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Sample records for hot atom chemical

  1. Kinetics of chemical reactions initiated by hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, L.P.

    1977-01-01

    Modern ideas about kinetics of chemical reactions of hot atoms are generalized. The main points of the phenomenological theories (''kinetic theory'' of Wolfgang-Estrup hot reactions and the theory of ''reactions integral probability'' of Porter) are given. Physico-chemical models of elastic and non-elastic collisions are considered which are used in solving Boltzmann integro-differential equations and stochastic equations in the Porter theory. The principal formulas are given describing probabilities or yields of chemical reactions, initiated with hot atoms, depending on the distribution functions of hot particles with respect to energy. Briefly described are the techniques and the results of applying the phenomenological theories for interpretation of the experimental data obtained during nuclear reactions with hot atoms, photochemical investigations, etc. 96 references are given

  2. Radiation-chemical aspects of solid state hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, T.; Collins, K.E.; Collins, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    The study of nuclear hot atom chemical (NHAC) processes occurring in solids is seriously limited by the lack of adequate methods for directly studying the chemical species containing hot atoms. In the present review the effects of ionizing radiation on parent and non-parent yields from solid state targets is surveyed and qualitative interpretations are given. After a few general remarks of the relationship of radiation chemistry to solid state NHAC, a detailed description of the radiation effects is given (radiation annealing, neutron activation, changes in separable yield). (Auth.)

  3. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H 2 /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C 2 H 2 /minus/> C 2 HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs

  4. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  5. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ''Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH → H 2 R reactions where RH is CH 4 , C 2 H 6 , or C 3 H 8 , (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants

  6. 18F in hot atom chemistry and equilibrium chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, J.W.; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Knickelbein, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Superexcited molecules are unusual species that at present can only be investigated using nuclear recoil methods. The thermochemical technique for measuring the excitation energy distributions of superexcited molecules is reviewed and applied to recent studies of CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F formed from high energy atomic exchange reactions in CF 4 and C 2 F 6 . The nascent CF 3 18 F and C 2 F 5 18 F range in energy from 1.7 to about 45 eV. The average energies of these products range from 15 to 20 eV. The internal excitation that accompanies these reactions is initially localized near the 18 F bonding site, and the C 2 F 5 18 F decomposition mechanism is non-statistical. Moderated nuclear recoil experiments yield mechanisms and rates for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms. Under our standard experimental conditions from 3.4 x 10 4 to 3.4 x 10 8 labeled product molecules are available for radioassay. This procedure is free from systematic error and the measurements yield exceptional precision and sensitivity because (1) high energy reactions with the thermally active reagents are suppressed. (2) the host environment is rigorously controlled, and (3) the molecular products from many single atom reactions are directly counted. The limitations of this technique are described and results are presented for the reactions of thermal 18 F atoms with CH 4 and C 2 H 4 . (J.P.N.)

  7. Significance of fundamental processes of radiation chemistry in hot atom chemical processes: electron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the current understanding of the course of electron thermalization. An outline is given of the physical picture without going into mathematical details. The analogy of electron thermalization with hot atom processes is taken as guiding principle in this paper. Content: secondary electrons (generation, track structure, yields); thermalization (mechanism, time, spatial distribution); behaviour of hot electrons. (Auth.)

  8. Ninth international symposium on hot atom chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the Symposium are compiled. The topics considered were chemical dynamics of high energy reactions, hot atom chemistry in organic compounds of tritium, nitrogen, oxygen, and halogens, theory and chemical dynamics of hot atom reactions as determined by beam studies, solid state reactions of recoil atoms and implanted ions, hot atom chemistry in energy-related research, hot atom chemistry in inorganic compounds of oxygen and tritium, hot positronium chemistry, applied hot atom chemistry in labelling, chemical effects of radioactive decay, decay-induced reactions and excitation labelling, physical methods in hot atom chemistry, and hot atom reactions in radiation and stratospheric chemistry

  9. Chemical effect in nuclear decay processes. Applications in in situ studies in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    In certain cases, secondary processes, such as X-ray or electron emission initiated by the primary event, do show effects which can be correlated with the chemical state of the emitting atom. The most well known is Moessbauer recoil-less γ-emission, but this talk will concentrate on other, more widespread processes that follow either γ-ray internal conversion (γIC) or electron capture (EC). The former leads to electron emission and the latter to X-ray and Auger electron emission. Such emissions have been extensively studied in non-radioactive situations. These studies have shown that changes in photo- or Auger-electron energy can be readily correlated with valency and that the energies, peak shapes and peak intensities of X-rays that are generated by valence-core transitions show chemically related perturbations. γIC has been applied to the determination of changes of 3p and 3d binding energies as a function of technetium valency. The results are comparable with those from conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) it is the Kα and Kβ X-rays from chromium ( 51 Cr) that have been most extensively studied. Studies in non-radioactive systems for chromium and related first row transition elements seem to indicate that the Kβ/Kα intensity ratio increases with valency. This may be rationalized as due to a greater response by 3p than 2p electrons to a reduction in the number of 3d electrons: 3p becomes more contracted and so the 3p → 1s transition probability is enhanced leading to the relative increase in Kβ intensity. Once 'chemical effects' in γIC and EC:XES have been established for a range of recoil elements they may be used to determine the chemical state of a recoil atom in a solid state matrix without recourse to dissolution. Such a non-invasive procedure will yield invalunable data on the primary hot atom chemistry processes. (author)

  10. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  11. Hot atom chemistry of sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovski, D. S.; Koleva, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt to cover all papers dealing with the hot atom chemistry of sulpphur is made. Publications which: a) only touch the problem, b) contain some data, indirectly connected with sulphur hot atom chemistry, c) deal with 35 S-production from a chloride matrix, are included as well. The author's name and literature source are given in the original language, transcribed, when it is necessary, in latine. A number of primery and secondary documents have been used including Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atomindex, the bibliographies of A. Siuda and J.-P. Adloff for 1973 - 77, etc. (authors)

  12. Hot atom chemistry of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemistry of energetic carbon atoms is discussed. The experimental approach to studies that have been carried out is described and the mechanistic framework of hot carbon atom reactions is considered in some detail. Finally, the direction that future work might take is examined, including the relationship of experimental to theoretical work. (author)

  13. Remarks on theoretical hot-atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, Mitio

    1993-01-01

    The publication of the 'Handbook of Hot Atom Chemistry', following the earlier volume 'Recent Trend and Application', was a major milestone in physical chemistry. Theoretical treatments of hot atom chemistry must address two classes of problems. The first class concerns the individual collisions of hot atoms with other atoms or molecules. The second class concerns the description of the consequences of the many collisions of hot atoms and their chemical environment. Most of the remarks pertain to the problems of the first class. The central issue is the adiabaticity of nuclear motions versus electronic motions. To be precise, any atomic core motion should be mentioned rather than pure nuclear motion, because tightly bound core electrons are largely irrelevant to the chemistry. When nuclear motions are sufficiently slow, or for other reasons that can be regarded as adiabatic, the collision problem is basically straightforward, therefore, interatomic and intermolecular forces can be assumed, and their consequences for nuclear motions are calculable in principle. In the case of non-adiabaticity being important, much more difficult problems arise, and it is briefly discussed, and the work by Phelps is cited. (K.I.)

  14. Hot atom chemistry of monovalent atoms in organic condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecklin, G.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of hot atom studies in condensed organic phases are considered, and recent advances in condensed phase organic hot atom chemistry of recoil tritium and halogen atoms are discussed. Details are presented of the present status and understanding of liquid phase hot atom chemistry and also that of organic solids. The consequences of the Auger effect in condensed organic systems are also considered. (author)

  15. Hot atom chemistry: Three decades of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The seminal experiments of Szilard and Chalmers indicated that the energy released in a nuclear transformation could be used to initiate chemical reaction. But basic studies of small molecules in the gas phase, from which reaction mechanisms could be elucidated, were not made until the late 50's. Since then theory and experiments have gone hand in hand in the study of the hot atom reactions of many recoil species. This review will present a broad overview of progress that has been made in understanding how the energy received by the atom (translation, ionization, electronic) in a nuclear transformation is used to drive chemical reactions. The limitations implied by concomitant radiation damage and ignorance of the exact state of the reacting species, upon fundamental studies and practical applications, will also be discussed

  16. Handbook of hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.; Matsuura, Tatsuo; Yoshihara, Kenji

    1992-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry is an increasingly important field, which has contributed significantly to our understanding of many fundamental processes and reactions. Its techniques have become firmly entrenched in numerous disciplines, such as applied physics, biomedical research, and all fields of chemistry. Written by leading experts, this comprehensive handbook encompasses a broad range of topics. Each chapter comprises a collection of stimulating essays, given an in-depth account of the state-of-the-art of the field, and stressing opportunities for future work. An extensive introduction to the whole area, this book provides unique insight into a vast subject, and a clear delineation of its goals, techniques, and recent findings. It also contains detailed discussions of applications in fields as diverse as nuclear medicine, geochemistry, reactor technology, and the chemistry of comets and interstellar grains. (orig.)

  17. Liquid phase hot atom chemistry: At crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, E.P.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Omaha, NE

    1981-01-01

    The state of current research in liquid phase hot atom chemistry is discussed. Four classes of experimental approaches are high-lighted. These include 1) primary physical data for (n,γ)-activated 128 I, (I.T.)-activated 130 I and effects on chemical reactivity; 2) the density-variation technique involving iodine reactions with saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; 3) stereochemistry experiments on chlorocarbon molecules with single and multiple chiral centers; and 4) experiments employing dilute aqueous solutions of halogenerated biomolecules in the ice state, exposed to neutron irradiation. (orig.) [de

  18. Molecular beam studies and hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continetti, R.E.; Lee, Y.T.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the crossed molecular beam technique to the study of hot atom chemistry has provided significant insights into the dynamics of hot atom reaction. To illustrate this, two recent studies are discussed. Those are the study on the influence of translational energy in 0.6 to 1.5 eV range on endoergic reaction, and the experimental study on the detailed dynamics of elementary reaction at translational energy of 0.53 and 1.01 eV. The first example illustrates the contribution that molecular beam experiment can make in the understanding of the dynamics of endoergic substitution reaction. The second example illustrates the role that such studies can play in evaluating exact three-dimensional quantum scattering calculation and ab initio potential energy surfaces for chemical reaction. In the case of endoergic reaction of halogen substitution, it was observed that the reactive collision involved short lived collision complexes. It is suggested that energetic effect alone cannot account for the difference in cross sections, and dynamic effect most play a large role. In atom-diatom reaction, the differential cross section measurement of D+H 2 →DH+H reaction was carried out, and the results are discussed. (K.I.)

  19. Study of porogen removal by atomic hydrogen generated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition for the fabrication of advanced low-k thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godavarthi, S., E-mail: srinivas@cinvestav.mx [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Universidad, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wang, C.; Verdonck, P. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matsumoto, Y.; Koudriavtsev, I. [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Tielens, H.; Baklanov, M.R. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-01-30

    In order to obtain low-k dielectric films, a subtractive technique, which removes sacrificial porogens from a hydrogenated silicon oxycarbide (SiOC:H) film, has been used successfully by different groups in the past. In this paper, we report on the porogen removal from porogenated SiOC:H films, using a hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) equipment. Molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atomic hydrogen by the hot wires and these atoms may successfully remove the hydrocarbon groups from the porogenated SiOC:H films. The temperature of the HWCVD filaments proved to be a determining factor. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), ellipsometric porosimetry and capacitance-voltage analyses, it was possible to determine that for temperatures higher than 1700 °C, efficient porogen removal occurred. For temperatures higher than 1800 °C, the presence of OH groups was detected. The dielectric constant was the lowest, 2.28, for the samples processed at a filament temperature of 1800 °C, although porosity measurements showed higher porosity for the films deposited at the higher temperatures. XRR and SIMS analyses indicated densification and Tungsten (W) incorporation at the top few nanometers of the films.

  20. Impurity 'hot' atoms 67Ga in a role a physical-chemical studies at an estimation of radiation damage in Zn cyclotron targets after bombardment with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the migration of impurity 'hot atoms' 67 Ga produced from various types of nuclear reaction on zinc targets is reported. The type of charged particles as well as their energy, beam current, total fluency was varied

  1. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta 2 O 5 and V 2 O 5 . Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O( 3 P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated

  2. From hot atom chemistry to epithermal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    2004-01-01

    The rise and fall of hot atom chemistry (HAC) over the years from 1934 to 2004 is reviewed. Several applications are discussed, in particular to astrophysics and the interaction of energetic ions and atoms in space. Epithermal chemistry (ETC) is proposed to substitute the old name, since it better fits the energy range as well as the non-thermal and non-equilibrium character of the reactions. ETC also avoids the strong connexion of HAC to nuclear chemistry and stands for the opening of the field to physical chemistry and astrophysics. (orig.)

  3. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  4. The hot-atom chemistry of crystalline chromates. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    Chromates in general and potassium chromate in particular, have been attractive as compounds for hot-atom chemical study because of the favourable nuclear properties of chromium, the great thermal and radiation stability of the compounds, the apparent structural simplicity of the crystals and the presumed known and simple chemistry of the expected recoil products. A wealth of information has been accumulated over the past 25 years, from which the anticipation of a straightforward chemistry has given way to an expanding realization that these systems are actually quite complex. More solid-state hot-atom chemical studies have dealt with potassium chromate than with any other compound. Thus, a major fraction of this review is given to this compound. The emphasis is on recent literature and on the pesent views of phenomena which affect the chemical fate of recoil chromium atoms in chromates. Many other data are tabulated so that the interested reader can speculate independently on the results of a wide variety of experiments. (Auth.)

  5. Chemical generation of iodine atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, Kevin B. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)]. E-mail: kevin.hewett@kirtland.af.mil; Hager, Gordon D. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States); Crowell, Peter G. [Northrup Grumman Information Technology, Science and Technology Operating Unit, Advanced Technology Division, P.O. Box 9377, Albuquerque, NM 87119-9377 (United States)

    2005-01-10

    The chemical generation of atomic iodine using a chemical combustor to generate the atomic fluorine intermediate, from the reaction of F{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, followed by the production of atomic iodine, from the reaction of F + HI, was investigated. The maximum conversion efficiency of HI into atomic iodine was observed to be approximately 75%, which is in good agreement with the theoretical model. The conversion efficiency is limited by the formation of iodine monofluoride at the walls of the combustor where the gas phase temperature is insufficient to dissociate the IF.

  6. A guide to Internet atomic databases for hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Internet atomic databases are nowadays considered to be the primary tool for dissemination of atomic data. We present here a review of numerical and bibliographic databases of importance for diagnostics of hot plasmas. Special attention is given to new and emerging trends, such as online calculation of various atomic parameters. The recently updated NIST databases are presented in detail

  7. A guide to Internet atomic databases for hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralchenko, Yuri [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States)]. E-mail: yuri.ralchenko@nist.gov

    2006-05-15

    Internet atomic databases are nowadays considered to be the primary tool for dissemination of atomic data. We present here a review of numerical and bibliographic databases of importance for diagnostics of hot plasmas. Special attention is given to new and emerging trends, such as online calculation of various atomic parameters. The recently updated NIST databases are presented in detail.

  8. Accelerators and nuclear reactors as tools in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, L.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of accelerators and of nuclear reactors - the latter to a lesser extent - are discussed in view of their present and future use in hot atom chemistry research and its applications. (author)

  9. Gas to liquid to solid transition in halogen hot atom chemistry. 6. Product formation routes and chemical selectivity of high energy iodine reactions with butyne isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmestani, S.K.; Firouzbakht, M.L.; Rack, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of recoil produced iodine-128 with isomers of butyne were studied in gaseous, high pressure, and condensed phase conditions, with rare gas additives and in the presence and absence of radical scavengers (I 2 and O 2 ). It was found that recoil iodine-128 reactions were initiated by thermal electronically excited I + species for both 1-butyne and 2-butyne systems. While the diverse and complex nature of the reactions cannot be explained by simple chemical parameters, comparisons among the alkyne systems demonstrate preferential attack of iodine at the triple bond resulting, mainly, in electronically excited intermediates. A comparison of the various product formation routes results in the characterization of general traits common to the alkynes. 6 figures, 4 tables

  10. Labelling of macromoleculear carbohydrates by means of 'Hot Atom' reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, H.; Malmborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of polysaccharides have been performed using atoms with such high kinetic energy that they can break normally very stable bindings thus permitting labelling by substitution reactions. Such atoms can be produced in nuclear transformations. We have chosen to study the labelling efficiency of 'hot atoms' ( 77 Br, 123 I and 125 I) produced in radioactive decay (β + -decay and E.C.) of noble gas nuclides ( 77 Kr, 123 Xe and 125 Xe) which easily could be brought in close contact with the molecule to be labelled. Substances to be labelled have been starch particles and high molecular weight glycogen. (author)

  11. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  12. Chemical fingerprints of hot Jupiter planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Villaver, E.; Eiroa, C.

    2018-05-01

    Context. The current paradigm to explain the presence of Jupiter-like planets with small orbital periods (P involves their formation beyond the snow line following inward migration, has been challenged by recent works that explore the possibility of in situ formation. Aims: We aim to test whether stars harbouring hot Jupiters and stars with more distant gas-giant planets show any chemical peculiarity that could be related to different formation processes. Methods: Our methodology is based on the analysis of high-resolution échelle spectra. Stellar parameters and abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn for a sample of 88 planet hosts are derived. The sample is divided into stars hosting hot (a 0.1 au) Jupiter-like planets. The metallicity and abundance trends of the two sub-samples are compared and set in the context of current models of planet formation and migration. Results: Our results show that stars with hot Jupiters have higher metallicities than stars with cool distant gas-giant planets in the metallicity range +0.00/+0.20 dex. The data also shows a tendency of stars with cool Jupiters to show larger abundances of α elements. No abundance differences between stars with cool and hot Jupiters are found when considering iron peak, volatile elements or the C/O, and Mg/Si ratios. The corresponding p-values from the statistical tests comparing the cumulative distributions of cool and hot planet hosts are 0.20, products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 072.C-0033(A), 072.C-0488(E), 074.B-0455(A), 075.C-0202(A), 077.C-0192(A), 077.D-0525(A), 078.C-0378(A), 078.C-0378(B), 080.A-9021(A), 082.C-0312(A) 082.C-0446(A), 083.A-9003(A), 083.A-9011(A), 083.A-9011(B), 083.A-9013(A), 083.C-0794(A), 084.A-9003(A), 084.A-9004(B), 085.A-9027(A), 085.C-0743(A), 087.A-9008(A), 088.C-0892(A), 089.C-0440(A), 089.C-0444(A), 089.C-0732(A), 090.C-0345(A), 092.A-9002(A), 192.C-0852

  13. Atomic properties in hot plasmas from levels to superconfigurations

    CERN Document Server

    Bauche, Jacques; Peyrusse, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to the calculation of hot-plasma properties which generally requires a huge number of atomic data. It is the first book that combines information on the details of the basic atomic physics and its application to atomic spectroscopy with the use of the relevant statistical approaches. Information like energy levels, radiative rates, collisional and radiative cross-sections, etc., must be included in equilibrium or non-equilibrium models in order to describe both the atomic-population kinetics and the radiative properties. From the very large number of levels and transitions involved in complex ions, some statistical (global) properties emerge. The book presents a coherent set of concepts and compact formulas suitable for tractable and accurate calculations. The topics addressed are: radiative emission and absorption, and a dozen of other collisional and radiative processes; transition arrays between level ensembles (configurations, superconfigurations); effective temperatures of configurat...

  14. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms? This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs

  15. The study of metal sulphide nanomaterials obtained by chemical bath deposition and hot-injection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Forostyanaya, N. A.; Levitskiy, V. S.; Mazing, D. S.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. Ph; Moshnikov, V. A.; Shupta, A. A.; Spivak, Yu M.; Tulenin, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study lead sulphide - cadmium sulphide based layers were obtained through chemical deposition of water solutions and cadmium sulphide quantum dots were formed through hot-injection technique. The article discusses the results of surface investigations with the use of atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements.

  16. The study of metal sulphide nanomaterials obtained by chemical bath deposition and hot-injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraeva, E V; Alexandrova, O A; Levitskiy, V S; Mazing, D S; Moshnikov, V A; Shupta, A A; Spivak, Yu M; Forostyanaya, N A; Maskaeva, L N; Markov, V Ph; Tulenin, S S

    2015-01-01

    In this study lead sulphide – cadmium sulphide based layers were obtained through chemical deposition of water solutions and cadmium sulphide quantum dots were formed through hot-injection technique. The article discusses the results of surface investigations with the use of atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements. (paper)

  17. A collisional-radiative average atom model for hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    A collisional-radiative 'average atom' (AA) model is presented for the calculation of opacities of hot plasmas not in the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The electron impact and radiative rate constants are calculated using the dipole oscillator strengths of the average atom. A key element of the model is the photon escape probability which at present is calculated for a semi infinite slab. The Fermi statistics renders the rate equation for the AA level occupancies nonlinear, which requires iterations until the steady state. AA level occupancies are found. Detailed electronic configurations are built into the model after the self-consistent non-LTE AA state is found. The model shows a continuous transition from the non-LTE to the LTE state depending on the optical thickness of the plasma. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  18. Hot spring therapy of atomic bomb exposed patients, (9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, O [Balneogic Sanatorium for the Atomic Bomb Injured Beppu, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, H

    1978-03-01

    The following description shows the statistics and the results of medical examinatin concerning the patients utilized Beppu Atomic Bomb Center from April, 1977, to March, 1978. Number of persons utilized the center was 3904, and 20285 man-days in total. Number of case treated there was 268. Number of diseases amounted to 442 of 66 sorts, excluding temporary of acute diseases such as acute entergastritis and cold diseases, etc. According to the report by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, atomic bomb-exposed persons show twice as much rate of incidence as normal persons, and owing to aging, many of them have more than two kinds of diseases. Among the diseases, 60 cases were hypertension, 32 heart disease, 30 knee-arthritis, 26 diabetes, 25 hepatitis, 23 spondylosis deformans, etc. Among 268 cases treated by hot spring therapy, 6 were totally cured, and 252 showed alleviation, while 10 showed no change.

  19. Atomic and Molecular Manipulation of Chemical Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    .... In effect, the goal is to carry out chemical changes by manipulating individual atoms and molecules to induce different bonding geometry and to create new interactions with their environment. These studies provide the scientific basis for the advancement of technology in catalysis, molecular electronics, optics, chemical and biological sensing, and magnetic storage.

  20. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale - the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  1. Hot atom chemistry of mixed crystals. 35 years of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1993-01-01

    When this contribution was prepared, the author decided to present the more personal aspects of his work and the concepts that directed him. Since the time when the author interested in solid state hot atom chemistry more than 30 years ago, still now the generally accepted theory has not been existed. The irradiation test by using the BEPO pile in Harwell is reported. The use of glass fiber paper instead of cellulose paper was investigated. The real problem of the different models of primary retention should be solved. The idea of mixed crystal systems was the result of an experimental accident. The attempt of preparing mixed crystals, the papers that the author has written, the procedures of the experiment such as electrophoresis, the results of the electrophoretic separation are discussed. The next step was obviously the investigation of the ligand recoil. The production of the transient ligand vacancy complexes and their final fate resulted in mixed hexachlorobromometallate species is shown for the system K 2 O s Cl 6 -K 2 O s Br 6 (n,γ) 38 Cl. The reaction of the 38 Cl, the information about recoil atom reactions which increased with the complexity of target substances, and the resulted informations are reported. (K.I.)71 refs

  2. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ablation of graphite, carbon-arc discharge and chemical vapour deposition (CVD). However, some of these techniques have been shown to be expensive due to high deposition temperatures and are not easily controllable. Recently hot-wire chemical vapour...

  3. 12th international hot atom chemistry symposium, Balatonfuered, Hungary, 23-28 September 1984. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This proceedings contains the abstracts of 91 papers presented at the symposium. The majority of papers discusses various hot atom reactions and decay processes. A list of previous 11 international hot atom chemistry symposia from 1959 to 1982 is also given. One paper published in full length presents an overview of them (A.P. Wolf p. 89-89/b). (R.P.)

  4. Self-consistent average-atom scheme for electronic structure of hot and dense plasmas of mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianmin

    2002-01-01

    An average-atom model is proposed to treat the electronic structures of hot and dense plasmas of mixture. It is assumed that the electron density consists of two parts. The first one is a uniform distribution with a constant value, which is equal to the electron density at the boundaries between the atoms. The second one is the total electron density minus the first constant distribution. The volume of each kind of atom is proportional to the sum of the charges of the second electron part and of the nucleus within each atomic sphere. By this way, one can make sure that electrical neutrality is satisfied within each atomic sphere. Because the integration of the electron charge within each atom needs the size of that atom in advance, the calculation is carried out in a usual self-consistent way. The occupation numbers of electron on the orbitals of each kind of atom are determined by the Fermi-Dirac distribution with the same chemical potential for all kinds of atoms. The wave functions and the orbital energies are calculated with the Dirac-Slater equations. As examples, the electronic structures of the mixture of Au and Cd, water (H 2 O), and CO 2 at a few temperatures and densities are presented

  5. Self-consistent average-atom scheme for electronic structure of hot and dense plasmas of mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianmin

    2002-10-01

    An average-atom model is proposed to treat the electronic structures of hot and dense plasmas of mixture. It is assumed that the electron density consists of two parts. The first one is a uniform distribution with a constant value, which is equal to the electron density at the boundaries between the atoms. The second one is the total electron density minus the first constant distribution. The volume of each kind of atom is proportional to the sum of the charges of the second electron part and of the nucleus within each atomic sphere. By this way, one can make sure that electrical neutrality is satisfied within each atomic sphere. Because the integration of the electron charge within each atom needs the size of that atom in advance, the calculation is carried out in a usual self-consistent way. The occupation numbers of electron on the orbitals of each kind of atom are determined by the Fermi-Dirac distribution with the same chemical potential for all kinds of atoms. The wave functions and the orbital energies are calculated with the Dirac-Slater equations. As examples, the electronic structures of the mixture of Au and Cd, water (H2O), and CO2 at a few temperatures and densities are presented.

  6. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  8. Research involving hot atoms of nucleogenic origin and its practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Over the years, a large body of information has amassed which has helped to clarify the authors understanding of the complex chemistry occurring within chemical systems immediately following a nuclear reaction. With the increased knowledge of how reactive nuclides generated by such processes react chemically, it became increasingly apparent that the translational or recoil energy imparted to such species was not always the driving force behind some of the unusual chemistry seen in these systems. In many instances, the state of electronic excitation was found to strongly affect their chemistry. In others, the concomitant radiation chemistry often altered initial chemical states. Even so, with just a general understanding of how these effects work in unison, it has been possible in many instances to predict radiolabel distributions and yields in molecules. This ability has had an enormous impact in other fields utilizing radiotracers in research. This presentation will highlight specific examples in basic hot atom research which have focused on these problems, and describe general applications to other disciplines using radiotracers

  9. Experimental studies of laser-generated translationally hot atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    An important determinant of the outcome of a chemical interaction is the relative translational energy of the partners. This thesis focuses on the generation of translationally energetic atoms and molecules and the role of translational energy in chemical interactions. One set of studies examines the competitive pathways of reactions and energy transfer in hyperthermal collisions of fast H or D atoms with HF. The vibrational excitation of HF or DF is measured using a time- and wavelength-resolved infrared emission technique. The results suggest that different collision geometries can lead to markedly different mechanisms for vibrational excitation. Another set of experiments is performed with a goal to generate a repetitively pulsed source of molecules or atoms with translational energies in the 0.1-10 eV range. A pulsed UV laser is used to excite a molecular film, vaporizing a number of molecules near the surface of the film. The composition and velocity of these molecules are measured by their time-of-flight to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Kinetic energies in the range of 0.1-10 eV are observed; the energies are continuously variable and the molecules can be repetitively and reproducibly generated. To establish the dynamics of the vaporization, the internal distributions of fast 0.1-0.7 eV NO molecules are measured using a laser multiphoton detection technique. These studies indicate that the translationally hot molecules are ejected rotationally cold, i.e. typically with only 3% of the energy in rotational excitation. The large disequilibrium between translation and rotation suggests that the vaporization occurs by a transient, nonequilibrium heating mechanism coupled with an adiabatic expansion. The result is additionally promising in light of the desire to produce fast beams of molecules with characterizable and narrow internal energy distributions

  10. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ -p atoms in each target. The rates λ ppμ and λ pd can be extracted

  11. Studies in hot atom and radiation chemistry. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, W.S.

    1980-09-01

    /sub nThe results on the reactive scattering of B + ( 3 P/sub u/) by D 2 has been published and a corresponding study on the ground state ( 1 S/sub g/) of B + has been submitted for publication. The ionic aspect of the Br-ethane hot atom system is being investigated using beam techniques. It is found that there is no direct reaction of Br + with ethane which can explain the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br reported by hot atom chemists for the Br-ethane hot atom system. Likewise, no satisfactory explanation exists for the dependence of the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br on moderator mole fraction. Studies of the collisions of Br + with Kr (which is used as a moderator in hot atom systems) shows that ions such as BrKr + are formed. Electron irradiation of CH 3 Br-Kr mixtures shows that CH 3 BrKr + is formed in good yield. Electron irradiation of Br 2 -Kr mixtures shows that ions such as Br(Kr)/sub n/ + are formed. Such ions can be produced in the Kr moderated Br-ethane hot atom system and can explain the thermal ionic yield of CH 3 Br and its dependence on Kr pressure

  12. The versatility of hot-filament activated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Lothar; Hoefer, Markus; Kroeger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    In the field of activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond films, hot-filament activation (HF-CVD) is widely used for applications where large deposition areas are needed or three-dimensional substrates have to be coated. We have developed processes for the deposition of conductive, boron-doped diamond films as well as for tribological crystalline diamond coatings on deposition areas up to 50 cm x 100 cm. Such multi-filament processes are used to produce diamond electrodes for advanced electrochemical processes or large batches of diamond-coated tools and parts, respectively. These processes demonstrate the high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of hot-filament CVD. The usability of hot-filament CVD for diamond deposition on three-dimensional substrates is well known for CVD diamond shaft tools. We also develop interior diamond coatings for drawing dies, nozzles, and thread guides. Hot-filament CVD also enables the deposition of diamond film modifications with tailored properties. In order to adjust the surface topography to specific applications, we apply processes for smooth, fine-grained or textured diamond films for cutting tools and tribological applications. Rough diamond is employed for grinding applications. Multilayers of fine-grained and coarse-grained diamond have been developed, showing increased shock resistance due to reduced crack propagation. Hot-filament CVD is also used for in situ deposition of carbide coatings and diamond-carbide composites, and the deposition of non-diamond, silicon-based films. These coatings are suitable as diffusion barriers and are also applied for adhesion and stress engineering and for semiconductor applications, respectively

  13. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  14. Quasi-static electron density fluctuations of atoms in hot compressed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.

    1982-01-01

    The standard theoretical methods for the calculation of properties of hot compressed matter lead to a description based on the Average Atom model. In this model the degenerate orbitals are populated with the Fermi-Dirac (FD) density, partitioned according to the binomial distribution. Since the one particle picture is inadequate to evaluate reliable optical properties, a method involving correlated population fluctuations, but limited to unrelaxed orbitals and lacking time dependence, has been examined. The probability distribution of fluctuations in a particular level is evaluated through a decoupling procedure. The method is carried out self consistently. For each level this leads to the definition of an effective 1st order ionization energy as a statistical sum of all possible transition energies. As a result the effective number of electrons exchanged with the outside weights the chemical potential. This defines an effective chemical potential μsup(k) for each level. In many cases of interest the statistics leads to FD type average occupation numbers. This allows a treatment of the continuum in a Thomas-Fermi like model using the effective ionization energy and μsup(k). We obtain a simultaneous description of charge rearrangements and net fluctuations in the Wigner-Seitz cell. The discussion is supported by numerical results for iron. (author)

  15. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry. [Production by sputtering; reaction with butenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O(/sup 3/P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated. (DLC)

  16. Electromagnetically induced photonic bandgap in hot Cs atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D. W.; Zhang, L.; Su, X. M.; Zhuo, Z. C.; Kim, J. B

    2010-01-01

    Three-level Λ-type thermal Cs atoms are used to demonstrate the phenomenon of a photonic bandgap induced by quantum coherence with a standing wave (SW). We observed the transmitted signals of probe field driven by several kinds of SW, which are formed by a strong forward-traveling field and a backward-traveling field when a mirror reflects the forward-traveling beam. Considering Doppler inhomogeneous broadenings with a SW drive, we employ Fourier transformation to solve density-matrix equations for simulation results. The simulation results are found to be consistent with the experimental results.

  17. A comparison of two atomic models for the radiative properties of dense hot low Z plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.; Sauvan, P.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Florido, R.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, two different atomic models (ANALOP based on parametric potentials and IDEFIX based on the dicenter model) are used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot dense, low Z plasmas, and the results are compared to each other. In addition, the ANALOP code has been used to compute free-bound cross sections for hydrogen-like ions

  18. Hot atom chemistry in oxyanion targets Pt 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Singh, Jyoti

    1986-01-01

    Fractional precipitation techniques were utilized to separate the lower valent and parent forms of 56 Mn in permanganate targets and an attempt was made to study a few aspects of chemical stabilization of recoil 56 Mn in permanganates. Ammonium permanganate, recoil behaviour of which was not studied previously, is chosen as one of the targets along with the potassium permanganate for initial retention and also for isothermal annealing. 56 Mn initial retentions of about 12% and about 4% are obtained for potassium and ammonium permanganate, respectively, by activation from a Ra-Be neutron source. A usual trend for KMnO 4 and the reduction of recoil fragments by ammonium ions in NH 4 MnO 4 are seen through the isothermal annealing study. (author)

  19. Molecular Ions in Ion Upflows and their Effects on Hot Atomic Oxygen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, V.; Yau, A. W.; Shizgal, B.

    2017-12-01

    We present new direct ion composition observations of molecular ions in auroral ion upflows from the CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP). These observed molecular ions are N2+, NO+, and possibly O2+, and are found to occur at all e-POP altitudes starting at about 400 km, during auroral substorms and the different phases of magnetic storms, sometimes with upflow velocities exceeding a few hundred meters per second and abundances of 5-10%. The dissociative recombination of both O2+ and NO+ was previously proposed as an important source of hot oxygen atoms in the topside thermosphere [Hickey et al., 1995]. We investigate the possible effect of the observed molecular ions on the production of hot oxygen atoms in the storm and substorm-time auroral thermosphere. We present numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation for the steady-state oxygen energy distribution function, taking into account both the production of the hot atoms and their subsequent collisional relaxation. Our result suggests the formation of a hot oxygen population with a characteristic temperature on the order of 0.3 eV and constituting 1-5% of the oxygen density near the exobase. We discuss the implication of this result in the context of magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling.

  20. Nuclear prehistory influence on transfer velocity of 54Mn impurity 'hot' atoms in irradiated metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of nuclear prehistory on transfer velocity of 54 Mn impurity 'hot'-atoms - got by different nuclear channels: 56 Fe(d, α), 54 Fe(n,p) in irradiated metallic iron - is studied. Irradiation of targets were carried out in U-120 accelerator (energy range 7.3/5.3 MeV, deuteron beam current makes up 5 μA). Mean density of thermal neutron (WWR-M reactor) makes up 8.6·10 13 neutron·cm -2 ·s -1 . It is shown, that transfer velocity of 54 Mn 'hot' atoms is defining by rate of radiation damage of targets in the irradiation process at that a key importance has a bombarding particles type applied for radioactive label getting

  1. Two-color ghost interference with photon pairs generated in hot atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sheng Ding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental observation of a two-photon ghost interference experiment. A distinguishing feature of our experiment is that the photons are generated via a non-degenerated spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a hot atomic ensemble; therefore the photon has narrow bandwidth. Besides, there is a large difference in frequency between two photons in a pair. Our works may be important to achieve more secure, large transmission capacity long-distance quantum communication.

  2. Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor in hot quartz cells with cold windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilshanskaya, E. V.; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Murashkin, D. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    Saturation spectroscopy of calcium atomic vapor was performed in hot quartz cells with cold windows. The Doppler-free absorption resonances with spectral width near 50 MHz were observed. For these experiments and future applications long-lived quartz cells with buffer gas were designed and made. A cooling laser for calcium magneto-optical trap will be frequency locked to the saturation resonances in the long-lived cells.

  3. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.

    1969-01-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [sr

  4. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Tamon [Genbaku Hibakusha Beppu Onsen Ryoyo Kenkyusho, Oita (Japan); Tsuji, Hideo

    1983-03-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2

  5. Hot spring therapy of the patients exposed to atomic bomb radiation, 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Tamon; Tsuji, Hideo.

    1983-01-01

    The patients exposed to the atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima area came to Beppu Spa to have hot spring therapy. During the fiscal year of 1982 (April, 1982, to March, 1983), 3972 persons came to the hot spring sanatorium, and 586 patients (14.8 %) received physical examination. Among them, 473 patients (80.7 %) were exposed to the atomic bomb radiation on August 6, 1945, or entered in the city of Hiroshima by August 20, 1945, according to the official notebook issued by the government. Physical examination was performed twice a week during their stay, and more than 53.5 % of the patients were older than 70, and the oldest was 93 years old. Blood pressure was measured when the patients came in and went out, and hypertensive patients were asked to observe the rule of treatment strictly. The complaints of the patients which brought them to the hot spring were mostly pain in bodies and lower extremities, and hypertension, common cold syndrome, diabetes and constipation. Patients took hot spring bath 2 - 3 times daily, and many patients had microwave and low frequency wave treatment. Soaking in a bath (containing 1.4 mg of cupric sulfate and 11.4 mg of zinc sulfate per liter) was practiced by diabetic patients. The therapeutic effects were difficult to judge because the period of stay of the most patients was about 10 days, but in most of them, subjective symptoms were relieved when they left the sanatorium. (Yamashita, S.)

  6. Atomic process calculations in hot dense plasmas using average atom models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragones, J.M.; Gamez, L.; Honrubia, J.J.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Minguez, E.; Ocana, J.L.; Perlado, J.M.; Serrano, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the past years, an important effort has been devoted in the authors Institute to develop the NORCLA code, which in the first version was characterized by the following features: one-dimensional lagrangian mesh; equilibrium between radiation, ion and electron species; local alpha energy deposition; neutron transport by the discrete ordinates method and analytical equation of state, opacities and conductivities. In the successive versions of NORCLA, EOS and electron conductivities were modified by the pressure ionization and degeneracy corrections; a module was also developed for computing the energy deposition of the incident ion beams coupled to the energy equation, and a code to calculate the alpha particle transport and energy deposition. Recently, a 3T version of the NORCLA code, with tabular EOS, opacities and conductivities, laser ray tracing and suprathermal electrons transport has been produced. In this article, the atomic physic models developed to determine more accurate the atomic data, such as EOS and opacities are explained, giving a brief description and a comparison of them. As a result of this development, a DENIM Atomic Data Library is being generated, taking some data and procedures from the SESAME Library. This library is presented, including a comparison of the opacity data for aluminium and iron at different densities and temperatures. Conclusions about this work are presented, and the ongoing developments summarized

  7. Validation of archived chemical shifts through atomic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieping, Wolfgang; Vranken, Wim F

    2010-01-01

    The public archives containing protein information in the form of NMR chemical shift data at the BioMagResBank (BMRB) and of 3D structure coordinates at the Protein Data Bank are continuously expanding. The quality of the data contained in these archives, however, varies. The main issue for chemical shift values is that they are determined relative to a reference frequency. When this reference frequency is set incorrectly, all related chemical shift values are systematically offset. Such wrongly referenced chemical shift values, as well as other problems such as chemical shift values that are assigned to the wrong atom, are not easily distinguished from correct values and effectively reduce the usefulness of the archive. We describe a new method to correct and validate protein chemical shift values in relation to their 3D structure coordinates. This method classifies atoms using two parameters: the per-atom solvent accessible surface area (as calculated from the coordinates) and the secondary structure of the parent amino acid. Through the use of Gaussian statistics based on a large database of 3220 BMRB entries, we obtain per-entry chemical shift corrections as well as Z scores for the individual chemical shift values. In addition, information on the error of the correction value itself is available, and the method can retain only dependable correction values. We provide an online resource with chemical shift, atom exposure, and secondary structure information for all relevant BMRB entries (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/nmr/vasco) and hope this data will aid the development of new chemical shift-based methods in NMR. Proteins 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20602353

  8. Accelerated procedure to solve kinetic equation for neutral atoms in a hot plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2017-12-01

    The recombination of plasma charged components, electrons and ions of hydrogen isotopes, on the wall of a fusion reactor is a source of neutral molecules and atoms, recycling back into the plasma volume. Here neutral species participate, in particular, in charge-exchange (c-x) collisions with the plasma ions and, as a result, atoms of high energies with chaotically directed velocities are generated. Some fraction of these hot atoms hit the wall. Statistical Monte Carlo methods normally used to model c-x atoms are too time consuming for reasonably small level of accident errors and extensive parameter studies are problematic. By applying pass method to evaluate integrals from functions, including the ion velocity distribution, an iteration approach to solve one-dimensional kinetic equation [1], being alternative to Monte Carlo procedure, has been tremendously accelerated, at least by a factor of 30-50 [2]. Here this approach is developed further to solve the 2-D kinetic equation, applied to model the transport of c-x atoms in the vicinity of an opening in the wall, e.g., the entrance of the duct guiding to a diagnostic installation. This is necessary to determine firmly the energy spectrum of c-x atoms penetrating into the duct and to assess the erosion of the installation there. The results of kinetic modeling are compared with those obtained with the diffusion description for c-x atoms, being strictly relevant under plasma conditions of low temperature and high density, where the mean free path length between c-x collisions is much smaller than that till the atom ionization by electrons. It is demonstrated that the previous calculations [3], done with the diffusion approximation for c-x atoms, overestimate the erosion rate of Mo mirrors in a reactor by a factor of 3 compared to the result of the present kinetic study.

  9. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi

    2007-04-01

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp 3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  10. Chemical reduction of refractory oxides by atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.; Balooch, M.; Olander, D.R.

    1978-11-01

    The chemical reduction of UO 2 and Al 2 O 3 by atomic hydrogen was studied. Results of the UO 2 /H investigation indicates that reduction of UO 2 by atomic hydrogen proceeds by the production of water vapor and hypostoichiometric urania. Water vapor and aluminum metal are formed in the Al 2 O 3 /H system. The relative ease which UO 2 is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with Al 2 O 3 is due to two factors. The first is related to the thermochemistry of the reactions. The second factor which favors efficient reduction of UO 2 but not of Al 2 O 3 is the oxygen diffusivity

  11. DBAC: A simple prediction method for protein binding hot spots based on burial levels and deeply buried atomic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A protein binding hot spot is a cluster of residues in the interface that are energetically important for the binding of the protein with its interaction partner. Identifying protein binding hot spots can give useful information to protein engineering and drug design, and can also deepen our understanding of protein-protein interaction. These residues are usually buried inside the interface with very low solvent accessible surface area (SASA). Thus SASA is widely used as an outstanding feature in hot spot prediction by many computational methods. However, SASA is not capable of distinguishing slightly buried residues, of which most are non hot spots, and deeply buried ones that are usually inside a hot spot. Results We propose a new descriptor called “burial level” for characterizing residues, atoms and atomic contacts. Specifically, burial level captures the depth the residues are buried. We identify different kinds of deeply buried atomic contacts (DBAC) at different burial levels that are directly broken in alanine substitution. We use their numbers as input for SVM to classify between hot spot or non hot spot residues. We achieve F measure of 0.6237 under the leave-one-out cross-validation on a data set containing 258 mutations. This performance is better than other computational methods. Conclusions Our results show that hot spot residues tend to be deeply buried in the interface, not just having a low SASA value. This indicates that a high burial level is not only a necessary but also a more sufficient condition than a low SASA for a residue to be a hot spot residue. We find that those deeply buried atoms become increasingly more important when their burial levels rise up. This work also confirms the contribution of deeply buried interfacial atomic contacts to the energy of protein binding hot spot. PMID:21689480

  12. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with atomic iodine generated via fluorine atoms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Špalek, Otomar; Kodymová, Jarmila; Picková, Irena; Jakubec, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 345, č. 1 (2008), 14-22 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0359 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : atomic iodine * atomic fluorine * chemical oxygen–iodine laser * COIL Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.961, year: 2008

  13. Interlayer electron-hole pair multiplication by hot carriers in atomic layer semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Fatemeh; Grossnickle, Max; Su, Shanshan; Lake, Roger; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel

    Two-dimensional heterostructures composed of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides provide the opportunity to design novel devices for the study of electron-hole pair multiplication. We report on highly efficient multiplication of interlayer electron-hole pairs at the interface of a tungsten diselenide / molybdenum diselenide heterostructure. Electronic transport measurements of the interlayer current-voltage characteristics indicate that layer-indirect electron-hole pairs are generated by hot electron impact excitation. Our findings, which demonstrate an efficient energy relaxation pathway that competes with electron thermalization losses, make 2D semiconductor heterostructures viable for a new class of hot-carrier energy harvesting devices that exploit layer-indirect electron-hole excitations. SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  14. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique

  15. KfK Institute for Hot Atom Chemistry. Results report on research and development activities 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Institute for Hot Atom Chemistry is concerned with R and D tasks in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The aim is to optimize reprocessing technology with a view to safety and economic efficiency. Work is carried out within the framework of the projects reprocessing and waste management, and fast breeder in contact with WAK. The Institute increasingly carries out work within the framework of the project pollution abatement in the environment; the emphasis lies on dioxin chemistry. After the Wackersdorf task, subjects of waste management, in particular special wastes, have been added. (orig.) [de

  16. Physics of quantum fluids new trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Modugno, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  17. Atom Probe Tomography of Phase and Grain Boundaries in Experimentally-Deformed and Hot-Pressed Wehrlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukjati, J.; Parman, S. W.; Cooper, R. F.; Zhao, N.

    2017-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) was used to characterize the chemistry of three grain boundaries: an olivine-olivine (ol-ol) and olivine-clinopyroxene (ol-cpx) boundary in fine-grained experimentally-deformed wehrlite and an ol-cpx boundary in a fine-grained, hot-pressed wehrlite. Grain boundaries were extracted and formed into APT tips using a focused ion beam (FIB). The tips were analyzed in a reflectron-equipped LEAP4000HR (Harvard University) at 1% or 0.5% detection rate, 5pJ laser energy and 100kHz pulse rate. Total ion counts are between 40 and 100 million per tip. Examination of grain and phase boundaries in wehrlite are of interest since slow-diffusing and olivine-incompatible cations present in cpx (e.g. Ca and Al) may control diffusion-accommodated grain boundary sliding and affect mantle rheology (Sundberg & Cooper, 2008). At steady state, ol-cpx aggregates are weaker than either ol or cpx end member, the results of which are not currently well-explained. We investigate grain boundary widths to understand the transport of olivine-incompatible elements. Widths of grain/phase boundary chemical segregation are between 3nm and 6nm for deformed ol-ol and ol-cpx samples; minimally-deformed (hot-pressed) samples having slightly wider chemical segregation widths. Chemical segregation widths were determined from profiles of Na, Al, P, Cl, K, Ca, or Ni, although not all listed elements can be used for all samples (e.g. Na, K segregation profiles can only be observed for ol-ol sample). These estimates are consistent with prior estimates of grain boundary segregation by atom probe tomography on ol-ol and opx-opx samples (Bachhav et al., 2015) and are less than ol-ol interface widths analyzed by STEM/EDX (Hiraga, Anderson, & Kohlstedt, 2007). STEM/EDX will be performed on deformed wehrlite to investigate chemical profile as a function of applied stress orientation and at length scales between those observable by APT and EPMA. Determination of phase boundary chemistry and

  18. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Guangjie; Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH 2 radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH 2 radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH 3 with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH 2 radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH 2 radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH 2 radical flux and the reactivity of the NH 2 radicals

  19. Isotopic and chemical features of hot springs in Akita Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubaya, Osamu

    1997-01-01

    All over the Akita Prefecture, many hot springs are located. Most of them are of meteoric water, fossil sea water and volcanic gas origins. In the Ohdate-Kazuno area, moderate temperature hot springs of meteoric water origin are found, which may exist as rather shallow formation water in the Green Tuff formations. On the contrary, high temperature geothermal waters of meteoric origin, which are used for power generation, are obtained in two volcanic area of Hachimantai and Oyasu. Those geothermal waters are expected to come up through vertical fissures from depth deeper than 2 km. The difference of these two manners of meteoric water circulation should be necessarily explained to understand the relationship of shallow and deep geothermal systems. About some hot springs of fossil sea water origin, the relationships of δ D and Cl - don't agree to the mixing relation of sea water and meteoric water. This may be explained by two different processes, one of which is mixing of sea water with saline meteoric water (Cl - ca. 12 g/kg). The other is modification of δD by hydrogen isotopic exchange with hydrous minerals underground, or by exchange with atmospheric vapor during a relic lake before burying. (author)

  20. Chemical effects of /sup 32/P recoil atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, N [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1975-06-01

    Szilard-Chalmers' effect of /sup 32/P were reviewed. The concentration method using Szilard-Chalmers' effect in production of radioisotope, circumstances such as exposure time in an atomic pile, states of target substances and the yields by them were discussed. Many kinds of chemical effects, such as chemical effects of /sup 32/P recoil atom in phosphorated glass, studies of the effect of adducts, the threshold of ..gamma..-ray effect, the oxidation number of /sup 32/P in phosphorated glass by exposure time in the pile and the labelling position of /sup 32/P, are associated with caryotransformation (nuclear transformation) by environmental factors. The abovementioned articles were explained concerning /sup 32/P.

  1. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  2. Physics of quantum fluids. New trends and hot topics in atomic and polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramati, Alberto [Paris Univ. (France). Laboratoire Kastler Brossel; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Modugno, Michele (eds.) [IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Historia de la Ciencia

    2013-10-01

    Provides an overview of the field of quantum fluids. Presents analogies and differences between polariton and atomic quantum fluids. With contributions from the major actors in the field. Explains a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics. The study of quantum fluids, stimulated by the discovery of superfluidity in liquid helium, has experienced renewed interest after the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in ultra-cold atomic gases and the observation a new type of quantum fluid with specific characteristics derived from its intrinsic out-of-equilibrium nature. The main objective of this book is to take a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of this fast moving field with a special emphasis on the hot topics and new trends. Bringing together the most active specialists of the two areas (atomic and polaritonic quantum fluids), we expect that this book will facilitate the exchange and the collaboration between these two communities working on subjects with very strong analogies.

  3. How deposition parameters control growth dynamics of nc-Si deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho, H.R.; To, B.; Jiang, C.-S.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B.P.; Teplin, C.W.; Jones, K.M.; Perkins, J.; Al-Jassim, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the growth of silicon films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition under different values of filament current, substrate temperature, and hydrogen dilution ratio. The physical and electrical properties of the films were studied by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, conductive-atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. There is an interdependence of the growth parameters, and films grown with different parameters can have similar structures. We discuss why this interdependence occurs and how it influences the properties of the deposited films, as well as the deposition rate. In general, the films have a complex structure, with a mixture of amorphous (220)-oriented crystalline and nanocrystalline phases present in most cases. The amount of each phase can be controlled by the variation of one or more of the growth parameters at a time

  4. Industrialization of hot wire chemical vapor deposition for thin film applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical

  5. Moderation and absorption effects on hot replacement reactions of 38Cl atoms in mixtures of ortho-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berei, K.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.; Szatmary, Z.; Vass, Sz.

    1989-10-01

    Conditions are given for the equivalence of the Estrup-Wolfgang description of the hot atom reaction kinetics with the first-order Hurwitz approximation in the neutron slowing down theory. Conclusions are drawn for the applicability of this approach for describing hot atom replacement processes in reactive mixtures. Analytical and numerical calculations were carried out to explain an unusual concentration dependence of 38 Cl-for-Cl substitution, found experimentally in liquid binary mixtures of ortho-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene. (author) 39 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Architectural and chemical insights into the origin of hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of ``lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely to be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. I will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planetesimal-disk or planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets.

  7. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammelselg, Väino; Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H 2 SO 4 was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Cr 2 O 3 were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al 2 O 3 was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed

  8. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  9. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp2 carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp2 carbon structures.

  10. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1976--January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1977-01-01

    Multivalent hot atoms formed by the nuclear recoil method were studied: 31 Si, 32 P, and 11 C. For the recoil 31 Si reactions, we have completed the study on the reactivities of conjugated dienes towards monomeric 31 SiF 2 . The relative reactivities of 1,3-butadiene, trans-pentadiene, cis-pentadiene and 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene towards 31 SiF 2 have been measured as: 1.0:0.89:0.91:1.06 for singlet 31 SiF 2 ; and as 1.0:0.80:0.52:0.89 for the triplet. The large steric effect detected here between cis- and trans-pentadienes for their reactivities towards triplet 31 SiF 2 -donor indicates that a direct 1,4-addition process is possible for such 31 SiF 2 donating complexes. 2-methyl-1,1-diflorosilacyclopent-3-ene and its 3-methyl isomer were successfully synthesized by the co-pyrolysis technique. Experiments to evaluate the relative addition efficiencies of 31 SiH 2 towards various conjugated dienes; and to study to H- and F-abstraction mechanism by 31 Si atoms were begun. For recoil 32 P reactions, some progress has been made towards evaluating the mechanism of abstraction reactions by recoil 32 P atoms in PF 3 -PCl 3 system, and the moderator effect for recoil 32 P reactions with PF 3 -CH 4 mixtures. The possible formation of 32 PH, and the formation of 32 P atoms via the 32 S(n,p) 32 P process have also been explored. For recoil 11 C reactions, major progress has been obtained in the moderator studies of its reactions with 1,3-butadiene. With the successive addition of Ne as a moderator, the yield of acetylene- 11 C decreased, the yield of cyclopentene- 11 C increased while those of both 1,2,4-pentatriene- 11 C and cyclopentadiene- 11 C went through a minimum. Some progress for the identification of the last unknown 11 C-labeled product from this system has also been made

  12. Shear Viscosity of Hot QED at Finite Chemical Potential from Kubo Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Hou Defu; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-01

    Within the framework of finite temperature feld theory this paper discusses the shear viscosity of hot QED plasma through Kubo formula at one-loop skeleton diagram level with a finite chemical potential. The effective widths (damping rates) are introduced to regulate the pinch singularities and then gives a reliable estimation of the shear viscous coefficient. The finite chemical potential contributes positively compared to the pure temperature case. The result agrees with that from the kinetics theory qualitatively

  13. Dipole-dipole interactions in a hot atomic vapor and in an ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautenkov, V. A.; Saakyan, S. A.; Bronin, S. Ya; Klyarfeld, A. B.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    In our paper ideal and non-ideal gas media of neutral atoms are analyzed. The first we discuss a dipole broadening of atomic transitions in excited dilute and dense metal vapors. Then the theoretical studies of the dipole-dipole interactions in dense ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms are considered. Possible future experiments on a base of our experimental arrangement are suggested.

  14. TL and OSL studies on undoped diamond films grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Anuj, E-mail: anujsoni.phy@gmail.com [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Choudhary, R.K. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Polymeris, G.S. [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences (Turkey); Mishra, D.R. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kulkarni, M.S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-09-15

    In this work, approximately 0.5 µm thick diamond films were grown on a silicon substrate by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) method in a gas mixture of hydrogen and methane. The batch to batch reproducibility of the sample using this technique was found to be very good. The obtained film was characterized by micro laser Raman spectroscopy (MLRS), grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force miscroscopy (AFM) techniques. MLRS and GIXRD results confirmed the formation of diamond whereas SEM and AFM analyses indicated uniform morphology of the film with an average grain size of 200 nm. The deposited film was studied for ionizing radiation dosimetry applications using the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques after irradiating the film by a calibrated 5 mCi, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta source. In the TL measurement, for a heating rate of 4 K/s, broad glow curve was obtained which was deconvoluted into seven TL peaks. The integrated TL counts were found to vary linearly with increasing the radiation dose up to 10 kGy. The characteristic TL output seen in the temperature range 200–300 °C, may be considered good for thermal stability of the film and it could also avoid TL fading during storage and non-interference of any black body radiation during the measurement. However, in comparison to TL output, the OSL response for 470 nm LED stimulation was found to be lesser. The CW–OSL decay curve has shown two components contributing to the OSL signal, having photoionization cross-section 1.5×10{sup −18} and 5.2×10{sup −19} cm{sup 2} respectively. The studies have revealed the possibility of using diamond film for high dose radiation dosimetry with TL/OSL method.

  15. Atom interaction propensities of oxygenated chemical functions in crystal packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jelsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal contacts of several families of hydrocarbon compounds substituted with one or several types of oxygenated chemical groups were analyzed statistically using the Hirshfeld surface methodology. The propensity of contacts to occur between two chemical types is described with the contact enrichment descriptor. The systematic large enrichment ratios of some interactions like the O—H...O hydrogen bonds suggests that these contacts are a driving force in the crystal packing formation. The same statement holds for the weaker C—H...O hydrogen bonds in ethers, esters and ketones, in the absence of polar H atoms. The over-represented contacts in crystals of oxygenated hydrocarbons are generally of two types: electrostatic attractions (hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. While Cl...O interactions are generally avoided, in a minority of chloro-oxygenated hydrocarbons, significant halogen bonding does occur. General tendencies can often be derived for many contact types, but outlier compounds are instructive as they display peculiar or rare features. The methodology also allows the detection of outliers which can be structures with errors. For instance, a significant number of hydroxylated molecules displaying over-represented non-favorable oxygen–oxygen contacts turned out to have wrongly oriented hydroxyl groups. Beyond crystal packings with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, the behavior of water in monohydrate compounds and of crystals with Z′ = 2 (dimers are also investigated. It was found in several cases that, in the presence of several oxygenated chemical groups, cross-interactions between different chemical groups (e.g. water/alcohols; alcohols/phenols are often favored in the crystal packings. While some trends in accordance with common chemical principles are retrieved, some unexpected results can however appear. For example, in crystals of alcohol–phenol compounds, the strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between

  16. Human serum albumin (HSA) adsorption onto a-SiC:H thin films deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, Bibhu P.

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the study of the adsorption behavior of human serum albumin (HSA) onto surfaces of a-SiC:H thin films deposited by using the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique. The surface composition and surface energy of the various substrates as well as the evaluation of the adsorbed amount of protein has been carried out by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, AFM and contact angle measurements. At the immediate effect of HSA interaction with a-SiC:H films N is adsorbed on the surface and stabilized after 3 days. Preliminary observation found that Si and O atom are desorbed from the surface while C and N set adsorbed to the surface of the a-SiC:H film

  17. Human serum albumin (HSA) adsorption onto a-SiC:H thin films deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Bibhu P. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India) and Samtel Centre for Display Technologies, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India, Kanpur 208016 (India)]. E-mail: bibhup@iitb.ac.in

    2006-12-15

    In the present paper, we report the study of the adsorption behavior of human serum albumin (HSA) onto surfaces of a-SiC:H thin films deposited by using the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique. The surface composition and surface energy of the various substrates as well as the evaluation of the adsorbed amount of protein has been carried out by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, AFM and contact angle measurements. At the immediate effect of HSA interaction with a-SiC:H films N is adsorbed on the surface and stabilized after 3 days. Preliminary observation found that Si and O atom are desorbed from the surface while C and N set adsorbed to the surface of the a-SiC:H film.

  18. Chemical composition of hot spring waters in the Oita river basins, Oita prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Tamio

    1988-01-30

    The source of the water from Oita River comes from the Kuju and Yubu-Tsurumi Volcanos, pouring into Beppu Bay. Its drainage area is 646 km/sup 2/ with a total length of 55 km. Hot springs are exist throughout most of the basin of the main and branches of Oita River. The chemical components of the hot springs in the Ota River basin -Yufuin, Yunotaira, Nagayu, Shonai/Hazama, and Oita City - have been analyzed. The equivalent of magnesium exceeds that of calcium in the carbonate springs of the above. Ca+Mg has positive correlations with HCO/sub 3/ in these carbonate springs. The water from these springs flows into the rivers and pours into Beppu Bay. The flow rate and chemical component concentration were measured at Fudai bridge. The concentration of chemical components having an average flow rate (30 ton/sec) were calculated. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 10 refs)

  19. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  20. The application of atomic absorption spectrometry to chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, A.

    1980-01-01

    YhThe history of the development of atomic absorption methods of elemental analysis is outlined. The theoretical basis of atomic absorption methods is discussed and the principle of modern methods of atomic absorption measurements is described. The advantages, scope and limations of these methods are discussed. Related methods based on the measurement of atomic fluorescence are also described

  1. sup(60)Co hot atom chemistry of tris(acetylacetonato) cobalt(III) adsorbed on silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioji, H.; Sakai, Y.; Tominaga, T.

    1985-01-01

    The sup(60)Co hot atom reactions were studied in tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt(III) adsorbed on silica gel surface. sup(57)Fe Moessbauer spectra of tris(acetylacetonato)iron(III) in the corresponding system were also measured in order to examine the state of dispersion of complex molecules on silica gel. The retention formation processes were discussed in terms of the dependence of sup(60)Co retention on the adsorbed amount (concentration) of cobalt(III) complexes. (author)

  2. Effect of Hot water and dilute acid pretreatment on the chemical properties of liquorice root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra takzare

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, the liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra that was extracted in the factory in Kerman province, pre-hydrolyzed and then chemical compositions (Extractives, Lignin content, Holocellulose percent, the hydrolysis process yield and weight loss of the waste was measured. Pre-hydrolysis process was done on the above mentioned waste by hot water, hot water followed by 0.5 percent sulfuric acid and also alone sulfuric acid with different concentrations (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 percent The samples were pre-hydrolyzed in hot water at 150 °C and 30, 60 and 90 minutes as well as in the mixture of hot water and 0.5 % sulfuric acid at 150 °C and 60 minutes and also in pure sulfuric acid, at 130 °C and at 60 minutes. The results showed that the pre-hydrolyzed treatment with hot water in 60 minutes had been favorable performance in the respect of weight loss, lignin content and holocellulose percent. Also, in the case of pre-treatment including sulfuric acid, 2% dose can be good selected option in term of maximum holocellulose percent and minimum lignin content so that it can be suggested to produce higher value-added products such as bioethanol from licorice root bid.

  3. Hetero- and homogeneous three-dimensional hierarchical tungsten oxide nanostructures by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z.S., E-mail: Silvester.Houweling@asml.com [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Harks, P.-P.R.M.L.; Kuang, Y.; Werf, C.H.M. van der [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, J.W. [Utrecht University, Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-30

    We present the synthesis of three-dimensional tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3−x}) nanostructures, called nanocacti, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. The growth of the nanocacti is controlled through a succession of oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes. By using only a resistively heated W filament, a flow of ambient air and hydrogen at subatmospheric pressure, and a substrate heated to about 700 °C, branched nanostructures are deposited. We report three varieties of simple synthesis approaches to obtain hierarchical homo- and heterogeneous nanocacti. Furthermore, by using catalyst nanoparticles site-selection for the growth is demonstrated. The atomic, morphological and crystallographic compositions of the nanocacti are determined using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. - Highlights: • Continuous upscalable hot-wire CVD of 3D hierarchical nanocacti • Controllable deposition of homo- and heterogeneous WO{sub 3−x}/WO{sub 3−y} nanocacti • Introduction of three synthesis routes comprising oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes • Growth of periodic arrays of hetero- and homogeneous hierarchical 3D nanocacti.

  4. Quasiclassical Studies of Eley-Rideal and Hot Atom Reactions on Surface: H(D)→D(H)+Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurdu, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Randomly distributed hydrogen adsorbates on the surface of Cu(1 1 1) are used to form 0.50, 0.25 and 0.15 monolayers of coverages to simulate D(H)→H(D) + Cu(111) system at 30 K and 94 K surface temperatures. The interaction of this system is mimicked by a LEPS function which is parameterized by using the energy points which were calculated by a density-functional theory method and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy for various configurations of one a,nd two hydrogen atoms on the Cu(111) surface. Our results on H 2 , D 2 , and HD formations via Eley-Redial and hot-atom mechanisms will be presented at these temperatures. Probabilities for the rotational, vibrational, total and translational energy distributions of the products are calculated. In addition traping onto the surface, inelastic reflection of the incident projectile and penetration of the adsorbate or projectile atom into the slab is analyzed. Hot-atom pathways for product formations are shown to make significant contributions

  5. Chemical reactions of recoil atoms and thermal atoms of tritium with haloid benzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1978-01-01

    Radiochemical yields have been determined for the products of substitution of hydrogen atoms and halides in Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes with tritium atoms obtained during thermal dissociation of T 2 and with recoil atoms T arising in nuclear reaction 6 Li(n, P)T. It is shown that in the series of Cl-, Br-, and I-benzenes yields of the products of substitution of halides atoms with tritium grow, whereas those of hydrogen atom substitution change only little. The correlation nature of the yields of substitution products of halide atoms with tritium remains constant in a wide range of the initial kinetic energies of T atoms for the recoil atoms with E 0 =2.7 MeV and for the completely thermolized atoms during thermal dissociation of T 2

  6. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL MODIFICATION AND HOT-PRESS DRYING ON POPLAR WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Feng Wu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Urea-formaldehyde prepolymer and hot-press drying were used to improve the properties of poplar wood. The wood was impregnated with the prepolymer using a pulse-dipping machine. The impregnated timbers were compressed and dried by a multilayer hot-press drying kiln. The drying rate was more rapid during the chemical modification and hot-press drying than conventional kiln-drying. In addition, the properties of timber were also enhanced obviously. When the compression rate was 28.6%, the basic density, oven dry density and air-dried density of modified wood improved 22%, 71%, and 70%, respectively. The bending strength and compressive strength parallel to grain increased 60% and 40%. The water uptake of treated wood was significantly decreased compared with the untreated wood. The FTIR analysis successfully showed that the intensity of hydroxyl and carbonyl absorption peaks decreased significantly, which was attributed to a reaction of the NHCH2OH of urea-formaldehyde prepolymer with the wood carboxyl (C=O and hydroxyl (-OH groups. The XRD results indicated that the degree of crystallinity increased from 35.09% to 36.91%. The morphologic models of chemical within wood were discovered by SEM.

  7. Chemical segregation in hot cores with disk candidates. An investigation with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Cesaroni, R.; Beltrán, M. T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. In the study of high-mass star formation, hot cores are empirically defined stages where chemically rich emission is detected toward a massive YSO. It is unknown whether the physical origin of this emission is a disk, inner envelope, or outflow cavity wall and whether the hot core stage is common to all massive stars. Aims: We investigate the chemical makeup of several hot molecular cores to determine physical and chemical structure. We use high spectral and spatial resolution submillimeter observations to determine how this stage fits into the formation sequence of a high-mass star. Methods: The submillimeter interferometer ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) was used to observe the G35.20-0.74N and G35.03+0.35 hot cores at 350 GHz in Cycle 0. We analyzed spectra and maps from four continuum peaks (A, B1, B2 and B3) in G35.20-0.74N, separated by 1000-2000 AU, and one continuum peak in G35.03+0.35. We made all possible line identifications across 8 GHz of spectral windows of molecular emission lines down to a 3σ line flux of 0.5 K and determined column densities and temperatures for as many as 35 species assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Results: In comparing the spectra of the four continuum peaks, we find each has a distinct chemical composition expressed in over 400 different transitions. In G35.20, B1 and B2 contain oxygen- and sulfur-bearing organic and inorganic species but few nitrogen-bearing species whereas A and B3 are strong sources of O-, S-, and N-bearing organic and inorganic species (especially those with the CN bond). Column densities of vibrationally excited states are observed to be equal to or greater than the ground state for a number of species. Deuterated methyl cyanide is clearly detected in A and B3 with D/H ratios of 8 and 13%, respectively, but is much weaker at B1 and undetected at B2. No deuterated species are detected in G35.03, but similar molecular abundances to G35.20 were found in other species. We also

  8. The role of catalytic nanoparticle pretreatment on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Gohier, Aurélien; Bourée, Jean Eric; Châtelet, Marc; Cojocaru, Costel-Sorin, E-mail: costel-sorin.cojocaru@polytechnique.edu

    2015-01-30

    The effect of atomic hydrogen assisted pre-treatment on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Iron nanoparticle catalysts were formed on an aluminum oxide support layer by spraying of iron chloride salt solutions as catalyst precursor. It is found that pre-treatment time and process temperature tune the density as well as the shape and the structure of the grown carbon nanotubes. An optimum pre-treatment time can be found for the growth of long and well aligned carbon nanotubes, densely packed to each other. To provide insight on this behavior, the iron catalytic nanoparticles formed after the atomic hydrogen assisted pre-treatment were analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The relations between the size and the density of the as-formed catalyst and the as-grown carbon nanotube's structure and density are discussed. - Highlights: • Effect of the atomic hydrogen assisted pre-treatment on the growth of VACNT using hot-filament CVD. • Pre-treatment time and process temperature tune the density, the shape and the structure of the CNTs. • Correlations between size and density of the as-formed catalyst and the CNT’s structure and density. • Carbon nanotubes synthesized at low temperature down to 500 °C using spayed iron chloride salts. • Density of the CNT carpet adjusted by catalytic nanoparticle engineering.

  9. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  10. Noble gas atoms as chemical impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Minaev, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of noble gas atoms implanted in silicon is studied by the luminescence method. The energy position of Moessbauer-type luminescence bands with zero-phonon lines 1.0148, 1.0120, 1.0097, 1.0048 eV and others connected with implanted atoms of neon, helium, argon, krypton, respectively, indicates the formation of deep energy levels in the forbidden gap of silicon. Implantation of the noble gas isotopes confirms their participation in formation processes of the luminescence centers in silicon. The temperature range of existence and the symmetry of defects incorporating the noble gas atoms are found. It is noted that noble gas atoms form impurity complexes with deep energy levels and their behaviour in crystals does not differ from that of main doped or residual technological impurity atoms. (author)

  11. Atomic Charges and Chemical Bonding in Y-Ga Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Grin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A negative deviation from Vegard rule for the average atomic volume versus yttrium content was found from experimental crystallographic information about the binary compounds of yttrium with gallium. Analysis of the electron density (DFT calculations employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules revealed an increase in the atomic volumes of both Y and Ga with the increase in yttrium content. The non-linear increase is caused by the strengthening of covalent Y-Ga interactions with stronger participation of genuine penultimate shell electrons (4d electrons of yttrium in the valence region. Summing the calculated individual atomic volumes for a unit cell allows understanding of the experimental trend. With increasing yttrium content, the polarity of the Y-Ga bonding and, thus its ionicity, rises. The covalency of the atomic interactions in Y-Ga compounds is consistent with their delocalization from two-center to multi-center ones.

  12. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  13. Nonspherical atomic ground-state densities and chemical deformation densities from x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schwarz, W.H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Presuming that chemical insight can be gained from the difference between the molecular electron density and the superposition of the ground-state densities of the atoms in a molecule, it is pointed out that, for atoms with degenerate ground states, an unpromoted ''atom in a molecule'' is represented by a specific ensemble of the degenerate atomic ground-state wave functions and that this ensemble is determined by the anisotropic local surroundings. The resulting atomic density contributions are termed oriented ground state densities, and the corresponding density difference is called the chemical deformation density. The constraints implied by this conceptual approach for the atomic density contributions are formulated and a method is developed for determining them from x-ray scattering data. The electron density of the appropriate promolecule and its x-ray scattering are derived, the determination of the parameters of the promolecule is outlined, and the chemical deformation density is formulated

  14. CHEMICAL SEGREGATION TOWARD MASSIVE HOT CORES: THE AFGL2591 STAR-FORMING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Martin-Pintado, J. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Ctra. de Torrejon a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); De Wit, W.-J., E-mail: ijimenez-serra@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: wdewit@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-07-01

    We present high angular resolution observations (0.''5 Multiplication-Sign 0.''3) carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward the AFGL2591 high-mass star-forming region. Our SMA images reveal a clear chemical segregation within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core, where different molecular species (Types I, II, and III) appear distributed in three concentric shells. This is the first time that such a chemical segregation is ever reported at linear scales {<=}3000 AU within a hot core. While Type I species (H{sub 2}S and {sup 13}CS) peak at the AFGL2591 VLA 3 protostar, Type II molecules (HC{sub 3}N, OCS, SO, and SO{sub 2}) show a double-peaked structure circumventing the continuum peak. Type III species, represented by CH{sub 3}OH, form a ring-like structure surrounding the continuum emission. The excitation temperatures of SO{sub 2}, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}OH (185 {+-} 11 K, 150 {+-} 20 K, and 124 {+-} 12 K, respectively) show a temperature gradient within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 envelope, consistent with previous observations and modeling of the source. By combining the H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH images, representative of the three concentric shells, we find that the global kinematics of the molecular gas follow Keplerian-like rotation around a 40 M{sub Sun} star. The chemical segregation observed toward AFGL2591 VLA 3 is explained by the combination of molecular UV photodissociation and a high-temperature ({approx}1000 K) gas-phase chemistry within the low extinction innermost region in the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core.

  15. Growth of highly oriented carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.P.; Xu, J.W.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, and Center for Advanced Photonic and Electronic Materials (CAPEM), State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Provencio, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Highly oriented, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were grown on polished polycrystalline and single crystal nickel substrates by plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 666 {degree}C. The carbon nanotubes range from 10 to 500 nm in diameter and 0.1 to 50 {mu}m in length depending on growth conditions. Acetylene is used as the carbon source for the growth of the carbon nanotubes and ammonia is used for dilution gas and catalysis. The plasma intensity, acetylene to ammonia gas ratio, and their flow rates, etc. affect the diameters and uniformity of the carbon nanotubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  17. The main chemical properties of hot and cold mineral waters in Bayankhongor, Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Oyuntsetseg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, hot and cold mineral springs and sub mineral waters in the Bayankhongor province were examined for their chemical characteristics and identified cold mineral waters classification according to mineral water classification of Mongolia. The hot spring waters belong to Na+-HCO3- and Na+-SO42- types. The cold mineral spring of Lkham belongs to Ca2+-HCO3- type. All sub mineral waters are generally located in the two areas (northern part or mountain forest area and the southern part or Gobi desert area. TDS concentrations of cold springs of the southern part in the study area were higher than northern part’s cold springs. The total dissolved silica content of cold spring was ranged from 4.5mg/L to 26 mg/L which did not correspond to requirements of mineral water standard of Mongolia. Thus, these cold springs are belonging to sub mineral water classification. The sub mineral waters were characterized into four types such as a Ca2+-SO42-, Na+-SO42-, Na+-HCO3 and Ca2+ - HCO3 by their chemical composition in the study area. The values for the quartz, chalcedony geothermometer and the Na/K geothermometer were quite different. The silica-enthalpy mixing model predicts a subsurface reservoir temperature between 124 and 197°C and most of the hot waters have been  probably mixed with cold water. The result shows that an averaged value of calculated temperature ranges from 77°C to 119°C which indicates that studied area has low temperature geothermal resources. DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.324 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p56-62

  18. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of μ - p atoms. The ppμ-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced

  19. Atomic oxygen-MoS sub 2 chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, J.B.; Martin, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pope, L.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Koontz, S.L. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The present study shows that an O-atom translation energy of 1.5 eV, SO{sub 2} is generated and outgases from an anhydrous MoS{sub 2} surface with an initial reactivity nearly 50% that of kapton. The reaction of atomic oxygen with MoS{sub 2} has little or no translational energy barrier, i.e. thermally generated atomic oxygen reacts as readily as that having 1.5 eV of translational energy. For MoS{sub 2} films sputter-deposited at 50-70deg C, friction measurements showed a high initial friction coefficient (up to 0.25) for MoS{sub 2} surfaces exposed to atomic oxygen, which dropped to the normal low values after several cycles of operation in air and ultrahigh vacuum. For MoS{sub 2} films deposited at 200deg C, the friction coefficient was not affected by the O-atom exposure. (orig.).

  20. Relativistic total energy and chemical potential of heavy atoms and positive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.H.; Grout, P.J.; March, N.H.

    1984-01-01

    The relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory, with a finite nucleus, is used to study the variation of the chemical potential μ with atomic number Z and number of electrons N (N <= Z). The difference between the total energy of positive ions and that of the corresponding neutral atom has been obtained. The scaling predictions are confirmed by numerical calculations. The first principles calculation of the relativistic Thomas-Fermi total energy of neutral atoms is also studied. (author)

  1. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Attempts are made to gain insights into the effect of confinement of noble gas atoms on their various reactivity indices. Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum fluid density functional technique is adopted in order to study ...

  2. Neutral atom analyzers for diagnosing hot plasmas: A review of research at the ioffe physicotechnical institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.

    2009-01-01

    Research on neutral particle diagnostics of thermonuclear plasmas that has been carried out in recent years at the Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (St. Petersburg, Russia) is reviewed. Work on the creation and improvement of neutral atom analyzers was done in two directions: for potential applications (in particular, on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which is now under construction at Cadarache in France) and for investigation of the ion plasma component in various devices (in particular, in the largest tokamaks, such as JET, TFTR, and JT-60). Neutral atom analyzers are the main tool for studying the behavior of hydrogen ions and isotopes in magnetic confinement systems. They make it possible to determine energy spectra, to perform the isotope analysis of atom fluxes from the plasma, to measure the absolute intensity of the fluxes, and to record how these parameters vary with time. A comparative description of the analyzers developed in recent years at the Ioffe Institute is given. These are ACORD-12/24 analyzers for recording 0.2-100-keV hydrogen and deuterium atoms with a tunable range of simultaneously measured energies, CNPA compact analyzers for a fixed energy gain in the ranges 80-1000 eV and 0.8-100 keV, an ISEP analyzer for simultaneously recording the atoms of all the three hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) in the energy range 5-700 keV, and GEMMA analyzers for recording atom fluxes of hydrogen and helium isotopes in the range 0.1-4 MeV. The scintillating detectors of the ISEP and GEMMA analyzers have a lowered sensitivity to neutrons and thus can operate without additional shielding in neutron fields of up to 10 9 n/(cm 2 s). These two types of analyzers, intended to operate under deuterium-tritium plasma conditions, are prototypes of atom analyzers created at the Ioffe Institute for use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. With these analyzers, a number of new results have been

  3. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA's hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R ampersand D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required

  4. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  5. Synthesis of thick diamond films by direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Zeng Sun; Bai Yi Zhen; Lu Xian Yi

    2002-01-01

    The method of direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition has been established. A long-time stable glow discharge at large discharge current and high gas pressure has been achieved by using a hot cathode in the temperature range from 1100 degree C to 1500 degree C and non-symmetrical configuration of the poles, in which the diameter of the cathode is larger than that of anode. High-quality thick diamond films, with a diameter of 40-50 mm and thickness of 0.5-4.2 mm, have been synthesized by this method. Transparent thick diamond films were grown over a range of growth rates between 5-10 mu m/h. Most of the thick diamond films have thermal conductivities of 10-12 W/K centre dot cm. The thick diamond films with high thermal conductivity can be used as a heat sink of semiconducting laser diode array and as a heat spreading and isolation substrate of multichip modules. The performance can be obviously improved

  6. Glass Imprint Templates by Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving for Microfabrication by Hot Embossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Abia Hof

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the field of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS matures, new demands are being placed on the microfabrication of complex architectures in robust materials, such as hard plastics. Iterative design optimization in a timely manner—rapid prototyping—places challenges on template fabrication, for methods such as injection moulding and hot embossing. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE to produce micro patterned glass templates. The direct, write-based approach enabled the facile fabrication of smooth microfeatures with variations in all three-dimensions, which could be replicated by hot embossing different thermoplastics. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated the technique for a high glass transition temperature polycarbonate. Good fidelity over more than 10 cycles provides evidence that the approach is viable for rapid prototyping and has the potential to satisfy commercial-grade production at medium-level output volumes. Glass imprint templates showed no degradation after use, but care must be taken due to brittleness. The technique has the potential to advance microfabrication needs in academia and could be used by MEMS product developers.

  7. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  8. Magnetic and cytotoxic properties of hot-filament chemical vapour deposited diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, Hudson, E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Ceragioli, Helder Jose [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues, Ana Amelia; Belangero, William Dias [Laboratorio de Biomateriais em Ortopedia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Cinco de Junho 350 CEP 13083970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    Microcrystalline (MCD) and nanocrystalline (NCD) magnetic diamond samples were produced by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) on AISI 316 substrates. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) measurements indicated the presence of Fe, Cr and Ni in the MCD and NCD samples, and all samples showed similar magnetisation properties. Cell viability tests were realised using Vero cells, a type of fibroblastic cell line. Polystyrene was used as a negative control for toxicity (NCT). The cells were cultured under standard cell culture conditions. The proliferation indicated that these magnetic diamond samples were not cytotoxic. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycrystalline diamonds doped with Fe, Cr and Ni acquire ferromagnetic properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CVD diamonds have been prepared with magnetic and semiconductor properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro/nanocrystalline diamonds show good cell viability with fibroblast proliferation.

  9. Experimental and Simulation Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressing of Gas Atomized Stainless Steel 316L Powder Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Dongguo; Park, Seong Jin; Ha, Sangyul; Shin, Youngho; Park, Dong Yong; Chung, Sung Taek; Bollina, Ravi; See, Seongkyu

    2016-01-01

    In this work, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the densification behavior of stainless steel 316L (STS 316L) powders during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and to characterize the mechanical properties of HIPed specimens. The HIP experiments were conducted with gas atomized STS 316L powders with spherical particle shapes under controlled pressure and temperature conditions. The mechanical properties of HIPed samples were determined based on a series of tensile tests, and the results were compared to a reference STS 316L sample prepared by the conventional process, i.e., extrusion and annealing process. Corresponding microstructures before and after tensile tests were observed using scanning electron microscopy and their relationships to the mechanical properties were addressed. Furthermore, a finite element simulation based on the power-law creep model was carried out to predict the density distribution and overall shape change of the STS316L powder compact during HIP process, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  10. Experimental and Simulation Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressing of Gas Atomized Stainless Steel 316L Powder Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dongguo; Park, Seong Jin [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sangyul [Samsung Electro-Mechanics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Youngho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Yong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung Taek [CetaTech Inc., Sacheon (Korea, Republic of); Bollina, Ravi [Bahadurpally Jeedimetla, Hyderabad (India); See, Seongkyu [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the densification behavior of stainless steel 316L (STS 316L) powders during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and to characterize the mechanical properties of HIPed specimens. The HIP experiments were conducted with gas atomized STS 316L powders with spherical particle shapes under controlled pressure and temperature conditions. The mechanical properties of HIPed samples were determined based on a series of tensile tests, and the results were compared to a reference STS 316L sample prepared by the conventional process, i.e., extrusion and annealing process. Corresponding microstructures before and after tensile tests were observed using scanning electron microscopy and their relationships to the mechanical properties were addressed. Furthermore, a finite element simulation based on the power-law creep model was carried out to predict the density distribution and overall shape change of the STS316L powder compact during HIP process, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  11. Work on the hot atom chemistry at the Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Yugoslavia; Hemija vruceg atoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1969-07-01

    A survey of work on hot atom chemistry from the establishment of the Institute up to now, where the role of Prof. P. Savic, should be specially emphasized, is given. The investigations in this domain during the first period, were directed to solve various problems in production of radioactive isotopes. Today these investigations are closely associated with the work in radiochemistry, physical chemistry of liquid and solid systems and fast reaction kinetics improving the development of these branches (author) [Serbo-Croat] Daje se pregled rada na hemiji vruceg atoma od osnivanja Instituta do danas, pri cemu se narocito istice uloga koju je u tome imao prof. P. Savic. Dok su u prvom periodu istrazivanja u ovoj oblasti doprinosila resavanju raznih problema proizvodnje radioaktivnih izotopa, ona su danas tesno povezana sa radom u radiohemiji, fizickoj hemiji tecnih i cvrstih sistema, kinetici brzih reakcija, doprinoseci sa svoje strane razvoju tih oblasti (author)

  12. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, R.E.I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl

    2015-11-30

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  13. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  14. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, B.; Baluktsian, T.; Schlagmueller, M.; Koelle, A.; Kuebler, H.; Loew, R.; Pfau, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of ∼4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. Thermal and chemical interaction of hot liquid sodium with limestone concrete in argon atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakir, Charan Parida; Sanjay, Kumar Das; Anil, Kumar Sharma; Ramesh, S.S.; Somayajulu, P.A.; Malarvizhi, B.; Kasinathan, N.; Rajan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) may experience accidental leakage of hot liquid sodium in the inert equipment cells and reactor cavity. The leaked sodium at temperature ranging from 120degC to 550degC can come in contact with the sacrificial layer of limestone concrete. In order to study the thermal and chemical impact of sodium on the limestone concrete, five experimental runs were carried out under different test conditions simulating accident scenarios as realistically as possible. In each experimental run, a given mass of liquid sodium preheated to a specified temperature was dumped on the surface of concrete specimen housed in a test vessel with argon atmosphere. The sodium pool formed on the concrete was heated with an immersion heater to maintain the pool temperature at pre-selected level. The temperatures at various strategic locations were continuously monitored throughout the test run. Online measurement of pressure, hydrogen gas and oxygen gas in argon atmosphere was conducted. The solid samples of sodium debris were retrieved from the posttest concrete specimen by manual core drilling device for chemical analysis of reacted and un-reacted sodium. After cleaning the sodium debris, a power-drilling machine was employed to collect powder samples at regular depth interval from the concrete block floor to determine residual free and bound water. This paper presents some of the dominant thermal and chemical features related to structural safety of the concrete. Among the thermal parameters, on-set time and residence period for Energetic Thermal Transients (ETT) along with peak and average heat generation rates are evaluated. Chemical parameters such as rate and extent of water release from concrete, sodium consumption, sodium hydroxide production and sodium emission into argon atmosphere are also elucidated. Physicochemical characteristics of post-test sodium and concrete debris were investigated. Moreover spatial distribution of sodium, free and

  16. Relativistic Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom NMR Chemical Shifts: General Trends Across the Periodic Table Explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vícha, Jan; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2018-05-10

    The importance of relativistic effects on the NMR parameters in heavy-atom (HA) compounds, particularly the SO-HALA (Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom) effect on NMR chemical shifts, has been known for about 40 years. Yet, a general correlation between the electronic structure and SO-HALA effect has been missing. By analyzing 1 H NMR chemical shifts of the sixth-period hydrides (Cs-At), we discovered general electronic-structure principles and mechanisms that dictate the size and sign of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts. In brief, partially occupied HA valence shells induce relativistic shielding at the light atom (LA) nuclei, while empty HA valence shells induce relativistic deshielding. In particular, the LA nucleus is relativistically shielded in 5d 2 -5d 8 and 6p 4 HA hydrides and deshielded in 4f 0 , 5d 0 , 6s 0 , and 6p 0 HA hydrides. This general and intuitive concept explains periodic trends in the 1 H NMR chemical shifts along the sixth-period hydrides (Cs-At) studied in this work. We present substantial evidence that the introduced principles have a general validity across the periodic table and can be extended to nonhydride LAs. The decades-old question of why compounds with occupied frontier π molecular orbitals (MOs) cause SO-HALA shielding at the LA nuclei, while the frontier σ MOs cause deshielding is answered. We further derive connection between the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts and Spin-Orbit-induced Electron Deformation Density (SO-EDD), a property that can be obtained easily from differential electron densities and can be represented graphically. SO-EDD provides an intuitive understanding of the SO-HALA effect in terms of the depletion/concentration of the electron density at LA nuclei caused by spin-orbit coupling due to HA in the presence of a magnetic field. Using an analogy between the SO-EDD concept and arguments from classic NMR theory, the complex question of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts becomes easily understandable for a wide

  17. Properties of Hot and Fast Rotating Atomic Nuclei Studied by Means of Giant Dipole Resonance in Exclusive Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maj, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work entitled ''Properties of hot and fast rotating atomic nuclei studied by means of Giant Dipole Resonance in exclusive experiments'', is the habilitation thesis of dr. Adam Maj. It consists of the review (in Polish) of performed research and of attached reprints from 16 original publications (in English) which A. Maj is the main or one of the main authors. All the studies were performed in collaboration with the groups from Milano and Copenhagen, using the HECTOR array equipment (described in chapter V). The Giant Dipole Resonance couples to the quadrupole degrees of freedom of the nucleus, and therefore constitutes a unique probe to test the shapes of atomic nuclei. In addition, the γ decay of the GDR from highly excited nuclei is a very fast process, it can compete with other modes of nuclear decay, and therefore can provide the information on the initial stages of excited nuclei. The presented investigations were concentrated on the following aspects: the shapes and thermal shape fluctuations, the origin of the behaviour of the GDR width, the properties of some exotic nuclei (Jacobi shapes, superdeformation, superheavy nuclei) and on ''entrance channel'' effects. The GDR γ decay was measured for nuclei with very different masses: from light nuclei with A≅45, through A≅110, 145,170,190, up to superheavy nuclei with A≅270. The shapes of hot nuclei are not fixed but fluctuate. The extent of these fluctuations and their influence on the measured quantities (GDR strength function, angular distribution and effective shape) is discussed in chapter VI.1. The observed width of the GDR is found to arise from the interplay of two effects: the thermal shape fluctuations, which are controlled by the nuclear temperature, and the deformation effects, controlled by the angular momentum. The ''collisional damping'' effect, which should influence the intrinsic GDR width, was found to be negligible (chapter VI.2). The GDR γ decay from hot superheavy nucleus 272 Hs

  18. Chemical reactions involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions; Cr203 + 2 Na2S04(1) + 3/2 02 yields 2 Na2Cr04(1) + 2 S03(g)n TiO2 + Na2S04(1) yields Na20(T102)n + 503(g)n T102 + Na2Cro4(1) yields Na2(T102)n + Cr03(g).

  19. Geologic setting and chemical characteristics of hot springs in central and western Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas P.; Barnes, Ivan; Pattan, William Wallace

    1973-01-01

    Numerous hot springs occur in a variety of geologic provinces in central and western Alaska. Granitic plutons are common to all the provinces and the hot springs are spatially associated with the contacts of these plutons. Of 23 hot springs whose bedrock geology is known, all occur within 3 miles of a granitic pluton. The occurrence of hot springs, however, appears to be independent of the age, composition, or magmatic history of the pluton.

  20. Observations of crystallization and melting in poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends by hot-stage atomic-force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, R.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1998-01-01

    The binary blend of poly(ethylene oxide)/atactic poly(methyl methacrylate) is examined using hot-stage atomic-force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with differential scanning calorimetry and optical microscopy. It was found possible to follow in real time the melting process, which reveals itself to

  1. Use of a CO2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO 2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility

  2. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil 31 Si and recoil 11 C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil 31 Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of 31 Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to γ-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100 0 C. Another recoil 31 Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the 31 Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of [ 31 Si]-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH 3 and PF 3 together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil 31 Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of 31 SiF 2 reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of 31 SiF 2 and 31 SiH 2 with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2- 14 C-propanone and 1,3- 14 C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO 4 was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the 11 C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil 11 C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the 11 C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T 2 on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated

  3. Generation of atomic iodine via fluorine for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Špalek, Otomar; Čenský, Miroslav; Picková, Irena; Kodymová, Jarmila; Jakubec, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 334, - (2007), s. 167-174 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0359 Grant - others:USAF European Office for Research and Development(XE) FA 8655-05-M-4027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : atomic iodine * atomic fluorine * chemical oxygen-iodine laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.805, year: 2007

  4. Chemical effects of alkali atoms on critical temperature in superconducting alkali-doped fullerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetfleisch, F.; Gunnarsson, O.; Srama, R.; Han, J. E.; Stepper, M.; Roeser, H.-P.; Bohr, A.; Lopez, J. S.; Mashmool, M.; Roth, S.

    2018-03-01

    Alkali metal doped fullerides (A3C60) are superconductors with critical temperatures, Tc, extending up to 38 K. Tc is known to depend strongly on the lattice parameter a, which can be adjusted by physical or chemical pressure. In the latter case an alkali atom is replaced by a different sized one, which changes a. We have collected an extensive data base of experimental data for Tc from very early up to recent measurements. We disentangle alkali atom chemical effects on Tc, beyond the well-known consequences of changing a. It is found that Tc, for a fixed a, is typically increased as smaller alkali atoms are replaced by larger ones, except for very large a. Possible reasons for these results are discussed. Although smaller in size than the lattice parameter contribution, the chemical effect is not negligible and should be considered in future physical model developments.

  5. Impact of microcrystalline silicon carbide growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon surface passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaska, M.; Beyer, W.; Neumann, E.; Finger, F.; Ding, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly crystalline microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) with excellent optoelectronic material properties is a promising candidate as highly transparent doped layer in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. These high quality materials are usually produced using hot wire chemical vapor deposition under aggressive growth conditions giving rise to the removal of the underlying passivation layer and thus the deterioration of the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. In this work, we introduced the n-type μc-SiC:H/n-type μc-SiO x :H/intrinsic a-SiO x :H stack as a front layer configuration for p-type SHJ solar cells with the μc-SiO x :H layer acting as an etch-resistant layer against the reactive deposition conditions during the μc-SiC:H growth. We observed that the unfavorable expansion of micro-voids at the c-Si interface due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen atoms through the layer stack might be responsible for the deterioration of surface passivation. Excellent lifetime values were achieved under deposition conditions which are needed to grow high quality μc-SiC:H layers for SHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • High surface passivation quality was preserved after μc-SiC:H deposition. • μc-SiC:H/μc-SiO x :H/a-SiO x :H stack a promising front layer configuration • Void expansion at a-SiO x :H/c-Si interface for deteriorated surface passivation • μc-SiC:H provides a high transparency and electrical conductivity.

  6. Hot atom reactions involving multivalent and univalent species. Progress report, February 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.N.

    1980-01-01

    The major progress during this period was in the study of recoil /sup 31/Si and recoil /sup 11/C reactions and in the initiation of the studies on the interaction of molecular tritium on solid surfaces. For the recoil /sup 31/Si systems, heterogeneous hydrogenation experiments have been designed to positively confirm that a major unknown product, derived from the interaction of /sup 31/Si atoms with 1,3-butadiene, is 1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene. This compound has been shown to be very sensitive to ..gamma..-ray irradiation and to be thermally unstable at a temperature higher than 100/sup 0/C. Another recoil /sup 31/Si experiment was designed to review the mechanism of the /sup 31/Si abstraction reactions. From the fact that high yields of (/sup 31/Si)-1-fluorosilacyclopent-3-ene were obtained as a product from a mixture of PH/sub 3/ and PF/sub 3/ together with 1,3-butadiene, the stepwise abstraction mechanism is definitely much more predominant than the possible simultaneous abstraction. Other recoil /sup 31/Si works involved a detailed systematic composition study of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ reactions with 1,3-butadiene, some neon moderator studies, and the continuation of the studies on the reactions of /sup 31/SiF/sub 2/ and /sup 31/SiH/sub 2/ with conjugated hexadienes. By using 2-/sup 14/C-propanone and 1,3-/sup 14/C-propanone, the mechanism of solvent-free oxidative cleavage of propanone by KMnO/sub 4/ was elucidated. Information thus derived was used to degradate the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene derived from the reactions of recoil /sup 11/C atoms with ethylene. Results indicate that 73% of the /sup 11/C-labelled propadiene was center-labelled. This value was observed to change with additives. Various mechanistic studies on the heterogeneous interactions of molecular T/sub 2/ on solid surfaces such as Pd supported on active carbon have been initiated.

  7. Generation of atomic iodine via fluorine for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirasek, Vit; Spalek, Otomar; Censky, Miroslav; Pickova, Irena; Kodymova, Jarmila; Jakubec, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    A method of the chemical generation of atomic iodine for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) using atomic fluorine as a reaction intermediate was studied experimentally. This method is based on the reaction between F 2 and NO providing F atoms, and the reaction of F with HI resulting in iodine atoms generation. Atomic iodine was produced with efficiency exceeding 40% relative to initial F 2 flow rate. This efficiency was nearly independent on pressure and total gas flow rate. The F atoms were stable in the reactor up to 2 ms. An optimum ratio of the reactants flow rates was F 2 :NO:HI = 1:1:1. A rate constant of the reaction of F 2 with HI was determined. The numerical modelling showed that remaining HI and IF were probably consumed in their mutual reaction. The reaction system was found suitable for employing in a generator of atomic iodine with its subsequent injection into a supersonic nozzle of a COIL

  8. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Baryshnikov, F.F.; Lisitsa, V.S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom are used to calculate the charge exchange cross-sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, allowance being made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross-section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross-section. The cross-sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values Z. It is shown that the cross-section may be approximated to within approximately 9 /v).10 -15 cm 2 for Z>=18 (v in cm/s). A detailed comparison with the calculations of various authors is performed. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found. A calculation is made of variation in the spectral line intensities of the ion O +7 with injection of a neutral hydrogen beam in conditions similar to the experimental conditions on the ORMAK facility. (author)

  9. Hot-wire chemical vapor synthesis for a variety of nano-materials with novel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, A.C.; Mahan, A.H.; Deshpande, R.; Alleman, J.L.; Blackburn, J.L.; Parillia, P.A.; Heben, M.J.; Engtrakul, C.; Gilbert, K.E.H.; Jones, K.M.; To, R.; Lee, S-H.; Lehman, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) has been demonstrated as a simple economically scalable technique for the synthesis of a variety of nano-materials in an environmentally friendly manner. For example we have employed HWCVD for the continuous production of both carbon single- and multi-wall nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs). Unanticipated hydrogen storage on HWCVD-generated MWNTs has led insight into the adsorption mechanism of hydrogen on metal/carbon composites at near ambient temperatures that could be useful for developing a vehicular hydrogen storage system. Recent efforts have been focused on growing MWNT arrays on thin nickel films with a simple HWCVD process. New data suggests that these MWNT arrays could replace the gold black coatings currently used in pyroelectric detectors to accurately measure laser power. Finally, we have very recently employed HWCVD for the production of crystalline molybdenum and tungsten oxide nanotubes and nanorods. These metal oxide nanorods and nanotubes could have applications in catalysis, batteries and electrochromic windows or as gas sensors. A summary of the techniques for growing these novel materials and their various potential applications is provided

  10. Chemical Composition of Apricot Pit Shells and Effect of Hot-Water Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B. Corbett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural residues, such as corn stover, wheat straw, and nut shells show promise as feedstocks for lignocellulosic biorefinery due to their relatively high polysaccharide content and low or no nutritional value for human consumption. Apricot pit shells (APS were studied in this work to assess their potential for use in a biorefinery. Hot water extraction (HWE; 160 °C, 2 h, proposed to remove easily accessible hemicelluloses, was performed to evaluate the susceptibility of APS to this mild pretreatment process. The chemical composition of APS before and after HWE (EAPS was analyzed by standard methods and 1H-NMR. A low yield of the remaining HW-extracted APS (~59% indicated that APS are highly susceptible to this pretreatment method. 1H-NMR analysis of EAPS revealed that ~77% of xylan present in raw APS was removed along with ~24% of lignin. The energy of combustion of APS was measured before and after HWE showing a slight increase due to HWE (1.61% increase. Near infrared radiation spectroscopy (NIRS, proposed as a quick non-invasive method of biomass analysis, was performed. NIRS corroborated results of traditional analysis and 1H-NMR. Determination of antioxidizing activity (AOA of APS extracts was also undertaken. AOA of organic APS extracts were shown to be more than 20 times higher than that of a synthetic antioxidizing agent.

  11. Plasma effects in aligned carbon nanoflake growth by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Zheng, K. [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Cheng, Q.J., E-mail: qijin.cheng@xmu.edu.cn [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), Manufacturing Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, PO Box 218, Lindfield 2070, NSW (Australia); Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4000, QLD (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, NSW (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Plasma-specific effects in the growth of carbon nanoflakes (CNFs) are studied. • Electic field in the plasma sheath promotes separation of CNFs from the substrate. • The orentention of GNFs is related to the combined electic force and growth effects. • The high growth grates of aligned GNFs are plasma-related. - Abstract: Carbon nanofilms are directly grown on silicon substrates by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition in methane environment. It is shown that the nanofilms are composed of aligned carbon nanoflakes by extensive investigation of experimental results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In comparison with the graphene-like films grown without plasmas, the carbon nanoflakes grow in an alignment mode and the growth rate of the films is increased. The effects of the plasma on the growth of the carbon nanofilms are studied. The plasma plays three main effects of (1) promoting the separation of the carbon nanoflakes from the silicon substrate, (2) accelerating the motion of hydrocarbon radicals, and (3) enhancing the deposition of hydrocarbon ions onto the substrate surface. Due to these plasma-specific effects, the carbon nanofilms can be formed from the aligned carbon nanoflakes with a high rate. These results advance our knowledge on the synthesis, properties and applications of graphene-based materials.

  12. Computer Simulation of Temperature Parameter for Diamond Formation by Using Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Weon Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the deposition parameters of diamond films, the temperature, pressure, and distance between the filament and the susceptor need to be considered. However, it is difficult to precisely measure and predict the filament and susceptor temperature in relation to the applied power in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD system. In this study, the temperature distribution inside the system was numerically calculated for the applied powers of 12, 14, 16, and 18 kW. The applied power needed to achieve the appropriate temperature at a constant pressure and other conditions was deduced, and applied to actual experimental depositions. The numerical simulation was conducted using the commercial computational fluent dynamics software ANSYS-FLUENT. To account for radiative heat-transfer in the HF-CVD reactor, the discrete ordinate (DO model was used. The temperatures of the filament surface and the susceptor at different power levels were predicted to be 2512–2802 K and 1076–1198 K, respectively. Based on the numerical calculations, experiments were performed. The simulated temperatures for the filament surface were in good agreement with the experimental temperatures measured using a two-color pyrometer. The results showed that the highest deposition rate and the lowest deposition of non-diamond was obtained at a power of 16 kW.

  13. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  14. He-ion and self-atom induced damage and surface-morphology changes of a hot W target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Dadras, J; Krstic, P S; Meyer, H M III; Parish, C M

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80–12 000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundred impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences, energies and temperatures for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased. (paper)

  15. Chemical hot gas purification for biomass gasification processes; Chemische Heissgasreinigung bei Biomassevergasungsprozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemmler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The German government decided to increase the percentage of renewable energy up to 20 % of all energy consumed in 2020. The development of biomass gasification technology is advanced compared to most of the other technologies for producing renewable energy. So the overall efficiency of biomass gasification processes (IGCC) already increased to values above 50 %. Therefore, the production of renewable energy attaches great importance to the thermochemical biomass conversion. The feedstock for biomass gasification covers biomasses such as wood, straw and further energy plants. The detrimental trace elements released during gasification of these biomasses, e.g. KCl, H{sub 2}S and HCl, cause corrosion and harm downstream devices. Therefore, gas cleaning poses an especial challenge. In order to improve the overall efficiency this thesis aims at the development of gas cleaning concepts for the allothermic, water blown gasification at 800 C and 1 bar (Guessing-Process) as well as for the autothermic, water and oxygen blown gasification at 950 C and 18 bar (Vaernamo-Process). Although several mechanisms for KCl- and H{sub 2}S-sorption are already well known, the achievable reduction of the contamination concentration is still unknown. Therefore, calculations on the produced syngas and the chemical hot gas cleaning were done with a thermodynamic process model using SimuSage. The syngas production was included in the calculations because the knowledge of the biomass syngas composition is very limited. The results of these calculations prove the dependence of syngas composition on H{sub 2}/C-ratio and ROC (Relative Oxygen Content). Following the achievable sorption limits were detected via experiments. The KCl containing syngases were analysed by molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). Furthermore, an optimised H{sub 2}S-sorbent was developed because the examined sorbents exceeded the sorption limit of 1 ppmv. The calculated sorption limits were compared to the limits

  16. Chemical bond imaging using higher eigenmodes of tuning fork sensors in atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Daniel; Zhong, Qigang; Ahles, Sebastian; Chi, Lifeng; Wegner, Hermann A.; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability of resolving the chemical structure of single organic molecules using non-contact atomic force microscopy with higher normal eigenmodes of quartz tuning fork sensors. In order to achieve submolecular resolution, CO-functionalized tips at low temperatures are used. The tuning fork sensors are operated in ultrahigh vacuum in the frequency modulation mode by exciting either their first or second eigenmode. Despite the high effective spring constant of the second eigenmode (on the order of several tens of kN/m), the force sensitivity is sufficiently high to achieve atomic resolution above the organic molecules. This is observed for two different tuning fork sensors with different tip geometries (small tip vs. large tip). These results represent an important step towards resolving the chemical structure of single molecules with multifrequency atomic force microscopy techniques where two or more eigenmodes are driven simultaneously.

  17. Solubilization of advanced ceramic materials controlled by chemical analysis by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante Junior, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper purpose is to show the techniques used in chemical analysis laboratory at Escola SENAI Mario Amato in the ceramic nucleus for opening and solubilization of Advanced Ceramic materials, where the elements in its majority are determined for atomic absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  18. Chemical modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption determination of Platinum and Palladium containing preparations in blood serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аntonina Alemasova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological liquids matrixes influence on the characteristic masses and repeatability of Pt and Pd electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS determination was studied. The chemical modifiers dimethylglyoxime and ascorbic acid for matrix interferences elimination and ETAAS results repeatability improvement were proposed while bioliquids ETAAS analysis, and their action mechanism was discussed.

  19. Atomic nitrogen encapsulated in fullerenes: realization of a chemical Faraday cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, K.

    2000-01-01

    Fullerenes, C 60 and C 70 , are ideal containers for atomic nitrogen. We will show by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments that nitrogen in C 60 keeps its atomic ground state configuration and resides in the center of the cage. This is the first time that atomic nitrogen is stabilized at ambient conditions. The inert shell of the fullerene protects the highly reactive nitrogen from undergoing chemical reactions with the surroundings. The fullerene cage is the chemical analogue of the Faraday cage in case of electrical fields, i.e. it shields off the chemical reactivity. As for the free nitrogen atom, the spins of the three p-electrons of nitrogen in C 60 are parallel (S = 3/2) and the atom has spherical symmetry. Due to the center position of nitrogen in C 60 , extremely sharp EPR lines are observed. This reflects the absence of a strong host-guest interaction and shows that the individuality of nitrogen in the fullerenes is preserved. Further evidence for the almost interaction-free suspension of nitrogen in the fullerene cages is provided by g-factor measurements. These investigations show that magnetic shielding of the host molecules can account for the observed differences between N rate at C 60 and N rate at C 70 . The fullerene cage can be chemically modified without destroying the endohedral complex. The chemical modifications change the symmetry of the molecule which is observed through an additional fine structure in the EPR spectrum. Influences of the modifications on the stability of N rate at C 60 will be discussed. (orig.)

  20. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu .

  1. Young Investigator Proposal, Research Area 7.4 Reactive Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer Electroless Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Report: Young Investigator Proposal, Research Area 7.4 Reactive Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer ...Chemical Systems: Multifunctional, Bimetallic Nanomaterials Prepared by Atomic Layer Electroless Deposition Report Term: 0-Other Email: pcappillino... Layer Electroless Deposition (ALED, Figure 1) is the ability to tune growth mechanism, hence growth morphology, by altering conditions. In this

  2. Role of tip chemical reactivity on atom manipulation process in dynamic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sugimoto, Y.; Yurtsever, A.; Abe, M.; Morita, S.; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, P.; Perez, R.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2013), s. 7370-7376 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP204/11/P578 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : noncontact atomic force microscopy * atomic manipulation * force spectroscopy * chemical interaction force * DFT simulations * nudged elastic band Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 12.033, year: 2013 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn403097p

  3. The Influence of Atomic Diffusion on Stellar Ages and Chemical Tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotter, Aaron; Conroy, Charlie; Cargile, Phillip [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Asplund, Martin, E-mail: aaron.dotter@gmail.com [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2017-05-10

    In the era of large stellar spectroscopic surveys, there is an emphasis on deriving not only stellar abundances but also the ages for millions of stars. In the context of Galactic archeology, stellar ages provide a direct probe of the formation history of the Galaxy. We use the stellar evolution code MESA to compute models with atomic diffusion—with and without radiative acceleration—and extra mixing in the surface layers. The extra mixing consists of both density-dependent turbulent mixing and envelope overshoot mixing. Based on these models we argue that it is important to distinguish between initial, bulk abundances (parameters) and current, surface abundances (variables) in the analysis of individual stellar ages. In stars that maintain radiative regions on evolutionary timescales, atomic diffusion modifies the surface abundances. We show that when initial, bulk metallicity is equated with current, surface metallicity in isochrone age analysis, the resulting stellar ages can be systematically overestimated by up to 20%. The change of surface abundances with evolutionary phase also complicates chemical tagging, which is the concept that dispersed star clusters can be identified through unique, high-dimensional chemical signatures. Stars from the same cluster, but in different evolutionary phases, will show different surface abundances. We speculate that calibration of stellar models may allow us to estimate not only stellar ages but also initial abundances for individual stars. In the meantime, analyzing the chemical properties of stars in similar evolutionary phases is essential to minimize the effects of atomic diffusion in the context of chemical tagging.

  4. Characterization of Sludge from the Process of Steel Tubes Chemical Treatment for Hot Galvanizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofilić, U.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate industrial waste management in Croatia is reflected in the non-sanitary waste disposal, low recycling levels, negligible share of waste processing technologies, insufficient control of its flows, etc.Generated industrial wastes are most frequently disposed of at producers’ own, mostly illegal landfills. There are many such landfills on the Croatian territory, and the disposed types of waste often include those that can be hazardous and represent a considerable source of environmental pollution.Past waste management in all industrial branches can be characterized in this way, which at the same time may result in the harmful impact on human health and the environment. It also represents economic loss due to low utilisation of material and energy potential of some industrial wastes. The metallurgical industry collects its production waste separately. Only a part of the generated waste is returned to the production process and some waste is occasionally used by other industries as secondary raw materials, but the largest part of it ends at producers' own landfills on site. Hazardous wastes (dust containing heavy metals, waste oils etc. are mostly disposed of in a controlled and lawful manner. Past handling of metallurgical waste was unacceptable both from the environmental and economic point of view. Therefore a systematic resolving of this important issue was initiated at the beginning of this decade. Sisak Steelworks galvanized steel pipes in the hot-dip galvanizing procedure by immersing in molten zinc. Between 1970 and 2000 Sisak Steelworks produced approximately 900 000 tonnes of galvanized pipes this way and generated around 70 000 m3 of neutralisation sludge, which was subsequently disposed of in the landfill on site. The paper presents the results of examination of physical-chemical properties of neutralisation sludge generated as waste material in the process of neutralisation of waste sulphate acid bath used in Sisak

  5. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vispute, R D [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Ermer, Henry K [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Sinsky, Phillip [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Seiser, Andrew [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Wilson, Leslie L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  6. Atomic-scale features of phase boundaries in hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodcock, T.G.; Ramasse, Q.M.; Hrkac, G.; Shoji, T.; Yano, M.; Kato, A.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2014-01-01

    Hot deformed Nd–Fe–Co–B–Ga magnets were infiltrated with a Nd–Cu eutectic liquid, resulting in a 71% increase in coercivity to μ 0 H c = 2.4 T without the use of Dy, and a 22% decrease in remanence, attributed to the dilution effect. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy have been used to reveal the structure and chemical composition of phase boundaries in the magnets on the atomic scale. The results showed that the Nd–Cu liquid penetrated the ≈1 nm thick intergranular regions. The coercivity increase following infiltration was therefore attributed to improved volume fraction and distribution of the intergranular phases. Co enrichment in the outermost 1–2 unit cells at several {0 0 1} and {1 1 0} surfaces of the Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B crystals was shown for the infiltrated sample. The as-deformed sample did not appear to show this Co enrichment. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the distorted layer at an {0 0 1} surface of a Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B grain was significantly thicker with higher Co surface enrichment. The magnetocrystalline anisotropy may be reduced in such distorted regions, which could have a detrimental effect on coercivity. Such features may therefore play a role in limiting coercivity to a fraction of the anisotropy field. Interfacial segregation of Cu between Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B and the Nd-rich intergranular phase occurred in the infiltrated sample. Step defects in Nd 2 (Fe, Co) 14 B {0 0 1} surfaces, a half or a whole unit cell in height, were also observed

  7. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  8. Determination of Hot Springs Physico-Chemical Water Quality Potentially Use for Balneotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Nurul Latiffah Abd Rani; Ahmad Saat; Ab Khalik Wood

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs areas are attractive places for locals and foreigners either for excursion or for medical purposes such as for healing of various types of diseases. This is because the hot spring water is believed rich in salt, sulfur, and sulfate in the water body. For many thousands of years, people have used hot springs water both for cozy bathing and therapy. Balneotherapy is the term used where the patients were immersed in hot mineral water baths emerged as an important treatment in Europe around 1800s. In view of this fact, a study of hot springs water was performed with the objective to determine the concentration of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , S, SO 4 2- and Cl - in hot springs water around the State of Selangor, Malaysia. Energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescent Spectrometry (EDXRF) was used to measure the concentrations of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and S meanwhile for SO 4 2- and Cl - anion, Ion Chromatography (IC) was used. The concentration of Na + obtained for filtered and unfiltered samples ranged from 33.68 to 80.95 and 37.03 to 81.91 ppm respectively. Meanwhile, the corresponding concentrations of K + ranged from 1.47 to 45.72 and 1.70 to 56.81 ppm. Concentrations of Ca 2+ ranged from 2.44 to 18.45 and 3.75 to 19.77 ppm. The concentration of S obtained for filtered and unfiltered samples ranged from 1.87 to 12.41 and 6.25 to 12.86 ppm. The concentrations for SO 4 2- and Cl - obtained ranged from 0.15 to 1.51 ppm and 7.06 to 20.66 ppm for filtered samples. The data signified higher concentration of salt and other important nutrients in hot spring water. (author)

  9. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  10. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    The cornerstone in this dissertation is made up by three individual assessments of the diversity in the macromolecular landscape that can be obtained by applying relatively few efficient chemical tools. The intention is to gain deeper knowledge on the chemical tuning of proton exchange membranes...... of hydrocarbon macromolecular architectures, PSU with postsulfonated polystyrene (PS) grafts are investigated. Here, IEC is controlled through the degree of substitution, the graft length and DS. The grafting is performed with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The third assessment is dedicated...... of control by ATRP and click chemistry enables a wide selection of polymer structures with the handles: degree of substitution (DS), polymerization and sulfonation, and blending....

  11. Mercury content in Hot Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of mercury in hot spring waters by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Further, the mercury content and the chemical behavior of the elementary mercury in hot springs are described. Sulfide and iodide ions interfered with the determination of mercury by the reduction-vapor phase technique. These interferences could, however, be minimized by the addition of potassium permanganate. Waters collected from 55 hot springs were found to contain up to 26.0 ppb mercury. High concentrations of mercury have been found in waters from Shimoburo Springs, Aomori (10.0 ppb), Osorezan Springs, Aomori (1.3 approximately 18.8 ppb), Gosyogake Springs, Akita (26.0 ppb), Manza Springs, Gunma (0.30 approximately 19.5 ppb) and Kusatu Springs, Gunma (1.70 approximately 4.50 ppb). These hot springs were acid waters containing a relatively high quantity of chloride or sulfate.

  12. Effect of chemical composition of copper alloys on their hot-brittleness and weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of different alloying elements on the hot crack formation in argon-arc welding of M1 copper has been studied. It is shown that the effective crystallization interval has a determining influence on hot-brittleness of low-alloyed high-thermal- and electric conducting welded copper alloys. The narrow is this interval the lower is linear schrinkage and the alloys inclined to the formation of crystallization cracks in welding to a lesser degree. Alloying elements with low solubility in copper in solid state broadening the crystallization interval affect negatively the alloy hot-brittleness. Such additives as zirconium are useful at 0.02-0.O5% content and at > 0.1% content are intolerable. As to cadmium, tin, magnesium, cerium and antimony additives they don't practically strengthen copper and its alloys at 700-800 deg C and they should not be introduced

  13. Effect of chemical composition and cooling conditions on solidification hot cracking of Ni-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vito, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Ni-based alloys 690 present solidification hot cracks during welding of vapour generators. Hot cracks are qualitatively known to be due to the formation of inter-dendritic liquid films and of secondary phases down to low temperatures. This study aims at establishing the link between thermodynamics, solidification and hot cracking. Experimental solidification paths of high purity alloys (with varying Nb and Si contents) are obtained from quenching during directional solidification and TIG-welding experiments. They are compared to Thermo-Calc computations, assuming no diffusion in the solid. From directional solidification samples, good agreement between computed and experimental solidification paths is shown in the quenched liquid. Secondary arms of dendrites are affected by solid state diffusion of Nb. Combined effect of diffusion and solute build-up in the liquid phase modifies micro-segregation in the solid region. Solidification paths from welding specimens are similar to those of the solid region of quenched samples. Nb solid state diffusion is negligible but undercooling compensates the effect of solid state diffusion in directional solidification. Evolution of liquid fraction at the end of the solidification is in accordance with the hot cracking classification of the alloys. Nb favours formation of inter-dendritic liquid films and eutectic-like phases down to low temperature. (author) [fr

  14. Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Amino Acids; Reactions entre Atomes Chauds de Tritium et Acides Amines; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov tritiya s aminokislotami; Reacciones de Atomos de Tritio Calientes con Aminoacidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonov, E. F.; Nesmejanov, An. N. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Universitet, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    In the existing literature there is a lack of systematic data on the interaction of tritium recoil atoms with amino acids, yet such data, in conjunction with results already obtained for organic acids and amines, could help in determining the mechanism of hot reactions in relation to the structure of compounds (chain length, functional substitutes). A study was made of the yields from the reaction of hot tritium atoms: (1) with amino acids having lengthened chains, and (2) with amino acids having a carbon chain of constant length, but with various functional substitutes. For this purpose mixtures of lithium carbonate and the acids under study were irradiated for 15 min with a slow neutron flux of 0.87 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. Analysis was carried out on a gas chromatography unit with interchangeable columns (molecular sieves, and liquid petrolatum on kieselguhr) and with paper chromatography. Although the data obtained for the radiation survival capacity of amino acids as a function of carbon chain length were at variance with a basic tenet of radiation chemistry according to which the conservation of molecules increases in proportion to the length of their chains, the data can be explained in terms of an intramolecular transfer of energy along the carbon chain from the collision site of the hot atom to the hydroxyl group, and subsequent ''de-excitation''; on the other hand, although the energy, of tritium recoil atoms is greater than that of the chemical bond, the latter nevertheless exerts an influence on the radiation conservation of molecules with a carbon chain of constant length but with various substitutes. (author) [French] Les etudes publiees jusqu'a present ne contiennent guere de renseignements systematiques sur les interactions entre atomes de tritium de recul et acides amines. Pourtant, ces donnees, completees par celles dont on dispose sur les acides organiques et les amines, pourraient aider a definir le mecanisme des reactions chaudes en fonction

  15. Calculation of the relative chemical stabilities of proteins as a function of temperature and redox chemistry in a hot spring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Dick

    Full Text Available Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems.

  16. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Nam Yu

    2015-10-01

    Results and conclusion: Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  17. Wet-chemical passivation of atomically flat and structured silicon substrates for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, H.; Rappich, J.; Korte, L.; Sieber, I.; Conrad, E.; Schmidt, M.; Hübener, K.; Polte, J.; Hauschild, J.

    2008-04-01

    Special sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and etching steps were optimised with respect to the etching behaviour of differently oriented silicon to prepare very smooth silicon interfaces with excellent electronic properties on mono- and poly-crystalline substrates. Surface photovoltage (SPV) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations were utilised to develop wet-chemical smoothing procedures for atomically flat and structured surfaces, respectively. Hydrogen-termination as well as passivation by wet-chemical oxides were used to inhibit surface contamination and native oxidation during the technological processing. Compared to conventional pre-treatments, significantly lower micro-roughness and densities of surface states were achieved on mono-crystalline Si(100), on evenly distributed atomic steps, such as on vicinal Si(111), on silicon wafers with randomly distributed upside pyramids, and on poly-crystalline EFG ( Edge-defined Film-fed- Growth) silicon substrates. The recombination loss at a-Si:H/c-Si interfaces prepared on c-Si substrates with randomly distributed upside pyramids was markedly reduced by an optimised wet-chemical smoothing procedure, as determined by PL measurements. For amorphous-crystalline hetero-junction solar cells (ZnO/a-Si:H(n)/c-Si(p)/Al) with textured c-Si substrates the smoothening procedure results in a significant increase of short circuit current Isc, fill factor and efficiency η. The scatter in the cell parameters for measurements on different cells is much narrower, as compared to conventional pre-treatments, indicating more well-defined and reproducible surface conditions prior to a-Si:H emitter deposition and/or a higher stability of the c-Si surface against variations in the a-Si:H deposition conditions.

  18. The behavior of various chemical forms of nickel in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry under different chemical modification approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Various organic and inorganic Ni forms were investigated using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Experiments without chemical modification showed a wide range of characteristic mass values for Ni (from 6.7 to 29 pg) and the importance of interaction with graphite. With the aim of achieving signal unification of organic Ni forms, different ways of chemical modification were tested. Some rules that govern the behavior of Ni were found and confirmed a significant role of the organic component of the analyte molecule in the analytical process. The application of air as an internal furnace gas in the pyrolysis phase and the Pd modifier injected with the sample solution improved the signal of porphyrins, while the application of iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride was required for organic compounds containing oxygen-bound Ni atoms. The Ni signal was strongly diminished when an aqueous solution containing hydrochloric acid was measured with the Pd modifier injected over the sample. Using the developed analytical methods, the range of characteristic mass values for various Ni forms totally dissolved in organic or aqueous solution was 6.5–7.9 pg. - Highlights: ► Some rules that govern behavior of organic Ni forms during GFAAS analysis were found. ► Interaction with graphite can significantly influence evaporation of porphyrins. ► Determination of Ni in form of porphyrins needs Pd organic modifier and air ashing. ► Determination of Ni in O-bound organic compounds needs pretreatment with I2+MTOACl. ► Chemical modification for GFAAS determination of Ni in HCl-containing solution.

  19. Atomic resolution chemical bond analysis of oxygen in La2CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M.; Nagai, T.; Lugg, N. R.; Neish, M. J.; Nagao, M.; Kurashima, K.; Allen, L. J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Kimoto, K.

    2013-08-01

    The distorted CuO6 octahedron in La2CuO4 was studied using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. The near-edge structure in the oxygen K-edge electron energy-loss spectrum was recorded as a function of the position of the electron probe. After background subtraction, the measured spectrum image was processed using a recently developed inversion process to remove the mixing of signals on the atomic columns due to elastic and thermal scattering. The spectra were then compared with first-principles band structure calculations based on the local-density approximation plus on-site Coulomb repulsion (LDA + U) approach. In this article, we describe in detail not only anisotropic chemical bonding of the oxygen 2p state with the Cu 3d state but also with the Cu 4p and La 5d/4f states. Furthermore, it was found that buckling of the CuO2 plane was also detectable at the atomic resolution oxygen K-edge. Lastly, it was found that the effects of core-hole in the O K-edge were strongly dependent on the nature of the local chemical bonding, in particular, whether it is ionic or covalent.

  20. Chemical analysis of carbonates and carbonate rocks by atomic absorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardon, S

    1981-01-01

    Evaluates methods of determining chemical composition of rocks surrounding black coal seams. Carbonate rock samples were collected in the Ostrava-Karvina coal mines. Sampling methods are described. Determination of the following elements and compounds in carbonate rocks is discussed: calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, barium, silicon, aluminium, titanium, sodium, potassium, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, water and carbon dioxide. Proportion of compounds insoluble in water in the investigated rocks is also determined. Most of the elements are determined by means of atomic absorption analysis. Phosphorus is also determined by atomic absorption analysis. Other compounds are determined gravimetrically. The described procedure permits weight of a rock sample to be reduced to 0.5 g without reducing analysis accuracy. The results of determining carbonate rock components by X-ray analysis and by chemical analysis are compared. Equipment used for atomic absorption analysis is characterized (the 503 Perkin-Elmer and the CF-4 Optica-Milano spectrophotometers). The analyzed method for determining carbonate rock permits more accurate classification of rocks surrounding coal seams and rock impurities in run-of-mine coal. (22 refs.) (In Czech)

  1. Diode laser probe of CO2 vibrational excitation produced by collisions with hot deuterium atoms from the 193 nm excimer laser photolysis D2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.A.; Cai, J.Y.; Flynn, G.W.; Weston, R.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of D 2 S in D 2 S/CO 2 mixtures produces fast deuterium atoms (E/sub TR/approx.2.2 eV) which vibrationally excite CO 2 molecules via inelastic translation--vibration/rotation (T--V/R) energy exchange processes. A high resolution (10 -3 cm -1 ) cw diode laser probe was used to monitor the excitation of ν 3 (antisymmetric stretch) and ν 2 (bend) vibrations in CO 2 . The present results are compared with previous experiments involving hot hydrogen atom excitation of CO 2 in H 2 S/CO 2 mixtures as well as with theoretical calculations of the excitation probability. The probability for excitation of a ν 3 quantum in CO 2 is about 1%--2% per gas kinetic D/CO 2 collision. Bending (ν 2 ) quanta are produced about eight times more efficiently than antisymmetric stretching (ν 3 ) quanta. The thermalization rate for cooling hot D atoms below the threshold for production of a ν 3 vibrational quantum corresponds to less than 2 D*/D 2 S collisions or 15 D*/CO 2 collisions

  2. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  3. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Martínez-Santiago

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms. It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  4. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp² carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-16

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp(2) carbon structures.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  6. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  8. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  9. Source apportionment of aerosol particles at a European air pollution hot spot using particle number size distributions and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Cecilia; Pokorná, Petra; Hovorka, Jan; Masiol, Mauro; Topinka, Jan; Zhao, Yongjing; Křůmal, Kamil; Cliff, Steven; Mikuška, Pavel; Hopke, Philip K

    2018-03-01

    Ostrava in the Moravian-Silesian region (Czech Republic) is a European air pollution hot spot for airborne particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ultrafine particles (UFPs). Air pollution source apportionment is essential for implementation of successful abatement strategies. UFPs or nanoparticles of diameter hot-spot including nanoparticles, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to highly time resolved particle number size distributions (NSD, 14 nm-10 μm) and PM 0.09-1.15 chemical composition. Diurnal patterns, meteorological variables, gaseous pollutants, organic markers, and associations between the NSD factors and chemical composition factors were used to identify the pollution sources. The PMF on the NSD reveals two factors in the ultrafine size range: industrial UFPs (28%, number mode diameter - NMD 45 nm), industrial/fresh road traffic nanoparticles (26%, NMD 26 nm); three factors in the accumulation size range: urban background (24%, NMD 93 nm), coal burning (14%, volume mode diameter - VMD 0.5 μm), regional pollution (3%, VMD 0.8 μm) and one factor in the coarse size range: industrial coarse particles/road dust (2%, VMD 5 μm). The PMF analysis of PM 0.09-1.15 revealed four factors: SIA/CC/BB (52%), road dust (18%), sinter/steel (16%), iron production (16%). The factors in the ultrafine size range resolved with NSD have a positive correlation with sinter/steel production and iron production factors resolved with chemical composition. Coal combustion factor resolved with NSD has moderate correlation with SIA/CC/BB factor. The organic markers homohopanes correlate with coal combustion and the levoglucosan correlates with urban background. The PMF applications to NSD and chemical composition datasets are complementary. PAHs in PM 1 were found to be associated with coal combustion factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Photo- and radiation-chemical stability of molecules. Reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.G.; Ovchinnikov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the review of works published up to 1978 one of the main problems of radiation chemistry is discussed, namely the relationship between the structure of organic molecules and their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation. Theoretical aspects of this problem are considered for reactions of monomolecular hydrogen atom splitting off. It is shown that the radical yield in low-temperature radiation-chemical experiments is connected with the position of lower triplet states of molecules, ionization potentials, polarity of medium and the energy of C-H bonds in cation radicals

  11. Effect of chemical composition of steel on the structure of hot – dip galvanized coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the effect of the content of conventional steel impurity elements on the thickness and composition of the zinc layer. This article is focused primarily on low-temperature, batch hot-dip galvanizing; however, the continuous coating process is also mentioned. The main discussion covers galvanizing from pure zinc melt, and only touches on galvanizing from melts with the usual amounts of aluminium (0,2 wt. %. Silicon, phosphorus, aluminium and sulfur may have an especially negative effect on the mechanical properties of the coating and its final appearance. The content of ballast carbon and manganese has a rather limited effect on composition and coating thickness.

  12. Progress in Visualizing Atomic Size Effects with DFT-Chemical Pressure Analysis: From Isolated Atoms to Trends in AB5 Intermetallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Veronica M; Engelkemier, Joshua; Guo, Yiming; Kilduff, Brandon J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-08-12

    The notion of atomic size poses an important challenge to chemical theory: empirical evidence has long established that atoms have spatial requirements, which are summarized in tables of covalent, ionic, metallic, and van der Waals radii. Considerations based on these radii play a central role in the design and interpretation of experiments, but few methods are available to directly support arguments based on atomic size using electronic structure methods. Recently, we described an approach to elucidating atomic size effects using theoretical calculations: the DFT-Chemical Pressure analysis, which visualizes the local pressures arising in crystal structures from the interactions of atomic size and electronic effects. Using this approach, a variety of structural phenomena in intermetallic phases have already been understood in terms that provide guidance to new synthetic experiments. However, the applicability of the DFT-CP method to the broad range of the structures encountered in the solid state is limited by two issues: (1) the difficulty of interpreting the intense pressure features that appear in atomic core regions and (2) the need to divide space among pairs of interacting atoms in a meaningful way. In this article, we describe general solutions to these issues. In addressing the first issue, we explore the CP analysis of a test case in which no core pressures would be expected to arise: isolated atoms in large boxes. Our calculations reveal that intense core pressures do indeed arise in these virtually pressure-less model systems and allow us to trace the issue to the shifts in the voxel positions relative to atomic centers upon expanding and contracting the unit cell. A compensatory grid unwarping procedure is introduced to remedy this artifact. The second issue revolves around the difficulty of interpreting the pressure map in terms of interatomic interactions in a way that respects the size differences of the atoms and avoids artificial geometrical

  13. Hot subluminous stars: On the Search for Chemical Signatures of their Genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Heiko Andreas

    2009-10-01

    This thesis deals with the hot subluminous stars of spectral class O. Although the name suggests otherwise, these stars are still 10 to 1000 times more luminous than the sun, they emit most of their radiation energy in the ultraviolet range. First stars of this type have been categorized in the 1950ies. Since they are blue objects like Quasars they often are discovered in surveys at high Galactic latitudes aiming at Quasars and other extragalactic objects. The hot subluminous stars can be divided into two classes, the subluminous O and subluminous B stars, or short sdO and sdB. The sdOs and sdBs play an important role in astronomy, as many old stellar populations, e.g. globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, have strong UV fluxes. UV bright regions often are "stellar nurseries", where new stars are born. Globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, however, do not experience star formation. This UV excess can be explained by population models that include the hot subluminous stars. Many sdB stars show short-period, multiperiodic light variations, which are due to radial and nonradial pulsations. Asteroseismology can explore the inner structure of stars and estimate e.g. the stellar mass, a variable that can only determine in very lucky circumstances (eclipsing binaries). These stars are also important for cosmology because they qualify as supernova Ia progenitors. The nature of the sdO stars is less well understood than that of their cooler and more numerous siblings, the sdBs. The connection of the sdBs to the horizontal branch is established for many years now, accordingly they are old helium core burning objects after their red giant phase. More precisely, they are on the extended horizontal branch (EHB), the hot end of the horizontal branch. EHB stars are characterized by a very low envelope mass, i.e. we see more or less directly the hot helium burning core. Strong mass loss in the RGB phase is regarded as responsible for this phenomenon, the exact mechanism

  14. Hot atom chemistry in oxyanion targets: Part 3. Some theoretical aspects of reincorporation of parent form in permanganates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.; Singh, J.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to advance qualitative and quantitative interpretations for the observed data on retention of recoil 56 Mn in potassium and ammonium permanganates in the light of following physical models; (a) extreme back-diffusion model, (b) billiard-ball collision model and (c) hot zone model. (author). 6 tables, 22 refs

  15. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  16. The relative reactivities of ethane, ethane-d6, n-butane and neopentane towards 'hot' tritium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urch, D.S.; Welch, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    The reactions of recoil tritium with ethane-butane, and ethane-neopentane mixtures have been studied in the presence and absence of helium moderator. It is shown that the larger molecules are labelled by recoil atoms of a higher mean energy than those which label ethane. It is also shown that hydrogen atoms at CH 2 sites are replaced by higher energy tritium atoms than those at CH 3 sites. An analogy is drawn with the abstraction reaction and a simple unified model for high-energy recoil tritium reactions at a C-H site is proposed. The more complex the other groups attached to the carbon the greater the mean energy of the recoil atoms reacting with the C-H bond. Experiments with ethane-d 6 established that the primary isotope effect for abstraction is comparable to that for displacement with a value of 1.25 approximately 1.30. (orig.) [de

  17. Influence of hard particle addition and chemical interdiffusion on the properties of hot extruded tool steel compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.A.; Weber, S.; Inden, G.; Pyzalla, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Low alloyed steel bars were co-extruded with pre-sintered tool steel powders with the addition of tungsten carbides (W 2 C/WC) as hard particles. During the hot extrusion process of these massive and powdery materials, an extrudate is formed consisting of a completely densified wear resistant coating layer and a bulk steel bar as the tough substrate core. This work combines experimental measurements (EPMA) and diffusion calculations (DICTRA TM ) to investigate the effect of hard particle addition and its dissolution, as well as the formation of M 6 C carbides on the properties of two different PM tool steel coatings hot extruded with a 1.2714 steel bar. A carburization effect resulting from the W 2 C hard particles is responsible for an increase of the 1.2344 steel matrix hardness. The mechanical properties of the interface region between coating matrix and substrate are influenced by chemical interdiffusion of carbon and other alloying elements occurring during heat treatment.

  18. Chemically assisted release of transition metals in graphite vaporizers for atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The processes associated with the vaporization of microgram samples and modifiers in a graphite tube ET AAS were investigated by the example of transition metals. The vapor absorption spectra and vaporization behavior of μg-amounts Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn and Cr were studied using the UV spectrometer with CCD detector, coupled with a continuum radiation source. The pyrocoated, Ta or W lined tubes, with Ar or He as internal gases, and filter furnace were employed in the comparative experiments. It was found that the kinetics of atomic vapor release changed depending on the specific metal-substrate-gas combination; fast vaporization at the beginning was followed by slower 'tailing.' The absorption continuum, overlapped by black body radiation at longer wavelengths, accompanied the fast vaporization mode for all metals, except Cd and Zn. The highest intensity of the continuum was observed in the pyrocoated tube with Ar. For Cu and Ag the molecular bands overlapped the absorption continuum; the continuum and bands were suppressed in the filter furnace. It is concluded that the exothermal interaction of sample vapor with the material of the tube causes the energy evolution in the gas phase. The emitted heat is dispersed near the tube wall in the protective gas and partially transferred back to the surface of the sample, thus facilitating the vaporization. The increased vapor flow causes over-saturation and gas-phase condensation in the absorption volume at some distance from the wall, where the gas temperature is not affected by the reaction. The condensation is accompanied by the release of phase transition energy via black body radiation and atomic emission. The particles of condensate and molecular clusters cause the scattering of light and molecular absorption; slow decomposition of the products of the sample vapor-substrate reaction produces the 'tailing' of atomic absorption signal. The interaction of graphite with metal vapor or oxygen, formed in the

  19. Structural and photoluminescence investigation on the hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Su Kong; Goh, Boon Tong; Wong, Yuen-Yee; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Do, Hien; Ahmad, Ishaq; Aspanut, Zarina; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat; Dee, Chang Fu; Rahman, Saadah Abdul

    2012-01-01

    High density of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were synthesized by a hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The structural and optical properties of the as-grown SiNWs prepared at different rf power of 40 and 80 W were analyzed in this study. The SiNWs prepared at rf power of 40 W exhibited highly crystalline structure with a high crystal volume fraction, X C of ∼82% and are surrounded by a thin layer of SiO x . The NWs show high absorption in the high energy region (E>1.8 eV) and strong photoluminescence at 1.73 to 2.05 eV (red–orange region) with a weak shoulder at 1.65 to 1.73 eV (near IR region). An increase in rf power to 80 W reduced the X C to ∼65% and led to the formation of nanocrystalline Si structures with a crystallite size of <4 nm within the SiNWs. These NWs are covered by a mixture of uncatalyzed amorphous Si layer. The SiNWs prepared at 80 W exhibited a high optical absorption ability above 99% in the broadband range between 220 and ∼1500 nm and red emission between 1.65 and 1.95 eV. The interesting light absorption and photoluminescence properties from both SiNWs are discussed in the text. - Highlights: ► Growth of random oriented silicon nanowires using hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. ► Increase in rf power reduces the crystallinity of silicon nanowires. ► High density and nanocrystalline structure in silicon nanowires significant enhance the near IR light absorption. ► Oxide defects and silicon nanocrystallites in silicon nanowires reveal photoluminescence in red–orange and red regions.

  20. Interactions of C+(2PJ) with rare gas atoms: incipient chemical interactions, potentials and transport coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, William D.; Thorington, Rebecca L.; Viehland, Larry A.; Breckenridge, W. H.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2018-03-01

    Accurate interatomic potentials were calculated for the interaction of a singly charged carbon cation, C+, with a single rare gas atom, RG (RG = Ne-Xe). The RCCSD(T) method and basis sets of quadruple-ζ and quintuple-ζ quality were employed; each interaction energy was counterpoise corrected and extrapolated to the basis set limit. The lowest C+(2P) electronic term of the carbon cation was considered, and the interatomic potentials calculated for the diatomic terms that arise from these: 2Π and 2Σ+. Additionally, the interatomic potentials for the respective spin-orbit levels were calculated, and the effect on the spectroscopic parameters was examined. In doing this, anomalously large spin-orbit splittings for RG = Ar-Xe were found, and this was investigated using multi-reference configuration interaction calculations. The latter indicated a small amount of RG → C+ electron transfer and this was used to rationalize the observations. This is taken as evidence of an incipient chemical interaction, which was also examined via contour plots, Birge-Sponer plots and various population analyses across the C+-RG series (RG = He-Xe), with the latter showing unexpected results. Trends in several spectroscopic parameters were examined as a function of the increasing atomic number of the RG atom. Finally, each set of RCCSD(T) potentials was employed, including spin-orbit coupling to calculate the transport coefficients for C+ in RG, and the results were compared with the limited available data. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  1. Role of hydrogen in the chemical vapor deposition growth of MoS2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Li, Xinming; Zang, Xiaobei; Zhu, Miao; He, Yijia; Wang, Kunlin; Xie, Dan; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen plays a crucial role in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Here, we have revealed the roles of hydrogen in the two-step CVD growth of MoS2. Our study demonstrates that hydrogen acts as the following: (i) an inhibitor of the thermal-induced etching effect in the continuous film growth process; and (ii) a promoter of the desulfurization reaction by decreasing the S/Mo atomic ratio and the oxidation reaction of the obtained MoSx (0 desulfurization reaction by decreasing the S/Mo atomic ratio and the oxidation reaction of the obtained MoSx (0 < x < 2) films. A high hydrogen content of more than 100% in argon forms nano-sized circle-like defects and damages the continuity and uniformity of the film. Continuous MoS2 films with a high crystallinity and a nearly perfect S/Mo atomic ratio were finally obtained after sulfurization annealing with a hydrogen content in the range of 20%-80%. This insightful understanding reveals the crucial roles of hydrogen in the CVD growth of MoS2 and paves the way for the controllable synthesis of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Low-magnification optical images; Raman spectra of 0% and 5% H2 samples; AFM characterization; Schematic of the film before and after sulfurization annealing; Schematic illustrations of two typical Raman-active phonon modes (E12g, A1g); Raman (mapping) spectra for 40% and 80% H2 samples before and after sulfurization annealing; PL spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00904a

  2. Wet-chemical etching of atom probe tips for artefact free analyses of nanoscaled semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, D; Fleischmann, C; Veloso, A; Franquet, A; Bogdanowicz, J; Morris, R J H; Vandervorst, W

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an innovative specimen preparation method employing the selectivity of a wet-chemical etching step to improve data quality and success rates in the atom probe analysis of contemporary semiconductor devices. Firstly, on the example of an SiGe fin embedded in SiO 2 we demonstrate how the selective removal of SiO 2 from the final APT specimen significantly improves accuracy and reliability of the reconstructed data. With the oxide removal, we eliminate the origin of shape artefacts, i.e. the formation of a non-hemispherical tip shape, that are typically observed in the reconstructed volume of complex systems. Secondly, using the same approach, we increase success rates to ∼90% for the damage-free, 3D site-specific localization of short (250 nm), vertical Si nanowires at the specimen apex. The impact of the abrupt emitter radius change that is introduced by this specimen preparation method is evaluated as being minor using field evaporation simulation and comparison of different reconstruction schemes. The Ge content within the SiGe fin as well as the 3D boron distribution in the Si NW as resolved by atom probe analysis are in good agreement with TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS analysis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced Electromagnetic and Chemical/Biological Sensing. Properties of Atomic Cluster-Derived Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schatz, George

    2003-01-01

    The Center for Atomic Clusters-derived Materials performed a broad range of research concerned with synthesizing, characterizing and utilizing atomic and molecular clusters, nanoparticles and nanomaterial...

  4. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  5. Chemical potential of molecules contrasted to averaged atomic electronegativities: alarming differences and their theoretical rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipankar; Shee, Nirmal K; von Szentpály, László

    2013-01-10

    We present the first large-scale empirical examination of the relation of molecular chemical potentials, μ(0)(mol) = -½(I(0) + A(0))(mol), to the geometric mean (GM) of atomic electronegativities, (GM) = (GM), and demonstrate that μ(0)(mol) ≠ -(GM). Out of 210 molecular μ(0)(mol)values considered more than 150 are not even in the range min{μ(0)(at)} (GM). For this equation the root-mean-square of relative errors amounts to SE = 71%. Our results are at strong variance with Sanderson's electronegativity equalization principle and present a challenge to some popular practice in conceptual density functional theory (DFT). The influences of the "external" potential and charge dependent covalent and ionic binding contributions are discussed and provide the theoretical rationalization for the empirical facts. Support is given to the warnings by Hinze, Bader et al., Allen, and Politzer et al. that equating the chemical potential to the negative of electronegativity may lead to misconceptions.

  6. Atomic force microscopy of histological sections using a chemical etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiribilli, B.; Bani, D.; Quercioli, F.; Ghirelli, A.; Vassalli, M.

    2005-01-01

    Physiology and pathology have a big deal on tissue morphology, and the intrinsic spatial resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is able to observe ultrastructural details. In order to investigate cellular and subcellular structures in histological sections with the AFM, we used a new simple method for sample preparation, i.e. chemical etching of semithin sections from epoxy resin-embedded specimens: such treatment appears to melt the upper layers of the embedding resin; thus, removing the superficial roughness caused by the edge of the microtome knife and bringing into high relief the biological structures hidden in the bulk. Consecutive ultrathin sections embedded in epoxy resin were observed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to compare the different imaging properties on the same specimen sample. In this paper we report, as an example, our AFM and TEM images of two different tissue specimens, rat pancreas and skeletal muscle fibres, showing that most of the inner details are visible with the AFM. These results suggest that chemical etching of histological sections may be a simple, fast and cost-effective method for AFM imaging with ultrastructural resolution

  7. Highly sensitive fiber grating chemical sensors: An effective alternative to atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxmeshwar, Lata. S.; Jadhav, Mangesh S.; Akki, Jyoti. F.; Raikar, Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; prakash, Om; Raikar, U. S.

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy in quantitative determination of trace elements like Zinc, present in drinking water in ppm level, is a big challenge and optical fiber gratings as chemical sensors may provide a promising solution to overcome the same. This paper presents design of two simple chemical sensors based on the principle of shift in characteristic wavelength of gratings with change in their effective refractive index, to measure the concentration of Zinc in drinking water using etched short period grating (FBG) and Long period grating (LPG) respectively. Three samples of drinking water from different places have been examined for presence of Zinc. Further, the results obtained by our sensors have also been verified with the results obtained by a standard method, Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The whole experiment has been performed by fixing the fibers in a horizontal position with the sensor regions at the center of the fibers, making it less prone to disturbance and breaking. The sensitivity of LPG sensor is about 205 times that of the FBG sensor. A few advantages of Fiber grating sensors, besides their regular features, over AAS have also been discussed, that make our sensors potential alternatives for existing techniques in determination of trace elements in drinking water.

  8. Wet chemical deposition of single crystalline epitaxial manganite thin films with atomically flat surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Amita; Dutta, Anirban; Samaddar, Sayanti; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2013-01-01

    We report the wet chemical deposition of single crystalline epitaxial thin films of the colossal magneto-resistive manganite La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 on the lattice-matched (001)-face of a La 0.3 Sr 0.7 Al 0.65 Ta 0.35 O 3 substrate. Topographic images of these films taken with a scanning tunneling microscope show atomically flat terraces separated by steps of monatomic height. The resistivity of these films shows an insulator-metal transition at 310 K, nearly coincident with the Curie temperature of 340 K, found from magnetization measurements. The films show a magnetoresistance of 7% at 300 K and 1.2 T. Their saturation magnetization value at low temperatures is consistent with that of the bulk. - Highlights: ► Wet chemical deposition of La 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 (LSMO) on a lattice-matched substrate. ► Single crystalline epitaxial LSMO films obtained. ► Flat terraces separated by monatomic steps observed by scanning tunneling microscope

  9. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  10. Exchange and polarization effects in the elementary excitation spectrum of a hydrogen atom immersed in a hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharma-wardana, M.W.C.; Grimaldi, F.; Lecourt, A.; Pellissier, J.

    1980-01-01

    The one-particle hydrogenic Green's function has been calculated for a partially ionized plasma consisting of hydrogen atoms, electrons, and protons at high temperatures. The theoretical method extends a previous publication and involves an evaluation of the mass operator in the Dyson equation to include proper self-energy parts to ''all orders'' in the screened interaction. This mass operator characterizes the effective micropotential felt by the atom in the plasma and determines all of the one-particle properties and some two-particle properties associated with the atomic subsystem. The first-order mass operator is nonzero only for exchange scattering, which leads to a frequency-independent exchange shift. This temperature- and density-dependent theory of the exchange shift replaces the usual semiphenomenological schemes based on the Slater-Kohn-Sham type of theory. The exchange-shifted Green's functions are used in evaluating the higher-order contributions. Computer calculations and the resolution of the poles of the Green's function lead to level shifts, widths, and spectral functions. These are calculated within both the second-order and the all-order theory. The second-order theory, which may be valid at sufficiently high densities and in turbulent plasmas, overemphasises the atom-plasmon coupling and shows new structures. The inclusion of contributions beyond second order removes these structures and produces a more ''conventional'' spectral-intensity function. The effects of center-of-mass motion on the level shifts and level profiles are investigated and the onset of plasma instabilities touched upon. These calculations make contact with the work on ''plasma-polarization shifts'' and provide an approach to q,ω-dependent plasma microfields

  11. Variations of geothermometry and chemical-isotopic compositions of hot spring fluids in the Rehai geothermal field, southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianguo; Liu, Congqiang; Fu, Bihong; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Zhang, Youlian; Wang, Chuanyuan; Wang, Hualiu; Sun, Zigang

    2005-04-01

    Geothermal variations, origins of carbon-bearing components and reservoir temperatures in the Rehai geothermal field (RGF) of Tengchong volcanic area, Yunnan Province, southwestern China, are discussed on the basis of carbon isotope compositions, combined with helium isotope ratios and geothermal data from 1973 to 2000. δ 13C values of CO 2, CH 4, HCO 3-, CO 3= and travertine in the hot springs range from -7.6‰ to -1.18‰, -56.9‰ to -19.48‰, -6.7‰ to -4.2‰, -6.4‰ to -4.2‰ and -27.1‰ to +0.6‰, respectively. The carbon dioxide probably has a mantle/magma origin, but CH 4 and He have multiple origins. HCO 3- and CO 3= in RGF thermal fluids are predominantly derived from igneous carbon dioxide, but other ions originate from rocks through which the fluids circulate. The 13C values of CO 2, HCO 3- (aq) and CO 3= (aq) illustrate that isotopic equilibriums between CO 2 and HCO 3- (aq), and CO 3= (aq) and between DIC and travertine were not achieved, and no carbon isotope fractionation between HCO 3- (aq) and CO 3= (aq) of the hot springs in RGF was found. Using various geothermometers, temperatures of the geothermal reservoirs are estimated in a wide range from 69 °C to 450 °C that fluctuated from time to time. The best estimate of subsurface reservoir temperature may be 250-300 °C. Contributions of mantle fluids and shallow crust fluids in Rehai geothermal field varied with time, which resulted in variations of chemical and isotopic compositions and reservoir temperatures.

  12. New conception in the theory of chemical bonding; the role of core and valence atomic orbitals in formation of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikova, G.P.; Kostikov, Yu.P.; Korol'kov, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectra leads to a simple and consistent conception in the theory of chemical bonding, which satisfies (unlike the simple MO-LCAO theory) the virial theorem and defines the roles of the core and valence atomic orbitals in the formation of chemical bonds. Its essence is clear from the foregoing: the exothermic effects of the formation of complexes are caused by the lowering of the energies of the core levels of the central atoms with simultaneous small changes in the energies of the core levels of the ligands despite the significant destabilization of the delocalized valence MO's in comparison to the orbital energies of the corresponding free atoms. In order to confirm these ideas, they recorded the x-ray photoelectron spectra of the valence region and the inner levels of single-crystal silicon carbide, silicon, and graphite

  13. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    CERN Document Server

    Fassbender, M; Heaton, R C; Jamriska, D J; Kitten, J J; Nortier, F M; Peterson, E J; Phillips, D R; Pitt, L R; Salazar, L L; Valdez, F O; 10.1524/ract.92.4.237.35596

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides /sup 68/Ge, /sup 82/Sr, /sup 109/Cd and /sup 88/Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40MBq to 75 GBq.

  14. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, M.; Nortier, F.M.; Phillips, D.R.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Kitten, J.J.; Pitt, L.R.; Salazar, L.L.; Valdez, F.O.; Peterson, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides 68 Ge, 82 Sr, 109 Cd and 88 Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40 MBq to 75 GBq. (orig.)

  15. Phosphorus atomic layer doping in SiGe using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Heinemann, Bernd; Murota, Junichi; Tillack, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe is investigated at temperatures between 100 °C to 600 °C using a single wafer reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system. SiGe(100) surface is exposed to PH 3 at different PH 3 partial pressures by interrupting SiGe growth. The impact of the SiGe buffer/cap growth condition (total pressure/SiGe deposition precursors) on P adsorption, incorporation, and segregation are investigated. In the case of SiH 4 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, steeper P spikes due to lower segregation are observed by SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric (ATM) pressure compared with reduced pressure (RP). The steepness of P spike of ∼ 5.7 nm/dec is obtained for ATM pressure without reducing deposition temperature. This result may be due to the shift of equilibrium of P adsorption/desorption to desorption direction by higher H 2 pressure. Using Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system for SiGe cap deposition in RP, lowering the SiGe growth temperature is possible, resulting in higher P incorporation and steeper P profile due to reduced desorption and segregation. In the case of Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, the P dose could be simulated assuming a Langmuir-type kinetics model. Incorporated P shows high electrical activity, indicating P is adsorbed mostly in lattice position. - Highlights: • Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe (100) is investigated using CVD. • P adsorption is suppressed by the hydrogen termination of Ge surface. • By SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric pressure, P segregation was suppressed. • By using Si 2 H 6 -based SiGe cap, P segregation was also suppressed. • The P adsorption process is self-limited and follows Langmuir-type kinetics model

  16. Characterization of carbon contamination under ion and hot atom bombardment in a tin-plasma extreme ultraviolet light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.; Lopaev, D.; Lee, Christopher James; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakushev, O.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular contamination of a grazing incidence collector for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was experimentally studied. A carbon film was found to have grown under irradiation from a pulsed tin plasma discharge. Our studies show that the film is chemically inert and has characteristics that

  17. Investigation of chemical modifiers for phosphorus in a graphite furnace using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepri, Fabio G.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Phosphorus is not one of the elements that are typically determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, but this technique nevertheless offers several advantages that make it attractive, such as the relatively great freedom from interferences. As the main resonance lines for phosphorus are in the vacuum-ultraviolet, inaccessible by conventional atomic absorption spectrometry equipment, L'vov and Khartsyzov proposed to use the non-resonance doublet at 213.5 / 213.6 nm. Later it turned out that with conventional equipment it is necessary to use a chemical modifier in order to get reasonable sensitivity, and lanthanum was the first one suggested for that purpose. In the following years more than 30 modifiers have been proposed for the determination of this element, and there is no consensus about the best one. In this work high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry has been used to investigate the determination of phosphorus without a modifier and with the addition of selected modifiers of very different nature, including the originally recommended lanthanum modifier, several palladium-based modifiers and sodium fluoride. As high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry is revealing the spectral environment of the analytical line at high resolution, it became obvious that without the addition of a modifier essentially no atomic phosphorus is formed, even at 2700 deg. C . The absorption measured with line source atomic absorption spectrometry in this case is due to the PO molecule, the spectrum of which is overlapping with the atomic line. Palladium, with or without the addition of calcium or ascorbic acid, was found to be the only modifier to produce almost exclusively atomic phosphorus. Lanthanum and particularly sodium fluoride produced a mixture of P and PO, depending on the atomization temperature. This fact can explain at least some of the discrepancies found in the literature and some of the phenomena observed in the

  18. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G. [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Abboud, Zeinab [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bressler, David C., E-mail: david.bressler@ualberta.ca [Biorefining Conversions and Fermentations Laboratory, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6E 2P5 (Canada)

    2014-09-30

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  19. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: limits and opportunities of protecting the tungsten catalyzer from silicide with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, P.A.; Nos, O.; Bengoechea, S.; Frevert, C.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) is one of the most promising techniques for depositing the intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layer for the production of micro-morph solar cells. However, the silicide formation at the colder ends of the tungsten wire drastically reduces the lifetime of the catalyzer, thus limiting its industrial exploitation. A simple but interesting strategy to decrease the silicide formation is to hide the electrical contacts of the catalyzer in a long narrow cavity which reduces the probability of the silane molecules to reach the colder ends of the wire. In this paper, the working mechanism of the cavity is elucidated. Measurements of the thickness profile of the silicon deposited in the internal walls of the cavity have been compared with those predicted using a simple diffusion model based on the assumption of Knudsen flow. A lifetime study of the protected and unprotected wires has been carried out. The different mechanisms which determine the deterioration of the catalyzer have been identified and discussed.

  20. Thermalhydraulic assessment of the Pickering NGS 'B' feed and bleed system for the hot boiler chemical clean (Siemens Process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorencez, Carlos M.

    2000-01-01

    The Hot Boiler Chemical Clean (HBCC) process from Siemens, to be used in PNGS, requires that the Heat Transport System (HTS) temperature be maintained in the range 160 to 170 o C for several days. To achieve these thermalhydraulic condition, the core decay power and the pump power of the main circulating pumps in a 3-3 configuration are employed to warm up the HTS from approximately 38 o C to 170 o C. At this point, high Bleed bias is applied to the signal of the HTS pressure controller to provide high Feed and Bleed flows, which are used to control the HTS temperature by means of the Bleed Cooler. To address any concern posed by these infrequently used HTS thermalhydraulic conditions, a detailed thermalhydraulic model of the Feed and Bleed System, that also includes the Gland Supply, Gland Return and Purification systems, was developed for the TUF code to determine the suitability of the Feed and Bleed System to conduct the HBCC. The model was then used to estimate the parameters such as Feed and Bleed flows, valve openings, pressure and temperature distributions throughout the Feed and Bleed System required for the application of HBCC. (author)

  1. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical vapour deposition of silicon under reduced pressure in a hot-wall reactor: Equilibrium and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlais, F.; Hottier, F.; Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon chemical vapour deposition (SiH 2 Cl 2 /H 2 system), under reduced pressure conditions, in a hot-wall reactor, is presented. The vapour phase composition is assessed by evaluating two distinct equilibria. The homogeneous equilibrium , which assumes that the vapour phase is not in equilibrium with solid silicon, is thought to give an adequate description of the vapour phase in the case of low pressure, high gas velocities, good temperature homogeneity conditions. A comparison with heterogeneous equilibrium enables us to calculate the supersaturation so evidencing a highly irreversible growth system. The experimental determination of the growth rates reveals two distinct temperature ranges: below 1000 0 C, polycrystalline films are usually obtained with a thermally activated growth rate (+40 kcal mole -1 ) and a reaction order, with respect to the predominant species SiCl 2 , close to one; above 1000 0 C, the films are always monocrystalline and their growth rate exhibits a much lower or even negative activation energy, the reaction order in SiCl 2 remaining about one. (orig.)

  3. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  4. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  5. Computational Study on Atomic Structures, Electronic Properties, and Chemical Reactions at Surfaces and Interfaces and in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2018-06-01

    Through computer simulations using atomistic models, it is becoming possible to calculate the atomic structures of localized defects or dopants in semiconductors, chemically active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, nanoscale structures, and active sites in biological systems precisely. Furthermore, it is also possible to clarify physical and chemical properties possessed by these nanoscale structures such as electronic states, electronic and atomic transport properties, optical properties, and chemical reactivity. It is sometimes quite difficult to clarify these nanoscale structure-function relations experimentally and, therefore, accurate computational studies are indispensable in materials science. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relation between local structures and functions for inorganic, organic, and biological systems by using atomistic computer simulations.

  6. Nanoscale fabrication and characterization of chemically modified silicon surfaces using conductive atomic force microscopy in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Christopher Reagan

    This dissertation examines the modification and characterization of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces in organic liquids. Conductive atomic force microscope (cAFM) lithography is used to fabricate structures with sub-100 nm line width on H:Si(111) in n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, and 1-alkanes. Nanopatterning is accomplished by applying a positive (n-alkanes and 1-alkenes) or a negative (1-alkanes) voltage pulse to the silicon substrate with the cAFM tip connected to ground. The chemical and kinetic behavior of the patterned features is characterized using AFM, lateral force microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF SIMS), and chemical etching. Features patterned in hexadecane, 1-octadecene, and undecylenic acid methyl ester exhibited chemical and kinetic behavior consistent with AFM field induced oxidation. The oxide features are formed due to capillary condensation of a water meniscus at the AFM tip-sample junction. A space-charge limited growth model is proposed to explain the observed growth kinetics. Surface modifications produced in the presence of neat 1-dodecyne and 1-octadecyne exhibited a reduced lateral force compared to the background H:Si(111) substrate and were resistant to a hydrofluoric acid etch, characteristics which indicate that the patterned features are not due to field induced oxidation and which are consistent with the presence of the methyl-terminated 1-alkyne bound directly to the silicon surface through silicon-carbon bonds. In addition to the cAFM patterned surfaces, full monolayers of undecylenic acid methyl ester (SAM-1) and undec-10-enoic acid 2-bromoethyl ester (SAM-2) were grown on H:Si(111) substrates using ultraviolet light. The structure and chemistry of the monolayers were characterized using AFM, TOF SIMS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray standing waves (XSW), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These combined analyses provide evidence that SAM-1 and SAM-2 form dense monolayers

  7. Size-segregated aerosol in a hot-spot pollution urban area: Chemical composition and three-way source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardoni, V; Elser, M; Valli, G; Valentini, S; Bigi, A; Fermo, P; Piazzalunga, A; Vecchi, R

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a comprehensive characterisation and source apportionment of size-segregated aerosol collected using a multistage cascade impactor was performed. The samples were collected during wintertime in Milan (Italy), which is located in the Po Valley, one of the main pollution hot-spot areas in Europe. For every sampling, size-segregated mass concentration, elemental and ionic composition, and levoglucosan concentration were determined. Size-segregated data were inverted using the program MICRON to identify and quantify modal contributions of all the measured components. The detailed chemical characterisation allowed the application of a three-way (3-D) receptor model (implemented using Multilinear Engine) for size-segregated source apportionment and chemical profiles identification. It is noteworthy that - as far as we know - this is the first time that three-way source apportionment is attempted using data of aerosol collected by traditional cascade impactors. Seven factors were identified: wood burning, industry, resuspended dust, regional aerosol, construction works, traffic 1, and traffic 2. Further insights into size-segregated factor profiles suggested that the traffic 1 factor can be associated to diesel vehicles and traffic 2 to gasoline vehicles. The regional aerosol factor resulted to be the main contributor (nearly 50%) to the droplet mode (accumulation sub-mode with modal diameter in the range 0.5-1 μm), whereas the overall contribution from the two factors related to traffic was the most important one in the other size modes (34-41%). The results showed that applying a 3-D receptor model to size-segregated samples allows identifying factors of local and regional origin while receptor modelling on integrated PM fractions usually singles out factors characterised by primary (e.g. industry, traffic, soil dust) and secondary (e.g. ammonium sulphate and nitrate) origin. Furthermore, the results suggested that the information on size

  8. Chemical analysis of Zam Zam water of Saudi Arabia and drinking water supplies of Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Sharif, A.K.M.; Idriss A, K.M.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The quality of water plays an important role to the living beings. Chemical analysis have been performed on Zam Zam water of Saudi Arabia and drinking water of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Bangladesh. Quantitative measurements of some essential elements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Co and Ni) and toxic elements (Pb and Cd) were carried out using atomic absorption spectrometric method. Tests indicate that all three samples (Zam Zam, tap and solar pump water) are drinkable and palatable. pH measurements show that Zam Zam water is alkaline whereas both tap and solar pump water are slightly acidic

  9. Chemical analyses of waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming from 1974 to 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.M.; Yadav, S.

    1979-01-01

    Waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools of Yellowstone National Park have been analyzed. We report 422 complete major ion analyses from 330 different locations of geysers, hot springs, and pools, collected from 1974 to 1978. Many of the analyses from Upper, Midway, Lower, and Norris Geyser Basin are recollections of features previously reported.

  10. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  11. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO 2 /CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector

  12. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapis, Ioannis, E-mail: iliapis@sidenor.vionet.gr [AEIFOROS SA, 12th km Thessaloniki-Veroia Rd, PO Box 59, 57008 Ionia, Thessaloniki (Greece); Papayianni, Ioanna [Laboratory of Building Materials, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO{sub 2}/CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  13. The Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom): Comparing the Chemical Climatology of Reactive Species and Air Parcels from Measurements and Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, M. J.; Flynn, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Kim, M. J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Hanisco, T. F.; Diskin, G. S.; Daube, B. C.; Commane, R.; McKain, K.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, S.; Steenrod, S.; Strahan, S. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Murray, L. T.; Mao, J.; Shindell, D. T.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) is building a photochemical climatology of the remote troposphere based on objective sampling and profiling transects over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. These statistics provide direct tests of chemistry-climate models. The choice of species focuses on those controlling primary reactivity (a.k.a. oxidative state) of the troposphere, specifically chemical tendencies of O3 and CH4. These key species include, inter alia, O3, CH4, CO, C2H6, other alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, NOx, HNO3, HO2NO2, PAN, other organic nitrates, H2O, HCHO, H2O2, CH3OOH. Three of the four ATom deployments are now complete, and data from the first two (ATom-1 & -2) have been released as of this talk (see espoarchive.nasa.gov/archive/browse/atom). The statistical distributions of key species are presented as 1D and 2D probability densities (PDs) and we focus here on the tropical and mid-latitude regions of the Pacific during ATom-1 (Aug) and -2 (Feb). PDs are computed from ATom observations and 6 global chemistry models over the tropospheric depth (0-12 km) and longitudinal extent of the observations. All data are weighted to achieve equal mass-weighting by latitude regimes to account for spatial sampling biases. The models are used to calculate the reactivity in each ATom air parcel. Reweighting parcels with loss of CH4 or production of O3, for example, allows us to identify which air parcels are most influential, including assessment of the importance of fine pollution layers in the most remote troposphere. Another photochemical climatology developed from ATom, and used to test models, includes the effect of clouds on photolysis rates. The PDs and reactivity-weighted PDs reveal important seasonal differences and similarities between the two campaigns and also show which species may be most important in controlling reactivities. They clearly identify some very specific failings in the modeled climatologies and help us evaluate the chemical

  14. Mechanism of pulse discharge production of iodine atoms from CF3I molecules for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P; Vagin, N P; Yuryshev, N N

    2009-01-01

    The pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) development is aimed at many new applications. Pulsed electric discharge is most effective in turning COIL operation into the pulse mode by instant production of iodine atoms. A numerical model is developed for simulations of the pulsed COIL initiated by an electric discharge. The model comprises a system of kinetic equations for neutral and charged species, electric circuit equation, gas thermal balance equation and the photon balance equation. Reaction rate coefficients for processes involving electrons are found by solving the electron Boltzmann equation, which is re-calculated in a course of computations when plasma parameters changed. The processes accounted for in the Boltzmann equation include excitation and ionization of atoms and molecules, dissociation of molecules, electron attachment processes, electron-ion recombination, electron-electron collisions, second-kind collisions and stepwise excitation of molecules. The last processes are particularly important because of a high singlet oxygen concentration in gas flow from the singlet oxygen chemical generator. Results of numerical simulations are compared with experimental laser pulse waveforms. It is concluded that there is satisfactory agreement between theory and the experiment. The prevailing mechanism of iodine atom formation from the CF 3 I donor in a very complex kinetic system of the COIL medium under pulse discharge conditions, based on their detailed numerical modelling and by comparing these results both with experimental results of other authors and their own experiments, is established. The dominant iodine atom production mechanism for conditions under study is the electron-impact dissociation of CF 3 I molecules. It was proved that in the conditions of the experiment the secondary chemical reactions with O atoms play an insignificant role.

  15. Pyroelectrically Induced Pyro-Electro-Chemical Catalytic Activity of BaTiO3 Nanofibers under Room-Temperature Cold–Hot Cycle Excitations

    OpenAIRE

    Yuntao Xia; Yanmin Jia; Weiqi Qian; Xiaoli Xu; Zheng Wu; Zichen Han; Yuanting Hong; Huilin You; Muhammad Ismail; Ge Bai; Liwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    A pyro-electro-chemical catalytic dye decomposition using lead-free BaTiO3 nanofibers was realized under room-temperature cold–hot cycle excitation (30–47 °C) with a high Rhodamine B (RhB) decomposition efficiency ~99%, which should be ascribed to the product of pyro-electric effect and electrochemical redox reaction. Furthermore, the existence of intermediate product of hydroxyl radical in pyro-electro-chemical catalytic process was also observed. There is no significant decrease in pyro-ele...

  16. NMR Chemical Shift of a Helium Atom as a Probe for Electronic Structure of FH, F-, (FHF)-, and FH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupikina, E Yu; Efimova, A A; Denisov, G S; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-12-21

    In this work, we present the first results of outer electronic shell visualization by using a 3 He atom as a probe particle. As model objects we have chosen F - , FH, and FH 2 + species, as well as the hydrogen-bonded complex FH···F - at various H···F - distances (3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 Å and equilibrium at ca. 1.14 Å). The interaction energy of investigated objects with helium atom (CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ) and helium atom chemical shift (B3LYP/pcS-2) surfaces were calculated, and their topological analysis was performed. For comparison, the results of standard quantum mechanical approaches to electronic shell visualization were presented (ESP, ELF, ED, ∇ 2 ED). We show that the Laplacian of helium chemical shift, ∇ 2 δ He , is sensitive to fluorine atom lone pair localization regions, and it can be used for the visualization of the outer electronic shell, which could be used to evaluate the proton accepting ability. The sensitivity of ∇ 2 δ He to lone pairs is preserved at distances as large as 2.0-2.5 Å from the fluorine nucleus (in comparison with the distance to ESP minima, located at 1.0-1.5 Å or maxima of ELF, which are as close as 0.6 Å to the fluorine nucleus).

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  18. Pyroelectrically Induced Pyro-Electro-Chemical Catalytic Activity of BaTiO3 Nanofibers under Room-Temperature Cold–Hot Cycle Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntao Xia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A pyro-electro-chemical catalytic dye decomposition using lead-free BaTiO3 nanofibers was realized under room-temperature cold–hot cycle excitation (30–47 °C with a high Rhodamine B (RhB decomposition efficiency ~99%, which should be ascribed to the product of pyro-electric effect and electrochemical redox reaction. Furthermore, the existence of intermediate product of hydroxyl radical in pyro-electro-chemical catalytic process was also observed. There is no significant decrease in pyro-electro-chemical catalysis activity after being recycled five times. The pyro-electrically induced pyro-electro-chemical catalysis provides a high-efficient, reusable and environmentally friendly technology to remove organic pollutants from water.

  19. III Scientific-technical conference. Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005). Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Summaries of reports of the III Scientific-technical conference: Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005) are presented. The conference performed 20-22 September, 2005, in Sosnovyj Bor. Problems of methodical, instrumental and metrological supply of chemical, radiochemical and radiometric control at active NPP and NPU, modern concepts of construction of automated systems of chemical and radiometric control in the atomic energetics, directions for the decision of questions in organization and conducting of chemical and radiochemical control of water-chemical regimes of NPP and NPU are discussed [ru

  20. Decommissioning of the radio chemical hot laboratory of the european commission joint research centre of Ispra - 59207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugolini, Daniele; Rossi, Francesco; Basile, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Radio Chemical Hot Laboratory (RCHL) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of Ispra began in the early 1960's while the laboratory activities started in 1964. In 1976 an annex to the main building was built. At this time the RCHL main research activities were in environment and biochemistry by means of radioactive tracers; neutron activation analyses; extraction of actinides from radioactive liquid waste coming from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; and analyses of U, Pu, and Th in samples from the nuclear fuel cycle in order to determine the isotopic ratio and the burn-up. In 1978, a new area of laboratories named 'Stabularium' was built to study the metabolism of heavy metal on laboratory animals. Complementary to the laboratory three pneumatic transfer systems for irradiated sources connected the RCHL to two research reactors. The decommissioning activities of the 2650 m 2 facility started in January 2008 and they were completed at the end of 2010 with the release for unrestricted use of all the buildings of the facility. They consisted in five main tasks: pre-decommissioning, licensing, dismantling, waste management, and final survey. The main pre-decommissioning activities were the physical and radiological characterization of the facility. The principal licensing activity was the preparation of the de-licensing documentation to obtain the license termination from the safety authorities. Dismantling consisted in the removal of all the equipments and ancillary systems, of the pneumatic transfer system, and in the decontamination of the structures of the controlled zone. The waste management was limited to the transfer of the waste and of the clearable material to the centralized waste management facility. The final survey consisted in the final radiological characterization to quantify the concentration of any residual radioactivity remained after the completion of the dismantling activities for the release of the RCHL without any

  1. The influence of a nuclear prehistory on transport rate of impurity ''hot'' atoms 111In, 114mIn and 115mIn in the irradiated metal cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.; Orlov, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous publications it was shown, that the velocity of migration of radioactive microimpurities (formed as a result of a nuclear change) in irradiated in metals is instituted by a nuclear prehistory. In the present work this problem was explored in detail. The selected system '' cadmium - impurity atoms of indium '' is unique for such experiments: it is possible to gain the same impurity ''hot'' atoms ( 111 In, 114m In and 115m In) via different ''nuclear channels'' and to explore their behavior depending on a nuclear prehistory. (orig.)

  2. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Farinas, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Barciela Garcia, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia Martin, S. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Pena Crecente, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Herrero Latorre, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: cherrero@lugo.usc.es

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1}), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  3. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar Farinas, M.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.; Herrero Latorre, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO 3 ) 2 and (NH 4 )H 2 PO 4 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 ] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 μg L -1 ), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged -1

  4. Atomic energy is hot stuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardo, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, it is the sun's heat and not CO2 emissions that is the cause of global warming. He then proceeds to outline the history of nuclear power and the nuclear policies of countries throughout the world as contrasted against Germany's phaseout decision. According to the author, Germany should reconsider its nuclear policy and go for nuclear power full-scale. (orig.)

  5. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-01-01

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions

  6. Role of N2 molecules in pulse discharge production of I atoms for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P; Vagin, N P; Yuryshev, N N

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed electric discharge is the most effective means to turn chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) operation into the pulse mode by fast production of iodine atoms. Experimental studies and numerical simulations are performed on a pulsed COIL initiated by an electric discharge in a mixture CF 3 I : N 2 : O 2 ( 3 X) : O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) flowing out of a chemical singlet oxygen generator. A transverse pulsed discharge is realized at various iodide pressures. The model comprises a system of kinetic equations for neutral and charged species, the electric circuit equation, the gas thermal balance equation and the photon balance equation. Reaction rate coefficients for processes involving electrons are repeatedly re-calculated by the electron Boltzmann equation solver when the plasma parameters are changed. The processes accounted for in the Boltzmann equation include direct and stepwise excitation and ionization of atoms and molecules, dissociation of molecules, electron attachment processes, electron-ion recombination, electron-electron collisions and second-kind collisions. The last processes are particularly important because of a high singlet oxygen concentration in gas flow from the singlet oxygen chemical generator. A conclusion is drawn about satisfactory agreement between the theory and the experiment.

  7. Dielectric functions, chemical and atomic compositions of the near surface layers of implanted GaAs by In+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, M.; Kołodyńska, D.; Bayramov, A.; Drozdziel, A.; Olejniczak, A.; Żuk, J.

    2018-06-01

    The surfaces of (100) GaAs were irradiated with In+ ions. The implanted samples were isobaric annealed at 800 °C and then of dielectric function, the surface atomic concentrations of atoms and also the chemical composition of the near surface layers in these implanted semiconductor samples were obtained. The following investigation methods were used: spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses (RBSA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the study of the above mentioned quantities, respectively. The change of the shape spectra of the dielectric functions at about 3.0 eV phonon energy, diffusion of In+ ions as well as chemical composition changes were observed after ion implantation and the thermal treatment. Due to displacement of Ga ions from GaAs by the In+ ions the new chemical compound InAs was formed. The relative amounts Ga2O3 and As2O3 ratio increase in the native oxide layers with the fluences increase after the thermal treatment of the samples. Additionally, it was noticed that the quantities of InO2 increase with the increasing values of the irradiated ions before thermal treatment.

  8. Evaluation of treatments with hot water, chemicals and ventilated containers to reduce microbial spoilage in irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirsat, S.G.; Thomas, P.; Nair, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Potatoes irradiated to control sprouting were dipped in: hot water (56°C, 5 min; 52°C, 10, 15 and 20 min); cold (25°C, 5 min) or hot (56°C, 5 min) salicylic acid (1000 and 2000 ppm); or sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.2%, 5 min); or dusted with salicylic acid (1 and 2%), to try to reduce the incidence of bacterial soft rot (Erwinia sp.) during controlled temperature (10°C, 15°C) and ambient temperature (20–34°C) storage. All treatments, particularly hot water and hot salicylic acid dip, increased microbial spoilage, possibly as a result of handling damage during the treatments combined with the inhibition of wound periderm formation as a result of irradiation. Storing irradiated tubers in well ventilated containers reduced soft rot compared to storing them in sacks and after 6 months storage at 10, 15 and 20–34°C, 95, 90 and 77% respectively were healthy and marketable. (author)

  9. Chemical composition and oxidative stability of jussara (Euterpe edulis M.) oil extracted by cold and hot mechanical pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Cunha, A.L.A.; Freitas, S.P.; Godoy, R.L.O.; Cabral, L.M.C.; Tonon, R.V.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of mechanical pressing on jussara oil yield, oxidative stability and carotenoid profile with or without heat application. Firstly, jussara pulp was centrifuged for juice extraction, and the resulting cake was dried until reaching 10% moisture content. Then, oil extraction was performed in an expeller press at 25 ºC (cold pressing) and at 50 ºC (hot pressing). The process performance was evaluated by the oil yield, and the crude jussara oil was characterized for fatty acid composition, acid value, carotenoid profile and oxidative stability. Jussara oil contained 74% unsaturated fatty acids, mainly oleic and linoleic acids (48% and 24%, respectively). The oil yield was almost twice as high for the hot process as compared to the cold one. Additionally, hot pressing resulted in 25% higher total carotenoid content as compared to cold pressing, with β-carotene as the most abundant one. Hot and cold pressing showed no difference in oil oxidative stability and fatty acid composition. [es

  10. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry - An Effective and Attractive Analytical Chemical Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Nielsen, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atom...

  11. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  12. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  13. Evaluating and interpreting the chemical relevance of the linear response kernel for atoms II: open shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Fias, Stijn; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-07-28

    Most of the work done on the linear response kernel χ(r,r') has focussed on its atom-atom condensed form χAB. Our previous work [Boisdenghien et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 1007] was the first effort to truly focus on the non-condensed form of this function for closed (sub)shell atoms in a systematic fashion. In this work, we extend our method to the open shell case. To simplify the plotting of our results, we average our results to a symmetrical quantity χ(r,r'). This allows us to plot the linear response kernel for all elements up to and including argon and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table and in the different representations of χ(r,r'). Within the context of Spin Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory, the first two-dimensional plots of spin polarized linear response functions are presented and commented on for some selected cases on the basis of the atomic ground state electronic configurations. Using the relation between the linear response kernel and the polarizability we compare the values of the polarizability tensor calculated using our method to high-level values.

  14. Chemical vapor generation of silver for atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer: Radiotracer efficiency study and characterization of silver species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, Stanislav [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan; Vobecky, Miloslav [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Hovorka, Jan [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Institute for Environmental Studies, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Benada, Oldrich [Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Matousek, Tomas, E-mail: matousek@biomed.cas.c [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2009-11-15

    Volatile Ag species were generated in flow injection arrangement from nitric acid environment in the presence of surfactants (Triton X-100 and Antifoam B) and permanent Pd deposits as the reaction modifiers. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer heated to 900 deg. C was used for atomization; evidence was found for thermal mechanism of atomization. Relative and absolute limits of detection (3sigma, 250 mul sample loop) measured under optimized conditions were: 1.4 mug l{sup -1} and 0.35 ng, respectively. The efficiency of chemical vapor generation (CVG) as well as spatial distribution of residual analyte in the apparatus was studied by {sup 111}Ag radioactive indicator (half-life 7.45 days) of high specific activity. It was found out that 23% of analyte was released into the gaseous phase. However, only 8% was found on filters placed at the entrance to the atomizer due to transport losses. About 40% of analyte remained in waste liquid, whereas the rest was found deposited over the CVG system. Presented study follows the hypothesis that the 'volatile' Ag species are actually metallic nanoparticles formed upon reduction in liquid phase and then released with good efficiency to the gaseous phase. Number/charge size distributions of dry aerosol were determined by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. Ag was detected in 40-45 nm particles holding 10 times more charge if compared to Boltzmann equilibrium. At the same time, Ag was also present on 150 nm particles, the main size mode of the CVG generator. The increase of Ag in standards was reflected by proportional increase in particle number/charge for 40-45 nm size particles only. Transmission electron microscopy revealed particles of 8 +- 2 nm sampled from the gaseous phase, which were associated in isolated clusters of few to few tens of nanometres. Ag presence in those particles was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  15. Near-room temperature deposition of W and WO3 thin films by hydrogen atom assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Reeves, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    A novel near-room temperatures CVD process has been developed using H-atoms reaction with WF 6 to produced tungsten and tungsten oxide films. The chemical, physical and electrical properties of these films were studied. Good adhesion and low resistivity of W films were measured. Conformal WO 3 films were obtained on columnar tungsten using a small amount of molecular oxygen in the gas stream. A reaction mechanism was evaluated on the basis of experimental results. The advantages of the method include deposition of adherent films in a plasma-free environment, near-room temperature, with a low level of impurity

  16. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hot flashes Overview Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the face, neck and chest. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you ...

  17. HOT 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    2016-01-01

    HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud.......HOT samler og formidler 21 literacykyndiges bud på, hvad der er hot, og hvad der bør være hot inden for literacy – og deres begrundelser for disse bud....

  18. Modeling the effects of cohesive energy for single particle on the material removal in chemical mechanical polishing at atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongguang; Zhao Yongwu; An Wei; Wang Jun

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical model for chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) based on interface solid physical and chemical theory in addition to energy equilibrium knowledge. And the effects of oxidation concentration and particle size on the material removal in CMP are investigated. It is shown that the mechanical energy and removal cohesive energy couple with the particle size, and being a cause of the non-linear size-removal rate relation. Furthermore, it also shows a nonlinear dependence of removal rate on removal cohesive energy. The model predictions are in good qualitative agreement with the published experimental data. The current study provides an important starting point for delineating the micro-removal mechanism in the CMP process at atomic scale

  19. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, Y.; Fernandez, P. [Centro de Control do Medio Marino, Peirao de Vilaxoan s/n, Vilagarcia de Arousa, 36611 Pontevedra (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, 15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 C and 2600 C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg{sup -1} (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg{sup -1} (wet weight). (orig.)

  20. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  1. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  2. Quantum degeneracy in atomic point contacts revealed by chemical force and conductance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sugimoto, Y.; Ondráček, Martin; Abe, M.; Pou, P.; Morita, S.; Perez, R.; Flores, F.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 10 (2013), "106803-1"-"106803-5" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP204/11/P578 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scanning tunneling microscopy * atomic force microscopy * degenerate states * silicon surface * dangling bonds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  3. Chemical environment of iron atoms in iron oxynitride films synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafoute, M.; Petitjean, C.; Rousselot, C.; Pierson, J.F.; Greneche, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    An iron oxynitride film was deposited on silicon and glass substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar-N 2 -O 2 reactive mixture. Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry was used to determine the film composition (Fe 1.06 O 0.35 N 0.65 ). X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of a face-centred cubic (fcc) structure with a lattice parameter close to that of γ'''-FeN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the occurrence of Fe-N and Fe-O bonds in the film. The local environment of iron atoms studied by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectrometry at both 300 and 77 K gives clear evidence that the Fe 1.06 O 0.35 N 0.65 is not a mixture of iron oxide and iron nitride phases. Despite a small amount of an iron nitride phase, the main sample consists of an iron oxynitride phase with an NaCl-type structure where oxygen atoms partially substitute for nitrogen atoms, thus indicating the formation of a iron oxynitride with an fcc structure

  4. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei G. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Santos, Luana N. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Charge transfer reactions increase the population of Cr{sup +}. •Chromium ions and electrons recombine to form excited-state Cr atoms. •A 10-fold improvement in LOD is observed for Cr emission measurements. •The two-step ionization/excitation mechanism improves sensitivity and accuracy. •High concentrations of Co also minimize matrix effects. -- Abstract: Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L{sup −1} Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ = 425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L{sup −1}; a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr{sup +} by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr{sup +}/e{sup −} recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25–10 mg L{sup −1} and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n = 10) for a 2.0 mg L{sup −1} Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and

  5. C 60 as a chemical Faraday cage for three ferromagnetic Fe atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guohua; Kang, Hong Seok

    2008-09-01

    Based on calculations using density functional theory, we show that C 60 can act as a chemical Faraday cage in which a highly magnetic metal cluster with a high chemical reactivity can be encapsulated. As an example, we find that C 60 can encapsulate a Fe 3 cluster, while it is much less likely to encapsulate a Fe 2 cluster. Spin multiplicity (=9) of the Fe 3@C 60 is very high, being comparable to that (=11) of a free Fe 3 cluster. Geometrically, the triangular plane of the cluster is perpendicular to a S6 axis of the fullerene.

  6. Quantum chemical study of the elementary reactions in zirconium oxide atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widjaja, Yuniarto; Musgrave, Charles B.

    2002-01-01

    Elementary reactions in atomic layer deposition of zirconia using zirconium tetrachloride and water are investigated using the density functional theory. The atomistic mechanisms of the two deposition half cycles on the Zr-OH and Zr-Cl surface sites are investigated. Both half reactions proceed through the formation of stable intermediates, resulting in high barriers for HCl formation. We find that the intermediate stability is lowered as the surface temperature is raised. However, increasing temperature also increases the dissociation free-energy barrier, which in turn results in increased desorption of adsorbed precursors

  7. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L., E-mail: aburin@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  8. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  9. Visualising the Micro World of Chemical/Geochemical Interactions Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G M; Sorbie, K S

    1997-12-31

    Scanning force microscopy, in particular AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), provides a particular useful and interesting tool for the examination of surface structure at the near-atomic level. AFM is particularly well suited to the study of interactions at the surface in aqueous solutions using real time in-situ measurements. In this paper there is presented AFM images showing in situ crystal growth from supersaturated BaSO{sub 4} solutions onto the surface of barite. Growth structures in the form of spiral crystal growth features, presumably originating from screw dislocations, are illustrated. AFM images of novel scale crystal growth inhibition experiments are presented. Examination of the manner in which generically different species adsorb onto growth structures may help to explain mechanistic differences in the way which different inhibitor species perform against barium sulphate scale formation. Adsorption of polyacrylamide species onto mica surfaces have been viewed. The general utility of AFM to a number of other common surface interactions in oil field chemistry will be discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Microplasticity in hot-pressed beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plane, D.C.; Bonfield, W.

    1977-01-01

    Closed hysteresis loops measured in the microstrain region of hot pressed, commercially pure, polycrystalline beryllium are correlated with a dislocation - impurity atom, energy dissipating mechanism. (author)

  11. Effect of chemical modification on behavior of various organic vanadium forms during analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewska, Zofia

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of various organic V forms dissolved in xylene during analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was compared. The investigated analyte forms included compounds with vanadium at the oxidation state III, IV or V, as well as N, O or S atoms in molecules. Another group consisted of petroleum products containing naturally-occurring V species. Although the characteristic mass determined under different analytical conditions was in the very wide range from 11 up to 55 pg, some rules of V behavior were found. In the case of porphyrins and petroleum products, the application of Pd as a chemical modifier (xylene solution of Pd(II) acetylacetonate) seemed to be crucial. It was shown that Pd must be introduced to a furnace together with a sample. Pd injected and thermally pretreated before the sample injection was less effective for porphyrins and the petroleum products, but it increased signals of V compounds containing O as donor atom. The iodine pretreatment followed by the methyltrioctylammonium chloride (MTOACl) pretreatment was advantageous for these V forms. The air ashing in a graphite tube appeared to be important to improve decomposition of the petroleum products. No significant influence of the V oxidation state on the analytical signal was observed. The behavior of V contained in two Conostan oil standards, the single-element and the S21 multielement standard, was different in many situations. Probably, the joint action of other elements is responsible for this effect. In general, chemical modification was applied in the work for two reasons: to reduce the V volatility (in some cases losses at about 300 deg. C were observed) and to enhance the atomization efficiency. For routine analysis air ashing, modification by Pd introduced into the furnace together with the sample solution and petroleum products with known V content as standard is recommended. Using this procedure the characteristic mass varied from 16 to 19 pg for

  12. Atomic Scale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Ceramic Oxide Heterostructure Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R. K.

    2003-04-16

    The research plan was divided into three tasks: (a) growth of oxide heterostructures for interface engineering using standard thin film deposition techniques, (b) atomic level characterization of oxide heterostructure using such techniques as STEM-2 combined with AFM/STM and conventional high-resolution microscopy (HRTEM), and (c) property measurements of aspects important to oxide heterostructures using standard characterization methods, including dielectric properties and dynamic cathodoluminescence measurements. Each of these topics were further classified on the basis of type of oxide heterostructure. Type I oxide heterostructures consisted of active dielectric layers, including the materials Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST), Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}. Type II heterostructures consisted of ferroelectric active layers such as lanthanum manganate and Type III heterostructures consist of phosphor oxide active layers such as Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  13. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  14. Quantum chemical approach for positron annihilation spectra of atoms and molecules beyond plane-wave approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Aiba, Risa; Iwanade, Toru; Nishizawa, Hiroaki; Wang, Feng; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-05-01

    We report theoretical calculations of positron-electron annihilation spectra of noble gas atoms and small molecules using the nuclear orbital plus molecular orbital method. Instead of a nuclear wavefunction, the positronic wavefunction is obtained as the solution of the coupled Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham equation for a positron and the electrons. The molecular field is included in the positronic Fock operator, which allows an appropriate treatment of the positron-molecule repulsion. The present treatment succeeds in reproducing the Doppler shift, i.e., full width at half maximum (FWHM) of experimentally measured annihilation (γ-ray) spectra for molecules with a mean absolute error less than 10%. The numerical results indicate that the interpretation of the FWHM in terms of a specific molecular orbital is not appropriate.

  15. Strain and Structure Heterogeneity in MoS2 Atomic Layers Grown by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    cture heterogeneity in MoS2 atomiclayers grown by chemical vapour deposition 6. AUTHORS Zheng Liu, Matin Amani, Sina Najmaei, Quan Xu, Xiaolong Zou...deposition Zheng Liu1•2•3·*, Matin Amani4·*, Sina Najmaei5·*, Quan Xu6•7, Xiaolong Zou5, Wu Zhou8, Ting Yu9, Caiyu Qiu9, A Glen Birdwell4, Frank J. Crowne4

  16. Atomic-level spatial distributions of dopants on silicon surfaces: toward a microscopic understanding of surface chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Robert J.; Wang, Yajun; Shan, Jun

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the interaction of phosphine (PH 3) and diborane (B 2H 6) with the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and ab initio molecular orbital calculations. Experiment and theory show that the formation of PSi heterodimers is energetically favorable compared with formation of PP dimers. The stability of the heterodimers arises from a large strain energy associated with formation of PP dimers. At moderate P coverages, the formation of PSi heterodimers leaves the surface with few locations where there are two adjacent reactive sites. This in turn modifies the chemical reactivity toward species such as PH 3, which require only one site to adsorb but require two adjacent sites to dissociate. Boron on Si(001) strongly segregates into localized regions of high boron concentration, separated by large regions of clean Si. This leads to a spatially-modulated chemical reactivity which during subsequent growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) leads to formation of a rough surface. The implications of the atomic-level spatial distribution of dopants on the rates and mechanisms of CVD growth processes are discussed.

  17. Modification of REE distribution of ordinary chondrites from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) hot deserts: Insights into the chemical weathering of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Rochette, Pierre; Valenzuela, Millarca; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Mirnejad, Hassan; Sutter, Brad; Hutzler, Aurore; Aboulahris, Maria

    2017-09-01

    The behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) during hot desert weathering of meteorites is investigated. Ordinary chondrites (OCs) from Atacama (Chile) and Lut (Iran) deserts show different variations in REE composition during this process. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) data reveal that hot desert OCs tend to show elevated light REE concentrations, relative to OC falls. Chondrites from Atacama are by far the most enriched in REEs and this enrichment is not necessarily related to their degree of weathering. Positive Ce anomaly of fresh chondrites from Atacama and the successive formation of a negative Ce anomaly with the addition of trivalent REEs are similar to the process reported from Antarctic eucrites. In addition to REEs, Sr and Ba also show different concentrations when comparing OCs from different hot deserts. The stability of Atacama surfaces and the associated old terrestrial ages of meteorites from this region give the samples the necessary time to interact with the terrestrial environment and to be chemically modified. Higher REE contents and LREE-enriched composition are evidence of contamination by terrestrial soil. Despite their low degrees of weathering, special care must be taken into account while working on the REE composition of Atacama meteorites for cosmochemistry applications. In contrast, chondrites from the Lut desert show lower degrees of REE modification, despite significant weathering signed by Sr content. This is explained by the relatively rapid weathering rate of the meteorites occurring in the Lut desert, which hampers the penetration of terrestrial material by forming voluminous Fe oxide/oxyhydroxides shortly after the meteorite fall.

  18. Atomization of Cd in U+Zr matrix after chemical separation using GF-AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulasidas, S.K.; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Natarajan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the direct atomization of Cd in U+Zr matrix were carried out and the effect of matrix composition and matrix concentration on the analyte absorbance were investigated. Development of a method using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) for determination of Cd is required for FBR fuel (U+20%Zr) materials. It was reported that the absorbance signal for Cd is reduced with matrix, 50% at 20 mg/mL of U and 10 mg/mL of Zr matrix as compared to matrix free solution. To use the method for U+Zr mixed oxide samples, effect of varying composition of Zr in U+Zr mixed matrix was studied. The results indicated that Cd absorbance signal remained unaffected in the range 0-40% Zr in (U+Zr) mixed matrix with 20 mg/mL total matrix. Based on these studies, an analytical method was developed for the direct determination of Cd with 20% Zr in 20 mg/mL of U+Zr solution with optimized experimental parameters. The range of analysis was found to be 0.005-0.1 g/mL for Cd with 20 mg/mL matrix; this leads to detection limits of 0.25 ppm. To meet the specification limits at 0.1 ppm level for Cd, it was necessary to separate the matrix from the sample using solvent extraction method. It was reported that with 30%TBP+70%CCl 4 in 7M HNO 3 , a selective simultaneous extraction of U and Zr into the organic phase can be achieved. In the present studies, same extraction procedure was used with 100 mg U+Zr sample. The effect of U+Zr in raffinate on Cd was also estimated. To validate the method, the extracted aqueous samples were also analyzed by ICP-AES SPECTRO ARCOS SOP technique independently and the results were compared. It was seen that Cd estimation was not affected in the presence of 10-50 μg/mL U+Zr by ICP-AES as well

  19. Atomic force microscopy indentation of fluorocarbon thin films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical deposition at low radio frequency power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirghi, L.; Ruiz, A.; Colpo, P.; Rossi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation technique is used for characterization of mechanical properties of fluorocarbon (CF x ) thin films obtained from C 4 F 8 gas by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low r.f. power (5-30 W) and d.c. bias potential (10-80 V). This particular deposition method renders films with good hydrophobic property and high plastic compliance. Commercially available AFM probes with stiff cantilevers (10-20 N/m) and silicon sharpened tips (tip radius < 10 nm) are used for indentations and imaging of the resulted indentation imprints. Force depth curves and imprint characteristics are used for determination of film hardness, elasticity modulus and plasticity index. The measurements show that the decrease of the discharge power results in deposition of films with decreased hardness and stiffness and increased plasticity index. Nanolithography based on AFM indentation is demonstrated on thin films (thickness of 40 nm) with good plastic compliance.

  20. Filamentous Morphology as a Means for Thermophilic Bacteria to Survive Steep Physical and Chemical Gradients in Yellowstone Hot Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Srivastava, V.; Bulone, V.; Keating, K. M.; Khetani, R. S.; Fields, C. J.; Inskeep, W.; Sanford, R. A.; Yau, P. M.; Imai, B. S.; Hernandez, A. G.; Wright, C.; Band, M.; Cann, I. K.; Ahrén, D.; Fouke, K. W.; Sivaguru, M.; Fried, G.; Fouke, B. W.

    2017-12-01

    The filamentous heat-loving bacterium Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense makes up more than 90% of the microbial community that inhabits turbulent, dysoxic hot spring outflow channels (66-71°C, 6.2-6.5 pH, 0.5-0.75 m/s flow rate) at Mammoth Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park. These environments contain abundantly available inorganic substrates (e.g., CO2, sulfide and thiosulfate) and are associated with extensive CaCO3 (travertine) precipitation driven in part by CO2 off-gassing. Evidence from integrated Meta-Omics analyses of DNA, RNA, and proteins (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics) extracted from these S. yellowstonense-dominated communities have detected 1499 non-rRNA open reading frames (ORFs), their transcripts and cognate proteins. During chemoautotrophy and CO2 carbon fixation, chaperons facilitate enzymatic stability and functionalities under elevated temperature. High abundance transcripts and proteins for Type IV pili and exopolysaccharides (EPS) are consistent with S. yellowstonense forming strong (up to 0.5 m) intertwined microbial filaments (fettuccini streamers) composed of linked individual cells that withstand hydrodynamic shear forces and extremely rapid travertine mineralization. Their primary energy source is the oxidation of reduced sulfur (e.g., sulphide, sulfur or thiosulfate) and the simultaneous uptake of extremely low concentrations of dissolved O2 facilitated by bd-type cytochromes. Field observations indicate that the fettuccini microbial filaments build up ridged travertine platforms on the bottom of the springs, parallel to the water flow, where living filaments attach almost exclusively to the top of each ridge. This maximizes their access to miniscule amounts of dissolved oxygen, while optimizing their ability to rapidly form down-flow branched filaments and thus survive in these stressful environments that few other microbes can inhabit.

  1. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  2. Effects of intermittent atomization on the properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Linjie; Wang, Lixin [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Qin, Xiujuan, E-mail: qinxj@ysu.edu.cn [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Cui, Li [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shao, Guangjie [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates with different atomization interval times by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, morphology, and optical and electrical properties were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, UV-vis double beam spectrophotometer and 4 point probe method. ZnO thin films exhibited strong growth orientation along the (002) plane and the crystalline was affected by the atomization interval time. All the films had high transmittance and the films with interval times of 2 min and 4 min had good haze values for the transparent conducting oxide silicon solar cell applications. The AZO thin film had the best optical and electrical properties when the atomization interval time was 4 min. This is very important for the optoelectronic device applications. The surface morphology of AZO films depended on the atomization interval time. - Highlights: • Intermittent atomization is proved to be an effective measure. • Atomization interval time has an important influence on the crystallinity of films. • The surface morphology of ZnO films depends on atomization interval time. • Different hazes can be obtained by changing the atomization interval time.

  3. Effects of intermittent atomization on the properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linjie; Wang, Lixin; Qin, Xiujuan; Cui, Li; Shao, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates with different atomization interval times by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, morphology, and optical and electrical properties were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, UV-vis double beam spectrophotometer and 4 point probe method. ZnO thin films exhibited strong growth orientation along the (002) plane and the crystalline was affected by the atomization interval time. All the films had high transmittance and the films with interval times of 2 min and 4 min had good haze values for the transparent conducting oxide silicon solar cell applications. The AZO thin film had the best optical and electrical properties when the atomization interval time was 4 min. This is very important for the optoelectronic device applications. The surface morphology of AZO films depended on the atomization interval time. - Highlights: • Intermittent atomization is proved to be an effective measure. • Atomization interval time has an important influence on the crystallinity of films. • The surface morphology of ZnO films depends on atomization interval time. • Different hazes can be obtained by changing the atomization interval time.

  4. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  5. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Toma, Andrea; Francardi, Marco; Malerba, Mario; Alabastri, Alessandro; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Stockman, Mark Mark; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  6. The role of radial nodes of atomic orbitals for chemical bonding and the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-15

    The role of radial nodes, or of their absence, in valence orbitals for chemical bonding and periodic trends is discussed from a unified viewpoint. In particular, we emphasize the special role of the absence of a radial node whenever a shell with angular quantum number l is occupied for the first time (lack of "primogenic repulsion"), as with the 1s, 2p, 3d, and 4f shells. Although the consequences of the very compact 2p shell (e.g. good isovalent hybridization, multiple bonding, high electronegativity, lone-pair repulsion, octet rule) are relatively well known, it seems that some of the aspects of the very compact 3d shell in transition-metal chemistry are less well appreciated, e.g., the often weakened and stretched bonds at equilibrium structure, the frequently colored complexes, and the importance of nondynamical electron-correlation effects in bonding. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  8. Direct growth of large grain polycrystalline silicon films on aluminum-induced crystallization seed layer using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing-Rui; Lo, Shih-Yung; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Ou, Sin-Liang; Mao, Hsin-Yuan; Wang, Jui-Hao; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Large grain polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films on glass substrates have been deposited on an aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) seed layer using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). A poly-Si seed layer was first formed by the AIC process and a thicker poly-Si film was subsequently deposited upon the seed layer using HWCVD. The effects of AIC annealing parameters on the structural and electrical properties of the poly-Si seed layers were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and Hall measurements. It was found that the crystallinity of seed layer was enhanced with increasing the annealing duration and temperature. The poly-Si seed layer formed at optimum annealing parameters can reach a grain size of 700 nm, hole concentration of 3.5 × 10 18 cm −3 , and Hall mobility of 22 cm 2 /Vs. After forming the seed layer, poly-Si films with good crystalline quality and high growth rate (> 1 nm/s) can be obtained using HWCVD. These results indicated that the HWCVD-deposited poly-Si film on an AIC seed layer could be a promising candidate for thin-film Si photovoltaic applications. - Highlights: ►Poly-Si seed layers are formed by aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) process. ►Poly-Si on AIC seed layers are prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. ►AIC process parameters affect structural properties of poly-Si films. ►Increasing the annealing duration and temperature increases the film crystallinity.

  9. Experimental research on the contrast production of the chemical elements with the atomic numbers 1-83 in a computer-totalbody-tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, H.; Burmester, U.; Stringaris, K.

    1979-01-01

    The contrast production for the chemical elements with the atomic numbers Z=1-83 were determined by computer-tomography. With the formula relation of the Δ-number and the atomic number can one compute the contrast production of any chosen chemical compound. Iodine-free and inorganic iodine-containing contrast media are examined for their contrast production and compared with presently used organic iodine-containing contrast media. The contrast enhancement of organic contrast media in tissue are discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Electrical and materials properties of ZrO2 gate dielectrics grown by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Charles M.; Triplett, Baylor B.; McIntyre, Paul C.; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Haukka, Suvi; Tuominen, Marko

    2001-04-01

    Structural and electrical properties of gate stack structures containing ZrO2 dielectrics were investigated. The ZrO2 films were deposited by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) after different substrate preparations. The structure, composition, and interfacial characteristics of these gate stacks were examined using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ZrO2 films were polycrystalline with either a cubic or tetragonal crystal structure. An amorphous interfacial layer with a moderate dielectric constant formed between the ZrO2 layer and the substrate during ALCVD growth on chemical oxide-terminated silicon. Gate stacks with a measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of 1.3 nm showed leakage values of 10-5 A/cm2 at a bias of -1 V from flatband, which is significantly less than that seen with SiO2 dielectrics of similar EOT. A hysteresis of 8-10 mV was seen for ±2 V sweeps while a midgap interface state density (Dit) of ˜3×1011 states/cm eV was determined from comparisons of measured and ideal capacitance curves.

  11. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: a chemical chaperone at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Brian J; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-04-27

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea and 4 M TMAO/8 M urea solutions, in addition to other control simulations, to investigate this effect at the atomic level. In 8 M urea, the protein unfolds, and urea acts in both a direct and indirect manner to achieve this effect. In contrast, introduction of 4 M TMAO counteracts the effect of urea and the protein remains well structured. TMAO makes few direct interactions with the protein. Instead, it prevents unfolding of the protein by structuring the solvent. In particular, TMAO orders the solvent and discourages it from competing with intraprotein H bonds and breaking up the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  12. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  13. Chemical analyses of hot springs, pools, geysers, and surface waters from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and vicinity, 1974-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, James W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Jenne, Everett A.; Vivit, Davison V.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents all analytical determinations for samples collected from Yellowstone National Park and vicinity during 1974 and 1975. Water temperature, pH, Eh, and dissolved O2 were determined on-site. Total alkalinity and F were determined on the day of sample collection. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was used to determine concentrations of Li, Na, K, Ca, and Mg. Ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry was used to determine concentrations of Fe(II), Fe(III), As(III), and As(V). Direct-current plasma-optical-emission spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of B, Ba, Cd, Cs, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zn. Two samples collected from Yellowstone Park in June 1974 were used as reference samples for testing the plasma analytical method. Results of these tests demonstrate acceptable precision for all detectable elements. Charge imbalance calculations revealed a small number of samples that may have been subject to measurement errors in pH or alkalinity. These data represent some of the most complete analyses of Yellowstone waters available.

  14. An Overt Chemical Protective Garment Reduces Thermal Strain Compared with a Covert Garment in Warm-Wet but Not Hot-Dry Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Maley

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A commercial chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN protective covert garment has recently been developed with the aim of reducing thermal strain. A covert CBRN protective layer can be worn under other clothing, with equipment added for full chemical protection when needed. However, it is unknown whether the covert garment offers any alleviation to thermal strain during work compared with a traditional overt ensemble. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare thermal strain and work tolerance times during work in an overt and covert ensemble offering the same level of CBRN protection.Methods: Eleven male participants wore an overt (OVERT or covert (COVERT CBRN ensemble and walked (4 km·h−1, 1% grade for a maximum of 120 min in either a wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] of 21, 30, or 37°C (Neutral, WarmWet and HotDry, respectively. The trials were ceased if the participants' gastrointestinal temperature reached 39°C, heart rate reached 90% of maximum, walking time reached 120 min or due to self-termination.Results: All participants completed 120 min of walking in Neutral. Work tolerance time was greater in OVERT compared with COVERT in WarmWet (P < 0.001, 116.5[9.9] vs. 88.9[12.2] min, respectively, though this order was reversed in HotDry (P = 0.003, 37.3[5.3] vs. 48.4[4.6] min, respectively. The rate of change in mean body temperature and mean skin temperature was greater in COVERT (0.025[0.004] and 0.045[0.010]°C·min−1, respectively compared with OVERT (0.014[0.004] and 0.027[0.007]°C·min−1, respectively in WarmWet (P < 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively. However, the rate of change in mean body temperature and mean skin temperature was greater in OVERT (0.068[0.010] and 0.170[0.026]°C·min−1, respectively compared with COVERT (0.059[0.004] and 0.120[0.017]°C·min−1, respectively in HotDry (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively. Thermal sensation, thermal comfort, and ratings of perceived

  15. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklem, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H ↔ X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H ↔ X + + H − have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  16. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper in nickel-base alloys with various chemical modifiers*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Shiue, Chia-Chann; Chang, Shiow-Ing

    1997-07-01

    The analytical characteristics of copper in nickel-base alloys have been investigated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Deuterium background correction was employed. The effects of various chemical modifiers on the analysis of copper were investigated. Organic modifiers which included 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino-phenol) (Br-PADAP), ammonium citrate, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-naphthol, 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and Triton X-100 were studied. Inorganic modifiers palladium nitrate, magnesium nitrate, aluminum chloride, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen peroxide and potassium nitrate were also applied in this work. In addition, zirconium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide precipitation methods have also been studied. Interference effects were effectively reduced with Br-PADAP modifier. Aqueous standards were used to construct the calibration curves. The detection limit was 1.9 pg. Standard reference materials of nickel-base alloys were used to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The copper contents determined with the proposed method agreed closely with the certified values of the reference materials. The recoveries were within the range 90-100% with relative standard deviation of less than 10%. Good precision was obtained.

  17. Influence of crystal defects on the chemical reactivity of recoil atoms in oxygen-containing chromium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costea, T.

    1969-01-01

    The influence of crystal defects on the chemical reactivity of recoil atoms produced by the reaction 50 Cr (n,γ) 51 Cr in oxygen-containing chromium compounds has been studied. Three methods have been used to introduce the defects: doping (K 2 CrO 4 doped with BaCrO 4 ), irradiation by ionizing radiation (K 2 CrO 4 irradiated in the presence of Li 2 CO 3 ) and non-stoichiometry (the semi-conducting oxides of the CrO 3 -Cr 2 O 3 series). The thermal annealing kinetics of the irradiated samples have been determined, and the activation energy has been calculated. In all cases it has been observed that there is a decrease in the activation energy for thermal annealing in the presence of the defects. In order to explain the annealing process, an electronic mechanism has been proposed based on the interaction between the recoil species and the charge-carriers (holes or electrons). (author) [fr

  18. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  19. HOT 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen......Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  20. HOT 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette

    Undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og hvad der burde være hot på læseområdet med 21 læsekyndige. Undersøgelsen er gennemført siden 2010. HOT-undersøgelsen er foretaget af Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning - Professionshøjskolerne i samarb. med Dansklærerforeningen...

  1. HOT 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager 21 læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet....

  2. Water Column Chemical Data of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program in the North Pacific 100 Miles North of Oahu, Hawaii for Cruises HOT199-227 during 2008-2010 (NODC Accession 0088839)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The HOT program makes repeated observations of the physics, biology and chemistry at a site approximately 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii. Two stations are visited...

  3. Chemical consequences of nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.H.; Lancas, F.M.; Andrade, J.C. de; Collins, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The recombination processes of chemical bonds in liquid phase, after being split by nuclear transformations, include hot and diffuse reactions. Both processes probably occur by different mechanisms. The direct substitution process as well as processes which involve atoms, ions or other fragments retained in 'cages' formed by surrounding molecules, are processes not sensitive to the presence of a sequestering agent. The diffuse reactions whose fragments escaped from the 'cage' involve reactions with any reactive species found in the medium. (Author) [pt

  4. Hot isostatically-pressed aluminosilicate glass-ceramic with natural crystalline analogues for immobilizing the calcined high-level nuclear waste at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.

    1993-12-01

    The additives Si, Al, MgO, P 2 O 5 were mechanically blended with fluorinelsodium calcine in varying proportions. The batches were vacuum sealed in stainless steel canisters and hot isostatically pressed at 20,000 PSI and 1000 C for 4 hours. The resulting suite of glass-ceramic waste forms parallels the natural rocks in microstructural and compositional heterogeneity. Several crystalline phases ar analogous in composition and structure to naturally occurring minerals. Additional crystalline phases are zirconia and Ca-Mg borate. The glasses are enriched in silica and alumina. Approximately 7% calcine elements occur dissolved in this glass and the total glass content in the waste forms averages 20 wt%. The remainder of the calcine elements are partitioned into crystalline phases at 75 wt% calcine waste loading. The waste forms were tested for chemical durability in accordance with the MCC1-test procedure. The leach rates are a function of the relative proportions of additives and calcine, which in turn influence the composition and abundances of the glass and crystalline phases. The DOE leach rate criterion of less than 1 g/m 2 -day is met by all the elements B, Cs and Na are increased by lowering the melt viscosity. This is related to increased crystallization or devitrification with increases in MgO addition. This exploratory work has shown that the increases in waste loading occur by preferred partitioning of the calcine components among crystalline and glass phases. The determination of optimum processing parameters in the form of additive concentration levels, homogeneous blending among the components, and pressure-temperature stabilities of phases must be continued to eliminate undesirable effects of chemical composition, microstructure and glass devitrification

  5. Investigation of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on TiN substrates using CupraSelect as precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    Copper films were deposited on oxidized Si substrates covered with TiN using a novel chemical vapor deposition reactor in which reactions were assisted by a heated tungsten filament (hot-wire CVD, HWCVD). Liquid at room temperature hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) was directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a direct-liquid injection (DLI) system using N2 as carrier gas. The deposition rates of HWCVD Cu films obtained on TiN covered substrates were found to increase with filament temperature (65 and 170 degrees C were tested). The resistivities of HWCVD Cu films were found to be higher than for thermally grown films due to the possible presence of impurities into the Cu films from the incomplete dissociation of the precursor and W impurities caused by the presence of the filament. For HWCVD films grown at a filament temperature of 170 degrees C, smaller grains are formed than at 65 degrees C as shown from the taken SEM micrographs. XRD diffractograms taken on Cu films deposited on TiN could not reveal the presence of W compounds originating from the filament because the relative peak was masked by the TiN [112] peak.

  6. Physical and chemical parameter correlations with technical and technological characteristics of heating systems and the presence of Legionella spp. in the hot water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, Anita; Štambuk-Giljanović, Nives

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Legionella spp. and compare the quality of hot water between four facilities for accommodation located in Southern Croatia (the Split-Dalmatian County). The research included data collection on the technical and technological characteristics in the period from 2009 to 2012. The survey included a type of construction material for the distribution and internal networks, heating system water heater type, and water consumption. Changes in water quality were monitored by determination of the physical and chemical parameters (temperature, pH, free chlorine residual concentrations, iron, zinc, copper and manganese) in the samples, as well as the presence and concentration of bacteria Legionella spp. The temperature is an important factor for the development of biofilms, and it is in negative correlation with the appearance of Legionella spp. Positive correlations between the Fe and Zn concentrations and Legionella spp. were established, while the inhibitory effect of a higher Cu concentration on the Legionella spp. concentration was proven. Legionella spp. were identified in 38/126 (30.2%) of the water samples from the heating system with zinc-coated pipes, as well as in 78/299 (26.1%) of the samples from systems with plastic pipes. A similar number of Legionella spp. positive samples were established regardless of the type of the water heating system (central or independent). The study confirms the necessity of regular microbial contamination monitoring of the drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs).

  7. The influence of charge effect on the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Nelson, B.P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Mahan, A.H.; Crandall, R.S.; Benner, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors observe at lower substrate temperatures that the scatter in the dark conductivity on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films grown on insulating substrates (e.g., Corning 7059 glass) by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique (HWCVD) can be five orders of magnitude or more. This is especially true at deposition temperatures below 350 C. However, when the authors grow the same materials on substrates with a conductive grid, virtually all of their films have acceptable dark conductivity (< 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} S/cm) at all deposition temperatures below 425 C. This is in contrast to only about 20% of the materials grown in this same temperature range on insulating substrates having an acceptable dark conductivity. The authors estimated an average energy of 5 eV electrons reaching the growing surface in vacuum, and did additional experiments to see the influence of both the electron flux and the energy of the electrons on the film growth. Although these effects do not seem to be important for growing a-Si:H by HWCVD on conductive substrates, they help better understand the important parameters for a-Si:H growth, and thus, to optimize these parameters in other applications of HWCVD technology.

  8. Chemical states of piled-up phosphorus and arsenic atoms at the SiO2/Si interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Yusuke; Ono, Kanta; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Uematsu, Masashi; Baba, Yuji; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Oshima, Masaharu

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the positions of the piled-up phosphorus atoms at the SiO 2 /Si interface using the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EXAFS and XPS data can be well explained on the assumption that the piled-up arsenic atoms exist at the tetrahedral sites. On the contrary, phosphorus atoms exist not at the tetrahedral sites but at the denser sites. The depth profile measurements of XPS have revealed that the piled-up arsenic and phosphorus atoms exist within 20A from the interface. (author)

  9. TWO REGIMES OF INTERACTION OF A HOT JUPITER’S ESCAPING ATMOSPHERE WITH THE STELLAR WIND AND GENERATION OF ENERGIZED ATOMIC HYDROGEN CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Prokopov, P. A.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G. [Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Acad. Sci., Graz (Austria); Johnstone, C. P., E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.at [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of escaping the upper atmosphere of a hydrogen-rich non-magnetized analog of HD 209458b with a stellar wind (SW) of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model. A realistic Sun-like spectrum of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation, which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, together with hydrogen photochemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric HD outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and SW interaction have been modeled. These are: (1) the “ captured by the star ” regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe toward the star, and (2) the “ blown by the wind ” regime, when sufficiently strong SW confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in detail the HD interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the SW, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud, either as a paraboloid shell between the ionopause and bowshock (for the “ blown by the wind ” regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and SW (for the “ captured by the star ” regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Ly α absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.

  10. TWO REGIMES OF INTERACTION OF A HOT JUPITER’S ESCAPING ATMOSPHERE WITH THE STELLAR WIND AND GENERATION OF ENERGIZED ATOMIC HYDROGEN CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Prokopov, P. A.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of escaping the upper atmosphere of a hydrogen-rich non-magnetized analog of HD 209458b with a stellar wind (SW) of its host G-type star at different orbital distances is simulated with a 2D axisymmetric multi-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model. A realistic Sun-like spectrum of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation, which ionizes and heats the planetary atmosphere, together with hydrogen photochemistry, as well as stellar-planetary tidal interaction are taken into account to generate self-consistently an atmospheric HD outflow. Two different regimes of the planetary and SW interaction have been modeled. These are: (1) the “ captured by the star ” regime, when the tidal force and pressure gradient drive the planetary material beyond the Roche lobe toward the star, and (2) the “ blown by the wind ” regime, when sufficiently strong SW confines the escaping planetary atmosphere and channels it into the tail. The model simulates in detail the HD interaction between the planetary atoms, protons and the SW, as well as the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) around the planet due to charge exchange between planetary atoms and stellar protons. The revealed location and shape of the ENA cloud, either as a paraboloid shell between the ionopause and bowshock (for the “ blown by the wind ” regime), or a turbulent layer at the contact boundary between the planetary stream and SW (for the “ captured by the star ” regime) are of importance for the interpretation of Ly α absorption features in exoplanetary transit spectra and characterization of the plasma environments.

  11. High-contrast sub-Doppler absorption spikes in a hot atomic vapor cell exposed to a dual-frequency laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Coget, Grégoire; Boudot, Rodolphe; Brazhnikov, Denis; Taichenachev, Alexei; Yudin, Valeriy; De Clercq, Emeric

    2017-01-01

    The saturated absorption technique is an elegant method widely used in atomic and molecular physics for high-resolution spectroscopy, laser frequency standards and metrology purposes. We have recently discovered that a saturated absorption scheme with a dual-frequency laser can lead to a significant sign reversal of the usual Doppler-free dip, yielding a deep enhanced-absorption spike. In this paper, we report detailed experimental investigations of this phenomenon, together with a full in-depth theoretical description. It is shown that several physical effects can support or oppose the formation of the high-contrast central spike in the absorption profile. The physical conditions for which all these effects act constructively and result in very bright Doppler-free resonances are revealed. Apart from their theoretical interest, results obtained in this manuscript are of great interest for laser spectroscopy and laser frequency stabilization purposes, with applications in laser cooling, matter-wave sensors, atomic clocks or quantum optics. (paper)

  12. Woody biomass: Niche position as a source of sustainable renewable chemicals and energy and kinetics of hot-water extraction/hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to chemicals and energy is imperative to sustaining our way of life as known to us today. Fossil chemical and energy sources are traditionally regarded as wastes from a distant past. Petroleum, natural gas, and coal are not being regenerated in a sustainable manner. However, biomass sources such as algae, grasses, bushes and forests are continuously being replenished. Woody biomass represents the most abundant and available biomass source. Woody biomass is a reliably sustainable source of chemicals and energy that could be replenished at a rate consistent with our needs. The biorefinery is a concept describing the collection of processes used to convert biomass to chemicals and energy. Woody biomass presents more challenges than cereal grains for conversion to platform chemicals due to its stereochemical structures. Woody biomass can be thought of as comprised of at least four components: extractives, hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. Each of these four components has a different degree of resistance to chemical, thermal and biological degradation. The biorefinery concept proposed at ESF (State University of New York - College of Environmental Science and Forestry) aims at incremental sequential deconstruction, fractionation/conversion of woody biomass to achieve efficient separation of major components. The emphasis of this work is on the kinetics of hot-water extraction, filling the gap in the fundamental understanding, linking engineering developments, and completing the first step in the biorefinery processes. This first step removes extractives and hemicellulose fractions from woody biomass. While extractives and hemicellulose are largely removed in the extraction liquor, cellulose and lignin largely remain in the residual woody structure. Xylo-oligomers and acetic acid in the extract are the major components having the greatest potential value for development. Extraction/hydrolysis involves at least 16 general reactions that could

  13. Fe3−δO4/MgO/Co magnetic tunnel junctions synthesized by full in situ atomic layer and chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantovan, R; Vangelista, S; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B; Lamperti, A; Fanciulli, M; Manca, N; Pellegrino, L

    2014-01-01

    Fe 3−δ O 4 /MgO/Co magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) are synthesized on top of ∼1 inch Si/SiO 2 substrates by conducting a full in situ chemical vapour and atomic layer deposition process with no vacuum break. Tunnel magnetoresistance up to 6% is measured at room temperature, increasing to 12.5% at 120 K. Our results demonstrate the possibility of using full-chemical processes to synthesize functional MTJs, and this could provide a path towards the use of cost-effective methods to produce magnetic devices on a large scale. (fast track communication)

  14. Physics in Brazil in the next decade: atomic, molecular and optical physics, biological, chemical and medical physics, physics teaching and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is an overview of physics in Brazil in the next decade. It is specially concerned with atomic, molecular and optical physics, biological chemical and medical physics, and also teaching of physics and plasma physics. It presents the main research groups in Brazil in the above mentioned areas. It talks as well, about financing new projects and the costs involved to improve these areas. (A.C.A.S.)

  15. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-01-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  16. Theoretical study of atomic structure of Zhot plasma and population inversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennou, Helene.

    1983-05-01

    This thesis presents a theoretical method for atomic-structure calculations (energy levels, wave functions, oscillator strengths): it is a modified Hartree-Fock method including the spin-orbit interaction in the variationnal process. Two applications are first described: one concerning the resonance lines of the Krypton isoelectronic sequence, the other having for purpose the interpretation of Lsub(α) and Lsub(β) satellites in Copper. A description is made of an original collisional-radiative model, which makes use of the preceding method, and allows to calculate the populations of a great number of ionic excited levels in a plasma. This model is used in a detailed study of the Al 10+ Lithium -like ion spectrum. It is able to explain the apparition of inversion populations for some special electronic densities and temperatures, for example between the levels corresponding to the transitions observed at 103.8, 105.7 and 154.7 A [fr

  17. HOT 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  18. HOT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henriette Romme

    En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010.......En undersøgelse af, hvad der er hot - og burde være hot på læseområdet. I undersøgelsen deltager en række læsekyndige fra praksisfeltet, professionshøjskolerne og forskningsområdet. Undersøgelsen er gentaget hvert år siden 2010....

  19. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Nanoscale Chemical Expansion in PrxCe1-xO2-δ during In Situ Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Jessica G; Lee, Ja Kyung; Defferriere, Thomas; Hughes, Gareth M; Raja, Shilpa N; Tuller, Harry L; Warner, Jamie H; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2018-02-27

    Thin film nonstoichiometric oxides enable many high-temperature applications including solid oxide fuel cells, actuators, and catalysis. Large concentrations of point defects (particularly, oxygen vacancies) enable fast ionic conductivity or gas exchange kinetics in these materials but also manifest as coupling between lattice volume and chemical composition. This chemical expansion may be either detrimental or useful, especially in thin film devices that may exhibit enhanced performance through strain engineering or decreased operating temperatures. However, thin film nonstoichiometric oxides can differ from bulk counterparts in terms of operando defect concentrations, transport properties, and mechanical properties. Here, we present an in situ investigation of atomic-scale chemical expansion in Pr x Ce 1-x O 2-δ (PCO), a mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxide relevant to electrochemical energy conversion and high-temperature actuation. Through a combination of electron energy loss spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy with in situ heating, we characterized chemical strains and changes in oxidation state in cross sections of PCO films grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) at temperatures reaching 650 °C. We quantified, both statically and dynamically, the nanoscale chemical expansion induced by changes in PCO redox state as a function of position and direction relative to the film-substrate interface. Additionally, we observed dislocations at the film-substrate interface, as well as reduced cation localization to threading defects within PCO films. These results illustrate several key aspects of atomic-scale structure and mechanical deformation in nonstoichiometric oxide films that clarify distinctions between films and bulk counterparts and that hold several implications for operando chemical expansion or "breathing" of such oxide films.

  20. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by 3O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O 2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  1. On the chemistry of the lightest exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical aspects of formation of three hydrogen-like exotic atoms, positronium, muonium and pionic hydrogen are discussed. For positronium two formation mechanisms, the Ore model with hot-atom reactions, and the spur reaction model are set against experimental observations in solutions. The use of pionic hydrogen atoms in obtaining information on the bond properties of hydrogen is illustrated by recent experiments performed in JINR. The use of negative pions in chemistry is demonstrated by electronic structure investigations performed in Dubna. The probability W that in a chemical system containing bound hydrogen atoms a stopped negative pion is captured by a proton reflects the bond properties of hydrogen. Recent results haVe shown that the hydrogen bond formation in liquid water and the coordination of water molecules in aquacomplexes lead to significant decreases in probability W for water. A comparison of the chemical uses of the exotic atoms shows that positronium and muonium inform us on intermolecular level probing a small environment of a few molecules while the pionic hydrogen atoms deliver information on the chemical bond of hydrogen, i.e. on intramolecular level

  2. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Nazarov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  3. Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reactions--Insights into the Particle Model and the Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on an interview study of 18 Grade 10-12 students' model-based reasoning of a chemical reaction: the reaction of magnesium and oxygen at the submicro level. It has been proposed that chemical reactions can be conceptualised using two models: (i) the "particle model," in which a reaction is regarded as the simple…

  4. The Reactions of Hot Fluorine-18 with Gaseous Carbon Tetrafluoride; Reactions des Atomes {sup 18}F Chauds avec le Tetrafluorure de Carbone en Phase Gazeuse; Reaktsii goryachikh atomov ftora-18 s gazovoj fazoj tetraftormetana; Reacciones de Atomos Calientes de Fluor-18 con Tetrafluoruro de Carbono Gaseoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colebourne, N.; Todd, J. F.J.; Wolfgang, R. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1965-04-15

    Studies on the reactions of hot Fie atoms with carbon tetrafluoride are reported. Gaseous samples were exposed to the 40-60 MeV (maximum) bremsstrahlung beam of the Yale University Electron Accelerator. The F{sup 19} ({gamma}, n) F{sup 18} process produces F{sup 18} with a kinetic energy of the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} eV. These species lose energy by collision and are expected to reach the ''chemical'' energy range (< 100 eV) as ground state atoms. Ethylene was found to be a good scavenger for thermal F{sup 18} atoms. Analysis of products was made using standard radio-gas chromatography techniques. The system was found to be quite sensitive to extraneous radiation damage effects and appropriate precautions were taken. Hot displacement reactions, similar to those observed for hot hydrogen, but much less efficient, were found: F{sup 18} + CF{sup 4} --> CF{sub 3}F{sup 18} + F, F{sup 18} +CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 2}F{sup 18} + (F + F), It was impossible to study the abstraction reaction F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} --> CF{sub 3} + FF{sup 18} directly. However, indirect evidence suggests that it also has a low efficiency. Detailed studies of the effect of moderator on the F{sup 18} + CF{sub 4} system have been made. The data obtained were analysed by means of the kinetic theory of hot reactions. The system was found to be in accord with this formalism, providing quantitative confirmation of the present interpretation of the results. The carbon tetrafluoride and methane systems provide a basis for some tentative conclusions on the mechanisms of hot fluorine atom reactions. At present it appears that with certain important, but natural, modifications the model first developed for hot hydrogen atoms is applicable [French] Le memoire est consacre a des etudes sur les reactions des atomes {sup 18}F chauds avec le tetrafluorure de carbone. Des echantillons gazeux ont ete exposes a un faisceau de rayonnements de freinage de 40 a 60 MeV (maximum) emis par l'accelerateur d

  5. Atomic-Scale Observations of (010) LiFePO4 Surfaces Before and After Chemical Delithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Fisher, Craig A J; Kato, Takeharu; Ukyo, Yoshio; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-14

    The ability to view directly the surface structures of battery materials with atomic resolution promises to dramatically improve our understanding of lithium (de)intercalation and related processes. Here we report the use of state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques to probe the (010) surface of commercially important material LiFePO4 and compare the results with theoretical models. The surface structure is noticeably different depending on whether Li ions are present in the topmost surface layer or not. Li ions are also found to migrate back to surface regions from within the crystal relatively quickly after partial delithiation, demonstrating the facile nature of Li transport in the [010] direction. The results are consistent with phase transformation models involving metastable phase formation and relaxation, providing atomic-level insights into these fundamental processes.

  6. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: A chemical chaperone at atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Brian J.; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea ...

  7. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  8. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis.......HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  9. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO2 grown by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al 0.5 Ga 0.5 N and ZrO 2 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO 2 on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO 2 /AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO 2 /AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms

  10. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO2 on AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO 2 on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO 2 and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications

  11. Confocal absorption spectral imaging of MoS2: optical transitions depending on the atomic thickness of intrinsic and chemically doped MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Krishna P; Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Jubok; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Minsu; Kan, Min; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-11-07

    We performed a nanoscale confocal absorption spectral imaging to obtain the full absorption spectra (over the range 1.5-3.2 eV) within regions having different numbers of layers and studied the variation of optical transition depending on the atomic thickness of the MoS2 film. Three distinct absorption bands corresponding to A and B excitons and a high-energy background (BG) peak at 2.84 eV displayed a gradual redshift as the MoS2 film thickness increased from the monolayer, to the bilayer, to the bulk MoS2 and this shift was attributed to the reduction of the gap energy in the Brillouin zone at the K-point as the atomic thickness increased. We also performed n-type chemical doping of MoS2 films using reduced benzyl viologen (BV) and the confocal absorption spectra modified by the doping showed a strong dependence on the atomic thickness: A and B exciton peaks were greatly quenched in the monolayer MoS2 while much less effect was shown in larger thickness and the BG peak either showed very small quenching for 1 L MoS2 or remained constant for larger thicknesses. Our results indicate that confocal absorption spectral imaging can provide comprehensive information on optical transitions of microscopic size intrinsic and doped two-dimensional layered materials.

  12. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  13. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  14. Composition and conductance distributions of single GeSi quantum rings studied by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y; Cui, J; Jiang, Z M; Yang, X J

    2013-02-15

    Atomic force microscopy imaging combined with selective chemical etching is employed to quantitatively investigate three-dimensional (3D) composition distributions of single GeSi quantum rings (QRs). In addition, the 3D quantitative composition distributions and the corresponding conductance distributions are simultaneously obtained on the same single GeSi QRs by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching, allowing us to investigate the correlations between the conductance and composition distributions of single QRs. The results show that the QRs' central holes have higher Ge content, but exhibit lower conductance, indicating that the QRs' conductance distribution is not consistent with their composition distribution. By comparing the topography, composition and conductance profiles of the same single QRs before and after different etching processes, it is found that the conductance distributions of GeSi QRs do not vary with the change of composition distribution. Instead, the QRs' conductance distributions are found to be consistent with their topographic shapes, which can be supposed to be due to the shape determined electronic structures.

  15. Assessing the role of "bottom-up" emissions and simplified chemical mechanisms in reconciling CESM2.0 with TOGA observations from the ORCAS and ATom-2 campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Kinnison, D. E.; Tilmes, S.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Stephens, B. B.; Apel, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    Surface albedo and precipitation over the Southern Ocean are sensitive to parameterizations of aerosol formation and cloud dynamics in global climate models. Observations of precursor gases for natural aerosols can help constrain the uncertainty in these parameterizations, if used in conjunction with an appropriately simplified chemical mechanism. We implement current oceanic "bottom-up" emission climatologies of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and isoprene in CESM2.0 (Lana et al. 2016; Archer et al. 2009) and compare modeled constituents from two separate chemical mechanisms with data obtained from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA) on the O2/N2 Ratios and CO2 Airborne Study in the Southern Ocean (ORCAS) and the Atmospheric Tomography Mission 2 (ATom-2). We use ORCAS measurements of DMS, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from over 10 flights in Jan. - Feb. 2016 as a training dataset to improve "bottom-up" emissions. Thereafter, we evaluate the scaled "top-down" emissions in CESM with TOGA data obtained from the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom-2) in Feb. 2017. Recent laboratory studies at NCAR confirm that TOGA surpasses proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and commercial gas chromatography (GC) instruments with respect to accurate measurements of oxygenated VOCs in low nitrogen oxide (NO) environments, such as MVK and MACR.

  16. Exploring Conceptual Frameworks of Models of Atomic Structures and Periodic Variations, Chemical Bonding, and Molecular Shape and Polarity: A Comparison of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students with High and Low Levels of Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' conceptual frameworks of models of atomic structure and periodic variations, chemical bonding, and molecular shape and polarity, and how these conceptual frameworks influence their quality of explanations and ability to shift among chemical representations. This study employed a purposeful sampling…

  17. On the Functionality of Complex Intermetallics: Frustration, Chemical Pressure Relief, and Potential Rattling Atoms in Y11Ni60C6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiming; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2016-10-17

    Intermetallic carbides provide excellent model systems for exploring how frustration can shape the structures and properties of inorganic materials. Combinations of several metals with carbon can be designed in which the formation of tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) intermetallics conflicts with the C atoms' requirement of trigonal prismatic or octahedral coordination environments, as offered by the simple close-packings (SCP) of equally sized spheres. In this Article, we explore the driving forces that lead to the coexistence of these incompatible arrangements in the Yb 11 Ni 60 C 6 -type compound Y 11 Ni 60 C 6 (cI154), as well as potential consequences of this intergrowth for the phase's physical properties. Our focus begins on the structure's SCP regions, which appear as C-stuffed versions of a AuCu 3 -type YNi 3 phase that is not observed on its own in the Y-Ni system. DFT-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) calculations on this hypothetical YNi 3 phase reveal large negative pressures within the Ni sublattice, as it is stretched to accommodate the size requirements of the Y atoms. In the Y 11 Ni 60 C 6 structure, two structural mechanisms for addressing these CP issues appear: the incorporation of interstitial C atoms, and the presence of interfaces with CaCu 5 -type domains. The relative roles of these two mechanisms are investigated with the CP analysis on a hypothetical YNi 3 C x series of C-stuffed AuCu 3 -type phases, the Y-Ni sublattice of Y 11 Ni 60 C 6 , and finally the full Y 11 Ni 60 C 6 structure. Through these calculations, the C atoms appear to play the roles of relieving positive Y CPs and supporting relaxation at the AuCu 3 -type/CaCu 5 -type interfaces, where the cancellation occurs between opposite CPs experienced by the Y atoms in the two parent structures (following the epitaxial stabilization mechanism). The CP analysis of Y 11 Ni 60 C 6 also highlights a sublattice of Y and Ni atoms with large negative CPs (and thus the potential for soft

  18. Chemical states of localized Fe atoms in ethylene matrices using in-beam Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y., E-mail: kyoshio@pc.uec.ac.jp [University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Yamada, Y. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Tanigawa, S. [University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Mihara, M. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Kubo, M. K. [International Christian University, Division of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Sato, W. [Kanazawa University, Institute of Science and Engineering (Japan); Miyazaki, J. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan); Nagatomo, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); Sato, Y.; Natori, D.; Suzuki, M. [University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Kobayashi, J. [International Christian University, Division of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Science (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    The reaction products of isolated single iron atoms in a low concentration matrix of ethylene were studied using in-beam Mössbauer spectroscopy with a short-lived {sup 57}Mn (T{sub 1/2}=1.45 m) beam. The in-beam Mössbauer spectrum of {sup 57}Fe arising from {sup 57}Mn in a matrix of ethylene and argon measured at 16 K was analyzed with four components. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to confirm the assignments. It was suggested that the reaction produced monoiron species of Fe(C {sub 2}H{sub 4}) with a spin state of S = 2.

  19. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Erico

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g -1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g -1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively (n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l -1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition of Chemical Passivation Layers and High Performance Anti-Reflection Coatings on Back-Illuminated Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A back-illuminated silicon photodetector has a layer of Al2O3 deposited on a silicon oxide surface that receives electromagnetic radiation to be detected. The Al2O3 layer has an antireflection coating deposited thereon. The Al2O3 layer provides a chemically resistant separation layer between the silicon oxide surface and the antireflection coating. The Al2O3 layer is thin enough that it is optically innocuous. Under deep ultraviolet radiation, the silicon oxide layer and the antireflection coating do not interact chemically. In one embodiment, the silicon photodetector has a delta-doped layer near (within a few nanometers of) the silicon oxide surface. The Al2O3 layer is expected to provide similar protection for doped layers fabricated using other methods, such as MBE, ion implantation and CVD deposition.

  1. Local atomic structure and chemical order in amorphous SiGe:H and SiC:H alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarkiewicz, T.; Stapinski, T.

    1994-01-01

    The local structure and chemical ordering in amorphous hydrogenated silicon-germanium and silicon-carbon alloys were analyzed mainly with the help of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, Raman scattering and electron diffraction. Ge-Ge and Ge-Si distances were found to be independent of concentration and the composition of the first coordination shell around Ge is consistent with a random mixing of the two species in a-Si 1-x Ge:H alloy. The first-coordination-shell average bond lengths for Si-Si and SiC in a-Si 1-x C x :H are also constant with concentration x and the comparison of the first coordination shell composition around Si with average concentration indicates that the alloys tends to be chemically ordered. The degree of crystallinity in microcrystalline Si films determined by EXAFS is in agreement with that obtained in Raman scattering analysis. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs

  2. Silver chemical vapor generation for atomic absorption spectrometry: Minimization of transport losses, interferences and application to water analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Kratzer, Jan; Vobecký, Miloslav; Benada, Oldřich; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 10 (2010), s. 1618-1626 ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chemical vapor generation * 111Ag radioindicator * transport losses Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.372, year: 2010

  3. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  4. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoglu, Salih Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ), photon interaction cross sections (σ t ), effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25 keV and γ-rays at 88 keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition.

  5. Multipurpose reprocessing hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A multipurpose hot cell is being designed for use at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant for handling future scheduled fuels that cannot be adequately handled by the existing facilities and equipment. In addition to providing considerable flexibility to handle a wide variety of fuel sizes up to 2,500 lb in weight the design will provide for remote maintenance or replacement of the in-cell equipment with a minimum of exposure to personnel and also provide process piping connections for custom processing of small quantities of fuel. (auth)

  6. First-Principles Calculations for Chemical Reaction between Sodium Diethyldithiocarbamate and Transition-Metal (Cr) atom to Produce Cr(DDC)3 and Cr(DDC)2ODDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiyanto, Henry; Muhida, Rifki; Kishi, Tomoya; Rempillo, Ofelia; Rahman, Mahmudur; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno; Di\\ {n}o, Wilson Agerico; Matsumoto, Shigeno; Kasai, Hideaki

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the chemical reaction between a Cr transition-metal atom and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC), a complexing agent used to detect and extract Cr in human blood samples. Using density-functional-theory-based calculations, we determine their stable structures of Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes and obtain their dissociation energies. We found dissociation energies of -10.66 and -3.24 eV for Cr(DDC)2ODDC and Cr(DDC)3 complexes, respectively. Hence, on the basis of dissociation energies, we have verified that the reaction of NaDDC with Cr produces Cr(DDC)2ODDC as a major product.

  7. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  9. Chemical inhomogeneity in InxGa1-xN and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In x Ga 1-x N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In x Ga 1-x N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  10. Change in local atomic and chemical bonding structures of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloys by isothermal heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woo-Sik; Cho, Sung-June; Lee, Hyun-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report evaluation of the atomic-scale phase transformation characteristics in one of the most comprehensively utilized phase change materials today, Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film. The phase transformation of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 thin film from amorphous to hexagonal structure via fcc structure was confirmed by XRD measurements. The approximate values of optical energy gap are 0.72 and 0.50 eV, with slopes (B 1/2 ) in the extended absorption region of 5.3 x 10 5 and 10 x 10 5 cm -1 ·eV -1 for the amorphous and fcc-crystalline structures, respectively. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed strengthening of the Te-Te bond as well as weakening of the Ge-Te bond during the amorphous-to-crystalline transition. This trend was also observed in extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis where the Ge metallic bond lengths in the amorphous, fcc, and hexagonal structures were 0.262, 0.280, and 0.290 nm

  11. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g{sup −1} using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g{sup −1} using NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ir and 10 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion.

  12. Direct determination of arsenic in soil samples by fast pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation using sodium formate as a reductant followed by nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Zhang, Jingya; Bu, Fanlong

    2015-09-01

    This new study shows for the first time that sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via fast pyrolysis – chemical vapor generation. We found that the presence of thiourea greatly enhanced the generation efficiency and eliminated the interference of copper. We studied the reaction temperature, the volume of sodium formate, the reaction acidity, and the carried argon rate using nondispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under optimal conditions of T = 500 °C, the volumes of 30% sodium formate and 10% thiourea were 0.2 ml and 0.05 ml, respectively. The carrier argon rate was 300 ml min{sup −1} and the detection limit and precision of arsenic were 0.39 ng and 3.25%, respectively. The amount of arsenic in soil can be directly determined by adding trace amount of hydrochloric acid as a decomposition reagent without any sample pretreatment. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amount of arsenic in two soil-certified reference materials (GBW07453 and GBW07450), and the results were found to be in agreement with certified reference values. - Highlights: • Sodium formate can react with trace arsenic to form volatile species via pyrolysis–chemical vapor generation. • Thiourea can enhance the generation efficiency and eliminate the interference of copper. • Arsenic in soil Sample can be directly determined without sample pretreatment.

  13. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kuang Liao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD and chemical bath deposition (CBD as used by the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  14. Simulant molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms: bond dissociation energies and other thermodynamic and structural properties from quantum chemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; RaghuVeer, Krishans S; Ortiz, J V

    2011-08-04

    The CBS-QB3 and G4 thermochemical models have been used to generate energetic, structural, and spectroscopic data on a set of molecules with trivalent or pentavalent phosphorus atoms that can serve as simulants of chemical warfare agents. Based on structural data, the conformational stabilities of these molecules are explained in terms of the anomeric interaction within the OPOC and OPSC fragments. For those cases where experimental data are available, comparisons have been made between calculated and previously reported vibrational frequencies. All varieties of bond dissociation energies have been examined except those for C-H and P═O bonds. In trivalent phosphorus molecules, the O-C and S-C bonds have the lowest dissociation energies. In the pentavalent phosphorus set, the S-C bonds, followed by P-S bonds, have the lowest dissociation energies. In the fluorinated simulant molecules, the P-F bond is strongest, and the P-C or O-C bonds are weakest. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  16. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M. H.; Viana, G. A.; de Lima, M. M.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Marques, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH4) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  17. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M. H. Jr.; Viana, G. A.; Marques, F. C.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH 4 ) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  18. Quantitative Studies of the Reactions of Hot Tritium Atoms with Hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbon Mixtures; Etudes Quantitatives des Reactions des Atomes Chauds de Tritium avec les Hydrocarbures et les Melanges d'Hydrocarbures; Kolichestvennoe issledovanie reaktsij goryachikh atomov tritiya s gidrouglerodami i smesyami gidrouglerodov; Estudio Cuantitativo de las Reacciones de Atomos de Tritio Calientes con Hidrocarburos y Mezclas de Hidrocarburos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urch, D. S.; Welch, M. J. [Department Of Chemistry, Queen Mary College. University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    The kinetic theory of hot-atom reactions is expanded to cover the general system of two reactive species and an inert moderator. From results with a single reactant and moderator, two reactants without moderator, and two reactants with moderator, values of, or ratios of, the reactivity integral I and the average logarithmic energy loss per collision a can be calculated. New results are presented from the reaction of hot tritium produced by the He{sup 3}(n, p)H{sup 3} reaction with the following systems (all contain oxygen scavenger): ethane with helium moderator butane with helium moderator neopentane with helium moderator ethane and butane with and without helium moderator ethane and neopentane with and without helium moderator Values of a and I for the three reactants are calculated from the three types of system and the agreement between the results is discussed in the terms of the accuracy of the model. The results obtained from the different systems agree to within the limits of the experimental error, and this shows that the kinetic theory model can be applied to hot-atom systems with some certainty and that the assumptions made when considering mixtures are reasonable ones. The ratios of the reactivity of the hydrocarbons in mixtures with regard to substitution reactions are not the same as the ratios of the number of hydrogen atoms in the hydrocarbons. The values obtained for these ratios are explained in terms of the values of I and S (the collision cross-section) for the hydrocarbons. (author) [French] Les auteurs etendent la theorie cinetique des reactions des atomes chauds au systeme general forme par deux especes reactives et un ralentisseur inerte. A partir des resultats obtenus au moyen d'un seul corps en reaction et d'un ralentisseur, de deux corps en reaction sans ralentisseur et de deux corps en reaction avec ralentisseur, il est possible de calculer les valeurs ou les rapports de l'integrale de reactivite I, et de la perte d'energie logarithmique

  19. Electron - atom bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.

    1986-01-01

    Features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas are studied. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point-Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. Results agree with exact quantum-mechanical partial-wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point-Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential, the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. The scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses were also studied. It was found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T 1 /Z 2 . This scaling is exact in the case of the point-Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. Bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas were also studied describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas-Fermi mode. Gaunt factors were obtained with the relativistic partial-wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures

  20. Giant resonances in atoms and in fluorine cage molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, M.W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Giant resonances in the photoabsorption spectra of atoms occur in the extreme ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In order to observe absorption spectra in this region it is necessary to generate columns of atomic vapor which will often by very hot and chemically aggressive, and to contain them without solid windows between two regions of high vacuum, the spectrometer and the light source, usually an electron synchrotron. The technical problems are often formidable so that although it had long been recognized that giant resonances in solid lanthanides were essentially atomic phenomena (Fomichev et al. 1967, Dehmer et al. 1971) earlier investigations of giant resonances in atoms were limited to the more manageable elements which precede the transition rows, the inert gases, alkali and alkaline earth elements. In this paper the authors discusses the spectra of transition row atoms in order of decreasing localization (Smith and Kmetko 1983) viz. 4d → f, 5d → f, 3p → d, 4p → d and 5p → d. He tends to avoid discussion of the giant resonances themselves because their profiles and interpretation will be discussed comprehensively by other contributors. Instead he concentrates on the detailed analyses which have been attempted of the discrete structure which usually accompanies giant resonances in atoms. Interpretation of this structure can provide accurate determinations of thresholds for inner shell excitation in atoms and can also be used to anticipate structure which may overlie the giant resonances and distort their profiles. 75 references, 21 figures

  1. Probabilistic human health risk assessment of degradation-related chemical mixtures in heterogeneous aquifers: Risk statistics, hot spots, and preferential channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2015-06-01

    The increasing presence of toxic chemicals released in the subsurface has led to a rapid growth of social concerns and the need to develop and employ models that can predict the impact of groundwater contamination on human health risk under uncertainty. Monitored natural attenuation is a common remediation action in many contamination cases. However, natural attenuation can lead to the production of daughter species of distinct toxicity that may pose challenges in pollution management strategies. The actual threat that these contaminants pose to human health depends on the interplay between the complex structure of the geological media and the toxicity of each pollutant byproduct. This work addresses human health risk for chemical mixtures resulting from the sequential degradation of a contaminant (such as a chlorinated solvent) under uncertainty through high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. We systematically investigate the interaction between aquifer heterogeneity, flow connectivity, contaminant injection model, and chemical toxicity in the probabilistic characterization of health risk. We illustrate how chemical-specific travel times control the regime of the expected risk and its corresponding uncertainties. Results indicate conditions where preferential flow paths can favor the reduction of the overall risk of the chemical mixture. The overall human risk response to aquifer connectivity is shown to be nontrivial for multispecies transport. This nontriviality is a result of the interaction between aquifer heterogeneity and chemical toxicity. To quantify the joint effect of connectivity and toxicity in health risk, we propose a toxicity-based Damköhler number. Furthermore, we provide a statistical characterization in terms of low-order moments and the probability density function of the individual and total risks.

  2. Construction of concrete hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The standard is to be applied to rooms (hot cells) which are enclosed by a concrete shield and in which radioactive material is handled by remote control. The rooms may be in facilities for experimental purposes (e.g. development of fuel elements and materials or of chemical processes) or in facilities for production purposes (e.g. reprocessing of nuclear fuel or treatment of radioactive wastes). The standard is to give a design hasis for concrete hot cells and their installations which is to be applied by designers, constructors, future users and competent authorities as well as independent experts. (orig.) [de

  3. Construction of concrete hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The standard is to be applied to rooms (hot cells) which are enclosed by a concrete shield and in which radioactive material is handled by remote control. The rooms may be in facilities for experimental purposes (e.g. development of fuel elements and materials or of chemical processes) or in facilities for production purposes (e.g. reprocessing of nuclear fuel or treatment of radioactive wastes). The standard is to give a design basis for concrete hot cells and their installations which is to be applied by designers, constructors, future users and competent authorities as well as independent experts. (orig.) [de

  4. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  5. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Chemistry, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jin Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han Weiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Miao, Qiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.cn

    2006-07-15

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH{sub 4} solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h{sup -1} with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l{sup -1} for Hg{sup 2+} and 2.0 ng l{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  6. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hong; Jin Yan; Han Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi Shuping

    2006-01-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h -1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l -1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l -1 for CH 3 Hg + . The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l -1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3 Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples

  7. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  8. Isotopes and atomic weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinglian

    1990-01-01

    A review of the chemical and mass spectrometric methods of determining the atomic weights of elements is presented. A, special discussion is devoted to the calibration of the mass spectrometer with highly enriched isotopes. It is illustrated by the recent work on europium. How to choose the candidate element for new atomic weight determination forms the last section of the article

  9. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  10. 40 CFR 68.85 - Hot work permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.85 Hot work permit. (a) The owner or operator shall issue a hot work permit for hot work operations conducted on or near a covered process. (b...

  11. Influence of a Thiolate Chemical Layer on GaAs (100 Biofunctionalization: An Original Approach Coupling Atomic Force Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bienaime

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Widely used in microelectronics and optoelectronics; Gallium Arsenide (GaAs is a III-V crystal with several interesting properties for microsystem and biosensor applications. Among these; its piezoelectric properties and the ability to directly biofunctionalize the bare surface, offer an opportunity to combine a highly sensitive transducer with a specific bio-interface; which are the two essential parts of a biosensor. To optimize the biorecognition part; it is necessary to control protein coverage and the binding affinity of the protein layer on the GaAs surface. In this paper; we investigate the potential of a specific chemical interface composed of thiolate molecules with different chain lengths; possessing hydroxyl (MUDO; for 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (HS(CH211OH or carboxyl (MHDA; for mercaptohexadecanoic acid (HS(CH215CO2H end groups; to reconstitute a dense and homogeneous albumin (Rat Serum Albumin; RSA protein layer on the GaAs (100 surface. The protein monolayer formation and the covalent binding existing between RSA proteins and carboxyl end groups were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis. Characterization in terms of topography; protein layer thickness and stability lead us to propose the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface as the optimal chemical layer to efficiently graft proteins. This analysis was coupled with in situ MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements; which proved the presence of a dense and uniform grafted protein layer on the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface. We show in this study that a critical number of carboxylic docking sites (10% is required to obtain homogeneous and dense protein coverage on GaAs. Such a protein bio-interface is of fundamental importance to ensure a highly specific and sensitive biosensor.

  12. Effects of Temperature and Pressure on Hot-Atom Reactions in Bromoethane; Effets de la Temperature et de la Pression sur les Reactions des Atomes Chauds dans le Bromoethane; Vliyanie temperatury i davleniya na reaktsii goryachikh atomov v bromehtane; Efectos de la Temperatura y de la Presion en las Reacciones de Atomos Calientes en el Bromoetano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, A. J.; Mia, M. D.; Miller, G. E.; Shaw, P. F.D. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1965-04-15

    A study has been made of the yields of compounds containing Br{sup 80m} produced by irradiation of bromethane- bromine mixtures with 14 MeV neutrons at 18 Degree-Sign C, -80 Degree-Sign C and -115 Degree-Sign C, and at atmospheric pressure, and also at 18 Degree-Sign C at pressures up to 10{sup 4} atm. In addition to compounds previously reported in this system, small quantities of bromoethene, 1:2 dibromoethene, mono-and dibromopropanes, and mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-bromo- butanes have been found. There is also indirect evidence for the production of bromobutenes. The diffusion-dependent reactions are complex, and can be explained by assuming that pyrolysis of the liquid occurs in the vicinity of the hot atom to give bromoethyl radicals and ethylene. Addition of radicals to the latter then accounts for the formation of bromides containing more than two carbon atoms and for their diffusion-dependent yields. Reduction in temperature or increase in pressure generally causes an increase in yield attributable to a decreased rate of diffusion. The effect is most marked upon the yield of 1:2 dibromoethane, which is largely produced by the diffusive reaction of bromoethyl radicals and which increases fourfold by the application of 10{sup 4} atm because of the suppression of the dissociation CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}Br Rightwards-Arrow-Over-Leftwards-Arrow CH{sub 2} = CH{sub 2} + Br under the influence of the ''hot-spike''. By contrast, dissociation of the radical (CH{sub 3} - CHBr) into bromoethene and a hydrogen atom is energetically forbidden, and the yield of 1: 1 dibromoethane is roughly independent of pressure. The variation with temperature and pressure of the yield of bromoethane at large bromine concentrations is close to that predicted previously. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie les rendements en composes contenant {sup 80m}Br produits par exposition de melanges de bromoethane-brome a des neutrons de 14 MeV aux temperatures de 18 Degree-Sign , -80 Degree

  13. Atomic-Resolution Visualization of Distinctive Chemical Mixing Behavior of Ni, Co and Mn with Li in Layered Lithium Transition-Metal Oxide Cathode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Lv, Dongping; Wei, Yi; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Zhiguo; Kuppan, Saravanan; Yu, Jianguo; Luo, Langli; Edwards, Danny J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie; Pan, Feng; Chen, Guoying; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-07-06

    Capacity and voltage fading of layer structured cathode based on lithium transition metal oxide is closely related to the lattice position and migration behavior of the transition metal ions. However, it is scarcely clear about the behavior of each of these transition metal ions. We report direct atomic resolution visualization of interatomic layer mixing of transition metal (Ni, Co, Mn) and lithium ions in layer structured oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Using chemical imaging with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and DFT calculations, we discovered that in the layered cathodes, Mn and Co tend to reside almost exclusively at the lattice site of transition metal (TM) layer in the structure or little interlayer mixing with Li. In contrast, Ni shows high degree of interlayer mixing with Li. The fraction of Ni ions reside in the Li layer followed a near linear dependence on total Ni concentration before reaching saturation. The observed distinctively different behavior of Ni with respect to Co and Mn provides new insights on both capacity and voltage fade in this class of cathode materials based on lithium and TM oxides, therefore providing scientific basis for selective tailoring of oxide cathode materials for enhanced performance.

  14. Mg-doped ZnO thin films deposited by the atomic layer chemical vapor deposition for the buffer layer of CIGS solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao-Hui [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Center for Photovoltaic and Solar Energy, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen city 518055 (China); Cho, Eou-Sik [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sang Jik, E-mail: sjkwon@gachon.ac.kr [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Mg-doped ZnO film as CIGS buffer was prepared by ALD process. • The grain size of ZnO-like hexagonal phase decreased with Mg content. • The transmittance and crystallinity increased but the band gap decreased with temperature. - Abstract: Mg-doped ZnO [(Zn, Mg)O] thin films were prepared by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) process with different Mg content, using diethyl zinc, biscyclopentadienyl magnesium, and water as the metal and oxygen sources, respectively. The ratio of Mg to Zn was varied by changing the pulse ratio of MgCp{sub 2} to DEZn precursor to study its effect on the properties of (Zn, Mg)O thin films. From the experimental results, it was shown that the grain size of the ZnO-like hexagonal phase (Zn, Mg)O decreased as the Mg content increased. But the transmittance and optical band gap of (Zn, Mg)O films increased with the increase of the Mg content. In addition, the effect of the substrate temperature on the properties of (Zn, Mg)O films was also investigated. The deposition rate, transmittance, and crystallinity of (Zn, Mg)O films increased as the substrate temperature increased. But its band gap decreased slightly with the increase of substrate temperature.

  15. A Scalable Route to Nanoporous Large-Area Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes by Roll-to-Roll Chemical Vapor Deposition and Polymer Support Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Piran R; Mariappan, Dhanushkodi D; Dee, Nicholas T; Vyatskikh, Andrey; Zhang, Sui; Karnik, Rohit; Hart, A John

    2018-03-28

    Scalable, cost-effective synthesis and integration of graphene is imperative to realize large-area applications such as nanoporous atomically thin membranes (NATMs). Here, we report a scalable route to the production of NATMs via high-speed, continuous synthesis of large-area graphene by roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD), combined with casting of a hierarchically porous polymer support. To begin, we designed and built a two zone roll-to-roll graphene CVD reactor, which sequentially exposes the moving foil substrate to annealing and growth atmospheres, with a sharp, isothermal transition between the zones. The configurational flexibility of the reactor design allows for a detailed evaluation of key parameters affecting graphene quality and trade-offs to be considered for high-rate roll-to-roll graphene manufacturing. With this system, we achieve synthesis of uniform high-quality monolayer graphene ( I D / I G casting and postprocessing, show size-selective molecular transport with performance comparable to that of membranes made from conventionally synthesized graphene. Therefore, this work establishes the feasibility of a scalable manufacturing process of NATMs, for applications including protein desalting and small-molecule separations.

  16. Prediction and synthesis of a family of atomic laminate phases with Kagomé-like and in-plane chemical ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Martin; Lu, Jun; Meshkian, Rahele; Tao, Quanzheng; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    The enigma of MAX phases and their hybrids prevails. We probe transition metal (M) alloying in MAX phases for metal size, electronegativity, and electron configuration, and discover ordering in these MAX hybrids, namely, (V2/3Zr1/3)2AlC and (Mo2/3Y1/3)2AlC. Predictive theory and verifying materials synthesis, including a judicious choice of alloying M from groups III to VI and periods 4 and 5, indicate a potentially large family of thermodynamically stable phases, with Kagomé-like and in-plane chemical ordering, and with incorporation of elements previously not known for MAX phases, including the common Y. We propose the structure to be monoclinic C2/c. As an extension of the work, we suggest a matching set of novel MXenes, from selective etching of the A-element. The demonstrated structural design on simultaneous two-dimensional (2D) and 3D atomic levels expands the property tuning potential of functional materials. PMID:28776034

  17. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  18. Synergetic enhancement effect of ionic liquid and diethyldithiocarbamate on the chemical vapor generation of nickel for its atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuan; Li Yan; Wu Peng; Yan Xiuping

    2009-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid in combination with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) was used to synergetically improve the chemical vapor generation (CVG) of nickel. Volatile species of nickel were effectively generated through reduction of acidified analyte solution with KBH 4 in the presence of 0.02% DDTC and 25 mmol L -1 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C 4 mim]Br) at room temperature. Thus, a new flow injection (FI)-CVG-atomic fluorescence spectrometric (FI-CVG-AFS) method was developed for determination of nickel with a detection limit of 0.65 μg L -1 (3 s) and a sampling frequency of 180 h -1 . With consumption of 0.5 mL sample solution, an enhancement factor of 2400 was obtained. The precision (RSD) for eleven replicate determinations of 20 μg L -1 Ni was 3.4%. The developed FI-CVG-AFS method was successfully applied to determination of trace Ni in several certified biological reference materials.

  19. Comparative studies on conventional (water-hot acid) and non-conventional (ultrasonication) procedures for extraction and chemical characterization of pectin from peel waste of mango cultivar chaunsa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kausar, S.; Saeed, A.

    2015-01-01

    Pectin, a naturally occurring heteropolysaccharide, is widely used as a functional ingredient in food and pharmaceutical industries due to its gelling and stabilizing properties. During the present study pectin was extracted from peel of mango (cultivar Chaunsa) using conventional (water-hot acid) and non-conventional (ultrasonication) methods. In conventional method, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, or HCl was used under variable conditions of pH (2.0, 2.5, 3.0), temperature (70, 80, 90, 100 degree C), duration of extraction (30, 60, 90, 120 min), and solvents (ethanol, methanol, acetone, isopropyl alcohol). Maximum yield of 16.6 g pectin 100 g/sup -1/ peel was obtained with HNO/sub 3/ at pH 2.5, 90 degree C, 90 min extraction, and ethanol. Whereas in non-conventional method, ultrasonication was used for different time intervals (10, 20, 40 min) using HNO/sub 3/ at pH 2.5 and 90 degree C. Maximum yield of 15.8 g pectin 100 g/sup -1/ peel was obtained by this method in 20 min. Pectin extracted by the above two methods was found to be of high quality as was determined in respect of methoxyl and galacturonic acid contents, degree of esterification, equivalent weight, and FTIR spectra. Extraction of pectin from mango peel by employing non-conventional method (ultrasonication) was observed to be an energy efficient method due to its less extraction time (20 min as compared to 90 min in conventional method) suggesting its suitability on commercial scale for the extraction of pectin from mango and other available fruit peel wastes. (author)

  20. EXPERIENCE OF APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE OPTICO – EMISSION SPECTROMETER FOR MONITORING OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HOT-ROLLED PRODUCTS TO IMPLEMENT THE CUSTOMER’S REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kazakova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of requirements of customers in the automotive industry is the guarantee of lack of intermix of various brands of steel in a mill process of manufacture. For ensuring implementation of this requirement, it is necessary to carry out monitoring of chemical composition of each bar just before shipment, after its packing and application of the required marking. An optimal solution of this problem is application of the portable optico-emission spectrometer allowing to carry out tests of samples directly in place of location.

  1. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  2. Solar hot spots are still hot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, T.

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22. 14 refs

  3. Simulation of multi-atomic interactions in H-O-W system with the MD code CADAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, I.S.

    2005-01-01

    For future tokamak reactors, chemical erosion of tungsten armour surfaces under impact of hot deuterium-tritium plasma that contains impurities, for instance oxygen, is an important issue. Oxygen can form volatile molecular complexes O x W y at the surface, and the retained H-atoms form the volatile complexes H x O y , which mitigates the erosion (H states for hydrogen isotopes). The plasma impact can substantially destroy the complexes. To describe this H-O-W system, the molecular dynamics (MD) code CADAC was earlier developed using only pair-atomic interactions. Now CADAC is extended for multi-body forces to simulate molecular organization of atoms near the tungsten surface. The approach uses the Abell's model of empirical bond-order potentials in addition combined, for the first time, with a valence concept. CADAC simulates chemical features using atomic valences and the Morse potentials. The new model is introduced and model parameters are estimated

  4. Adsorption studies at ionized surface layers by means of hot atoms; Etude, a l'aide d'atomes excites, de l'adsorption dans des couches superficielles ionisees; Issledovanie pri pomoshchi goryachikh atomov adsorbtsii na ionizirovannykh poverkhnostnykh sloyakh; Estudios, con ayuda de atomos excitados, de la adsorcion en capas superficiales ionizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrahami, Menashe; Steiger, Naftali H [Department of Chemistry, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    1962-03-15

    Adsorption of ions at the surface of solutions of ionic surface-active substances can directly be studied using hot atoms. Extremely small amounts of suitable radioactive ions, or ions liable to undergo induced nuclear transformations in situ, are added to such solutions, replacing some of the normal counter ions coadsorbed at the primary-adsorbed organic ions. Hot atoms with energies from about 100 keV down to a few electron volts give ranges in water from about 1000 A down to monomoleeular layers. This makes them suitable for sensitive surface layer studies. The hot atoms ejected from the surface are collected and counted. Among {alpha}-disintegration recoils, the system Bi{sup 212}/Tl{sup 208} has proved to be suitable. Now, by refining the method, valuable information about adsorption conditions at sodium dodecyl sulphate surface layers could be found. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by following in time the collected recoil activity caused by Bi-ion adsorption. Adsorption isotherms of Bi-ions as a function of the bulk concentration of the surface-active substance under varying conditions of ionic strength, pH and Bi{sup 212} activity were measured. By comparing these isotherms with those obtained by measuring the surface tension of the solutions and calculating the surface excess with the aid of a suitably modified Gibbs' isotherm, the adsorption of Bi{sup +++} and Pb{sup ++} relative to that of Na{sup +} and H{sub 3}O{sup +}, and by this the extent of ion exchange in the adsorbed layer could be determined. As the method measures the adsorption of charged species, surface reactions transforming primary-adsorbed organic anions to a non-ionic state could be followed. Conclusions could be drawn about the formation of a non-ionized acid soap in the surface and about micelle formation in the bulk under various experimental conditions. (author) [French] L'adsorption d'ions a la surface de solutions de substances ioniques tensioactives peut etre etudiee

  5. Genomic Comparison of Two Family-Level Groups of the Uncultivated NAG1 Archaeal Lineage from Chemically and Geographically Disparate Hot Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Becraft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress based on single-cell genomics and metagenomic investigations of archaea in a variety of extreme environments has led to significant advances in our understanding of the diversity, evolution, and metabolic potential of archaea, yet the vast majority of archaeal diversity remains undersampled. In this work, we coordinated single-cell genomics with metagenomics in order to construct a near-complete genome from a deeply branching uncultivated archaeal lineage sampled from Great Boiling Spring (GBS in the U.S. Great Basin, Nevada. This taxon is distantly related (distinct families to an archaeal genome, designated “Novel Archaeal Group 1” (NAG1, which was extracted from a metagenome recovered from an acidic iron spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. We compared the metabolic predictions of the NAG1 lineage to better understand how these archaea could inhabit such chemically distinct environments. Similar to the NAG1 population previously studied in YNP, the NAG1 population from GBS is predicted to utilize proteins as a primary carbon source, ferment simple carbon sources, and use oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor under oxic conditions. However, GBS NAG1 populations contained distinct genes involved in central carbon metabolism and electron transfer, including nitrite reductase, which could confer the ability to reduce nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Despite inhabiting chemically distinct environments with large variations in pH, GBS NAG1 populations shared many core genomic and metabolic features with the archaeon identified from YNP, yet were able to carve out a distinct niche at GBS.

  6. Sintering with a chemical reaction as applied to uranium monocarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.; Caillat, R.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper provides a survey of different investigations whose aim was the preparation and fabrication of uranium monocarbide for nuclear use. If a chemical reaction takes place in the sample during the sintering operation, it may be expected that the atom rearrangements involved in this reaction should favour the sintering process and thereby lower the temperature needed to yield a body of a given density. With this hypothesis in mind, the following methods have been studied: - Sintering of U-C mixtures; - Sintering of UO 2 -C mixtures; - Hot pressing of U-C mixtures; - Extrusion of U-C mixtures. To generalize our result, it could be said that a chemical reaction does not lead to high densification, if one depends on a simple contact between discrete particles. On the contrary, a chemical reaction can help sintering if, as our hot pressing experiments shows, the densification can be achieved prior to the reaction. (author) [fr

  7. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  8. Gas diffusion ultrabarriers on polymer substrates using Al2O3 atomic layer deposition and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcia, P. F.; McLean, R. S.; Groner, M. D.; Dameron, A. A.; George, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films grown by Al 2 O 3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) and SiN plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have been tested as gas diffusion barriers either individually or as bilayers on polymer substrates. Single films of Al 2 O 3 ALD with thicknesses of ≥10 nm had a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ≤5x10 -5 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% relative humidity (RH), as measured by the Ca test. This WVTR value was limited by H 2 O permeability through the epoxy seal, as determined by the Ca test for the glass lid control. In comparison, SiN PECVD films with a thickness of 100 nm had a WVTR of ∼7x10 -3 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. Significant improvements resulted when the SiN PECVD film was coated with an Al 2 O 3 ALD film. An Al 2 O 3 ALD film with a thickness of only 5 nm on a SiN PECVD film with a thickness of 100 nm reduced the WVTR from ∼7x10 -3 to ≤5x10 -5 g/m 2 day at 38 deg. C/85% RH. The reduction in the permeability for Al 2 O 3 ALD on the SiN PECVD films was attributed to either Al 2 O 3 ALD sealing defects in the SiN PECVD film or improved nucleation of Al 2 O 3 ALD on SiN.

  9. Determination of trace cadmium in rice by liquid spray dielectric barrier discharge induced plasma - chemical vapor generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Zhu, Zhenli; Bao, Zhengyu; Zheng, Hongtao; Hu, Shenghong

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium contamination in rice has become an increasing concern in many countries including China. A simple, cost-effective, and highly sensitive method was developed for the determination of trace cadmium in rice samples based on a new high-efficient liquid spray dielectric barrier discharge induced plasma (LSDBD) vapor generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The analytical procedure involves the efficient formation of Cd volatile species by LSDBD plasma induced chemical processes without the use of any reducing reagents (Na/KBH4 in conventional hydride generation). The effects of the addition of organic substances, different discharge parameters such as discharge voltage and discharge gap, as well as the foreign ion interferences were investigated. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.01 μg L- 1 and a precision of 0.8% (RSD, n = 5, 1 μg L- 1 Cd) was readily achieved. The calibration curve was linear in the range between 0.1 and 10 μg L- 1, with a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9995. Compared with the conventional acid-BH4- vapor generation, the proposed method not only eliminates the use of unstable and expensive reagents, but also offers high tolerance for coexisting ions, which is well suited to the direct analysis of environmental samples. The validation of the proposed method was demonstrated by the analysis of Cd in reference material of rice (GBW080684). It was also successfully applied to the determination of trace cadmium in locally collected 11 rice samples, and the obtained Cd concentrations are ranged from 7.2 to 517.7 μg kg- 1.

  10. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  11. Investigation of the influence of the chemical composition of HSLA steel grades on the microstructure homogeneity during hot rolling in continuous rolling mills using a fast layer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtchen, M; Kawalla, R; Rimnac, A; Bragin, S; Linzer, B; Warczok, P; Kozeschnik, E; Bernhard, C

    2016-01-01

    The newly developed LaySiMS simulation tool provides new insight for inhomogeneous material flow and microstructure evolution in an endless strip production (ESP) plant. A deepened understanding of the influence of inhomogeneities in initial material state, temperature profile and material flow and their impact on the finished product can be reached e.g. by allowing for variable layer thickness distributions in the roll gap. Coupling temperature, deformation work and work hardening/recrystallization phenomena accounts for covering important effects in the roll gap. The underlying concept of the LaySiMS approach will be outlined and new insight gained regarding microstructural evolution, shear and inhomogeneous stress and strain states in the roll gap as well as local residual stresses will be presented. For the case of thin slab casting and direct rolling (TSDR) the interrelation of inhomogeneous initial state, micro structure evolution and dissolution state of micro alloying elements within the roughing section of an ESP line will be discussed. Special emphasis is put on the influence of the local chemical composition arising from direct charging on throughthickness homogeneity of the final product. It is concluded that, due to the specific combination of large reductions in the high reduction mills (HRM) and the highly inhomogeneous inverse temperature profile, the ESP-concept provides great opportunities for homogenizing the microstructure across the strip thickness. (paper)

  12. The Effect of Cooling Vest on Heat Strain Indexes and Reaction Time While Wearing Chemical-Microbial-Radioactive Protective Clothing in Hot and Dry Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Heat is a harmful factor in workplaces that causes physiologic and cognitive changes in workers. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cooling vest on heat strain and reaction time while wearing chemical-biological-nuclear protective clothes. Methods Twelve male students with mean age of 25 ± 2 and body mass index (BMI of 23 ± 1.5 were recruited in the experiment. Each student ran on a treadmill with a speed of 2.4 km/hour in the climate chamber at 35°C and 30% relative humidity. physiological strain index score, oral temperature, heart rate, reaction time and number of errors were measured at the end of the two levels and analyzed by the SPSS software. Results Wilcoxon test showed that the differences of physiological strain index score (P = 0.02, oral temperature (P = 0.02, reaction time (P = 0.02, heart Rate (P = 0.02 and errors (P = 0.03 with and without the cooling vest were significant. The mean physiological strain index score without cooling vest was 4.038 ± 0.882 and with the cooling vest was 1.42 ± 0.435. The mean reaction time without and with the cooling vest was 0.769 ± 0.0972 and 0.539 ± 0.977, respectively. Conclusions The results of the study showed that the cooling vest reduces the physiological strain, reaction time and errors rate of workers.

  13. Hot tub folliculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... survives in hot tubs, especially tubs made of wood. Symptoms The first symptom of hot tub folliculitis ... may help prevent the problem. Images Hair follicle anatomy References D'Agata E. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other ...

  14. Development of constraint algorithm for the number of electrons in molecular orbitals consisting mainly 4f atomic orbitals of rare-earth elements and its introduction to tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, Akira; Onuma, Hiroaki; Jung, Sun-ho

    2007-01-01

    Our original tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics code, Colors', has been successfully applied to the theoretical investigation of complex materials including rare-earth elements, e.g., metal catalysts supported on a CeO 2 surface. To expand our code so as to obtain a good convergence for the electronic structure of a calculation system including a rare-earth element, we developed a novel algorithm to provide a constraint condition for the number of electrons occupying the selected molecular orbitals that mainly consist of 4f atomic orbitals of the rare-earth element. This novel algorithm was introduced in Colors. Using Colors, we succeeded in obtaining the classified electronic configurations of the 4f atomic orbitals of Ce 4+ and reduced Ce ions in a CeO 2 bulk model with one oxygen defect, which makes it difficult to obtain a good convergence using a conventional first-principles quantum chemical calculation code. (author)

  15. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  16. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  17. Reactions of Hot Hydrogen Atoms with Ethylene. The Role of Excited Ethyl Radicals as Intermediate Products; Reactions des Atomes Chauds d'Hydrogene avec l'Ethylene. Le Role des Radicaux Ethyle Excites Comme Produits Intermediaires; Reaktsiya goryachikh atomov vodoroda s ehtilenom. Rol' vozbuzhdennykh ehtil'nykh radikalov kak promezhutochnykh produktov; Reacciones de Atomos Calientes de Hidrogeno con Etileno Papel de los Radicales Etilicos Excitados como Productos Intermedios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzantiev, B. G.; Shvedchikov, A. P. [Institut Himicheskoj Fiziki AN SSSR, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-04-15

    It is well known that the nuclear reactions Li{sup 6}(n, {alpha})T and He{sup 3}(n, p) T result in the formation of hot atoms of radioactive hydrogen. The characteristics of the chemical consequences of nuclear transformations are largely determined by the high chemical activity of such atoms. However, hydrogen atoms can play an essential role not only in nuclear chemistry but also in other branches of high-energy chemistry, such as radiolysis and photolysis. In the present research we attempted to make a comparative study of the behaviour of hot hydrogen atoms obtained in various ways: by the Li{sup 6} (n, {alpha})T reaction (recoil energy = 2.7 MeV); by radiolysis (E{approx} a few eV); by photolysis (E{approx} 1 - 1,5 eV; hot hydrogen is obtained from HI by photolysis at {lambda} = 2537A). In order to obtain tritium atoms, we used crystals and films of Li{sub 2}Co{sub 3}, Li{sup 6}F, Li{sup 6}OH, Li{sup 6}BO{sub 2} * 8H{sub 2} as targets. Gaseous ethylene (P = 5-10 atm) and its mixtures with ammonia, helium and inhibitors, were subjected to radiation. Radiation was carried out on an IRT-1000 reactor with a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 12} a/cm{sup 2} * s. Tritium-labelled compounds and products of radiation chemistry reactions were identified by gas chromatography involving the use of two monitoring units connected in series (a katharometer and a G-M flow counter). It is shown that the spectrum of labelled and unlabelled products in irradiated ethylene is very distinct. The main labelled products are C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 4}H{sub 10} and hydrocarbons > C{sub 4}; the H{sub 2} yield is small. The main unlabelled products are HT, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}T and C{sub 4}H{sub 9}T; the yield of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}T and especially of C{sub 2}HT is insignificant. The labelled-compound yields are dependent on the introduction of additives (ammonia, helium, iodine) into the ethylene, on the type of lithium-containing compound and on the structure of

  18. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  19. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System''s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section

  20. Efficient transfer of large-area graphene films onto rigid substrates by hot pressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junmo; Hwang, Soonhwi; Kim, Jae Hwan; Kim, Min Hyeok; Ryu, Jaechul; Seo, Sang Jae; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2012-06-26

    Graphene films grown on metal substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method have to be safely transferred onto desired substrates for further applications. Recently, a roll-to-roll (R2R) method has been developed for large-area transfer, which is particularly efficient for flexible target substrates. However, in the case of rigid substrates such as glass or wafers, the roll-based method is found to induce considerable mechanical damages on graphene films during the transfer process, resulting in the degradation of electrical property. Here we introduce an improved dry transfer technique based on a hot-pressing method that can minimize damage on graphene by neutralizing mechanical stress. Thus, we enhanced the transfer efficiency of the large-area graphene films on a substrate with arbitrary thickness and rigidity, evidenced by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) images, Raman spectra, and various electrical characterizations. We also performed a theoretical multiscale simulation from continuum to atomic level to compare the mechanical stresses caused by the R2R and the hot-pressing methods, which also supports our conclusion. Consequently, we believe that the proposed hot-pressing method will be immediately useful for display and solar cell applications that currently require rigid and large substrates.

  1. PubChem atom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnke, Volker D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Atom environments and fragments find wide-spread use in chemical information and cheminformatics. They are the basis of prediction models, an integral part in similarity searching, and employed in structure search techniques. Most of these methods were developed and evaluated on the relatively small sets of chemical structures available at the time. An analysis of fragment distributions representative of most known chemical structures was published in the 1970s using the Chemical Abstracts Service data system. More recently, advances in automated synthesis of chemicals allow millions of chemicals to be synthesized by a single organization. In addition, open chemical databases are readily available containing tens of millions of chemical structures from a multitude of data sources, including chemical vendors, patents, and the scientific literature, making it possible for scientists to readily access most known chemical structures. With this availability of information, one can now address interesting questions, such as: what chemical fragments are known today? How do these fragments compare to earlier studies? How unique are chemical fragments found in chemical structures? For our analysis, after hydrogen suppression, atoms were characterized by atomic number, formal charge, implicit hydrogen count, explicit degree (number of neighbors), valence (bond order sum), and aromaticity. Bonds were differentiated as single, double, triple or aromatic bonds. Atom environments were created in a circular manner focused on a central atom with radii from 0 (atom types) up to 3 (representative of ECFP_6 fragments). In total, combining atom types and atom environments that include up to three spheres of nearest neighbors, our investigation identified 28,462,319 unique fragments in the 46 million structures found in the PubChem Compound database as of January 2013. We could identify several factors inflating the number of environments involving transition metals, with many

  2. Models of hot stellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Albada, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Elliptical galaxies consist almost entirely of stars. Sites of recent star formation are rare, and most stars are believed to be several billion years old, perhaps as old as the Universe itself (--10/sup 10/ yrs). Stellar motions in ellipticals show a modest amount of circulation about the center of the system, but most support against the force of gravity is provided by random motions; for this reason ellipticals are called 'hot' stellar systems. Spiral galaxies usually also contain an appreciable amount of gas (--10%, mainly atomic hydrogen) and new stars are continually being formed out of this gas, especially in the spiral arms. In contrast to ellipticals, support against gravity in spiral galaxies comes almost entirely from rotation; random motions of the stars with respect to rotation are small. Consequently, spiral galaxies are called 'cold' stellar systems. Other than in hot systems, in cold systems the collective response of stars to variations in the force field is an essential part of the dynamics. The present overview is limited to mathematical models of hot systems. Computational methods are also discussed

  3. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  4. Efficient generation of volatile species for cadmium analysis in seafood and rice samples by a modified chemical vapor generation system coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xin-an; Chi, Miao-bin; Wang, Qing-qing; Zhang, Wang-bing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a modified chemical vapor generation method coupled with AFS for the determination of cadmium. • The response of Cd could be increased at least four-fold compared to conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. • A simple mixing sequences experiment is designed to study the reaction mechanism. • The interference of transition metal ions can be easily eliminated by adding DDTC. • The method is successfully applied in seafood samples and rice samples. - Abstract: A vapor generation procedure to determine Cd by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) has been established. Volatile species of Cd are generated by following reaction of acidified sample containing Fe(II) and L-cysteine (Cys) with sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH 4 ). The presence of 5 mg L −1 Fe(II) and 0.05% m/v Cys improves the efficiency of Cd vapor generation substantially about four-fold compared with conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. Three experiments with different mixing sequences and reaction times are designed to study the reaction mechanism. The results document that the stability of Cd(II)–Cys complexes is better than Cys–THB complexes (THB means NaBH 4 ) while the Cys–THB complexes have more contribution to improve the Cd vapor generation efficiency than Cd(II)–Cys complexes. Meanwhile, the adding of Fe(II) can catalyze the Cd vapor generation. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Cd is 0.012 μg L −1 ; relative standard deviations vary between 0.8% and 5.5% for replicate measurements of the standard solution. In the presence of 0.01% DDTC, Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) have no significant influence up to 5 mg L −1 , 10 mg L −1 and 10 mg L −1 , respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through analysis of the certificated reference materials and the proposed method has been applied in the determination of Cd in seafood and rice samples

  5. Efficient generation of volatile species for cadmium analysis in seafood and rice samples by a modified chemical vapor generation system coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xin-an, E-mail: 13087641@qq.com; Chi, Miao-bin, E-mail: 1161306667@qq.com; Wang, Qing-qing, E-mail: wangqq8812@163.com; Zhang, Wang-bing, E-mail: ahutwbzh@163.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We develop a modified chemical vapor generation method coupled with AFS for the determination of cadmium. • The response of Cd could be increased at least four-fold compared to conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. • A simple mixing sequences experiment is designed to study the reaction mechanism. • The interference of transition metal ions can be easily eliminated by adding DDTC. • The method is successfully applied in seafood samples and rice samples. - Abstract: A vapor generation procedure to determine Cd by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) has been established. Volatile species of Cd are generated by following reaction of acidified sample containing Fe(II) and L-cysteine (Cys) with sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH{sub 4}). The presence of 5 mg L{sup −1} Fe(II) and 0.05% m/v Cys improves the efficiency of Cd vapor generation substantially about four-fold compared with conventional thiourea and Co(II) system. Three experiments with different mixing sequences and reaction times are designed to study the reaction mechanism. The results document that the stability of Cd(II)–Cys complexes is better than Cys–THB complexes (THB means NaBH{sub 4}) while the Cys–THB complexes have more contribution to improve the Cd vapor generation efficiency than Cd(II)–Cys complexes. Meanwhile, the adding of Fe(II) can catalyze the Cd vapor generation. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Cd is 0.012 μg L{sup −1}; relative standard deviations vary between 0.8% and 5.5% for replicate measurements of the standard solution. In the presence of 0.01% DDTC, Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) have no significant influence up to 5 mg L{sup −1}, 10 mg L{sup −1}and 10 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through analysis of the certificated reference materials and the proposed method has been applied in the determination of Cd in seafood and rice samples.

  6. High-Current Gain Two-Dimensional MoS 2 -Base Hot-Electron Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Torres, Carlos M.

    2015-12-09

    The vertical transport of nonequilibrium charge carriers through semiconductor heterostructures has led to milestones in electronics with the development of the hot-electron transistor. Recently, significant advances have been made with atomically sharp heterostructures implementing various two-dimensional materials. Although graphene-base hot-electron transistors show great promise for electronic switching at high frequencies, they are limited by their low current gain. Here we show that, by choosing MoS2 and HfO2 for the filter barrier interface and using a noncrystalline semiconductor such as ITO for the collector, we can achieve an unprecedentedly high-current gain (α ∼ 0.95) in our hot-electron transistors operating at room temperature. Furthermore, the current gain can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude with the collector-base voltage albeit this feature currently presents a drawback in the transistor performance metrics such as poor output resistance and poor intrinsic voltage gain. We anticipate our transistors will pave the way toward the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density, low-energy, and high-frequency hot-carrier electronic applications. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  7. High-Current Gain Two-Dimensional MoS 2 -Base Hot-Electron Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Torres, Carlos M.; Lan, Yann Wen; Zeng, Caifu; Chen, Jyun Hong; Kou, Xufeng; Navabi, Aryan; Tang, Jianshi; Montazeri, Mohammad; Adleman, James R.; Lerner, Mitchell B.; Zhong, Yuan Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii Dong; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-01-01

    The vertical transport of nonequilibrium charge carriers through semiconductor heterostructures has led to milestones in electronics with the development of the hot-electron transistor. Recently, significant advances have been made with atomically sharp heterostructures implementing various two-dimensional materials. Although graphene-base hot-electron transistors show great promise for electronic switching at high frequencies, they are limited by their low current gain. Here we show that, by choosing MoS2 and HfO2 for the filter barrier interface and using a noncrystalline semiconductor such as ITO for the collector, we can achieve an unprecedentedly high-current gain (α ∼ 0.95) in our hot-electron transistors operating at room temperature. Furthermore, the current gain can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude with the collector-base voltage albeit this feature currently presents a drawback in the transistor performance metrics such as poor output resistance and poor intrinsic voltage gain. We anticipate our transistors will pave the way toward the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density, low-energy, and high-frequency hot-carrier electronic applications. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  8. Reviews Book: Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air Equipment: Doppler Effect Unit Book: The Physics of Rugby Book: Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Equipment: Brunel Eyecam Equipment: 200x Digital Microscope Book: The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics Book: Physics 2 for OCR Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air This excellent book makes sense of energy facts and figures Doppler Effect Unit Another simple, effective piece of kit from SEP Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Intriguing and unique write-up of an intellectual fraud case Brunel Eyecam An affordable digital eyepiece for your microscope 200x Digital Microscope An adjustable digital flexcam for classroom use The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics A fascinating round-up of the recent history of physics WORTH A LOOK The Physics of Rugby Book uses sport analogy and context to teach physics concepts Physics 2 for OCR Essential textbook for the course but otherwise pointless WEB WATCH Some free teaching materials are better than those you'd pay for

  9. Hot testing of coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balon, I D

    1976-07-01

    Earlier investigations failed to take full account of the factors affecting coke behavior within the blast furnace. An apparatus was accordingly developed for testing coke, based on a cyclone furnace where the sample could be held in a flow of hot oxidizing gases, simulating conditions in the blast furnace hearth. The results are said to be suitable for comprehensive assessment of the coke, including abrasive strength and its rate of gasification in a flow of carbon dioxide. Coke of size 6-10 mm tested at 1,100/sup 0/C in an atmosphere of oxidizing gases close to those obtaining in the blast furnace hearth, indicated that destruction and total gasification of the coke occurs after 5 minutes for a weak coke and 8 minutes for strong coke, depending on the physico-chemical and physico-mechanical properties of the particular coke. When samples were treated for a fixed period (3 minutes), the amount of coke remaining, and the percentage over 6 mm varied between 22 and 40 and between 4 and 7 percent respectively.

  10. Effect of gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms on chemical bonding: A proposed mechanism for the formation of crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-04-01

    Using first principle calculations, we study the atomic arrangement and bonding mechanism in the crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). It is found that the stability of GST depends on the gradual ordering of Ge/Sb atoms. The configurations with different concentration of Ge/Sb in layers have been analyzed by the partial density of state, electron localization function and Bader charge distribution. The s and p-states of Ge atom alter with different stacking configurations but there is no change in Sb and Te atom states. Our findings show that the bonding between Ge-Te is not only responsible for the stability of GST alloy but can also predict which composition can show generic features of phase change material. As the number of Ge atoms near to vacancy layer decreases, Ge donates more charge. A growth model has been proposed for the formation of crystalline phase which justifies the structure models proposed in the literature.

  11. Hot Surface Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Tursyn, Yerbatyr; Goyal, Vikrant; Benhidjeb-Carayon, Alicia; Simmons, Richard; Meyer, Scott; Gore, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable hot surface ignition of flammable liquids is one of the hazards in ground and air transportation vehicles, which primarily occurs in the engine compartment. In order to evaluate the safety and sustainability of candidate replacement fuels with respect to hot surface ignition, a baseline low lead fuel (Avgas 100 LL) and four experimental unleaded aviation fuels recommended for reciprocating aviation engines were considered. In addition, hot surface ignition properties of the gas tu...

  12. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  13. Atomic oxygen adsorption and its effect on the oxidation behaviour of ZrB2-ZrC-SiC in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Dong; Zhang Yue; Xu Chunlai; Song Yang; Shi Xiaobin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Atomic oxygen was adsorbed on the surface of ZrB 2 -ZrC-SiC ceramics. → Atomic oxygen was preferred reacted with borides according to XPS spectra. → The atomic oxygen adsorption is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. → The porosity should be the major reason which provides diffusion path for the atomic oxygen. → The structure evolution of the ceramics during oxidation is analyzed. - Abstract: Atomic oxygen is adsorbed on the surface of the hot-pressed ZrB 2 -ZrC-SiC ceramic composites, and then the ceramic composites are oxidized in air up to 1500 deg. C with the purpose of clarifying the effect of atomic oxygen adsorption on the oxidation behaviour of the ceramic composites. The XPS spectra are employed to identify the adsorption mechanism of atomic oxygen on the surface of the ceramic composites, and the formation of O-B, O-Zr, and O-Si bonds indicates that atomic oxygen is chemically adsorbed on the surface of the ceramic. In addition, atomic oxygen is preferred to be adsorbed on the surface of borides according to the Zr 3d core level spectrum. On the other hand, the atomic oxygen adsorption is detrimental to the oxidation resistance according to experimental results, and the porosity of the ceramic should be the major reason which provides diffusion path for the atomic oxygen. Furthermore, the structure evolution of the ceramic composites during oxidation process is analyzed.

  14. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  15. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  16. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  17. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  18. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  19. On the existence of hot positronium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, E.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of hot Ps reactions is nowadays questioned; the controversy arises from the two models (the Ore gap and the spur theories) advanced in order to explain the mechanism of the positronium formation and of its inhibition in liquids by dissolution of certain compounds. The hypothesis of the hot Ps reactions was initially advanced as an additional statement for explaining the inhibition phenomenon within the framework of the Ore gap theory, but it is not considered necessary for the spur theory. The present paper is chiefly intended as a presentation of this particular aspect of Ps chemistry to hot atom chemists unspecialized in the field. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basic physics and experimental methods used in positronium chemistry. Contents: positrons and positronium formation; inhibition and enhancement of Ps formation in solutions; positronium reactions in gases. (Auth.)

  20. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  1. Comparison of palladium chemical modifiers for the determination of selenium in plasma by Zeeman-effect background corrected electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    , It was not possible to stabilize trimethylselenonium to the same extent with this modifier, Peak shapes and appearance times of the atomization signals were equal for the four selenium species with this modifier, The addition of 20 mu g of palladium was used for the analysis of the serum reference material Seronorm...

  2. Primary processes and ionic reactions in the chemistry of recoiling silicon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Boo, B.H.; Stewart, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Hot atom chemistry has permitted the elucidation of the chemistry of free atoms, and these include the polyvalent atoms of refractory group 14 elements, that is, carbon, silicon and germanium. Since no more than two bonds are formed normally in a single reactive collision of free atoms, the study on the chemistry of atoms like C, Si and Ge that require the formation of more than two bonds to saturate their chemical valence necessarily involves the study of reactive intermediates. By the studies on the chemistry of recoiling 31 Si atoms, the mechanistic conclusions reached are reported. The most important unanswered questions concerning the reaction of recoiling 31 Si atoms in the systems are shown, and progress has been made toward the answering. By using tetramethyl silane as a trapping agent for silicon ions, it has been established that the reaction of 31 Si ions contributes significantly to the formation of products in recoil systems. The studies by various researchers on this theme are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  4. 3D atom microscopy in the presence of Doppler shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullah; Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of hot atoms with laser fields produces a Doppler shift, which can severely affect the precise spatial measurement of an atom. We suggest an experimentally realizable scheme to address this issue in the three-dimensional position measurement of a single atom in vapors of rubidium atoms. A three-level Λ-type atom-field configuration is considered where a moving atom interacts with three orthogonal standing-wave laser fields and spatial information of the atom in 3D space is obtained via an upper-level population using a weak probe laser field. The atom moves with velocity v along the probe laser field, and due to the Doppler broadening the precision of the spatial information deteriorates significantly. It is found that via a microwave field, precision in the position measurement of a single hot rubidium atom can be attained, overcoming the limitation posed by the Doppler shift.

  5. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundim, K.C.; Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author) [pt

  6. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  7. Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.; Blanc, J.Y.; Duwe, R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Working Group on ' Hot Laboratories and Remote Handling' is firmly established as the major contact forum for the nuclear R and D facilities at the European scale. The yearly plenary meetings intend to: - Exchange experience on analytical methods, their implementation in hot cells, the methodologies used and their application in nuclear research; - Share experience on common infrastructure exploitation matters such as remote handling techniques, safety features, QA-certification, waste handling; - Promote normalization and co-operation, e.g., by looking at mutual complementarities; - Prospect present and future demands from the nuclear industry and to draw strategic conclusions regarding further needs. The 41. plenary meeting was held in CEA Saclay from September 22 to 24, 2003 in the premises and with the technical support of the INSTN (National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology). The Nuclear Energy Division of CEA sponsored it. The Saclay meeting was divided in three topical oral sessions covering: - Post irradiation examination: new analysis methods and methodologies, small specimen technology, programmes and results; - Hot laboratory infrastructure: decommissioning, refurbishment, waste, safety, nuclear transports; - Prospective research on materials for future applications: innovative fuels (Generation IV, HTR, transmutation, ADS), spallation source materials, and candidate materials for fusion reactor. A poster session was opened to transport companies and laboratory suppliers. The meeting addressed in three sessions the following items: Session 1 - Post Irradiation Examinations. Out of 12 papers (including 1 poster) 7 dealt with surface and solid state micro analysis, another one with an equally complex wet chemical instrumental analytical technique, while the other four papers (including the poster) presented new concepts for digital x-ray image analysis; Session 2 - Hot laboratory infrastructure (including waste theme) which was

  8. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  9. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  10. Reactions of hot nitrogen in water-ice at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.; Schurwanz, K.

    1985-04-01

    The reactions of hot nitrogen atoms were studied in H 2 O-ice at 77 K. The nitrogen atoms were generated via the nuclear process 16 O(p,α) 13 N with 20 MeV protons from a cyclotron and by implantation of 250 keV 14 N + ions. The formation of chemical compounds of 13 N was studied over a wide dose range of the energy deposited by the protons from Dsup(*)=10 -2 to 26 eV per target molecule. The 13 N-labeled products and their yields as depending on the dose were determined via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radio-gaschromatography (GC). The reactions of implanted 14 N + ions were studied in H 2 O-ice at 6 K. The analysis of the products was achieved by optical low-temperature spectroscopy in the near UV, visible and infrared spectral regions. Primary (original hot) products of 13 N were: 13 NH 4 + with a radiochemical yield of 51%, 13 NO 2 - (37%), and 13 NO 3 - (9%) as detected after irradiation with the lowest proton dose applied of Dsup(*)=10 -2 eV. With increasing dose the 13 NH 4 + -yield rose to a broad maximum at 95%. Correspondingly the yields of nitrite and nitrate decreased. Applications of the studies are the preparation of 13 N-labeled precursor compounds for the fast synthesis of 13 N-radiopharmaceuticals and the laboratory simulations of chemical processes in the interplanetary and interstellar ice bodies. The ion implantation studies gave first information on the hot formation of nitrogen-oxygen compounds. NH-compounds could not be found in the spectra. This reflects the 13 N-product distribution at high doses in the nuclear recoil experiments. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 1. Criteria for the development of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of chemical processes proceeding in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is analysed. Based on the analysis performed, the complete system of differential equations corresponding to this scheme is replaced by a simplified system of equations describing in dimensionless variables the chain dark decomposition of iodides - atomic iodine donors, in the COIL active medium. The procedure solving this system is described, the basic parameters determining the development of the chain reaction are found and its specific time intervals are determined. The initial stage of the reaction is analysed and criteria for the development of the branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the COIL active medium are determined. (active media)

  12. Comparison of Chemical Modifiers for Simultaneous Determination of Different Selenium-Compounds in Serum and Urine by Zeeman-Effect Electrothermal Atomic-Absorption Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, J.K.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal stability of selenite, selenate, selenomethionine and trimethylselenonium was studied using different chemical modifiers in various amounts. The normally recommended amounts of nickel nitrate, magnesium nitrate, copper nitrate, copper nitrate mixed with magnesium nitrate, palladium ni...

  13. Atomic Resolution Structural and Chemical Imaging Revealing the Sequential Migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the Battery Cycling of Layered Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2017-05-11

    Layered lithium transition metal oxides (LTMO) are promising candidate cathode materials for next generation high energy density lithium ion battery. The challenge for using this category of cathode is the capacity and voltage fading, which is believed to be associated with the layered structure disordering, a process that is initiated from the surface or solid-electrolyte interface and facilitated by transition metal (TM) reduction and oxygen vacancy formation. However, the atomic level dynamic mechanism of such a layered structure disordering is still not fully clear. In this work, utilizing atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we map, for the first time at atomic scale, the spatial evolution of Ni, Co and Mn in a cycled LiNi1/3M1/3Co1/3O2 layered cathode. In combination with atomic level structural imaging, we discovered the direct correlation of TM ions migration behavior with lattice disordering, featuring the residing of TM ions in the tetrahedral site and a sequential migration of Ni, Co, and Mn upon the increased lattice disordering of the layered structure. This work highlights that Ni ions, though acting as the dominant redox species in many LTMO, are labile to migrate to cause lattice disordering upon battery cycling; while the Mn ions are more stable as compared with Ni and Co and can act as pillar to stabilize layered structure. Direct visualization of the behavior of TM ions during the battery cycling provides insight for designing of cathode with structural stability and correspondingly a superior performance.

  14. Crossed-beam reaction of carbon atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. IV. Chemical dynamics of methylpropargyl radical formation, C4H5, from reaction of C(3Pj) with propylene, C3H6 (X1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.I.; Stranges, D.; Bevsek, H.M.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between ground state carbon atoms and propylene, C 3 H 6 , was studied at average collision energies of 23.3 and 45.0 kJmol -1 using the crossed molecular beam technique. Product angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra of C 4 H 5 at m/e=53 were recorded. Forward-convolution fitting of the data yields a maximum energy release as well as angular distributions consistent with the formation of methylpropargyl radicals. Reaction dynamics inferred from the experimental results suggest that the reaction proceeds on the lowest 3 A surface via an initial addition of the carbon atom to the π-orbital to form a triplet methylcyclopropylidene collision complex followed by ring opening to triplet 1,2-butadiene. Within 0.3 endash 0.6 ps, 1,2-butadiene decomposes through carbon endash hydrogen bond rupture to atomic hydrogen and methylpropargyl radicals. The explicit identification of C 4 H 5 under single collision conditions represents a further example of a carbon endash hydrogen exchange in reactions of ground state carbon with unsaturated hydrocarbons. This versatile machine represents an alternative pathway to build up unsaturated hydrocarbon chains in combustion processes, chemical vapor deposition, and in the interstellar medium. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  16. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  17. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  18. Chemical Evolution of a Protoplanetary Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Dmitry A.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we review recent progress in our understanding of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Current observational constraints and theoretical modeling on the chemical composition of gas and dust in these systems are presented. Strong variations of temperature, density, high-energy radiation intensities in these disks, both radially and vertically, result in a peculiar disk chemical structure, where a variety of processes are active. In hot, dilute and heavily irradiated atmosphere only the most photostable simple radicals and atoms and atomic ions exist, formed by gas-phase processes. Beneath the atmosphere a partly UV-shielded, warm molecular layer is located, where high-energy radiation drives rich ion-molecule and radical-radical chemistry, both in the gas phase and on dust surfaces. In a cold, dense, dark disk midplane many molecules are frozen out, forming thick icy mantles where surface chemistry is active and where complex polyatomic (organic) species are synthesized. Dynamical processes affect disk chemical composition by enriching it in abundances of complex species produced via slow surface processes, which will become detectable with ALMA.

  19. AN IN-DEPTH STUDY OF THE ABUNDANCE PATTERN IN THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN NGC 4649

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, Michael; Davis, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present our X-ray imaging spectroscopic analysis of data from deep Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observatory exposures of the Virgo Cluster elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M60), focusing on the abundance pattern in the hot interstellar medium (ISM). All measured elements show a radial decline in abundance, with the possible exception of O. We construct steady-state solutions to the chemical evolution equations that include infall in addition to stellar mass return and Type Ia supernova (SNIa) enrichment, and consider recently published SNIa yields. By adjusting a single model parameter to obtain a match to the global abundance pattern in NGC 4649, we infer that introduction of subsolar metallicity external gas has reduced the overall ISM metallicity and diluted the effectiveness of SNIa to skew the pattern toward low α/Fe ratios, and estimate the combination of SNIa rate and level of dilution. Evidently, newly introduced gas is heated as it is integrated into, and interacts with, the hot gas that is already present. These results indicate a complex flow and enrichment history for NGC 4649, reflecting the continual evolution of elliptical galaxies beyond the formation epoch. The heating and circulation of accreted gas may help reconcile this dynamic history with the mostly passive evolution of elliptical stellar populations. In an Appendix, we examine the effects of the recent updated atomic database AtomDB in spectral fitting of thermal plasmas with hot ISM temperatures in the elliptical galaxy range.

  20. The Hot ISM of Normal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1999-01-01

    X-ray observations of galaxies have shown the presence of hot ISM and gaseous halos. The most spectacular examples am in early-type galaxies (E and S0), and in galaxies hosting intense starforming regions. This talk will review the observational evidence and highlight the outstanding issues in our understanding of this gaseous component, with emphasis on our present understanding of the chemical composition of these hot halos. It will address how Chandra, XMM, and future X-ray missions can address these studies.

  1. Nuclear chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Shin, Young Jun

    1989-08-01

    The contents of this book are introduction of chemical engineering and related chemistry on an atomic reactor, foundation of the chemistry nuclear chemical engineering, theory on nuclear engineering, the cycle of uranium and nuclear fuel, a product of nuclear division, nuclear reprocessing, management of spent fuel separation of radioisotope, materials of an atomic reactor, technology and chemistry related water in atomic reactors and utilization of radioisotope and radiation. This book has the exercises and reference books for the each chapter.

  2. Influence of lanthanium atoms on the physico-chemical properties of GeS0,5Se0,5 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murguzov, M.I.; Alakbarov, A.S.; Bayramov, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    By the methods of physical-chemical analysis (DTA, X-ray, MSA, as well as measurement of microhardness and density determination) the influence of La on the physico-chemical properties of solid solutions (GeS 0 ,5Se 0 ,5) 1 -x(La) x was studied and its microdiagram was plotted. At room temperature the GeS 0 ,5Se 0 ,5 based solid solid solution extent to 4 at. percent La. The dependence of lanthane microhardness was studied

  3. Hot Weather Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person plenty of water and fruit or vegetable juice even if they say they’re not thirsty. No alcohol, coffee or tea. Seek medical help if you suspect dehydration. Light meals: Avoid hot, heavy meals and don’ ...

  4. China's 'Hot Money' Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Michael F; Morrison, Wayne M

    2008-01-01

    .... The recent large inflow of financial capital into China, commonly referred to as "hot money," has led some economists to warn that such flows may have a destabilizing effect on China's economy...

  5. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  6. Morphology and antimony segregation of spangles on batch hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu; Lu, Jintang; Che, Chunshan; Kong, Gang; Xu, Qiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    Spangles produced by batch hot-dip galvanizing process have a rougher surface and a greater surface segregation of alloying element compared with those in continuous hot-dip galvanizing line (CGL), owing to the cooling rate of the former is much smaller than that of the later. Therefore, typical spangles on a batch hot-dipped Zn-0.05Al-0.2Sb alloy coating were investigated. The chemical, morphological characterization and identification of the phases on the spangles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), backscattered electron imaging (BSE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The results showed that the coating surface usually exhibited three kinds of spangles: shiny, feathery and dull spangle, of which extensively antimony surface segregation was detected. The nature of precipitate on the coating surface was identified as β-Sb 3Zn 4, The precipitated β-Sb 3Zn 4 particles distributed randomly on the shiny spangle surface, both β-Sb 3Zn 4 particles and dentritic segregation of antimony dispersed in the dendritic secondary arm spacings of the feathery spangle and on the whole dull spangle surface. The dentritic segregation of antimony and precipitation of Sb 3Zn 4 compound are discussed by a proposed model.

  7. Morphology and antimony segregation of spangles on batch hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Shu, E-mail: shu.peng@mail.scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 371 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lu Jintang; Che Chunshan; Kong Gang; Xu Qiaoyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, No. 371 Wushan Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-06-01

    Spangles produced by batch hot-dip galvanizing process have a rougher surface and a greater surface segregation of alloying element compared with those in continuous hot-dip galvanizing line (CGL), owing to the cooling rate of the former is much smaller than that of the later. Therefore, typical spangles on a batch hot-dipped Zn-0.05Al-0.2Sb alloy coating were investigated. The chemical, morphological characterization and identification of the phases on the spangles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), backscattered electron imaging (BSE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The results showed that the coating surface usually exhibited three kinds of spangles: shiny, feathery and dull spangle, of which extensively antimony surface segregation was detected. The nature of precipitate on the coating surface was identified as {beta}-Sb{sub 3}Zn{sub 4}, The precipitated {beta}-Sb{sub 3}Zn{sub 4} particles distributed randomly on the shiny spangle surface, both {beta}-Sb{sub 3}Zn{sub 4} particles and dentritic segregation of antimony dispersed in the dendritic secondary arm spacings of the feathery spangle and on the whole dull spangle surface. The dentritic segregation of antimony and precipitation of Sb{sub 3}Zn{sub 4} compound are discussed by a proposed model.

  8. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  9. A Qualitative Report of the Ways High School Chemistry Students Attempt to Represent a Chemical Reaction at the Atomic/Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Anne L.; Wood, Nathan B.; Roehrig, Gillian H.; Nyachwaya, James

    2010-01-01

    We report the findings of a large-scale (n = 1,337) qualitative descriptive analysis of U.S. high schools students' particulate representations of a chemical reaction, specifically, the combustion of methane. Data were collected as part of an end of course exam. Student representations were coded into 17 distinct subcategories under one of five…

  10. Characterization, non-isothermal decomposition kinetics and photocatalytic water splitting of green chemically synthesized polyoxoanions of molybdenum containing phosphorus as hetero atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Cruz, Bessy; Samuel, Jadu; George, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CPM nanorods were synthesized by applying the principles of green chemistry. • The isoconversional method was used to analyze the effective activation energy. • The appropriate reaction models of the two decomposition stages were determined. • Photocatalytic water splitting was investigated in the presence of platinum co-catalyst. - Abstract: In here, the green synthesis and thermal characterization of a novel polyoxoanions of molybdenum containing phosphorus as hetero atom are reported. The composition and morphology of the nanorods were established by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP-AES) techniques. Thermal properties of the nanoparticles were investigated by non-isothermal analysis under nitrogen atmosphere. The values activation energy of each stage of thermal decomposition for all heating rates was calculated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO) and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunnose (KAS) methods. Invariant kinetic parameter (IKP) method and master plot method were also used to evaluate the kinetic parameters and mechanism for the thermal decomposition of cetylpyridinium phosphomolybdate (CPM). Photocatalytic water oxidation mechanism using CPM catalyst in the presence of platinum (Pt) co-catalyst enhances the H 2 evolution and was found to be 1.514 mmol/g/h

  11. Characterization, non-isothermal decomposition kinetics and photocatalytic water splitting of green chemically synthesized polyoxoanions of molybdenum containing phosphorus as hetero atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Cruz, Bessy [Department of Chemistry, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015 (India); Samuel, Jadu, E-mail: jadu_samuel@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram 695015 (India); George, Leena [Catalysis and Inorganic Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2014-11-20

    Highlights: • CPM nanorods were synthesized by applying the principles of green chemistry. • The isoconversional method was used to analyze the effective activation energy. • The appropriate reaction models of the two decomposition stages were determined. • Photocatalytic water splitting was investigated in the presence of platinum co-catalyst. - Abstract: In here, the green synthesis and thermal characterization of a novel polyoxoanions of molybdenum containing phosphorus as hetero atom are reported. The composition and morphology of the nanorods were established by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP-AES) techniques. Thermal properties of the nanoparticles were investigated by non-isothermal analysis under nitrogen atmosphere. The values activation energy of each stage of thermal decomposition for all heating rates was calculated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO) and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunnose (KAS) methods. Invariant kinetic parameter (IKP) method and master plot method were also used to evaluate the kinetic parameters and mechanism for the thermal decomposition of cetylpyridinium phosphomolybdate (CPM). Photocatalytic water oxidation mechanism using CPM catalyst in the presence of platinum (Pt) co-catalyst enhances the H{sub 2} evolution and was found to be 1.514 mmol/g/h.

  12. Valence properties of tellurium in different chemical systems and its determination in refractory environmental samples using hydride generation – Atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Alzahrani, Ali [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Deng, Tian-Long [College of Marine Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin (China); Belzile, Nelson, E-mail: nbelzile@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2016-01-28

    Using HG – AFS as a powerful tool to study valence transformations of Te, we found that, in presence of HCl and at high temperature, Te can form volatile species and be lost during sample digestion and pre-reduction steps. It was also noticed that the chemical valences of Te can be modified under different chemical and digestion conditions and even by samples themselves with certain matrices. KBr can reduce Te(VI) to Te(IV) in 3.0 M HCl at 100 °C, but when HNO{sub 3} was >5% (v/v) in solution, Br{sub 2} was formed and caused serious interference to Te measurements. HCl alone can also pre-reduce Te(VI) to Te(IV), only when its concentration was ≥6.0 M (100 °C for 15min). Among 10 studied chemical elements, only Cu{sup 2+} caused severe interference. Thiourea is an effective masking agent only when Cu{sup 2+} concentration is equal or lower than 10 mg/L. Chemical reagents, chemical composition of sample, as well as the modes of digestion can greatly affect Te valences, reagent blanks and analytical precisions. A protocol of 2–step–digestion followed by an elimination of HF is proposed to minimize reagent blank and increase the signal/noise ratios. It is important to perform a preliminary test to confirm whether a pre-reduction step is necessary; this is especially true for samples with complex matrices such as those with high sulfide content. The analytical detection limits of this method in a pure solution and a solid sample were 100 ng/L and 0.10 ± 0.02 μg/g, respectively. - Highlights: • HG–AFS is a powerful tool in studies of chemical valences and forms of Te in different conditions. • Te can be lost in form of volatile species in presence of HCl at high temperature. • Metal ions can be classified into 3 categories of interference; thiourea can effectively mask Cu{sup 2+}. • A 2-step digestion allows to eliminate HF, reduce background and improve analytical precision. • Matrix of sample can strongly influence Te chemical valence

  13. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of atomic-layer deposited lanthanum doped zirconium dioxide thin film on 4H-SiC substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Way Foong; Quah, Hock Jin; Lu, Qifeng; Mu, Yifei; Ismail, Wan Azli Wan; Rahim, Bazura Abdul; Esa, Siti Rahmah; Kee, Yeh Yee; Zhao, Ce Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Studies of RTA temperatures on La doped ZrO2 atomic layer deposited on 4HSiC. • Oxygen vacancies improved insulating and catalytic properties of La doped ZrO2. • 700 °C annealed sample showed the highest EB, k value, and sensitivity on O2. • La doped ZrO2 was proposed as a potential metal reactive oxide on 4H-SiC. - Abstract: Effects of rapid thermal annealing at different temperatures (700–900 °C) on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of lanthanum (La) doped zirconium oxide (ZrO_2) atomic layer deposited on 4H-SiC substrates have been investigated. Chemical composition depth profiling analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cross-sectional studies using high resolution transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line scan analysis were insufficient to justify the presence of La in the investigated samples. The minute amount of La present in the bulk oxide was confirmed by chemical depth profiles of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The presence of La in the ZrO_2 lattice led to the formation of oxygen vacancies, which was revealed through binding energy shift for XPS O 1s core level spectra of Zr−O. The highest amount of oxygen vacancies in the sample annealed at 700 °C has yielded the acquisition of the highest electric breakdown field (∼ 6.3 MV/cm) and dielectric constant value (k = 23) as well as the highest current–time (I–t) sensor response towards oxygen gas. The attainment of both the insulating and catalytic properties in the La doped ZrO_2 signified the potential of the doped ZrO_2 as a metal reactive oxide on 4H-SiC substrate.

  14. A FEROS Survey of Hot Subdwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennes, Stéphane; Németh, Péter; Kawka, Adela

    2018-02-01

    We have completed a survey of twenty-two ultraviolet-selected hot subdwarfs using the Fiber-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) and the 2.2-m telescope at La Silla. The sample includes apparently single objects as well as hot subdwarfs paired with a bright, unresolved companion. The sample was extracted from our GALEX catalogue of hot subdwarf stars. We identified three new short-period systems (P = 3.5 hours to 5 days) and determined the orbital parameters of a long-period (P = 62d.66) sdO plus G III system. This particular system should evolve into a close double degenerate system following a second common envelope phase.We also conducted a chemical abundance study of the subdwarfs: Some objects show nitrogen and argon abundance excess with respect to oxygen. We present key results of this programme.

  15. Atomic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation λ = h/(mv), where λ is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  16. Organic palladium and palladium-magnesium chemical modifiers in direct determination of lead in fractions from distillation of crude oil by electrothermal atomic absorption analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Bulska, Ewa; Hulanicki, Adam

    1999-05-01

    Platinum reforming catalysts are easily poisoned by increased levels of lead, therefore a sensitive atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for lead determination in fractions from crude oil distillation was developed. Lead was present in organic form in the samples analysed therefore the behaviour of various lead compounds (Pb-alkylarylsulphonate, Pb-4-cyclohexanobutyrate, tetraethyllead, Pb in fuel oil) was studied. The best procedure for the determination of lead in different petroleum products, including those containing asphaltenes includes a pretreatment with iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride, followed by the use of an organic Pd-Mg modifier. Under these conditions an effective matrix removal is possible at a pyrolysis temperature up to approximately 1100°C and the behaviour of lead present in different forms is unified. The characteristic mass is 11-12 pg Pb, corresponding to a detection limit of 0.25 ng g -1 for 20 μl sample solution. This can be lowered by multiple injection.

  17. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  18. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  19. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  20. HotRegion: a database of predicted hot spot clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukuroglu, Engin; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Hot spots are energetically important residues at protein interfaces and they are not randomly distributed across the interface but rather clustered. These clustered hot spots form hot regions. Hot regions are important for the stability of protein complexes, as well as providing specificity to binding sites. We propose a database called HotRegion, which provides the hot region information of the interfaces by using predicted hot spot residues, and structural properties of these interface residues such as pair potentials of interface residues, accessible surface area (ASA) and relative ASA values of interface residues of both monomer and complex forms of proteins. Also, the 3D visualization of the interface and interactions among hot spot residues are provided. HotRegion is accessible at http://prism.ccbb.ku.edu.tr/hotregion.

  1. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  2. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  3. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  4. Typing of the sausage-shaped bacteria forming A-type sulfur-turf according to cell length distributions of natural populations and physico-chemical conditions of hot spring waters; Saibo chobunpu to seiiku kankyo kara mita A gata io shiba shizen kotaigun ni okeru okamagata saikin no katabetsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, Y. [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

    1996-01-25

    In order to type the sausage-shaped bacteria forming A-type sulfur-turf, cell length distributions and physics-chemical conditions of hot spring waters were investigated on twelve samples collected from all over Japan. The frequency distributions of the cell length of eight samples were bimodal, while the other four samples were unimodal. In seven samples with bimodal distributions, two types (large and small) of the sausage-shaped bacteria could be differentiated. The cell length of the large-type was between 10.1 and 31.9{mu}m, while that of the small-type ranged 2.2 to 6.6{mu}m. The pH of seven hot spring waters were between 6 and 8, and the two types (large and small) formed together sulfur-turf. In contrast, pH of the three hot springs were over 8, and the two types of the sausage-shaped bacteria could not be detected in the sulfur-turf. Therefore, it is reasonable to set a third type of the sausage-shaped bacteria which prefers high-pH (over 8) and low calcium condition. The cell lengths of the third type were in the range of 5.5 to 8.6{mu}m, which correspond to the sausage-shaped bacteria of medium size. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Effects of nitrogen incorporation in HfO(2) grown on InP by atomic layer deposition: an evolution in structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu-Seon; Kim, Dae-Kyoung; Kang, Hang-Kyu; Jeong, Kwang-Sik; Cho, Mann-Ho; Ko, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Seo, Jung-Hye; Kim, Dong-Chan

    2014-03-26

    We investigated the effects of postnitridation on the structural characteristics and interfacial reactions of HfO2 thin films grown on InP by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a function of film thickness. By postdeposition annealing under NH3 vapor (PDN) at 600 °C, an InN layer formed at the HfO2/InP interface, and ionized NHx was incorporated in the HfO2 film. We demonstrate that structural changes resulting from nitridation of HfO2/InP depend on the film thickness (i.e., a single-crystal interfacial layer of h-InN formed at thin (2 nm) HfO2/InP interfaces, whereas an amorphous InN layer formed at thick (>6 nm) HfO2/InP interfaces). Consequently, the tetragonal structure of HfO2 transformed into a mixture structure of tetragonal and monoclinic because the interfacial InN layer relieved interfacial strain between HfO2 and InP. During postdeposition annealing (PDA) in HfO2/InP at 600 °C, large numbers of oxidation states were generated as a result of interfacial reactions between interdiffused oxygen impurities and out-diffused InP substrate elements. However, in the case of the PDN of HfO2/InP structures at 600 °C, nitrogen incorporation in the HfO2 film effectively blocked the out-diffusion of atomic In and P, thus suppressing the formation of oxidation states. Accordingly, the number of interfacial defect states (Dit) within the band gap of InP was significantly reduced, which was also supported by DFT calculations. Interfacial InN in HfO2/InP increased the electron-barrier height to ∼0.6 eV, which led to low-leakage-current density in the gate voltage region over 2 V.

  6. Atomic secrecy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.

    1979-01-01

    An article, The H-Bomb Secret: How We Got It, Why We're Telling It, by Howard Morland was to be published in The Progressive magazine in February, 1979. The government, after learning of the author's and the editors' intention to publish the article and failing to persuade them to voluntarily delete about 20% of the text and all of the diagrams showing how an H-bomb works, requested a court injunction against publication. Acting under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, US District Court Judge Robert W. Warren granted the government's request on March 26. Events dealing with the case are discussed in this publication. Section 1, Progressive Hydrogen Bomb Case, is discussed under the following: Court Order Blocking Magazine Report; Origins of the Howard Morland Article; Author's Motives, Defense of Publication; and Government Arguments Against Disclosure. Section 2, Access to Atomic Data Since 1939, contains information on need for secrecy during World War II; 1946 Atomic Energy Act and its effects; Soviet A-Bomb and the US H-Bomb; and consequences of 1954 Atomic Energy Act. Section 3, Disputed Need for Atomic Secrecy, contains papers entitled: Lack of Studies on H-Bomb Proliferation; Administration's Position on H-Bombs; and National Security Needs vs Free Press

  7. The quantum chemical causality of pMHC-TCR biological avidity: Peptide atomic coordination data and the electronic state of agonist N termini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantum state of functional avidity of the synapse formed between a peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC and a T cell receptor (TCR is a subject not previously touched upon. Here we present atomic pair correlation meta-data based on crystalized tertiary structures of the Tax (HTLV-1 peptide along with three artificially altered variants, all of which were presented by the (Class I HLA-A201 protein in complexation with the human (CD8+ A6TCR. The meta-data reveal the existence of a direct relationship between pMHC-TCR functional avidity (agonist/antagonist and peptide pair distribution function (PDF. In this context, antagonist peptides are consistently under-coordinated in respect to Tax. Moreover, Density Functional Theory (DFT datasets in the BLYP/TZ2P level of theory resulting from relaxation of the H species on peptide tertiary structures reveal that the coordination requirement of agonist peptides is also expressed as a physical observable of the protonation state of their N termini: agonistic peptides are always found to retain a stable ammonium (NH3+ terminal group while antagonist peptides are not.

  8. Chemical vapor deposited monolayer MoS2 top-gate MOSFET with atomic-layer-deposited ZrO2 as gate dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaoqiao; Jiang, Huaxing; Lau, Kei May; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    For the first time, ZrO2 dielectric deposition on pristine monolayer MoS2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is demonstrated and ZrO2/MoS2 top-gate MOSFETs have been fabricated. ALD ZrO2 overcoat, like other high-k oxides such as HfO2 and Al2O3, was shown to enhance the MoS2 channel mobility. As a result, an on/off current ratio of over 107, a subthreshold slope of 276 mV dec-1, and a field-effect electron mobility of 12.1 cm2 V-1 s-1 have been achieved. The maximum drain current of the MOSFET with a top-gate length of 4 μm and a source/drain spacing of 9 μm is measured to be 1.4 μA μm-1 at V DS = 5 V. The gate leakage current is below 10-2 A cm-2 under a gate bias of 10 V. A high dielectric breakdown field of 4.9 MV cm-1 is obtained. Gate hysteresis and frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage measurements were also performed to characterize the ZrO2/MoS2 interface quality, which yielded an interface state density of ˜3 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1.

  9. Hot Electron Nanoscopy and Spectroscopy (HENs)

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea; Torre, Bruno; Allione, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter includes a brief description of different laser coupling methods with guided surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the surface of a cone. It shows some devices, their electromagnetic simulations, and their optical characterization. A theoretical section illustrates the optical and quantum description of the hot charge generation rate as obtained for the SPP propagation along the nanocone in adiabatic compression. The chapter also shows some experimental results concerning the application of the hot electron nanoscopy and spectroscopy (HENs) in the so-called Schottky configuration, highlighting the sensitivity and the nanoscale resolution of the technique. The comparison with Kelvin probe and other electric atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques points out the intrinsic advantages of the HENs. In the end, some further insights are given about the possibility of exploiting HENs with a pulsed laser at the femtosecond time scale without significant pulse broadening and dispersion.

  10. Hot Electron Nanoscopy and Spectroscopy (HENs)

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-08-17

    This chapter includes a brief description of different laser coupling methods with guided surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the surface of a cone. It shows some devices, their electromagnetic simulations, and their optical characterization. A theoretical section illustrates the optical and quantum description of the hot charge generation rate as obtained for the SPP propagation along the nanocone in adiabatic compression. The chapter also shows some experimental results concerning the application of the hot electron nanoscopy and spectroscopy (HENs) in the so-called Schottky configuration, highlighting the sensitivity and the nanoscale resolution of the technique. The comparison with Kelvin probe and other electric atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques points out the intrinsic advantages of the HENs. In the end, some further insights are given about the possibility of exploiting HENs with a pulsed laser at the femtosecond time scale without significant pulse broadening and dispersion.

  11. Effects of chemical composition and test parameters on the hot ductility of C-Mn-Al steels; Efeito da composicao quimica e parametros de ensaios sobre a ductilidade a quente de acos C-Mn-Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Marcelo C.S. de; Comineli, Osvaldo G; Pancieri, Jose G.P.; Oliveira, Maria A.L. de [Espirito Santo Univ., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Souza Lima Cardoso, Geraldo I. de [Companhia Siderurgica de Tubarao (CST), Serra, ES (Brazil); Mintz, Barry [The City Univ., London (United Kingdom)

    1987-12-31

    The effects of Al content, as well as hot tensile test parameters on hot ductility of two C-Mn-Al steels are presented. Thermal cycle were carried out to study the influence of thermal oscillations during those compositions cooling, consisting of heating the samples up to a solubilization temperature, high enough to dissolve any phase which could possibly be present in the original ingot, and also to produce a coarser grain size. After 5 minutes at 1330 deg C, the steels were cooled in three different ways to reach test temperature and samples remain at this temperature for 5 minutes for stabilization before testing. Further, a preliminary comparison between hot ductility results, obtained when samples are molten and continuously cooled at two different rates, and those obtained for solution treated samples which are cooled at an intermediate cooling rate. For the two composition solution treated, a ductility was observed trough displaced from each other about 50 deg C, being the Al content the responsible for this difference. (author) 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Antimatter atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    In january 1996, CERN broadcasted the information of the creation of nine anti-hydrogen atoms, observed through disintegration products. The experimental facility was CERN LEAR ring. An antiproton beam scattered a xenon jet, and the resulting antimatter was first selected by its insensitivity to beam bending magnets. Their disintegration was detected in thin NaI detectors, in which the anti-atoms are at once deprived from their positron. Then, magnetic and time-of-flight spectrometers are used. (D.L.)

  13. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  14. Iodine speciation in the hot cell effluent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.S.; Jester, W.A.; Olynyk, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The various species of airborne radioiodine can affect the iodine source term of a severe core damage accident because of the different transport and deposition properties. also, the radiobiological hazardness may vary according to their chemical form. The purpose of the work reported in this paper was to characterize the various chemical forms of airborne radioiodine in hot cell effluent gases of a radiopharmaceutical production facility that produces medical radioisotopes from separated fission products of irradiated uranium targets. It is concluded that the methyl iodide is the youngest chemical species in terms of effective decay time age, and the hot cell filter bank is least efficient in removing the methyl iodide

  15. PMMA-Etching-Free Transfer of Wafer-scale Chemical Vapor Deposition Two-dimensional Atomic Crystal by a Water Soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol Polymer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yongteng; Han, Suk Kil; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-09-01

    We have explored a facile technique to transfer large area 2-Dimensional (2D) materials grown by chemical vapor deposition method onto various substrates by adding a water-soluble Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) layer between the polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and the 2D material film. This technique not only allows the effective transfer to an arbitrary target substrate with a high degree of freedom, but also avoids PMMA etching thereby maintaining the high quality of the transferred 2D materials with minimum contamination. We applied this method to transfer various 2D materials grown on different rigid substrates of general interest, such as graphene on copper foil, h-BN on platinum and MoS2 on SiO2/Si. This facile transfer technique has great potential for future research towards the application of 2D materials in high performance optical, mechanical and electronic devices.

  16. Receptor visualization and the atomic bomb. A historical account of the development of the chemical neuroanatomy of receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs during the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J M; Mengod, G

    2018-03-01

    This is a historical account of how receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs got to be seen at the regional, cellular, and subcellular levels in brain, in the years going from the end of the World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Cold War (1945-1991). The realization in the US of the problem of mental health care, as a consequence of the results of medical evaluation for military service during the war, let the US Government to act creating among other things the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). Coincident with that, new drug treatments for these disorders were introduced. War science also created an important number of tools and instruments, such as the radioisotopes, that played a significant role in the development of our story. The scientific context was marked by the development of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and the introduction in the early 80's of the DNA recombinant technologies. The concepts of chemical neurotransmission in the brain and of receptors for drugs and transmitters, although proposed before the war, where not generally accepted. Neurotransmitters were identified and the mechanisms of biosynthesis, storage, release and termination of action by mechanisms such as reuptake, elucidated. Furthermore, the synapse was seen with the electron microscope and more important for our account, neurons and their processes visualized in the brain first by fluorescence histochemistry, then using radioisotopes and autoradiography, and later by immunohistochemistry (IHC), originating the Chemical Neuroanatomy. The concept of chemical neurotransmission evolved from the amines, expanded to excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, then to neuropeptides and finally to gases and other "atypical" neurotransmitters. In addition, coexpression of more than one transmitter in a neuron, changed the initial ideas of neurotransmission. The concept of receptors for these and other messengers underwent a significant evolution from an abstract

  17. Hanbury Brown and Twiss and other atom-atom correlations: advances in quantum atom optics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, two astronomers, R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, invented a new method to measure the angular diameter of stars, in spite of the atmospheric fluctuations. Their proposal prompted a hot debate among physicists : how might two particles (photons), emitted independently (at opposite extremities of a star) , behave in a correlated way when detected ? It was only after the development of R Glauber's full quantum analysis that the effect was understood as a two particle quantum interference effect. From a modern perspective, it can be viewed as an early example of the amazing properties of pairs of entangled particles. The effect has now been observed with bosonic and fermionic atoms, stressing its fully quantum character. After putting these experiments in a historical perspective, I will present recent results, and comment on their significance. I will also show how our single atom detection scheme has allowed us to demonstrate the creation of atom pairs by non linear mixing of matter wa...

  18. Selective hydrogen atom abstraction by hydrogen atoms in photolysis and radiolysis of alkane mixtures at 770 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, T.; Kinugawa, K.; Eguchi, M.; Guedes, S.M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms, has been found in Isobutane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane(TMB), cyclopropane matrices besides neopentane matrix. The selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction in neopentane-isobutane mixture is affected by the difference of kinetic energies of H atoms. The reaction occurs more favorably with decreasing the kinetic energy of H atoms. Competitive reaction between c-C 6 H 12 and Hi for H atoms has been studied in the radiolysis and photolysis of neo-C 5 H 12 HI mixture at 77 K. The rate constants of these reactions in neopentane matrix are quite different from these of thermal H atom reaction, but similar to those of hot H atom reaction. Importance of the selective hydrogen atom abstraction reaction by H atoms is pointed out in the radical formation in the radiolysis of pure TMB at 77 K [pt

  19. Spectrochemical analysis by atomic absorption and emission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lajunen, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    ... of these techniques. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become a 'hot' analytical technique during the last few years, and is being used in many branches of science. Since the publication of my previous book 'Atomispektrometria' (in Finnish) in 1986, various techniques in analytical atomic spectroscopy have undergone significant dev...

  20. Multifragmentation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1990-10-01

    It is difficult to deposit a large amount (∼ 1 Gev) of excitation energy into a nucleus. And if one wants to deposit large excitation energy values, the best way consists of shooting a given target nucleus with several nucleons, which can be achieved by using intermediate energy (10-100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. Such very excited objects were named hot nuclei. The study of hot nuclei has been undertaken only for 7 years because intermediate energy heavy ion facilities were not available before. The game is then to determine the decay properties of such nuclei, their limits of existence. Their study is connected with general properties of nuclear matter: namely its equation of state. Of special interest, is the onset of a new decay mechanism: multifragmentation, which is the non-sequential disassembly of a hot nucleus into several light nuclei (often called intermediate-mass fragments or IMF) or particles. This paper, shows how this mechanism can reflect fundamental properties of nuclear matter, but also how its experimental signature is difficult to establish. Multifragmentation has also been studied by using very energetic projectiles (protons and heavy ions) in the relativistic or ultra-relativistic region. The multifragmentation question of hot nuclei is far from being solved. One knows that IMF production increases when the excitation energy brought into a system is strongly increased, but very little is known about the mechanisms involved and a clear onset for multifragmentation is not established

  1. Utilizing hot electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozik, Arthur J.

    2018-03-01

    In current solar cells, any photon energy exceeding the semiconductor bandgap is lost before being collected, limiting the cell performance. Hot carrier solar cells could avoid these losses. Now, a detailed experimental study and analysis shows that this strategy could lead to an improvement of the photoconversion efficiency in practice.

  2. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  3. Atoms stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.; Bordry, M.

    1988-01-01

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  4. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  5. Detecting hot spots at hazardous-waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirschky, J.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluating the need for remedial cleanup at a waste site involves both finding the average contaminant concentration and identifying highly contaminated areas, or hot spots. A nomographic procedure to determine the sample configuration needed to locate a hot spot is presented. The technique can be used to develop a waste-site sampling plant - to determine either the grid spacing required to detect a hot spot at a given level of confidence, or the probability of finding a hot spot of a certain size, given a particular grid spacing. The method and computer program (ELIPGRID) were developed for locating geologic deposits, but the basic procedure can also be used to detect hot spots at chemical- or nuclear-waste disposal sites. Nomographs based on the original program are presented for three sampling-grid configurations - square, rectangular and triangular

  6. Hot helium flow test facility summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility and cost of modifying an existing circulator test facility (CTF) at General Atomic Company (GA). The CTF originally was built to test the Delmarva Power and Light Co. steam-driven circulator. This circulator, as modified, could provide a source of hot, pressurized helium for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) component testing. To achieve this purpose, a high-temperature impeller would be installed on the existing machine. The projected range of tests which could be conducted for the project is also presented, along with corresponding cost considerations

  7. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Energy partitioning in elementary chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersohn, R. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    In the past year research has centered on the decomposition of hot molecules, the reaction of ethynyl radicals with hydrogen molecules and the reaction of oxygen atoms with acetylene. Reaction kinetics studies are reported for each of these systems.

  9. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, K.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. All penetrations within the facility were sealed; the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced; the manipulators were replaced; the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled; all hot cell utilities were replaced; a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  10. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  11. Hot gas cleaning, a targeted project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romey, I. [University of Essen, Essen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Advanced hot gas cleaning systems will play a key role in future integrated combined cycle technologies. IGCC demonstration plants in operation or under construction are at present equipped with conventional wet gas scrubbing and cleaning systems. Feasibility studies for those IGCC plants have shown that the total efficiency of the processes can be improved using hot gas cleaning systems. However, this technology has not been developed and tested at a technical scale. Six well-known European industrial companies and research centres jointly worked together since January 1996 on a Targeted Project `Hot Gas Cleaning` to investigate and develop new hot gas cleaning systems for advanced clean coal power generation processes. In addition project work on chemical analysis and modelling was carried out in universities in England and Germany. The latest main findings were presented at the workshop. The main project aims are summarised as follows: to increase efficiency of advanced power generation processes; to obtain a reduction of alkalis and environmental emissions e.g. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2} and dust; and to develop the design basis for future industrial plants based on long-term operation of laboratory, pilot and demo-plants. To cover a range of possible process routes for future hot gas cleaning systems the following research programme is under investigation: removal of trace elements by different commercial and self developed sorbents; gas separation by membranes; separation of gas turbine relevant pollutants by hot filter dust and; H{sub 2}S removal and gas dedusting at high temperatures. 13 figs.

  12. Hot Deformation Behavior of Hot-Extruded AA7175 Through Hot Torsion Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Yeon; Jung, Taek-Kyun; Son, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Sang-Wook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Choi, Ho-Joon; Oh, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ji-Woon; Hyun, Soong-Keun

    2018-03-01

    The hot deformation behavior of hot-extruded AA7175 was investigated with flow curves and processing maps through hot torsion tests. The flow curves and the deformed microstructures revealed that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred in the hot-extruded AA7175 during hot working. The failure strain was highest at medium temperature. This was mainly influenced by the dynamic precipitation of fine rod-shaped MgZn2. The processing map determined the optimal deformation condition for the alloy during hot working.

  13. Hot reactions of 13N in solid methane at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiergolla, J.; Nebeling, B.; Roessler, K.

    1987-09-01

    The chemical reactions of recoil- 13 N were studied in solid methane at 77 K. 13 N was generated via the the nuclear reaction 12 C(d,n) 13 N. The radiation dose deliverd by the 8.5 MeV deuterons amounted to D * = 0.6 eV per target molecule. The products formed by high energy chemical processes (hot chemistry) were analyzed by radio-gaschromatography. 13 NH 3 with 52% and CH 3 13 NH 2 with 25% radiochemical yield were found to be the main products. HC 13 N was not formed, but CH 3 13 CN amounts to 4%. For the more complex products carbon chain prolongation is prefered over multiple methylation such as show the yields of 8% for C 2 H 5 13 NH 2 and 3% (CH 3 ) 2 13 NH. (CH 3 ) 3 N was not detected. The formation of 13 NH 3 is due to hydrogen abstraction, that of CH 3 13 NH 2 due to insertion of NH radical into the C-H bond of CH 4 . Another, however, less probable pathway could be the insertion of 13 N into methane. The methylamine radical may react with another methane molecule via hydrogen transfer to methylamine or attack to CH 4 to dimethylamine. The 13 N-products were formed with high radiochemical purity and can potentially be applied for the synthesis of 13 N-radiopharmaceuticals. The reactions studied bear also informations on chemical processes in space (e.g. solar wind interactions with comets or interplanetary dust). 13 N-high energy chemical products are, however, of a less exobiological significance then those formed by hot carbon atoms, e.g. in the 'mirror' system 11 C/NH 3 (s). (orig.) [de

  14. Software Simulation of Hot Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.; Hansen, P.N.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    1999-01-01

    The brittleness of a solidifying alloy in a temperature range near the solidus temperature has been recognised since the fifties as the mechanism responsible for hot tearing. Due to this brittlenes, the metal will crack under even small amounts of strain in that temperature range. We see these hot...... tears in castings close to hot centres, where the level of strain is often too high.Although the hot tearing mechanism is well understood, until now it has been difficult to do much to reduce the hot tearing tendency in a casting. In the seventies, good hot tearing criteria were developed by considering...... the solidification rate and the strain rate of the hot tear prone areas. But, until recently it was only possible to simulate the solidification rate, so that the criteria could not be used effectively.Today, with new software developments, it is possible to also simulate the strain rate in the hot tear prone areas...

  15. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  16. A study of atomic interaction between suspended nanoparticles and sodium atoms in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A feasibility study of suppression of the chemical reactivity of sodium itself using an atomic interaction between nanoparticles and sodium atoms has been carried out. We expected that the atomic interaction strengthens when the nanoparticle metal is the transition element which has a major difference in electronegativity from sodium. We also calculated the atomic interaction between nanoparticle and sodium atoms. It became clear that the atomic bond between the nanoparticle atom and the sodium atom is larger than that between sodium atoms, and the charge transfer takes place to the nanoparticle atom from the sodium atom. Using sodium with suspended nanoparticles, the fundamental physical properties related to the atomic interaction were investigated to verify the atomic bond. The surface tension of sodium with suspended nanoparticles increased, and the evaporation rate of sodium with suspended nanoparticles also decreased compared with that of sodium. Therefore the presence of the atomic interaction between nanoparticles and sodium was verified from these experiments. Because the fundamental physical property changes by the atomic interaction, we expected changes in the chemical reactivity characteristics. The chemical reaction properties of sodium with suspended nanoparticles with water were investigated experimentally. The released reaction heat and the reaction rate of sodium with suspended nanoparticles were reduced than those of sodium. The influence of the charge state of nanoparticle on the chemical process with water was theoretically investigated to speculate on the cause of reaction suppression. The potential energy in both primary and side reactions changed by the charge transfer, and the free energy of activation of the reaction with water increased. Accordingly, the reaction barrier also increased. This suggests there is a possibility of the reduction in the reaction of sodium by the suspension of nanoparticles. Consequently the possibility of the

  17. The Mystery of Matter, World of the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, William G.

    This booklet is one in the "World of the Atome Series" for junior high school students and their teachers. It describes the fascinating story of the search for the key to the structure of matter. These topics are reviewed: the chemical atom of the 19th century, the planetary atom, the wave atom, inside the elementary particles, and the mystery of…

  18. Hot subluminous star: HDE 283048

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, M.; Vuillemin, A.; Parsons, S.B.; Henize, K.G.; Wray, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The star HDE 283048, located at α = 3/sup h/50/sup m/.3, delta = +25 0 36', shows a strong ultraviolet continuum. Ground-based observations indicate a hot-dominated composite spectrum. Several lines of evidence suggest that the hot component is a hot subdwarf. 2 figures

  19. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  20. Hot chocolate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments