these structures and produces a more ''conventional'' spectral-intensity function. The effects of center-of-mass motion on the level shifts and level profiles are investigated and the onset of plasma instabilities touched upon. These calculations make contact with the work on ''plasma-polarization shifts'' and provide an approach to q,ω-dependent plasma microfields

  2. Prediction of Tetraoxygen Reaction Mechanism with Sulfur Atom on the Singlet Potential Energy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Khademzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of S+O4 (D2h reaction has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df and CCSD levels on the singlet potential energy surface. One stable complex has been found for the S+O4 (D2h reaction, IN1, on the singlet potential energy surface. For the title reaction, we obtained four kinds of products at the B3LYP level, which have enough thermodynamic stability. The results reveal that the product P3 is spontaneous and exothermic with −188.042 and −179.147 kcal/mol in Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of reaction, respectively. Because P1 adduct is produced after passing two low energy level transition states, kinetically, it is the most favorable adduct in the 1S+1O4 (D2h atmospheric reactions.

  3. Nonheme Fe(IV) Oxo Complexes of Two New Pentadentate Ligands and Their Hydrogen-Atom and Oxygen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Mainak; Nimir, Hassan; Demeshko, Serhiy; Bhat, Satish S; Malinkin, Sergey O; Haukka, Matti; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Lisensky, George C; Meyer, Franc; Shteinman, Albert A; Browne, Wesley R; Hrovat, David A; Richmond, Michael G; Costas, Miquel; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-08-03

    Two new pentadentate {N5} donor ligands based on the N4Py (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) framework have been synthesized, viz. [N-(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(2-pyridyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridyl methyl)amine] (L(1)) and [N-bis(1-methyl-2-benzimidazolyl)methyl-N-(bis-2-pyridylmethyl)amine] (L(2)), where one or two pyridyl arms of N4Py have been replaced by corresponding (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl-containing arms. The complexes [Fe(II)(CH3CN)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (1); L(2) (2)) were synthesized, and reaction of these ferrous complexes with iodosylbenzene led to the formation of the ferryl complexes [Fe(IV)(O)(L)](2+) (L = L(1) (3); L(2) (4)), which were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution mass spectrometry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Complexes 3 and 4 are relatively stable with half-lives at room temperature of 40 h (L = L(1)) and 2.5 h (L = L(2)). The redox potentials of 1 and 2, as well as the visible spectra of 3 and 4, indicate that the ligand field weakens as ligand pyridyl substituents are progressively substituted by (N-methyl)benzimidazolyl moieties. The reactivities of 3 and 4 in hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) and oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions show that both complexes exhibit enhanced reactivities when compared to the analogous N4Py complex ([Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+)), and that the normalized HAT rates increase by approximately 1 order of magnitude for each replacement of a pyridyl moiety; i.e., [Fe(IV)(O)(L(2))](2+) exhibits the highest rates. The second-order HAT rate constants can be directly related to the substrate C-H bond dissociation energies. Computational modeling of the HAT reactions indicates that the reaction proceeds via a high spin transition state.

  4. Reaction mechanisms and kinetics of processing glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures under hot compressed water conditions for predicting bio-crude composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigoras, Ionela; Toor, Saqib Sohail; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    Mechanisms for bio-crude formation during the conversion of glucose, xylose and glucose-xylose mixtures as biomass model compounds under hot compressed water conditions are investigated. Studies in literature have shown that the diverse products formed at the early stages of glucose or xylose...... conversion are 5-HMF, erythrose, glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, pyruvaldehyde, and saccharinic acids resulted through reactions such as dehydration, retro-aldol condensation and isomerization. However, these compounds are mostly water soluble compounds and lack the final steps towards formation of water...... insoluble components at longer reaction times. The effects of pressure, pH, catalyst and reaction time on the main products are examined thoroughly. The possible routes for the formation of oil compounds are developed....

  5. Evidence for different fission behavior of hot nuclei formed in central and peripheral collisions of 40Ar + 209Bi reaction at 25 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Enjiu; Zheng Jiwen; Xiao Zhigang; Zhang Chun; Tan Jilian; Yin Shuzhi; Wang Sufang; Jin Genming; Yin Xu; Song Mingtao; Jin Weiyang; Peng Xingping; Li Zuyu; Wu Heyu; He Zhiyong; Jiang Dongxing; Qian Xing

    1999-01-01

    Correlated fission fragments from the reaction of 25 MeV/u 40 Ar + 209 Bi and their further correlation with α particles have been studied for peripheral and central collisions simultaneously. The excitation energy at scission deduced from post scission multiplicity is about 172.5 MeV. The fission timescale deduced from prescission multiplicity is about 4 x 10 -21 s. Systematic analysis of the mass and energy distributions of fission fragments as a function of the initial temperature of hot fissioning nuclei reveals the existence of different fission behavior of hot nuclei formed in central and peripheral collisions. Experimental data demonstrate the change of fission behavior at T∼4 MeV

  6. Effects of doping in 25-atom bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for carbon–carbon coupling reaction of iodoanisole and phenylacetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We here report the catalytic effects of foreign atoms (Cu, Ag, and Pt doped into well-defined 25-gold-atom nanoclusters. Using the carbon-carbon coupling reaction of p-iodoanisole and phenylacetylene as a model reaction, the gold-based bimetallic MxAu25−x(SR18 (–SR=–SCH2CH2Ph nanoclusters (supported on titania were found to exhibit distinct effects on the conversion of p-iodoanisole as well as the selectivity for the Sonogashira cross-coupling product, 1-methoxy-4-(2-phenylethynylbenzene. Compared to Au25(SR18, the centrally doped Pt1Au24(SR18 causes a drop in catalytic activity but with the selectivity retained, while the AgxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters gave an overall performance comparable to Au25(SR18. Interestingly, CuxAu25−x(SR18 nanoclusters prefer the Ullmann homo-coupling pathway and give rise to product 4,4′-dimethoxy-1,1′-biphenyl, which is in opposite to the other three nanocluster catalysts. Our overall conclusion is that the conversion of p-iodoanisole is largely affected by the electronic effect in the bimetallic nanoclusters’ 13-atom core (i.e., Pt1Au12, CuxAu13−x, and Au13, with the exception of Ag doping, and that the selectivity is primarily determined by the type of atoms on the MxAu12−x shell (M=Ag, Cu, and Au in the nanocluster catalysts.

  7. A New Road to Reactions Part 5: The Elements and Its Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that some students have in understanding the concept of chemical reactions. Proposes that instructors try to consider the various difficulties during a chemistry course when students form their concepts of element conservation. (TW)

  8. Determination of H-atom reaction rate constants by the competition kinetic technique using riboflavin as a standard solute [Paper No. RD-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Moorthy, P.N.; Rao, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    Riboflavin has been used as a standard solute to evaluate H-atom rate constants of other solutes by steady state radiolytic competition kinetic method. The bleaching of absorbance of riboflavin at 445 nm as a result of its reaction with H-atoms is made use of in estimating its decomposition. The merits and demerits of this method are discussed. (author)

  9. Using muonium to probe the kinetics of the reaction between the H atom and OH"- in superheated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, K.; Alcorn, C.; Brodovitch, J.-C.; Driedger, E.; Mozafari, M.; Percival, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Operation of a supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor requires knowledge of water chemistry over a wide range of conditions. The considerable knowledge gap for conditions above the operating temperature of current-generation CANDU reactors is the target of this study. Since the H atom is difficult to probe at the desired temperatures and pressures, muonium is used as an alternative. In the current CANDU reactors, coolant pH is controlled using LiOH. We are studying how the rate constants for the reaction of muonium with LiOH and NaOH change with temperature and pressure. (author)

  10. Using muonium to probe the kinetics of the reaction between the H atom and OH{sup -} in superheated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandi, K.; Alcorn, C. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Brodovitch, J.-C. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Driedger, E. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Mozafari, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); Percival, P.W. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Operation of a supercritical-water-cooled nuclear reactor requires knowledge of water chemistry over a wide range of conditions. The considerable knowledge gap for conditions above the operating temperature of current-generation CANDU reactors is the target of this study. Since the H atom is difficult to probe at the desired temperatures and pressures, muonium is used as an alternative. In the current CANDU reactors, coolant pH is controlled using LiOH. We are studying how the rate constants for the reaction of muonium with LiOH and NaOH change with temperature and pressure. (author)

  11. Need for reaction coordinates to ensure a complete basis set in an adiabatic representation of ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabli, Djamal; McCarroll, Ronald

    2018-02-01

    This review surveys the different theoretical approaches, used to describe inelastic and rearrangement processes in collisions involving atoms and ions. For a range of energies from a few meV up to about 1 keV, the adiabatic representation is expected to be valid and under these conditions, inelastic and rearrangement processes take place via a network of avoided crossings of the potential energy curves of the collision system. In general, such avoided crossings are finite in number. The non-adiabatic coupling, due to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer separation of the electronic and nuclear variables, depends on the ratio of the electron mass to the nuclear mass terms in the total Hamiltonian. By limiting terms in the total Hamiltonian correct to first order in the electron to nuclear mass ratio, a system of reaction coordinates is found which allows for a correct description of both inelastic channels. The connection between the use of reaction coordinates in the quantum description and the electron translation factors of the impact parameter approach is established. A major result is that only when reaction coordinates are used, is it possible to introduce the notion of a minimal basis set. Such a set must include all avoided crossings including both radial coupling and long range Coriolis coupling. But, only when reactive coordinates are used, can such a basis set be considered as complete. In particular when the centre of nuclear mass is used as centre of coordinates, rather than the correct reaction coordinates, it is shown that erroneous results are obtained. A few results to illustrate this important point are presented: one concerning a simple two-state Landau-Zener type avoided crossing, the other concerning a network of multiple crossings in a typical electron capture process involving a highly charged ion with a neutral atom.

  12. External heavy atom effect on intersystem crossing reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.

    1988-01-01

    The external heavy atom effect by xenon on the S 1 → T n and T 1 → S o transitions of naphthalene and pyrene was investigated in hydrocarbon solvents by fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. The quencher forms a short-lived encounter complex (that may be called exciplex as well) with the excited molecules in equilibrium process. This exciplex formation in solutions with naphthalene leads to some deviation from the Stern-Volmer type concentration dependence of the quenching. (author)

  13. Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory: Application to Hydrogen Atom Abstraction and Exchange Reactions of Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2015-12-17

    Quantum mechanical methods for calculating rate constants are often intractable for reactions involving many atoms. Semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) offers computational advantages over these methods but nonetheless scales exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the system. Here we present a method with more favorable scaling, reduced-dimensionality SCTST (RD SCTST), that treats only a subset of DOFs of the system explicitly. We apply it to three H abstraction and exchange reactions for which two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) have previously been constructed and evaluated using RD quantum scattering calculations. We differentiated these PESs to calculate harmonic frequencies and anharmonic constants, which were then used to calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and rate constants by RD SCTST. This method yielded rate constants in good agreement with quantum scattering results. Notably, it performed well for a heavy-light-heavy reaction, even though it does not explicitly account for corner-cutting effects. Recent extensions to SCTST that improve its treatment of deep tunneling were also evaluated within the reduced-dimensionality framework. The success of RD SCTST in this study suggests its potential applicability to larger systems.

  14. Sterochemical consequences of hydrogen exchange as a result of tritium atom reactions on solid aliphatic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenkaufer, R.L.E.; Hembree, W.C.; Lieberman, S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The products of stereochemistry resulting from radicals generated by the interaction of tritium atoms with L-isoleucine and L-alloisoleucine in the solid phase were determined. Among the four possible tritiated stereoisomers for each amino acid the major product was the parent L-amino acid (approximately 70 percent in each case) with the major fraction of the labeling being in positions other than the α position. Approximately 30 percent of the labeling resulted in the diastereomeric product by reaction at either the α or β position, with the major pathway being β-inversion. The yield of products from α-carbon attack of L-isoleucine was minor (7.9 percent) and occurred with net retention. Labeling at the α-carbon of alloisoleucine was less than 1 percent. Tritiated glycine was formed from both amino acids by cleavage of the alkyl side chain. This may result from the excitation decomposition of the intermediates formed from recombination of α (or β) amino acid radicals with tritium. Determination of the stereochemical and chemical consequences of radical formation at chiral centers provides a sensitive probe for studying the consequences of tritium (hydrogen or deuterium) atom reactions

  15. Fe Isolated Single Atoms on S, N Codoped Carbon by Copolymer Pyrolysis Strategy for Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiheng; Chen, Wenxing; Xiao, Hai; Gong, Yue; Li, Zhi; Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Xusheng; Yan, Wensheng; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Shen, Rongan; Fu, Ninghua; Gu, Lin; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dingsheng; Peng, Qing; Li, Jun; Li, Yadong

    2018-06-01

    Heteroatom-doped Fe-NC catalyst has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to replace noble metal-based catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, delicate controls over their structure parameters to optimize the catalytic efficiency and molecular-level understandings of the catalytic mechanism are still challenging. Herein, a novel pyrrole-thiophene copolymer pyrolysis strategy to synthesize Fe-isolated single atoms on sulfur and nitrogen-codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/SNC) with controllable S, N doping is rationally designed. The catalytic efficiency of Fe-ISA/SNC shows a volcano-type curve with the increase of sulfur doping. The optimized Fe-ISA/SNC exhibits a half-wave potential of 0.896 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), which is more positive than those of Fe-isolated single atoms on nitrogen codoped carbon (Fe-ISA/NC, 0.839 V), commercial Pt/C (0.841 V), and most reported nonprecious metal catalysts. Fe-ISA/SNC is methanol tolerable and shows negligible activity decay in alkaline condition during 15 000 voltage cycles. X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory calculations reveal that the incorporated sulfur engineers the charges on N atoms surrounding the Fe reactive center. The enriched charge facilitates the rate-limiting reductive release of OH* and therefore improved the overall ORR efficiency. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Rational Design of Single Molybdenum Atoms Anchored on N-Doped Carbon for Effective Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxing; Pei, Jiajing; He, Chun-Ting; Wan, Jiawei; Ren, Hanlin; Zhu, Youqi; Wang, Yu; Dong, Juncai; Tian, Shubo; Cheong, Weng-Chon; Lu, Siqi; Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Xusheng; Yan, Wensheng; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Chen, Chen; Peng, Qing; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2017-12-11

    The highly efficient electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) provides a promising pathway to resolve energy and environment problems. An electrocatalyst was designed with single Mo atoms (Mo-SAs) supported on N-doped carbon having outstanding HER performance. The structure of the catalyst was probed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, indicating the formation of Mo-SAs anchored with one nitrogen atom and two carbon atoms (Mo 1 N 1 C 2 ). Importantly, the Mo 1 N 1 C 2 catalyst displayed much more excellent activity compared with Mo 2 C and MoN, and better stability than commercial Pt/C. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation revealed that the unique structure of Mo 1 N 1 C 2 moiety played a crucial effect to improve the HER performance. This work opens up new opportunities for the preparation and application of highly active and stable Mo-based HER catalysts. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  18. Atomic platinum layer coated titanium copper nitride supported on carbon nanotubes for the methanol oxidation reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available measurements. The results confirm the core-shell structure of the prepared TiN@Pt/CNTs catalyst. More importantly, the catalyst exhibits superb mass activity and durability for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of the commercial JM Pt/C catalyst...

  19. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skibsted, Jorgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly

  20. Laboratory Studies of Stratospheric Bromine Chemistry: Kinetics of the Reactions of Bromine Monoxide with Nitrogen Dioxide and Atomic Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Robert Peyton, Jr.

    A laser flash photolysis - long path absorption technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the reaction rm BrO + NO_2 + M{k _{16}atopto} products as a function of temperature (248-346 K), pressure (16 -800 Torr), and buffer gas identity (rm N _2,CF_4). 351 nm photolysis of rm NO_2/Br_2/N_2 mixtures generated BrO. The BrO decay in the presence of excess NO_2 was followed by UV absorption at 338.3 nm. The reaction is in the falloff regime between third and second order over the entire range of conditions investigated. This is the first study where temperature dependent measurements of k_{16} (P,T) have been reported at pressures greater than 12 Torr; hence, these results help constrain choices of k_{16}(P,T) for use in modeling stratospheric BrO_{rm x} chemistry. The kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction rm BrO+O(^3P)_sp{to }{k_{14}}Br+O_2 in N_2 buffer gas have been studied as a function of temperature (233-328 K) and pressure (25 -150 Torr) using a novel dual laser flash photolysis/long path absorption/resonance fluorescence technique. 248 nm pulsed laser photolysis of rm Br_2/O _3/N_2 mixtures produces O atoms in excess over Br_2. After a delay sufficient for BrO to be generated, a 532 nm laser pulse photolyses a small fraction of the O_3 to generate O(^3P). The decay of O(^3P) in the presence of an excess, known concentration of BrO, as determined by UV absorption at 338.3 nm and by numerical simulation, is then followed by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results have shown the reaction kinetics to be independent of pressure, to increase with decreasing temperature, and to be faster than suggested by the only previous (indirect) measurement. The resulting Anhenius expression for k_{14}(T) is given below.rm k_{14 }(T) = 1.64times 10^{-11} exp (263/T) cm^3 molecule ^{-1} s^{-1} The absolute accuracy of k_{14 }(T) at any temperature within the range studied is estimated to be +/-25%. Possible kinetic

  1. Understanding the reaction between muonium atoms and hydrogen molecules: zero point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldegunde, J.; Jambrina, P. G.; García, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The advent of very precise measurements of rate coefficients in reactions of muonium (Mu), the lightest hydrogen isotope, with H2 in its ground and first vibrational state and of kinetic isotope effects with respect to heavier isotopes has triggered a renewed interests in the field of muonic chemistry. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent results about the dynamics and mechanism of the reaction Mu+H2 to shed light on the importance of quantum effects such as tunnelling, the preservation of the zero point energy, and the vibrational adiabaticity. In addition to accurate quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, quasiclassical trajectories (QCT) have been run in order to check the reliability of this method for this isotopic variant. It has been found that the reaction with H2(v=0) is dominated by the high zero point energy (ZPE) of the products and that tunnelling is largely irrelevant. Accordingly, both QCT calculations that preserve the products' ZPE as well as those based on the Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics methodology can reproduce the QM rate coefficients. However, when the hydrogen molecule is vibrationally excited, QCT calculations fail completely in the prediction of the huge vibrational enhancement of the reactivity. This failure is attributed to tunnelling, which plays a decisive role breaking the vibrational adiabaticity when v=1. By means of the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that the tunnelling takes place through the ν1=1 collinear barrier. Somehow, the tunnelling that is missing in the Mu+H2(v=0) reaction is found in Mu+H2(v=1).

  2. Hetero-atom doped carbon nanotubes for dye degradation and oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Ravi, E-mail: aerawat27@gmail.com; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the synthesis of nitrogen doped vertically aligned multi-walled (MWNCNTs) carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis and its catalytic performance for degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye & oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The degradation of MB was monitored spectrophotometrically with time. Kinetic studies show the degradation of MB follows a first order kinetic with rate constant k=0.0178 min{sup −1}. The present rate constant is better than that reported for various supported/non-supported semiconducting nanomaterials. Further ORR performance in alkaline media makes MWNCNTs a promising cost-effective, fuel crossover tolerance, metal-free, eco-friendly cathode catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cell.

  3. A low temperature investigation of the gas-phase N(2D) + NO reaction. Towards a viable source of N(2D) atoms for kinetic studies in astrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Reyes, Dianailys; Hickson, Kevin M

    2018-06-18

    The gas-phase reaction of metastable atomic nitrogen N(2D) with nitric oxide has been investigated over the 296-50 K temperature range using a supersonic flow reactor. As N(2D) could not be produced photolytically in the present work, these excited state atoms were generated instead through the C(3P) + NO → N(2D) + CO reaction while C(3P) atoms were created in situ by the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of CBr4 precursor molecules. The kinetics of N(2D) atoms were followed on-resonance by vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence at 116.7 nm. The measured rate constants for the N(2D) + NO reaction are in excellent agreement with most of the earlier work at room temperature and represent the only available kinetic data for this process below 296 K. The rate constants are seen to increase slightly as the temperature falls to 100 K with a more substantial increase at even lower temperature; a finding which is not reproduced by theoretical work. The prospects for using this chemical source of N(2D) atoms in future studies of a wide range of N(2D) atom reactions are discussed.

  4. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan’s upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  5. Kinetics and Products of the Reactions of Fluorine Atoms with ClNO and Br2 from 295 to 950 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedjanian, Yuri

    2017-11-09

    The kinetics and products of the reactions of F atoms with Br 2 and ClNO have been studied in a flow reactor coupled with an electron impact ionization mass spectrometer at nearly 2 Torr total pressure of helium and over a wide temperature range, T = 295-950 K. The rate constant of the reaction F + ClNO → products (1) was determined under pseudo-first order conditions, monitoring the kinetics of F atom consumption in excess of ClNO. The measured temperature independent rate constant, k 1 = (1.29 ± 0.13) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 (T = 299-950 K), was found to be in excellent agreement with the only previous low temperature study which allowed to recommend the value of k 1 in an extended temperature range, 228-950 K. FCl and Cl atoms were observed as the reactions products (corresponding to two reaction pathways: Cl-atom abstraction and replacement with fluorine atom, respectively) with the independent of temperature, in the range 295-948 K, yields of 0.68 ± 0.10 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. Rate constant of the reaction F + Br 2 (2), k 2 = (1.28 ± 0.20) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , determined using both absolute and relative rate methods, was found to be independent of temperature at T = 299-940 K.

  6. The reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane - Temperature dependence of the rate constant and implications for germane photochemistry in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the formation and loss processes for GeH4 are required in order to provide data to help determine the major chemical form in which germanium exists in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. The reaction of hydrogen atoms with germane is one of the most important of these reactions. The absolute rate constant for this reaction as a function of temperature and pressure is studied. Flash photolysis of dilute mixtures of GeH4 in argon, combined with time-resolved detection of H atoms via Lyman alpha resonance fluorescence, is employed to measure the reaction rate. The reaction is shown to be moderately rapid, independent of total pressure, but possessing a positive temperature dependence.

  7. Thermal annealing and recoil reactions of 128I atoms in thermal neutron activated iodate-nitrate mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Sharma, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recoil reaction of 128 I atoms in neutron irradiated mixed crystals (iodate-nitrate) have been studied by thermal annealing methods. The retention of 128 I (i.e. radioactivity of 128 I retained in the parent chemi cal form) decreases sharply in the beginning and then attains saturation value with the increase in concentration of nitrate. The annealing followed the usual characteristic pattern, viz., a steep rise in retention within the first few minutes and then a saturation value thereafter but these saturation values in case of mixed crystals are lower in comparison to those of pure iodate targets. The process obeys simple first order kinetics and the activation energy obtained are of lower order than those obtained in case of pure targets. The results are discussed in the light of present ideas and the role of nitrate ion and its radiolytic products have also been invoked. (author)

  8. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  9. Quantum chemistry and dynamics of the abstraction reaction of H atoms from formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siaï, A. [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, (LPMC), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Oueslati, I. [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, (LPMC), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR8112 du CNRS, LERMA, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Académie Militaire, Fondouk Jedid, 8012 Nabeul (Tunisia); Kerkeni, Boutheïna, E-mail: Boutheina.kerkeni@obspm.fr [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, (LPMC), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR8112 du CNRS, LERMA, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Institut Supérieur des Arts Multimédia de la Manouba, Université de la Manouba, 2010 la Manouba (Tunisia)

    2016-08-02

    This work reports a reduced dimensionality rate constant calculation of the H-abstraction reaction from formaldehyde. Quantum scattering calculations are performed treating explicitly the bonds being broken and formed. Geometry optimisations and frequency calculations are done at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level while energies are calculated with the CCSD(T) method. An analytical potential energy surface was developed from a relatively small number of grid points. When compared to semi-classical approaches, the quantum scattering calculations show that quantum tunnelling yields large contributions at low temperatures. At 200 K, we note a difference of about 5 orders of magnitude between transition state theory (TST) and quantum rate constants. Our predicted results show that the quantum and the CVT/SCT rate constants are in reasonable agreement with the available experiment at high temperatures, but that the last one gives better agreement to experimental results at low temperatures.

  10. Pion-transfer (n,d) and (d, 3He) reactions leading to deeply bound pionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, H.; Hirenzaki, S.; Yamazaki, T.

    1990-11-01

    Theoretical studies are given on the (n,d) and (d, 3 He) reactions leading to deeply bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei of configuration [(nl) π ·j n -1 ]J. The cross sections for various pionic and neutron-hole configurations in the case of a 208 Pb target are calculated at incident energies 300-1000 MeV/u by using the effective number approach and the eikonal approximation for distortion. The effective number with a pion in the 1s or 2p state and a neutron hole in the i 13/2 orbit peaks around the same incident energy (T n =600 MeV) as the elementary cross section n+n→d+π - , where the momentum transfer matches the angular-momentum transfer of L=5∼7. The DWIA cross section for (n,d) producing a pion in the 1s or 2p orbit at T n =600 MeV is found to be around 42 or 75 μb/sr, respectively. At T n =350 MeV, where the momentum transfer is small, quasi-substitutional states of configurations [(2p) π (3p 1/2 ) n -1 ]L=0 and [(2p) π (3p 3/2 ) n -1 ]L=0 are preferentially populated with cross sections of 190 and 380 μb/sr, respectively. The (d, 3 He) cross sections are estimated to be an order of magnitude smaller than the (n,d) cross sections. Thus, the (n,d) and (d, 3 He) reactions are found to be suited for the production of deeply bound pionic atoms. (author)

  11. Experimental and theoretical studies of the reactions of ground-state sulfur atoms with hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristopher M.; Gao, Yide; Marshall, Paul; Wang, Han; Zhou, Linsen; Li, Yongle; Guo, Hua

    2017-10-01

    The gas-phase kinetics of S(3P) atoms with H2 and D2 have been studied via the laser flash photolysis—resonance fluorescence technique. S atoms were generated by pulsed photolysis of CS2 at 193 nm and monitored by time-resolved fluorescence at 181 nm. The rate coefficients for H2 (k1) and D2 (k2), respectively, are summarized as k1(600-1110 K) = 3.0 × 10-9 exp(-1.317/×105-2.703 ×107K /T 8.314 T /K ) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and k2(770-1110 K) = 2.2 × 10-14 (T/298 K)3.55 exp(-5420 K/T) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Error limits are discussed in the text. The rate coefficients for formation of SH(SD) + H(D) on a newly developed triplet potential energy surface were characterized via ring polymer molecular dynamics and canonical variational transition-state theory. There is excellent agreement above about 1000 K between theory and experiment. At lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient is substantially larger than the results computed for the adiabatic reaction, suggesting a significant role for intersystem crossing to the singlet potential energy surface at lower temperatures.

  12. Reaction and devitrification of a prototype nuclear-waste-storage glass with hot magnesium-rich brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarneni, S.; Freeborn, W.P.; Scheetz, B.E.; White, W.B.; McCarthy, G.J.

    1982-10-01

    PNL 76-68, a prototype nuclear waste storage glass, was reacted under hydrothermal conditions at 100, 200, and 300 C with NBT-6a (Ca-Mg-K-Na-Cl) brine. Reaction products were identified, the state of the residual glass determined, and the concentrations of various elements remaining in the solutions analyzed. Solid products formed by reaction of the glass and brine talc (hydrated magnesium silicate), powellite (CaMoO 4 ), hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) and rarely an unidentified uranium-containing phase. Glass fragments were leached to depths of 300 to 500 μm, depending on time and temperature. Most elements were extracted, but the silicate framework remained intact. Distinct diffusion fronts due to K/Na exchange and Mg/Zn exchange were identified. A complex compositional layering develops in the outer reaction rind. The concentration of silica in brine solution was lower by an order of magnitude than the concentration of silica in deionized water reacted under similar conditions. The concentration of cesium, strontium, uranium, rare earths, and other alkali and alkaline earth elements in solution increases exponentially with temperature of reaction. Behavior of the transition metals is more complex. In general the extraction of elements from the glass by hydrothermal brine leads to concentrations in solution that are from 10 to 100 times higher than the concentrations obtained by deionized water extraction under similar conditions of temperature and pressure

  13. Study on the Formation of Reaction Phase to Si Addition in Boron Steel Hot-Dipped in Al–7Ni Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Gil Yun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the intermetallic compounds formed during the application of an Al–7Ni wt % hot-dip multifunctional coating on boron steel, developed for Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB and hot stamping, 2–6 wt % Si was added to the coating to change the reaction layer. The coating was run at 690 °C for 120 s. Al9FeNi phases were formed on the steel interface, Fe2Al5 was formed on the steel, FeAl3 was generated between the existing layers, and flake-type Al2Fe3Si3 was formed in the Fe2Al5 phase, depending on the Si content. In addition, as Si was added to the coating, the thickness of the Fe2Al5 phase decreased and the thickness of the Al9FeNi phase and Al2Fe3Si3 increased. The decrease in the thickness of the Fe2Al5 phase was mainly due to the effect of the Si solid solution and the Al2Fe3Si3 formation in the Fe2Al5 phase. The reason for the growth of Al9FeNi is that the higher the Si content in the coating, the more the erosion of the interface of the steel material due to the coating solution. Therefore, the outflow of Fe into the coating liquid increased.

  14. The influence of a nuclear prehistory on transport rate of impurity ''hot'' atoms 111In, 114mIn and 115mIn in the irradiated metal cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.; Orlov, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous publications it was shown, that the velocity of migration of radioactive microimpurities (formed as a result of a nuclear change) in irradiated in metals is instituted by a nuclear prehistory. In the present work this problem was explored in detail. The selected system '' cadmium - impurity atoms of indium '' is unique for such experiments: it is possible to gain the same impurity ''hot'' atoms ( 111 In, 114m In and 115m In) via different ''nuclear channels'' and to explore their behavior depending on a nuclear prehistory. (orig.)

  15. I. The properties of hot Ca-like fragments from the 40Ca+40Ca reaction at 35 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planeta, R.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Wieloch, A.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of hot Ca-like fragments was investigated in the 40 Ca + 40 Ca reaction at 35 AMeV. Using the AMPHORA 4π detector system, the primary projectile-like fragment was reconstructed and its properties were determined. Both primary and secondary distributions are compared with the predictions of a Monte Carlo code describing a heavy-ion collision as a two-step process. Some of the nucleons which are identified as participants in the first step are transferred in the second step to these final states, which correspond on the average to the maximum value of entropy (thermodynamic probability). The model allows for competition between mean-field effects and nucleon-nucleon interactions in the overlap zone of the interacting nuclei. The analysis presented here suggests a thermalized source picture of the decay of the projectile-like fragment. The validity of the reconstruction procedure for projectile-like fragments is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Study of the selective abstration reaction of the hydrogen atom in the radiolysis and photolysis of alkane mixture at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The occurence of the selective abstraction reaction of the solute hydrogen atom by hydrogen atom produced during radiolysis or photolysis of the systems such as neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI, neopentane/2,3 dimethylbutane, n-pentane/HI/cyclo-hexane and cyclo-hexane/HI/n-pentane, at 77 K is studied. Experiments have been undertaken on the kinetics nature of the active species, the H atom, during radiolysis and photolysis of the neopentane/cyclo-hexane/HI system at 77 K, presenting competitive reactions. Studies have also been made on the occurrence of the selective abstraction reaction in inverted systems, in which the concentrations of the components of a system are so much altered that the solute becomes the solvent and vice-versa, in the other system. By means of photolysis at 77 K, it has been observed that for the two systems constitued by the cyclo-hexane and n-pentane the selective abstraction reaction occurs. However, for radiolysis of that same two systems it has been observed that only the hydrogen atom abstraction reaction corresponding to the solvent occurs. (Author) [pt

  17. High-temperature shock tube and modeling studies on the reactions of methanol with D-atoms and CH3-radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, S L; Michael, J V

    2013-10-10

    The shock tube technique has been used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions D + CH3OH → CH2O + H + HD (A) and CH3 + CH3OH → CH2O + H + CH4 (B). For reaction A, the experiments span a T-range of 1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K, at pressures 0.25 bar ≤ P ≤ 0.46 bar. The experiments on reaction B, CH3 + CH3OH, cover a T-range of 1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K, at pressures around 0.40 bar. Reflected shock tube experiments, monitoring the depletion of D-atoms by applying D-atom atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS), were performed on reaction A using gas mixtures of C2D5I and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. C2D5I was used as precursor for D-atoms. For reaction B, reflected shock tube experiments monitoring H-atom formation with H-ARAS, were carried out using gas mixtures of diacetyl ((CH3CO)2) and CH3OH in Kr bath gas. (CH3CO)2 was used as the source of CH3-radicals. Detailed reaction models were assembled to fit the D-atom and H-atom time profiles in order to obtain experimental rate constants for reactions A and B. Total rate constants from the present experiments on D + CH3OH and CH3 + CH3OH can be represented by the Arrhenius equations kA(T) = 1.51 × 10(-10) exp(-3843 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1016 K ≤ T ≤ 1325 K) and kB(T) = 9.62 × 10(-12) exp(-7477 K/T) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1) (1138 K ≤ T ≤ 1270 K). The experimentally obtained rate constants were compared with available rate data from the literature. The results from quantum chemical studies on reaction A were found to be in good agreement with the present results. The present work represents the first direct experimental study on these bimolecular reactions at combustion temperatures and is important to the high-temperature oxidation of CH3OH.

  18. Properties and decay modes of hot nuclei produced in the reaction: 36Ar on 58Ni and detected with INDRA device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalpas, L.

    1997-01-01

    Hot nuclei are formed in heavy ion collisions covering the Fermi energy domain. According to the excitation energy deposited into these nuclei, several de-excitation processes can be observed, in particular the emission of complex fragments (Z ≥ 3) which remains poorly understood. The GANIL facility offers the possibility to cover the excitation function for the Ar on Ni reaction over a broad energy range from 32 to 95 MeV/u where the hot nuclei evolve from classical 'evaporation' to complete 'vaporization' into light particles (neutrons, isotopes of H, He). The study of reaction mechanisms shows that from peripheral to central collisions the total cross section is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. Both partners coming from well-characterized events with the INDRA detector are reconstructed using the 'Minimum Spanning Tree' method. Thus excitation energy up to 20 MeV/A are reached in the most violent collisions at the highest bombarding energy. The deposited energy is not shared in the mass ratio between the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target, the quasi-projectile being hotter. For total excitation energies ranging roughly from 2 to 8 MeV/A, the proportion of 'multifragmentation' events increases to reach a plateau at about 10 MeV/A due to the rising probability to have complete 'vaporization' of the system above 8 MeV/A. The steady increase of the temperature extracted from the double isotopic He-Li ratios with excitation energy for the quasi-projectile suggests a progressive evolution of the de-excitation processes as predicted by statistical models. No signal of first order liquid-gas phase transition is seen in our data. (author)

  19. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction -- energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    In this experiment we tried to measure the evaporation residue cross section over a wide range of beam energies for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction using the FMA. However, because of longer-than-estimated runs needed at each beam energy, and the difficulty of bending evaporation residues at the higher energies in the FMA, data were taken only at beam energies of E{sub beam} = 460, 490, and 521 MeV, which correspond to excitation energies of E{sub exc} = 62, 78, and 95 MeV, respectively. By comparing to results for the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reactions measured recently, we expect to demonstrate a strong entrance channel effect related to the hindrance of complete fusion in near-symmetric heavy systems (a fusion hindrance factor of the order 7-10 is expected on the basis of the Extra-Push Model). The data are being analyzed.

  20. Atomic-scale features of phase boundaries in hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodcock, T.G.; Ramasse, Q.M.; Hrkac, G.; Shoji, T.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2014-01-01

    Hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets were infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid, resulting in a 71% increase in coercivity to μ 0 H c = 2.4 T without the use of Dy, and a 22% decrease in remanence, attributed to the dilution effect. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy have been used to reveal the structure and chemical composition of phase boundaries in the magnets on the atomic scale. The results showed that the Nd–Cu liquid penetrated the ≈1 nm thick intergranular regions. The coercivity increase following infiltration was therefore attributed to improved volume fraction and distribution of the intergranular phases. Co enrichment in the outermost 1–2 unit cells at several {0 0 1} and {1 1 0} surfaces of the Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B crystals was shown for the infiltrated sample. The as-deformed sample did not appear to show this Co enrichment. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the distorted layer at an {0 0 1} surface of a Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B grain was significantly thicker with higher Co surface enrichment. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy may be reduced in such distorted regions, which could have a detrimental effect on coercivity. Such features may therefore play a role in limiting coercivity to a fraction of the anisotropy field. Interfacial segregation of Cu between Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B and the Nd-rich intergranular phase occurred in the infiltrated sample. Step defects in Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B {0 0 1} surfaces, a half or a whole unit cell in height, were also observed

  1. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  2. Synthesis, reactions and biological activity of some new bis-heterocyclic ring compounds containing sulphur atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The derivatives of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene belong to a significant category of heterocyclic compounds, which have shown a wide spectrum of medical and industrial application. Results A new building block with two electrophilic center of thieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives 2 has been reported by one-pot reaction of diketone derivative 1 with Br2/AcOH in excellent yield. A variety of heteroaromatics having bis(1H-imidazo[1,2a] benzimidazole), bis(1H-imidazo[1,2-b][1,2,4]triazole)-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives, dioxazolo-, dithiazolo-, and 1H-imidazolo-3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives as well pyrrolo, thiazolo -3-methyl-4-phenylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene derivatives have been designed, synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for their biological activity. Compounds 3–9 showed good bioassay result. These new derivatives were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against PC-3 cell lines, in vitro antioxidant potential and β-glucuronidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. Compound 3 (IC50 = 56.26 ± 3.18 μM) showed a potent DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant activity and found to be more active than standard N-acetylcystein (IC50 = 105.9 ± 1.1 μM). Compounds 8a (IC50 = 13.2 ± 0.34 μM) and 8b (IC50 = 14.1 ± 0.28 μM) found as potent inhibitor of α-glucusidase several fold more active than the standard acarbose (IC50 = 841 ± 1.73 μM). Most promising results were obtained in β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibition assay. Compounds 5 (IC50 = 0.13 ± 0.019 μM), 6 (IC50 = 19.9 ± 0.285 μM), 8a (IC50 = 1.2 ± 0.0785 μM) and 9 (IC50 = 0.003 ± 0.09 μM) showed a potent inhibition of β-glucuronidase. Compound 9 was found to be several hundred fold more active than standard D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (IC50 = 45.75 ± 2.16 μM). Conclusions Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological activity of a series of

  3. Atomic energy is hot stuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardo, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, it is the sun's heat and not CO2 emissions that is the cause of global warming. He then proceeds to outline the history of nuclear power and the nuclear policies of countries throughout the world as contrasted against Germany's phaseout decision. According to the author, Germany should reconsider its nuclear policy and go for nuclear power full-scale. (orig.)

  4. Hot-Fire Testing of 100 LB(sub F) LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid oxygen/liquid methane (LO2/LCH4 ) has recently been viewed as a potential green propulsion system for both the Altair ascent main engine (AME) and reaction control system (RCS). The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development Project (PCAD) has been tasked by NASA to develop these green propellant systems to enable safe and cost effective exploration missions. However, experience with LO2/LCH4 as a propellant combination is limited, so testing of these systems is critical to demonstrating reliable ignition and performance. A test program of a 100 lb f reaction control engine (RCE) is underway at the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) of the NASA Glenn Research Center, with a focus on conducting tests at altitude conditions. These tests include a unique propellant conditioning feed system (PCFS) which allows for the inlet conditions of the propellant to be varied to test warm to subcooled liquid propellant temperatures. Engine performance, including thrust, c* and vacuum specific impulse (I(sub sp,vac)) will be presented as a function of propellant temperature conditions. In general, the engine performed as expected, with higher performance at warmer propellant temperatures but better efficiency at lower propellant temperatures. Mixture ratio effects were inconclusive within the uncertainty bands of data, but qualitatively showed higher performance at lower ratios.

  5. Presolvated Electron Reactions with Methyl Acetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-Atom Abstraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Petrovici

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methyl acetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-COOCH3 at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-COOCH3 in the 77 to ca. 170 K temperature range have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylene protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K, CH3-C(•OH-CH2-COOCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-COOCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT support the radical assignments.

  6. Presolvated electron reactions with methyl acetoacetate: electron localization, proton-deuteron exchange, and H-atom abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Alex; Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D

    2014-09-01

    Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methyl acetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-COOCH3) at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•--CH2-COOCH3) in the 77 to ca. 170 K temperature range have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-COOCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-COOCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-COOCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylene protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K), CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-COOCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-COOCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) support the radical assignments.

  7. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO(sub 2) emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO(sub 2) capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO(sub 2) emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH)(sub 2) was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH)(sub 2) gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO(sub 2) mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO(sub 2) sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact

  8. Temperature and excitation energy of hot nuclei in the reaction of 40Ar+197Au at 25 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.; Jin, G.; Li, Z.; Dai, G.; Qi, Y.; He, Z.; Luo, Q.; Duan, L.; Wen, W.; Zhang, B.

    1997-01-01

    The coincidence measurements between heavy fission fragments and light charged particles with Z ≤2 were carried out for the 40 Ar+ 197 Au reaction at 25 MeV/nucleon, to study the properties of hot nuclei in heavy ion induced reactions. The linear momentum transfers (LMTs) were deduced from the folding angle and the time-of-flight difference between two fission fragments of heavy residues. The relationship of the nuclear temperature (slope parameter of the energy spectrum) and the excitation energy was determined independently from the measurement of the kinetic energy spectra in the frames of the emitting sources and from the LMT analysis. Both the temperature and the excitation energy increase with decreasing impact parameter, which suggests that a plateau temperature of 5.5 MeV is reached at an excitation energy of 3.1 MeV/nucleon. The result was also compared with various statistical models that explain the plateau by the multifragmentation process, where the excitation energy is assumed to be stored in compression and expansion effects. (orig.)

  9. The importance of a hot-sequential mechanism in triplet-state formation by charge recombination in reaction centers of bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Mukai, K.; Sumi, H.

    2006-01-01

    In photosynthesis, pigment-excitation energies in the antenna system produced by light harvesting are transferred among antenna pigments toward the core antenna, where they are captured by the reaction center and initially fixed in the form of a charge separation. Primary charge separation between an oxidized special pair (P + ) and a reduced bacteriopheohytin (H - ) is occasionally intervened by recombination, and a spin-triplet state ( 3 P*) is formed on P in the bacterial reaction center. The 3 P* state is harmful to bio-organisms, inducing the formation of the highly damaging singlet oxygen species. Therefore, understanding the 3 P*-formation mechanism is important. The 3 P* formation is mediated by a state |m> of intermediate charge separation between P and the accessory chlorophyll, which is located between P and H. It will be shown theoretically in the present work that at room temperature, not only the mechanism of superexchange by quantum-mechanical virtual mediation at |m>, but also a hot-sequential mechanism contributes to the mediation. In the latter, although |m> is produced as a real state, the final state 3 P* is quickly formed during thermalization of phonons in the protein matrix in |m>. In the former, the final state is formed more quickly before dephasing-thermalization of phonons in |m>. 3 P* is unistep formed from the charge-separated state in the both mechanisms

  10. Low energy cross section data for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Kazuhiko

    2007-04-01

    Systematic cross section measurements for ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems and for charge transfer of multiply charged ions in low energy collisions with atoms and molecules have been performed continuously by the identical apparatus installed with an octo-pole ion beam guide (OPIG) since 1980 till 2004. Recently, all of accumulated cross section data for a hundred collision systems has been entered into CMOL and CHART of the NIFS atomic and molecular numerical database together with some related cross section data. In this present paper, complicated ion-molecule reactions in hydrogen systems are revealed and the brief outlines of specific properties in low energy charge transfer collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms and molecules are introduced. (author)

  11. Molecular beam scattering experiments on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms with the hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Rusin, L.Y.; Toennies, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Molecular beam scattering experiments have been carried out on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms (T=2600 K) with the hydrogen halides HX(T=300 K) in the range of scattering angles: 0 0 0 (theta/sub cm/=0 0 is the direction of the incident D-atom beam). The apparatus employed a very sensitive electron bombardment detector with a sufficiently low H 2 background to make possible the measurement of differential cross sections of about 0.1 A 2 /sr for reactively scattered HD and H and nonreactively scattered D-atoms. The measured HD signal can be largely attributed to various background sources and only serves to establish a rough upper limit on the abstraction cross section in the angular range investigated. The H-atom signal was more intense. The observed angular distribution was forward peaked, and is attributed to the exchange reaction. The nonreactively scattered D-atom signal was used in conjunction with a recently reported effective spherically symmetric potential to provide an absolute calibration of the detector sensitivity. The measured integral cross sections for the exchange reactions are 2.3 A 2 (D+HCl), 1.3 A 2 (D+HBr) and 1.6 A 2 (D+HI) with an estimated error of about +- 30%. The absolute cross sections and the H-atom angular distributions are consistent with the DX distributions measured by McDonald and Herschbach. Both experimental angular distributions are considerably narrower than those predicted by the recent classical trajectory calculations of Raff, Suzukawa, and Thompson. The implications of the new data for the activation energies for the exchange reactions are discussed

  12. 248-NM Laser Photolysis of CHBr3/O-Atom Mixtures: Kinetic Evidence for UV CO(A)-Chemiluminescence in the Reaction of Methylidyne Radicals With Atomic Oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-01-01

    4TH Positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr3 vapor in an excess of O-atoms...

  13. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  14. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  15. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  16. The initial stages of the reaction between ZrCo and hydrogen studied by hot-stage microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J.; Brill, M.; Ben-Eliahu, Y.; Gavra, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The development of hydride phase on the surface of ZrCo under 1 bar of hydrogen was investigated at temperatures between 75 and 300 C. Both surface modifications of the parent alloy and the nucleation and growth of hydride phase were observed. Surface modifications included: grain boundary outgrowth, intra-granular precipitation in the form of fine lamellar hydride phase and micro cracks. It is suggested that the surface modifications result from a combination of hydrogen solubility and the parent metal ductility. These modifications were enhanced near areas which had been previously transformed. The nucleation was self catalyzed, with new nuclei preferentially formed at the vicinity of growing former nuclei. All this suggested that the transport of hydrogen through the hydride phase is faster than its transfer through the surface passivation layer. The growth rate of the nuclei was similar to that of uranium. The activation energy for the growth was E a =24±3 kJ/mol. The results were compared with several other metal-hydrogen systems. It is suggested that the important physical factors controlling the mechanism of the initial hydriding reaction are hydrogen solubility and the brittleness of the parent metal/alloy. These parameters are responsible to the different changes observed during the initial hydriding stages which include: surface modifications, cracking, nucleation and growth. (orig.)

  17. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasili; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes our research performed under NASA Grant NAG5-11857. The three-year grant have been supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program. We have investigated the energetic metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere. Hot atoms in the atmosphere are produced by solar radiation, the solar wind and various ionic reactions. Nascent hot atoms arise in ground and excited electronic states, and their translational energies are larger by two - three orders of magnitude than the thermal energies of the ambient gas. The relaxation kinetics of hot atoms determines the rate of atmospheric heating, the intensities of aeronomic reactions, and the rate of atom escape from the planet. Modeling of the non-Maxwellian energy distributions of metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been focused on the determination of their impact on the energetics and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere between 25 and 250 km . At this altitudes, we have calculated the energy distribution functions of metastable O and N atoms and computed non-equilibrium rates of important aeronomic reactions, such as destruction of the water molecules by O(1D) atoms and production of highly excited nitric oxide molecules. In the upper atmosphere, the metastable O(lD) and N(2D) play important role in formation of the upward atomic fluxes. We have computed the upward fluxes of the metastable and ground state oxygen atoms in the upper atmosphere above 250 km. The accurate distributions of the metastable atoms have been evaluated for the day and night-time conditions.

  18. Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reactions--Insights into the Particle Model and the Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on an interview study of 18 Grade 10-12 students' model-based reasoning of a chemical reaction: the reaction of magnesium and oxygen at the submicro level. It has been proposed that chemical reactions can be conceptualised using two models: (i) the "particle model," in which a reaction is regarded as the simple…

  19. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-01-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O( 3 P)+C 3 H 5 →H( 2 S)+C 3 H 4 O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O( 3 P)] and allyl radicals (C 3 H 5 ) were generated by the photolysis of NO 2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O( 3 P) to C 3 H 5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C 3 H 4 O. The major counterpart C 3 H 4 O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C 3 H 4 O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition

  20. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-05-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H5→H(2S)+C3H4O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3P)] and allyl radicals (C3H5) were generated by the photolysis of NO2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O(3P) to C3H5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C3H4O. The major counterpart C3H4O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C3H4O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition.

  1. Reaction Mechanisms of the Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Tributyltin Ethoxide and Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Charith E; Liu, Guo; Vega, Abraham; Dezelah, Charles L; Kanjolia, Ravindra K; Chabal, Yves J

    2017-06-20

    Uniform and conformal deposition of tin oxide thin films is important for several applications in electronics, gas sensing, and transparent conducting electrodes. Thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) is often best suited for these applications, but its implementation requires a mechanistic understanding of the initial nucleation and subsequent ALD processes. To this end, in situ FTIR and ex situ XPS have been used to explore the ALD of tin oxide films using tributyltin ethoxide and ozone on an OH-terminated, SiO 2 -passivated Si(111) substrate. Direct chemisorption of tributyltin ethoxide on surface OH groups and clear evidence that subsequent ligand exchange are obtained, providing mechanistic insight. Upon ozone pulse, the butyl groups react with ozone, forming surface carbonate and formate. The subsequent tributyltin ethoxide pulse removes the carbonate and formate features with the appearance of the bands for CH stretching and bending modes of the precursor butyl ligands. This ligand-exchange behavior is repeated for subsequent cycles, as is characteristic of ALD processes, and is clearly observed for deposition temperatures of 200 and 300 °C. On the basis of the in situ vibrational data, a reaction mechanism for the ALD process of tributyltin ethoxide and ozone is presented, whereby ligands are fully eliminated. Complementary ex situ XPS depth profiles confirm that the bulk of the films is carbon-free, that is, formate and carbonate are not incorporated into the film during the deposition process, and that good-quality SnO x films are produced. Furthermore, the process was scaled up in a cross-flow reactor at 225 °C, which allowed the determination of the growth rate (0.62 Å/cycle) and confirmed a self-limiting ALD growth at 225 and 268 °C. An analysis of the temperature-dependence data reveals that growth rate increases linearly between 200 and 300 °C.

  2. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: A comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2→HD+D(n') reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hui; Dai Dongxu; Wu Guorong; Wang, C.-C.; Harich, Steven A.; Hayes, Michael Y.; Wang Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang Xueming; Skodje, Rex T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D 2 →HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H + +D 2 →D + +HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the 'spectator' Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out

  3. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of methylpropargyl radical formation, C4H5, from reaction of C(3Pj) with propylene, C3H6 (X1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.I.; Stranges, D.; Bevsek, H.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between ground state carbon atoms and propylene, C 3 H 6 , was studied at average collision energies of 23.3 and 45.0 kJmol -1 using the crossed molecular beam technique. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C 4 H 5 at m/e=53 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields a maximum energy release as well as angular distributions consistent with the formation of methylpropargyl radicals. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental results suggest that the reaction proceeds on the lowest 3 A surface via an initial addition of the carbon atom to the π-orbital to form a triplet methylcyclopropylidene collision complex followed by ring opening to triplet 1,2-butadiene. Within 0.3 endash 0.6 ps, 1,2-butadiene decomposes through carbon endash hydrogen bond rupture to atomic hydrogen and methylpropargyl radicals. The explicit identification of C 4 H 5 under single collision conditions represents a further example of a carbon endash hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This versatile machine represents an alternative pathway to build up unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in combustion processes, chemical vapor deposition, and in the interstellar medium. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO2/GeO2/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlOx interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Shingo; Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO 2 /GeO 2 /Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that 18 O-tracers composing the GeO 2 underlayers diffuse within the HfO 2 overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO 2 also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO 2 surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO x interlayers between the HfO 2 and GeO 2 layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks

  5. Insights into thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks and their suppressed reaction with atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shingo, E-mail: Shingo-Ogawa@trc.toray.co.jp [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Asahara, Ryohei; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji, E-mail: hosoi@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sako, Hideki; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Yamada, Ichiko; Miyamoto, Takashi [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    The thermal diffusion of germanium and oxygen atoms in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge gate stacks was comprehensively evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with an isotopic labeling technique. It was found that {sup 18}O-tracers composing the GeO{sub 2} underlayers diffuse within the HfO{sub 2} overlayers based on Fick's law with the low activation energy of about 0.5 eV. Although out-diffusion of the germanium atoms through HfO{sub 2} also proceeded at the low temperatures of around 200 °C, the diffusing germanium atoms preferentially segregated on the HfO{sub 2} surfaces, and the reaction was further enhanced at high temperatures with the assistance of GeO desorption. A technique to insert atomically thin AlO{sub x} interlayers between the HfO{sub 2} and GeO{sub 2} layers was proven to effectively suppress both of these independent germanium and oxygen intermixing reactions in the gate stacks.

  6. Reactions of charged and neutral recoil particles following nuclear transformations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    A summary is given of the various activities conducted as part of the research on the chemical reactions of energetic particles generated in nuclear reactions. Emphasis was on hot atom chemistry in gases and liquids. A bibliography of 110 publications published as part of the program is included

  7. Formation and decay of hot nuclei in the 64Zn + 48Ti reactions from 35 to 79 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The 4π plastic multidetector of NAUTILUS has been used to detect charged products of the collisions in the reactions of 64 Zn with 48 Ti from 35 to 79 MeV/u. Well measured events were selected and sorted as a function of the impact parameter. The primary mass of the fast source as well as its excitation energy have been carefully reconstructed from the characteristics of the disintegration products after separation of both the pre-equilibrium and the target emission. The isotropic emission of particles in the frame of the primary hot nucleus suggests that thermal equilibrium has been achieved. The excitation energy increases from peripheral to central collisions, with values reaching more than 10 MeV/u at the highest bombarding energy. Experimental multiplicities and relative velocity distributions of intermediate mass fragments will be compared to theoretical predictions of both statistical and dynamical models. Differences between data and calculations suggest the existence of a radial expansion of the hottest nuclei

  8. Microplasticity in hot-pressed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plane, D.C.; Bonfield, W.

    1977-01-01

    Closed hysteresis loops measured in the microstrain region of hot pressed, commercially pure, polycrystalline beryllium are correlated with a dislocation - impurity atom, energy dissipating mechanism. (author)

  9. Direct determination of atom and radical concentrations in thermal reactions of hydrocarbons and other gases. Progress report, December 1, 1981-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.B.; Rao, V.S.; Wood, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    This is the seventh annual progress report on this project. During the period covered by the first six reports (June 1976 through December 1980) a shock tube and optical systems to measure H, D and O atom concentrations were built and fully characterized. The performance of our microwave discharge lamps were defined by numerous high-resolution spectroscopic profiles, while empirical calibrations were also made for all three of the above species. H, D and O atom concentrations were measured in gas mixtures containing H 2 , D 2 , O 2 , CD 4 , C 2 H 6 , C 2 D 6 , C 3 H 8 and C 3 D 8 in various proportions, and rate constants of several elementary reactions were deduced from the data. During the period covered by this report (December 1, 1981 to December 31, 1982) we have made kinetic modelling calculations to correlate H, D and O atom concentrations measured in shock-heated mixtures of C 2 H 6 -O 2 -Ar, C 2 D 6 -O 2 -Ar, C 3 H 8 -O 2 -Ar and C 3 D 8 -O 2 -Ar. These computations are difficult because there are several reactions for which rate constants are not known, so that it is necessary to do many calculations to completely optimize the results. Consequently, work is still going on with these calculations. We have completed an extensive series of measurements of H and D atom concentrations in pyrolysis experiments of benzene, toluene and neopentane and deuterium analogs, that have led to rate constants for the initial dissociation of these compounds, and for the reaction of H atoms with benzene and toluene

  10. Measurements of an ablator-gas atomic mix in indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V A; Tipton, R E; Pino, J E; Casey, D T; Grim, G P; Remington, B A; Rowley, D P; Weber, S V; Barrios, M; Benedetti, L R; Bleuel, D L; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D A; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Edgell, D H; Edwards, M J; Frenje, J A; Gatu-Johnson, M; Glebov, V Y; Glenn, S; Haan, S W; Hamza, A; Hatarik, R; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J; Knauer, J; Landen, O L; Ma, T; McNaney, J M; Mintz, M; Moore, A; Nikroo, A; Pak, A; Parham, T; Petrasso, R; Sayre, D B; Schneider, M B; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Widmann, K; Wilson, D C; Yeamans, C B

    2014-01-17

    We present the first results from an experimental campaign to measure the atomic ablator-gas mix in the deceleration phase of gas-filled capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic capsules containing CD layers were filled with tritium gas; as the reactants are initially separated, DT fusion yield provides a direct measure of the atomic mix of ablator into the hot spot gas. Capsules were imploded with x rays generated in hohlraums with peak radiation temperatures of ∼294  eV. While the TT fusion reaction probes conditions in the central part (core) of the implosion hot spot, the DT reaction probes a mixed region on the outer part of the hot spot near the ablator-hot-spot interface. Experimental data were used to develop and validate the atomic-mix model used in two-dimensional simulations.

  11. Line-emission cross sections for the charge-exchange reaction between fully stripped carbon and atomic hydrogen in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Kato, T.

    1992-01-01

    Line-emission cross sections of the charge-exchange reaction between fully stripped carbon and atomic hydrogen are measured in the energy range of 18 - 38 keV/amu in tokamak plasmas. The energy dependence of the emission cross sections for the transition of Δn = 8 - 7 and Δn = 7 - 6 and their ratios are compared with theoretical calculations. (author)

  12. Atmospheric chemistry of trans-CF3CH=CHCl: Kinetics of the gas-phase reactions with Cl atoms, OH radicals, and O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbaek; Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Nielsen, Ole John

    2008-01-01

    Long path length Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)–smog chamber techniques were used to study the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms, OH radicals and O3 with trans-3,3,3-trifluoro-1-chloropropene, t-CF3CH CHCl, in 700 Torr total pressure at 295±2K. Values of k(Cl + t-CF3CH CHCl) = (5...

  13. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  14. Exploring possible reaction pathways for the o-atom transfer reactions to unsaturated substrates catalyzed by a [Ni-NO2 ] ↔ [Ni-NO] redox couple using DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2017-07-15

    The (nitro)(N-methyldithiocarbamato)(trimethylphospane)nickel(II), [Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex catalyses efficiently the O-atom transfer reactions to CO and acetylene. Energetically feasible sequence of elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle of the air oxidation of CO and acetylene are proposed promoted by the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ↔ Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 ) redox couple using DFT methods both in vacuum and dichloromethane solutions. The catalytic air oxidation of HC≡CH involves formation of a five-member metallacycle intermediate, via a [3 + 2] cyclo-addition reaction of HC≡CH to the Ni-N = O moiety of the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex, followed by a β H-atom migration toward the C α carbon atom of the coordinated acetylene and release of the oxidation product (ketene). The geometric and energetic reaction profile for the reversible [Ni( κN1-NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ⇌ [Ni( κO,O2-ONO)(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] linkage isomerization has also been modeled by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  16. Theoretical Kinetics Analysis for Ḣ Atom Addition to 1,3-Butadiene and Related Reactions on the Ċ4H7 Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2017-10-12

    The oxidation chemistry of the simplest conjugated hydrocarbon, 1,3-butadiene, can provide a first step in understanding the role of polyunsaturated hydrocarbons in combustion and, in particular, an understanding of their contribution toward soot formation. On the basis of our previous work on propene and the butene isomers (1-, 2-, and isobutene), it was found that the reaction kinetics of Ḣ-atom addition to the C═C double bond plays a significant role in fuel consumption kinetics and influences the predictions of high-temperature ignition delay times, product species concentrations, and flame speed measurements. In this study, the rate constants and thermodynamic properties for Ḣ-atom addition to 1,3-butadiene and related reactions on the Ċ 4 H 7 potential energy surface have been calculated using two different series of quantum chemical methods and two different kinetic codes. Excellent agreement is obtained between the two different kinetics codes. The calculated results including zero-point energies, single-point energies, rate constants, barrier heights, and thermochemistry are systematically compared among the two quantum chemical methods. 1-Methylallyl (Ċ 4 H 7 1-3) and 3-buten-1-yl (Ċ 4 H 7 1-4) radicals and C 2 H 4 + Ċ 2 H 3 are found to be the most important channels and reactivity-promoting products, respectively. We calculated that terminal addition is dominant (>80%) compared to internal Ḣ-atom addition at all temperatures in the range 298-2000 K. However, this dominance decreases with increasing temperature. The calculated rate constants for the bimolecular reaction C 4 H 6 + Ḣ → products and C 2 H 4 + Ċ 2 H 3 → products are in excellent agreement with both experimental and theoretical results from the literature. For selected C 4 species, the calculated thermochemical values are also in good agreement with literature data. In addition, the rate constants for H atom abstraction by Ḣ atoms have also been calculated, and it is

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy of deeply-bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei by pion-transfer reactions of inverse kinematics using the GSI cooler ring ESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1991-02-01

    Many studies published in the past are reviewed first in relation to high-resolution spectroscopy of deeply-bound pionic atoms in heavy nuclei. The report then describes a procedure for applying the method of inverse kinematics to the case of (d, 3 He) reactions. The (d, 3 He) reaction in inverse kinematics is feasible from practical viewpoints. Thus a discussion is made of the inverse kinematics in which a heavy-ion beam ( 208 Pb for instance) with a projectile kinetic energy hits a deuteron target and ejected recoil 3 He nuclei are measured in the forward direction. The recoil momentum is calculated as a function of the Q value. Analysis shows that the recoil spectroscopy with inverse kinematics can be applied to the case of (d, 3 He) reaction, which will yield a very high mass resolution. The experimental setup for use in the first stage is then outlined, and a simple detector configuration free of magnetic field is discussed. These investigations demonstrate that the (d, 3 He) reaction in inverse kinematics provides a promising tool for obtaining high-resolution spectra of deeply-bound pionic atoms. (N.K.)

  18. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 1. Criteria for the development of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of chemical processes proceeding in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is analysed. Based on the analysis performed, the complete system of differential equations corresponding to this scheme is replaced by a simplified system of equations describing in dimensionless variables the chain dark decomposition of iodides - atomic iodine donors, in the COIL active medium. The procedure solving this system is described, the basic parameters determining the development of the chain reaction are found and its specific time intervals are determined. The initial stage of the reaction is analysed and criteria for the development of the branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the COIL active medium are determined. (active media)

  19. Electric- and magnetic-dipole contributions to a theory of radiation reaction field and atom self-energy: An operator reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Mahran, M.H.

    1982-08-01

    The consequences of including magnetic-dipole contributions, besides the electric-dipole, are considered in the operators for the radiation field. The Bloch equations which describe the two-level atom operators are modified. These equations together with the field operators are discussed, and the contributions are manifested. The spectrum for spontaneous emission and a generalized dynamical Stark effect are obtained. Rabi frequency is modified. (author)

  20. The Formation of Polymeric Products in Reactions of Polyvalent Recoil Atoms; Formation de Polymeres lors de Reactions Provoquees par des Atomes de Recul Polyvalents; Obrazovanie polimernykh produktov pri reaktsiyakh polivalentnykh atomov otdachi; Formacion de Polimeros en las Reacciones de Atomos de Retroceso Polivalentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzantiev, B. G.; Stukan, R. A.; Shvedchikov, A. P.; Shishkov, A. V. [Institut Himicheskoj Fiziki AN SSSR, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    One of the features of the hot-atom reactions obtained as a result of nuclear transformations is that labelled polymeric products can be formed. This tendency is very marked in the case of polyvalent recoil atoms, where the polymer yield can, in certain cases, reach an amount of about 90% of the total activity. The aim of the present research is a study of the behaviour of recoil atoms of sulphur-35 and carbon-14, obtained in the nuclear reactions Cl{sup 35}(n, p)S{sup 35} and N{sup 14}(n, p) C{sup 14} in gas and liquid phases. It can be assumed that in the stabilization process hot carbon atoms form methylene biradicals, whose behaviour, by reason of their reaction capacity, greatly resembles that of atomic sulphur. The investigations were conducted like those for paraffins (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} ), and for cyclic hydrocarbons (cyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene). The binary systems comprising hydrocarbons on the one hand and S{sup 35} and C{sup 14} hot-atom donors on the other were subjected to irradiation. Compounds of CCI{sub 4}, HCl and ammonia were used as the donors. Irradiation was carried out on a reactor of type IRT-1000 with a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}. s. It is shown that for various compounds in the liquid phase, up to 60-90% of the sulphur-35 becomes stabilized in the form of a polymer, the yield of which is highly dependent on the composition, passing through the maximum at a nearly equimolecular ratio of components. In the gas phase the polymer yield amounts to 30-40% of the total activity. By means of paper radiochromatography it was established that labelled polymer products have a complex structure and are, at the least, a mixture of compounds of two qualitatively different types whose yield changes in various ways depending upon the ratio of the components. An increase in irradiation time leads to an increase in the labelled polymer yield. In the case of the liquid phase system C{sub 6}H{sub 12}-CCl{sub 4

  1. A barrier-free atomic radical-molecule reaction: N (2D) NO2 (2A1) mechanistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ming-Hui; Liu, Hui-Ling; Huang, Xu-Ri; Zhan, Jin-Hui; Sun, Chia-Chung

    The reaction of N (2D) radical with NO2 molecule has been studied theoretically using density functional theory and ab initio quantum chemistry method. Singlet electronic state [N2O2] potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(d) + ZPE and G3B3 levels of theory. All the involved transition states for generation of (2NO) and (O2 + N2) lie much lower than the reactants. Thus, the novel reaction N + NO2 can proceed effectively even at low temperatures and it is expected to play a role in both combustion and interstellar processes. On the basis of the analysis of the kinetics of all pathways through which the reactions proceed, we expect that the competitive power of reaction pathways may vary with experimental conditions for the title reaction.

  2. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  3. Direct determination of atom and radical concentrations in thermal reactions of hydrocarbons and other gases. Progress report, January 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.B.; Lifshitz, A.; Wood, D.R.; Chiang, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    This is a second annual progress report on this project. The period covered by the first report (June through December, 1976) was devoted to building and testing a shock tube and an optical system to be used to measure H and D atom concentrations. During 1977 this apparatus was completed and used. The performance of our microwave discharge lamps was characterized by numerous high-resolution spectroscopic profiles, so that the shapes of the Lyman-alpha lines produced under various operating conditions are now quite well-known. Measurements of H or D atom concentrations in shock-heated mixtures of D 2 -N 2 O-Ar, D 2 -O 2 -Ar and H 2 -O 2 -Ar have been made. During the balance of the contract year (January 1 through May 31, 1978) measurements of H or D atom concentrations in shock-heated mixtures of CD 4 -Ar, C 8 H 18 (2,2,3,3, tetramethyl butane)-Ar, C 8 H 18 -CH 4 -Ar, C 3 H 8 -Ar and C 3 H 8 -CH 4 -Ar will be made, and kinetic data on reactions of H and D atoms deduced from the experimental results

  4. Ganoderma-Like MoS2 /NiS2 with Single Platinum Atoms Doping as an Efficient and Stable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yongxin; Feng, Yangyang; Wan, Jing; Yang, Xiaohui; Fang, Ling; Gu, Xiao; Liu, Ruirui; Huang, Zhengyong; Li, Jian; Luo, Jun; Li, Changming; Wang, Yu

    2018-05-27

    Herein, a unique ganoderma-like MoS 2 /NiS 2 hetero-nanostructure with isolated Pt atoms anchored is reported. This novel ganoderma-like heterostructure can not only efficiently disperse and confine the few-layer MoS 2 nanosheets to fully expose the edge sites of MoS 2 , and provide more opportunity to capture the Pt atoms, but also tune the electronic structure to modify the catalytic activity. Because of the favorable dispersibility and exposed large specific surface area, single Pt atoms can be easily anchored on MoS 2 nanosheets with ultrahigh loading of 1.8 at% (the highest is 1.3 at% to date). Owing to the ganoderma-like structure and platinum atoms doping, this catalyst shows Pt-like catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction with an ultralow overpotential of 34 mV and excellent durability of only 2% increase in overpotential for 72 h under the constant current density of 10 mA cm -2 . © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Heavy-Atom Tunneling Calculations in Thirteen Organic Reactions: Tunneling Contributions are Substantial, and Bell's Formula Closely Approximates Multidimensional Tunneling at ≥250 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Armas, Randy; Walker, Dana; Cosgriff, Christopher V; Greer, Edyta M

    2017-10-09

    Multidimensional tunneling calculations are carried out for 13 reactions, to test the scope of heavy-atom tunneling in organic chemistry, and to check the accuracy of one-dimensional tunneling models. The reactions include pericyclic, cycloaromatization, radical cyclization and ring opening, and S N 2. When compared at the temperatures that give the same effective rate constant of 3×10 -5  s -1 , tunneling accounts for 25-95 % of the rate in 8 of the 13 reactions. Values of transmission coefficients predicted by Bell's formula, κ Bell  , agree well with multidimensional tunneling (canonical variational transition state theory with small curvature tunneling), κ SCT . Mean unsigned deviations of κ Bell vs. κ SCT are 0.08, 0.04, 0.02 at 250, 300 and 400 K. This suggests that κ Bell is a useful first choice for predicting transmission coefficients in heavy-atom tunnelling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  7. I. Activation energies for the gas phase reactions of hydrogen atom with carbon monoxide and with ethylene. II. Rate constants for the reactions of benzyl cation with triethylphosphine and with triethylarsine in 1,2-dichloroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Two H-atom reactions H + CO + H 2 → HCO + H 2 and H + C 2 H 4 → C 2 H 5 * were separately studied from room temperature to about 100 0 C, and the activation energies for these two reactions were determined in this temperature range. For H + C 2 H 4 system, a small activation energy of 0.2 kcal/mole was obtained in the present narrow temperature range. The low activation energy indicates that the pre-exponential factor has a predominant contribution to the rate constant of this reaction and has about the same magnitude as that of the rate constant. For H + CO system, a fairly large activation energy of more than 7 kcal/mole was speculated in the potential energy surfaces of the system. The activation energy obtained in the present work, however, has a low value of about 2 kcal/mole. This low value reveals the low level of crossing of this reaction in the potential energy surface and thus indicates considerable complexity involved in the surface. Carbonium ions can be formed from chosen solutes in pulse-irradiated 1,2-dichloroethane (RCl) solutions. Upon irradiation, the electrons generated from the ionization of the solvent become localized on chloride ions as a result of their reaction with the neutral solvent molecules. The solvent counterion, RCl + , on the other hand, is free to exchange charge with the solute molecule. By choosing appropriate solutes, carbonium ion can be formed through a dissociative ionization process in the exchange. The benzyl cation was formed from its precursor compound dibenzylmercury and its reactions with two nucleophiles, triethylphosphine and triethylarsine, were separately studied. The formation and decay of benzyl cation were observed at 363 nm, the position of the maximum of its absorption band, and the second-order rate constants for the two reactions were determined at room temperature

  8. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  9. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen......Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  10. First-Principles Calculations for Chemical Reaction between Sodium Diethyldithiocarbamate and Transition-Metal (Cr) atom to Produce Cr(DDC)3 and Cr(DDC)2ODDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiyanto, Henry; Muhida, Rifki; Kishi, Tomoya; Rempillo, Ofelia; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno; Di\\ {n}o, Wilson Agerico; Matsumoto, Shigeno; Kasai, Hideaki

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the chemical reaction between a Cr transition-metal atom and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC), a complexing agent used to detect and extract Cr in human blood samples. Using density-functional-theory-based calculations, we determine their stable structures of Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes and obtain their dissociation energies. We found dissociation energies of -10.66 and -3.24 eV for Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes, respectively. Hence, on the basis of dissociation energies, we have verified that the reaction of NaDDC with Cr produces Cr(DDC)2ODDC as a major product.

  11. HOT 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  12. Ab initio R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange reaction on a defect TiO{sub 2} surface: The case of terminal oxygen atom exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevorkyants, Ruslan, E-mail: ruslan.kevorkyants@gmail.com; Sboev, Mikhail N.; Chizhov, Yuri V.

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • DFT R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect surface of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} is proposed. • The mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. • Activation energy of the reaction is 0.24 eV. • G-tensors of O{sub 3}{sup −} intermediates match EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorbed on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} surface. - Abstract: Based on density functional theory we propose R1 mechanism of photostimulated oxygen isotope exchange (POIEx) reaction between {sup 16}O{sup 18}O and terminal oxygen atom of a defect TiO{sub 2} surface, which is modeled by amorphous Ti{sub 8}O{sub 16} nanocluster in excited S{sup 1} electronic state. The proposed mechanism involves four adsorption intermediates and five transition states. The computed activation energy of the POIEx equals 0.24 eV. The computed g-tensors of the predicted ozonide O{sub 3}{sup −} chemisorption species match well EPR data on O{sub 2} adsorption on UV-irradiated nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}. This match serves a mean of justification of the proposed R1 mechanism of the POIEx reaction. In addition, it is found that the proposed R1 POIEx reaction’s mechanism differs from R1 mechanism of thermo-assisted OIEx reaction on a surface of supported vanadium oxide catalyst VO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} reported earlier.

  13. Computational Study on Atomic Structures, Electronic Properties, and Chemical Reactions at Surfaces and Interfaces and in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2018-06-01

    Through computer simulations using atomistic models, it is becoming possible to calculate the atomic structures of localized defects or dopants in semiconductors, chemically active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, nanoscale structures, and active sites in biological systems precisely. Furthermore, it is also possible to clarify physical and chemical properties possessed by these nanoscale structures such as electronic states, electronic and atomic transport properties, optical properties, and chemical reactivity. It is sometimes quite difficult to clarify these nanoscale structure-function relations experimentally and, therefore, accurate computational studies are indispensable in materials science. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relation between local structures and functions for inorganic, organic, and biological systems by using atomistic computer simulations.

  14. The decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs

  15. HOT 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet....

  16. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbschleb, C. T.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Frenken, J. W. M., E-mail: frenken@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van [Leiden Probe Microscopy B.V., J.H. Oortweg 21, 2333 CH Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  17. From trace chemistry to single atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry in the vast majority of experimental works deals with the trace amount of radioactive matters. Accordingly, the concept of trace chemistry is at the heart of hot atom chemistry. Some aspects of the chemistry at trace scale and at subtrace scale are presented together with the related problems of speciation and the complication which may arise due to the formation of radio colloids. The examples of 127 I(n,γ) 128 I and 132 Te (β - ) 132 I are shown, and the method based on radioactivity was used. The procedure of separating the elements in pitchblende is shown as the example of the chemistry of traces. 13 27 Al+ 2 4 He→ 0 1 n+ 15 30 P and 15 30 P→ 14 30 Si+e + +V are shown, and how to recognize the presence of radioactive colloids is explained. The formation of radiocolloids is by the sorption of a trace radioelement on pre-existing colloidal impurity or the self-condensation of monomeric species. The temporal parameters of the nature of reactions at trace concentration are listed. The examples of Class A and Class B reactions are shown. The kinetics of reactions at trace level, radon concentration, anthropogenic Pu and natural Pu in environment, the behavior of Pu atoms and so on are described. (K.I.)

  18. Temperature Dependence of the OH- + CH3I Reaction Kinetics. Experimental and Simulation Studies and Atomic-Level Dynamics (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    reaction time, the core of the flow was sampled through a small orifice in a rounded nose cone, while the bulk of the gas was pumped by an oil free...with direct dynamics simulations,6’ 10’ 11’ 13- 17 have provided an atomistic understanding of the dynamics of gas phase x- + CH3Y reactions. In...OH- was mass selected using a quadrupole mass filter, injected into the flow tube through a Venturi inlet, and carried downstream by a helium

  19. Simulation of the effects of translational and vibrational energy on H and D atom reactions with HCl and DCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencich, T.; Hsieh, J.; Kwan, J.; Stewart, T.; Lenhardt, T.

    1976-01-01

    Agreement with experimental rate measurements for vibrational and translational effects on reactivity are shown to place stringent requirements on empirical potential energy surfaces. Classical trajectory dynamics on various surfaces show that Cl exchange reactions between isotopes of hydrogen require a barrier to agree with laser induced fluorescence experiments as well as molecular beam and thermal data. (orig.) [de

  20. Kinetic of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with Diethyl Ethylphosphonate and Triethyl Phosphate

    KAUST Repository

    Laversin, H.; El Masri, A.; Rachidi, Mariam El; Roth, E.; Chakir, A.

    2015-01-01

    pressure and at different temperatures. The calculated rate constants were fitted to the Arrhenius expression over the temperature range 298 – 352 K. The following expressions (in cm3molecule-1s-1) were obtained for the reactions of OH and CL with DEEP

  1. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  2. Adsorption studies at ionized surface layers by means of hot atoms; Etude, a l'aide d'atomes excites, de l'adsorption dans des couches superficielles ionisees; Issledovanie pri pomoshchi goryachikh atomov adsorbtsii na ionizirovannykh poverkhnostnykh sloyakh; Estudios, con ayuda de atomos excitados, de la adsorcion en capas superficiales ionizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrahami, Menashe; Steiger, Naftali H [Department of Chemistry, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    1962-03-15

    Adsorption of ions at the surface of solutions of ionic surface-active substances can directly be studied using hot atoms. Extremely small amounts of suitable radioactive ions, or ions liable to undergo induced nuclear transformations in situ, are added to such solutions, replacing some of the normal counter ions coadsorbed at the primary-adsorbed organic ions. Hot atoms with energies from about 100 keV down to a few electron volts give ranges in water from about 1000 A down to monomoleeular layers. This makes them suitable for sensitive surface layer studies. The hot atoms ejected from the surface are collected and counted. Among {alpha}-disintegration recoils, the system Bi{sup 212}/Tl{sup 208} has proved to be suitable. Now, by refining the method, valuable information about adsorption conditions at sodium dodecyl sulphate surface layers could be found. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by following in time the collected recoil activity caused by Bi-ion adsorption. Adsorption isotherms of Bi-ions as a function of the bulk concentration of the surface-active substance under varying conditions of ionic strength, pH and Bi{sup 212} activity were measured. By comparing these isotherms with those obtained by measuring the surface tension of the solutions and calculating the surface excess with the aid of a suitably modified Gibbs' isotherm, the adsorption of Bi{sup +++} and Pb{sup ++} relative to that of Na{sup +} and H{sub 3}O{sup +}, and by this the extent of ion exchange in the adsorbed layer could be determined. As the method measures the adsorption of charged species, surface reactions transforming primary-adsorbed organic anions to a non-ionic state could be followed. Conclusions could be drawn about the formation of a non-ionized acid soap in the surface and about micelle formation in the bulk under various experimental conditions. (author) [French] L'adsorption d'ions a la surface de solutions de substances ioniques tensioactives peut etre etudiee

  3. TWO REGIMES OF INTERACTION OF A HOT JUPITER’S ESCAPING ATMOSPHERE WITH THE STELLAR WIND AND GENERATION OF ENERGIZED ATOMIC HYDROGEN CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Prokopov, P. A.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G. [Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Acad. Sci., Graz (Austria); Johnstone, C. P., E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.at [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of escaping the upper atmosphere of a hydrogen-rich non-magnetized analog of HD 209458b with a stellar wind (SW) of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model. A realistic Sun-like spectrum of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation, which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, together with hydrogen photochemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric HD outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and SW interaction have been modeled. These are: (1) the “ captured by the star ” regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe toward the star, and (2) the “ blown by the wind ” regime, when sufficiently strong SW confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in detail the HD interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the SW, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud, either as a paraboloid shell between the ionopause and bowshock (for the “ blown by the wind ” regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and SW (for the “ captured by the star ” regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Ly α absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.

  4. TWO REGIMES OF INTERACTION OF A HOT JUPITER’S ESCAPING ATMOSPHERE WITH THE STELLAR WIND AND GENERATION OF ENERGIZED ATOMIC HYDROGEN CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Prokopov, P. A.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of escaping the upper atmosphere of a hydrogen-rich non-magnetized analog of HD 209458b with a stellar wind (SW) of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model. A realistic Sun-like spectrum of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation, which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, together with hydrogen photochemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric HD outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and SW interaction have been modeled. These are: (1) the “ captured by the star ” regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe toward the star, and (2) the “ blown by the wind ” regime, when sufficiently strong SW confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in detail the HD interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the SW, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud, either as a paraboloid shell between the ionopause and bowshock (for the “ blown by the wind ” regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and SW (for the “ captured by the star ” regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Ly α absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.

  5. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  6. Reactions of State-Selected Atomic Oxygen Ions O+(S-4, D-2, P-2) with Methane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Miranda, B. C.; Romanzin, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Vuitton, V.; Žabka, Ján; Polášek, Miroslav; Alcaraz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 23 (2015), s. 6082-6098 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19693S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14024 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : CHARGE-TRANSFER REACTIONS * PHOTOELECTRON-PHOTOION COINCIDENCE * TRANSLATIONAL ENERGY-DEPENDENCE Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.883, year: 2015

  7. Development of a Knowledgebase (MetRxn) of Metabolites, Reactions and Atom Mappings to Accelerate Discovery and Redesign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranas, Costas D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-12-11

    With advances in DNA sequencing and genome annotation techniques, the breadth of metabolic knowledge across all kingdoms of life is increasing. The construction of genome-scale models (GSMs) facilitates this distillation of knowledge by systematically accounting for reaction stoichiometry and directionality, gene to protein to reaction relationships, reaction localization among cellular organelles, metabolite transport costs and routes, transcriptional regulation, and biomass composition. Genome-scale reconstructions available now span across all kingdoms of life, from microbes to whole-plant models, and have become indispensable for driving informed metabolic designs and interventions. A key barrier to the pace of this development is our inability to utilize metabolite/reaction information from databases such as BRENDA [1], KEGG [2], MetaCyc [3], etc. due to incompatibilities of representation, duplications, and errors. Duplicate entries constitute a major impediment, where the same metabolite is found with multiple names across databases and models, which significantly slows downs the collating of information from multiple data sources. This can also lead to serious modeling errors such as charge/mass imbalances [4,5] which can thwart model predictive abilities such as identifying synthetic lethal gene pairs and quantifying metabolic flows. Hence, we created the MetRxn database [6] that takes the next step in integrating data from multiple sources and formats to automatically create a standardized knowledgebase. We subsequently deployed this resource to bring about new paradigms in genome-scale metabolic model reconstruction, metabolic flux elucidation through MFA, modeling of microbial communities, and pathway prospecting. This research has enabled the PI’s group to continue building upon research milestones and reach new ones (see list of MetRxn-related publications below).

  8. High-contrast sub-Doppler absorption spikes in a hot atomic vapor cell exposed to a dual-frequency laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Coget, Grégoire; Boudot, Rodolphe; Brazhnikov, Denis; Taichenachev, Alexei; Yudin, Valeriy; De Clercq, Emeric

    2017-01-01

    The saturated absorption technique is an elegant method widely used in atomic and molecular physics for high-resolution spectroscopy, laser frequency standards and metrology purposes. We have recently discovered that a saturated absorption scheme with a dual-frequency laser can lead to a significant sign reversal of the usual Doppler-free dip, yielding a deep enhanced-absorption spike. In this paper, we report detailed experimental investigations of this phenomenon, together with a full in-depth theoretical description. It is shown that several physical effects can support or oppose the formation of the high-contrast central spike in the absorption profile. The physical conditions for which all these effects act constructively and result in very bright Doppler-free resonances are revealed. Apart from their theoretical interest, results obtained in this manuscript are of great interest for laser spectroscopy and laser frequency stabilization purposes, with applications in laser cooling, matter-wave sensors, atomic clocks or quantum optics. (paper)

  9. A theoretical study of the mechanism of the atmospherically relevant reaction of chlorine atoms with methyl nitrate, and calculation of the reaction rate coefficients at temperatures relevant to the troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie; Mok, Daniel K W; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2015-03-21

    The reaction between atomic chlorine (Cl) and methyl nitrate (CH3ONO2) is significant in the atmosphere, as Cl is a key oxidant, especially in the marine boundary layer, and alkyl nitrates are important nitrogen-containing organic compounds, which are temporary reservoirs of the reactive nitrogen oxides NO, NO2 and NO3 (NOx). Four reaction channels HCl + CH2ONO2, CH3OCl + NO2, CH3Cl + NO3 and CH3O + ClNO2 were considered. The major channel is found to be the H abstraction channel, to give the products HCl + CH2ONO2. For all channels, geometry optimization and frequency calculations were carried out at the M06-2X/6-31+G** level, while relative electronic energies were improved to the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level. The reaction barrier (ΔE(‡)0K) and reaction enthalpy (ΔH(RX)298K) of the H abstraction channel were computed to be 0.61 and -2.30 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS//M06-2X/6-31+G** level. Reaction barriers (ΔE(‡)0K) for the other channels are more positive and these pathways do not contribute to the overall reaction rate coefficient in the temperature range considered (200-400 K). Rate coefficients were calculated for the H-abstraction channel at various levels of variational transition state theory (VTST) including tunnelling. Recommended ICVT/SCT rate coefficients in the temperature range 200-400 K are presented for the first time for this reaction. The values obtained in the 200-300 K region are particularly important as they will be valuable for atmospheric modelling calculations involving reactions with methyl nitrate. The implications of the results to atmospheric chemistry are discussed. Also, the enthalpies of formation, ΔHf,298K, of CH3ONO2 and CH2ONO2 were computed to be -29.7 and 19.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively, at the UCCSD(T*)-F12/CBS level.

  10. Reactions of 11C recoil atoms in the systems H2O-NH3, H2O-CH4 and NH3-CH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebeling, B.

    1988-11-01

    In this study the chemical reactions of recoil carbon 11 in the binary gas mixtures H 2 O-NH 3 , H 2 O-CH 4 and NH 3 -CH 4 in different mixing ratios as well as in solid H 2 O and in a solid H 2 O-NH 3 mixture were analyzed in dependence of the dose. The analyses were to serve e.g. the simulation of chemical processes caused by solar wind, solar radiation and cosmic radiation in the coma and core of comets. They were to give further information about the role of the most important biogeneous element carbon, i.e. carbon, in the chemical evolution of the solar system. Besides the actual high energy processes resulting in the so-called primary products, also the radiation-chemical changes of the primary products were also observed in a wide range of dosing. The generation of the energetic 11 C atoms took place according to the target composition by the nuclear reactions 14 N(p,α) 11 C, 12 C( 3 He,α) 11 C or the 16 O(p,αpn) 11 C reaction. The identification of the products marked with 11 C was carried out by means of radio gas chromatography or radio liquid chromatography (HPLC). (orig./RB) [de

  11. Reaction of H atoms with chelators in highly basic solution: H2 production in high level liquid waste simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnabas, F.; Cerny, E.; Jonah, C.D.; Meisel, D.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction by H from ethylene-diamine tetracetic acid (EDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA), glycolic acid and citric acid were measured at pH 13. The predominant product of these reactions is H 2 . The rate constants obtained are more than an order of magnitude larger than the literature rates that had been measured at pH 1. These measurements are of significance for understanding the radiolytic production of H 2 in nuclear waste storage tanks. (Author)

  12. Theoretical study of atomic structure of Zhot plasma and population inversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennou, Helene.

    1983-05-01

    This thesis presents a theoretical method for atomic-structure calculations (energy levels, wave functions, oscillator strengths): it is a modified Hartree-Fock method including the spin-orbit interaction in the variationnal process. Two applications are first described: one concerning the resonance lines of the Krypton isoelectronic sequence, the other having for purpose the interpretation of Lsub(α) and Lsub(β) satellites in Copper. A description is made of an original collisional-radiative model, which makes use of the preceding method, and allows to calculate the populations of a great number of ionic excited levels in a plasma. This model is used in a detailed study of the Al 10+ Lithium -like ion spectrum. It is able to explain the apparition of inversion populations for some special electronic densities and temperatures, for example between the levels corresponding to the transitions observed at 103.8, 105.7 and 154.7 A [fr

  13. Hot nuclei production in Ar+Ag reactions at 50 and 70 MeV/u: limits of decay standard mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vient, E.

    1992-04-01

    The experiment discussed in this thesis is devoted to the study of hot nuclei produced in the Ar + Ag collisions at 50 and 70 MeV per nucleon. Special emphasis has been given to the standard decay of these nuclei, i.e. to the sequential evaporation process leading to a heavy residue. The experimental set up has been triggered by a residue detector and all the evaporated light charged particles have been detected in a large area set up covering nearly the whole space. It has been possible to sort all the detected particles and to isolate those evaporated from the initial hot nuclei, the initial characteristics of which have been reconstructed. Two important features have been stressed: - A shot nuclei can sustain an excitation energy of 6 MeV/a and a temperature of 8 MeV without disintegrating completely. - The distributions of excitation energy stored at 50 and 70 MeV/nucleon are similar. This result can refled either an entrance channel property or a hot nuclei behaviour. Further results obtained in this work give arguments supporting the first interpretation

  14. HOT 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  15. HOT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  16. Atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering of platinum-gold alloy nanocrystals with high electrocatalytic performance for the formic acid oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Min; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Min; Zhai, Ya-Nan; Hu, Man-Cheng; Chen, Yu

    2018-03-15

    Bimetallic noble metal nanocrystals have been widely applied in many fields, which generally are synthesized by the wet-chemistry reduction method. This work presents a purposely designed atoms diffusion induced phase engineering of PtAu alloy nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (PtAu-on-Au nanostructures) through simple hydrothermal treatment. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of component and structure, PtAu-on-Au nanostructures remarkably enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and thus exhibit much higher FAOR activity and durability compared with Pt nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (Pt-on-Au nanostructures) and commercial Pd black due to an excellent stability of platy Au substrate and a high oxidation resistance of PtAu alloy nanocrystals. The atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering demonstrated in this work builds a bridge between the traditional metallurgy and modern nanotechnologies, which also provides some useful insights in developing noble metals based alloyed nanostructures for the energy and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical study of the gas-phase reactions of iodine atoms ((2)P(3/2)) with H(2), H(2)O, HI, and OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canneaux, Sébastien; Xerri, Bertrand; Louis, Florent; Cantrel, Laurent

    2010-09-02

    The rate constants of the reactions of iodine atoms with H(2), H(2)O, HI, and OH have been estimated using 39, 21, 13, and 39 different levels of theory, respectively, and have been compared to the available literature values over the temperature range of 250-2500 K. The aim of this methodological work is to demonstrate that standard theoretical methods are adequate to obtain quantitative rate constants for the reactions involving iodine-containing species. Geometry optimizations and vibrational frequency calculations are performed using three methods (MP2, MPW1K, and BHandHLYP) combined with three basis sets (cc-pVTZ, cc-pVQZ, and 6-311G(d,p)). Single-point energy calculations are performed with the highly correlated ab initio coupled cluster method in the space of single, double, and triple (pertubatively) electron excitations CCSD(T) using the cc-pVnZ (n = T, Q, and 5), aug-cc-pVnZ (n = T, Q, and 5), 6-311G(d,p), 6-311+G(3df,2p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis sets. Canonical transition state theory with a simple Wigner tunneling correction is used to predict the rate constants as a function of temperature. CCSD(T)/cc-pVnZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ (n = T and Q), CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-311G(d,p), and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory provide accurate kinetic rate constants when compared to available literature data. The use of the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels of theory allows one to obtain a better agreement with the literature data for all reactions with the exception of the I + H(2) reaction R(1) . This computational procedure has been also used to predict rate constants for some reactions where no available experimental data exist. The use of quantum chemistry tools could be therefore extended to other elements and next applied to develop kinetic networks involving various fission products, steam, and hydrogen in the absence of literature data. The final objective is to implement the kinetics of gaseous

  18. Neutron-capture reactions by stable and unstable neutron-rich nuclei and their relevance for nucleosynthesis in hot and explosive astrophysical scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofinger, R.

    1997-10-01

    This thesis deals on the one hand with neutron-capture reactions by carbon-, nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulfur-isotopes, and on the other hand with the two-step processes 4 He(2n, γ) 6 He and 9 Li(2n, γ) 11 Li. Some of the involved carbon-, nitrogen- and oxygen-isotopes possess neutron-halos characterized by the unexpected large radial extension of the nuclear matter density distribution. Special attention is paid to the halo properties in the calculation of the direct neutron capture cross section. For the determination of the nuclear structure, models are used, when no experimental information is available. The results for the reaction rates are compared to previously used rates. The rates obtained in this work are partly orders of magnitude higher than the previously used reaction rates. The reaction rates for the two-step processes are on the one hand calculated assuming a two-step process, on the other hand from genuine three-body models for the process of photodisintegration of the nuclei 6 He and 11 Li. It turns out that the calculations assuming a trio-step process underestimate the reaction rates by orders of magnitude. The influence of the reaction rate for the reaction 4 He(2n, γ) 6 He and the formation of 12 C is examined in a nuclear reaction network under conditions which are typical for the α- process in supernovae of type II. It turns out that under these conditions the influence of the reaction 4 He(2n, γ) 6 He is negligible on the formation of 12 C. (author)

  19. Heat transfer between adsorbate and laser-heated hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueba, H; Persson, B N J

    2008-01-01

    Strong short laser pulses can give rise to a strong increase in the electronic temperature at metal surfaces. Energy transfer from the hot electrons to adsorbed molecules may result in adsorbate reactions, e.g. desorption or diffusion. We point out the limitations of an often used equation to describe the heat transfer process in terms of a friction coupling. We propose a simple theory for the energy transfer between the adsorbate and hot electrons using a newly introduced heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the adsorbate temperature. We calculate the transient adsorbate temperature and the reaction yield for a Morse potential as a function of the laser fluency. The results are compared to those obtained using a conventional heat transfer equation with temperature-independent friction. It is found that our equation of energy (heat) transfer gives a significantly lower adsorbate peak temperature, which results in a large modification of the reaction yield. We also consider the heat transfer between different vibrational modes excited by hot electrons. This mode coupling provides indirect heating of the vibrational temperature in addition to the direct heating by hot electrons. The formula of heat transfer through linear mode-mode coupling of two harmonic oscillators is applied to the recent time-resolved study of carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen hopping on an ultrafast laser-heated Pt(111) surface. It is found that the maximum temperature of the frustrated translation mode can reach high temperatures for hopping, even when direct friction coupling to the hot electrons is not strong enough

  20. A Simulation Study for Radiation Treatment Planning Based on the Atomic Physics of the Proton-Boron Fusion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunmi; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Moo-Sub; Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon; Jang, Hong-Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate, based on a Monte Carlo simulation code, the procedure of radiation treatment planning for proton-boron fusion therapy (PBFT). A discrete proton beam (60 - 120 MeV) relevant to the Bragg peak was simulated using a Monte Carlo particle extended (MCNPX, Ver. 2.6.0, National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM, USA) simulation code. After computed tomography (CT) scanning of a virtual water phantom including air cavities, the acquired CT images were converted using the simulation source code. We set the boron uptake regions (BURs) in the simulated water phantom to achieve the proton-boron fusion reaction. Proton sources irradiated the BUR, in the phantom. The acquired dose maps were overlapped with the original CT image of the phantom to analyze the dose volume histogram (DVH). We successfully confirmed amplifications of the proton doses (average: 130%) at the target regions. From the DVH result for each simulation, we acquired a relatively accurate dose map for the treatment. A simulation was conducted to characterize the dose distribution and verify the feasibility of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT). We observed a variation in proton range and developed a tumor targeting technique for treatment that was more accurate and powerful than both conventional proton therapy and boron-neutron capture therapy.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of cations containing C-N bonds in the reaction of benzene with atomic nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, Marco; Rosi, Marzio; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Ascenzi, Daniela; Bassi, Davide; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, astronomical spectra have revealed the presence of aromatic and polyaromatic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, near carbon stars, in molecular clouds and meteorites. Moreover, the recent observation of benzene in interstellar space has noticeably increased the interest in the entire class of molecules and in their chemical behavior. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the benzene molecule and the atomic nitrogen cation and, in particular, the mechanisms by which the reactants are converted into cationic products containing at least one C-N bond, according to the general scheme C 6 H 6 +N + →H m C n N + +C x H y . We have measured the energy dependence of the cross section in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Relevant stationary points of the potential energy surface have been studied by using the density functional theory hybrid functional B3LYP with the 6-31G* basis set. Thermochemical calculations, and the comparison with experimental results, allow us to distinguish between exoergic and endoergic processes and to obtain a detailed description of the reaction mechanisms. We show that aromatic hydrocarbons may be converted into organic-nitrogen compounds via the insertion of N + into the benzene ring and the formation of C-N bonds from C-C ring reactants

  2. Atomic-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Movies for Study of Organic Molecules, Assemblies, and Reactions: The First 10 Years of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2017-06-20

    A molecule is a quantum mechanical entity. "Watching motions and reactions of a molecule with our eyes" has therefore been a dream of chemists for a century. This dream has come true with the aid of the movies of atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopic (AR-TEM) molecular images through real-time observation of dynamic motions of single organic molecules (denoted hereafter as single-molecule atomic-resolution real-time (SMART) TEM imaging). Since 2007, we have reported movies of a variety of single organic molecules, organometallic molecules, and their assemblies, which are rotating, stretching, and reacting. Like movies in the theater, the atomic-resolution molecular movies provide us information on the 3-D structures of the molecules and also their time evolution. The success of the SMART-TEM imaging crucially depends on the development of "chemical fishhooks" with which fish (organic molecules) in solution can be captured on a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT, serving as a "fishing rod"). The captured molecules are connected to a slowly vibrating CNT, and their motions are displayed on a monitor in real time. A "fishing line" connecting the fish and the rod may be a σ-bond, a van der Waals force, or other weak connections. Here, the molecule/CNT system behaves as a coupled oscillator, where the low-frequency anisotropic vibration of the CNT is transmitted to the molecules via the weak chemical connections that act as an energy filter. Interpretation of the observed motions of the molecules at atomic resolution needs us to consider the quantum mechanical nature of electrons as well as bond rotation, letting us deviate from the conventional statistical world of chemistry. What new horizons can we explore? We have so far carried out conformational studies of individual molecules, assigning anti or gauche conformations to each C-C bond in conformers that we saw. We can also determine the structures of van der Waals assemblies of organic molecules

  3. Progress in hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodhag, C.; Thevenot, F.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental technique is described to study hot pressing of ceramics under conditions of controlled temperature and pressure during both the heating and final sintering stages. This method gives a better control of the final microstructure of the material. Transformation mechanisms can be studied during initial heating stage (impurity degasing, reaction, phase transformation, mechanical behavior of intergranular phase...) using computer control and graphical data representations. Some examples will be given for different systems studied in our laboratory: B (α, β, amorphous), B 12 O 2 (reaction of B + B 2 O 3 ), Si 3 N 4 ( + additives), TiN, Al 2 O 3 + AlON,ZrC

  4. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  5. The Effect of Cooling Vest on Heat Strain Indexes and Reaction Time While Wearing Chemical-Microbial-Radioactive Protective Clothing in Hot and Dry Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Heat is a harmful factor in workplaces that causes physiologic and cognitive changes in workers. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cooling vest on heat strain and reaction time while wearing chemical-biological-nuclear protective clothes. Methods Twelve male students with mean age of 25 ± 2 and body mass index (BMI of 23 ± 1.5 were recruited in the experiment. Each student ran on a treadmill with a speed of 2.4 km/hour in the climate chamber at 35°C and 30% relative humidity. physiological strain index score, oral temperature, heart rate, reaction time and number of errors were measured at the end of the two levels and analyzed by the SPSS software. Results Wilcoxon test showed that the differences of physiological strain index score (P = 0.02, oral temperature (P = 0.02, reaction time (P = 0.02, heart Rate (P = 0.02 and errors (P = 0.03 with and without the cooling vest were significant. The mean physiological strain index score without cooling vest was 4.038 ± 0.882 and with the cooling vest was 1.42 ± 0.435. The mean reaction time without and with the cooling vest was 0.769 ± 0.0972 and 0.539 ± 0.977, respectively. Conclusions The results of the study showed that the cooling vest reduces the physiological strain, reaction time and errors rate of workers.

  6. Mercury content in Hot Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of mercury in hot spring waters by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Further, the mercury content and the chemical behavior of the elementary mercury in hot springs are described. Sulfide and iodide ions interfered with the determination of mercury by the reduction-vapor phase technique. These interferences could, however, be minimized by the addition of potassium permanganate. Waters collected from 55 hot springs were found to contain up to 26.0 ppb mercury. High concentrations of mercury have been found in waters from Shimoburo Springs, Aomori (10.0 ppb), Osorezan Springs, Aomori (1.3 approximately 18.8 ppb), Gosyogake Springs, Akita (26.0 ppb), Manza Springs, Gunma (0.30 approximately 19.5 ppb) and Kusatu Springs, Gunma (1.70 approximately 4.50 ppb). These hot springs were acid waters containing a relatively high quantity of chloride or sulfate.

  7. RATE CONSTANTS FOR THE REACTIONS OF OH RADICALS AND CL ATOMS WITH DI-N-PROPYL ETHER AND DI-N-BUTYL ETHER AND THEIR DEUTERATED ANALOGS. (R825252)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using relative rate methods, rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and Cl atoms with di-n-propyl ether, di-n-propyl ether-d14, di-n-butyl ether and di-n-butyl ether-d18 have been measured at 296 ? 2 K and atmos...

  8. Hot nuclei production and deexcitation in heavy ions induced reactions on medium mass targets in the 10-84 MeV/nucleon energy domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lleres, A.

    1988-01-01

    Velocity, angular distributions and total cross sections for heavy residues produced in the reactions 12 C, 14 N, 20 Ne, 40 Ar + 124 Sn have been measured in the 10-84 MeV/nucleon incident energy range using catchers technique in association with off-line gamma-activity spectroscopy. The observed reaction products are interpreted as evaporation residues from equilibrated systems formed by complete or incomplete fusion of the projectile and target nuclei. From the velocities and residual masses measured at forward angles, the linear momentum transfers and excitation energies associated with the intermediate systems are estimated using simple fusion-evaporation models and are next compared to the predictions of the preequilibrium and Fermi jets models. Energy, angular, charge and charge correlation distributions for intermediate mass fragments emitted in the reaction 32 S + nat Ag at 30 MeV/nucleon were also measured using gaseous and silicon detectors. The energy and angular distributions indicate that both equilibrated and non-equilibrated emitting sources are present. The equilibrium emission is attributed to the deexcitation of systems produced by incomplete fusion of the projectile and target nuclei. The charge correlation distributions are consistent with an asymmetric fission decay process. The linear momentum transfer and excitation energy associated with the equilibrated source are estimated using a simple fusion-fission model [fr

  9. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis.......HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  10. Impact parameter selected nuclear temperatures of hot nuclei from excited state populations for 40Ar+197Au reactions at E/A=25MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuyu; He Zhiyong; Duan Limin; Jin Genming; Wu Heyu; Zhang Baoguo; Wen Wanxin; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng; Dai Guangxi; Wang Hongwei

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear temperatures extracted from excited state populations were measured as a function of linear momentum transfer (LMT) for 40 Ar+ 197 Au reactions at 25MeV/nucleon. The emission temperatures increased slightly with increasing linear momentum transfer or decreasing impact parameter. Taking into account the corrections of detection efficiency and sequential feeding from higher-lying states, a temperature of T∼4MeV was deduced for central collisions. For peripheral collisions the extracted temperatures increased with the energy of the particles. (orig.)

  11. Study of the decay of hot nuclear systems formed in Au-induced reactions at E/A=60 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, D.N.; Colonna, N.; Sui, Q.; Tso, K.

    1993-01-01

    Multifragment production was measured for the 197 Au + 12 C, 27 Al, 51 V, 63 Cu and 197 Au reactions at E/A= 60 MeV. Comparison of experimental observables to calculations with a dynamical code coupled to a statistical model indicates agreement with some features of the experimental data. Furthermore the logarithms of the branching ratios for binary, ternary, quaternary, and quinary decays plotted as a function of E -1/2 show a linear dependence that ,strongly suggests a statistical competition between the various multifraigment channels. Finally, by utilizing the momentum tensor, the shape of the most central events in momentum space has been determined

  12. Free radical hydrogen atom abstraction from saturated hydrocarbons: A crossed-molecular-beams study of the reaction Cl + C{sub 3}H{sub 8} {yields} HCl + C{sub 3}H{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.; Hemmi, N.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The abstraction of hydrogen atoms from saturated hydrocarbons are reactions of fundamental importance in combustion as well as often being the rate limiting step in free radical substitution reactions. The authors have begun studying these reactions under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique on beamline 9.0.2.1, utilizing VUV undulator radiation to selectively ionize the scattered hydrocarbon free radical products (C{sub x}H{sub 2x+1}). The crossed molecular beam technique involves two reactant molecular beams fixed at 90{degrees}. The molecular beam sources are rotatable in the plane defined by the two beams. The scattered neutral products travel 12.0 cm where they are photoionized using the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. In the authors initial investigations they are using halogen atoms as protypical free radicals to abstract hydrogen atoms from small alkanes. Their first study has been looking at the reaction of Cl + propane {r_arrow} HCl + propyl radical. In their preliminary efforts the authors have measured the laboratory scattering angular distribution and time of flight spectra for the propyl radical products at collision energies of 9.6 kcal/mol and 14.9 kcal/mol.

  13. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana; Bartosz, Grzegorz; El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Leroy, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. ► Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. ► Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH· absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH· quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH· resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH· and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH· and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile–10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH· onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH· was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH· using standards (0.02 and 14 μM, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox ® , ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of higher selectivity than colorimetry, and (ii) its help to investigate the mechanisms occurring with the free radical.

  14. Static and dynamical properties of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.

    1990-01-01

    We briefly review our understanding of the formation of excited/hot nuclei in heavy-ion collisions at some tens of MeV/A. We recall the major theoretical frameworks used for describing as well the entrance channel of the reaction as the structure properties of hot nuclei. We finally focus on multifragmentation within insisting upon the theoretical challenge it does represent

  15. On the chemistry of the lightest exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of formation of three hydrogen-like exotic atoms, positronium, muonium and pionic hydrogen are discussed. For positronium two formation mechanisms, the Ore model with hot-atom reactions, and the spur reaction model are set against experimental observations in solutions. The use of pionic hydrogen atoms in obtaining information on the bond properties of hydrogen is illustrated by recent experiments performed in JINR. The use of negative pions in chemistry is demonstrated by electronic structure investigations performed in Dubna. The probability W that in a chemical system containing bound hydrogen atoms a stopped negative pion is captured by a proton reflects the bond properties of hydrogen. Recent results haVe shown that the hydrogen bond formation in liquid water and the coordination of water molecules in aquacomplexes lead to significant decreases in probability W for water. A comparison of the chemical uses of the exotic atoms shows that positronium and muonium inform us on intermolecular level probing a small environment of a few molecules while the pionic hydrogen atoms deliver information on the chemical bond of hydrogen, i.e. on intramolecular level

  16. Phosphite effect on hot and sweet pepper reaction to Phytophthora capsici Efeito do fosfito na reação de pimentão e pimenteira a Phytophthora capsici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cesar Sala

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphite has been recommended to enhance plant resistance against Phytophthora. This work evaluated the response of hot and sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L. to Phytophthora capsici from juvenile up to the adult stage following treatment with phosphite. Sweet pepper hybrids considered to be resistant to P. capsici, like Reinger, Nathalie and Athenas, were evaluated. The susceptible checks were hybrid Magali R and cvs. Myr 10 and Ikeda. Hot pepper Criollo de Morelos 328, CM 334, BGH 3756, BGH 5122, CNPH 294 and Locorte were used as referential resistant lines. Phosphite did not have an effect on the hot pepper resistant lines because of their genetic homozygozity, while no protection was observed for the Athenas hybrid claimed to be resistant. Heterozygous hybrids recognized as resistant, like Reinger and Nathalie, showed higher survival following phosphite treatment, and their reaction was equivalent to the resistant cvs. CM 328 and CM 334, except for the fruiting stage. Depending of the hybrid heterozygous genotype, phosphite possibly acts through indirect phytoalexin induction through the inhibited pathogen.Fosfito tem sido recomendado para aumentar o sistema de resistência de plantas atacadas por fitopatógenos. Este trabalho avaliou a ação do fosfito nas reações de pimentão e pimenteiras (Capsicum annuum L. a Phytophthora capsici na fase juvenil até a fase adulta, tratadas com fosfito. Os híbridos de pimentão considerados resistentes a P. capsici foram Reinger, Nathalie e Athenas, enquanto que o híbrido Magali R e as cvs. Myr 10 e Ikeda constituíram as referenciais suscetíveis. As linhagens de pimenta Criollo de Morelos 328, CM 334, BGH 3756, BGH 5122, CNPH 294 e Locorte, foram usadas como padrão referencial de resistência ao patógeno. O fosfito não afetou a reação das linhagens resistentes devido sua homozigosidade genética. Não houve ação protetora do fosfito nos hospedeiros suscetíveis, inclusive no híbrido Athenas

  17. Deeply bound pionic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1989-01-01

    The standard method of pionic atom formation does not produce deeply bound pionic atoms. A study is made on the properties of deeply bound pionic atom states by using the standard pion-nucleus optical potential. Another study is made to estimate the cross sections of the formation of ls pionic atom states by various methods. The pion-nucleus optical potential is determined by weakly bound pionic atom states and pion nucleus scattering. Although this potential may not be valid for deeply bound pionic atoms, it should provide some hint on binding energies and level widths of deeply bound states. The width of the ls state comes out to be 0.3 MeV and is well separated from the rest. The charge dependence of the ls state is investigated. The binding energies and the widths increase linearly with Z azbove a Z of 30. The report then discusses various methods to populate deeply bound pionic atoms. In particular, 'pion exchange' reactions are proposed. (n, pπ) reaction is discussed first. The cross section is calculated by assuming the in- and out-going nucleons on-shell and the produced pion in (n1) pionic atom states. Then, (n, dπ - ) cross sections are estimated. (p, 2 Heπ - ) reaction would have cross sections similar to the cross section of (n, dπ - ) reaction. In conclusion, it seems best to do (n, p) experiment on heavy nuclei for deeply bound pionic atom. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Action of Mercaptan and Disulfide in Hydrogen Atom Exchange Reactions; Action des Thioalcools et des Disulfures dans les Reactions d'Echange d'Atomes d'Hydrogene; Vozdejstvie merkaptanov i disul'fidov v reaktsiyakh obmena atoma vodoroda; Accion de los Mercaptanos y Disulfuros en las Reacciones de Intercambio del Hidrogeno Atomico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S. G. [Brandeis University Waltham, MA (United States)

    1965-10-15

    Free- radical, photochemical, and high-energy radiation-induced reactions may be catalysed or inhibited by rapid hydrogen atom exchange reactions of mercaptans and disulfides. The radical-induced, light-initiated, and benzophenone-sensitized decarbonylations of aldehydes are catalysed by mercaptans. The chain-propagating hydrogen transfer reaction, R' + RCH = O -> RH + RC = O , is made more rapid by a similar sequence of hydrogen atom transfers involving the sulfur compound: R' + C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}SH -> RH + C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}S'; C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}S + RCH = 0 -> C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}SH + RC = 0. The photoreduction of benzophenone in 2-propanol leads to benzpinacol by a non-chain reaction via the radicals (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}C-OH and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}COH. The reaction is retarded and inhibited by mercaptan and disulfide, which reconvert the radicals to the starting materials by rapid hydrogen transfer reactions and are themselves regenerated in their alternate valence states, each molecule of sulfur compound negating the chemical consequences of many quanta: (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}C-OH + AS' -> (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}C = O + ASH; (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C-OH + ASH -> (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C = 0 + AS'. Proof of the mechanism is found in: equilibration of initially present mercaptan or disulfide during inhibition; in racemization of optically active alcohol during inhibition; in deuterium exchange during inhibition. Similar inhibition is seen when only one intermediate radical is formed, as in the benzophenone- benzhydrol and acetophenone-{alpha}-methyl-benzyl alcohol systems. Inhibition by sulfur compounds, by the same mechanism, is found in the {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray induced conversion of benzophenone to benzpinacol; naphthalene has no protecting effect on benzophenone in the {sup 60}Co system, while quenching the photochemical reaction. The protection by sulfur compounds of solutes against radiation damage thus results from hydrogen atom

  19. Kinetics of the reaction of F atoms with O2 and UV spectrum of FO2 radicals in the gas phase at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermann, T.; Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1994-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of FO2 radicals and the kinetics of the reaction of F atoms with O2 have been studied in the gas phase at 295 K using pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV spectroscopy. At 230 nm, sigma(FO2) = (5.08 +/- 0.70) X 10(-18) cm2 molecule-1. The kinetics of the r......The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of FO2 radicals and the kinetics of the reaction of F atoms with O2 have been studied in the gas phase at 295 K using pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV spectroscopy. At 230 nm, sigma(FO2) = (5.08 +/- 0.70) X 10(-18) cm2 molecule-1. The kinetics...

  20. Calculating constants of the rates of the reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange: A model of a shock oscillator with a change of the Hamiltonian of the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganov, D. L.

    2017-11-01

    A new model for calculating the rates of reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange is proposed. Diatomic molecule AB is an unstructured particle M upon the exchange of elastic-vibrational (VT) energy, i.e., a model of a shock forceful oscillator with a change in Hamiltonian (SFOH). The SFOH model is based on the quantum theory of strong perturbations. The SFOH model allows generalization in simulating the rates of the reactions of excitation, ionization, and atomic exchange in the vibrational-vibrational (VV) energy exchange of diatomic molecules, and the exchange of VV- and VT-energy of polyatomic molecules. The rate constants of the excitation of metastables A 3Σ u +, B 3Π g , W 3Δ u , B'3Σ u -, a'3Σ u -, and the ionization of a nitrogen molecules from ground state X2Σ g + upon a collision with a heavy structureless particle (a nitrogen molecule), are found as examples.

  1. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bartosz, Grzegorz [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid [Laboratoire de Nutrition et Sante, Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra (Morocco); Sapin-Minet, Anne [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Leroy, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.leroy@pharma.uhp-nancy.fr [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{center_dot}) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH{center_dot} absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH{center_dot} quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH{center_dot} resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH{center_dot} and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH{center_dot} and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH{center_dot} onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH{center_dot} was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH{center_dot} using standards (0.02 and 14 {mu}M, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox{sup Registered-Sign }, ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of

  2. DFT Studies of Adsorption of Cu7-atom Nanoclusters on TiO2 Surfaces and Application to Methanol Steam Reforming Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Michael J., Sr.

    Alcohol conversion to hydrogen, via steam reforming, is an alternative energy process that is promising for the future of clean energy economies. With advancements in fuel cell technologies, on-board hydrogen reforming could leverage already existing automotive designs and fuel infrastructure. The design of catalytic materials with tunable properties requires a level of insight that has yet to be achieved experimentally. The central objective of this project is to develop a working model of metal-oxide surface mediated copper clusters, since such catalytic beds have a wide-range of applications. More specifically, we investigate the catalytic framework of this process with theoretical models of the active metal (Cu) and metal­oxide support (TiO2). We employ a Density Functional Theory (DFT)-Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) approach for the quantum level electronic structure calculations of Cu, TiO2 and CH3OH. Additionally, we have generated anatase (A(001), A(101)) and rutile (R(100), R(110)) surface morphologies and 7­atom copper cluster complexes with those planes. To examine the possible influence of TiO2 on the adsorption properties of our active metal, Cu7, we have carried out adsorption studies with CH3OH. Our final data and observations predict that the Cu7 cluster adopts a symmetric pentagonal bipyramidal geometry with D5h symmetry. We find that the anatase morphology has a greater overall stability than rutile. The adsorption strength of the Cu7 cluster has been predicted in this study to be according to the following order: A(001) > A(101)> R(110). Indeed, the R(100) surface appears to be an unfavorable surface for metal cluster binding. Our data indicates that copper cluster stabilization on the metal-oxide surface depends on the nature of the crystal face. Again, we studied the adsorption properties of methanol on nascent Cu7 cluster, Cu7-TiO 2 complex and on pure TiO2-surface in A(001) polymorphic form. The calculations revealed that methanol

  3. Nuclear Data Center (NDC) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Progress Report to the IAEA Technical Meeting of Nuclear Reaction Data Centers (NRDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Ouk

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Data Center (NDC, former Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab.) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a director, 10 permanent staffs (2 in evaluation, 1 in measurement, 2 in atomic and molecular data, 2 in processing and validation, 3 in applications), one PhD student and one secretary. KAERI/NDC recently expanded its scope of work into the atomic and molecular data where two permanent staffs are involved. Mission of KAERI/NDC is disseminating outcomes of international network as well as promoting domestic nuclear data activities and related applications.

  4. Properties and decay modes of hot nuclei produced in the reaction: {sup 36}Ar on {sup 58}Ni and detected with INDRA device; Proprietes et modes de desexcitation des noyaux chauds observes dans la reaction {sup 36}Ar sur {sup 58}Ni avec le detecteur INDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalpas, L [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d` Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l` Instrumentation Associee; [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-01-01

    Hot nuclei are formed in heavy ion collisions covering the Fermi energy domain. According to the excitation energy deposited into these nuclei, several de-excitation processes can be observed, in particular the emission of complex fragments (Z {>=} 3) which remains poorly understood. The GANIL facility offers the possibility to cover the excitation function for the Ar on Ni reaction over a broad energy range from 32 to 95 MeV/u where the hot nuclei evolve from classical `evaporation` to complete `vaporization` into light particles (neutrons, isotopes of H, He). The study of reaction mechanisms shows that from peripheral to central collisions the total cross section is dominated by binary dissipative collisions. Both partners coming from well-characterized events with the INDRA detector are reconstructed using the `Minimum Spanning Tree` method. Thus excitation energy up to 20 MeV/A are reached in the most violent collisions at the highest bombarding energy. The deposited energy is not shared in the mass ratio between the quasi-projectile and the quasi-target, the quasi-projectile being hotter. For total excitation energies ranging roughly from 2 to 8 MeV/A, the proportion of `multifragmentation` events increases to reach a plateau at about 10 MeV/A due to the rising probability to have complete `vaporization` of the system above 8 MeV/A. The steady increase of the temperature extracted from the double isotopic He-Li ratios with excitation energy for the quasi-projectile suggests a progressive evolution of the de-excitation processes as predicted by statistical models. No signal of first order liquid-gas phase transition is seen in our data. (author) 124 refs.

  5. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  6. Electron - atom bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.

    1986-01-01

    Features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas are studied. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point-Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. Results agree with exact quantum-mechanical partial-wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point-Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential, the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. The scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses were also studied. It was found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T 1 /Z 2 . This scaling is exact in the case of the point-Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. Bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas were also studied describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas-Fermi mode. Gaunt factors were obtained with the relativistic partial-wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures

  7. Free Br atom and free radical reactions in the radiolysis of 1,2 dibromoethane (DBE) in air free aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Manohar

    1986-01-01

    G(Br - ) have been reported in the free radical degradation of 1,2 DBE in Ar - and N 2 O-saturated solutions. It is clear from the results that a small chain reaction occurs, t-butanol radical reacts with 1,2 DBE to give Br - . At pH 12.3, high (Br - ) are attributed to another chain reaction involving O - radical anion. Dose rate studies confirm the occurrence of chain reaction. (author). 5 refs

  8. The Effect of Kinetic Energy on the Reactions of Nucleogenic Carbon Atoms with Hydrocarbons; Effet de l'Energie Cinetique sur les Reactions des Atomes de Carbone Nucleogeniques avec des Hydrocarbures; Ehffekt kineticheskoj ehnergii pri reaktsiyakh atomov yadernogenichesko- go ugleroda s uglevodorodami; Efecto de la Energia Cinetica en las Reacciones de Atomos Nucleogenos de Carbono con Hidrocarburos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrin, J.; Rosenberg, H.; Wolfgang, R. [Sterling Chemistry Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); MacKay, C. [Haverford College, Haverford, PA (United States)

    1965-04-15

    The basic technique for studying the effect of kinetic energy on reactions of C atoms produced by nuclear transformation involves the well-known method of moderation with inert gases. However, this can be combined with other techniques such as (1) the use of scavengers to detect processes involving long- lived radicals, (2) degradative studies that serve to fix the position occupied by the labelled atom, (3) double tracer studies in which a reactant is partially labelled with deuterium and the isotopic composition of the labelled products is determined in order to establish the origin of the hydrogen which they contain. In this paper new results on product yields in two systems, neon-ethylene and neon-ethane, will be presented, and the relation of these results to other work involving degradative studies and double tracer experiments will be discussed. The discussion of the neon-ethylene results is in terms of the two previously postulated insertion mechanisms, insertion of the C atom into the C = C and into the C-H bonds to give C-C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adducts, As neon concentration is increased no product is eliminated, but the relative yields of products are altered markedly. Those products such as acetylene and vinyl acetylene which can be formed from the initial C-C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adducts via processes with a high energy requirement decrease in importance, and the yields of products formed in low energy processes, such as C{sub 5} compounds, increase. The ethane pattern is similar. Degradative studies have already shown that the intramolecular C{sup 11} distribution in allene and methyl- acetylene formed from ethylene is affected by neon moderation. These results imply both participation of the C = C and C-H bonds in formation of these products, and a dependence of the ratio of attack at the two bond types on the kinetic energy of the reacting C atom. Other work involving double tracer studies on acetylene formation from single molecules such as CH{sub 2}CD{sub 2

  9. Reactions of pigs to a hot environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh Thi Thanh Thuy,; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    When compared to other species of farm animals, pigs are relatively sensitive to high environmental temperatures because the pig cannot sweat and is relatively poor at panting. Little information is available about the ambient temperatures above which group-housed pigs start to adapt their

  10. Atmospheric chemistry of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane: kinetics and mechanisms of reactions with chlorine atoms and OH radicals and global warming potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Nielsen, Ole J; Karpichev, Boris; Wallington, Timothy J; Sander, Stanley P

    2012-06-21

    The smog chamber/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), isoflurane) = (4.5 ± 0.8) × 10(-15), k(Cl + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2), desflurane) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F, sevoflurane) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(-13), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (3.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) in 700 Torr of N(2)/air diluent at 295 ± 2 K. An upper limit of 6 × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) was established for k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F). The laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) technique was employed to determine hydroxyl radical rate coefficients as a function of temperature (241-298 K): k(OH + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2)) = (7.05 ± 1.80) × 10(-13) exp[-(1551 ± 72)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(296 ± 1 K) = (3.73 ± 0.08) × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1), and k(OH + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F) = (9.98 ± 3.24) × 10(-13) exp[-(969 ± 82)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1); k(298 ± 1 K) = (3.94 ± 0.30) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1). The rate coefficient of k(OH + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), 296 ± 1 K) = (1.45 ± 0.16) × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) was also determined. Chlorine atoms react with CF(3)CHFOCHF(2) via H-abstraction to give CF(3)CFOCHF(2) and CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals in yields of approximately 83% and 17%. The major atmospheric fate of the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) alkoxy radical is decomposition via elimination of CF(3) to give FC(O)OCHF(2) and is unaffected by the method used to generate the CF(3)C(O)FOCHF(2) radicals. CF(3)CHFOCF(2) radicals add O(2) and are converted by subsequent reactions into CF(3)CHFOCF(2)O alkoxy radicals, which decompose to give COF(2) and CF(3)CHFO radicals. In 700 Torr of air 82% of CF(3)CHFO radicals undergo C-C scission to yield HC(O)F and CF(3) radicals with the remaining 18% reacting with O(2) to give CF(3)C(O)F. Atmospheric oxidation of (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F gives (CF(3))(2)CHOC(O)F in a molar yield of 93 ± 6% with CF(3)C(O)CF(3) and HCOF as minor products. The IR

  11. Potential Energy Surfaces for Reactions of X Metal Atoms (X = Cu, Zn, Cd, Ga, Al, Au, or Hg with YH4 Molecules (Y = C, Si, or Ge and Transition Probabilities at Avoided Crossings in Some Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Novaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review ab initio studies based on quantum mechanics on the most important mechanisms of reaction leading to the C–H, Si–H, and Ge–H bond breaking of methane, silane, and germane, respectively, by a metal atom in the lowest states in Cs symmetry: X(2nd excited state, 1st excited state and ground state + YH4→ H3XYH → H + XYH3 and XH + YH3. with X = Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Al, and G, and Y = C, Si, and Ge. Important issues considered here are (a the role that the occupation of the d-, s-, or p-shells of the metal atom plays in the interactions with a methane or silane or germane molecule, (b the role of either singlet or doublet excited states of metals on the reaction barriers, and (c the role of transition probabilities for different families of reacting metals with these gases, using the H–X–Y angle as a reaction coordinate. The breaking of the Y–H bond of YH4 is useful in the production of amorphous hydrogenated films, necessary in several fields of industry.

  12. Infrared Spectra and Structures of SiH{sub 2}-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} Intermediates Prepared in Reactions of Laser-ablated Silicon Atoms with Ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Han-Gook [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Andrews, Lester [University of Virginia, Charlottesville (United States)

    2016-03-15

    SiH{sub 2}-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} were observed in the matrix IR spectra following reactions of laser-ablated Si atoms with ethane on the basis of correlation with computed frequencies. Evidently photon energy is required for the formation of the cyclic Si compound. These Si complexes are similar to the primary products in the previous studies of group 4 metals, in line with the previous results that s{sup 2}p{sup 2} and s{sup 2}d{sup 2} electronic configurations yield similar products. The relatively long C–C bond in the cyclic Si product reflects the structural strain, and the short C-Si and C-C bonds of CH{sub 3}CH=SiH{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} show that they are true double bonds in line with the natural bond orders. Reactions of transition-metal atoms with small alkanes and halomethanes have been studied in a series of recent investigations. High oxidation-state products (methylidenes and methylidynes) along with insertion complexes were identified in the matrix spectra. It is interesting whether or not Si, a group 14 metalloid, undergoes similar reactions with larger hydrocarbons to provide higher oxidation-state compounds.

  13. Study of surface reaction of spinel Li4Ti5O12 during the first lithium insertion and extraction processes using atomic force microscopy and analytical transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitta, Mitsunori; Akita, Tomoki; Maeda, Yasushi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2012-08-21

    Spinel lithium titanate (Li(4)Ti(5)O(12), LTO) is a promising anode material for a lithium ion battery because of its excellent properties such as high rate charge-discharge capability and life cycle stability, which were understood from the viewpoint of bulk properties such as small lattice volume changes by lithium insertion. However, the detailed surface reaction of lithium insertion and extraction has not yet been studied despite its importance to understand the mechanism of an electrochemical reaction. In this paper, we apply both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) surface during the charge-discharged (lithium insertion and extraction) processes. The AFM observation revealed that irreversible structural changes of an atomically flat Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) surface occurs at the early stage of the first lithium insertion process, which induces the reduction of charge transfer resistance at the electrolyte/Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) interface. The TEM observation clarified that cubic rock-salt crystal layers with a half lattice size of the original spinel structure are epitaxially formed after the first charge-discharge cycle. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) observation revealed that the formed surface layer should be α-Li(2)TiO(3). Although the transformation of Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) to Li(7)Ti(5)O(12) is well-known as the lithium insertion reaction of the bulk phase, the generation of surface product layers should be inevitable in real charge-discharge processes and may play an effective role in the stable electrode performance as a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI).

  14. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  15. Solar hot spots are still hot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, T.

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22. 14 refs

  16. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  17. The reaction of fluorine atoms with methanol: yield of CH3O/CH2OH and rate constant of the reactions CH3O + CH3O and CH3O + HO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Vereecken, Luc; Fittschen, Christa

    2018-04-25

    Xenondifluoride, XeF2, has been photolysed in the presence of methanol, CH3OH. Two reaction pathways are possible: F + CH3OH → CH2OH + HF and F + CH3OH → CH3O + HF. Both products, CH2OH and CH3O, will be converted to HO2 in the presence of O2. The rate constants for the reaction of both radicals with O2 differ by more than 3 orders of magnitude, which allows an unequivocal distinction between the two reactions when measuring HO2 concentrations in the presence of different O2 concentrations. The following yields have then been determined from time-resolved HO2 profiles: φCH2OH = (0.497 ± 0.013) and φCH3O = (0.503 ± 0.013). Experiments under low O2 concentrations lead to reaction mixtures containing nearly equal amounts of HO2 (converted from the first reaction) and CH3O (from the second reaction). The subsequent HO2 decays are very sensitive to the rate constants of the reaction between these two radicals and the following rate constants have been obtained: k(CH3O + CH3O) = (7.0 ± 1.4) × 10-11 cm3 s-1 and k(CH3O + HO2) = (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10-10 cm3 s-1. The latter reaction has also been theoretically investigated on the CCSD(T)//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory and CH3OH + O2 have been identified as the main products. Using μVTST, a virtually pressure independent rate constant of k(CH3O + HO2) = 4.7 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 has been obtained, in good agreement with the experiment.

  18. AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF HOT JUPITER–STELLAR WIND HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point

  19. AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF HOT JUPITER–STELLAR WIND HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point.

  20. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  1. Examining the rudimentary steps of the oxygen reduction reaction on single-atomic Pt using Ti-based non-oxide supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tak, Young Joo; Yang, Sungeun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2018-01-01

    C(100)-supported single Pt atoms. The O2 and OOH* dissociation processes on Pt/TiN(100) are determined to be non-activated (i.e. "barrier-less" dissociation) while an activation energy barrier of 0.19 and 0.51eV is found for these dissociation processes on Pt/TiC(100), respectively. Moreover, the series...

  2. Formation and decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1992-09-01

    The mechanisms involved in hot nuclei formation and decay and their eventual connexion with fundamental properties of nuclear matter are discussed, i.e. its equation of state is considered. After a brief review of the reactions in which hot nuclei can be formed, the variables which are used to describe them, the corresponding theoretical descriptions and their limits when extreme states are reached are discussed. Experimental evidences for hot nuclei formation are presented, with the corresponding decay properties used as signatures. (R.P.) 64 refs.; 25 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Modeling deflagration waves out of hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that shock initiation and detonation of heterogeneous explosives comes about by a two-step process known as ignition and growth. In the first step a shock sweeping through an explosive cell (control volume) creates hot spots that become ignition sites. In the second step, deflagration waves (or burn waves) propagate out of those hot spots and transform the reactant in the cell into reaction products. The macroscopic (or average) reaction rate of the reactant in the cell depends on the speed of those deflagration waves and on the average distance between neighboring hot spots. Here we simulate the propagation of deflagration waves out of hot spots on the mesoscale in axial symmetry using a 2D hydrocode, to which we add heat conduction and bulk reaction. The propagation speed of the deflagration waves may depend on both pressure and temperature. It depends on pressure for quasistatic loading near ambient temperature, and on temperature at high temperatures resulting from shock loading. From the simulation we obtain deflagration fronts emanating out of the hot spots. For 8 to 13 GPa shocks, the emanating fronts propagate as deflagration waves to consume the explosive between hot spots. For higher shock levels deflagration waves may interact with the sweeping shock to become detonation waves on the mesoscale. From the simulation results we extract average deflagration wave speeds.

  4. Atomic inner shell ionization: a new method of nuclear interaction lifetimes in the range 10-16-10-18 second. Lifetime measurement of the compound nucleus in the reaction 106Cd+p (Ep=10 and 12 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemin, J.-F.

    1978-01-01

    A new method to measure the lifetime of the compound nucleus formed in the reaction 106 Cd+p at Ep=10 and 12 MeV is described. The nuclear lifetime is compared to the known lifetime of an atomic inner shell vacancy created in the entrance channel of the nuclear reaction. If the ionization probability in he way-in of the nuclear reaction is kown the compound nucleus lifetime is deduced by a simple relation from the number of compound X-rays measured in coincidence with one of the reaction products. A large number of ionization probability values measured in very small impact parameter collisions induced by H + , He + , D + on Al, Cu, S, Ti, Si, Ag, Cd are reported. The data are interpreted in terms of the corrected SCA theory of ionization. New effects such as angular dependence and trajectory effect (hair-pin-curve effect) are shown experimentally. The influence of a nuclear delay time on the ionization probability value is considered; the effect on a nuclear reaction of the energy losses by the projectile during the ionization process is analysed in detail. The yield curve of the resonant nuclear reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si is taken as an example. A detailed analysis of the compound nucleus 107 In lifetimes is given. Attention has been paid to competitive processes leading to X ray emission of same energy as the compound X rays. Extensions of the method to measure compound nucleus lifetimes in collision induced by heavy ions and to separate the shape elastic and compound elastic mechanisms are presented [fr

  5. Methodology of hot nucleus calorimetry and thermometry produced by nuclear reactions around Fermi energies; Methodologie de la calorimetrie et de la thermometrie des noyaux chauds formes lors de collisions nucleaires aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vient, E

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the calorimetry and thermometry of hot nuclei produced in collisions Xe + Sn between 25 and 100 MeV/u. The apparatus for hot nucleus physical characterization is the 4{pi} detector array Indra. This study was made by using the event generators Gemini, Simon and Hipse and a data-processing filter simulating the complete operation of the multi-detector. The first chapter presents the different ways of producing hot nuclei. In the second and third chapters, the author presents a critical methodological study of calorimetry and thermometry applied to hot nuclei, different methods are reviewed, their accuracy and application range are assessed. All the calorimetry methods rely on the assumption that we are able to discriminate decay products of the hot nucleus from evaporated particles. In the fourth chapter, the author gives some ways of improving calorimetry characterization of the hot nucleus. An alternative method of calorimetry is proposed in the fifth chapter, this method is based on the experimental determination of an evaporation probability that is deduced from the physical characteristics of the particles present in a restricted domain of the space of velocities.

  6. Application of atomic mutations included in nuclear reactions, 40Ar(γ, p)39Cl(β decay)39Ar, to surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Juzo

    1987-01-01

    It has been found that the nuclear transformation processes which are initiated by photonuclear reactions can be used for studying the adsorption and chemical reactions taking place on solid surfaces. Chemically reactive 39 Cl was produced by irradiating 40 Ar with high-energy bremsstrahlung, and its blow was directed onto several material surfaces. The amount of chlorine adsorption was ascertained by detecting its radioactivity. Desorption without heating the adsorber samples inevitably occurred owing to the nuclear decay of 39 Cl. The adsorption and desorption rates were compared for several elements. A fast growth of oxide islands on sample surfaces was observed during the adsorption-desorption process. (author)

  7. An absolute- and relative-rate study of the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals and Cl atoms with n-alkyl nitrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sidebottom, H.W.; Donlon, M.

    1991-01-01

    combined with kinetic spectroscopy and a conventional photolytic relative-rate method. The Cl rate constants were measured using only the relative-rate method. Evidence is presented from the kinetic studies that reaction of OH radicals with alkyl nitrates may involve both addition and abstraction pathways...

  8. Atmospheric chemistry of trans-CF3CH = CHCl: Kinetics of the gas-phase reactions with Cl atoms, OH radicals, and O-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nilsson, E. J. K.; Nielsen, O. J.

    2008-01-01

    spectrum of t-CF3CH = CHCl is reported. The atmospheric lifetime of t-CF3CH = CHCl is determined by reaction with OH radicals and is approximately 26 days. The global warming potential of t-CF3CH = CHCl is approximately 7 for a 100-year time horizon. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. A Qualitative Report of the Ways High School Chemistry Students Attempt to Represent a Chemical Reaction at the Atomic/Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Anne L.; Wood, Nathan B.; Roehrig, Gillian H.; Nyachwaya, James

    2010-01-01

    We report the findings of a large-scale (n = 1,337) qualitative descriptive analysis of U.S. high schools students' particulate representations of a chemical reaction, specifically, the combustion of methane. Data were collected as part of an end of course exam. Student representations were coded into 17 distinct subcategories under one of five…

  10. Hot tub folliculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... survives in hot tubs, especially tubs made of wood. Symptoms The first symptom of hot tub folliculitis ... may help prevent the problem. Images Hair follicle anatomy References D'Agata E. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other ...

  11. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  12. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  13. Ultrahigh-sensitive detection of molecules produced in catalytic reactions by uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on solid substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumatsu, H; Fukui, N

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for measuring catalytic activities of uni-atomic-composition bi-element clusters supported on a solid substrate. The cluster sample is prepared by irradiating a cluster-ion beam having the uni-atomic composition onto the substrate on a soft-landing condition in an ultra-high vacuum. The catalytic activity is measured by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) mass analysis. Molecules at a density as low as 3 cm −3 have been detected with an ultrahigh-sensitive TPD mass spectrometer consisting of a cylindrical electron gun, a quadrupole mass filter and a micro-channel-plate ion-detector. The high reproducibility has been achieved by careful calibration of the TPD mass spectrometer. As a benchmark example, thermal oxidation of CO catalysed on Pt 30 disks supported on a silicon surface was studied. The CO 2 products have been successfully observed at the Pt 30 density as low as 3 × 10 12 clusters in a circular area of 8 mm in diameter at the ramping rate of the sample temperature as low as 0.3 K s −1 .

  14. Nuclear reactor for release of nuclear energy, without a chain reaction using the simultaneous implosion of three, or more, atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    A modified form of what is known as a 'streaking nuclear reactor' is described. In this type of reactor it is proposed to obtain release of nuclear energy from atomic nuclei by stripping such nuclei of their electron clouds or shells, to form a high temperature plasma, and breaking nucleons off the surface of the nuclei. In the apparatus described it is proposed to break up nuclei by causing three or more nuclei to collide with each other at very high velocity. Streams of nuclei, stripped of their electron clouds are directed into a reactor vessel to a focal point or implosion center along three or more ducts, equi-angularly spaced around the implosion center in the same plane, the arrangement being such as to permit mutual simultaneous collision of three or more of the nuclei. The importance of achieving a release of nuclear energy in this manner is that it may be able to use any chemical element that can be converted to a plasma, but it is most likely to be successful with elements of high atomic number, such as Pb or Bi. (U.K.)

  15. Temperature Dependences for the Reactions of O2- and O- with N and O Atoms in a Selected-Ion Flow Tube Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    quadrupole mass filter, mass selected, and injected into the flow reactor via a Venturi - type inlet. Ions undergo ∼105 collisions with helium buffer... gas at pressures of 0.4 to 0.8 Torr resulting in complete or near-complete thermalization.10 The higher pressure was used when studying the high...butterfly gate valve resulting in lower pumping speeds and thus longer reaction times. Neutrals were injected 49 cm before the end of the flow tube and

  16. Chemical generation of iodine atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, Kevin B. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)]. E-mail: kevin.hewett@kirtland.af.mil; Hager, Gordon D. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States); Crowell, Peter G. [Northrup Grumman Information Technology, Science and Technology Operating Unit, Advanced Technology Division, P.O. Box 9377, Albuquerque, NM 87119-9377 (United States)

    2005-01-10

    The chemical generation of atomic iodine using a chemical combustor to generate the atomic fluorine intermediate, from the reaction of F{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, followed by the production of atomic iodine, from the reaction of F + HI, was investigated. The maximum conversion efficiency of HI into atomic iodine was observed to be approximately 75%, which is in good agreement with the theoretical model. The conversion efficiency is limited by the formation of iodine monofluoride at the walls of the combustor where the gas phase temperature is insufficient to dissociate the IF.

  17. Atomic hydrogen cleaning of EUV multilayer optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Samuel, Jr.; Steinhaus, Charles A.; Clift, W. Miles; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Bajt, Sasa

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have been conducted to investigate the use of atomic hydrogen as an in-situ contamination removal method for EUV optics. In these experiments, a commercial source was used to produce atomic hydrogen by thermal dissociation of molecular hydrogen using a hot filament. Samples for these experiments consisted of silicon wafers coated with sputtered carbon, Mo/Si optics with EUV-induced carbon, and bare Si-capped and Ru-B4C-capped Mo/Si optics. Samples were exposed to an atomic hydrogen source at a distance of 200 - 500 mm downstream and angles between 0-90° with respect to the source. Carbon removal rates and optic oxidation rates were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. In addition, at-wavelength peak reflectance (13.4 nm) was measured using the EUV reflectometer at the Advanced Light Source. Data from these experiments show carbon removal rates up to 20 Å/hr for sputtered carbon and 40 Å/hr for EUV deposited carbon at a distance of 200 mm downstream. The cleaning rate was also observed to be a strong function of distance and angular position. Experiments have also shown that the carbon etch rate can be increased by a factor of 4 by channeling atomic hydrogen through quartz tubes in order to direct the atomic hydrogen to the optic surface. Atomic hydrogen exposures of bare optic samples show a small risk in reflectivity degradation after extended periods. Extended exposures (up to 20 hours) of bare Si-capped Mo/Si optics show a 1.2% loss (absolute) in reflectivity while the Ru-B4C-capped Mo/Si optics show a loss on the order of 0.5%. In order to investigate the source of this reflectivity degradation, optic samples were exposed to atomic deuterium and analyzed using low energy ion scattering direct recoil spectroscopy to determine any reactions of the hydrogen with the multilayer stack. Overall, the results show that the risk of over-etching with atomic hydrogen is much less than previous studies using RF discharge cleaning

  18. Kinetics of the CH3 + HCl/DCl → CH4/CH3D + Cl and CD3 + HCl/DCl → CD3H/CD4 + Cl reactions: An experimental H atom tunneling investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskola, Arkke J.; Seetula, Jorma A.; Timonen, Raimo S.

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of the radical reactions of CH 3 with HCl or DCl and CD 3 with HCl or DCl have been investigated in a temperature controlled tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer. The CH 3 (or CD 3 ) radical, R, was produced homogeneously in the reactor by a pulsed 193 nm exciplex laser photolysis of CH 3 COCH 3 (or CD 3 COCD 3 ). The decay of CH 3 /CD 3 was monitored as a function of HCl/DCl concentration under pseudo-first-order conditions to determine the rate constants as a function of temperature, typically from 188 to 500 K. The rate constants of the CH 3 and CD 3 reactions with HCl had strong non-Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures. The rate constants were fitted to a modified Arrhenius expression k = QA exp (-E a /RT) (error limits stated are 1σ + Students t values, units in cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 ): k(CH 3 + HCl) = [1.004 + 85.64 exp (-0.02438 x T/K)] x (3.3 ± 1.3) x 10 -13 exp [-(4.8 ± 0.6) kJ mol -1 /RT] and k(CD 3 + HCl) = [1.002 + 73.31 exp (-0.02505 x T/K)] x (2.7 ± 1.2) x 10 -13 exp [-(3.5 ± 0.5) kJ mol -1 /RT]. The radical reactions with DCl were studied separately over a wide ranges of temperatures and in these temperature ranges the rate constants determined were fitted to a conventional Arrhenius expression k = A exp (-E a /RT) (error limits stated are 1σ + Students t values, units in cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 ): k(CH 3 + DCl) = (2.4 ± 1.6) x 10 -13 exp [-(7.8 ± 1.4) kJ mol -1 /RT] and k(CD 3 + DCl) = (1.2 ± 0.4) x 10 -13 exp [-(5.2 ± 0.2) kJ mol -1 /RT] cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . Curvature in the Arrhenius plots of the H-atom abstraction reactions at low temperatures was analyzed by considering H-atom tunneling through the reaction barrier and primary kinetic isotope effect. Contribution of tunneling in it was concluded to be negligible. In addition, secondary isotope effect was measured

  19. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  20. Models of hot stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Albada, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Elliptical galaxies consist almost entirely of stars. Sites of recent star formation are rare, and most stars are believed to be several billion years old, perhaps as old as the Universe itself (--10/sup 10/ yrs). Stellar motions in ellipticals show a modest amount of circulation about the center of the system, but most support against the force of gravity is provided by random motions; for this reason ellipticals are called 'hot' stellar systems. Spiral galaxies usually also contain an appreciable amount of gas (--10%, mainly atomic hydrogen) and new stars are continually being formed out of this gas, especially in the spiral arms. In contrast to ellipticals, support against gravity in spiral galaxies comes almost entirely from rotation; random motions of the stars with respect to rotation are small. Consequently, spiral galaxies are called 'cold' stellar systems. Other than in hot systems, in cold systems the collective response of stars to variations in the force field is an essential part of the dynamics. The present overview is limited to mathematical models of hot systems. Computational methods are also discussed

  1. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  2. The adventure of atom. Vol.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Gorce, P.M. de; Bacher, P.; Bourgeois, J.; Bussac, J.; Cauquais, C.; Gauvenet, A.; Goldschmidt, B.; Le Baut, Y.; Mezin, M.

    1992-01-01

    In the first volume on the ambiguous adventure of atom, the authors present the history of atom conquest with the discoveries of natural and artificial radioactivity and chain reactions, before to explain the first military uses

  3. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, John Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  4. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2'-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol

  5. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  6. Reviews Book: Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air Equipment: Doppler Effect Unit Book: The Physics of Rugby Book: Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Equipment: Brunel Eyecam Equipment: 200x Digital Microscope Book: The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics Book: Physics 2 for OCR Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air This excellent book makes sense of energy facts and figures Doppler Effect Unit Another simple, effective piece of kit from SEP Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Intriguing and unique write-up of an intellectual fraud case Brunel Eyecam An affordable digital eyepiece for your microscope 200x Digital Microscope An adjustable digital flexcam for classroom use The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics A fascinating round-up of the recent history of physics WORTH A LOOK The Physics of Rugby Book uses sport analogy and context to teach physics concepts Physics 2 for OCR Essential textbook for the course but otherwise pointless WEB WATCH Some free teaching materials are better than those you'd pay for

  7. Atomic inner-shell physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects on atomic inner shells; relativistic calculation of atomic transition probabilities; many-body effects in energetic atomic transitions; Auger Electron spectrometry of core levels of atoms; experimental evaluation of inner-vacancy level energies for comparison with theory; mechanisms for energy shifts of atomic K-X rays; atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation; investigations of inner-shell states by the electron energy-loss technique at high resolution; coherence effects in electron emission by atoms; inelastic X-ray scattering including resonance phenomena; Rayleigh scattering: elastic photon scattering by bound electrons; electron-atom bremsstrahlung; X-ray and bremsstrahlung production in nuclear reactions; positron production in heavy-ion collisions, and X-ray processes in heavy-ion collisions

  8. A theoretical study of the H-abstraction reactions from HOI by moist air radiolytic products (H, OH, and O (3P)) and iodine atoms (2P(3/2)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammaecher, Catherine; Canneaux, Sébastien; Louis, Florent; Cantrel, Laurent

    2011-06-23

    The rate constants of the reactions of HOI molecules with H, OH, O ((3)P), and I ((2)P(3/2)) atoms have been estimated over the temperature range 300-2500 K using four different levels of theory. Geometry optimizations and vibrational frequency calculations are performed using MP2 methods combined with two basis sets (cc-pVTZ and 6-311G(d,p)). Single-point energy calculations are performed with the highly correlated ab initio coupled cluster method in the space of single, double, and triple (pertubatively) electron excitations CCSD(T) using the cc-pVTZ, cc-pVQZ, 6-311+G(3df,2p), and 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis sets. Reaction enthalpies at 0 K were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVnZ//MP2/cc-pVTZ (n = T and Q), CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-311G(d,p), and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory and compared to the experimental values taken from the literature. Canonical transition-state theory with an Eckart tunneling correction is used to predict the rate constants as a function of temperature. The computational procedure has been used to predict rate constants for H-abstraction elementary reactions because there are actually no literature data to which the calculated rate constants can be directly compared. The final objective is to implement kinetics of gaseous reactions in the ASTEC (accident source term evaluation code) program to improve speciation of fission products, which can be transported along the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in the case of a severe accident.

  9. Speciation of arsenic in water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry at trace levels using a post-column reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stummeyer, J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Harazim, B. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Wippermann, T. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    Anion-exchange HPLC has been combined with hydride generation - atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) for the routine speciation of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsenic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. The sensitivity of the AAS-detection was increased by a post-column reaction system to achieve complete formation of volatile arsines from the methylated species and arsenate. The system allows the quantitative determination of 0.5 {mu}g/l of each arsenic compound in water samples. The stability of synthetical and natural water containing arsenic at trace levels was investigated. To preserve stored water samples, a method for quantitative separation of arsenate at high pH-values with the basic anion-exchange resin Dowex 1 x 8 was developed. (orig.)

  10. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of NO2 reactions on CaCO3 (1014) surfaces in humid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-09-13

    In this study, alternating current (AC) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with phase imaging and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the effect of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) adsorption on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) (101̅4) surfaces at 296 K in the presence of relative humidity (RH). At 70% RH, CaCO3 (101̅4) surfaces undergo rapid formation of a metastable amorphous calcium carbonate layer, which in turn serves as a substrate for recrystallization of a nonhydrated calcite phase, presumably vaterite. The adsorption of nitrogen dioxide changes the surface properties of CaCO3 (101̅4) and the mechanism for formation of new phases. In particular, the first calcite nucleation layer serves as a source of material for further island growth; when it is depleted, there is no change in total volume of nitrocalcite, Ca(NO3)2, particles formed whereas the total number of particles decreases. This indicates that these particles are mobile and coalesce. Phase imaging combined with force curve measurements reveals areas of inhomogeneous energy dissipation during the process of water adsorption in relative humidity experiments, as well as during nitrocalcite particle formation. Potential origins of the different energy dissipation modes within the sample are discussed. Finally, XPS analysis confirms that NO2 adsorbs on CaCO3 (101̅4) in the form of nitrate (NO3(-)) regardless of environmental conditions or the pretreatment of the calcite surface at different relative humidity.

  11. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O(3P) atoms with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 over the temperature range 258--861 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of O( 3 P) with ethylene, propylene, and propylene-d6 were determined over the temperature range 258--861 K using a laser photolysis-chemiluminescence technique. The following empirical expressions are the best fits to the data: k/sub ethylene/ = 2.12 x 10 -13 T -63 e -1370 /sup ///sup R//sup T/, k/sub propylene/ = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.56/e/sup 1130/RT/, and k/sub propylene-d/6 = 3.40 x 10 -19 T/sup 2.53/ e/sup 1210/R/T cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . A simple transition state theory model is shown to provide a reasonable explanation for non-Arrhenius temperature behavior

  12. Asymmetric 1,8/13,2,x-M2C2B10 14-vertex metallacarboranes by direct electrophilic insertion reactions; the VCD and BHD methods in critical analysis of cage C atom positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnaw, Amelia; Lopez, Maria Elena; Ellis, David; Rosair, Georgina M; Welch, Alan J

    2014-04-07

    The isolation of six isomeric, low-symmetry, dicobaltacarboranes with bicapped hexagonal antiprismatic cage structures, always in low yield, is described from reactions in which 13-vertex cobaltacarborane anions and sources of cobalt-containing cations were present. The vertex-to-centroid distance (VCD) and boron-H distance (BHD) methods are used to locate the correct C atom positions in the cages, thus allowing the compounds to be identified as 1,13-Cp2-1,13,2,10-closo-Co2C2B10H12 (1), 1,8-Cp2-3-OEt-1,8,2,10-closo-Co2C2B10H11 (2), 1,13-Cp2-1,13,2,9-closo-Co2C2B10H12 (3), 1,8-Cp2-1,8,2,4-closo-Co2C2B10H12 (4), 1,13-Cp2-1,13,2,4-closo-Co2C2B10H12 (5) and 1,8-Cp2-1,8,2,5-closo-Co2C2B10H12 (6). It is shown that a common alternative method of cage C atom identification, using refined (as B) U(eq) values, does not work well, at least in these cases. Having identified the correct isomeric forms of the six dicobaltacarboranes, their syntheses are tentatively rationalised in terms of the direct electrophilic insertion of a {CpCo(+)} fragment into [CpCoC2B10](-) anions and it is demonstrated that compounds 1, 4, 5 and 6 can be successfully prepared by deliberately performing such reactions.

  13. Atomic masses 1995. The 1995 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    The 1995 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment or systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  14. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  15. Probing the Influence of the Conjugated Structure and Halogen Atoms of Poly-Iron-Phthalocyanine on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Cui, Lufang; Yang, Shifeng; Fu, Jingjing; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia; Xia, Dingguo

    2015-01-01

    Metal-phthalocyanine (MPc) macrocyclic catalysts have been perceived as promising alternatives to Pt and Pt-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the effect of different MPc molecular structures on the ORR has rarely been reported in depth. Herein, iron-phthalocyanine polymers (poly-FePcs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites with different structures were synthesized using microwave method. The relationship between their molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity was fully revealed by density functional theory (DFT) and X-ray fine absorption spectroscopy (XAFS). DFT calculations revealed that the introduction of halogen atoms can increase the ion potential (IP) and the dioxo-binding energy () of the poly-FePcs. Meanwhile, their conjugated structure not only facilitates electronic transmission, but also significantly increases . XAFS analysis indicated that the poly-FePc/MWCNTs composites had a square planar structure and a smaller of phthalocyanine ring (Fe-N 4 structure) skeleton structure radius when a larger conjugated structure or introduced halogen atoms was present. The experimental results suggest that the these changes in properties arising from the different structures of the MPc macrocyclic compounds led to a huge effect on their ORR electrochemical activities, and provide a guide to obtaining promising electrochemical catalysts

  16. A study of atomic interaction between suspended nanoparticles and sodium atoms in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A feasibility study of suppression of the chemical reactivity of sodium itself using an atomic interaction between nanoparticles and sodium atoms has been carried out. We expected that the atomic interaction strengthens when the nanoparticle metal is the transition element which has a major difference in electronegativity from sodium. We also calculated the atomic interaction between nanoparticle and sodium atoms. It became clear that the atomic bond between the nanoparticle atom and the sodium atom is larger than that between sodium atoms, and the charge transfer takes place to the nanoparticle atom from the sodium atom. Using sodium with suspended nanoparticles, the fundamental physical properties related to the atomic interaction were investigated to verify the atomic bond. The surface tension of sodium with suspended nanoparticles increased, and the evaporation rate of sodium with suspended nanoparticles also decreased compared with that of sodium. Therefore the presence of the atomic interaction between nanoparticles and sodium was verified from these experiments. Because the fundamental physical property changes by the atomic interaction, we expected changes in the chemical reactivity characteristics. The chemical reaction properties of sodium with suspended nanoparticles with water were investigated experimentally. The released reaction heat and the reaction rate of sodium with suspended nanoparticles were reduced than those of sodium. The influence of the charge state of nanoparticle on the chemical process with water was theoretically investigated to speculate on the cause of reaction suppression. The potential energy in both primary and side reactions changed by the charge transfer, and the free energy of activation of the reaction with water increased. Accordingly, the reaction barrier also increased. This suggests there is a possibility of the reduction in the reaction of sodium by the suspension of nanoparticles. Consequently the possibility of the

  17. Cycling the Hot CNO: A Teaching Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost-Schenk, J. W.; Diget, C. Aa.; Bentley, M. A.; Tuff, A.

    2018-01-01

    An interactive activity to teach the hot Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen (HCNO) cycle is proposed. Justification for why the HCNO cycle is important is included via an example of x-ray bursts. The activity allows teaching and demonstration of half-life, nuclear isotopes, nuclear reactions, protons and a-particles, and catalytic processes. Whilst the…

  18. Collective motion in hot superheavy nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tveter, TS; Gaardhoje, JJ; Maj, A; Ramsoy, T; Atac, A; Bacelar, J; Bracco, A; Buda, A; Camera, F; Herskind, B; Korten, W; Krolas, W; Menthe, A; Million, B; Nifenecker, H; Pignanelli, M; Pinston, JA; vanderPloeg, H; Schussler, F; Sletten, G

    1996-01-01

    The superheavy nucleus (272)(108)Hs and its evaporation daughters have been produced using the reaction Th-232(Ar-40,gamma xn) with beam energies 10.5 and 15.0 MeV/A. The Giant Dipole Resonance gamma-radiation from the hot conglomerate system prior to fission has been isolated using a differential

  19. Dynamics and mechanisms of hot chemistry stimulated by recoil methods. Progress report, March 1, 1977--February 28, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.D.

    1977-11-01

    Evaluation of the nuclear recoil chemical activation process in cyclobutane-t and subsequent collisional energy transfer processes has shown: The average quanta of energy transferred from cyclobutane excited to vibrational energies near 100 kcal/mole upon collision is in the kcal/collision range, and also the hot tritium for hydrogen replacement reaction deposits about 46% of its kinetic energy into internal modes of the cyclobutane-t and the energy distribution of activated molecules is relatively independent of the composition of mixed bath systems. An evaluation of the average energy at which recoil stimulated, hot hydrogen replacement reaction in cyclohexane and n-butane occurs has been made as a function of added moderator. Calculated results indicate that the average reaction energy is relatively independent of composition over the range from 0 to 99% moderation with noble gases in well scavenged systems of moderate reactivity. Geometrical isomerization accompanying the gas phase chlorine atom replacement reaction in 2,3 dichlorohexafluoro-2-butene as a function of moderation has been investigated. Both a thermal or near thermal reaction path having a trans/cis product ratio of 1.3 and a high energy process which preferentially forms trans product from both cis and trans reactant are found

  20. Hot Surface Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Tursyn, Yerbatyr; Goyal, Vikrant; Benhidjeb-Carayon, Alicia; Simmons, Richard; Meyer, Scott; Gore, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable hot surface ignition of flammable liquids is one of the hazards in ground and air transportation vehicles, which primarily occurs in the engine compartment. In order to evaluate the safety and sustainability of candidate replacement fuels with respect to hot surface ignition, a baseline low lead fuel (Avgas 100 LL) and four experimental unleaded aviation fuels recommended for reciprocating aviation engines were considered. In addition, hot surface ignition properties of the gas tu...

  1. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  2. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  3. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  4. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ulcers. Affected individuals may complain of a burning sensation and mouth sensitivity to cold, hot, and spicy foods. Lichenoid ... melon, and pineapple, are all associated with this syndrome. You should inform your ... reaction in the mouth, though some are more common than others. If ...

  5. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  6. Atomic resolution structures of discrete stages on the reaction coordinate of the [Fe4S4] enzyme IspG (GcpE)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix; Frank, Annika; Wang, Ke; Rao, Guodong; O'Dowd, Bing; Li, Jikun; Guerra, Francisco; Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Bacher, Adelbert; Eppinger, Jö rg; Oldfield, Eric; Groll, Michael

    2015-01-01

    IspG is the penultimate enzyme in non-mevalonate biosynthesis of the universal terpene building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Its mechanism of action has been the subject of numerous studies but remained unresolved due to difficulties in identifying distinct reaction intermediates. Using a moderate reducing agent as well as an epoxide substrate analogue, we were now able to trap and crystallographically characterize various stages in the IspG catalyzed conversion of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MEcPP) to (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methylbut-2-enyl-4-diphosphate (HMBPP). In addition, the enzyme’s structure was determined in complex with several inhibitors. These results, combined with recent electron paramagnetic resonance data, allowed us to deduce a detailed and complete IspG catalytic mechanism which describes all stages from initial ring opening to formation of HMBPP via discrete radical and carbanion intermediates. The data presented in this article provide a guide for the design of selective drugs against many pro- and eukaryotic pathogens to which the non-mevalonate pathway is essential for survival and virulence.

  7. Atomic resolution structures of discrete stages on the reaction coordinate of the [Fe4S4] enzyme IspG (GcpE)

    KAUST Repository

    Quitterer, Felix

    2015-04-11

    IspG is the penultimate enzyme in non-mevalonate biosynthesis of the universal terpene building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Its mechanism of action has been the subject of numerous studies but remained unresolved due to difficulties in identifying distinct reaction intermediates. Using a moderate reducing agent as well as an epoxide substrate analogue, we were now able to trap and crystallographically characterize various stages in the IspG catalyzed conversion of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MEcPP) to (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methylbut-2-enyl-4-diphosphate (HMBPP). In addition, the enzyme’s structure was determined in complex with several inhibitors. These results, combined with recent electron paramagnetic resonance data, allowed us to deduce a detailed and complete IspG catalytic mechanism which describes all stages from initial ring opening to formation of HMBPP via discrete radical and carbanion intermediates. The data presented in this article provide a guide for the design of selective drugs against many pro- and eukaryotic pathogens to which the non-mevalonate pathway is essential for survival and virulence.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 on H-Passivated GeSi: Initial Surface Reaction Pathways with H/GeSi(100)-2 × 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shi; Qing-Qing, Sun; Lin, Dong; Han, Liu; Shi-Jin, Ding; Wei, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The reaction mechanisms of Al(CH 3 ) 3 (TMA) adsorption on H-passivated GeSi(100)-2 × 1 surface are investigated with density functional theory. The Si–Ge and Ge–Ge one-dimer cluster models are employed to represent the GeSi(100)-2 × 1 surface with different Ge compositions. For a Si-Ge dimer of a H-passivated SiGe surface, TMA adsorption on both Si–H * and Ge–H * sites is considered. The activation barrier of TMA with the Si–H * site (1.2eV) is higher than that of TMA with the Ge-H * site (0.91 eV), which indicates that the reaction proceeds more slowly on the Si-H * site than on the Ge-H * site. In addition, adsorption of TMA is more energetically favorable on the Ge–Ge dimer than on the Si–Ge dimer of H-passivated SiGe. (atomic and molecular physics)

  9. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  10. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  11. The Third Dimension of a More O'Ferrall-Jencks Diagram for Hydrogen Atom Transfer in the Isoelectronic Hydrogen Exchange Reactions of (PhX)(2)H(•) with X = O, NH, and CH(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembran, Alessandro; Provorse, Makenzie R; Wang, Changwei; Wu, Wei; Gao, Jiali

    2012-11-13

    A critical element in theoretical characterization of the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, including hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), is the formulation of the electron and proton localized diabatic states, based on which a More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram can be represented to determine the step-wise and concerted nature of the reaction. Although the More O'Ferrall-Jencks diabatic states have often been used empirically to develop theoretical models for PCET reactions, the potential energy surfaces for these states have never been determined directly based on first principles calculations using electronic structure theory. The difficulty is due to a lack of practical method to constrain electron and proton localized diabatic states in wave function or density functional theory calculations. Employing a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT), in which the electron and proton localized diabatic configurations are constructed through block-localization of Kohn-Sham orbitals, we show that distinction between concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) and HAT, which are not distinguishable experimentally from phenomenological kinetic data, can be made by examining the third dimension of a More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram that includes both the ground and excited state potential surfaces. In addition, we formulate a pair of effective two-state valence bond models to represent the CPET and HAT mechanisms. We found that the lower energy of the CPET and HAT effective diabatic states at the intersection point can be used as an energetic criterion to distinguish the two mechanisms. In the isoelectronic series of hydrogen exchange reaction in (PhX)(2)H(•), where X = O, NH, and CH(2), there is a continuous transition from a CPET mechanism for the phenoxy radical-phenol pair to a HAT process for benzyl radical and toluene, while the reaction between PhNH(2) and PhNH(•) has a mechanism intermediate of CPET and HAT. The electronically nonadiabatic

  12. 3D atom microscopy in the presence of Doppler shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullah; Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of hot atoms with laser fields produces a Doppler shift, which can severely affect the precise spatial measurement of an atom. We suggest an experimentally realizable scheme to address this issue in the three-dimensional position measurement of a single atom in vapors of rubidium atoms. A three-level Λ-type atom-field configuration is considered where a moving atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave laser fields and spatial information of the atom in 3D space is obtained via an upper-level population using a weak probe laser field. The atom moves with velocity v along the probe laser field, and due to the Doppler broadening the precision of the spatial information deteriorates significantly. It is found that via a microwave field, precision in the position measurement of a single hot rubidium atom can be attained, overcoming the limitation posed by the Doppler shift.

  13. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  14. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  15. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures is descr......The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  16. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  17. Hot workability of γ + α2 titanium aluminide: Development of processing map and constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Narayana Murty, S.V.S.; Pant, Bhanu; Agarwala, Vijaya; Sinha, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deformation studies of five TiAl alloys carried out through processing map. ► DRX domain and superplastic domain identified in power efficiency map. ► Safe working zone for alloys found at 1223–1423 K at strain rates (10 −2 –10 −3 s −1 ). ► Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy, Zener Hollomon parameter (Z) are obtained. ► Constitutive equations derived and verified. DRX grain size correlated with Z. - Abstract: Gamma titanium alumindes are intermetallics, which have very narrow working range. Hot isothermal working is the most suitable process for hot working of alloy. Accordingly, hot isothermal compression test is carried out on reaction synthesized and homogenized titanium aluminide alloys at different temperatures and strain rates using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (atom%) have been used in the study. Stress–strain data obtained from the test has been used to construct processing map, which indicates the safe and unsafe working zone. Strain rate sensitivity and Zener–Hollomon parameter has been calculated. Further, constitutive equations have been generated and verified. It is found that alloy has good workability in the temperature range of 1223–1423 K at strain rates of 0.01–0.001 s −1 . In this range of parameters, the alloys nearly follow the constitutive equations.

  18. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  19. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  20. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru